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Sample records for shielding calculation methods

  1. Analytical method for calculating neutron bulk shielding in a medium-energy accelerator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2001-05-01

    This investigation aims at an analytical method for calculating neutron bulk shielding in a medium-energy accelerator facility on the basis of the modified Moyer model. Shielding parameters for the analytical formula are obtained using the ANISN one-dimensional discrete ordinate code and the MCNP three-dimensional Monte Carlo code. The dose attenuation length of a concrete shield, which is the most important parameter, is obtained as a function of neutron energies from 0.2 MeV to 400 MeV and of shield thickness from 1 m to 7 m. The equation is also applicable to the estimation of neutron oblique penetration through a concrete shield, so the correction factor for oblique penetration is introduced into the analytical formula. It is expressed as the ratio of dose equivalent as calculated with MCNP for penetration through a relatively thin (1 or 2 m thick) concrete slab shield to that with the analytical equation developed in this work.

  2. Nuclei-selected NMR shielding calculations: a sublinear-scaling quantum-chemical method.

    PubMed

    Beer, Matthias; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2011-02-21

    An ab initio method for the direct calculation of NMR shieldings for selected nuclei at the Hartree-Fock and density-functional theory level is presented. Our method shows a computational effort scaling only sublinearly with molecular size, as it is motivated by the physical consideration that the chemical shielding is dominated by its local environment. The key feature of our method is to avoid the conventionally performed calculation of all NMR shieldings but instead to solve directly for specific nuclear shieldings. This has important implications not only for the study of large molecules, but also for the simulation of solvent effects and molecular dynamics, since often just a few shieldings are of interest. Our theory relies on two major aspects both necessary to provide a sublinear scaling behavior: First, an alternative expression for the shielding tensor is derived, which involves the response density matrix with respect to the nuclear magnetic moment instead of the response to the external magnetic field. Second, as unphysical long-range contributions occur within the description of distributed gauge origin methods that do not influence the final expectation value, we present a screening procedure to truncate the B-field dependent basis set, which is crucial in order to ensure an early onset of the sublinear scaling. The screening is in line with the r(-2) distance decay of Biot-Savarts law for induced magnetic fields. Our present truncation relies on the introduced concept of "individual gauge shielding contributions" applied to a reformulated shielding tensor, the latter consisting of gauge-invariant terms. The presented method is generally applicable and shows typical speed-ups of about one order of magnitude; moreover, due to the reduced scaling behavior of O(1) as compared to O(N), the wins become larger with increasing system size. We illustrate the validity of our method for several test systems, including ring-current dominated systems and

  3. Validation of source biasing method for its use in CSNS beamline shielding calculation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tai-ran; Shen, Fei; Liang, Tian-jiao; Yin, Wen; Yu, Quan-zhi; Yu, Chun-xu

    2014-12-01

    The Chinese spallation neutron source (CSNS) is a high-performance pulsed neutron source, having 20 neutron beamlines for neutron scattering instruments. The shielding design of these beamlines is usually needed for Monte Carlo (MC) calculation, and the use of variance reduction methods is critical to carrying out an efficient, reliable MC shielding calculation. This paper discusses the source biasing method based on actual source term and geometry model of a CSNS neutron beamline. Dose distribution throughout the geometry model was calculated with the FLUKA MC code. Full analogue calculation and biased calculation were compared, and it was validated that the source biasing method can effectively promote the calculation efficiency. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. An iterative method for calculating gamma-ray build-up factors in multi-layer shields.

    PubMed

    Suteau, C; Chiron, M

    2005-01-01

    Point kernel codes that simulate gamma-ray transport often use build-up factors to take scattered photons into account. This study introduces a new method, for computing multi-layer shield build-up factors. This method, based on an empirical formula for calculating double-layer shield build-up factors, is iterative. For an N-layer shield, each iteration of the method treats the first and the second layer of the shield. It replaces these layers by a single equivalent layer composed of an appropriate material and, hence, it turns the N-layer shield into an (N - 1)-layer shield. In order to determine the equivalent layer of an appropriate material, a neural network approach is developed: some neural networks trained on a large set of various configurations provide the equivalent material for any double-layer configuration. The method is implemented into MERCURE-6.3 straight-line attenuation code and is validated by comparison between MERCURE-6.3 results and reference data for one-dimensional geometries. Reference data obtained from transport calculations performed using the Sn transport code TWODANT. The comparisons prove the accuracy and sturdiness of the method.

  5. Synthesis of calculational methods for design and analysis of radiation shields for nuclear rocket systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capo, M. A.; Disney, R. K.; Jordan, T. A.; Soltesz, R. G.; Woodsum, H. C.

    1969-01-01

    Eight computer programs make up a nine volume synthesis containing two design methods for nuclear rocket radiation shields. The first design method is appropriate for parametric and preliminary studies, while the second accomplishes the verification of a final nuclear rocket reactor design.

  6. Analysis of the bond-valence method for calculating (29) Si and (31) P magnetic shielding in covalent network solids.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Sean T; Alkan, Fahri; Iuliucci, Robbie J; Mueller, Karl T; Dybowski, Cecil

    2016-07-05

    (29) Si and (31) P magnetic-shielding tensors in covalent network solids have been evaluated using periodic and cluster-based calculations. The cluster-based computational methodology employs pseudoatoms to reduce the net charge (resulting from missing co-ordination on the terminal atoms) through valence modification of terminal atoms using bond-valence theory (VMTA/BV). The magnetic-shielding tensors computed with the VMTA/BV method are compared to magnetic-shielding tensors determined with the periodic GIPAW approach. The cluster-based all-electron calculations agree with experiment better than the GIPAW calculations, particularly for predicting absolute magnetic shielding and for predicting chemical shifts. The performance of the DFT functionals CA-PZ, PW91, PBE, rPBE, PBEsol, WC, and PBE0 are assessed for the prediction of (29) Si and (31) P magnetic-shielding constants. Calculations using the hybrid functional PBE0, in combination with the VMTA/BV approach, result in excellent agreement with experiment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. SU-E-T-569: Neutron Shielding Calculation Using Analytical and Multi-Monte Carlo Method for Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, S; Shin, E H; Kim, J; Ahn, S H; Chung, K; Kim, D-H; Han, Y; Choi, D H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the shielding wall design to protect patients, staff and member of the general public for secondary neutron using a simply analytic solution, multi-Monte Carlo code MCNPX, ANISN and FLUKA. Methods: An analytical and multi-Monte Carlo method were calculated for proton facility (Sumitomo Heavy Industry Ltd.) at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The NCRP-144 analytical evaluation methods, which produced conservative estimates on the dose equivalent values for the shielding, were used for analytical evaluations. Then, the radiation transport was simulated with the multi-Monte Carlo code. The neutron dose at evaluation point is got by the value using the production of the simulation value and the neutron dose coefficient introduced in ICRP-74. Results: The evaluation points of accelerator control room and control room entrance are mainly influenced by the point of the proton beam loss. So the neutron dose equivalent of accelerator control room for evaluation point is 0.651, 1.530, 0.912, 0.943 mSv/yr and the entrance of cyclotron room is 0.465, 0.790, 0.522, 0.453 mSv/yr with calculation by the method of NCRP-144 formalism, ANISN, FLUKA and MCNP, respectively. The most of Result of MCNPX and FLUKA using the complicated geometry showed smaller values than Result of ANISN. Conclusion: The neutron shielding for a proton therapy facility has been evaluated by the analytic model and multi-Monte Carlo methods. We confirmed that the setting of shielding was located in well accessible area to people when the proton facility is operated.

  8. Calculations of atomic magnetic nuclear shielding constants based on the two-component normalized elimination of the small component method.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Terutaka; Zou, Wenli; Cremer, Dieter

    2017-04-07

    A new method for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants of relativistic atoms based on the two-component (2c), spin-orbit coupling including Dirac-exact NESC (Normalized Elimination of the Small Component) approach is developed where each term of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic contribution to the isotropic shielding constant σiso is expressed in terms of analytical energy derivatives with regard to the magnetic field B and the nuclear magnetic moment . The picture change caused by renormalization of the wave function is correctly described. 2c-NESC/HF (Hartree-Fock) results for the σiso values of 13 atoms with a closed shell ground state reveal a deviation from 4c-DHF (Dirac-HF) values by 0.01%-0.76%. Since the 2-electron part is effectively calculated using a modified screened nuclear shielding approach, the calculation is efficient and based on a series of matrix manipulations scaling with (2M)(3) (M: number of basis functions).

  9. Calculations of atomic magnetic nuclear shielding constants based on the two-component normalized elimination of the small component method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Terutaka; Zou, Wenli; Cremer, Dieter

    2017-04-01

    A new method for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants of relativistic atoms based on the two-component (2c), spin-orbit coupling including Dirac-exact NESC (Normalized Elimination of the Small Component) approach is developed where each term of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic contribution to the isotropic shielding constant σi s o is expressed in terms of analytical energy derivatives with regard to the magnetic field B and the nuclear magnetic moment 𝝁 . The picture change caused by renormalization of the wave function is correctly described. 2c-NESC/HF (Hartree-Fock) results for the σiso values of 13 atoms with a closed shell ground state reveal a deviation from 4c-DHF (Dirac-HF) values by 0.01%-0.76%. Since the 2-electron part is effectively calculated using a modified screened nuclear shielding approach, the calculation is efficient and based on a series of matrix manipulations scaling with (2M)3 (M: number of basis functions).

  10. Background simulations and shielding calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2011-04-01

    Key improvements in the sensitivity of the underground particle astrophysics experiments can only be achieved if the radiation causing background events in detectors is well understood and proper measures are taken to suppress it. The background radiation arising from radioactivity and cosmic-ray muons is discussed here together with the methods of its suppression. Different shielding designs are considered to attenuate gamma-rays and neutrons coming from radioactivity in rock and lab walls. Purity of materials used in detector construction is analysed and the background event rates due to the presence of radioactive isotopes in detector components are discussed. Event rates in detectors caused by muon-induced neutrons with and without active veto systems are presented leading to the requirements for the depth of an underground laboratory and the efficiency of the veto system.

  11. Implementation of radiation shielding calculation methods. Volume 2: Seminar/Workshop notes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capo, M. A.; Disney, R. K.

    1971-01-01

    Detailed descriptions are presented of the input data for each of the MSFC computer codes applied to the analysis of a realistic nuclear propelled vehicle. The analytical techniques employed include cross section data, preparation, one and two dimensional discrete ordinates transport, point kernel, and single scatter methods.

  12. Shielding Calculations on Waste Packages - The Limits and Possibilities of different Calculation Methods by the example of homogeneous and inhomogeneous Waste Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Mike; Smalian, Silva

    2017-09-01

    For nuclear waste packages the expected dose rates and nuclide inventory are beforehand calculated. Depending on the package of the nuclear waste deterministic programs like MicroShield® provide a range of results for each type of packaging. Stochastic programs like "Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System" (MCNP®) on the other hand provide reliable results for complex geometries. However this type of program requires a fully trained operator and calculations are time consuming. The problem here is to choose an appropriate program for a specific geometry. Therefore we compared the results of deterministic programs like MicroShield® and stochastic programs like MCNP®. These comparisons enable us to make a statement about the applicability of the various programs for chosen types of containers. As a conclusion we found that for thin-walled geometries deterministic programs like MicroShield® are well suited to calculate the dose rate. For cylindrical containers with inner shielding however, deterministic programs hit their limits. Furthermore we investigate the effect of an inhomogeneous material and activity distribution on the results. The calculations are still ongoing. Results will be presented in the final abstract.

  13. Phenomenological calculations of shielding spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragopoulou, M.; Zamani, M.

    2013-06-01

    The high level of radiation generated by a spallation source requires the design of an appropriate shielding to surround the source in order to fulfill radiation protection standards. A calculation of the spallation neutron attenuation is presented for various shielding materials, using a phenomenological model, based on the Moyer model. In the first step of the calculation, the interaction length of neutrons for each neutron energy and shielding material was estimated using inelastic cross-sections. In the second step the calculation deals with the attenuation of the neutron flux applying the Moyer model, for each material and neutron energy region. The transmission factors were calculated and compared with experimental data collected from the "Gamma-2" and the "E+T" projects running in JINR (Dubna, Russia). The results of the present work were also compared to the data obtained by different Monte Carlo codes such as MORSE, MCNPX, MARS14 and LAHET.

  14. RZ calculations for self shielded multigroup cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Sanchez, R.; Zmijarevic, I.; Stankovski, Z.

    2006-07-01

    A collision probability method has been implemented for RZ geometries. The method accounts for white albedo, specular and translation boundary condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the geometry and for a white albedo condition on the outer radial surface. We have applied the RZ CP method to the calculation of multigroup self shielded cross sections for Gadolinia absorbers in BWRs. (authors)

  15. A linear- and sublinear-scaling method for calculating NMR shieldings in atomic orbital-based second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Marina; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2013-05-07

    An atomic-orbital (AO) based formulation for calculating nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shieldings at the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory level is introduced, which provides a basis for reducing the scaling of the computational effort with the molecular size from the fifth power to linear and for a specific nucleus to sublinear. The latter sublinear scaling in the rate-determining steps becomes possible by avoiding global perturbations with respect to the magnetic field and by solving for quantities that involve the local nuclear magnetic spin perturbation instead. For avoiding the calculation of the second-order perturbed density matrix, we extend our AO-based reformulation of the Z-vector method within a density matrix-based scheme. Our pilot implementation illustrates the fast convergence with respect to the required number of Laplace points and the asymptotic scaling behavior in the rate-determining steps.

  16. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  17. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P.; Ballester, Facundo; Siebert, Frank-André

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 20–1090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (20–1090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [“Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation,” Health Phys. 44, 507–517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [“Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities,” Med. Phys. 34, 1398–1404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions

  18. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data.

    PubMed

    Zourari, K; Peppa, V; Ballester, Facundo; Siebert, Frank-André; Papagiannis, P

    2014-04-01

    To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 20-1090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (20-1090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced by Archer et al. ["Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation," Health Phys. 44, 507-517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. ["Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities," Med. Phys. 34, 1398-1404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. The data of this work allow for the accurate

  19. A conversion method of air kerma from the primary, scatter, and leakage radiations to effective dose for calculating x-ray shielding barriers in mammography.

    PubMed

    Kharrati, Hedi

    2005-05-01

    In this study, a new approach has been introduced for derivation of the effective dose from air kerma to calculate shielding requirements in mammography facilities. This new approach has been used to compute the conversion coefficients relating air kerma to the effective dose for the mammography reference beam series of the Netherlands Metrology Institute Van Swinden Laboratorium, National Institute of Standards and Technology, and International Atomic Energy Agency laboratories. The results show that, in all cases, the effective dose in mammography energy range is less than 25% of the incident air kerma for the primary and the scatter radiations and does not exceed 75% for the leakage radiation.

  20. Shielding Calculations for NSLS-II Beamlines.

    SciTech Connect

    Job,P.K.; Casey, W.R.

    2008-04-13

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is in the process of designing a new Electron Synchrotron for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. This facility, called the 'National Synchrotron Light Source II' (NSLS-II), will provide x-ray radiation of ultra-high brightness and exceptional spatial and energy resolution. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. The project scope includes the design, construction, installation, and commissioning of the following accelerators: a 200 MeV linac, a booster accelerator operating from 200 MeV to 3.0 GeV, the storage ring which stores 500 mA current of electrons at an energy of 3.0 GeV and 56 beamlines for experiments. It is planned to operate the facility primarily in a top-off mode, thereby maintaining the maximum variation in stored beam current to < 1%. Because of the very demanding requirements for beam emittance and synchrotron radiation brilliance, the beam life-time is expected to be quite low, on the order of 2 hours. Each of the 56 beamlines will be unique in terms of the source properties and configuration. The shielding designs for five representative beamlines are discussed in this paper.

  1. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  2. Shield weight optimization using Monte Carlo transport calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.; Wohl, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines are given of the theory used in FASTER-3 Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in complex geometries. The code has the additional capability of calculating the minimum weight layered unit shield configuration which will meet a specified dose rate constraint. It includes the treatment of geometric regions bounded by quadratic and quardric surfaces with multiple radiation sources which have a specified space, angle, and energy dependence. The program calculates, using importance sampling, the resulting number and energy fluxes at specified point, surface, and volume detectors. Results are presented for sample problems involving primary neutron and both primary and secondary photon transport in a spherical reactor shield configuration. These results include the optimization of the shield configuration.

  3. Comparison of deterministic and Monte Carlo methods in shielding design.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A D; Oliveira, C

    2005-01-01

    In shielding calculation, deterministic methods have some advantages and also some disadvantages relative to other kind of codes, such as Monte Carlo. The main advantage is the short computer time needed to find solutions while the disadvantages are related to the often-used build-up factor that is extrapolated from high to low energies or with unknown geometrical conditions, which can lead to significant errors in shielding results. The aim of this work is to investigate how good are some deterministic methods to calculating low-energy shielding, using attenuation coefficients and build-up factor corrections. Commercial software MicroShield 5.05 has been used as the deterministic code while MCNP has been used as the Monte Carlo code. Point and cylindrical sources with slab shield have been defined allowing comparison between the capability of both Monte Carlo and deterministic methods in a day-by-day shielding calculation using sensitivity analysis of significant parameters, such as energy and geometrical conditions.

  4. Gamma self-shielding correction factors calculation for aqueous bulk sample analysis by PGNAA technique.

    PubMed

    Nasrabadi, M N; Mohammadi, A; Jalali, M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) was applied to aqueous sample analysis using a relative method. For elemental analysis of an unknown bulk sample, gamma self-shielding coefficient was required. Gamma self-shielding coefficient of unknown samples was estimated by an experimental method and also by MCNP code calculation. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the gamma self-shielding within the sample volume is required.

  5. Shielding calculations for a production target for secondary beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; Back, B.B.; Jiang, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    In order to estimate the amount of shielding required for a radioactive beam facility dose rate were performed. The calculations for production targets with different geometries were performed. The calculations were performed with the MSU shielding code assuming a 500-p{mu}A 200-MeV deuteron beam stopped in a thick Al target. The target and the ion-optical elements for beam extraction are located in a 2 m{sup 3} large volume at the center of the production cell. These dose rate calculations show that with a combination of Fe and concrete it is possible to reduce the dose rate expected at the surface of a 7-m-wide cube housing the production target to less than 2 mrem/hr.

  6. Reliability Methods for Shield Design Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is a major challenge to the exploration and development of space. The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in deep space operations. In this enabling technology, we have developed methods for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. An important component of this technology is the estimation of two most commonly identified uncertainties in radiation shield design, the shielding properties of materials used and the understanding of the biological response of the astronaut to the radiation leaking through the materials into the living space. The largest uncertainty, of course, is in the biological response to especially high charge and energy (HZE) ions of the galactic cosmic rays. These uncertainties are blended with the optimization design procedure to formulate reliability-based methods for shield design processes. The details of the methods will be discussed.

  7. Spacesuit Radiation Shield Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Anderson, Brooke M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ware, J.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2006-01-01

    Meeting radiation protection requirements during EVA is predominantly an operational issue with some potential considerations for temporary shelter. The issue of spacesuit shielding is mainly guided by the potential of accidental exposure when operational and temporary shelter considerations fail to maintain exposures within operational limits. In this case, very high exposure levels are possible which could result in observable health effects and even be life threatening. Under these assumptions, potential spacesuit radiation exposures have been studied using known historical solar particle events to gain insight on the usefulness of modification of spacesuit design in which the control of skin exposure is a critical design issue and reduction of blood forming organ exposure is desirable. Transition to a new spacesuit design including soft upper-torso and reconfigured life support hardware gives an opportunity to optimize the next generation spacesuit for reduced potential health effects during an accidental exposure.

  8. Importance of resonance interference effects in multigroup self-shielding calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Stachowski, R.E.; Protsik, R.

    1995-12-31

    The impact of the resonance interference method (RIF) on multigroup neutron cross sections is significant for major isotopes in the fuel, indicating the importance of resonance interference in the computation of gadolinia burnout and plutonium buildup. The self-shielding factor method with the RIF method effectively eliminates shortcomings in multigroup resonance calculations.

  9. Software Tools for Measuring and Calculating Electromagnetic Shielding Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    ARMY RSRCH LAB ATTN AMSRD- ARL -CI-OK-T TECHL PUB (2 COPIES) ATTN AMSRD- ARL -CI-OK-TL TECHL LIB (2 COPIES) ATTN AMSRD- ARL -D J M MILLER ATTN...Software Tools for Measuring and Calculating Electromagnetic Shielding Effectiveness by Neal Tesny ARL -TR-3645 September 2005...report when it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. Army Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1197 ARL -TR-3645 September

  10. SUBGR: A Program to Generate Subgroup Data for the Subgroup Resonance Self-Shielding Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kang Seog

    2016-06-06

    The Subgroup Data Generation (SUBGR) program generates subgroup data, including levels and weights from the resonance self-shielded cross section table as a function of background cross section. Depending on the nuclide and the energy range, these subgroup data can be generated by (a) narrow resonance approximation, (b) pointwise flux calculations for homogeneous media; and (c) pointwise flux calculations for heterogeneous lattice cells. The latter two options are performed by the AMPX module IRFFACTOR. These subgroup data are to be used in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) neutronic simulator MPACT, for which the primary resonance self-shielding method is the subgroup method.

  11. Research on Primary Shielding Calculation Source Generation Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Mei, Qiliang; Li, Hui; Shangguan, Danhua; Zhang, Guangchun

    2017-09-01

    Primary Shielding Calculation (PSC) plays an important role in reactor shielding design and analysis. In order to facilitate PSC, a source generation code is developed to generate cumulative distribution functions (CDF) for the source particle sample code of the J Monte Carlo Transport (JMCT) code, and a source particle sample code is deveoped to sample source particle directions, types, coordinates, energy and weights from the CDFs. A source generation code is developed to transform three dimensional (3D) power distributions in xyz geometry to source distributions in r θ z geometry for the J Discrete Ordinate Transport (JSNT) code. Validation on PSC model of Qinshan No.1 nuclear power plant (NPP), CAP1400 and CAP1700 reactors are performed. Numerical results show that the theoretical model and the codes are both correct.

  12. Development of a New Shielding Model for JB-Line Dose Rate Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.R.

    2001-08-09

    This report describes the shielding model development for the JB-Line Upgrade project. The product of this effort is a simple-to-use but accurate method of estimating the personnel dose expected for various operating conditions on the line. The current techniques for shielding calculations use transport codes such as ANISN which, while accurate for geometries which can be accurately approximated as one dimensional slabs, cylinders or spheres, fall short in calculating configurations in which two-or three-dimensional effects (e.g., streaming) play a role in the dose received by workers.

  13. NMR shieldings from density functional perturbation theory: GIPAW versus all-electron calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wijs, G. A.; Laskowski, R.; Blaha, P.; Havenith, R. W. A.; Kresse, G.; Marsman, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present a benchmark of the density functional linear response calculation of NMR shieldings within the gauge-including projector-augmented-wave method against all-electron augmented-plane-wave+local-orbital and uncontracted Gaussian basis set results for NMR shieldings in molecular and solid state systems. In general, excellent agreement between the aforementioned methods is obtained. Scalar relativistic effects are shown to be quite large for nuclei in molecules in the deshielded limit. The small component makes up a substantial part of the relativistic corrections.

  14. Methods of Making Z-Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, III, Donald Laurence (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods of building Z-graded radiation shielding and covers. In one aspect, the method includes: providing a substrate surface having about medium Z-grade; plasma spraying a first metal having higher Z-grade than the substrate surface; and infusing a polymer layer to form a laminate. In another aspect, the method includes electro/electroless plating a first metal having higher Z-grade than the substrate surface. In other aspects, the methods include improving an existing electronics enclosure to build a Z-graded radiation shield by applying a temperature controller to at least part of the enclosure and affixing at least one layer of a first metal having higher Z-grade from the enclosure.

  15. PFP vertical calciner shield wall dose rate calculations using MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Wittekind, W.D.

    1997-08-21

    This report yields a neutron shield wall design for a full time occupancy dose rate of 0.25 mrem/h. ORIGEN2 generated gamma ray spectrum and neutron intensity for plutonium. MCNP modeled the calciner glovebox and room for reflection of neutrons off concrete walls and ceiling. Neutron calculations used MCNP in mode n, p to include neutron capture gammas. Photon calculations used MCNP in mode p for gamma rays. Neutron shield with lower 137.16 cm (4.5 feet) of 12.7 cm (5 inch) thick Lucite{reg_sign} and 0.3175 cm (0.125 inch) stainless steel on both sides, and upper 76.2 cm (2.5 feet) of 10.16 cm (4 inch) thick Lucite{reg_sign} and 1.905 cm (0.75 inch) thick glass on each side gave a total weighted dose rate of 0.23 mrem/h, fulfilling the design goal. Lucite{reg_sign} is considered to be equivalent to Plexiglas{reg_sign} since both are methylmethacrylate polymers.

  16. Calculation of an optimized design of magnetic shields with integrated demagnetization coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Schnabel, A.; Burghoff, M.; Li, L.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic shielding made from permalloy is frequently used to provide a time-stable magnetic field environment. A low magnetic field and low field gradients inside the shield can be obtained by using demagnetization coils through the walls, encircling edges of the shield. We first introduce and test the computational models to calculate magnetic properties of large size shields with thin shielding walls. We then vary the size, location and shape of the openings for the demagnetization coils at the corners of a cubic shield. It turns out that the effect on the shielding factor and the expected influence on the residual magnetic field homogeneity in the vicinity of the center of the shield is negligible. Thus, a low-cost version for the openings can be chosen and their size could be enlarged to allow for additional cables and easier handling. A construction of a shield with beveled edges and open corners turned out to substantially improve the shielding factor.

  17. Benchmark calculations for FFTF Inner radial shield damage rates

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, A.H.; Schwarz, R.A.; Simons, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    A comparison of the damage rates calculated by Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP), with values based on a FERRET-adjusted diffusion theory flux, was made for 22 dosimeter locations in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The C/E values in the fueled region for characterizer assemblies in core locations 2101, 2402, 3404, 2503, 2603 and in the axial reflector of assembly 2101 are within 10% of unity, indicating agreement within the combined calculated and adjusted uncertainties. The comparison also shows good agreement within 20% of unity in most of the axial zones of radial reflectors in rows 7, 8, and 9, their deviation either within, or slightly outside, the combined one-sigma uncertainty. There are three relatively large C/E deviations, ranging from 30% to 45% of unity, in the lower reflector block of row 9 and the upper shield regions of rows 7 and 8. The possible reasons for the large C/E are explained.

  18. Temperature effects in first-principles solid state calculations of the chemical shielding tensor made simple

    SciTech Connect

    Monserrat, Bartomeu Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-10-07

    We study the effects of atomic vibrations on the solid-state chemical shielding tensor using first principles density functional theory calculations. At the harmonic level, we use a Monte Carlo method and a perturbative expansion. The Monte Carlo method is accurate but computationally expensive, while the perturbative method is computationally more efficient, but approximate. We find excellent agreement between the two methods for both the isotropic shift and the shielding anisotropy. The effects of zero-point quantum mechanical nuclear motion are important up to relatively high temperatures: at 500 K they still represent about half of the overall vibrational contribution. We also investigate the effects of anharmonic vibrations, finding that their contribution to the zero-point correction to the chemical shielding tensor is small. We exemplify these ideas using magnesium oxide and the molecular crystals L-alanine and β-aspartyl-L-alanine. We therefore propose as the method of choice to incorporate the effects of temperature in solid state chemical shielding tensor calculations using the perturbative expansion within the harmonic approximation. This approach is accurate and requires a computational effort that is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of dynamical or Monte Carlo approaches, so these effects might be routinely accounted for.

  19. Temperature effects in first-principles solid state calculations of the chemical shielding tensor made simple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2014-10-01

    We study the effects of atomic vibrations on the solid-state chemical shielding tensor using first principles density functional theory calculations. At the harmonic level, we use a Monte Carlo method and a perturbative expansion. The Monte Carlo method is accurate but computationally expensive, while the perturbative method is computationally more efficient, but approximate. We find excellent agreement between the two methods for both the isotropic shift and the shielding anisotropy. The effects of zero-point quantum mechanical nuclear motion are important up to relatively high temperatures: at 500 K they still represent about half of the overall vibrational contribution. We also investigate the effects of anharmonic vibrations, finding that their contribution to the zero-point correction to the chemical shielding tensor is small. We exemplify these ideas using magnesium oxide and the molecular crystals L-alanine and β-aspartyl-L-alanine. We therefore propose as the method of choice to incorporate the effects of temperature in solid state chemical shielding tensor calculations using the perturbative expansion within the harmonic approximation. This approach is accurate and requires a computational effort that is about an order of magnitude smaller than that of dynamical or Monte Carlo approaches, so these effects might be routinely accounted for.

  20. A converse approach to the calculation of NMR shielding tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonhauser, Timo

    2008-03-01

    We propose an alternative approach for computing the NMR response in periodic solids that is based on a recently developed theory of orbital magnetization [1]. Instead of obtaining the shielding tensor from the response to an external magnetic field, we derive it directly from the orbital magnetization appearing in response to a microscopic magnetic dipole [2]. Our new approach is very general, and it can be applied to either isolated or periodic systems. The converse procedure has an established parallel in the case of electric fields, where Born effective charges are often obtained from the polarization induced by a sublattice displacement instead of the force induced by an electric field. Our novel approach is simple and straightforward to implement since all complexities concerning the choice of the gauge origin are avoided and the need for a linear-response implementation is circumvented. We have demonstrated its correctness and viability by calculating chemical shieldings in simple molecular systems, finding excellent agreement with previous theoretical and experimental results. Applications to more complex systems are currently in progress. *[(1)] T. Thonhauser, D. Ceresoli, D. Vanderbilt, and R. Resta, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 137205 (2005). *[(2)] T. Thonhauser, Arash A. Mostofi, Nicola Marzari, R. Resta, David Vanderbilt, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. (2007), arXiv:0709.4429v1.

  1. MCNPX Cosmic Ray Shielding Calculations with the NORMAN Phantom Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Michael R.; Durkee, Joe W.; McKinney, Gregg; Singleterry Robert

    2008-01-01

    The United States is planning manned lunar and interplanetary missions in the coming years. Shielding from cosmic rays is a critical aspect of manned spaceflight. These ventures will present exposure issues involving the interplanetary Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) environment. GCRs are comprised primarily of protons (approx.84.5%) and alpha-particles (approx.14.7%), while the remainder is comprised of massive, highly energetic nuclei. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) has commissioned a joint study with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to investigate the interaction of the GCR environment with humans using high-fidelity, state-of-the-art computer simulations. The simulations involve shielding and dose calculations in order to assess radiation effects in various organs. The simulations are being conducted using high-resolution voxel-phantom models and the MCNPX[1] Monte Carlo radiation-transport code. Recent advances in MCNPX physics packages now enable simulated transport over 2200 types of ions of widely varying energies in large, intricate geometries. We report here initial results obtained using a GCR spectrum and a NORMAN[3] phantom.

  2. Structural Calculations of Drip Shield Exposed to Vibratory Ground Motion

    SciTech Connect

    S. Mastilovic

    2003-06-16

    The objective of this calculation is twofold. First, to determine whether or not separation of interlocking drip shield (DS) segments occurs during vibratory ground motion. Second, if DS separation does not occur, to estimate the area of the DS for which the residual 1st principal stress exceeds a certain limit. (The area of DS plate-1 and DS plate-2 [see Attachment I] where the residual 1st principal stress exceeds a certain limit will be, for brevity, referred to as ''the damaged area'' throughout this document; also, DS plate-1 and DS plate-2 will be referred to, for brevity, as ''DS plates'' henceforth.) The stress limit used throughout this document is defined as 50 percent of yield strength of the DS plate material, Titanium Grade 7 (Ti-7) (SB-265 R52400), at temperature of 150 C. A set of 15 calculations is performed at two different annual frequencies of occurrence (annual exceedance frequency): 10{sup -6} per year (1/yr) and 10{sup -7} 1/yr . (Note: Due to computational problems only five realizations at 10{sup -7} 1/yr are presented in this document.) Additionally, one calculation is performed at the annual frequency of occurrence of 5 {center_dot} 10{sup -4} 1/yr. The scope of this document is limited to reporting whether or not the DS separation occurs. If the DS separation does not occur the scope is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of the damaged area. All these results are evaluated for the DS plates. This calculation is intended for use in support of the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application seismicity modeling. This calculation is associated with the DS design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group. AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses'' (Ref. 1) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The DS is classified as Quality Level 1 (Ref. 5, p. 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (Ref. 4). The information provided by

  3. BAC: A computer program for calculating shielding in buildings against initial radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, G.

    1980-10-01

    Calculation methodology and transmission data for BAC in the event of a nuclear explosion are considered. The shielding factor is the rate between the radiation dose at one point in the building and the dose in open air. It is separately calculated for neutrons, gamma rays from fission products, and secondary gamma rays. For this calculation, BAC uses data for radiation transmission in concrete. This program is utilized for fallout shelters and other buildings where walls and floors/roofs are mostly made of concrete and bricks. Instructions for the program are given, and BAC results and values are in certain cases compared with those obtained with the Monte Carlo method.

  4. NSLS-II beamline scattered gas bremsstrahlung radiation shielding calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, Razvan; Xia, Zhenghua Job, Panakkal; Lee, Wah-Keat

    2016-07-27

    National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a new state-of-the-art 3rd generation synchrotron. The NSLS-II facility is shielded up to 3 GeV electron beam energy at 500 mA. When the gas bremsstrahlung (GB) from the storage ring is scattered by the beamline components in the first optical enclosure (FOE), the scattered radiation will pose additional radiation hazard (bypassing primary GB collimators and stops) and challenge the FOE shielding. The scattered GB radiation hazard can be mitigated by supplementary shielding or with an exclusion zone downstream of the FOE.

  5. Standardized Radiation Shield Design Methods: 2005 HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Tripathi, Ram K.; Badavi, Francis F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2006-01-01

    Research committed by the Langley Research Center through 1995 resulting in the HZETRN code provides the current basis for shield design methods according to NASA STD-3000 (2005). With this new prominence, the database, basic numerical procedures, and algorithms are being re-examined with new methods of verification and validation being implemented to capture a well defined algorithm for engineering design processes to be used in this early development phase of the Bush initiative. This process provides the methodology to transform the 1995 HZETRN research code into the 2005 HZETRN engineering code to be available for these early design processes. In this paper, we will review the basic derivations including new corrections to the codes to insure improved numerical stability and provide benchmarks for code verification.

  6. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, J.R.; Clem, J.R.

    1983-10-11

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped. 5 figs.

  7. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, J.R.

    1982-07-09

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  8. Superconducting magnetic shielding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Clem, John R.; Clem, John R.

    1983-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for providing magnetic shielding around a working volume. The apparatus includes a hollow elongated superconducting shell or cylinder having an elongated low magnetic pinning central portion, and two high magnetic pinning end regions. Transition portions of varying magnetic pinning properties are interposed between the central and end portions. The apparatus further includes a solenoid substantially coextensive with and overlying the superconducting cylinder, so as to be magnetically coupled therewith. The method includes the steps passing a longitudinally directed current through the superconducting cylinder so as to depin magnetic reservoirs trapped in the cylinder. Next, a circumferentially directed current is passed through the cylinder, while a longitudinally directed current is maintained. Depinned magnetic reservoirs are moved to the end portions of the cylinder, where they are trapped.

  9. Shielding calculations and verifications for the new Radiation Instrument Calibration Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    George, G. L.; Olsher, R. H.; Seagraves, D. T.

    2002-01-01

    MCNP-4C1 was used to perform the shielding design for the new Central Health Physics Calibration Facility (CHPCF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The problem of shielding the facility was subdivided into three separate components: (1) Transmission; (2) Skyshine; and (3) Maze Streaming/ Transmission. When possible, actual measurements were taken to verify calculation results. The comparison of calculation versus measurement results shows excellent agreement for neutron calculations. For photon comparisons, calculations resulted in conservative estimates of the Effective Dose Equivalent (EDE) compared to measured results. This disagreement in the photon measurements versus calculations is most likely due to several conservative assumptions regarding shield density and composition. For example, reinforcing steel bars (Rebar) in the concrete shield walls were not included in the shield model.

  10. Four-component relativistic density functional theory calculations of NMR shielding tensors for paramagnetic systems.

    PubMed

    Komorovsky, Stanislav; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth; Malkina, Olga L; Malkin, Vladimir G

    2013-12-27

    A four-component relativistic method for the calculation of NMR shielding constants of paramagnetic doublet systems has been developed and implemented in the ReSpect program package. The method uses a Kramer unrestricted noncollinear formulation of density functional theory (DFT), providing the best DFT framework for property calculations of open-shell species. The evaluation of paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) tensors reduces to the calculation of electronic g tensors, hyperfine coupling tensors, and NMR shielding tensors. For all properties, modern four-component formulations were adopted. The use of both restricted kinetically and magnetically balanced basis sets along with gauge-including atomic orbitals ensures rapid basis-set convergence. These approaches are exact in the framework of the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian, thus providing useful reference data for more approximate methods. Benchmark calculations on Ru(III) complexes demonstrate good performance of the method in reproducing experimental data and also its applicability to chemically relevant medium-sized systems. Decomposition of the temperature-dependent part of the pNMR tensor into the traditional contact and pseudocontact terms is proposed.

  11. NMR Shielding in Metals Using the Augmented Plane Wave Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of solid state NMR magnetic shielding in metals, which includes both the orbital and the complete spin response of the system in a consistent way. The latter contains an induced spin-polarization of the core states and needs an all-electron self-consistent treatment. In particular, for transition metals, the spin hyperfine field originates not only from the polarization of the valence s-electrons, but the induced magnetic moment of the d-electrons polarizes the core s-states in opposite direction. The method is based on DFT and the augmented plane wave approach as implemented in the WIEN2k code. A comparison between calculated and measured NMR shifts indicates that first-principle calculations can obtain converged results and are more reliable than initially concluded based on previous publications. Nevertheless large k-meshes (up to 2 000 000 k-points in the full Brillouin-zone) and some Fermi-broadening are necessary. Our results show that, in general, both spin and orbital components of the NMR shielding must be evaluated in order to reproduce experimental shifts, because the orbital part cancels the shift of the usually highly ionic reference compound only for simple sp-elements but not for transition metals. This development paves the way for routine NMR calculations of metallic systems. PMID:26322148

  12. Comparison of dose calculation algorithms for colorectal cancer brachytherapy treatment with a shielded applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Xiangsheng; Poon, Emily; Reniers, Brigitte; Vuong, Te; Verhaegen, Frank

    2008-11-15

    Colorectal cancer patients are treated at our hospital with {sup 192}Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using an applicator that allows the introduction of a lead or tungsten shielding rod to reduce the dose to healthy tissue. The clinical dose planning calculations are, however, currently performed without taking the shielding into account. To study the dose distributions in shielded cases, three techniques were employed. The first technique was to adapt a shielding algorithm which is part of the Nucletron PLATO HDR treatment planning system. The isodose pattern exhibited unexpected features but was found to be a reasonable approximation. The second technique employed a ray tracing algorithm that assigns a constant dose ratio with/without shielding behind the shielding along a radial line originating from the source. The dose calculation results were similar to the results from the first technique but with improved accuracy. The third and most accurate technique used a dose-matrix-superposition algorithm, based on Monte Carlo calculations. The results from the latter technique showed quantitatively that the dose to healthy tissue is reduced significantly in the presence of shielding. However, it was also found that the dose to the tumor may be affected by the presence of shielding; for about a quarter of the patients treated the volume covered by the 100% isodose lines was reduced by more than 5%, leading to potential tumor cold spots. Use of any of the three shielding algorithms results in improved dose estimates to healthy tissue and the tumor.

  13. Ab initio calculation of the NMR shielding constants for histamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, A. P.; Dobrowolski, J. Cz.; Sadlej, J.

    1997-12-01

    The gage-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) approach is used within the coupled Hartree-Fock approximation to compute the 1H, 13C and 15N NMR shielding constants in two tautomeric forms of both the histamine molecule and its protonated form. An analysis of the results shows that the protonation on the end of the chain changes its nitrogen shielding constants of the pyridine and pyrrole type. These changes are much higher for the N(3)-H than for the N(1)-H tautomer.

  14. MO-D-213-07: RadShield: Semi- Automated Calculation of Air Kerma Rate and Barrier Thickness

    SciTech Connect

    DeLorenzo, M; Wu, D; Rutel, I; Yang, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop the first Java-based semi-automated calculation program intended to aid professional radiation shielding design. Air-kerma rate and barrier thickness calculations are performed by implementing NCRP Report 147 formalism into a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The ultimate aim of this newly created software package is to reduce errors and improve radiographic and fluoroscopic room designs over manual approaches. Methods: Floor plans are first imported as images into the RadShield software program. These plans serve as templates for drawing barriers, occupied regions and x-ray tube locations. We have implemented sub-GUIs that allow the specification in regions and equipment for occupancy factors, design goals, number of patients, primary beam directions, source-to-patient distances and workload distributions. Once the user enters the above parameters, the program automatically calculates air-kerma rate at sampled points beyond all barriers. For each sample point, a corresponding minimum barrier thickness is calculated to meet the design goal. RadShield allows control over preshielding, sample point location and material types. Results: A functional GUI package was developed and tested. Examination of sample walls and source distributions yields a maximum percent difference of less than 0.1% between hand-calculated air-kerma rates and RadShield. Conclusion: The initial results demonstrated that RadShield calculates air-kerma rates and required barrier thicknesses with reliable accuracy and can be used to make radiation shielding design more efficient and accurate. This newly developed approach differs from conventional calculation methods in that it finds air-kerma rates and thickness requirements for many points outside the barriers, stores the information and selects the largest value needed to comply with NCRP Report 147 design goals. Floor plans, parameters, designs and reports can be saved and accessed later for modification and recalculation

  15. MORSE Monte Carlo shielding calculations for the zirconium hydride reference reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgart, C. E.

    1972-01-01

    Verification of DOT-SPACETRAN transport calculations of a lithium hydride and tungsten shield for a SNAP reactor was performed using the MORSE (Monte Carlo) code. Transport of both neutrons and gamma rays was considered. Importance sampling was utilized in the MORSE calculations. Several quantities internal to the shield, as well as dose at several points outside of the configuration, were in satisfactory agreement with the DOT calculations of the same.

  16. Shielded beam delivery apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Montano, Rory Dominick

    2006-07-11

    An apparatus includes a plasma generator aligned with a beam generator for producing a plasma to shield an energized beam. An electrode is coaxially aligned with the plasma generator and followed in turn by a vortex generator coaxially aligned with the electrode. A target is spaced from the vortex generator inside a fluid environment. The electrode is electrically biased relative to the electrically grounded target for driving the plasma toward the target inside a vortex shield.

  17. Ab initio calculation of Ti NMR shieldings for titanium oxides and halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    Titanium NMR shielding constants have been calculated using ab initio coupled Hartree-Fock perturbation theory and polarized double-zeta basis sets for TiF 4, TiF 62-, TiCI 4, Ti(OH) 4, Ti(OH 2) 64+, Ti(OH) 4O, and Ti(OH) 3O -. In all cases the calculations were performed at Hartree-Fuck energy-optimized geometries. For Ti(OH) 4 a S4-symmetry geometry with nonlinear ∠ TiOH was employed. Relative shieldings are in reasonable agreement with experiment for TiF 62-, TiCI 4, and Ti(OR) 4, where R = H or alkyl. Ti(OH 2) 64+ is predicted to be more highly shielded than Ti(OH) 4 by about 340 ppm. The five-coordinate complex Ti(OH) 4O, whose calculated structure matches well that measured by extended X-ray absorption fine structure in K 2O · TiO 2 · SiO 2 glass, is actually deshielded compared to Ti(OH) 4 by about 40 ppm. X-ray absorption-near-edge spectral energies have also been calculated for TiF 4, TiCI 4, Ti(OH) 4, and Ti(OH) 4O using an equivalent ionic core virtual-orbital method and the observed reduction in term energy for the five-coordinate species compared to Ti(OH) 4 has been reproduced. Replacement of the H atoms in Ti(OH) 4 by point charges has only a slight effect upon σTi, suggesting a possible means of incorporating second-neighbor effects in NMR calculations for condensed phases.

  18. Shielding calculations for multi-TeV hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ginneken, A.; Yurista, P.; Yamaguchi, C.

    1987-01-01

    The present volume is most easily described as an extension of an earlier similar effort. The extension is mainly to higher energies but it also includes colliding beam simulations as well as muon production and transport. There is also a larger variety of geometries presented. But the purpose remains the same: to provide a collection of graphs which may serve as a rough guide in shielding applications. Detailed designs seldom resemble the idealized cases analyzed here and deserve specific computation with particular attention to any suspected weak spots. The graphs included here are intended to go no further than to form a useful starting point in design work. Such an approach is already quite effective at 1 TeV and below and will become even more so at higher energies where shielding costs are even larger. The choice of standard energies (5, 10 and 20 TeV) reflects the range of collider energies presently contemplated and allows for modest extrapolation outside this range. For fixed target results up to 1 TeV refs. 1 and 2 may be consulted. As in refs. 1 and 2, all results in this volume (except those pertaining to ``muon beams``) use the Monte Carlo code CASIM. Where {pi}{degrees} induced electromagnetic showers are included as, e.g., in muon production or in energy deposition, they are simulated with the AEGIS code. Predictions of CASIM (plus AEGIS where applicable) for target heating, induced radioactivity and absorbed dose in the sub-TeV regime agree quite well with experiment. Likewise CASIM results compare well with a set of absorbed dose measurements taken outside thick shields for a variety of beam loss and shielding geometries. The full extension of CASIM into the multi-TeV domain requires considerable modifications to both particle production and particle transport models. This extension is presently only partly completed.

  19. Efficient heterogeneous execution of Monte Carlo shielding calculations on a Beowulf cluster.

    PubMed

    Dewar, David; Hulse, Paul; Cooper, Andrew; Smith, Nigel

    2005-01-01

    Recent work has been done in using a high-performance 'Beowulf' cluster computer system for the efficient distribution of Monte Carlo shielding calculations. This has enabled the rapid solution of complex shielding problems at low cost and with greater modularity and scalability than traditional platforms. The work has shown that a simple approach to distributing the workload is as efficient as using more traditional techniques such as PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine). In addition, when used in an operational setting this technique is fairer with the use of resources than traditional methods, in that it does not tie up a single computing resource but instead shares the capacity with other tasks. These developments in computing technology have enabled shielding problems to be solved that would have taken an unacceptably long time to run on traditional platforms. This paper discusses the BNFL Beowulf cluster and a number of tests that have recently been run to demonstrate the efficiency of the asynchronous technique in running the MCBEND program. The BNFL Beowulf currently consists of 84 standard PCs running RedHat Linux. Current performance of the machine has been estimated to be between 40 and 100 Gflop s(-1). When the whole system is employed on one problem up to four million particles can be tracked per second. There are plans to review its size in line with future business needs.

  20. Shielding analysis methods available in the scale computational system

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Tang, J.S.; Hermann, O.W.; Bucholz, J.A.; Emmett, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Computational tools have been included in the SCALE system to allow shielding analysis to be performed using both discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques. One-dimensional discrete ordinates analyses are performed with the XSDRNPM-S module, and point dose rates outside the shield are calculated with the XSDOSE module. Multidimensional analyses are performed with the MORSE-SGC/S Monte Carlo module. This paper will review the above modules and the four Shielding Analysis Sequences (SAS) developed for the SCALE system. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Radiation predictions and shielding calculations for RITS-6

    SciTech Connect

    Maenchen, John Eric; O'Malley, John; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Fan, Wesley C.; Bollinger, Lance

    2005-06-01

    The mission of Radiographic Integrated Test Stand-6 (RITS-6) facility is to provide the underlying science and technology for pulsed-power-driven flash radiographic X-ray sources for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). Flash X-ray radiography is a penetrating diagnostic to discern the internal structure in dynamic experiments. Short (~50 nanosecond (ns) duration) bursts of very high intensity Xrays from mm-scale source sizes are required at a variety of voltages to address this mission. RITS-6 was designed and is used to both develop the accelerator technology needed for these experiments and serves as the principal test stand to develop the high intensity electron beam diodes that generate the required X-ray sources. RITS is currently in operation with three induction cavities (RITS-3) with a maximum voltage output of 5.5 MV and is classified as a low hazard non-nuclear facility in accordance with CPR 400.1.1, Chapter 13, Hazards Identification/Analysis and Risk Management. The facility will be expanded from three to six cavities (RITS-6) effectively doubling the operating voltage. The increase in the operating voltage to above 10 MV has resulted in RITS-6 being classified as an accelerator facility. RITS-6 will come under DOE Order 420.2B, Safety of Accelerator Facilities. The hazards of RITS are detailed in the "Safety Assessment Document for the Radiographic Integrated Test Stand Facility." The principal non-industrial hazard is prompt x-ray radiation. As the operating voltage is increased, both the penetration power and the total amount (dose) of x-rays are increased, thereby increasing the risk to local personnel. Fixed site shielding (predominantly concrete walls and a steel/lead skyshine shield) is used to attenuate these x-rays and mitigate this risk. This SAND Report details the anticipated x-ray doses, the shielding design, and the anticipated x-ray doses external to this shielding structure both in areas where administrative access

  2. Calculation of the BREN Japanese House Shielding Experiments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-22

    Radiation Effects Re- 8 search Foundation ( RERF ) data bases, such as Life Span Study (LSS), have been compiled from interviews and placed in shielding...vial . ." with-MORSE. Th- Uodel contins he goun and ai surounin .h struc- k’"’ ture inie h lekaesufae of hecylnd. Th djit fulto comne’tth eetrloaini...the T65D system to provide the doses at all ground ranges used by RERF . For small Ar, we can write 0(r) - 0(r+Ar) Ar1 (26) The relaxation length is on

  3. Calculations of cosmic-ray helium transport in shielding materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1993-01-01

    The transport of galactic cosmic-ray helium nuclei and their secondaries through bulk shielding is considered using the straight-ahead approximation to the Boltzmann equation. A data base for nuclear interaction cross sections and secondary particle energy spectra for high-energy light-ion breakup is presented. The importance of the light ions H-2, H-3, and He-3 for cosmic-ray risk estimation is discussed, and the estimates of the fractional contribution to the neutron flux from helium interactions compared with other particle interactions are presented using a 1977 solar minimum cosmic-ray spectrum.

  4. Application of automated weight windows to spallation neutron source shielding calculations using Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenander, John; DiJulio, Douglas D.

    2015-10-01

    We present an implementation of a general weight-window generator for global variance reduction in Geant4 based applications. The implementation is flexible and can be easily adjusted to a user-defined model. In this work, the weight-window generator was applied to calculations based on an instrument shielding model of the European Spallation Source, which is currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. The results and performance of the implemented methods were evaluated through the definition of two figures of merit. It was found that the biased simulations showed an overall improvement in performance compared to the unbiased simulations. The present work demonstrates both the suitability of the generator method and Geant4 for these types of calculations.

  5. NASA-Lewis experiences with multigroup cross sections and shielding calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.

    1972-01-01

    The nuclear reactor shield analysis procedures employed at NASA-Lewis are described. Emphasis is placed on the generation, use, and testing of multigroup cross section data. Although coupled neutron and gamma ray cross section sets are useful in two dimensional Sn transport calculations, much insight has been gained from examination of uncoupled calculations. These have led to experimental and analytic studies of areas deemed to be of first order importance to reactor shield calculations. A discussion is given of problems encountered in using multigroup cross sections in the resolved resonance energy range. The addition to ENDF files of calculated and/or measured neutron-energy-dependent capture gamma ray spectra for shielding calculations is questioned for the resonance region. Anomalies inherent in two dimensional Sn transport calculations which may overwhelm any cross section discrepancies are illustrated.

  6. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    PubMed

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors.

  7. Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2014-07-01

    A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist

  8. Analysis methods for Kevlar shield response to rotor fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstle, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Several empirical and analytical approaches to rotor burst shield sizing are compared and principal differences in metal and fabric dynamic behavior are discussed. The application of transient structural response computer programs to predict Kevlar containment limits is described. For preliminary shield sizing, present analytical methods are useful if insufficient test data for empirical modeling are available. To provide other information useful for engineering design, analytical methods require further developments in material characterization, failure criteria, loads definition, and post-impact fragment trajectory prediction.

  9. Shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis of spent fuel transportation cask in research reactors.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Hassanzadeh, M; Gharib, M

    2016-02-01

    In this study, shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis were carried out for general material testing reactor (MTR) research reactors interim storage and relevant transportation cask. During these processes, three major terms were considered: source term, shielding, and criticality calculations. The Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5 was used for shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis and ORIGEN2.1 code for source term calculation. According to the results obtained, a cylindrical cask with body, top, and bottom thicknesses of 18, 13, and 13 cm, respectively, was accepted as the dual-purpose cask. Furthermore, it is shown that the total dose rates are below the normal transport criteria that meet the standards specified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic methods for radiation shielding problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Troy L.

    For the past few decades, the most common type of deep-penetration (shielding) problem simulated using Monte Carlo methods has been the source-detector problem, in which a response is calculated at a single location in space. Traditionally, the nonanalog Monte Carlo methods used to solve these problems have required significant user input to generate and sufficiently optimize the biasing parameters necessary to obtain a statistically reliable solution. It has been demonstrated that this laborious task can be replaced by automated processes that rely on a deterministic adjoint solution to set the biasing parameters---the so-called hybrid methods. The increase in computational power over recent years has also led to interest in obtaining the solution in a region of space much larger than a point detector. In this thesis, we propose two methods for solving problems ranging from source-detector problems to more global calculations---weight windows and the Transform approach. These techniques employ sonic of the same biasing elements that have been used previously; however, the fundamental difference is that here the biasing techniques are used as elements of a comprehensive tool set to distribute Monte Carlo particles in a user-specified way. The weight window achieves the user-specified Monte Carlo particle distribution by imposing a particular weight window on the system, without altering the particle physics. The Transform approach introduces a transform into the neutron transport equation, which results in a complete modification of the particle physics to produce the user-specified Monte Carlo distribution. These methods are tested in a three-dimensional multigroup Monte Carlo code. For a basic shielding problem and a more realistic one, these methods adequately solved source-detector problems and more global calculations. Furthermore, they confirmed that theoretical Monte Carlo particle distributions correspond to the simulated ones, implying that these methods

  11. Evaluation of approximate methods for the prediction of noise shielding by airframe components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahtye, W. F.; Mcculley, G.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of some approximate methods for the prediction of shielding of monochromatic sound and broadband noise by aircraft components is reported. Anechoic-chamber measurements of the shielding of a point source by various simple geometric shapes were made and the measured values compared with those calculated by the superposition of asymptotic closed-form solutions for the shielding by a semi-infinite plane barrier. The shields used in the measurements consisted of rectangular plates, a circular cylinder, and a rectangular plate attached to the cylinder to simulate a wing-body combination. The normalized frequency, defined as a product of the acoustic wave number and either the plate width or cylinder diameter, ranged from 4.6 to 114. Microphone traverses in front of the rectangular plates and cylinders generally showed a series of diffraction bands that matched those predicted by the approximate methods, except for differences in the magnitudes of the attenuation minima which can be attributed to experimental inaccuracies. The shielding of wing-body combinations was predicted by modifications of the approximations used for rectangular and cylindrical shielding. Although the approximations failed to predict diffraction patterns in certain regions, they did predict the average level of wing-body shielding with an average deviation of less than 3 dB.

  12. Continuous Energy, Multi-Dimensional Transport Calculations for Problem Dependent Resonance Self-Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    T. Downar

    2009-03-31

    The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system.

  13. Ab initio calculation of through-space magnetic shielding of linear polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (acenes): extent of aromaticity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ned H; Caldwell, Brian W; Carlson, Katie P; Teague, Matthew R

    2009-02-01

    GIAO-HF within Gaussian 03 was employed to compute the NMR isotropic shielding values of a diatomic hydrogen probe above a series of acenes (linear polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). Subtraction of the isotropic shielding of diatomic hydrogen by itself allowed the determination of computed through-space proton NMR shielding increment surfaces for these systems. Shielding was observed above the center of each aromatic ring, but the magnitude of calculated shielding above each ring center depends on the number of fused benzenoid rings. The computed shielding increments above each ring center were correlated to other measures of extent of aromaticity, including geometric, energetic, and magnetic measurements.

  14. A Code For Calculating Self-Shielded Multigroup Neutron Cross Sections and Self-Shielding Factors From Preprocessed ENDF/B Basic Data Files.

    SciTech Connect

    1990-11-20

    Version 00 REX2-87 is a computer code developed for the calculation of self-shielded multigroup average cross sections, and self-shielding factors for total, elastic, fission and capture processes from an ENDF/B formatted nuclear data file in which the tabulated cross sections follow linear interpolation throughout.

  15. Monte Carlo calculations of the energy deposited in biological samples and shielding materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akar Tarim, U.; Gurler, O.; Ozmutlu, E. N.; Yalcin, S.

    2014-03-01

    The energy deposited by gamma radiation from the Cs-137 isotope into body tissues (bone and muscle), tissue-like medium (water), and radiation shielding materials (concrete, lead, and water), which is of interest for radiation dosimetry, was obtained using a simple Monte Carlo algorithm. The algorithm also provides a realistic picture of the distribution of backscattered photons from the target and the distribution of photons scattered forward after several scatterings in the scatterer, which is useful in studying radiation shielding. The presented method in this work constitutes an attempt to evaluate the amount of energy absorbed by body tissues and shielding materials.

  16. SU-E-T-270: Optimized Shielding Calculations for Medical Linear Accelerators (LINACs).

    PubMed

    Muhammad, W; Lee, S; Hussain, A

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of radiation shielding is to reduce the effective equivalent dose from a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) to a point outside the room to a level determined by individual state/international regulations. The study was performed to design LINAC's room for newly planned radiotherapy centers. Optimized shielding calculations were performed for LINACs having maximum photon energy of 20 MV based on NCRP 151. The maximum permissible dose limits were kept 0.04 mSv/week and 0.002 mSv/week for controlled and uncontrolled areas respectively by following ALARA principle. The planned LINAC's room was compared to the already constructed (non-optimized) LINAC's room to evaluate the shielding costs and the other facilities those are directly related to the room design. In the evaluation process it was noted that the non-optimized room size (i.e., 610 × 610 cm(2) or 20 feet × 20 feet) is not suitable for total body irradiation (TBI) although the machine installed inside was having not only the facility of TBI but the license was acquired. By keeping this point in view, the optimized INAC's room size was kept 762 × 762 cm 2. Although, the area of the optimized rooms was greater than the non-planned room (i.e., 762 × 762 cm 2 instead of 610 × 610 cm 2), the shielding cost for the optimized LINAC's rooms was reduced by 15%. When optimized shielding calculations were re-performed for non-optimized shielding room (i.e., keeping room size, occupancy factors, workload etc. same), it was found that the shielding cost may be lower to 41 %. In conclusion, non- optimized LINAC's room can not only put extra financial burden on the hospital but also can cause of some serious issues related to providing health care facilities for patients. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Critical Analysis of Cluster Models and Exchange-Correlation Functionals for Calculating Magnetic Shielding in Molecular Solids.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Sean T; Iuliucci, Robbie J; Mueller, Karl T; Dybowski, Cecil

    2015-11-10

    Calculations of the principal components of magnetic-shielding tensors in crystalline solids require the inclusion of the effects of lattice structure on the local electronic environment to obtain significant agreement with experimental NMR measurements. We assess periodic (GIPAW) and GIAO/symmetry-adapted cluster (SAC) models for computing magnetic-shielding tensors by calculations on a test set containing 72 insulating molecular solids, with a total of 393 principal components of chemical-shift tensors from 13C, 15N, 19F, and 31P sites. When clusters are carefully designed to represent the local solid-state environment and when periodic calculations include sufficient variability, both methods predict magnetic-shielding tensors that agree well with experimental chemical-shift values, demonstrating the correspondence of the two computational techniques. At the basis-set limit, we find that the small differences in the computed values have no statistical significance for three of the four nuclides considered. Subsequently, we explore the effects of additional DFT methods available only with the GIAO/cluster approach, particularly the use of hybrid-GGA functionals, meta-GGA functionals, and hybrid meta-GGA functionals that demonstrate improved agreement in calculations on symmetry-adapted clusters. We demonstrate that meta-GGA functionals improve computed NMR parameters over those obtained by GGA functionals in all cases, and that hybrid functionals improve computed results over the respective pure DFT functional for all nuclides except 15N.

  18. Method for expanding the uniformly shielded area in a short-length open-ended cylindrical magnetic shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshita, K.; Sasada, I.; Naka, H.; Paperno, E.

    1999-04-01

    A compensation method is proposed by which the uniformly shielded area of the axial magnetic field in a relatively short, open-structure axial magnetic shield can be extended. An open-ended cylindrical magnetic shield of 120 cm in length, 52 cm inner diameter, and a ˜0.5 mm total thickness of the shielding material is used to demonstrate the idea. The shield axis is oriented along the horizontal component (˜320 mG) of the Earth's magnetic field. A simple way to increase the axial shielding factor is to use a pair of compensating coaxial ring coils set at both open ends of the shield. This increases, however, the radial gradient of the shielded field since the axial compensation field is stronger towards the shield axis. In order to decrease the radial gradient, an additional ring coil is wound around the middle part of the outer surface of the shield. The compensating field generated by this central ring coil is stronger towards the inner surface of the shield, and it helps, therefore, to unify the axial resultant field over a wider area inside the shield. The axial shielding factor obtained with this compensation according to the proposed method is 128, in contrast to only 16.4 obtained with compensation by a set of two ring coils. The field gradients observed are 1.2 μG/cm along the length direction and 2.7 μG/cm along the radial direction, in contrast to the 14 μG/cm axial and 78 μG/cm radial gradients obtained with compensation by a set of two ring coils.

  19. Efficient time-independent method for conceptual design optimization of the national ignition facility primary shield

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E.; Annese, C.E.; Miller, W.F. Jr.; Watkins, E.F.; Tobin, M.L.; Latkowski, J.F.; Lee, J.D.; Soran, P.

    1995-07-01

    Minimum-cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National (laser fusion) Ignition Facility are sought with the help of the SWAN optimization code. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables the time-dependent problem to be addressed using time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying and accelerating the design process. The search for constituents that will minimize the shield cost is guided by the newly defined equal cost replacement effectiveness functions. The minimum-cost shield design concept consists of a mixture of polyethylene and low-cost, low-activation materials, such as CaCO{sub 3} or silicon carbide, with boron added near the shield boundaries. An alternative approach to the target chamber design is analyzed. It involves placing the shield interior, rather than exterior to the main aluminum structural wall of the target chamber. The resulting inner shield design approach was found to be more expensive but inherently safer; the overall inventory of radioactive activation product it contains is one to two orders of magnitude lower than in the conventional design approach. 21 refs., 16 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. Calculation of Dental Exam Room X-Ray Shielding in Walls and Entrances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-24

    currently uses 5/16 in drywall on all walls. No specialty shielding products (e.g., lead) are currently being used on any walls. f. The window and...needed for Q (Eq. 2). This calculation assumes the use of a 100-kVp beam. (3) With the use of 5/16 in drywall , no radiation shielding properties are...the doonl’ilay entry t o the room. Both sides of the room contain offices1 single sheet of 5/15n drywall on each side of each \\!Vall to combine

  1. Radiation shielding calculations for MuCool test area at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Rakhno; Carol Johnstone

    2004-05-26

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets being developed for cooling intense muon beams. In this shielding study the results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding calculations performed using the MARS14 code for the MuCool Test Area and including the downstream portion of the target hall and berm around it, access pit, service building, and parking lot are presented and discussed within the context of the proposed MTA experimental configuration.

  2. Observation and calculation of trapped modes near cut-off in the ALS bellow-shield

    SciTech Connect

    Corlett, J.N.

    1996-06-01

    Observed heating of the RF shields in the bellows of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) storage ring has led to studies of possible causes. One such possibility is resonant impedances near the cut-off frequency of the beam-pipe that arise from small, localized, enlargements of the beampipe cross-section. Calculations of trapped modes in the elliptical-section vacuum chamber, approximated by a rectangular geometry, are described. Measurements of a bellows-shield in the test laboratory are also described, as are temperature measurements of a flexband in the storage ring.

  3. Gas bremsstrahlung shielding calculation for first optic enclosure of ILSF medical beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigzadeh Jalali, H.; Salimi, E.; Rahighi, J.

    2016-10-01

    Gas bremsstrahlung is generated in high energy electron storage ring accompanies the synchrotron radiation into the beamlines and strike the various components of the beamline. In this paper, radiation shielding calculation for secondary gas bremsstrahlung is performed for the first optics enclosure (FOE) of medical beamline of the Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF). Dose equivalent rate (DER) calculation is accomplished using FLUKA Monte Carlo code. A comprehensive study of DER distribution at the back wall, sides and roof is given.

  4. Measured and calculated fast neutron spectra in a depleted uranium and lithium hydride shielded reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.; Mueller, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of MeV neutron were made at the surface of a lithium hydride and depleted uranium shielded reactor. Four shield configurations were considered: these were assembled progressively with cylindrical shells of 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, 13-centimeter-thick lithium hydride, 5-centimeter-thick depleted uranium, and 3-centimeter-thick depleted uranium. Measurements were made with a NE-218 scintillation spectrometer; proton pulse height distributions were differentiated to obtain neutron spectra. Calculations were made using the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DOT and ENDF/B (version 3) cross sections. Good agreement between measured and calculated spectral shape was observed. Absolute measured and calculated fluxes were within 50 percent of one another; observed discrepancies in absolute flux may be due to cross section errors.

  5. Use of the EUR LiB 15/5 data set for radiation shielding calculations in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. El-Sayed; Bashter, I. I.; Kansouh, W. A.

    The shielding effect of an iron sphere assembly has been tested for a Pu-α-Be neutron source placed in the center of the shield assembly. Emergent neutron and gamma spectra were measured with a stilbene scintillation counter. Discrimination between neutrons and gammas was achieved by the pulse shape discrimination technique based on the zero crossing method. Calculations have been made using the one-dimensional transport code ANISN-Westinghouse version (ANISN-W) and the EUR LiB 15/5 cross section data set. The agreement between measurements and calculations indicates that the cross section set and the calculation model are suitable for studying the iron shielding experiments over the neutron energy range 1.35-10 MeV and the gamma energy range 0.3-6 MeV. Total macroscopic cross sections for fast neutrons, linear attenuation coefficients for gamma rays and half-value thicknesses for neutrons and gammas for the whole energy range and at different energies have been obtained.

  6. Calculation of the 13C NMR shieldings of the C0 2 complexes of aluminosilicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tossell, J. A.

    1995-04-01

    13C NMR shieldings have been calculated using the random-phase-approximation, localized-orbital local-origins version of ab initio coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory for CO 2 and and for several complexes formed by the reaction of CO 2 with molecular models for aluminosilicate glasses, H 3TOT'H3 3-n, T,T' = Si,Al. Two isomeric forms of the CO 2-aluminosilicate complexes have been considered: (1) "CO 2-like" complexes, in which the CO 2 group is bound through carbon to a bridging oxygen and (2) "CO 3-like" complexes, in which two oxygens of a central CO 3 group form bridging bonds to the two TH 3 groups. The CO 2-like isomer of CO 2-H 3SiOSiH 3 is quite weakly bonded and its 13C isotropic NMR shielding is almost identical to that in free CO 2. As Si is progressively replaced by Al in the - H terminated aluminosilicate model, the CO 2-like isomers show increasing distortion from the free CO 2 geometry and their 13C NMR shieldings decrease uniformly. The calculated 13C shielding value for H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 is only about 6 ppm larger than that calculated for point charge stabilized CO 3-2. However, for a geometry of H 3SiO(CO 2) AlH 3-1, in which the bridging oxygen to C bond length has been artificially increased to that found in the - OH terminated cluster (OH) 3SiO(CO 2)Al(OH) 3-1, the calculated 13C shielding is almost identical to that for free CO 2. The CO 3-like isomers of the CO 2-aluminosili-cate complexes show carbonate like geometries and 13C NMR shieldings about 4-9 ppm larger than those of carbonate for all T,T' pairs. For the Si,Si tetrahedral atom pair the CO 2-like isomer is more stable energetically, while for the Si,Al and Al,Al cases the CO 3-like isomer is more stable. Addition of Na + ions to the CO 3-2 or H 3AlO(CO 2)AlH 3-2 complexes reduces the 13C NMR shieldings by about 10 ppm. Complexation with either Na + or CO 2 also reduces the 29Si NMR shieldings of the aluminosilicate models, while the changes in 27Al shielding with Na + or CO 2

  7. Results of monte carlo calculations of neutron spectra and doses outside the BDMS shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R P; Hall, J M

    2000-10-16

    A set of Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron dose rates and neutron spectra outside Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) shielding were performed with U.S. and Russian neutron fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. The purpose of these calculations was to facilitate the proper interpretation of the dose rate measurements from rem meters outside the BDMS shielding. An accurate determination of the dose rate is of particular interest so that dose rate can be compared with the applicable regulatory limit. The calculations show that the neutrons outside the BDMS shielding are significantly reduced in energy, i.e. the spectrum is shifted (moderated) towards the lower energies and contains significantly larger amount of neutrons in the energy range below 100 keV. The result of these calculations indicates that the dose measurement for the BDMS neutrons is overestimated from 25% to 55% depending on the location around BDMS when using either Russian or U.S. dose conversion coefficients. For an accurate neutron dose determination the application of an appropriate correcting factor to the neutron dose measurement is necessary.

  8. Shielding and activation calculations around the reactor core for the MYRRHA ADS design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Anna; Mueller, Stefan; Konheiser, J.; Castelliti, D.; Sarotto, M.; Stankovskiy, A.

    2017-09-01

    In the frame of the FP7 European project MAXSIMA, an extensive simulation study has been done to assess the main shielding problems in view of the construction of the MYRRHA accelerator-driven system at SCK·CEN in Mol (Belgium). An innovative method based on the combined use of the two state-of-the-art Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and FLUKA has been used, with the goal to characterize complex, realistic neutron fields around the core barrel, to be used as source terms in detailed analyses of the radiation fields due to the system in operation, and of the coupled residual radiation. The main results of the shielding analysis are presented, as well as the construction of an activation database of all the key structural materials. The results evidenced a powerful way to analyse the shielding and activation problems, with direct and clear implications on the design solutions.

  9. Gamma-ray energy buildup factor calculations and shielding effects of some Jordanian building structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharaf, J. M.; Saleh, H.

    2015-05-01

    The shielding properties of three different construction styles, and building materials, commonly used in Jordan, were evaluated using parameters such as attenuation coefficients, equivalent atomic number, penetration depth and energy buildup factor. Geometric progression (GP) method was used to calculate gamma-ray energy buildup factors of limestone, concrete, bricks, cement plaster and air for the energy range 0.05-3 MeV, and penetration depths up to 40 mfp. It has been observed that among the examined building materials, limestone offers highest value for equivalent atomic number and linear attenuation coefficient and the lowest values for penetration depth and energy buildup factor. The obtained buildup factors were used as basic data to establish the total equivalent energy buildup factors for three different multilayer construction styles using an iterative method. The three styles were then compared in terms of fractional transmission of photons at different incident photon energies. It is concluded that, in case of any nuclear accident, large multistory buildings with five layers exterior walls, style A, could effectively attenuate radiation more than small dwellings of any construction style.

  10. Converging Nuclear Magnetic Shielding Calculations with Respect to Basis and System Size in Protein Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Neubauer, Thomas J.; Caulkins, Bethany G.; Mueller, Leonard J.; Beran, Gregory J. O.

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio chemical shielding calculations greatly facilitate the interpretation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts in biological systems, but the large sizes of these systems requires approximations in the chemical models used to represent them. Achieving good convergence in the predicted chemical shieldings is necessary before one can unravel how other complex structural and dynamical factors affect the NMR measurements. Here, we investigate how to balance trade-offs between using a better basis set or a larger cluster model for predicting the chemical shieldings of the substrates in two representative examples of protein-substrate systems involving different domains in tryptophan synthase: the N-(4′-trifluoromethoxybenzoyl)-2-aminoethyl phosphate (F9) ligand which binds in the α active site, and the 2-aminophenol (2AP) quinonoid intermediate formed in the β active site. We first demonstrate that a chemically intuitive three-layer, locally dense basis model that uses a large basis on the substrate, a medium triple-zeta basis to describe its hydrogen-bonding partners and/or surrounding van derWaals cavity, and a crude basis set for more distant atoms provides chemical shieldings in good agreement with much more expensive large basis calculations. Second, long-range quantum mechanical interactions are important, and one can accurately estimate them as a small-basis correction to larger-basis calculations on a smaller cluster. The combination of these approaches enables one to perform density functional theory NMR chemical shift calculations in protein systems that are well-converged with respect to both basis set and cluster size. PMID:25993979

  11. Long-lived activation products in TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield: calculation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žagar, Tomaž; Božič, Matjaž; Ravnik, Matjaž

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, a process of long-lived activity determination in research reactor concrete shielding is presented. The described process is a combination of experiment and calculations. Samples of original heavy reactor concrete containing mineral barite were irradiated inside the reactor shielding to measure its long-lived induced radioactivity. The most active long-lived (γ emitting) radioactive nuclides in the concrete were found to be 133Ba, 60Co and 152Eu. Neutron flux, activation rates and concrete activity were calculated for actual shield geometry for different irradiation and cooling times using TORT and ORIGEN codes. Experimental results of flux and activity measurements showed good agreement with the results of calculations. Volume of activated concrete waste after reactor decommissioning was estimated for particular case of Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA reactor. It was observed that the clearance levels of some important long-lived isotopes typical for barite concrete (e.g. 133Ba, 41Ca) are not included in the IAEA and EU basic safety standards.

  12. Estimation of isotropic nuclear magnetic shieldings in the CCSD(T) and MP2 complete basis set limit using affordable correlation calculations.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Stachów, Michał; Kaminsky, Jakub; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2013-08-01

    A linear correlation between isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants for seven model molecules (CH2 O, H2 O, HF, F2 , HCN, SiH4 and H2 S) calculated with 37 methods (34 density functionals, RHF, MP2 and CCSD(T)), with affordable pcS-2 basis set and corresponding complete basis set results, estimated from calculations with the family of polarization-consistent pcS-n basis sets is reported. This dependence was also supported by inspection of profiles of deviation between CBS estimated nuclear shieldings and shieldings obtained with the significantly smaller basis sets pcS-2 and aug-cc-pVTZ-J for the selected set of 37 calculation methods. It was possible to formulate a practical approach of estimating the values of isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants at the CCSD(T)/CBS and MP2/CBS levels from affordable CCSD(T)/pcS-2, MP2/pcS-2 and DFT/CBS calculations with pcS-n basis sets. The proposed method leads to a fairly accurate estimation of nuclear magnetic shieldings and considerable saving of computational efforts.

  13. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Lee, J; Kim, H; Kim, I; Ye, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm{sup 2} applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield.

  14. Organ shielding and doses in Low-Earth orbit calculated for spherical and anthropomorphic phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthiä, Daniel; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther

    2013-08-01

    Humans in space are exposed to elevated levels of radiation compared to ground. Different sources contribute to the total exposure with galactic cosmic rays being the most important component. The application of numerical and anthropomorphic phantoms in simulations allows the estimation of dose rates from galactic cosmic rays in individual organs and whole body quantities such as the effective dose. The male and female reference phantoms defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the hermaphrodite numerical RANDO phantom are voxel implementations of anthropomorphic phantoms and contain all organs relevant for radiation risk assessment. These anthropomorphic phantoms together with a spherical water phantom were used in this work to translate the mean shielding of organs in the different anthropomorphic voxel phantoms into positions in the spherical phantom. This relation allows using a water sphere as surrogate for the anthropomorphic phantoms in both simulations and measurements. Moreover, using spherical phantoms in the calculation of radiation exposure offers great advantages over anthropomorphic phantoms in terms of computational time. In this work, the mean shielding of organs in the different voxel phantoms exposed to isotropic irradiation is presented as well as the corresponding depth in a water sphere. Dose rates for Low-Earth orbit from galactic cosmic rays during solar minimum conditions were calculated using the different phantoms and are compared to the results for a spherical water phantom in combination with the mean organ shielding. For the spherical water phantom the impact of different aluminium shielding between 1 g/cm2 and 100 g/cm2 was calculated. The dose equivalent rates were used to estimate the effective dose rate.

  15. Use of Lagrange Multipliers to Provide an Approximate Method for the Optimisation of a Shield Radius and Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Paul

    2017-09-01

    For any appreciable radiation source, such as a nuclear reactor core or radiation physics accelerator, there will be the safety requirement to shield operators from the effects of the radiation from the source. Both the size and weight of the shield need to be minimised to reduce costs (and to increase the space available for the maintenance envelope on a plant). This needs to be balanced against legal radiation dose safety limits and the requirement to reduce the dose to operators As Low As Reasonably Practicable (ALARP). This paper describes a method that can be used, early in a shield design, to scope the design and provide a practical estimation of the size of the shield by optimising the shield internals. In particular, a theoretical model representative of a small reactor is used to demonstrate that the primary shielding radius, thickness of the primary shielding inner wall and the thicknesses of two steel inner walls, can be set using the Lagrange multiplier method with a constraint on the total flux on the outside of the shielding. The results from the optimisation are presented and an RZ finite element transport theory calculation is used to demonstrate that, using the optimised geometry, the constraint is achieved.

  16. Modeling resonance interference by 0-D slowing-down solution with embedded self-shielding method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Martin, W.; Kim, K. S.; Williams, M.

    2013-07-01

    The resonance integral table based methods employing conventional multigroup structure for the resonance self-shielding calculation have a common difficulty on treating the resonance interference. The problem arises due to the lack of sufficient energy dependence of the resonance cross sections when the calculation is performed in the multigroup structure. To address this, a resonance interference factor model has been proposed to account for the interference effect by comparing the interfered and non-interfered effective cross sections obtained from 0-D homogeneous slowing-down solutions by continuous-energy cross sections. A rigorous homogeneous slowing-down solver is developed with two important features for reducing the calculation time and memory requirement for practical applications. The embedded self-shielding method (ESSM) is chosen as the multigroup resonance self-shielding solver as an integral component of the interference method. The interference method is implemented in the DeCART transport code. Verification results show that the code system provides more accurate effective cross sections and multiplication factors than the conventional interference method for UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel cases. The additional computing time and memory for the interference correction is acceptable for the test problems including a depletion case with 87 isotopes in the fuel region. (authors)

  17. Examination of energy spectrum acquisition method using shielded radiopharmaceutical syringes.

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomoyuki

    2009-09-20

    I previously reported on a spectrum sampling method with shielded syringes before use, although the report included only data obtained using technetium-99m. In this study, we sampled the energy spectrum in a similar manner using thallium-201, iodine-123, and gallium-67. In spectrum sampling, a radioisotopic source in a cylindrical shield is located midway between two opposed gamma-camera detectors equipped with collimators. An unshielded syringe before use emits excessive radiation and makes count rates too high to obtain accurate photopeak values. With a shielded syringe, we can sample the spectrum of radiation leaked from the needle side of the syringe and the unshielded part of its plunger side. Consequently, the detectors are exposed to lower-dose gamma rays and probably offer count rates appropriate to measure accurate photopeak values. The study results show the general validity of spectrum sampling and photopeak acquisition in our method. However, a syringe should be located accurately perpendicular to each detector; otherwise, gamma rays did not reach the detectors in some cases, resulting in measurement failures. In addition, when low-energy collimators are used for sampling from (123)I sources, photopeak values depend on penetration. More accurate measurements require the use of high-energy collimators.

  18. Development and verification of design methods for ducts in a space nuclear shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerbone, R. J.; Selph, W. E.; Read, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    A practical method for computing the effectiveness of a space nuclear shield perforated by small tubing and cavities is reported. Performed calculations use solutions for a two dimensional transport code and evaluate perturbations of that solution using last flight estimates and other kernel integration techniques. In general, perturbations are viewed as a change in source strength of scattered radiation and a change in attenuation properties of the region.

  19. A novel shielding scheme studied by the Monte Carlo method for electron beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yue, Kun; Yao, Yuan; Dong, Xiaoqing; Luo, Wenyun

    2013-03-01

    Lead that has been employed widely for shielding in electron beam radiotherapy can produce bremsstrahlung photons during the shielding process. A novel shielding scheme with a two-layer structure has been studied using a Monte Carlo method in order to reduce this bremsstrahlung effect. Compared with the conventional lead, the novel shielding scheme, comprised of a Styrene-Ethylene-Butylene-Styrene Block Co-polymer (SEBS) above and lead below, can efficiently reduce the generation of bremsstrahlung while providing better shielding for incident electrons. Therefore, this novel shielding scheme may play an important role in future applications.

  20. X-ray spectroscopy applied to radiation shielding calculation in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuenzel, Roseli; Levenhagen, Ronaldo Savarino; Herdade, Silvio Bruni; Terini, Ricardo Andrade; Costa, Paulo Roberto

    2008-08-15

    The protective shielding design of a mammography facility requires the knowledge of the scattered radiation by the patient and image receptor components. The shape and intensity of secondary x-ray beams depend on the kVp applied to the x-ray tube, target/filter combination, primary x-ray field size, and scattering angle. Currently, shielding calculations for mammography facilities are performed based on scatter fraction data for Mo/Mo target/filter, even though modern mammography equipment is designed with different anode/filter combinations. In this work we present scatter fraction data evaluated based on the x-ray spectra produced by a Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and W/Rh target/filter, for 25, 30 and 35 kV tube voltages and scattering angles between 30 and 165 deg. Three mammography phantoms were irradiated and the scattered radiation was measured with a CdZnTe detector. The primary x-ray spectra were computed with a semiempirical model based on the air kerma and HVL measured with an ionization chamber. The results point out that the scatter fraction values are higher for W/Rh than for Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh, although the primary and scattered air kerma are lower for W/Rh than for Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh target/filter combinations. The scatter fractions computed in this work were applied in a shielding design calculation in order to evaluate shielding requirements for each of these target/filter combinations. Besides, shielding requirements have been evaluated converting the scattered air kerma from mGy/week to mSv/week adopting initially a conversion coefficient from air kerma to effective dose as 1 Sv/Gy and then a mean conversion coefficient specific for the x-ray beam considered. Results show that the thickest barrier should be provided for Mo/Mo target/filter combination. They also point out that the use of the conversion coefficient from air kerma to effective dose as 1 Sv/Gy is conservatively high in the mammography energy range and overestimate the barrier thickness.

  1. Beam line shielding calculations for an Electron Accelerator Mo-99 production facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2016-05-03

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the photon and neutron fields in and around the latest beam line design for the Mo-99 production facility. The radiation dose to the beam line components (quadrupoles, dipoles, beam stops and the linear accelerator) are calculated in the present report. The beam line design assumes placement of two cameras: infra red (IR) and optical transition radiation (OTR) for continuous monitoring of the beam spot on target during irradiation. The cameras will be placed off the beam axis offset in vertical direction. We explored typical shielding arrangements for the cameras and report the resulting neutron and photon dose fields.

  2. [CALCULATION OF RADIATION LOADS ON THE ANTHROPOMORPHIC PHANTOM ONBOARD THE SPACE STATION IN THE CASE OF ADDITIONAL SHIELDING].

    PubMed

    Kartashov, D A; Shurshakov, V A

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of calculating doses from space ionizing radiation for a modeled orbital station cabin outfitted with an additional shield aimed to reduce radiation loads on cosmonaut. The shield is a layer with the mass thickness of -6 g/cm2 (mean density = 0.62 g/cm3) that covers the outer cabin wall and consists of wet tissues and towels used by cosmonauts for hygienic purposes. A tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom imitates human body. Doses were calculated for the standard orbit of the International space station (ISS) with consideration of the longitudinal and transverse phantom orientation relative to the wall with or without the additional shield. Calculation of dose distribution in the human body improves prediction of radiation loads. The additional shield reduces radiation exposure of human critical organs by -20% depending on their depth and body spatial orientation in the ISS compartment.

  3. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, D T; Ingersoll, J K

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  4. Calculation of binary magnetic properties and potential energy curve in xenon dimer: second virial coefficient of (129)Xe nuclear shielding.

    PubMed

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Runeberg, Nino; Jokisaari, Jukka; Vaara, Juha

    2004-09-22

    Quantum chemical calculations of the nuclear shielding tensor, the nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor, and the spin-rotation tensor are reported for the Xe dimer using ab initio quantum chemical methods. The binary chemical shift delta, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor Delta sigma, the nuclear quadrupole coupling tensor component along the internuclear axis chi( parallel ), and the spin-rotation constant C( perpendicular ) are presented as a function of internuclear distance. The basis set superposition error is approximately corrected for by using the counterpoise correction (CP) method. Electron correlation effects are systematically studied via the Hartree-Fock, complete active space self-consistent field, second-order Møller-Plesset many-body perturbation, and coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) theories, the last one without and with noniterative triples, at the nonrelativistic all-electron level. We also report a high-quality theoretical interatomic potential for the Xe dimer, gained using the relativistic effective potential/core polarization potential scheme. These calculations used valence basis set of cc-pVQZ quality supplemented with a set of midbond functions. The second virial coefficient of Xe nuclear shielding, which is probably the experimentally best-characterized intermolecular interaction effect in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, is computed as a function of temperature, and compared to experiment and earlier theoretical results. The best results for the second virial coefficient, obtained using the CCSD(CP) binary chemical shift curve and either our best theoretical potential or the empirical potentials from the literature, are in good agreement with experiment. Zero-point vibrational corrections of delta, Delta sigma, chi (parallel), and C (perpendicular) in the nu=0, J=0 rovibrational ground state of the xenon dimer are also reported.

  5. Weight optimization methods in space radiation shield design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    An empirical relation between proton range and material density is used to examine relations between shield weight, geometry, and material composition for shielding against a space proton environment. The optimum material resulting in minimum shield weight usually lies at the extremes of either the lightest or heaviest materials. Aluminum, which has special prominence in the space program, appears universally suboptimal as a radiation shielding material. Assuming square-box geometry (rectangular prisms with two square faces), the optimum shape for the shielded objects is found to be a cube, although moderate deviations from a cube result in only a small weight penalty.

  6. A temperature error correction method for a naturally ventilated radiation shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Qingquan; Dai, Wei; Ding, Rrenhui

    2016-11-01

    Due to solar radiation exposure, air flowing inside a naturally ventilated radiation shield may produce a measurement error of 0.8 °C or higher. To improve the air temperature observation accuracy, a temperature error correction method is proposed. The correction method is based on a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method and a Genetic Algorithm (GA) method. The CFD method is implemented to analyze and calculate the temperature errors of a naturally ventilated radiation shield under various environmental conditions. Then, a temperature error correction equation is obtained by fitting the CFD results using the GA method. To verify the performance of the correction equation, the naturally ventilated radiation shield and an aspirated temperature measurement platform are characterized in the same environment to conduct the intercomparison. The aspirated temperature measurement platform serves as an air temperature reference. The mean temperature error given by measurements is 0.36 °C, and the mean temperature error given by correction equation is 0.34 °C. This correction equation allows the temperature error to be reduced by approximately 95%. The mean absolute error (MAE) and the root mean square error (RMSE) between the temperature errors given by the correction equation and the temperature errors given by the measurements are 0.07 °C and 0.08 °C, respectively.

  7. Deconstructing Calculation Methods: Part 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ian

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this series of four articles is to look critically, and in some detail, at the primary strategy approach to written calculation, as set out on pages 5 to 16 of the "Guidance paper" "Calculation." The underlying principle of that approach is that children should use mental methods whenever they are appropriate, whereas for calculations…

  8. Comparison of spent-fuel cask radiation doses calculated by one- and two-dimensional shielding codes

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajo, J.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Spent-fuel cask shield design and calculation of radiation doses are major parts of the overall cask design. This paper compares radiation doses calculated by one- and two-dimensional or three-dimensional shielding codes. The paper also investigates the appropriateness of using one-dimensional codes for two-dimensional geometries. From these results, it can be concluded that the one-dimensional XSDRNPM/XSDOSE codes are adequate for both radial and axial shielding calculations if appropriate bucklings are used. For radial calculations, no buckling or a buckling equal to the length of the fuel are appropriate. For axial calculations, a buckling at least equal to the diameter of the cask must be used for neutron doses. For gamma axial doses, a buckling around the diameter of the fuel region is adequate. More complicated two- or three-dimensional codes are not needed for these types of problems.

  9. Standard growth curve which was integrated to obtain a mathematical representation for calculating shielding requirements in diagnostic x-ray departments by computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Ali

    2003-12-01

    Specifically, these methods reassess shielding calculations in X-ray areas with respect to the methodology of the calculation of the barrier thickness and the number of sources consider in the area. Thus, they generate an overall solution for the cases met at the medical radiation structural design. This report provides an extension of an existing method for the calculation of the barrier thickness required to reduce the three types of radiation exposure emitted from the source, the primary, secondary and leakage radiation, to a specified weekly design limit (MPD). Because each of these three types of radiation are of different beam quality, having different shielding requirements, NCRP 49 has provided means to calculate the necessary protective barrier thickness for each type of radiation individually. However, this report (NCRP 49) provides little guidance for the contribution of each of the three types of radiation to the barrier thickness requirement. The medical physicist have to estimate which components of the field are most important to be shielded and how they are to combine, if more than one component is significant to generate a single shielding requirement. In questionable situations, multiple half-value layers (HVLs) of material recommended to be added; by the general "add one half value layer (HVL)" approximation of NCRP 49.

  10. The calculation of some gamma shielding parameters for semiconductor CsPbBr3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oto, Berna; Gulebaglan, Sinem Erden; Kanberoglu, Gulsah Saydan

    2017-02-01

    Recently, researchers produced perovskites structures used in optoelectronic devices as substrates, sensors. CsPbBr3 crystal is found in the cubic perovskite structure and its space group is Pm-3m. CsPbBr3 is a developing material for detection of X- and γ-ray radiations and the knowledge of the attenuation parameters of CsPbBr3 crystal is important. In this study, some photon shielding parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient (μρ), effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Nel) have been investigated for CsPbBr3 compound. The theoretical values of μρ have been calculated in the energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV using WinXCom computer code and these values have been used in order to calculate the values of Zeff and Nel in the same energy range.

  11. Geant4 calculations for space radiation shielding material Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capali, Veli; Acar Yesil, Tolga; Kaya, Gokhan; Kaplan, Abdullah; Yavuz, Mustafa; Tilki, Tahir

    2015-07-01

    Aluminium Oxide, Al2O3 is the most widely used material in the engineering applications. It is significant aluminium metal, because of its hardness and as a refractory material owing to its high melting point. This material has several engineering applications in diverse fields such as, ballistic armour systems, wear components, electrical and electronic substrates, automotive parts, components for electric industry and aero-engine. As well, it is used as a dosimeter for radiation protection and therapy applications for its optically stimulated luminescence properties. In this study, stopping powers and penetrating distances have been calculated for the alpha, proton, electron and gamma particles in space radiation shielding material Al2O3 for incident energies 1 keV - 1 GeV using GEANT4 calculation code.

  12. SHIELDING AND DETECTOR RESPONSE CALCULATIONS PERTAINING TO CATEGORY 1 QUANTITIES OF PLUTONIUM AND HAND-HELD PLASTIC SCINTILLATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, A.

    2013-06-07

    Nuclear facilities sometimes use hand-held plastic scintillator detectors to detect attempts to divert special nuclear material in situations where portal monitors are impractical. MCNP calculations have been performed to determine the neutron and gamma radiation field arising from a Category I quantity of weapons-grade plutonium in various shielding configurations. The shields considered were composed of combinations of lead and high-density polyethylene such that the mass of the plutonium plus shield was 22.7 kilograms. Monte-Carlo techniques were also used to determine the detector response to each of the shielding configurations. The detector response calculations were verified using field measurements of high-, medium-, and low- energy gamma-ray sources as well as a Cf-252 neutron source.

  13. Processing and validation of JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 group-wise cross section libraries for shielding calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pescarini, M.; Sinitsa, V.; Orsi, R.; Frisoni, M.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a synthesis of the ENEA-Bologna Nuclear Data Group programme dedicated to generate and validate group-wise cross section libraries for shielding and radiation damage deterministic calculations in nuclear fission reactors, following the data processing methodology recommended in the ANSI/ANS-6.1.2-1999 (R2009) American Standard. The VITJEFF311.BOLIB and VITENDF70.BOLIB finegroup coupled n-γ (199 n + 42 γ - VITAMIN-B6 structure) multi-purpose cross section libraries, based on the Bondarenko method for neutron resonance self-shielding and respectively on JEFF-3.1.1 and ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluated nuclear data, were produced in AMPX format using the NJOY-99.259 and the ENEA-Bologna 2007 Revision of the SCAMPI nuclear data processing systems. Two derived broad-group coupled n-γ (47 n + 20 γ - BUGLE-96 structure) working cross section libraries in FIDO-ANISN format for LWR shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry calculations, named BUGJEFF311.BOLIB and BUGENDF70.BOLIB, were generated by the revised version of SCAMPI, through problem-dependent cross section collapsing and self-shielding from the cited fine-group libraries. The validation results on the criticality safety benchmark experiments for the fine-group libraries and the preliminary validation results for the broad-group working libraries on the PCA-Replica and VENUS-3 engineering neutron shielding benchmark experiments are reported in synthesis.

  14. From CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ-J to CCSD(T) complete basis set limit isotropic nuclear magnetic shieldings via affordable DFT/CBS calculations.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Teobald; Stachów, Michał; Nieradka, Marzena; Kaminsky, Jakub; Pluta, Tadeusz; Sauer, Stephan P A

    2011-05-01

    It is shown that a linear correlation exists between nuclear shielding constants for nine small inorganic and organic molecules (N(2), CO, CO(2), NH(3), CH(4), C(2)H(2), C(2)H(4), C(2)H(6) and C(6)H(6)) calculated with 47 methods (42 DFT methods, RHF, MP2, SOPPA, SOPPA(CCSD), CCSD(T)) and the aug-cc-pVTZ-J basis set and corresponding complete basis set results, estimated from calculations with the family of polarization-consistent pcS-n basis sets. This implies that the remaining basis set error of the aug-cc-pVTZ-J basis set is very similar in DFT and CCSD(T) calculations. As the aug-cc-pVTZ-J basis set is significantly smaller, CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ-J calculations allow in combination with affordable DFT/pcS-n complete basis set calculations the prediction of nuclear shieldings at the CCSD(T) level of nearly similar accuracy as those, obtained by fitting results obtained from computationally demanding pcS-n calculations at the CCSD(T) limit. A significant saving of computational efforts can thus be achieved by scaling inexpensive CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ-J calculations of nuclear isotropic shieldings with affordable DFT complete basis set limit corrections. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Dosimetric evaluation of photon dose calculation under jaw and MLC shielding.

    PubMed

    Fogliata, A; Clivio, A; Vanetti, E; Nicolini, G; Belosi, M F; Cozzi, L

    2013-10-01

    The accuracy of photon dose calculation algorithms in out-of-field regions is often neglected, despite its importance for organs at risk and peripheral dose evaluation. The present work has assessed this for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros-XB algorithms implemented in the Eclipse treatment planning system. Specifically, the regions shielded by the jaw, or the MLC, or both MLC and jaw for flattened and unflattened beams have been studied. The accuracy in out-of-field dose under different conditions was studied for two different algorithms. Measured depth doses out of the field, for different field sizes and various distances from the beam edge were compared with the corresponding AAA and Acuros-XB calculations in water. Four volumetric modulated arc therapy plans (in the RapidArc form) were optimized in a water equivalent phantom, PTW Octavius, to obtain a region always shielded by the MLC (or MLC and jaw) during the delivery. Doses to different points located in the shielded region and in a target-like structure were measured with an ion chamber, and results were compared with the AAA and Acuros-XB calculations. Photon beams of 6 and 10 MV, flattened and unflattened were used for the tests. Good agreement between calculated and measured depth doses was found using both algorithms for all points measured at depth greater than 3 cm. The mean dose differences (± 1SD) were -8% ± 16%, -3% ± 15%, -16% ± 18%, and -9% ± 16% for measurements vs AAA calculations and -10% ± 14%, -5% ± 12%, -19% ± 17%, and -13% ± 14% for Acuros-XB, for 6X, 6 flattening-filter free (FFF), 10X, and 10FFF beams, respectively. The same figures for dose differences relative to the open beam central axis dose were: -0.1% ± 0.3%, 0.0% ± 0.4%, -0.3% ± 0.3%, and -0.1% ± 0.3% for AAA and -0.2% ± 0.4%, -0.1% ± 0.4%, -0.5% ± 0.5%, and -0.3% ± 0.4% for Acuros-XB. Buildup dose was overestimated with AAA, while Acuros-XB gave results more consistent with

  16. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  17. Comparison of measured and calculated neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra behind an in-line shielded duct

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.; Tang, J.S.

    1982-05-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV neutrons through a 0.30-m-diameter duct having a length-to-diameter ratio of 2.83 that is partially plugged with a 0.15 m diameter, 0.51 m long shield comprised of alternating layers of stainless steel type 304 and borated polyethylene have been carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared at several locations relative to the mouth of the duct. The measured spectra were obtained using an NE-213 liquid scintillator detector with pulse shape discrimination methods used to simultaneously resolve neutron and gamma ray events. The calculated spectra were obtained using a computer code network that incorporates two radiation transport methods: discrete ordinates (with P/sub 3/ multigroup cross sections) and Monte Carlo (with continuous point cross sections). The two radiation transport methods are required to account for neutrons that singly scatter from the duct to the detectors. The calculated and measured neutron energy spectra above 850 keV agree with 5 to 50% depending on detector location and neutron energy. The calculated and measured gamma ray energy spectra above 750 keV are also in favorable agreement, approx. 5 to 50%, depending on detector location and gamma ray energy.

  18. Shielding of medical imaging X-ray facilities: a simple and practical method.

    PubMed

    Bibbo, Giovanni

    2017-10-05

    The most widely accepted method for shielding design of X-ray facilities is that contained in the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report 147 whereby the computation of the barrier thickness for primary, secondary and leakage radiations is based on the knowledge of the distances from the radiation sources, the assumptions of the clinical workload, and usage and occupancy of adjacent areas. The shielding methodology used in this report is complex. With this methodology, the shielding designers need to make assumptions regarding the use of the X-ray room and the adjoining areas. Different shielding designers may make different assumptions resulting in different shielding requirements for a particular X-ray room. A more simple and practical method is to base the shielding design on the shielding principle used to shield X-ray tube housing to limit the leakage radiation from the X-ray tube. In this case, the shielding requirements of the X-ray room would depend only on the maximum radiation output of the X-ray equipment regardless of workload, usage or occupancy of the adjacent areas of the room. This shielding methodology, which has been used in South Australia since 1985, has proven to be practical and, to my knowledge, has not led to excess shielding of X-ray installations.

  19. Calculations of neutron shielding data for 10-100 MeV proton accelerators.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Sheu, R J; Jian, S H

    2005-01-01

    The characteristics of neutron sources and their attenuation in concrete were investigated in detail for protons with energies ranging from 10 to 100 MeV striking on target materials of C, N, Al, Fe, Cu and W. A two-step approach was adopted: thick-target double-differential neutron yields were first calculated from the (p, xn) cross sections recommended in the ICRU Report 63; further, transport simulations of those neutrons in concrete were performed by using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The purpose of this study is to provide reasonably accurate parameters for shielding design for 10-100 MeV proton accelerators. Source terms and the corresponding attenuation lengths in concrete for several target materials are given as a function of proton energies and neutron emission angles.

  20. Methods for Melting Temperature Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Qi-Jun

    Melting temperature calculation has important applications in the theoretical study of phase diagrams and computational materials screenings. In this thesis, we present two new methods, i.e., the improved Widom's particle insertion method and the small-cell coexistence method, which we developed in order to capture melting temperatures both accurately and quickly. We propose a scheme that drastically improves the efficiency of Widom's particle insertion method by efficiently sampling cavities while calculating the integrals providing the chemical potentials of a physical system. This idea enables us to calculate chemical potentials of liquids directly from first-principles without the help of any reference system, which is necessary in the commonly used thermodynamic integration method. As an example, we apply our scheme, combined with the density functional formalism, to the calculation of the chemical potential of liquid copper. The calculated chemical potential is further used to locate the melting temperature. The calculated results closely agree with experiments. We propose the small-cell coexistence method based on the statistical analysis of small-size coexistence MD simulations. It eliminates the risk of a metastable superheated solid in the fast-heating method, while also significantly reducing the computer cost relative to the traditional large-scale coexistence method. Using empirical potentials, we validate the method and systematically study the finite-size effect on the calculated melting points. The method converges to the exact result in the limit of a large system size. An accuracy within 100 K in melting temperature is usually achieved when the simulation contains more than 100 atoms. DFT examples of Tantalum, high-pressure Sodium, and ionic material NaCl are shown to demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of the method in its practical applications. The method serves as a promising approach for large-scale automated material screening in which

  1. Density functional calculations of NMR shielding tensors for paramagnetic systems with arbitrary spin multiplicity: Validation on 3d metallocenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrobárik, Peter; Reviakine, Roman; Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Malkina, Olga L.; Malkin, Vladimir G.; Köhler, Frank H.; Kaupp, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The calculation of nuclear shieldings for paramagnetic molecules has been implemented in the ReSpect program, which allows the use of modern density functional methods with accurate treatments of spin-orbit effects for all relevant terms up to order O(α4) in the fine structure constant. Compared to previous implementations, the methodology has been extended to compounds of arbitrary spin multiplicity. Effects of zero-field splittings in high-spin systems are approximately accounted for. Validation of the new implementation is carried out for the C13 and H1 NMR signal shifts of the 3d metallocenes V4Cp2, Cr3Cp2, Mn2Cp2, Mn6Cp2, Co2Cp2, and Ni3Cp2. Zero-field splitting effects on isotropic shifts tend to be small or negligible. Agreement with experimental isotropic shifts is already good with the BP86 gradient-corrected functional and is further improved by admixture of Hartree-Fock exchange in hybrid functionals. Decomposition of the shieldings confirms the dominant importance of the Fermi-contact shifts, but contributions from spin-orbit dependent terms are frequently also non-negligible. Agreement with C13 NMR shift tensors from solid-state experiments is of similar quality as for isotropic shifts.

  2. Calculated volumes of individual shield volcanoes at the young end of the Hawaiian Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Eakins, Barry W.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution multibeam bathymetry and a digital elevation model of the Hawaiian Islands are used to calculate the volumes of individual shield volcanoes and island complexes (Niihau, Kauai, Oahu, the Maui Nui complex, and Hawaii), taking into account subsidence of the Pacific plate under the load of the Hawaiian Ridge. Our calculated volume for the Island of Hawaii and its submarine extent (213 × 103 km3) is nearly twice the previous estimate (113 × 103 km3), due primarily to crustal subsidence that had not been accounted for in the earlier work. The volcanoes that make up the Island of Hawaii (Mahukona, Kohala, Mauna Kea, Hualalai, Mauna Loa, Kilauea and Loihi) are generally considered to have been formed within the past million years, and our revised volume for the island indicates that magma supply rates are greater than previously estimated, 0.21 km3/yr as opposed to ∼ 0.1 km3/yr. This result also shows that compared with rates calculated for the Hawaiian Islands (0–6 Ma, 0.095 km3/yr), the Hawaiian Ridge (0–45 Ma, 0.017 km3/yr), and the Emperor Seamounts (45–80 Ma, 0.010 km3/yr), magma supply rates have increased dramatically to build the Island of Hawaii.

  3. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM LOG INACTIVATION CALCULATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appendix O of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR) Guidance Manual introduces the CeffT10 (i.e., reaction zone outlet C value and T10 time) method for calculating ozone CT value and Giardia and virus log inactivation. The LT2ESWTR Pre-proposal Draft Regulatory Language for St...

  4. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM LOG INACTIVATION CALCULATION METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Appendix O of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR) Guidance Manual introduces the CeffT10 (i.e., reaction zone outlet C value and T10 time) method for calculating ozone CT value and Giardia and virus log inactivation. The LT2ESWTR Pre-proposal Draft Regulatory Language for St...

  5. Fast Neutron Albedo Calculations for a Concrete Shield with Different Curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, F. M.; Salama, M.

    The O5R Monte Carlo neutron transport Code had been used to calculate the neutron albedo for neutrons reflected from plane and curved concrete shields. The present calculations were performed to investigate the fast-neutron albedo in case of ordinary concrete shield, in order to perform comparative studies with the case of neutron reflection against a flat wall. The calculations were performed for three different neutron source energies of 1 MeV, 5 MeV and 15 MeV and at neutron incident angles of 5°, 30°, 45°, 60° and 90° and for surfaces with different curvatures (flat, 100, 50, 20 and 5 cm).The results obtained reveal that there will be an appreciable error on using the flat wall albedo value in the case of duct penetration calculations. The error was assumed to be due to the neglection of the curvature effect as well as to the improper choice of the neutron incident angle.Translated AbstractAlbedoberechnungen für schnelle Neutronen an einem Betonschild unterschiedlicher KrümmungDas O5R Monte Carlo Neutronentransport-Programm wurde benutzt, um die Albedo für Neutronen, reflektiert von ebenen oder gekrümmten Betonschilden, zu berechnen. Diese Berechnungen für die Albedo schneller Neutronen an gewöhnlichen Betonschilden wurden zum Vergleich mit ähnlichen Untersuchungen der Neutronenreflektion an flachen Wänden angestellt. Es wird bei drei verschiedenen Neutronenquellenenergien, 1 MeV, 5 MeV, und 15 MeV, Einfallswinkeln von 5°, 30°, 45°, 60° und 90° sowie für verschieden gekrümmte Oberflächen (flach, 100, 50, 20 und 5 cm) gerechnet.Diese Ergebnisse zeigen, daß die Verwendung von Albedowerten an flachen Wänden für den Fall von Durchlaßkanälen zu beträchtlichen Fehlern führt. Sie können sowohl der Vernachlässigung der Krümmung als auch der Wahl falscher Einfallswinkel zugeschrieben werden.

  6. Application of the Moyer method to transverse shielding of linear Bremsstrahlung sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, W. P.; Sun, R. K.; Thomas, R. H.

    1991-12-01

    The Moyer method is applied to the design of transverse shielding for an electron linear accelerator, assuming uniform beam power loss along the accelerator structure. Parameters for this application are given and sample calculations are shown. For a beam power loss uniformly distributed with distance along a straight line of 0.5W/m, it is predicted that 1.2 m of concrete are needed to reduce the dose equivalent rate to 1.39 x 10(exp -8) Sv/s, (5 mrem/hour) at a transverse distance of 3.5 m from the source.

  7. Overview of active methods for shielding spacecraft from energetic space radiation.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W

    2001-01-01

    During the 1960's and into the early 1970's, investigations were conducted related to the feasibility of using active radiation shielding methods, such as afforded by electromagnetic fields, as alternatives to passive, bulk material shielding to attenuate space radiations. These active concepts fall into four categories: (1) electrostatic fields; (2) plasma shields; (3) confined magnetic fields; and (4) unconfined magnetic fields. In nearly all of these investigations, consideration was given only to shielding against protons or electrons, or both. During the 1980's and 1990's there were additional studies related to proton shielding and some new studies regarding the efficacy of using active methods to shield from the high energy heavy ion (HZE particle) component of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum. In this overview, each concept category is reviewed and its applicability and limitations for the various types of space radiations are described. Recommendations for future research on this topic are made.

  8. Overview of active methods for shielding spacecraft from energetic space radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    During the 1960's and into the early 1970's, investigations were conducted related to the feasibility of using active radiation shielding methods, such as afforded by electromagnetic fields, as alternatives to passive, bulk material shielding to attenuate space radiations. These active concepts fall into four categories: (1) electrostatic fields; (2) plasma shields; (3) confined magnetic fields; and (4) unconfined magnetic fields. In nearly all of these investigations, consideration was given only to shielding against protons or electrons, or both. During the 1980's and 1990's there were additional studies related to proton shielding and some new studies regarding the efficacy of using active methods to shield from the high energy heavy ion (HZE particle) component of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum. In this overview, each concept category is reviewed and its applicability and limitations for the various types of space radiations are described. Recommendations for future research on this topic are made.

  9. Assessment of shielding analysis methods, codes, and data for spent fuel transport/storage applications. [Radiation dose rates from shielded spent fuels and high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Tang, J.S.; Cramer, S.N.; Gauthey, J.C.; Kirk, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of the computational tools and existing methods used to obtain radiation dose rates from shielded spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Particular emphasis is placed on analysis tools and techniques applicable to facilities/equipment designed for the transport or storage of spent nuclear fuel or HLW. Applications to cask transport, storage, and facility handling are considered. The report reviews the analytic techniques for generating appropriate radiation sources, evaluating the radiation transport through the shield, and calculating the dose at a desired point or surface exterior to the shield. Discrete ordinates, Monte Carlo, and point kernel methods for evaluating radiation transport are reviewed, along with existing codes and data that utilize these methods. A literature survey was employed to select a cadre of codes and data libraries to be reviewed. The selection process was based on specific criteria presented in the report. Separate summaries were written for several codes (or family of codes) that provided information on the method of solution, limitations and advantages, availability, data access, ease of use, and known accuracy. For each data library, the summary covers the source of the data, applicability of these data, and known verification efforts. Finally, the report discusses the overall status of spent fuel shielding analysis techniques and attempts to illustrate areas where inaccuracy and/or uncertainty exist. The report notes the advantages and limitations of several analysis procedures and illustrates the importance of using adequate cross-section data sets. Additional work is recommended to enable final selection/validation of analysis tools that will best meet the US Department of Energy's requirements for use in developing a viable HLW management system. 188 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. Photon dose estimation from ultraintense laser-solid interactions and shielding calculation with Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo; Qiu, Rui; Li, JunLi; Lu, Wei; Wu, Zhen; Li, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    When a strong laser beam irradiates a solid target, a hot plasma is produced and high-energy electrons are usually generated (the so-called "hot electrons"). These energetic electrons subsequently generate hard X-rays in the solid target through the Bremsstrahlung process. To date, only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this study, extensive literature reviews on the physics and properties of hot electrons have been conducted. On the basis of these information, the photon dose generated by the interaction between hot electrons and a solid target was simulated with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. With some reasonable assumptions, the calculated dose can be regarded as the upper boundary of the experimental results over the laser intensity ranging from 1019 to 1021 W/cm2. Furthermore, an equation to estimate the photon dose generated from ultraintense laser-solid interactions based on the normalized laser intensity is derived. The shielding effects of common materials including concrete and lead were also studied for the laser-driven X-ray source. The dose transmission curves and tenth-value layers (TVLs) in concrete and lead were calculated through Monte Carlo simulations. These results could be used to perform a preliminary and fast radiation safety assessment for the X-rays generated from ultraintense laser-solid interactions.

  11. Space mapping method for the design of passive shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, Peter; Dupré, Luc; Melkebeek, Jan

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the paper is to find the optimal geometry of a passive shield for the reduction of the magnetic stray field of an axisymmetric induction heater. For the optimization, a space mapping algorithm is used that requires two models. The first is an accurate model with a high computational effort as it contains finite element models. The second is less accurate, but it has a low computational effort as it uses an analytical model: the shield is replaced by a number of mutually coupled coils. The currents in the shield are found by solving an electrical circuit. Space mapping combines both models to obtain the optimal passive shield fast and accurately. The presented optimization technique is compared with gradient, simplex, and genetic algorithms.

  12. Accurate Monte Carlo modeling of cyclotrons for optimization of shielding and activation calculations in the biomedical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Infantino, Angelo; Marengo, Mario; Baschetti, Serafina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Longo Vaschetto, Vittorio; Lucconi, Giulia; Massucci, Piera; Vichi, Sara; Zagni, Federico; Mostacci, Domiziano

    2015-11-01

    Biomedical cyclotrons for production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) radionuclides and radiotherapy with hadrons or ions are widely diffused and established in hospitals as well as in industrial facilities and research sites. Guidelines for site planning and installation, as well as for radiation protection assessment, are given in a number of international documents; however, these well-established guides typically offer analytic methods of calculation of both shielding and materials activation, in approximate or idealized geometry set up. The availability of Monte Carlo codes with accurate and up-to-date libraries for transport and interactions of neutrons and charged particles at energies below 250 MeV, together with the continuously increasing power of nowadays computers, makes systematic use of simulations with realistic geometries possible, yielding equipment and site specific evaluation of the source terms, shielding requirements and all quantities relevant to radiation protection. In this work, the well-known Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used to simulate two representative models of cyclotron for PET radionuclides production, including their targetry; and one type of proton therapy cyclotron including the energy selection system. Simulations yield estimates of various quantities of radiological interest, including the effective dose distribution around the equipment, the effective number of neutron produced per incident proton and the activation of target materials, the structure of the cyclotron, the energy degrader, the vault walls and the soil. The model was validated against experimental measurements and comparison with well-established reference data. Neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) was measured around a GE PETtrace cyclotron: an average ratio between experimental measurement and simulations of 0.99±0.07 was found. Saturation yield of 18F, produced by the well-known 18O(p,n)18F reaction, was calculated and compared with the IAEA recommended

  13. Revised Calculated Volumes Of Individual Shield Volcanoes At The Young End Of The Hawaiian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J. E.; Eakins, B. W.

    2003-12-01

    Recent, high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and a digital elevation model of the Hawaiian Islands allow us to recalculate Bargar and Jackson's [1974] volumes of coalesced volcanic edifices (Hawaii, Maui-Nui, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau) and individual shield volcanoes at the young end of the Hawaiian Ridge, taking into account subsidence of the Pacific plate under the load of the volcanoes as modeled by Watts and ten Brink [1989]. Our volume for the Island of Hawaii (2.48 x105 km3) is twice the previous estimate (1.13 x105 km3), due primarily to crustal subsidence, which had not been accounted for in the earlier work. The volcanoes that make up the Hawaii edifice (Mahukona, Kohala, Mauna Kea, Hualalai, Mauna Loa, Kilauea, and Loihi) are generally considered to have formed within the past million years and our revised volume for Hawaii indicates that either magma-supply rates are greater than previously estimated (0.25 km3/yr as opposed to 0.1 km3/yr) or that Hawaii's volcanoes have erupted over a longer period of time (>1 million years). Our results also indicate that magma supply rates have increased dramatically to build the Hawaiian edifices: the average rate of the past 5 million years (0.096 km3/yr) is substantially greater than the overall average of the Hawaiian Ridge (0.018km3/yr) or Emperor Seamounts (0.012 km3/yr) as calculated by Bargar and Jackson, and that rates within the past million years are greater still (0.25 km3/yr). References: Bargar, K. E., and Jackson, E. D., 1974, Calculated volumes of individual shield volcanoes along the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain, Jour. Research U.S. Geol. Survey, Vol. 2, No. 5, p. 545-550. Watts, A. B., and ten Brink, U. S., 1989, Crustal structure, flexure, and subsidence history of the Hawaiian Islands, Jour. Geophys. Res., Vol. 94, No. B8, p. 10,473-10,500.

  14. Technical note: DoseMapper - A validated GUI based exact numerical modelling method of shielding in PET/CT facilities.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, Jonas S; Fonslet, Jesper; Søndergaard, Lasse R

    2017-08-30

    To provide a faster and more intuitive way of designing shielding for PET facilities, while still relying on the principles of the AAPM 108 Taskforce guidelines, as well as illustrating the calculation output using dose maps that are easily evaluated. A graphical user interface was developed, implementing an inverse AAPM method, wherein radiation sources and shield barriers are manually defined. Simulations are calculated using a user defined control mesh grid. DoseMapper simulations were verified against manual calculations using the AAPM guidelines, as well as compared with in-situ dose rate measurements using four different dosemeters. DoseMapper simulations were virtually identical to manual calculations using AAPM guidelines, with a maximum relative error of <0.01%. Comparison with in-situ measurements showed that DoseMapper simulated dose rates in all instances are higher than what can be measured, ensuring no unintended hotspots can be overlooked in the shielding design. DoseMapper is an easy to use implementation of the AAPM 108 Taskforce principles that allows for a rapid iterative design process of shielding in PET facilities, and the resulting maps of dose rate and annual accumulated dose serve as clear documentation for the design. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of the method of steepest descent to laminated shield weight optimization with several constraints: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.

    1971-01-01

    The method of steepest descent used in optimizing one-dimensional layered radiation shields is extended to multidimensional, multiconstraint situations. The multidimensional optimization algorithm and equations are developed for the case of a dose constraint in any one direction being dependent only on the shield thicknesses in that direction and independent of shield thicknesses in other directions. Expressions are derived for one-, two-, and three-dimensional cases (one, two, and three constraints). The precedure is applicable to the optimization of shields where there are different dose constraints and layering arrangements in the principal directions.

  16. PAPIN: A Fortran-IV program to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko and transmission self-shielding factors for fertile isotopes in the unresolved resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Cobos, J.G.

    1981-08-01

    The Fortran IV code PAPIN has been developed to calculate cross section probability tables, Bondarenko self-shielding factors and average self-indication ratios for non-fissile isotopes, below the inelastic threshold, on the basis of the ENDF/B prescriptions for the unresolved resonance region. Monte-Carlo methods are utilized to generate ladders of resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region, from average resonance parameters and their appropriate distribution functions. The neutron cross-sections are calculated by the single level Breit-Wigner (SLBW) formalism, with s, p and d-wave contributions. The cross section probability tables are constructed by sampling the Doppler-broadened cross sections. The various self-shielded factors are computed numerically as Lebesgue integrals over the cross section probability tables. The program PAPIN has been validated through extensive comparisons with several deterministic codes.

  17. Monte Carlo Modeling of Computed Tomography Ceiling Scatter for Shielding Calculations.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Stephen; Schick, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Radiation protection for clinical staff and members of the public is of paramount importance, particularly in occupied areas adjacent to computed tomography scanner suites. Increased patient workloads and the adoption of multi-slice scanning systems may make unshielded secondary scatter from ceiling surfaces a significant contributor to dose. The present paper expands upon an existing analytical model for calculating ceiling scatter accounting for variable room geometries and provides calibration data for a range of clinical beam qualities. The practical effect of gantry, false ceiling, and wall attenuation in limiting ceiling scatter is also explored and incorporated into the model. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calibrate the model for scatter from both concrete and lead surfaces. Gantry attenuation experimental data showed an effective blocking of scatter directed toward the ceiling at angles up to 20-30° from the vertical for the scanners examined. The contribution of ceiling scatter from computed tomography operation to the effective dose of individuals in areas surrounding the scanner suite could be significant and therefore should be considered in shielding design according to the proposed analytical model.

  18. Calculations and measurements of the energy-dependent response of a shielded gamma-ray detector

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, R.C.

    1996-03-01

    Instruments designed to record high-intensity gamma-ray flashes must have fast time response, wide dynamic range, and good rejection of photon backgrounds at lower energies. In principle, plastic scintillators can easily provide the necessary time response and dynamic range; like other photon detectors, however, they must be carefully shielded to reduce their low-energy sensitivity. This shielding is often complicated by the need to use different optical sensors to cover the full dynamic range, which each sensor requiring a separate opening through the shielding. In this detector, a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube handles low-intensity signals, and a silicon photodiode covers high intensities. These electronic components, particularly the diode, may also respond directly to incident radiation, so localized shielding must be provided. To reduce the detector`s total mass, the scintillator and photodiode are enclosed in a relatively thick, tight-fitting inner shield, which is surrounded by a thin outer shield to reduce the leakage through any gaps. Although efficient, this arrangement demands careful design and testing. This report describes such an analysis, which uses Monte Carlo simulations to develop a comprehensive model of the detector at photon energies from threshold to above 10 MeV. Included are discussions of the fundamental responses of the unshielded silicon diode and plastic scintillator, explanations of the effectiveness of different shielding materials, studies of calibration sources, and comparisons with laboratory tests.

  19. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-11-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles used to provide supplemental

  20. Investigation of noise-shielding efficiency with the method of sequences of maximum length in application to the problems of aviation acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, S. L.; Korolkov, A. I.

    2017-07-01

    A study of the phenomenon of diffraction of acoustic waves in application to the task of noise shielding by the method of maximum length sequences has been carried out. Rectangular plates and an aircraft model of integrated layout are used as the screens. In the study of noise shielding by aircraft model, the theorem of reciprocity is used. A comparison of experimental results with calculations performed in the framework of the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) is performed. On the basis of calculations, the identification of the contributions from different areas of the shielding surface in the full acoustic field is carried out. For the aircraft model, the shielding factor is calculated depending on the frequency.

  1. Calculation of self-shielding factor for neutron activation experiments using GEANT4 and MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Barrientos, Jaime; Molina, F.; Aguilera, Pablo; Arellano, H. F.

    2016-07-01

    The neutron self-shielding factor G as a function of the neutron energy was obtained for 14 pure metallic samples in 1000 isolethargic energy bins from 1.10-5eV to 2.107eV using Monte Carlo simulations in GEANT4 and MCNP6. The comparison of these two Monte Carlo codes shows small differences in the final self-shielding factor mostly due to the different cross section databases that each program uses.

  2. Calculation of physical and biological dose in different organs after a solar particle event: role of shielding conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.; de Biaggi, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Panzarasa, A.; Pelliccioni, M.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.

    Distributions of physical and "biological" doses in different organs after a solar- particle event (SPE) were calculated by coupling a purposely modified version of the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code with a human phantom. The phantom, which was assumed to be in deep space, was inserted in a shielding box of variable thickness and material and was irradiated with available spectra of SPEs occurred in the past decades. The "biological" dose was modelled by adopting a technique already tested in previous works, consisting in integrating into "condensed-history" codes - such as FLUKA - yields of radiobiological damage, either calculated with "event-by-event" track structure simulations, or taken from experimental works available in the literature. In the present work, damage yields due to the various beam components (including those derived from nuclear interactions with both the shielding structures and the human body) were integrated in FLUKA. This provided spatial distributions of biological damage in different organs, besides distributions of physical dose. Repetition of the simulations in different shielding conditions allowed us to quantify the role of the shielding features in modulating organ dose distributions. Secondary particles were found to play an important role, especially in the case of biological dose, for which, in particular conditions, the contribution of secondary particles can be higher than that of primary protons.

  3. Evaluations of Space Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, Norris F.; Shen, S. P.; Heyda, J. F.

    1962-01-01

    A general method of evaluating the efficiency of space vehicle shielding is developed and used to compare various active and passive systems for protection against ionizing radiation. Available permanent magnets are found useless for active shielding, and combined active-passive systems in general are determined to be inefficient. On the other hand, evaluations show that active electrostatic shielding may have possibilities for weight savings if electrical conditions (presently unknown) are favorable therefor in space. Further, a positive potential improvement is calculated for an active shielding system which utilizes superconducting Nb3Sn to provide a confined magnetic flux to deflect incident charged particles; this potential points toward substantial reductions in shield weight for the protection of large vehicles from highly energetic particles. Recommendations are made for further research, particularly for flight experiments to measure directionality of solar flare protons.

  4. [A new approach to shielding function calculation: radiation dose estimation for a phantome inside space station compartment].

    PubMed

    Kartashov, D A; Shurshakov, V A

    2012-01-01

    The article presents a new procedure of calculating the shielding functions for irregular objects formed from a set of nonintersecting (adjacent) triangles covering completely the surface of each object. Calculated and experimentally derived distributions of space ionizing radiation doses in the spherical tissue-equivalent phantom (experiment MATRYOSHKA-R) inside the International space station were in good agreement in the mass of phantom depths with allowance for measurement error (-10%). The procedure can be applied in modeling radiation loads on cosmonauts, calculating effectiveness of secondary protection in spacecraft, and design review of radiation protection for future space exploration missions.

  5. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-08-10

    We present that third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. In conclusion, this made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The principles

  6. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; ...

    2016-08-10

    We present that third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and rampedmore » operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. In conclusion, this made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. The

  7. Calculation of self–shielding factor for neutron activation experiments using GEANT4 and MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Romero–Barrientos, Jaime; Molina, F.; Aguilera, Pablo; Arellano, H. F.

    2016-07-07

    The neutron self–shielding factor G as a function of the neutron energy was obtained for 14 pure metallic samples in 1000 isolethargic energy bins from 1·10{sup −5}eV to 2·10{sup 7}eV using Monte Carlo simulations in GEANT4 and MCNP6. The comparison of these two Monte Carlo codes shows small differences in the final self–shielding factor mostly due to the different cross section databases that each program uses.

  8. Shielding analyses of an AB-BNCT facility using Monte Carlo simulations and simplified methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Bo-Lun; Sheu, Rong-Jiun

    2017-09-01

    Accurate Monte Carlo simulations and simplified methods were used to investigate the shielding requirements of a hypothetical accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (AB-BNCT) facility that included an accelerator room and a patient treatment room. The epithermal neutron beam for BNCT purpose was generated by coupling a neutron production target with a specially designed beam shaping assembly (BSA), which was embedded in the partition wall between the two rooms. Neutrons were produced from a beryllium target bombarded by 1-mA 30-MeV protons. The MCNP6-generated surface sources around all the exterior surfaces of the BSA were established to facilitate repeated Monte Carlo shielding calculations. In addition, three simplified models based on a point-source line-of-sight approximation were developed and their predictions were compared with the reference Monte Carlo results. The comparison determined which model resulted in better dose estimation, forming the basis of future design activities for the first ABBNCT facility in Taiwan.

  9. Methods for shielding a flexible, PCB-made eddy current array probe against edge effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, B.

    2012-05-01

    Probe shielding has been used in combination with eddy current and eddy current array sensors for quite some time to improve detection of defects located near component edges. Conventional methods of providing such shielding are not suitable for coils etched on printed circuit board. This paper describes an innovative shielded coil design suitable for highly flexible, printed circuit board eddy current array probes. The benefits of the new design will be demonstrated for the inspection of dovetails, where detection of defects along the edge is critical.

  10. Point Kernel Code System for Neutron and Gamma-Ray Shielding Calculations in Complex Geometry, Including a Graphical User Interface.

    SciTech Connect

    SUBBAIAH, K. V.

    2001-10-01

    Version 01 GUI2QAD is an aid in preparation of input for the included QAD-CGPIC program, which is based on CCC-493/QAD-CGGP and PICTURE. QAD-CGPIC is a Fortran code for fast neutron and gamma-ray shielding calculations through various shield configurations defined by combinatorial geometry specifications. Provision is available to interactively input the geometry and view the same in three dimensions with arbitrary rotations along x,y,z axis. The salient features of the present package include: a) Handles off centered multiple identical sources b) Axis of cylindrical sources can be parallel to any of the axes. c) Provides plots of buildup factors (ANSI-1990) and material cross sections d) Estimates dose rate for point source-slab shield situations e) Interactive input of CG geometry with 3D view and rotation f) Fission product decay power computation and plots for source term calculations. g) Provision to read and graphical 1y display picture input file.

  11. Numerical calculation of the parameters of the efflux from a helium dewar used for cooling of heat shields in a satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brendley, K.; Chato, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The parameters of the efflux from a helium dewar in space were numerically calculated. The flow was modeled as a one dimensional compressible ideal gas with variable properties. The primary boundary conditions are flow with friction and flow with heat transfer and friction. Two PASCAL programs were developed to calculate the efflux parameters: EFFLUZD and EFFLUXM. EFFLUXD calculates the minimum mass flow for the given shield temperatures and shield heat inputs. It then calculates the pipe lengths, diameter, and fluid parameters which satisfy all boundary conditions. Since the diameter returned by EFFLUXD is only rarely of nominal size, EFFLUXM calculates the mass flow and shield heat exchange for given pipe lengths, diameter, and shield temperatures.

  12. A simple calculation method for determination of equivalent square field.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Seyed Ali; Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Shafiei, Seyed Ahmad

    2012-04-01

    Determination of the equivalent square fields for rectangular and shielded fields is of great importance in radiotherapy centers and treatment planning software. This is accomplished using standard tables and empirical formulas. The goal of this paper is to present a formula based on analysis of scatter reduction due to inverse square law to obtain equivalent field. Tables are published by different agencies such as ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and measurements), which are based on experimental data; but there exist mathematical formulas that yield the equivalent square field of an irregular rectangular field which are used extensively in computation techniques for dose determination. These processes lead to some complicated and time-consuming formulas for which the current study was designed. In this work, considering the portion of scattered radiation in absorbed dose at a point of measurement, a numerical formula was obtained based on which a simple formula was developed to calculate equivalent square field. Using polar coordinate and inverse square law will lead to a simple formula for calculation of equivalent field. The presented method is an analytical approach based on which one can estimate the equivalent square field of a rectangular field and may be used for a shielded field or an off-axis point. Besides, one can calculate equivalent field of rectangular field with the concept of decreased scatter radiation with inverse square law with a good approximation. This method may be useful in computing Percentage Depth Dose and Tissue-Phantom Ratio which are extensively used in treatment planning.

  13. Theoretical gas to liquid shift of (15)N isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding in nitromethane using ab initio molecular dynamics and GIAO/GIPAW calculations.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Iann C; Jolibois, Franck

    2015-05-14

    Chemical shift requires the knowledge of both the sample and a reference magnetic shielding. In few cases as nitrogen (15N), the standard experimental reference corresponds to its liquid phase. Theoretical estimate of NMR magnetic shielding parameters of compounds in their liquid phase is then mandatory but usually replaced by an easily-get gas phase value, forbidding direct comparisons with experiments. We propose here to combine ab initio molecular dynamic simulations with the calculations of magnetic shielding using GIAO approach on extracted cluster's structures from MD. Using several computational strategies, we manage to accurately calculate 15N magnetic shielding of nitromethane in its liquid phase. Theoretical comparison between liquid and gas phase allows us to extrapolate an experimental value for the 15N magnetic shielding of nitromethane in gas phase between -121.8 and -120.8 ppm.

  14. Calculated shielding characteristics of eight materials for neutrons and secondary photons produced by monoenergetic source neutrons with energies less than 400 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Noriyoshi; Shikata, Takashi; Fujita, Shin; Kosako, Toshiso

    1995-10-01

    Shielding characteristics of iron, lead, ordinary concrete, heavy concrete, graphite, marble, water, and paraffin were calculated for monoenergetic source neutrons with energies < 400 MeV. The depth dependence of neutron and secondary photon transmitted dose equivalents at the exit surfaces of shields of varying thickness is exhibited for some monoenergetic source neutrons and for each material. Their shielding characteristics are compared and discussed in terms of the degradation process of neutron energy and the change of neutron spectrum in typical shielding materials. Calculations were carried out by using the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN-JR and the cross-section library DLC-87/HILO. Systematic knowledge concerning the shielding of neutrons with energies < 400 MeV was successfully obtained.

  15. Dose estimation and shielding calculation for X-ray hazard at high intensity laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bo; James, C. Liu; Sayed, H. Rokni; Michael, B. Woods; Li, Jun-Li

    2014-12-01

    An ionizing radiation hazard produced from the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets has been observed. Laser-plasma interactions create “hot” electrons, which generate bremsstrahlung X-rays when they interact with ions in the target. However, up to now only limited studies have been conducted on this laser-induced radiological protection issue. In this paper, the physical process and characteristics of the interaction between high intensity lasers and solid targets are analyzed. The parameters of the radiation sources are discussed, including the energy conversion efficiency from laser to hot electrons, hot electron energy spectrum and electron temperature, and the bremsstrahlung X-ray energy spectrum produced by hot electrons. Based on this information, the X-ray dose generated with high-Z targets for laser intensities between 1014 and 1020 W/cm2 is estimated. The shielding effects of common shielding items such as the glass view port, aluminum chamber wall and concrete wall are also studied using the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. This study provides a reference for the dose estimation and the shielding design of high intensity laser facilities.

  16. Method of shielding a liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    DOEpatents

    Sayre, Robert K.

    1978-01-01

    The primary heat transport system of a nuclear reactor -- particularly for a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor -- is shielded and protected from leakage by establishing and maintaining a bed of a powdered oxide closely and completely surrounding all components thereof by passing a gas upwardly therethrough at such a rate as to slightly expand the bed to the extent that the components of the system are able to expand without damage and yet the particles of the bed remain close enough so that the bed acts as a guard vessel for the system. Preferably the gas contains 1 to 10% oxygen and the gas is passed upwardly through the bed at such a rate that the lower portion of the bed is a fixed bed while the upper portion is a fluidized bed, the line of demarcation therebetween being high enough that the fixed bed portion of the bed serves as guard vessel for the system.

  17. Method for fabricating fan-fold shielded electrical leads

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Rajeev R.; Cowan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    Fan-folded electrical leads made from copper cladded Kapton, for example, with the copper cladding on one side serving as a ground plane and the copper cladding on the other side being etched to form the leads. The Kapton is fan folded with the leads located at the bottom of the fan-folds. Electrical connections are made by partially opening the folds of the fan and soldering, for example, the connections directly to the ground plane and/or the lead. The fan folded arrangement produces a number of advantages, such as electrically shielding the leads from the environment, is totally non-magnetic, and has a very low thermal conductivity, while being easy to fabricate.

  18. Calculation of evapotranspiration: Recursive and explicit methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crop yield is proportional to crop evapotranspiration (ETc) and it is important to calculate ETc correctly. Methods to calculate ETc have combined empirical and theoretical approaches. The combination method was used to calculate potential ETp. It is a combination method because it combined the ener...

  19. [Radiation safety provisions in a piloted mission to Mars based on calculated risks of overdose behind shielding].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V; Kolomenskiĭ, A V; Petrov, V M

    2007-01-01

    The article deals with the prime sources of radiation hazard in a mission to Mars, compares the radiation risk values in flight and over the life span with consideration for various shielding thicknesses in habitable compartments and radiation shelter, and estimates possible life shortening. Given the stochastic nature of solar cosmic rays effects in a two-year mission and probability of powerful solar proton events, calculated were not only the mean tissue-equivalent doses behind various thickness of the shelter but also probability of their violation, risks of immediate and delayed radiation consequences and conceivable approaches to risk mitigation.

  20. Method for calculating alloy energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A semiempirical method for the computation of alloy energies is introduced. It is based on the equivalent-crystal theory of defect-formation energies in elemental solids. The method is both simple and accurate. Heats of formation as a function of composition are computed for some binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Pd, Pt, and Au using the heats of solution in the dilute limit as experimental input. The separation of heats into strain and chemical components helps in understanding the energetics. In addition, lattice-parameter contractions seen in solid solutions of Ag and Au are accurately predicted. Good agreement with experiment is obtained in all cases.

  1. Method for calculating alloy energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A semiempirical method for the computation of alloy energies is introduced. It is based on the equivalent-crystal theory of defect-formation energies in elemental solids. The method is both simple and accurate. Heats of formation as a function of composition are computed for some binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Pd, Pt, and Au using the heats of solution in the dilute limit as experimental input. The separation of heats into strain and chemical components helps in understanding the energetics. In addition, lattice-parameter contractions seen in solid solutions of Ag and Au are accurately predicted. Good agreement with experiment is obtained in all cases.

  2. Solvent polarity and hydrogen-bonding effects on the nitrogen NMR shieldings of N-nitrosamines and DFT calculations of the shieldings of C-, N-, and O-nitroso systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witanowski, Michal; Biedrzycka, Zenobia; Sicinska, Wanda; Grabowski, Zbigniew

    2003-10-01

    High-precision nitrogen NMR shieldings, bulk susceptibility corrected, are reported for dimethyl- N-nitrosamine ( I) and diethyl- N-nitrosamine ( II) in a variety of solvents which represent a wide range of solvent properties from the point of view of polarity as well as hydrogen bond donor and acceptor strength. The observed range of solvent-induced nitrogen shielding variations of ( I) and ( II) is significant for the amino-type nitrogens, up to about 16 ppm, and originates essentially from the deshielding effect of the increasing polarity of solvent. On the other side, the nitroso nitrogen shieldings reveal an even stronger response to solvent effects, within about 20 ppm, but in this case the increasing polarity and hydrogen bond donor strength of solvent produce enhanced shielding. DFT quantum-mechanical calculations using the GIAO/B3PW91/6-311++G** approach and geometry optimizations employing the same basis set and hybrid density functionals show an excellent correlation with the experimental data on C-, N-, and O-nitroso moieties and reproduce not only major changes but also most of the subtle variations in the experimental nitrogen shieldings of the nitroso systems as a whole. A combination of the calculations involving the corresponding N and O-protonated species and the trends observed in the solvent-induced nitrogen shielding variations shows clearly that the prime acceptor site for hydrogen bonding is the nitroso oxygen atom.

  3. Shielding requirements for constant-potential diagnostic x-ray beams determined by a Monte Carlo calculation.

    PubMed

    Simpkin, D J

    1989-02-01

    A Monte Carlo calculation has been performed to determine the transmission of broad constant-potential x-ray beams through Pb, concrete, gypsum wallboard, steel and plate glass. The EGS4 code system was used with a simple broad-beam geometric model to generate exposure transmission curves for published 70, 100, 120 and 140-kVcp x-ray spectra. These curves are compared to measured three-phase generated x-ray transmission data in the literature and found to be reasonable. For calculation ease the data are fit to an equation previously shown to describe such curves quite well. These calculated transmission data are then used to create three-phase shielding tables for Pb and concrete, as well as other materials not available in Report No. 49 of the NCRP.

  4. An improved method for correction of air temperature measured using different radiation shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinghong; Su, Debin; Li, Deping; Chen, Lu; Xu, Wenjing; Yang, Meilin; Li, Yongcheng; Yue, Zhizhong; Wang, Zijing

    2014-11-01

    The variation of air temperature measurement errors using two different radiation shields (DTR502B Vaisala, Finland, and HYTFZ01, Huayun Tongda Satcom, China) was studied. Datasets were collected in the field at the Daxing weather station in Beijing from June 2011 to May 2012. Most air temperature values obtained with these two commonly used radiation shields were lower than the reference records obtained with the new Fiber Reinforced Polymers (FRP) Stevenson screen. In most cases, the air temperature errors when using the two devices were smaller on overcast and rainy days than on sunny days; and smaller when using the imported rather than the Chinese shield. The measured errors changed sharply at sunrise and sunset, and reached maxima at noon. Their diurnal variation characteristics were, naturally, related to changes in solar radiation. The relationships between the record errors, global radiation, and wind speed were nonlinear. An improved correction method was proposed based on the approach described by Nakamura and Mahrt (2005) (NM05), in which the impact of the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the temperature error is considered and extreme errors due to changes in SZA can be corrected effectively. Measurement errors were reduced significantly after correction by either method for both shields. The error reduction rate using the improved correction method for the Chinese and imported shields were 3.3% and 40.4% higher than those using the NM05 method, respectively.

  5. Non-contact radio frequency shielding and wave guiding by multi-folded transformation optics method.

    PubMed

    Madni, Hamza Ahmad; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-11-14

    Compared with conventional radio frequency (RF) shielding methods in which the conductive coating material encloses the circuits design and the leakage problem occurs due to the gap in such conductive material, non-contact RF shielding at a distance is very promising but still impossible to achieve so far. In this paper, a multi-folded transformation optics method is proposed to design a non-contact device for RF shielding. This "open-shielded" device can shield any object at a distance from the electromagnetic waves at the operating frequency, while the object is still physically open to the outer space. Based on this, an open-carpet cloak is proposed and the functionality of the open-carpet cloak is demonstrated. Furthermore, we investigate a scheme of non-contact wave guiding to remotely control the propagation of surface waves over any obstacles. The flexibilities of such multi-folded transformation optics method demonstrate the powerfulness of the method in the design of novel remote devices with impressive new functionalities.

  6. Radiation calculations and shielding considerations for the design of the Next Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; Rokni, S.H.; Vylet, V.

    1996-11-01

    The authors describe some of the work that they have done as a contribution to the Next Linear Collider (NLC) Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR), with specific emphasis placed on radiation-protection issues. However, because of the very nature of this machine--namely, extremely-small beam spots of high intensity--a new approach in accelerator radiation-protection philosophy appears to be warranted. Accordingly, the presentation will first take a look at recent design studies directed at protecting the machine itself, since this has resulted in a much better understanding of the very short exposure times involved whenever beam is lost and radiation sources are created. At the end of the paper, the authors suggest a Beam Containment System (BCS) that would provide an independent, redundant guarantee that exposure times are, indeed, kept very short. This, in turn, has guided them in the determination of the transverse shield thickness for the machine.

  7. A new shielding analysis method for used fuel transport and storage casks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Léger, Vincent; Kitsos, Stavros

    2017-09-01

    To provide a cask with the largest possible loading capacity of spent fuel assemblies with the largest practicable burnup and shortest cooling time within all safety requirements, AREVA TN has adapted its design process and developed a more elaborated shielding analysis method. Taking advantage of the potential heterogeneities between sources of fuel assemblies to be loaded, and the self-shielding of assemblies loaded at the basket centre by the assemblies loaded at the basket periphery, the result of this method is expressed under the shape of a linear inequalities system allowing to optimize the cask capacity and performance.

  8. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. II. Consideration of perturbations in the metric operator.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Ootani, Y; Fukui, H

    2007-05-07

    A previous relativistic shielding calculation theory based on the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component approach is improved by the inclusion of the magnetic interaction term contained in the metric operator. In order to consider effects of the metric perturbation, the self-consistent perturbation theory is used for the case of perturbation-dependent overlap integrals. The calculation results show that the second-order regular approximation results obtained for the isotropic shielding constants of halogen nuclei are well improved by the inclusion of the metric perturbation to reproduce the fully relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock results. However, it is shown that the metric perturbation hardly or does not affect the anisotropy of the halogen shielding tensors and the proton magnetic shieldings.

  9. Nuclei-selected atomic-orbital response-theory formulation for the calculation of NMR shielding tensors using density-fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Chandan; Kjærgaard, Thomas; Helgaker, Trygve; Fliegl, Heike

    2016-12-01

    An atomic orbital density matrix based response formulation of the nuclei-selected approach of Beer, Kussmann, and Ochsenfeld [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 074102 (2011)] to calculate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors has been developed and implemented into LSDalton allowing for a simultaneous solution of the response equations, which significantly improves the performance. The response formulation to calculate nuclei-selected NMR shielding tensors can be used together with the density-fitting approximation that allows efficient calculation of Coulomb integrals. It is shown that using density-fitting does not lead to a significant loss in accuracy for both the nuclei-selected and the conventional ways to calculate NMR shielding constants and should thus be used for applications with LSDalton.

  10. Nuclei-selected atomic-orbital response-theory formulation for the calculation of NMR shielding tensors using density-fitting.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Chandan; Kjærgaard, Thomas; Helgaker, Trygve; Fliegl, Heike

    2016-12-21

    An atomic orbital density matrix based response formulation of the nuclei-selected approach of Beer, Kussmann, and Ochsenfeld [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 074102 (2011)] to calculate nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors has been developed and implemented into LSDalton allowing for a simultaneous solution of the response equations, which significantly improves the performance. The response formulation to calculate nuclei-selected NMR shielding tensors can be used together with the density-fitting approximation that allows efficient calculation of Coulomb integrals. It is shown that using density-fitting does not lead to a significant loss in accuracy for both the nuclei-selected and the conventional ways to calculate NMR shielding constants and should thus be used for applications with LSDalton.

  11. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Non-contact radio frequency shielding and wave guiding by multi-folded transformation optics method

    PubMed Central

    Madni, Hamza Ahmad; Zheng, Bin; Yang, Yihao; Wang, Huaping; Zhang, Xianmin; Yin, Wenyan; Li, Erping; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Compared with conventional radio frequency (RF) shielding methods in which the conductive coating material encloses the circuits design and the leakage problem occurs due to the gap in such conductive material, non-contact RF shielding at a distance is very promising but still impossible to achieve so far. In this paper, a multi-folded transformation optics method is proposed to design a non-contact device for RF shielding. This “open-shielded” device can shield any object at a distance from the electromagnetic waves at the operating frequency, while the object is still physically open to the outer space. Based on this, an open-carpet cloak is proposed and the functionality of the open-carpet cloak is demonstrated. Furthermore, we investigate a scheme of non-contact wave guiding to remotely control the propagation of surface waves over any obstacles. The flexibilities of such multi-folded transformation optics method demonstrate the powerfulness of the method in the design of novel remote devices with impressive new functionalities. PMID:27841358

  13. Including shielding effects in application of the TPCA method for detection of embedded radiation sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, William C.; Shokair, Isaac R.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional full spectrum gamma spectroscopic analysis has the objective of quantitative identification of all the radionuclides present in a measurement. For low-energy resolution detectors such as NaI, when photopeaks alone are not sufficient for complete isotopic identification, such analysis requires template spectra for all the radionuclides present in the measurement. When many radionuclides are present it is difficult to make the correct identification and this process often requires many attempts to obtain a statistically valid solution by highly skilled spectroscopists. A previous report investigated using the targeted principal component analysis method (TPCA) for detection of embedded sources for RPM applications. This method uses spatial/temporal information from multiple spectral measurements to test the hypothesis of the presence of a target spectrum of interest in these measurements without the need to identify all the other radionuclides present. The previous analysis showed that the TPCA method has significant potential for automated detection of target radionuclides of interest, but did not include the effects of shielding. This report complements the previous analysis by including the effects of spectral distortion due to shielding effects for the same problem of detection of embedded sources. Two examples, one with one target radionuclide and the other with two, show that the TPCA method can successfully detect shielded targets in the presence of many other radionuclides. The shielding parameters are determined as part of the optimization process using interpolation of library spectra that are defined on a 2D grid of atomic numbers and areal densities.

  14. Application of the Monte Carlo method to the analysis of doses and shielding around an X-ray fluorescence equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ródenas, José; Juste, Belén; Gallardo, Sergio; Querol, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    An X-ray fluorescence equipment is used for practical exercises in the laboratory of Nuclear Engineering of the Polytechnic University of Valencia (Spain). This equipment includes a compact X-ray tube, ECLIPSE-III, and a Si-PIN XR-100T detector. The voltage (30 kV), and the current (100 μA) of the tube are low enough so that expected doses around the tube do not represent a risk for students working in the laboratory. Nevertheless, doses and shielding should be evaluated to accomplish the ALARA criterion. The Monte Carlo method has been applied to evaluate the dose rate around the installation provided with a shielding composed by a box of methacrylate. Dose rates calculated are compared with experimental measurements to validate the model. Obtained results show that doses are below allowable limits. Hence, no extra shielding is required for the X-ray beam. A previous Monte Carlo model was also developed to obtain the tube spectrum and validated by comparison with data from manufacturer.

  15. Computing the 7Li NMR chemical shielding of hydrated Li+ using cluster calculations and time-averaged configurations from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Alam, Todd M; Hart, David; Rempe, Susan L B

    2011-08-14

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations have been used to predict the time-averaged Li NMR chemical shielding for a Li(+) solution. These results are compared to NMR shielding calculations on smaller Li(+)(H(2)O)(n) clusters optimized in either the gas phase or with a polarizable continuum model (PCM) solvent. The trends introduced by the PCM solvent are described and compared to the time-averaged chemical shielding observed in the AIMD simulations where large explicit water clusters hydrating the Li(+) are employed. Different inner- and outer-coordination sphere contributions to the Li NMR shielding are evaluated and discussed. It is demonstrated an implicit PCM solvent is not sufficient to correctly model the Li shielding, and that explicit inner hydration sphere waters are required during the NMR calculations. It is also shown that for hydrated Li(+), the time averaged chemical shielding cannot be simply described by the population-weighted average of coordination environments containing different number of waters.

  16. Shielding calculations for industrial 5/7.5MeV electron accelerators using the MCNP Monte Carlo Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peri, Eyal; Orion, Itzhak

    2017-09-01

    High energy X-rays from accelerators are used to irradiate food ingredients to prevent growth and development of unwanted biological organisms in food, and by that extend the shelf life of the products. The production of X-rays is done by accelerating 5 MeV electrons and bombarding them into a heavy target (high Z). Since 2004, the FDA has approved using 7.5 MeV energy, providing higher production rates with lower treatments costs. In this study we calculated all the essential data needed for a straightforward concrete shielding design of typical food accelerator rooms. The following evaluation is done using the MCNP Monte Carlo code system: (1) Angular dependence (0-180°) of photon dose rate for 5 MeV and 7.5 MeV electron beams bombarding iron, aluminum, gold, tantalum, and tungsten targets. (2) Angular dependence (0-180°) spectral distribution simulations of bremsstrahlung for gold, tantalum, and tungsten bombarded by 5 MeV and 7.5 MeV electron beams. (3) Concrete attenuation calculations in several photon emission angles for the 5 MeV and 7.5 MeV electron beams bombarding a tantalum target. Based on the simulation, we calculated the expected increase in dose rate for facilities intending to increase the energy from 5 MeV to 7.5 MeV, and the concrete width needed to be added in order to keep the existing dose rate unchanged.

  17. The design of asymmetric 4 pi shields for space reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engle, W. W., Jr.; Childs, R. L.; Mynatt, F. R.

    1972-01-01

    A one dimensional shield optimization program based on the method of discrete ordinates has been developed and is used to determine material thicknesses used in asymmetric 4 pion shields for space power reactors. The two dimensional discrete ordinates program DOT is used to check the design, and the information generated in the DOT calculation is used as a guide in shaping the shield which may be considered a first step in two dimensional shield optimization.

  18. New method for calculating shell correction

    SciTech Connect

    Salamon, P.; Kruppa, A. T.; Vertse, T.

    2010-06-15

    A new method is presented for the calculation of the shell correction with the inclusion of the continuum part of the spectrum. The smoothing function used has a finite energy range in contrast to the Gaussian shape of the Strutinski method. The new method is especially useful for light nuclei where the generalized Strutinski procedure cannot be applied.

  19. Neutron and photon shielding benchmark calculations by MCNP on the LR-0 experimental facility.

    PubMed

    Hordósy, G

    2005-01-01

    In the framework of the REDOS project, the space-energy distribution of the neutron and photon flux has been calculated over the pressure vessel simulator thickness of the LR-0 experimental reactor, Rez, Czech Republic. The results calculated by the Monte Carlo code MCNP4C are compared with the measurements performed in the Nuclear Research Institute, Rez. The spectra have been measured at the barrel, in front of, inside and behind the pressure vessel in different configurations. The neutron measurements were performed in the energy range 0.1-10 MeV. This work has been done in the frame of the 5th Frame Work Programme of the European Community 1998-2002.

  20. An improved method of Nusselt number calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho-Liu, Phyllis; Hager, Bradford H.; Raefsky, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    A novel method for calculating the Nusselt number, Nu, in a steady-state Rayleigh-Benard convection problem is presented, in which calculations are done for a square box with constant temperature, free-slip boundary conditions at the top and bottom, and a reflection symmetry along the side walls. The element heat flux is obtained by averaging over the entire element; element heat fluxes are then projected to the adjacent nodes. Compared with previous methods, the approach reduces the calculated depth variation in horizontally averaged flux by more than a factor of 10 and shows more rapid convergence of Nu as a function of grid size.

  1. Shielded resistive electromagnets of arbitrary surface geometry using the boundary element method and a minimum energy constraint.

    PubMed

    Harris, Chad T; Haw, Dustin W; Handler, William B; Chronik, Blaine A

    2013-09-01

    Eddy currents are generated in MR by the use of rapidly switched electromagnets, resulting in time varying and spatially varying magnetic fields that must be either minimized or corrected. This problem is further complicated when non-cylindrical insert magnets are used for specialized applications. Interruption of the coupling between an insert coil and the MR system is typically accomplished using active magnetic shielding. A new method of actively shielding insert gradient and shim coils of any surface geometry by use of the boundary element method for coil design with a minimum energy constraint is presented. This method was applied to shield x- and z-gradient coils for two separate cases: a traditional cylindrical primary gradient with cylindrical shield and, to demonstrate its versatility in surface geometry, the same cylindrical primary gradients with a rectangular box-shaped shield. For the cylindrical case this method produced shields that agreed with analytic solutions. For the second case, the rectangular box-shaped shields demonstrated very good shielding characteristics despite having a different geometry than the primary coils.

  2. The CAIRN method: automated, reproducible calculation of catchment-averaged denudation rates from cosmogenic nuclide concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marius Mudd, Simon; Harel, Marie-Alice; Hurst, Martin D.; Grieve, Stuart W. D.; Marrero, Shasta M.

    2016-08-01

    We report a new program for calculating catchment-averaged denudation rates from cosmogenic nuclide concentrations. The method (Catchment-Averaged denudatIon Rates from cosmogenic Nuclides: CAIRN) bundles previously reported production scaling and topographic shielding algorithms. In addition, it calculates production and shielding on a pixel-by-pixel basis. We explore the effect of sampling frequency across both azimuth (Δθ) and altitude (Δϕ) angles for topographic shielding and show that in high relief terrain a relatively high sampling frequency is required, with a good balance achieved between accuracy and computational expense at Δθ = 8° and Δϕ = 5°. CAIRN includes both internal and external uncertainty analysis, and is packaged in freely available software in order to facilitate easily reproducible denudation rate estimates. CAIRN calculates denudation rates but also automates catchment averaging of shielding and production, and thus can be used to provide reproducible input parameters for the CRONUS family of online calculators.

  3. Benchmarking density-functional theory calculations of NMR shielding constants and spin-rotation constants using accurate coupled-cluster calculations.

    PubMed

    Teale, Andrew M; Lutnæs, Ola B; Helgaker, Trygve; Tozer, David J; Gauss, Jürgen

    2013-01-14

    Accurate sets of benchmark nuclear-magnetic-resonance shielding constants and spin-rotation constants are calculated using coupled-cluster singles-doubles (CCSD) theory and coupled-cluster singles-doubles-perturbative-triples [CCSD(T)] theory, in a variety of basis sets consisting of (rotational) London atomic orbitals. The accuracy of the calculated coupled-cluster constants is established by a careful comparison with experimental data, taking into account zero-point vibrational corrections. Coupled-cluster basis-set convergence is analyzed and extrapolation techniques are employed to estimate basis-set-limit quantities, thereby establishing an accurate benchmark data set. Together with the set provided for rotational g-tensors and magnetizabilities in our previous work [O. B. Lutnæs, A. M. Teale, T. Helgaker, D. J. Tozer, K. Ruud, and J. Gauss, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 144104 (2009)], it provides a substantial source of consistently calculated high-accuracy data on second-order magnetic response properties. The utility of this benchmark data set is demonstrated by examining a wide variety of Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functionals for the calculation of these properties. None of the existing approximate functionals provide an accuracy competitive with that provided by CCSD or CCSD(T) theory. The need for a careful consideration of vibrational effects is clearly illustrated. Finally, the pure coupled-cluster results are compared with the results of Kohn-Sham calculations constrained to give the same electronic density. Routes to future improvements are discussed in light of this comparison.

  4. Application of the MCNPX-McStas interface for shielding calculations and guide design at ESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkby, E. B.; Knudsen, E. B.; Willendrup, P. K.; Lauritzen, B.; Nonbøl, E.; Bentley, P.; Filges, U.

    2014-07-01

    Recently, an interface between the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the neutron ray-tracing code MCNPX was developed [1, 2]. Based on the expected neutronic performance and guide geometries relevant for the ESS, the combined MCNPX-McStas code is used to calculate dose rates along neutron beam guides. The generation and moderation of neutrons is simulated using a full scale MCNPX model of the ESS target monolith. Upon entering the neutron beam extraction region, the individual neutron states are handed to McStas via the MCNPX-McStas interface. McStas transports the neutrons through the beam guide, and by using newly developed event logging capability, the neutron state parameters corresponding to un-reflected neutrons are recorded at each scattering. This information is handed back to MCNPX where it serves as neutron source input for a second MCNPX simulation. This simulation enables calculation of dose rates in the vicinity of the guide. In addition the logging mechanism is employed to record the scatterings along the guides which is exploited to simulate the supermirror quality requirements (i.e. m-values) needed at different positions along the beam guide to transport neutrons in the same guide/source setup.

  5. Comparison of four methods used in determination of secondary shielding requirements for a teletherapy facility: a case study of 137Cs room in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Muhogora, W E; Nyanda, A M; Ngoye, W M

    2004-12-01

    The performance of four methods often used to calculate the secondary barrier requirements is evaluated for a typical 137Cs-therapy room as a case study. The first two methods are provided by the NCRP49 and IAEA and both consider the influence of the primary, leakage and scattered radiation at a point as corrected for the workload, use and occupancy factors. A different shielding model encompasses the third method, which determines the doses as corrected for build-up effects assuming the narrow beam geometry. The fourth method is based on the calculation of the dose rates from the source activity with a relevant gamma constant. In all four methods, an appropriate transmission factor for the protective barrier in question is applied. The results show that for controlled area, the similarity in the calculated thicknesses using all four methods was nearly within 50%. For uncontrolled areas, a significant difference of magnitude up to a factor of 2.4 was found, which is mainly attributed to the non-consideration of occupancy factors in the latter two methods. Nevertheless, the non-agreement is useful to validate the specific assumptions taken for the employed shielding method. Despite being slightly high, it is concluded that the current shielding methods based on NCRP fundamentals are satisfactorily optimal in planning new therapy facilities. However for existing facilities, such as those undesigned according to the standard requirements, the combination of the four different methods with the dose rate measurements tend to offer a better cost effective shielding option. Retrospectively, additional 41-cm thick concrete is recommended for the unshielded southern barrier of the 137Cs room. Interestingly, the recommended thickness agrees to within +/-5% with that estimated by using the recently recommended method by IAEA.

  6. Evaluation of shielding effectiveness of composite wall with a time domain discontinuous Galerkin method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameni Ntichi, Abelin; Modave, Axel; Boubekeur, Mohamed; Preault, Valentin; Pichon, Lionel; Geuzaine, Christophe

    2013-11-01

    This article presents a time domain discontinuous Galerkin method applied for solving the con-servative form of Maxwells' equations and computing the radiated fields in electromagnetic compatibility problems. The results obtained in homogeneous media for the transverse magnetic waves are validated in two cases. We compare our solution to an analytical solution of Maxwells' equations based on characteristic method. Our results on shielding effectiveness of a conducting wall are same as those obtained from analytical expression in frequency domain. The propagation in heterogeneous medium is explored. The shielding effectiveness of a composite wall partially filled by circular conductives inclusions is computed. The proposed results are in conformity with the classical predictive homogenization rules. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Numelec 2012", Edited by Adel Razek.

  7. Drag calculations of wings using Euler methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dam, C. P.; Chang, I. C.; Vijgen, P. M. H. W.; Nikfetrat, Koorosh

    1991-01-01

    Several techniques for the calculation of drag using Euler-equation formulations are discussed and compared. Surface-pressure integration (a nearfield technique) as well as two different farfield calculation techniques are described and applied to three-dimensional flow-field solutions for an aspect-ratio-7 wing with attached flow. The present calculations are limited to steady, low-Mach-number flows around three-dimensional configurations in the absence of active systems such as surface blowing/suction and propulsion. Although the main focus of the paper is the calculation of aerodynamic drag, the calculation of aerodynamic lift is also briefly discussed. Three Euler methods are used to obtain the flowfield solutions. The farfield technique based on the evaluation of a wake-integral appears to provide the most consistent and accurate drag predictions.

  8. Calculations of neutron and photon source terms and attenuation profiles for the generic design of the SPEAR3 storage ring shield.

    PubMed

    Rokni, S H; Khater, H; Liu, J C; Mao, S; Vincke, H

    2005-01-01

    The FLUKA Monte Carlo particle generation and transport code was used to calculate shielding requirements for the 3 GeV, 500 mA SPEAR3 storage ring at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. The photon and neutron dose equivalent source term data were simulated for a 3 GeV electron beam interacting with two typical target/shielding geometries in the ring. The targets simulated are a rectangular block of 0.7 cm thick copper and a 5 cm thick iron block, both tilted at 1 degree relative to the beam direction. Attenuation profiles for neutrons and photons in concrete and lead as a function of angle at different shield thicknesses were calculated. The first, second and equilibrium attenuation lengths of photons and neutrons in the shield materials are derived from the attenuation profiles. The source term data and the attenuation lengths were then used to evaluate the shielding requirements for the ratchet walls of all front-ends of the SPEAR3 storage ring.

  9. Optimation of cooled shields in insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, J. C.; Khodadadi, J. M.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method to optimize the location, temperature, and heat dissipation rate of each cooled shield inside an insulation layer was developed. The method is based on the minimization of the entropy production rate which is proportional to the heat leak across the insulation. It is shown that the maximum number of shields to be used in most practical applications is three. However, cooled shields are useful only at low values of the overall, cold wall to hot wall absolute temperature ratio. The performance of the insulation system is relatively insensitive to deviations from the optimum values of the temperature and location of the cooling shields. Design curves for rapid estimates of the locations and temperatures of cooling shields in various types of insulations, and an equation for calculating the cooling loads for the shields are presented.

  10. The role of the exchange-correlation response kernel and scaling corrections in relativistic density functional nuclear magnetic shielding calculations with the zeroth-order regular approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autschbach, Jochen

    2013-09-01

    The relativistic NMR module of the Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF) package, which is frequently utilised in studies of heavy atom NMR chemical shifts, is extended to calculate a hitherto neglected term from the response of the exchange-correlation (XC) potential. The term vanishes in the absence of spin-orbit coupling. Further, corrections to the shielding arising from scaling factors in the zeroth-order regular approximation (zora) relativistic framework are investigated. The XC response markedly improves calculated proton chemical shifts for hydrogen halides. Mercury chemical shifts for mercury dihalides are also noticeably altered. Contributions from density-gradient dependent terms in the response kernel contribute about 30-40%. New fully relativistic density functional theory (DFT) benchmark data are compared with zora and literature reference values. In line with previous work, it is found that absolute shielding constants for Hg are not accurately predicted with zora. However, chemical shifts agree well with fully relativistic calculations. The application of 'scaled-zora' scaling factors deteriorates the shielding constants and is therefore not recommended. The scaling hardly affects chemical shifts. zora calculations are not suitable for absolute shielding of heavy atoms but they can be used safely for chemical shifts in most application scenarios.

  11. New K-Ar ages for calculating end-of-shield extrusion rates at West Maui volcano, Hawaiian island chain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, D.R.; Murai, T.; Tagami, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    Thirty-seven new K-Ar ages from West Maui volcano, Hawai'i, are used to define the waning stages of shield growth and a brief episode of postshield volcanism. All but two samples from shield-stage strata have reversed polarity magnetization, so conceivably the exposed shield is not much older than the Olduvai Normal-Polarity subchron, or about 1.8 Ma. The oldest ages obtained are in the range 1.9-2.1 Ma but have large analytical error. Shield volcanism ended about 1.35 Ma, and postshield volcanism followed soon thereafter, persisting until about 1.2 Ma. Exposed shield-stage strata were emplaced at a rate of about 0.001 km3 per year, a rate smaller than historic Hawaiian magmatic rates by a factor of 100. Stratigraphic accumulation rates are similar to those measured previously at Wai'anae volcano (O'ahu) or the upper part of the Mauna Kea shield sequence (Hilo drill core, Hawai'i). These rates diminish sharply during the final 0.3-0.5 m.y. of the shield stage. Hawaiian shield volcanoes begin waning well before their last 0.5 m.y. of life, then end quickly, geologically speaking, if West Maui is representative. ?? Springer-Verlag 2006.

  12. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses [Shielding Synchrotron Light Sources: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-08-10

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. Lastly, the principles used to provide

  13. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Calculation procedures for non-reacting compressible two- and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers were reviewed. Integral, transformation and correlation methods, as well as finite difference solutions of the complete boundary layer equations summarized. Alternative numerical solution procedures were examined, and both mean field and mean turbulence field closure models were considered. Physics and related calculation problems peculiar to compressible turbulent boundary layers are described. A catalog of available solution procedures of the finite difference, finite element, and method of weighted residuals genre is included. Influence of compressibility, low Reynolds number, wall blowing, and pressure gradient upon mean field closure constants are reported.

  14. Calculation of thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for aqueous bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Jalali, M.; Mohammadi, A.

    2007-10-01

    In this work thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing materials is studied using bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) with the MCNP code. The code was used to perform three dimensional simulations of a neutron source, neutron detector and sample of various material compositions. The MCNP model was validated against experimental measurements of the neutron flux performed using a BF 3 detector. Simulations were performed to predict thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing solutes. In practice, the MCNP calculations are combined with experimental measurements of the relative thermal neutron flux over the sample's surface, with respect to a reference water sample, to derive the thermal neutron self-shielding within the sample. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the average thermal neutron flux within the sample volume is required.

  15. A New Iterative Method to Calculate [pi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dion, Peter; Ho, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    For at least 2000 years people have been trying to calculate the value of [pi], the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle. People know that [pi] is an irrational number; its decimal representation goes on forever. Early methods were geometric, involving the use of inscribed and circumscribed polygons of a circle. However, real…

  16. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Ewert, Michael; Broyan, James; Walker, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  17. A new method for calculating loss coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Yang, W.T.; Liu, C.C. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    A method is proposed which avoids many limitations associated with traditional B-coefficient loss coefficient calculation. The proposed method, unlike the traditional B-coefficient method, is very fast and can handle line outages. The method utilizes network sensitivity factors which are established from DC load flow solutions. Line outage distribution factors (ODF's) are formulated using changes in network power generations to simulate the outaged line from the network. The method avoids the use of complicated reference frame transformations based upon Kron's tensor analysis. The necessity of data normalization used in least squares and the evaluation of the slope of [theta][sub j] versus PG[sub n] is not necessary with the proposed method. Using IEEE standard 14-bus and 30-bus systems, the method's results are compared against results obtained from an AC load flow program (LFED). The method's solution speed is compared to that of the LFED method, the base case database method and the conventional B-coefficient method based on A[sub jn]-factor. The proposed method is easy to implement and, when compared to other methods, has exhibited good accuracy and rapid execution times. The method is well suited to on-line dispatch applications.

  18. The Method of Characteristics for 2-D Multigroup and Pointwise Transport Calculations in SCALE/CENTRM

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kang Seog; Williams, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    SCALE 6 computes problem-dependent multigroup (MG) cross sections through a combination of the conventional Bondarenko shielding-factor method and a deterministic pointwise (PW) transport calculation of the fine-structure spectra in the resolved resonance and thermal energy ranges. The PW calculation is performed by the CENTRM code using a 1-D cylindrical Wigner-Seitz model with the white boundary condition instead of the real rectangular cell shape to represent a lattice unit cell. The pointwise fluxes computed by CENTRM are not exact because a 1-D model is used for the transport calculation, which introduces discrepancies in the MG self-shielded cross sections, resulting in some deviation in the eigenvalue. In order to solve this problem, the method of characteristics (MOC) has been applied to enable the CENTRM PW transport calculation for a 2-D square pin cell. The computation results show that the new BONAMI/CENTRM-MOC procedure produces very precise self-shielded cross sections compared to MCNP reaction rates.

  19. Automated Fragmentation Polarizable Embedding Density Functional Theory (PE-DFT) Calculations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Shielding Constants of Proteins with Application to Chemical Shift Predictions.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Casper; Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Kongsted, Jacob

    2017-02-14

    Full-protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants based on ab initio calculations are desirable, because they can assist in elucidating protein structures from NMR experiments. In this work, we present NMR shielding constants computed using a new automated fragmentation (J. Phys. Chem. B 2009, 113, 10380-10388) approach in the framework of polarizable embedding density functional theory. We extend our previous work to give both basis set recommendations and comment on how large the quantum mechanical region should be to successfully compute (13)C NMR shielding constants that are comparable with experiment. The introduction of a probabilistic linear regression model allows us to substantially reduce the number of snapshots that are needed to make comparisons with experiment. This approach is further improved by augmenting snapshot selection with chemical shift predictions by which we can obtain a representative subset of snapshots that gives the smallest predicted error, compared to experiment. Finally, we use this subset of snapshots to calculate the NMR shielding constants at the PE-KT3/pcSseg-2 level of theory for all atoms in the protein GB3.

  20. Development of deterministic transport methods for low energy neutrons for shielding in space. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.

    1993-09-01

    Transport of low energy neutrons associated with the galactic cosmic ray cascade is analyzed in this dissertation. A benchmark quality analytical algorithm is demonstrated for use with BRYNTRN, a computer program written by the High Energy Physics Division of NASA Langley Research Center, which is used to design and analyze shielding against the radiation created by the cascade. BRYNTRN uses numerical methods to solve the integral transport equations for baryons with the straight-ahead approximation, and numerical and empirical methods to generate the interaction probabilities. The straight-ahead approximation is adequate for charged particles, but not for neutrons. As NASA Langley improves BRYNTRN to include low energy neutrons, a benchmark quality solution is needed for comparison. The neutron transport algorithm demonstrated in this dissertation uses the closed-form Green's function solution to the galactic cosmic ray cascade transport equations to generate a source of neutrons. A basis function expansion for finite heterogeneous and semi-infinite homogeneous slabs with multiple energy groups and isotropic scattering is used to generate neutron fluxes resulting from the cascade. This method, called the FN method, is used to solve the neutral particle linear Boltzmann transport equation. As a demonstration of the algorithm coded in the programs MGSLAB and MGSEMI, neutron and ion fluxes are shown for a beam of fluorine ions at 1000 MeV per nucleon incident on semi-infinite and finite aluminum slabs. Also, to demonstrate that the shielding effectiveness against the radiation from the galactic cosmic ray cascade is not directly proportional to shield thickness, a graph of transmitted total neutron scalar flux versus slab thickness is shown. A simple model based on the nuclear liquid drop assumption is used to generate cross sections for the galactic cosmic ray cascade.

  1. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses [Shielding Synchrotron Light Sources: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing thismore » dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. Lastly, the principles used to provide

  2. Nuclear data calculation methods for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shubin, Yu.N.; Lunev, V.P.; Masterov, V.S.; Kurenkov, N.V.; Kulikov, E.V.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron deficient radionuclides play an important role in medicine, where they are used for diagnostic with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPET). Using some reactions connected with the producing most widely used radioisotopes {sup 123}I, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 99}Tc as example we calculated reaction cross sections and discuss the possibilities of the models and codes and recent progress in the methods to predict nuclear data for medical and other applications in medium energy region.

  3. Development of deterministic transport methods for low energy neutrons for shielding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry

    1993-01-01

    Transport of low energy neutrons associated with the galactic cosmic ray cascade is analyzed in this dissertation. A benchmark quality analytical algorithm is demonstrated for use with BRYNTRN, a computer program written by the High Energy Physics Division of NASA Langley Research Center, which is used to design and analyze shielding against the radiation created by the cascade. BRYNTRN uses numerical methods to solve the integral transport equations for baryons with the straight-ahead approximation, and numerical and empirical methods to generate the interaction probabilities. The straight-ahead approximation is adequate for charged particles, but not for neutrons. As NASA Langley improves BRYNTRN to include low energy neutrons, a benchmark quality solution is needed for comparison. The neutron transport algorithm demonstrated in this dissertation uses the closed-form Green's function solution to the galactic cosmic ray cascade transport equations to generate a source of neutrons. A basis function expansion for finite heterogeneous and semi-infinite homogeneous slabs with multiple energy groups and isotropic scattering is used to generate neutron fluxes resulting from the cascade. This method, called the FN method, is used to solve the neutral particle linear Boltzmann transport equation. As a demonstration of the algorithm coded in the programs MGSLAB and MGSEMI, neutron and ion fluxes are shown for a beam of fluorine ions at 1000 MeV per nucleon incident on semi-infinite and finite aluminum slabs. Also, to demonstrate that the shielding effectiveness against the radiation from the galactic cosmic ray cascade is not directly proportional to shield thickness, a graph of transmitted total neutron scalar flux versus slab thickness is shown. A simple model based on the nuclear liquid drop assumption is used to generate cross sections for the galactic cosmic ray cascade. The ENDF/B V database is used to generate the total and scattering cross sections for neutrons in

  4. Development of deterministic transport methods for low energy neutrons for shielding in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapol, Barry

    1993-09-01

    Transport of low energy neutrons associated with the galactic cosmic ray cascade is analyzed in this dissertation. A benchmark quality analytical algorithm is demonstrated for use with BRYNTRN, a computer program written by the High Energy Physics Division of NASA Langley Research Center, which is used to design and analyze shielding against the radiation created by the cascade. BRYNTRN uses numerical methods to solve the integral transport equations for baryons with the straight-ahead approximation, and numerical and empirical methods to generate the interaction probabilities. The straight-ahead approximation is adequate for charged particles, but not for neutrons. As NASA Langley improves BRYNTRN to include low energy neutrons, a benchmark quality solution is needed for comparison. The neutron transport algorithm demonstrated in this dissertation uses the closed-form Green's function solution to the galactic cosmic ray cascade transport equations to generate a source of neutrons. A basis function expansion for finite heterogeneous and semi-infinite homogeneous slabs with multiple energy groups and isotropic scattering is used to generate neutron fluxes resulting from the cascade. This method, called the FN method, is used to solve the neutral particle linear Boltzmann transport equation. As a demonstration of the algorithm coded in the programs MGSLAB and MGSEMI, neutron and ion fluxes are shown for a beam of fluorine ions at 1000 MeV per nucleon incident on semi-infinite and finite aluminum slabs. Also, to demonstrate that the shielding effectiveness against the radiation from the galactic cosmic ray cascade is not directly proportional to shield thickness, a graph of transmitted total neutron scalar flux versus slab thickness is shown. A simple model based on the nuclear liquid drop assumption is used to generate cross sections for the galactic cosmic ray cascade. The ENDF/B V database is used to generate the total and scattering cross sections for neutrons in

  5. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baechler, S.; Bochud, F. O.; Verellen, D.; Moeckli, R.

    2007-08-01

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  6. Shielding requirements in helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baechler, S; Bochud, F O; Verellen, D; Moeckli, R

    2007-08-21

    Helical tomotherapy is a relatively new intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for which room shielding has to be reassessed for the following reasons. The beam-on-time needed to deliver a given target dose is increased and leads to a weekly workload of typically one order of magnitude higher than that for conventional radiation therapy. The special configuration of tomotherapy units does not allow the use of standard shielding calculation methods. A conventional linear accelerator must be shielded for primary, leakage and scatter photon radiations. For tomotherapy, primary radiation is no longer the main shielding issue since a beam stop is mounted on the gantry directly opposite the source. On the other hand, due to the longer irradiation time, the accelerator head leakage becomes a major concern. An analytical model based on geometric considerations has been developed to determine leakage radiation levels throughout the room for continuous gantry rotation. Compared to leakage radiation, scatter radiation is a minor contribution. Since tomotherapy units operate at a nominal energy of 6 MV, neutron production is negligible. This work proposes a synthetic and conservative model for calculating shielding requirements for the Hi-Art II TomoTherapy unit. Finally, the required concrete shielding thickness is given for different positions of interest.

  7. SU-E-T-795: Validations of Dose Calculation Accuracy of Acuros BV in High-Dose-Rate (HDR) Brachytherapy with a Shielded Cylinder Applicator Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y; Tian, Z; Hrycushko, B; Jiang, S; Jia, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Acuros BV has become available to perform accurate dose calculations in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with phantom heterogeneity considered by solving the Boltzmann transport equation. In this work, we performed validation studies regarding the dose calculation accuracy of Acuros BV in cases with a shielded cylinder applicator using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Fifteen cases were considered in our studies, covering five different diameters of the applicator and three different shielding degrees. For each case, a digital phantom was created in Varian BrachyVision with the cylinder applicator inserted in the middle of a large water phantom. A treatment plan with eight dwell positions was generated for these fifteen cases. Dose calculations were performed with Acuros BV. We then generated a voxelized phantom of the same geometry, and the materials were modeled according to the vendor’s specifications. MC dose calculations were then performed using our in-house developed fast MC dose engine for HDR brachytherapy (gBMC) on a GPU platform, which is able to simulate both photon transport and electron transport in a voxelized geometry. A phase-space file for the Ir-192 HDR source was used as a source model for MC simulations. Results: Satisfactory agreements between the dose distributions calculated by Acuros BV and those calculated by gBMC were observed in all cases. Quantitatively, we computed point-wise dose difference within the region that receives a dose higher than 10% of the reference dose, defined to be the dose at 5mm outward away from the applicator surface. The mean dose difference was ∼0.45%–0.51% and the 95-percentile maximum difference was ∼1.24%–1.47%. Conclusion: Acuros BV is able to accurately perform dose calculations in HDR brachytherapy with a shielded cylinder applicator.

  8. Technical Work Plan For: Calculation of Waste Packave and Drip Shield Response to Vibratory Ground Motion and Revision of the Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gross

    2006-12-08

    The overall objective of the work scope covered by this technical work plan (TWP) is to develop new damage abstractions for the seismic scenario class in total system performance assessment (TSPA). The new abstractions will be based on a new set of waste package and drip shield damage calculations in response to vibratory ground motion and fault displacement. The new damage calculations, which are collectively referred to as damage models in this TWP, are required to represent recent changes in waste form packaging and in the regulatory time frame. The new damage models also respond to comments from the Independent Validation Review Team (IVRT) postvalidation review of the draft TSPA model regarding performance of the drip shield and to an Additional Information Need (AIN) from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  9. Implementation of hybrid variance reduction methods in a multi group Monte Carlo code for deep shielding problems

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, E.; Palmer, T. S.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the work that has been done to implement variance reduction techniques in a three dimensional, multi group Monte Carlo code - Tortilla, that works within the frame work of the commercial deterministic code - Attila, is presented. This project is aimed to develop an integrated Hybrid code that seamlessly takes advantage of the deterministic and Monte Carlo methods for deep shielding radiation detection problems. Tortilla takes advantage of Attila's features for generating the geometric mesh, cross section library and source definitions. Tortilla can also read importance functions (like adjoint scalar flux) generated from deterministic calculations performed in Attila and use them to employ variance reduction schemes in the Monte Carlo simulation. The variance reduction techniques that are implemented in Tortilla are based on the CADIS (Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling) method and the LIFT (Local Importance Function Transform) method. These methods make use of the results from an adjoint deterministic calculation to bias the particle transport using techniques like source biasing, survival biasing, transport biasing and weight windows. The results obtained so far and the challenges faced in implementing the variance reduction techniques are reported here. (authors)

  10. [PSA doubling time and method of calculation].

    PubMed

    Ruffion, Alain; Rebillard, Xavier; Grima, François

    2005-12-01

    Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is currently the best marker for prostate cancer, although it is not very specific for this disease. The use of the PSA kinetic, in addition to its absolute value, is theoretically very attractive in a large number of clinical situations. Based on a review of the literature, the authors report the various methods used to study this kinetic, with particular emphasis on the most reliable method: the PSA doubling time. After describing the definitions and the methods used to calculate this parameter, the authors discuss the various clinical situations in which it could be useful: surveillance of prostatic tumours after the initial diagnosis in high-risk patients or patients refusing treatment, prognostic factor before curative treatment, evaluation of the efficacy of curative treatment, prognostic factor of tumour aggressiveness at the time of biochemical recurrence after curative treatment or during endocrine therapy.

  11. Enhanced Whipple Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor); Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Williamsen, Joel E. (Inventor); Robinson, Jennifer R. (Inventor); Nolen, Angela M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact (HVI) Whipple Shield and a method for shielding a wall from penetration by high velocity particle impacts where the Whipple Shield is comprised of spaced apart inner and outer metal sheets or walls with an intermediate cloth barrier arrangement comprised of ceramic cloth and high strength cloth which are interrelated by ballistic formulae.

  12. The DOPEX code: An application of the method of steepest descent to laminated-shield-weight optimization with several constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahti, G. P.

    1972-01-01

    A two- or three-constraint, two-dimensional radiation shield weight optimization procedure and a computer program, DOPEX, is described. The DOPEX code uses the steepest descent method to alter a set of initial (input) thicknesses for a shield configuration to achieve a minimum weight while simultaneously satisfying dose constaints. The code assumes an exponential dose-shield thickness relation with parameters specified by the user. The code also assumes that dose rates in each principal direction are dependent only on thicknesses in that direction. Code input instructions, FORTRAN 4 listing, and a sample problem are given. Typical computer time required to optimize a seven-layer shield is about 0.1 minute on an IBM 7094-2.

  13. Monte Carlo methods to calculate impact probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickman, H.; Wiśniowski, T.; Wajer, P.; Gabryszewski, R.; Valsecchi, G. B.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Unraveling the events that took place in the solar system during the period known as the late heavy bombardment requires the interpretation of the cratered surfaces of the Moon and terrestrial planets. This, in turn, requires good estimates of the statistical impact probabilities for different source populations of projectiles, a subject that has received relatively little attention, since the works of Öpik (1951, Proc. R. Irish Acad. Sect. A, 54, 165) and Wetherill (1967, J. Geophys. Res., 72, 2429). Aims: We aim to work around the limitations of the Öpik and Wetherill formulae, which are caused by singularities due to zero denominators under special circumstances. Using modern computers, it is possible to make good estimates of impact probabilities by means of Monte Carlo simulations, and in this work, we explore the available options. Methods: We describe three basic methods to derive the average impact probability for a projectile with a given semi-major axis, eccentricity, and inclination with respect to a target planet on an elliptic orbit. One is a numerical averaging of the Wetherill formula; the next is a Monte Carlo super-sizing method using the target's Hill sphere. The third uses extensive minimum orbit intersection distance (MOID) calculations for a Monte Carlo sampling of potentially impacting orbits, along with calculations of the relevant interval for the timing of the encounter allowing collision. Numerical experiments are carried out for an intercomparison of the methods and to scrutinize their behavior near the singularities (zero relative inclination and equal perihelion distances). Results: We find an excellent agreement between all methods in the general case, while there appear large differences in the immediate vicinity of the singularities. With respect to the MOID method, which is the only one that does not involve simplifying assumptions and approximations, the Wetherill averaging impact probability departs by diverging toward

  14. Group Contribution Methods for Phase Equilibrium Calculations.

    PubMed

    Gmehling, Jürgen; Constantinescu, Dana; Schmid, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    The development and design of chemical processes are carried out by solving the balance equations of a mathematical model for sections of or the whole chemical plant with the help of process simulators. For process simulation, besides kinetic data for the chemical reaction, various pure component and mixture properties are required. Because of the great importance of separation processes for a chemical plant in particular, a reliable knowledge of the phase equilibrium behavior is required. The phase equilibrium behavior can be calculated with the help of modern equations of state or g(E)-models using only binary parameters. But unfortunately, only a very small part of the experimental data for fitting the required binary model parameters is available, so very often these models cannot be applied directly. To solve this problem, powerful predictive thermodynamic models have been developed. Group contribution methods allow the prediction of the required phase equilibrium data using only a limited number of group interaction parameters. A prerequisite for fitting the required group interaction parameters is a comprehensive database. That is why for the development of powerful group contribution methods almost all published pure component properties, phase equilibrium data, excess properties, etc., were stored in computerized form in the Dortmund Data Bank. In this review, the present status, weaknesses, advantages and disadvantages, possible applications, and typical results of the different group contribution methods for the calculation of phase equilibria are presented.

  15. Singularity embedding method in potential flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jou, W. H.; Huynh, H.

    1982-01-01

    The so-called H-type mesh is used in a finite-element (or finite-volume) calculation of the potential flow past an airfoil. Due to coordinate singularity at the leading edge, a special singular trial function is used for the elements neighboring the leading edge. The results using the special singular elements are compared to those using the regular elements. It is found that the unreasonable pressure distribution obtained by the latter is removed by the embedding of the singular element. Suggestions to extend the present method to transonic cases are given.

  16. Variational fitting methods for electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlap, Brett I.; Rösch, Notker; Trickey, S. B.

    2010-11-01

    We review the basics and the evolution of a powerful and widely applicable general approach to the systematic reduction of computational burden in many-electron calculations. Variational fitting of electron densities (either total or partial) has the great advantage, for quantum mechanical calculations, that it respects the stationarity property, which is at the heart of the success of the basis set expansion methods ubiquitous in computational chemistry and materials physics. The key point is easy. In a finite system, independent of whether the fitted charge distribution is constrained to contain the proper amount of charge, variational fitting guarantees that the quantum mechanical total energy retains the stationarity property. Thus, many-electron quantum mechanics with variational fitting of an electronic density in an incomplete density-fitting basis set behaves similarly as the exact quantum mechanical energy does when evaluated with an incomplete basis set to fit wavefunctions or spin-orbitals. Periodically bounded systems are a bit more subtle but the essential stationarity is preserved. This preservation of an exact property is quite distinct from truncation of the resolution of the identity in a basis. Variational fitting has proven to have benefits far beyond the original objective of making a Gaussian-orbital basis calculation of an early density functional computationally feasible. We survey many of those developments briefly, with guidance to the pertinent literature and a few remarks about the connections with Quantum Theory Project.

  17. Open Rotor Tone Shielding Methods for System Noise Assessments Using Multiple Databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Thomas, Russell H.; Lopes, Leonard V.; Burley, Casey L.; Van Zante, Dale E.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced aircraft designs such as the hybrid wing body, in conjunction with open rotor engines, may allow for significant improvements in the environmental impact of aviation. System noise assessments allow for the prediction of the aircraft noise of such designs while they are still in the conceptual phase. Due to significant requirements of computational methods, these predictions still rely on experimental data to account for the interaction of the open rotor tones with the hybrid wing body airframe. Recently, multiple aircraft system noise assessments have been conducted for hybrid wing body designs with open rotor engines. These assessments utilized measured benchmark data from a Propulsion Airframe Aeroacoustic interaction effects test. The measured data demonstrated airframe shielding of open rotor tonal and broadband noise with legacy F7/A7 open rotor blades. Two methods are proposed for improving the use of these data on general open rotor designs in a system noise assessment. The first, direct difference, is a simple octave band subtraction which does not account for tone distribution within the rotor acoustic signal. The second, tone matching, is a higher-fidelity process incorporating additional physical aspects of the problem, where isolated rotor tones are matched by their directivity to determine tone-by-tone shielding. A case study is conducted with the two methods to assess how well each reproduces the measured data and identify the merits of each. Both methods perform similarly for system level results and successfully approach the experimental data for the case study. The tone matching method provides additional tools for assessing the quality of the match to the data set. Additionally, a potential path to improve the tone matching method is provided.

  18. Design calculations for a xenon plasma x-ray shield to protect the NIF optical Thomson scattering diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Swadling, G F; Ross, J S; Datte, P; Moody, J; Divol, L; Jones, O; Landen, O

    2016-11-01

    An Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic is currently being developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This diagnostic is designed to make measurements of the hohlraum plasma parameters, such as the electron temperature and the density, during inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. NIF ICF experiments present a very challenging environment for optical measurements; by their very nature, hohlraums produce intense soft x-ray emission, which can cause "blanking" (radiation induced opacity) of the radiation facing optical components. The soft x-ray fluence at the surface of the OTS blast shield, 60 cm from the hohlraum, is estimated to be ∼8 J cm(-2). This is significantly above the expected threshold for the onset of "blanking" effects. A novel xenon plasma x-ray shield is proposed to protect the blast shield from x-rays and mitigate "blanking." Estimates suggest that an areal density of 10(19) cm(-2) Xe atoms will be sufficient to absorb 99.5% of the soft x-ray flux. Two potential designs for this shield are presented.

  19. Design calculations for a xenon plasma x-ray shield to protect the NIF optical Thomson scattering diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swadling, G. F.; Ross, J. S.; Datte, P.; Moody, J.; Divol, L.; Jones, O.; Landen, O.

    2016-11-01

    An Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic is currently being developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This diagnostic is designed to make measurements of the hohlraum plasma parameters, such as the electron temperature and the density, during inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. NIF ICF experiments present a very challenging environment for optical measurements; by their very nature, hohlraums produce intense soft x-ray emission, which can cause "blanking" (radiation induced opacity) of the radiation facing optical components. The soft x-ray fluence at the surface of the OTS blast shield, 60 cm from the hohlraum, is estimated to be ˜8 J cm-2. This is significantly above the expected threshold for the onset of "blanking" effects. A novel xenon plasma x-ray shield is proposed to protect the blast shield from x-rays and mitigate "blanking." Estimates suggest that an areal density of 1019 cm-2 Xe atoms will be sufficient to absorb 99.5% of the soft x-ray flux. Two potential designs for this shield are presented.

  20. Design calculations for a xenon plasma x-ray shield to protect the NIF optical Thomson scattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Swadling, G. F.; Ross, J. S.; Datte, P.; Moody, J.; Divol, L.; Jones, O.; Landen, O.

    2016-11-15

    An Optical Thomson Scattering (OTS) diagnostic is currently being developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This diagnostic is designed to make measurements of the hohlraum plasma parameters, such as the electron temperature and the density, during inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. NIF ICF experiments present a very challenging environment for optical measurements; by their very nature, hohlraums produce intense soft x-ray emission, which can cause “blanking” (radiation induced opacity) of the radiation facing optical components. The soft x-ray fluence at the surface of the OTS blast shield, 60 cm from the hohlraum, is estimated to be ∼8 J cm{sup −2}. This is significantly above the expected threshold for the onset of “blanking” effects. A novel xenon plasma x-ray shield is proposed to protect the blast shield from x-rays and mitigate “blanking.” Estimates suggest that an areal density of 10{sup 19} cm{sup −2} Xe atoms will be sufficient to absorb 99.5% of the soft x-ray flux. Two potential designs for this shield are presented.

  1. Role of shielding in modulating the effects of solar particle events: Monte Carlo calculation of absorbed dose and DNA complex lesions in different organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballarini, F.; Biaggi, M.; De Biaggi, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ottolenghi, A.; Panzarasa, A.; Paretzke, H. G.; Pelliccioni, M.; Sala, P.; Scannicchio, D.; hide

    2004-01-01

    Distributions of absorbed dose and DNA clustered damage yields in various organs and tissues following the October 1989 solar particle event (SPE) were calculated by coupling the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code with two anthropomorphic phantoms (a mathematical model and a voxel model), with the main aim of quantifying the role of the shielding features in modulating organ doses. The phantoms, which were assumed to be in deep space, were inserted into a shielding box of variable thickness and material and were irradiated with the proton spectra of the October 1989 event. Average numbers of DNA lesions per cell in different organs were calculated by adopting a technique already tested in previous works, consisting of integrating into "condensed-history" Monte Carlo transport codes--such as FLUKA--yields of radiobiological damage, either calculated with "event-by-event" track structure simulations, or taken from experimental works available in the literature. More specifically, the yields of "Complex Lesions" (or "CL", defined and calculated as a clustered DNA damage in a previous work) per unit dose and DNA mass (CL Gy-1 Da-1) due to the various beam components, including those derived from nuclear interactions with the shielding and the human body, were integrated in FLUKA. This provided spatial distributions of CL/cell yields in different organs, as well as distributions of absorbed doses. The contributions of primary protons and secondary hadrons were calculated separately, and the simulations were repeated for values of Al shielding thickness ranging between 1 and 20 g/cm2. Slight differences were found between the two phantom types. Skin and eye lenses were found to receive larger doses with respect to internal organs; however, shielding was more effective for skin and lenses. Secondary particles arising from nuclear interactions were found to have a minor role, although their relative contribution was found to be larger for the Complex Lesions than for the

  2. A new high-voltage interconnection shielding method for SOI monolithic ICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Long; Zhu, Jing; Sun, Weifeng; Huang, Xuequan; Zhao, Minna; Chen, Jiajun; Shi, Longxing; Chen, Jian; Ding, Desheng

    2017-07-01

    The high-voltage interconnection (HVI) issue becomes severe in the high-voltage monolithic ICs when single-layer metal is used for lowering the cost. This paper proposes a dual deep-oxide trenches (DDOT) structure for 500 V Silicon-on-Insulator Lateral Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (SOI-LIGBT) to shield the influence of HVI on the breakdown voltage. Compared with the conventional DDOT structure, HVI region of the proposed DDOT structure is shrunk by employing a shallow trench (T1) and a deep trench (T2). Besides the breakdown mechanism in the off-state, the current density and impact ionization rate distributions in the on-state of the proposed structure are also investigated. The experiments demonstrate that the proposed DDOT structure can fully shield the influence of HVI with significant reduction in the area of silicon region beneath the HVI. With almost the same off-state breakdown voltage (BVoff) of 550 V as the conventional DDOT structure, the length of the silicon region under the HVI in the proposed structure is shortened from 45 μm to 15 μm. Meanwhile, no on-state breakdown voltage (BVon) degradation is observed according to the measured results. The new method proposed in this work can also be used for other types of high-voltage devices such as LDMOS and free-wheeling diode in SOI Monolithic ICs.

  3. Optimal shield mass distribution for space radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    Computational methods have been developed and successfully used for determining the optimum distribution of space radiation shielding on geometrically complex space vehicles. These methods have been incorporated in computer program SWORD for dose evaluation in complex geometry, and iteratively calculating the optimum distribution for (minimum) shield mass satisfying multiple acute and protected dose constraints associated with each of several body organs.

  4. Calculation of NMR chemical shifts. 7. Gauge-invariant INDO method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, H.; Miura, K.; Hirai, A.

    A gauge-invariant INDO method based on the coupled Hartree-Fuck perturbation theory is presented and applied to the calculation of 1H and 13C chemical shifts of hydrocarbons including ring compounds. Invariance of the diamagnetic and paramagnetic shieldings with respect to displacement of the coordinate origin is discussed. Comparison between calculated and experimental results exhibits fairly good agreement, provided that the INDO parameters of Ellis et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc.94, 4069 (1972)) are used with the inclusion of all multicenter one-electron integrals.

  5. RSMASS-D models: An improved method for estimating reactor and shield mass for space reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, A.C.

    1997-10-01

    Three relatively simple mathematical models have been developed to estimate minimum reactor and radiation shield masses for liquid-metal-cooled reactors (LMRs), in-core thermionic fuel element (TFE) reactors, and out-of-core thermionic reactors (OTRs). The approach was based on much of the methodology developed for the Reactor/Shield Mass (RSMASS) model. Like the original RSMASS models, the new RSMASS-derivative (RSMASS-D) models use a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations, along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. All three models vary basic design parameters within a range specified by the user to achieve a parameter choice that yields a minimum mass for the power level and operational time of interest. The impact of critical mass, fuel damage, and thermal limitations are accounted for to determine the required fuel mass. The effect of thermionic limitations are also taken into account for the thermionic reactor models. All major reactor component masses are estimated, as well as instrumentation and control (I&C), boom, and safety system masses. A new shield model was developed and incorporated into all three reactor concept models. The new shield model is more accurate and simpler to use than the approach used in the original RSMASS model. The estimated reactor and shield masses agree with the mass predictions from separate detailed calculations within 15 percent for all three models.

  6. Proton Affinity Calculations with High Level Methods.

    PubMed

    Kolboe, Stein

    2014-08-12

    Proton affinities, stretching from small reference compounds, up to the methylbenzenes and naphthalene and anthracene, have been calculated with high accuracy computational methods, viz. W1BD, G4, G3B3, CBS-QB3, and M06-2X. Computed and the currently accepted reference proton affinities are generally in excellent accord, but there are deviations. The literature value for propene appears to be 6-7 kJ/mol too high. Reported proton affinities for the methylbenzenes seem 4-5 kJ/mol too high. G4 and G3 computations generally give results in good accord with the high level W1BD. Proton affinity values computed with the CBS-QB3 scheme are too low, and the error increases with increasing molecule size, reaching nearly 10 kJ/mol for the xylenes. The functional M06-2X fails markedly for some of the small reference compounds, in particular, for CO and ketene, but calculates methylbenzene proton affinities with high accuracy.

  7. Numerical computation of lightning transfer functions for layered, anisotropically conducting shielding structures by the method of moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Happ, Fabian; Brüns, Heinz-D.; Mavraj, Gazmend; Gronwald, Frank

    2016-09-01

    A formalism for the computation of lightning transfer functions by the method of moments, which involves shielding structures that may consist of layered, anisotropically conducting composite materials, is presented in this contribution. The composite materials, being of a type that is widely used in space- and aircraft design, are electrically characterized by an equivalent conductivity. As basis for the quantitative analysis the method of moments is used where shielding surfaces can be treated by a thin layer technique which utilizes analytical solutions inside the layer. Also the effect of an extended lightning channel can be taken into account. The method is applied to geometries that resemble an actual airplane fuselage.

  8. Resonance self-shielding methodology in MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Collins, B.; Kochunas, B.; Martin, W.; Kim, K. S.; Williams, M.

    2013-07-01

    The resonance self-shielding methods of the neutron transport code Michigan Parallel Characteristics based Transport (MPACT) are described in this paper. Two resonance-integral table based methods are utilized to resolve the resonance self-shielding effect. The subgroup method is a mature approach used in MPACT as the basic functionality for the resonance calculation. Another new iterative method, named the embedded self-shielding method is also implemented in MPACT. Comparisons of the two methods as well as their numerical verifications are presented. The results show that MPACT is capable of modeling the resonance self-shielding in a variety of PWR benchmarking cases, including difficult fuel lattice cases with poison, control rods or mixed gadolinia fuel rods. (authors)

  9. A radiation emission shielding method for high intensity focus ultrasound probes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Shen, Guofeng; Chen, Yazhu

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is a key issue in the design and development of safe and effective medical instruments. The treatment probes of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) systems not only receive and transmit electromagnetic waves, but also radiate ultrasound waves, resulting in electromagnetic coupling. In this paper, an electromagnetic shielding method involving the enclosure of the probe in a copper wire mesh was introduced. First, sound pressure distribution simulations and measurements were performed using a hydrophone in order to evaluate the effects of the wire mesh on the acoustic performance of the HIFU system. The results indicated that the wire mesh did not disturb the normalized sound pressure field. In addition, the attenuation of the maximum pressure in the focal plane was equal to 6.2%. Then, the electronic emission level was tested in a chamber. After the implementation of the wire mesh, the 10-100 MHz frequency band radiation was suppressed, and the HIFU system satisfied the national EMC standards.

  10. Multigrid Methods in Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Emil

    1996-03-01

    Multigrid techniques have become the method of choice for a broad range of computational problems. Their use in electronic structure calculations introduces a new set of issues when compared to traditional plane wave approaches. We have developed a set of techniques that address these issues and permit multigrid algorithms to be applied to the electronic structure problem in an efficient manner. In our approach the Kohn-Sham equations are discretized on a real-space mesh using a compact representation of the Hamiltonian. The resulting equations are solved directly on the mesh using multigrid iterations. This produces rapid convergence rates even for ill-conditioned systems with large length and/or energy scales. The method has been applied to both periodic and non-periodic systems containing over 400 atoms and the results are in very good agreement with both theory and experiment. Example applications include a vacancy in diamond, an isolated C60 molecule, and a 64-atom cell of GaN with the Ga d-electrons in valence which required a 250 Ry cutoff. A particular strength of a real-space multigrid approach is its ready adaptability to massively parallel computer architectures. The compact representation of the Hamiltonian is especially well suited to such machines. Tests on the Cray-T3D have shown nearly linear scaling of the execution time up to the maximum number of processors (512). The MPP implementation has been used for studies of a large Amyloid Beta Peptide (C_146O_45N_42H_210) found in the brains of Alzheimers disease patients. Further applications of the multigrid method will also be described. (in collaboration D. J. Sullivan and J. Bernholc)

  11. Improving Hiroshima Air-Over-Ground Thermal/Epithermal Activation Calculations Using a MUSH Model to Show the Importance of Local Shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.V.

    2002-02-14

    Achieving agreement between measured and calculated neutron activation data resulting from Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb detonations has been a major problem since the early 1980's. This has been particularly true for the materials that are activated by thermal and epithermal neutrons. Since thermal and epithermal neutrons are not transported very far from the weapon, the local shielding environment around the measurement location can be very important. A set of calculations incorporating an average density local-environment material (mush) has been made to demonstrate that the local environment plays an important role in the calculation-measurement agreement process. The optimum solution would be to include the local environment in all thermal neutron response calculations.

  12. Tests of a novel method to assay SNM using polarized photofission and its sensitivity in the presence of shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, J. M.; Ahmed, M. W.; Kafkarkou, A.; Kendellen, D. P.; Sikora, M. H.; Spraker, M. C.; Weller, H. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.

    2015-03-01

    A novel method to identify Special Nuclear Material was recently developed (Mueller et al., 2014) [1]. This method relies upon using a linearly polarized γ-ray beam to induce photofission of a sample and then comparing the prompt fission neutron yields in and out of the plane of beam polarization. The present paper will describe experimental tests of this new technique and assess its sensitivity in the presence of shielding. The capability of this technique to measure the enrichment of uranium was tested by using combinations of thin 235U and 238U foils of known enrichments. The sensitivity of this assay to shielding by lead, steel, and polyethylene was experimentally measured and simulated using GEANT4. These tests show that the measured asymmetry can indeed be used to determine the enrichment of materials composed of an admixture of 235U and 238U, and this asymmetry is relatively insensitive to moderate amounts of shielding.

  13. A simple scheme for magnetic balance in four-component relativistic Kohn-Sham calculations of nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants in a Gaussian basis.

    PubMed

    Olejniczak, Małgorzata; Bast, Radovan; Saue, Trond; Pecul, Magdalena

    2012-01-07

    We report the implementation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding tensors within the four-component relativistic Kohn-Sham density functional theory including non-collinear spin magnetization and employing London atomic orbitals to ensure gauge origin independent results, together with a new and efficient scheme for assuring correct balance between the large and small components of a molecular four-component spinor in the presence of an external magnetic field (simple magnetic balance). To test our formalism we have carried out calculations of NMR shielding tensors for the HX series (X = F, Cl, Br, I, At), the Xe atom, and the Xe dimer. The advantage of simple magnetic balance scheme combined with the use of London atomic orbitals is the fast convergence of results (when compared with restricted kinetic balance) and elimination of linear dependencies in the basis set (when compared to unrestricted kinetic balance). The effect of including spin magnetization in the description of NMR shielding tensor has been found important for hydrogen atoms in heavy HX molecules, causing an increase of isotropic values of 10%, but negligible for heavy atoms.

  14. Polynominal Interpolation Methods for Viscous Flow Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, S. G.; Khosla, P. K.

    1976-01-01

    Higher-order collocation procedures resulting in tridiagonal matrix systems are derived from polynomial spline interpolation and by Hermitian (Taylor series) finite-difference discretization. The similarities and special features of these different developments are discussed. The governing systems apply for both uniform and variable meshes. Hybrid schemes resulting from two different polynomial approximations for the first and second derivatives lead to a nonuniform mesh extension of the so-called compact or Pad? difference technique (Hermite 4). A variety of fourth-order methods are described and the Hermitian approach is extended to sixth-order (Hermite 6). The appropriate spline boundary conditions are derived for all procedures. For central finite differences, this leads to a two-point, second-order accurate generalization of the commonly used three-point end-difference formula. Solutions with several spline and Hermite procedures are presented for the boundary layer equations, with and without mass transfer, and for the incompressible viscous flow in a driven cavity. Divergence and nondivergence equations are considered for the cavity. Among the fourth-order techniques, it is shown that spline 4 has the smallest truncation error. The spline 4 procedure generally requires one-quarter the number of mesh points in a given coordinate direction as a central finite-difference calculation of equal accuracy. The Hermite 6 procedure leads to remarkably accurate boundary layer solutions.

  15. Shielding for thermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    McCall, R C

    1997-01-01

    The problem of calculating the neutron capture gamma-ray dose rate due to thermal neutron capture in a boron or cadmium rectangular shield is considered. An example is given for shielding for a door at the exit of medical accelerator room maze in order to determine the optimum location of lead relative to the borated polyethylene.

  16. Simulation of reflected and scattered laser radiation for designing laser shields.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Piotr; Wolska, Agnieszka; Swiderski, Jacek; Zajac, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a computer simulation of reflected and scattered laser radiation for calculating the angle of laser shields performed with the Laser Shield Solver computer program. The authors describe a method of calculating the shield angle for laser shields which protect workers against reflected and scattered laser radiation and which are made from different materials. The main assumptions of the program, which calculates and simulates reflected laser radiation from any material and which can be used for designing shield angles, are presented. Calculations are compared with measurements of reflected laser radiation. The results for one type of laser and different materials which interacted with a laser beam showed that the Laser Shield Solver was an appropriate tool for designing laser shields and its simulations of reflected laser radiation distribution have practical use.

  17. Program GROUPIE (version 79-1): calculation of Bondarenko self-shielded neutron cross sections and multiband parameters from data in the ENDF/B format

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1980-07-04

    Program GROUPIE reads evaluated data in the ENDF/B format and uses these data to calculate Bondarenko self-shielded cross sections and multiband parameters. To give as much generality as possible, the program allows the user to specify arbitrary energy groups and an arbitrary energy groups and an arbitrary energy-dependent neutron spectrum (weighing function). To guarantee the accuracy of the results, all integrals are performed analytically; in no case is iteration or any approximate form of integration used. The output from this program includes both listings and multiband parameters suitable for use either in a normal multigroup transport calculation or in a multiband transport calculation. A listing of the source deck is available on request.

  18. SU-E-T-670: Radiotherapy Vault Shielding Evaluation Method for a Flattening Filter-Free (FFF) Linac-Practical Considerations and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailidis, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To date, there isn’t formal approach for flattening filter-free (FFF) linac vault shielding evaluation, thus, we propose an extension to NCRP#151 to accommodate the recent large number of FFF linac installations.Methods and Materials: We extended the approach in NCRP#151 to design two Truebeam vaults in our new cancer center for hypofractionated treatments. Monte Carlo calculations have characterized primary, scattered, leakage and neutron radiations from FFF-modes. These calculations have shown that: a) FFF primary beam is softer on the central-axis compared to flattening filtered (FF), b) the lateral dose profile is peaked on the central axis and less integral target current is required to generate the same tumor dose with the FF beam. Thus, the TVLs for FFF mode are smaller than those of the FF mode and the scatter functions of the FF mode (NCRP#151) may not be appropriate for FFF-mode, c) the neutron source strength and fluence for 18X-FFF is smaller than 18X-FF, but it is not of a concern here, no 18X-FFF-mode is available on the linac under investigation. Results: These barrier thickness are smaller (12% reduction on the average) than those computed for conventional FF mode with same realistic primary workload since, the primary TVLs used here are smaller and the WL is smaller than the conventional (almost half reduced), keeping the TADR in tolerance. Conclusions: A comprehensive method for shielding barrier calculations based on dedicated data for FFF-mode linacs is highly desired. Meanwhile, we provide an extension to NCRP#151 to accommodate the shielding design of such installations. It is also shown that if a vault is already designed for IMRT/VMAT and SABR hypofractionated treatments with FFF-mode linac, the vault can also be used for a FFF mode linac replacement, leaving some leeway for slightly higher workload on the FFF linac.

  19. A Quantile Mapping Bias Correction Method Based on Hydroclimatic Classification of the Guiana Shield

    PubMed Central

    Ringard, Justine; Seyler, Frederique; Linguet, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Satellite precipitation products (SPPs) provide alternative precipitation data for regions with sparse rain gauge measurements. However, SPPs are subject to different types of error that need correction. Most SPP bias correction methods use the statistical properties of the rain gauge data to adjust the corresponding SPP data. The statistical adjustment does not make it possible to correct the pixels of SPP data for which there is no rain gauge data. The solution proposed in this article is to correct the daily SPP data for the Guiana Shield using a novel two set approach, without taking into account the daily gauge data of the pixel to be corrected, but the daily gauge data from surrounding pixels. In this case, a spatial analysis must be involved. The first step defines hydroclimatic areas using a spatial classification that considers precipitation data with the same temporal distributions. The second step uses the Quantile Mapping bias correction method to correct the daily SPP data contained within each hydroclimatic area. We validate the results by comparing the corrected SPP data and daily rain gauge measurements using relative RMSE and relative bias statistical errors. The results show that analysis scale variation reduces rBIAS and rRMSE significantly. The spatial classification avoids mixing rainfall data with different temporal characteristics in each hydroclimatic area, and the defined bias correction parameters are more realistic and appropriate. This study demonstrates that hydroclimatic classification is relevant for implementing bias correction methods at the local scale. PMID:28621723

  20. A Quantile Mapping Bias Correction Method Based on Hydroclimatic Classification of the Guiana Shield.

    PubMed

    Ringard, Justine; Seyler, Frederique; Linguet, Laurent

    2017-06-16

    Satellite precipitation products (SPPs) provide alternative precipitation data for regions with sparse rain gauge measurements. However, SPPs are subject to different types of error that need correction. Most SPP bias correction methods use the statistical properties of the rain gauge data to adjust the corresponding SPP data. The statistical adjustment does not make it possible to correct the pixels of SPP data for which there is no rain gauge data. The solution proposed in this article is to correct the daily SPP data for the Guiana Shield using a novel two set approach, without taking into account the daily gauge data of the pixel to be corrected, but the daily gauge data from surrounding pixels. In this case, a spatial analysis must be involved. The first step defines hydroclimatic areas using a spatial classification that considers precipitation data with the same temporal distributions. The second step uses the Quantile Mapping bias correction method to correct the daily SPP data contained within each hydroclimatic area. We validate the results by comparing the corrected SPP data and daily rain gauge measurements using relative RMSE and relative bias statistical errors. The results show that analysis scale variation reduces rBIAS and rRMSE significantly. The spatial classification avoids mixing rainfall data with different temporal characteristics in each hydroclimatic area, and the defined bias correction parameters are more realistic and appropriate. This study demonstrates that hydroclimatic classification is relevant for implementing bias correction methods at the local scale.

  1. Evaluation of a method to shield a welding electron beam from magnetic interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    It is known that electron beams are easily deflected by magnetic and electrostatic fields. Therefore, to prevent weld defects, stray electromagnetic fields are avoided in electron beam welding chambers if at all possible. The successful results of tests conducted at MSFC to evaluate a simple magnetic shield made from steel tubing are reported. Tests indicate that this shield was up to 85 percent effective in reducing magnetic effects on the electron beam of a welding machine. In addition, residual magnetic fields within the shield were so nearly uniform that the net effect on the beam alignment was negligible. It is concluded that the shield, with the addition of a tungsten liner, could be used in production welding.

  2. Computational methods for probability of instability calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Burnside, O. H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of the methods and a computer program to compute the probability of instability of a dynamic system than can be represented by a system of second-order ordinary linear differential equations. Two instability criteria based upon the roots of the characteristics equation or Routh-Hurwitz test functions are investigated. Computational methods based on system reliability analysis methods and importance sampling concepts are proposed to perform efficient probabilistic analysis. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the methods.

  3. GCFR radial blanket and shield experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.; Hull, J.L.; Manning, J.J.

    1980-12-01

    This report presents integral neutron flux, energy spectra, and gamma-ray heating measurements made for the Radial Blanket and Shield Experiment at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility as part of a continuing Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor program. The experimental configurations were divided into four basic segments: a spectrum modifier inserted into the Tower Shielding Reactor II beam; blanket slabs consisting of either ThO/sub 2/ or UO/sub 2/ placed directly behind the spectrum modifier; an inner radial shield behind the blankets; and an outer radial shield to complete the mockup. The segments were added in sequence, with selected measurements made within and beyond each segment. The integral experiment was performed to provide verification of calculational methods and nuclear data used in designing a radial shield for the GCFR and determining the effectiveness of the design. The ThO/sub 2/ blanket measurements were needed to bracket the uncertainties in the nuclear cross sections for calculating both the neutron transmission through the blanket and the gamma-ray heating rates within the blanket. Measurements with a UO/sub 2/ blanket were included both as a reference for the ThO/sub 2/ analysis, neutron transmission through UO/sub 2/ having been successfully calculated in previous experiments, and to provide comparison information for other breeder reactor designs.

  4. Comparison and physical interpretation of MCNP and TART neutron and γ Monte Carlo shielding calculations for a heavy-ion ICF system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainardi, E.; Premuda, F.; Lee, E.

    2004-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) aims to induce implosions of D-T pellets to obtain a extremely dense and hot plasma with lasers or heavy-ion beams. For heavy-ion fusion (HIF), recent research has focused on "liquid-protected" designs that allow highly compact target chambers. In the design of a reactor such as HYLIFE-II [Fus. Techol. 25 (1984); HYLIFE-II Progress Report, UCID-21816, 4.82-100], the liquid used is a molten salt made of F 10, Li 6, Li 7, Be 9 (called flibe). Flibe allows the final-focus magnets to be closer to the target, which helps to reduce the focus spot size and in turn the size of the driver, with a large reduction of the cost of HIF electricity. Consequently the superconducting coils of the magnets closer to the D-T neutron source will potentially suffer higher damage though they can stand only a certain amount of energy deposited before quenching. This work has been primarily focusing on verifying that total energy deposited by fusion neutrons and induced γ rays remain under such limit values and the final purpose is the optimization of the shielding of the magnetic lens system from the points of view of the geometrical configuration and of the physical nature of the materials adopted. The system is analyzed in terms of six geometrical models going from simplified up to much more realistic representations of a system of 192 beam lines, each focused by six magnets. A 3-D transport calculation of the radiation penetrating through ducts, that takes into account the complexity of the system, requires Monte Carlo methods. The technical nature of the design problem and the methodology followed were presented in a previous paper [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 464 (2001) 410] by summarizing briefly the results for the deposited energy distribution on the six focal magnets of a beam line. Now a comparison of the performances of the two codes TART98 [TART98: A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D Combinational Geometry Monte Carlo Transport Code, Lawrence Livermore

  5. A shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    The perturbation theory for fixed sources was applied to radiation shielding problems to determine changes in neutron and gamma ray doses due to changes in various shield layers. For a given source and detector position the perturbation method enables dose derivatives due to all layer changes to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. The direct approach requires two forward calculations for the derivative due to a single layer change. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives permits an appreciable savings in computation for a multilayered shield. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  6. Methods of calculating radiation absorbed dose.

    PubMed

    Wegst, A V

    1987-01-01

    The new tumoricidal radioactive agents being developed will require a careful estimate of radiation absorbed tumor and critical organ dose for each patient. Clinical methods will need to be developed using standard imaging or counting instruments to determine cumulated organ activities with tracer amounts before the therapeutic administration of the material. Standard MIRD dosimetry methods can then be applied.

  7. Methods of Stress Calculation in Rotating Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumarkin, S.

    1944-01-01

    The paper describes nethods of computing the stresses in disks of a given profile as well as methods of choosing the disk profiles for a given stress distribution for turhines, turbo blowers, and so forth. A new method of in tegrating the differential equations of Stodola leads to a simplification of the computation for disks of hyperbolic profile.

  8. A generic TG-186 shielded applicator for commissioning model-based dose calculation algorithms for high-dose-rate (192) Ir brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunzhi; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa; Granero, Domingo; Haworth, Annette; Mourtada, Firas; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis; Rivard, Mark J; Siebert, Frank André; Sloboda, Ron S; Smith, Ryan; Chamberland, Marc J P; Thomson, Rowan M; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2017-07-19

    A joint working group was created by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO), and the Australasian Brachytherapy Group (ABG) with the charge, among others, to develop a set of well-defined test case plans and perform model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCA) dose calculations and comparisons. Its main goal is to facilitate a smooth transition from the AAPM Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) dose calculation formalism, widely being used in clinical practice for brachytherapy, to the one proposed by Task Group No. 186 (TG-186) for MBDCAs. To do so, in this work a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) (192) Ir shielded applicator has been designed and benchmarked. A generic HDR (192) Ir shielded applicator was designed based on three commercially available gynecological applicators as well as a virtual cubic water phantom that can be imported into any DICOM-RT compatible treatment planning system (TPS). The absorbed dose distribution around the applicator with the TG-186 (192) Ir source located at one dwell position at its center was computed using two commercial TPSs incorporating MBDCAs (Oncentra(®) Brachy with Advanced Collapsed-cone Engine, ACE(™) , and BrachyVision ACUROS(™) ) and state-of-the-art Monte Carlo (MC) codes, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, egs_brachy, Geant4, MCNP6, and Penelope2008. TPS-based volumetric dose distributions for the previously reported "source centered in water" and "source displaced" test cases, and the new "source centered in applicator" test case, were analyzed here using the MCNP6 dose distribution as a reference. Volumetric dose comparisons of TPS results against results for the other MC codes were also performed. Distributions of local and global dose difference ratios are reported. The local dose differences among MC codes are comparable to the statistical uncertainties of the reference datasets for the "source centered in water" and "source

  9. Developpement de methodes de calcul de coefficients de sensibilite des sections efficaces multigroupes autoprotegees et de sensibilite implicite du keff aux densites isotopiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dion, Maxime

    Since deterministic codes use a multigroup scheme, self-shielding calculations are required before one can carry out neutron transport calculations. These calculations are used to obtain multigroup cross sections where flux depressions at resonance energies are properly taken into account. For each system where a transport solution is required, self-shielding calculations must be carried out beforehand. Multigroup cross sections in the resonant energy range are therefore system-dependent quantities. This means that a variation on a reactor parameter, an isotopic density for example, will have an impact on the resonant self-shielded cross sections. It is therefore relevant to distinguish between two types of effects resulting from a variation on a given parameter. This parameter can explicitly appear in the transport equation (for example, an isotopic density explicitly appears through the macroscopic cross sections of the corresponding mixture) and perturb the multiplication factor keff (or any other quantity obtained from solving the transport equation). This is called an explicit effect. This parameter variation can also affect self-shielding calculations and perturb resonant multigroup cross sections, which can themselves cause a variation of keff. This is what we refer to as an implicit effect. In general, the keff perturbations resulting from the implicit effect have the opposite sign of those resulting from the explicit effect. When a variation on a parameter leads to a perturbation on another parameter, following a transport calculation for instance, we can compute sensitivity coefficients between those two parameters. In this thesis, we consider the self-shielded cross sections and keff sensitivity coefficients to isotopic densities. More precisely, we develop methods to compute the self-shielded cross sections sensitivity to densities arising from two different self-shielding models, an equivalent dilution model and a subgroup model. Once these

  10. FIFRELIN - TRIPOLI-4® coupling for Monte Carlo simulations with a fission model. Application to shielding calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Odile; Jouanne, Cédric; Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Chebboubi, Abdelhazize; Pénéliau, Yannick

    2017-09-01

    TRIPOLI-4® Monte Carlo transport code and FIFRELIN fission model have been coupled by means of external files so that neutron transport can take into account fission distributions (multiplicities and spectra) that are not averaged, as is the case when using evaluated nuclear data libraries. Spectral effects on responses in shielding configurations with fission sampling are then expected. In the present paper, the principle of this coupling is detailed and a comparison between TRIPOLI-4® fission distributions at the emission of fission neutrons is presented when using JEFF-3.1.1 evaluated data or FIFRELIN data generated either through a n/g-uncoupled mode or through a n/g-coupled mode. Finally, an application to a modified version of the ASPIS benchmark is performed and the impact of using FIFRELIN data on neutron transport is analyzed. Differences noticed on average reaction rates on the surfaces closest to the fission source are mainly due to the average prompt fission spectrum. Moreover, when working with the same average spectrum, a complementary analysis based on non-average reaction rates still shows significant differences that point out the real impact of using a fission model in neutron transport simulations.

  11. The application of the phase space time evolution method to electron shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordaro, M. C.; Zucker, M. S.

    1972-01-01

    A computer technique for treating the motion of charged and neutral particles and called the phase space time evolution method was developed. This technique employs the computer's bookkeeping capacity to keep track of the time development of a phase space distribution of particles. This method was applied to a study of the penetration of electrons. A 1 MeV beam of electrons normally incident on a semi-infinite slab of aluminum was used. Results of the calculation were compared with Monte Carlo calculations and experimental results. Time-dependent PSTE electron penetration results for the same problem are presented.

  12. Heat Shielding: A Novel Method of Colonial Thermoregulation in Honey Bees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, Philip T.; Gilley, David C.

    Honey bees, Apis mellifera, maintain constant colony temperatures throughout the year. Honey bees fan their wings to cool the colony, and often spread fluid in conjunction with this behavior to induce evaporative cooling. We present an additional, previously undescribed mechanism used by the honey bee to maintain constant colony temperature in response to localized temperature increases. Worker bees shield the comb from external heat sources by positioning themselves on hot interior regions of the hive's walls. Although honey comb and brood comb were both shielded, the temperature-sensitive brood received a greater number of heat shielders and was thus better protected from overheating. Heat shielding appears to be a context-dependent adaptive behavior performed by worker bees who would previously have been considered "unemployed."

  13. Lie algebraic methods for particle tracking calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.R.; Dragt, A.J.

    1983-08-01

    A study of the nonlinear stability of an accelerator or storage ring lattice typically includes particle tracking simulations. Such simulations trace rays through linear and nonlinear lattice elements by numerically evaluating linear matrix or impulsive nonlinear transformations. Using the mathematical tools of Lie groups and algebras, one may construct a formalism which makes explicit use of Hamilton's equations and which allows the description of groups of linear and nonlinear lattice elements by a single transformation. Such a transformation will be exactly canonical and will describe finite length linear and nonlinear elements through third (octupole) order. It is presently possible to include effects such as fringing fields and potentially possible to extend the formalism to include nonlinearities of higher order, multipole errors, and magnet misalignments. We outline this Lie algebraic formalism and its use in particle tracking calculations. A computer code, MARYLIE, has been constructed on the basis of this formalism. We describe the use of this program for tracking and provide examples of its application. 6 references, 3 figures.

  14. Deconstructing Calculation Methods, Part 4: Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    In the final article of a series of four, the author deconstructs the primary national strategy's approach to written division. The approach to division is divided into five stages: (1) mental division using partition; (2) short division of TU / U; (3) "expanded" method for HTU / U; (4) short division of HTU / U; and (5) long division.…

  15. Calculating the response of NMR shielding tensor σ(31P) and 2J(31P,13C) coupling constants in nucleic acid phosphate to coordination of the Mg2+ cation.

    PubMed

    Benda, Ladislav; Schneider, Bohdan; Sychrovský, Vladimír

    2011-03-24

    Dependence of NMR (31)P shielding tensor and (2)J(P,C) coupling constants on solvation of nucleic acid phosphate by Mg(2+) and water was studied using methods of bioinformatic structural analyses of crystallographic data and DFT B3LYP calculations of NMR parameters. The effect of solvent dynamics on NMR parameters was calculated using molecular dynamic. The NMR calculations for representative solvation patterns determined in crystals of B-DNA and A-RNA molecules pointed out the crucial importance of local Mg(2+) coordination geometry, including hydration by explicit water molecules and necessity of dynamical averaging over the solvent reorientation. The dynamically averaged (31)P chemical shift decreased by 2-9.5 ppm upon Mg(2+) coordination, the chemical shielding anisotropy increased by 0-20 ppm, and the (2)J(P,C5') coupling magnitude decreased by 0.2-1.8 Hz upon Mg(2+) coordination. The calculated decrease of the (31)P chemical shift is in excellent agreement with the 1.5-10 ppm decrease of the phosphorothioate (31)P chemical shift upon Cd(2+) coordination probed experimentally in hammerhead ribozyme (Suzumura; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 8230-8236; Osborne; et al., Biochemistry 2009, 48, 10654-10664). None of the dynamically averaged NMR parameters unequivocally distinguishes the site-specific Mg(2+) coordination to one of the two nonesterified phosphate oxygen atoms of the phosphate determined by bioinformatic analyses. By comparing the limit cases of static and dynamically averaged solvation, we propose that mobility of the solvent has a dramatic impact on NMR parameters of nucleic acid phosphate and must be taken into account for their accurate modeling.

  16. Enhanced Method for Cavity Impedance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Marhauser, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    With the proposal of medium to high average current accelerator facilities the demand for cavities with extremely low Higher Order Mode (HOM) impedances is increasing. Modern numerical tools are still under development to more thoroughly predict impedances that need to take into account complex absorbing boundaries and lossy materials. With the usually large problem size it is preferable to utilize massive parallel computing when applicable and available. Apart from such computational issues, we have developed methods using available computer resources to enhance the information that can be extracted from a cavities? wakefield computed in time domain. In particular this is helpful for a careful assessment of the extracted RF power and the mitigation of potential beam break-up or emittance diluting effects, a figure of merit for the cavity performance. The method is described as well as an example of its implementation.

  17. Calculating Pi Using the Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Timothy

    2013-11-01

    During the summer of 2012, I had the opportunity to participate in a research experience for teachers at the center for sustainable energy at Notre Dame University (RET @ cSEND) working with Professor John LoSecco on the problem of using antineutrino detection to accurately determine the fuel makeup and operating power of nuclear reactors. During full power operation, a reactor may produce 1021 antineutrinos per second with approximately 100 per day being detected. While becoming familiar with the design and operation of the detectors, and how total antineutrino flux could be obtained from such a small sample, I read about a simulation program called Monte Carlo. Further investigation led me to the Monte Carlo method page of Wikipedia2 where I saw an example of approximating pi using this simulation. Other examples where this method was applied were typically done with computer simulations2 or purely mathematical.3 It is my belief that this method may be easily related to the students by performing the simple activity of sprinkling rice on an arc drawn in a square. The activity that follows was inspired by those simulations and was used by my AP Physics class last year with very good results.

  18. Examinations of electron temperature calculation methods in Thomson scattering diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seungtae; Lee, Jong Ha; Wi, Hanmin

    2012-10-15

    Electron temperature from Thomson scattering diagnostic is derived through indirect calculation based on theoretical model. {chi}-square test is commonly used in the calculation, and the reliability of the calculation method highly depends on the noise level of input signals. In the simulations, noise effects of the {chi}-square test are examined and scale factor test is proposed as an alternative method.

  19. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  20. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  1. The SHIELD (Safety & Health Improvement: Enhancing Law Enforcement Departments) Study: Mixed Methods Longitudinal Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kuehl, Kerry S.; Elliot, Diane L.; MacKinnon, David P.; O’Rourke, Holly P.; DeFrancesco, Carol; Miočević, Milica; Valente, Matthew; Sleigh, Adriana; Garg, Bharti; McGinnis, Wendy; Kuehl, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The SHIELD (Safety & Health Improvement: Enhancing Law Enforcement Departments) Study is a worksite wellness team-based intervention among police and sheriff departments assessing the program’s effectiveness to reduce occupational risks and unhealthy lifestyle behaviors. The SHIELD program focused on improving diet, physical activity, body weight and sleep and reducing the effects of unhealthy stress and behaviors such as tobacco and substance abuse. The SHIELD team-based health promotion program was found to be feasible and effective at 6 months in improving diet, sleep, stress, and overall quality of life of law enforcement department personnel. Both intervention and control groups were followed for 24 months, and we report those durability findings, along with qualitative group interview results that provide insight into the changes of the long term outcomes. Long term effects were observed for consumption of fruits and vegetables and there was some evidence for effects on tobacco and alcohol use. Assessment of dietary habits, physical activity behaviors, weight loss maintenance, and substance use is rare more than one year following an intervention, and in general, initial positive changes do not persist in prior research. The SHIELD program was feasible, effective, and durable for improving dietary changes. PMID:27158956

  2. Algebraic method for calculating a neutron albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatovich, V. K.; Shabalin, E. P.

    2007-02-01

    A neutron albedo from arbitrary homogeneous and finely grained substances is examined on the basis of a new, algebraic, method. In the approximation of an isotropic distribution of incident and reflected neutrons, it is shown that, in the case of thermal neutrons, coherent scattering on individual particles of finely grained media increases only slightly the transport cross section, but, at a given wall thickness, it reduces the albedo because of a decrease in the density of the substance. A significant increase in the albedo is possible only for neutrons of wavelength on the order of dimensions of a powder grain. The angular distribution of reflected neutrons is discussed, and it is proven that a deviation of this distribution from an isotropic one does not lead to a change in the magnitude of the albedo.

  3. A CT-based analytical dose calculation method for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Poon, Emily; Verhaegen, Frank

    2009-09-01

    This article presents an analytical dose calculation method for high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, taking into account the effects of inhomogeneities and reduced photon backscatter near the skin. The adequacy of the Task Group 43 (TG-43) two-dimensional formalism for treatment planning is also assessed. The proposed method uses material composition and density data derived from computed tomography images. The primary and scatter dose distributions for each dwell position are calculated first as if the patient is an infinite water phantom. This is done using either TG-43 or a database of Monte Carlo (MC) dose distributions. The latter can be used to account for the effects of shielding in water. Subsequently, corrections for photon attenuation, scatter, and spectral variations along medium- or low-Z inhomogeneities are made according to the radiological paths determined by ray tracing. The scatter dose is then scaled by a correction factor that depends on the distances between the point of interest, the body contour, and the source position. Dose calculations are done for phantoms with tissue and lead inserts, as well as patient plans for head-and-neck, esophagus, and MammoSite balloon breast brachytherapy treatments. Gamma indices are evaluated using a dose-difference criterion of 3% and a distance-to-agreement criterion of 2 mm. PTRAN_CT MC calculations are used as the reference dose distributions. For the phantom with tissue and lead inserts, the percentages of the voxels of interest passing the gamma criteria (Pgamma > or = 1) are 100% for the analytical calculation and 91% for TG-43. For the breast patient plan, TG-43 overestimates the target volume receiving the prescribed dose by 4% and the dose to the hottest 0.1 cm3 of the skin by 9%, whereas the analytical and MC results agree within 0.4%. Pgamma > or = 1 are 100% and 48% for the analytical and TG-43 calculations, respectively. For the head-and-neck and esophagus patient plans, Pgamma > or = 1 are > or

  4. Hybrid density functional calculations of nuclear magnetic shieldings using Slater-type orbitals and the zeroth-order regular approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Ziegler, Tom; Lenthe, Erik Van

    We report the implementation of an algorithm for the calculation of the exact Hartree-Fock exchange with Slater-type orbitals (STOs). Similar to the article of Watson et al., J Chem Phys, 2003, 119, 6475, it is based on the fitting of each atomic orbital pair. However, our algorithm avoids the evaluation of three-center two-electron integrals and, as a result, makes it possible to carry out hybrid DFT calculations for larger size molecules and compounds with heavy elements. For the first time, the NMR chemical shifts of transition metal complexes have been calculated with STOs and hybrid density functionals. To take into account the relativistic effects, we have employed the zeroth-order regular approximation.

  5. Shielding of substations against direct lightning strokes by shield wires

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhuri, P. )

    1994-01-01

    A new analysis for shielding outdoor substations against direct lightning strokes by shield wires is proposed. The basic assumption of this proposed method is that any lightning stroke which penetrates the shields will cause damage. The second assumption is that a certain level of risk of failure must be accepted, such as one or two failures per 100 years. The proposed method, using electrogeometric model, was applied to design shield wires for two outdoor substations: (1) 161-kV/69-kV station, and (2) 500-kV/161-kV station. The results of the proposed method were also compared with the shielding data of two other substations.

  6. Magnetic shielding for a spaceborne adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Brent A.; Shirron, Peter J.; Castles, Stephen H.; Serlemitsos, Aristides T.

    1991-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center has studied magnetic shielding for an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Four types of shielding were studied: active coils, passive ferromagnetic shells, passive superconducting coils, and passive superconducting shells. The passive superconducting shells failed by allowing flux penetration. The other three methods were successful, singly or together. Experimental studies of passive ferromagnetic shielding are compared with calculations made using the Poisson Group of programs, distributed by the Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Agreement between calculation and experiment is good. The ferromagnetic material is a silicon iron alloy.

  7. Magnetic shielding for a spaceborne adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Brent A.; Shirron, Peter J.; Castles, Stephen H.; Serlemitsos, Aristides T.

    1991-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center has studied magnetic shielding for an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Four types of shielding were studied: active coils, passive ferromagnetic shells, passive superconducting coils, and passive superconducting shells. The passive superconducting shells failed by allowing flux penetration. The other three methods were successful, singly or together. Experimental studies of passive ferromagnetic shielding are compared with calculations made using the Poisson Group of programs, distributed by the Los Alamos Accelerator Code Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Agreement between calculation and experiment is good. The ferromagnetic material is a silicon iron alloy.

  8. Fast calculation method for spherical computer-generated holograms.

    PubMed

    Tachiki, Mark L; Sando, Yusuke; Itoh, Masahide; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2006-05-20

    The synthesis of spherical computer-generated holograms is investigated. To deal with the staggering calculation times required to synthesize the hologram, a fast calculation method for approximating the hologram distribution is proposed. In this method, the diffraction integral is approximated as a convolution integral, allowing computation using the fast-Fourier-transform algorithm. The principles of the fast calculation method, the error in the approximation, and results from simulations are presented.

  9. Neutron streaming analysis for shield design of FMIT Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    Applications of the Monte Carlo method have been summarized relevant to neutron streaming problems of interest in the shield design for the FMIT Facility. An improved angular biasing method has been implemented to further optimize the calculation of streaming and this method has been applied to calculate streaming within a double bend pipe.

  10. Improved analysis of electron penetration and numerical procedures for space radiation shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Denn, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    Electron penetration calculational techniques are reviewed with regard to their suitability for shield analysis in future space operations. Methods based on the transmission factors of Mar are discussed and a correction term for low-energy electrons, which results in slightly conservative shield estimates, is derived. This modified Mar's method provides estimates of the dose for electrons that penetrate through shields of arbitrary elemental material with an atomic number greater than four. A complete computer algorithm is included.

  11. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  12. EXAMPLES OF RADIATION SHIELDING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Willison, J

    2006-07-27

    The attached pictures are examples of shielding models used by WSMS. The models were used in shielding evaluations for Tank 50 pump replacement. They show the relative location of shielding to radiation sources for pumps and pipes. None of the calculations that were associated with these models involved UCNI. The last page contains two pictures from a shielding calculation for the saltstone area. The upper picture is a conceptual drawing. The lower picture is an image copied from the website of a supplier for the project.

  13. Complexity of Monte Carlo and deterministic dose-calculation methods.

    PubMed

    Börgers, C

    1998-03-01

    Grid-based deterministic dose-calculation methods for radiotherapy planning require the use of six-dimensional phase space grids. Because of the large number of phase space dimensions, a growing number of medical physicists appear to believe that grid-based deterministic dose-calculation methods are not competitive with Monte Carlo methods. We argue that this conclusion may be premature. Our results do suggest, however, that finite difference or finite element schemes with orders of accuracy greater than one will probably be needed if such methods are to compete well with Monte Carlo methods for dose calculations.

  14. Some methods for calculation of perturbations in nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, B. D.

    2015-12-15

    Some methods for calculation of local perturbations of neutron fields and reactivity effects accompanying them are considered. Existence, uniqueness, properties and methods for finding solutions to the considered problems are discussed.

  15. Some methods for calculation of perturbations in nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Some methods for calculation of local perturbations of neutron fields and reactivity effects accompanying them are considered. Existence, uniqueness, properties and methods for finding solutions to the considered problems are discussed.

  16. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and closure methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers are discussed. Flow phenomena peculiar to calculation of these boundary layers were considered, along with calculations of three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers. Procedures for ascertaining nonsimilar two and three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers were appended, including finite difference, finite element, and mass-weighted residual methods.

  17. Shielding current analysis by current-vector-potential method: Application to HTS film with multiply-connected structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamitani, A.; Takayama, T.; Ikuno, S.

    2013-11-01

    The performance of the virtual voltage method is compared with that of the conventional method in which integral forms of Faraday’s law along crack surfaces are treated as natural boundary conditions. As a result, it is found that there is a significant difference between numerical solutions by the two methods. In this sense, not the conventional method but the virtual voltage method should be employed to the shielding current analysis in a high-temperature superconducting film with cracks. By means of the virtual voltage method, the influence of a crack on the inductive method is investigated numerically. The results of computations show that, if the threshold current changes remarkably from its ambient value, a part of a crack is contained in the projection of the field-generating coil onto the film surface. Furthermore, the applicability of the inductive method to the crack detection is investigated numerically.

  18. A Multigroup Method for the Calculation of Neutron Fluence with a Source Term

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinbockel, J. H.; Clowdsley, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Current research on the Grant involves the development of a multigroup method for the calculation of low energy evaporation neutron fluences associated with the Boltzmann equation. This research will enable one to predict radiation exposure under a variety of circumstances. Knowledge of radiation exposure in a free-space environment is a necessity for space travel, high altitude space planes and satellite design. This is because certain radiation environments can cause damage to biological and electronic systems involving both short term and long term effects. By having apriori knowledge of the environment one can use prediction techniques to estimate radiation damage to such systems. Appropriate shielding can be designed to protect both humans and electronic systems that are exposed to a known radiation environment. This is the goal of the current research efforts involving the multi-group method and the Green's function approach.

  19. Calculation of transonic flows using an extended integral equation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D.

    1976-01-01

    An extended integral equation method for transonic flows is developed. In the extended integral equation method velocities in the flow field are calculated in addition to values on the aerofoil surface, in contrast with the less accurate 'standard' integral equation method in which only surface velocities are calculated. The results obtained for aerofoils in subcritical flow and in supercritical flow when shock waves are present compare satisfactorily with the results of recent finite difference methods.

  20. The heterogeneous anti-radiation shield for spacecraft*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telegin, S. V.; Draganyuk, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper deals with modeling of elemental composition and properties of heterogeneous layers in multilayered shields to protect spacecraft onboard equipment from radiation emitted by the natural Earth’s radiation belt. This radiation causes malfunctioning of semiconductor elements in electronic equipment and may result in a failure of the spacecraft as a whole. We consider four different shield designs and compare them to the most conventional radiation-protective material for spacecraft - aluminum. Out of light and heavy chemical elements we chose the materials with high reaction cross sections and low density. The mass attenuation coefficient of boron- containing compounds is 20% higher than that of aluminum. Heterogeneous shields consist of three layers: a glass cloth, borated material, and nickel. With a protective shield containing heavy metal the output bremsstrahlung can be reduced. The amount of gamma rays that succeed to penetrate the shield is 4 times less compared to aluminum. The shields under study have the thicknesses of 5.95 and 6.2 mm. A comparative analysis of homogeneous and multilayered protective coatings of the same chemical composition has been performed. A heterogeneous protective shield has been found to be advantageous in weight and shielding properties over its homogeneous counterparts and aluminum. The dose characteristics and transmittance were calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The results of our study lead us to conclude that a three-layer boron carbide shield provides the most effective protection from radiation. This shield ensures twice as low absorbed dose and 4 times less the number of penetrated gamma-ray photons compared to its aluminum analogue. Moreover, a heterogeneous shield will have a weight 10% lighter than aluminum, with the same attenuation coefficient of the electron flux. Such heterogeneous shields can be used to protect spacecraft launched to geostationary orbit. Furthermore, a protective boron-containing and

  1. Iterative acceleration methods for Monte Carlo and deterministic criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, T.J.

    1995-11-01

    If you have ever given up on a nuclear criticality calculation and terminated it because it took so long to converge, you might find this thesis of interest. The author develops three methods for improving the fission source convergence in nuclear criticality calculations for physical systems with high dominance ratios for which convergence is slow. The Fission Matrix Acceleration Method and the Fission Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (FDSA) Method are acceleration methods that speed fission source convergence for both Monte Carlo and deterministic methods. The third method is a hybrid Monte Carlo method that also converges for difficult problems where the unaccelerated Monte Carlo method fails. The author tested the feasibility of all three methods in a test bed consisting of idealized problems. He has successfully accelerated fission source convergence in both deterministic and Monte Carlo criticality calculations. By filtering statistical noise, he has incorporated deterministic attributes into the Monte Carlo calculations in order to speed their source convergence. He has used both the fission matrix and a diffusion approximation to perform unbiased accelerations. The Fission Matrix Acceleration method has been implemented in the production code MCNP and successfully applied to a real problem. When the unaccelerated calculations are unable to converge to the correct solution, they cannot be accelerated in an unbiased fashion. A Hybrid Monte Carlo method weds Monte Carlo and a modified diffusion calculation to overcome these deficiencies. The Hybrid method additionally possesses reduced statistical errors.

  2. BNCT dose calculation in irregular fields using the sector integration method.

    PubMed

    Blaumann, H R; Sanz, D E; Longhino, J M; Larrieu, O A Calzetta

    2004-11-01

    Irregular fields for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have been already proposed to spare normal tissue in the treatment of superficial tumors. This added dependence would require custom measurements and/or to have a secondary calculation system. As a first step, we implemented the sector-integration method for irregular field calculation in a homogeneous medium and on the central beam axis. The dosimetric responses (fast neutron and photon dose and thermal neutron flux), are calculated by sector integrating the measured responses of circular fields over the field boundary. The measurements were carried out at our BNCT facility, the RA-6 reactor (Argentina). The input data were dosimetric responses for circular fields measured at different depths in a water phantom using ionisation and activation techniques. Circular fields were formed by shielding the beam with two plates: borated polyethilene plus lead. As a test, the dosimetric responses of a 7x4 cm(2) rectangular field, were measured and compared to calculations, yielding differences less than 3% in equivalent dose at any depth indicating that the tool is suitable for redundant calculations.

  3. A method of calculating the ultimate strength of continuous beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newlin, J A; Trayer, George W

    1931-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the strength of continuous beams after the elastic limit has been passed. As a result, a method of calculation, which is applicable to maximum load conditions, has been developed. The method is simpler than the methods now in use and it applies properly to conditions where the present methods fail to apply.

  4. Dual Optimization Method of RF and Quasi-Static Field Simulations for Reduction of Eddy Currents Generated on 7T RF Coil Shielding

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Zhao, Tiejun; Raval, Shailesh B.; Krishnamurthy, Narayanan; Zheng, Hai; Harris, Chad T.; Handler, William B.; Chronik, Blaine A.; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To optimize the design of radiofrequency (RF) shielding of transmit coils at 7T and reduce eddy currents generated on the RF shielding when imaging with rapid gradient waveforms. Methods One set of a four-element, 2×2 Tic-Tac-Toe (TTT) head coil structure is selected and constructed to study eddy currents on the RF coil shielding. The generated eddy currents are quantitatively studied in the time and frequency domains. The RF characteristics are studied using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Five different kinds of RF shielding were tested on a 7T MRI scanner with phantoms and in-vivo human subjects. Results The eddy current simulation method is verified by the measurement results. Eddy currents induced by solid/intact and simple-structured slotted RF shielding can significantly distort the gradient fields. EPI images, B1+ maps and S matrix measurements verified that the proposed slot pattern can suppress the eddy currents while maintaining the RF characteristics of the transmit coil. Conclusion The presented dual-optimization method could be used to design the RF shielding and reduce the gradient field-induced eddy currents while maintaining the RF characteristics of the transmit coil. PMID:25367703

  5. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  6. Application of wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation method to MOX fuel problem

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.

    2012-07-01

    More and more MOX fuels are used in all over the world in the past several decades. Compared with UO{sub 2} fuel, it contains some new features. For example, the neutron spectrum is harder and more resonance interference effects within the resonance energy range are introduced because of more resonant nuclides contained in the MOX fuel. In this paper, the wavelets scaling function expansion method is applied to study the resonance behavior of plutonium isotopes within MOX fuel. Wavelets scaling function expansion continuous-energy self-shielding method is developed recently. It has been validated and verified by comparison to Monte Carlo calculations. In this method, the continuous-energy cross-sections are utilized within resonance energy, which means that it's capable to solve problems with serious resonance interference effects without iteration calculations. Therefore, this method adapts to treat the MOX fuel resonance calculation problem natively. Furthermore, plutonium isotopes have fierce oscillations of total cross-section within thermal energy range, especially for {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu. To take thermal resonance effect of plutonium isotopes into consideration the wavelet scaling function expansion continuous-energy resonance calculation code WAVERESON is enhanced by applying the free gas scattering kernel to obtain the continuous-energy scattering source within thermal energy range (2.1 eV to 4.0 eV) contrasting against the resonance energy range in which the elastic scattering kernel is utilized. Finally, all of the calculation results of WAVERESON are compared with MCNP calculation. (authors)

  7. Magnetic Shield for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso C.; Haddad, Nicolas E.

    2013-01-01

    A new method was developed for creating a less expensive shield for ADRs using 1018 carbon steel. This shield has been designed to have similar performance to the expensive vanadium permendur shields, but the cost is 30 to 50% less. Also, these shields can be stocked in a variety of sizes, eliminating the need for special forgings, which also greatly reduces cost.

  8. Determination of dosimetric parameters for shielded 153Gd source in prostate cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Ghatei, Najmeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Meigooni, Ali S.; Shahraini, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) is a recently developed method for treatment of prostate cancer. In the present study TG-43 dosimetric parameters of a 153Gd source were obtained for use in I-RSBT. Materials and methods A 153Gd source located inside a needle including a Pt shield and an aluminum window was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Dosimetric parameters of this source model, including air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function, with and without the shields were calculated according to the TG-43 report. Results The air kerma strength was found to be 6.71 U for the non-shielded source with 1 GBq activity. This value was found to be 0.04 U and 6.19 U for the Pt shield and Al window cases, respectively. Dose rate constant for the non-shielded source was found to be 1.20 cGy/(hU). However, for a shielded source with Pt and aluminum window, dose rate constants were found to be 0.07 cGy/(hU) and 0.96 cGy/(hU), on the shielded and window sides, respectively. The values of radial dose function and anisotropy function were tabulated for these sources. Additionally, isodose curves were drawn for sources with and without shield, in order to evaluate the effect of shield on dose distribution. Conclusions Existence of the Pt shield may greatly reduce the dose to organs at risk and normal tissues which are located toward the shielded side. The calculated air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function data for the 153Gd source for the non-shielded and the shielded sources can be used in the treatment planning system (TPS). PMID:28265239

  9. Stellarator expansion methods for MHD equilibrium and stability calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, V.E.; Charlton, L.A.; Hicks, H.R.; Holmes, J.A.; Carreras, B.A.; Hender, T.C.; Garcia, L.

    1986-03-01

    Two methods for performing stellarator expansion, or average method, MHD calculations are described. The first method includes the calculation of vacuum, equilibrium, and stability, using the Greene and Johnson stellarator expansion in which the equilibrium is reduced to a 2-D problem by averaging over the geometric toroidal angle in real space coordinates. In the second method, the average is performed in a system of vacuum magnetic coordinates. Both methods are implemented to utilize realistic vacuum field information, making them applicable to configuration studies and machine design, as well as to basic research. Illustrative examples are presented to detail the sensitivities of the calculations to physical parameters and to show numerical convergence and the comparison of these methods with each other and with other methods.

  10. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  11. A Recursive Method for Calculating Certain Partition Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrum, Luther; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes a simple recursive method for calculating the partition function and average energy of a system consisting of N electrons and L energy levels. Also, presents an efficient APL computer program to utilize the recursion relation. (Author/GA)

  12. Exploring Chemical Bonds through Variations in Magnetic Shielding.

    PubMed

    Karadakov, Peter B; Horner, Kate E

    2016-02-09

    Differences in nuclear isotropic magnetic shieldings give rise to the chemical shifts measured in NMR experiments. In contrast to existing NMR experimental techniques, quantum chemical methods are capable of calculating isotropic magnetic shieldings not just at nuclei, but also at any point in the space surrounding a molecule. Using s-trans-1,3-butadiene, ethane, ethene, and ethyne as examples, we show that the variations in isotropic magnetic shielding around a molecule, represented as isosurfaces and contour plots, provide an unexpectedly clear picture of chemical bonding, which is much more detailed than the traditional description in terms of the total electron density.

  13. Self shielding in cylindrical fissile sources in the APNea system

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, D.

    1997-02-01

    In order for a source of fissile material to be useful as a calibration instrument, it is necessary to know not only how much fissile material is in the source but also what the effective fissile content is. Because uranium and plutonium absorb thermal neutrons so Efficiently, material in the center of a sample is shielded from the external thermal flux by the surface layers of the material. Differential dieaway measurements in the APNea System of five different sets of cylindrical fissile sources show the various self shielding effects that are routinely encountered. A method for calculating the self shielding effect is presented and its predictions are compared with the experimental results.

  14. Shielding application of perturbation theory to determine changes in neutron and gamma doses due to changes in shield layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fieno, D.

    1972-01-01

    Perturbation theory formulas were derived and applied to determine changes in neutron and gamma-ray doses due to changes in various radiation shield layers for fixed sources. For a given source and detector position, the perturbation method enables dose derivatives with respect to density, or equivalently thickness, for every layer to be determined from one forward and one inhomogeneous adjoint calculation. A direct determination without the perturbation approach would require two forward calculations to evaluate the dose derivative due to a change in a single layer. Hence, the perturbation method for obtaining dose derivatives requires fewer computations for design studies of multilayer shields. For an illustrative problem, a comparison was made of the fractional change in the dose per unit change in the thickness of each shield layer in a two-layer spherical configuration as calculated by perturbation theory and by successive direct calculations; excellent agreement was obtained between the two methods.

  15. Effect size calculations for the clinician: methods and comparability.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Jason A; Miller, Scott D; Chow, Daryl L

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of clinical change via single-group pre-post effect size has become increasingly common in psychotherapy settings that collect practice-based evidence and engage in feedback-informed treatment. Different methods of calculating effect size for the same sample of clients and the same measure can lead to wide-ranging results, reducing interpretability. Effect sizes from therapists-including those drawn from a large web-based database of practicing clinicians-were calculated using nine different methods. The resulting effect sizes varied significantly depending on the method employed. Differences between measurement methods routinely exceeded 0.40 for individual therapists. Three methods for calculating effect sizes are recommended for moderating these differences, including two equations that show promise as valid and practical methods for use by clinicians in professional practice.

  16. Magsat investigation. [Canadian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A computer program was prepared for modeling segments of the Earth's crust allowing for heterogeneity in magnetization in calculating the Earth's field at Magsat heights. This permits investigation of a large number of possible models in assessing the magnetic signatures of subprovinces of the Canadian shield. The fit between the model field and observed fields is optimized in a semi-automatic procedure.

  17. Cosmic ray particles with different LET values under various thicknesses of shielding in low altitude orbits: Calculations and Cosmos-2044 measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.; Benton, E.R.; Marenny, A.M.; Nymmik, R.A.; Suslov, A.A. |

    1995-03-01

    Fluxes of cosmic ray particles with different LET values were measured on board the COSMOS-2044 biosatellite under various thicknesses of shielding by stacks of CR-39 and nitrocellulose plastic nuclear track detectors (mounted outside the satellite). The component composition of the particles detected under shieldings of 0.1-2.5 g cm{sup {minus}2} is verified by comparing experimental data with the results of model simulations of the fluxes of galactic cosmic ray particles and of radiation belt protons.

  18. Cosmic ray particles with different LET values under various thicknesses of shielding in low altitude orbits: calculations and Cosmos-2044 measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marenny, A. M.; Nymmik, R. A.; Suslov, A. A.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    Fluxes of cosmic ray particles with different LET values were measured on board the Cosmos-2044 biosatellite under various thicknesses of shielding by stacks of CR-39 and nitrocellulose plastic nuclear track detectors (mounted outside the satellite). The component composition of the particles detected under shieldings of 0.1-2.5 g cm-2 is verified by comparing experimental data with the results of model simulations of the fluxes of galactic cosmic ray particles and of radiation belt protons.

  19. Cosmic ray particles with different LET values under various thicknesses of shielding in low altitude orbits: Calculations and Cosmos-2044 measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.; Marenny, A. M.; Nymmik, R. A.; Suslov, A. A.

    1995-01-01

    Fluxes of cosmic ray particles with different LET values were measured on board the COSMOS-2044 biosatellite under various thicknesses of shielding by stacks of CR-39 and nitrocellulose plastic nuclear track detectors (mounted outside the satellite). The component composition of the particles detected under shieldings of 0.1-2.5 g cm(exp -2) is verified by comparing experimental data with the results of model simulations of the fluxes of galactic cosmic ray particles and of radiation belt protons.

  20. Shielding design for multiple-energy linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Barish, Robert J

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of medical linear accelerators (linacs) capable of producing three different x-ray energies has complicated the process of designing shielding for these units. The conventional approach for the previous generation of dual-energy linacs relied on the addition of some amount of supplementary shielding to that calculated for the higher-energy beam, where the amount of that supplement followed the historical "two-source" rule, also known as the "add one HVL rule," a practice derived from other two-source shielding considerations. The author describes an iterative approach that calculates shielding requirements accurately for any number of multiple beam energies assuming the workload at each energy can be specified at the outset. This method is particularly useful when considering the requirements for possible modifications to an existing vault when new equipment is to be installed as a replacement for a previous unit.

  1. Comparison of electrical conductivity calculation methods for natural waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCleskey, R. Blaine; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2012-01-01

    The capability of eleven methods to calculate the electrical conductivity of a wide range of natural waters from their chemical composition was investigated. A brief summary of each method is presented including equations to calculate the conductivities of individual ions, the ions incorporated, and the method's limitations. The ability of each method to reliably predict the conductivity depends on the ions included, effective accounting of ion pairing, and the accuracy of the equation used to estimate the ionic conductivities. The performances of the methods were evaluated by calculating the conductivity of 33 environmentally important electrolyte solutions, 41 U.S. Geological Survey standard reference water samples, and 1593 natural water samples. The natural waters tested include acid mine waters, geothermal waters, seawater, dilute mountain waters, and river water impacted by municipal waste water. The three most recent conductivity methods predict the conductivity of natural waters better than other methods. Two of the recent methods can be used to reliably calculate the conductivity for samples with pH values greater than about 3 and temperatures between 0 and 40°C. One method is applicable to a variety of natural water types with a range of pH from 1 to 10, temperature from 0 to 95°C, and ionic strength up to 1 m.

  2. Radiation shielding effectiveness of newly developed superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.; Saliqur Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Gamma ray shielding effectiveness of superconductors with a high mass density has been investigated. We calculated the mass attenuation coefficients, the mean free path (mfp) and the exposure buildup factor (EBF). The gamma ray EBF was computed using the Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method at energies 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp. The fast-neutron shielding effectiveness has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section of the superconductors. It is shown that CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 are superior shielding materials for gamma rays and Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 for fast neutrons. The present work should be useful in various applications of superconductors in fusion engineering and design.

  3. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaya, S.; Maeda, H.; Funaki, M.; Fukui, H.

    2008-12-01

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Δσ =σ∥-σ⊥, for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator σ⃗ṡπ⃗U/2c, in which π⃗=p⃗+A⃗, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c ≅137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A⃗ (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c-2 and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c-4. It is shown that the small Δσ for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  4. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model.

    PubMed

    Hamaya, S; Maeda, H; Funaki, M; Fukui, H

    2008-12-14

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Delta sigma = sigma(parallel) - sigma(perpendicular), for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator sigma x piU/2c, in which pi = p + A, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c approximately = 137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c(-2) and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c(-4). It is shown that the small Delta sigma for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  5. Methods of Calculation of a Friction Coefficient: Application to Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servantie, J.; Gaspard, P.

    2003-10-01

    In this Letter we develop theoretical and numerical methods to calculate the dynamic friction coefficient. The theoretical method is based on an adiabatic approximation which allows us to express the dynamic friction coefficient in terms of the time integral of the autocorrelation function of the force between both sliding objects. The motion of the objects and the autocorrelation function can be numerically calculated by molecular-dynamics simulations. We have successfully applied these methods to the evaluation of the dynamic friction coefficient of the relative motion of two concentric carbon nanotubes. The dynamic friction coefficient is shown to increase with the temperature.

  6. Pressure algorithm for elliptic flow calculations with the PDF method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anand, M. S.; Pope, S. B.; Mongia, H. C.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm to determine the mean pressure field for elliptic flow calculations with the probability density function (PDF) method is developed and applied. The PDF method is a most promising approach for the computation of turbulent reacting flows. Previous computations of elliptic flows with the method were in conjunction with conventional finite volume based calculations that provided the mean pressure field. The algorithm developed and described here permits the mean pressure field to be determined within the PDF calculations. The PDF method incorporating the pressure algorithm is applied to the flow past a backward-facing step. The results are in good agreement with data for the reattachment length, mean velocities, and turbulence quantities including triple correlations.

  7. Experimental verification of a recursive method to calculate evapotranspiration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, a recursive combination method (RCM) to calculate potential and crop evapotranspiration (ET) was given by Lascano and Van Bavel (Agron. J. 2007, 99:585–590). The RCM differs from the Penman-Monteith (PM) method, the main difference being that the assumptions made regarding the temperature ...

  8. A Simple Method for Calculating Clebsch-Gordan Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klink, W. H.; Wickramasekara, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for calculating Clebsch-Gordan coefficients for the tensor product of two unitary irreducible representations (UIRs) of the rotation group. The method also works for multiplicity-free irreducible representations appearing in the tensor product of any number of UIRs of the rotation group. The generalization to…

  9. General method for calculating derivatives of the lattice electrostatic energy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, D. E.; Eftis, J.; Arkilic, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    A method for calculating the derivatives of lattice electrostatic strain energy is proposed. It offers a computation procedure that is more general, concise, and systematic than any of the procedures previously used by Fuchs (1936), Cousins (1967), and Suzuki et al. (1968). The method can also easily be extended to fourth- and higher-order derivatives without undue difficulty.

  10. Calculation of Solar Radiation by Using Regression Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kızıltan, Ö.; Şahin, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, solar radiation was estimated at 53 location over Turkey with varying climatic conditions using the Linear, Ridge, Lasso, Smoother, Partial least, KNN and Gaussian process regression methods. The data of 2002 and 2003 years were used to obtain regression coefficients of relevant methods. The coefficients were obtained based on the input parameters. Input parameters were month, altitude, latitude, longitude and landsurface temperature (LST).The values for LST were obtained from the data of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (NOAA-AVHRR) satellite. Solar radiation was calculated using obtained coefficients in regression methods for 2004 year. The results were compared statistically. The most successful method was Gaussian process regression method. The most unsuccessful method was lasso regression method. While means bias error (MBE) value of Gaussian process regression method was 0,274 MJ/m2, root mean square error (RMSE) value of method was calculated as 2,260 MJ/m2. The correlation coefficient of related method was calculated as 0,941. Statistical results are consistent with the literature. Used the Gaussian process regression method is recommended for other studies.

  11. Method and models for R-curve instability calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for performing elastic R-curve instability calculations. For a single material-structure combination, the calculations can be done on some pocket calculators. On microcomputers and larger, it permits the development of a comprehensive program having libraries of driving force equations for different configurations and R-curve model equations for different materials. The paper also presents several model equations for fitting to experimental R-curve data, both linear elastic and elastoplastic. The models are fit to data from the literature to demonstrate their viability.

  12. Method and models for R-curve instability calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for performing elastic R-curve instability calculations. For a single material-structure combination, the calculations can be done on some pocket calculators. On microcomputers and larger, it permits the development of a comprehensive program having libraries of driving force equations for different configurations and R-curve model equations for different materials. The paper also presents several model equations for fitting to experimental R-curve data, both linear elastic and elastoplastic. The models are fit to data from the literature to demonstrate their viability.

  13. Description of an exact, recursive method to simplify shading calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrocki, A. D.; Kammerud, R.

    An exact, recursive method called SHADE is described which attempts to simplify shading calculations as performed by a programmable calculator or microcomputer. Preliminary applications of SHADE using a Hewlett Packard HP-41C programmable calculator are outlined. For a given solar hour, SHADE is used to compute the following quantities for overhang and side fin combinations which shade various openings: the percentage of the total area of the opening which is shaded; the shaded area itself; the cosine of the angle of incidence between the Sun and glazing surface; the direct insolation at this surface, with and without shading; and the direct solar power at this surface, with and without shading.

  14. Refinement of thermal imager minimum resolvable temperature difference calculating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobrodov, V. G.; Mykytenko, V. I.

    2015-11-01

    Calculating methods, which accurately predict minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD), are of significant interest for many years. The article deals with improvement the accuracy of determining the thermal imaging system MRTD by elaboration the visual perception model. We suggest MRTD calculating algorithm, which is based on a reliable approximation of the human visual system modulation transfer function (MTF) proposed by N. Nill. There was obtained a new expression for the bandwidth evaluation, which is independent of angular size of the Foucault bar target.

  15. Shape integral method for magnetospheric shapes. [boundary layer calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. C.

    1979-01-01

    A method is developed for calculating the shape of any magnetopause to arbitrarily high precision. The method uses an integral equation which is evaluated for a trial shape. The resulting values of the integral equation as a function of auxiliary variables indicate how close one is to the desired solution. A variational method can then be used to improve the trial shape. Some potential applications are briefly mentioned.

  16. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  17. Fast calculation method for computer-generated cylindrical holograms.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Fujii, Tomohiko; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi

    2008-07-01

    Since a general flat hologram has a limited viewable area, we usually cannot see the other side of a reconstructed object. There are some holograms that can solve this problem. A cylindrical hologram is well known to be viewable in 360 deg. Most cylindrical holograms are optical holograms, but there are few reports of computer-generated cylindrical holograms. The lack of computer-generated cylindrical holograms is because the spatial resolution of output devices is not great enough; therefore, we have to make a large hologram or use a small object to fulfill the sampling theorem. In addition, in calculating the large fringe, the calculation amount increases in proportion to the hologram size. Therefore, we propose what we believe to be a new calculation method for fast calculation. Then, we print these fringes with our prototype fringe printer. As a result, we obtain a good reconstructed image from a computer-generated cylindrical hologram.

  18. Calculations of EURACOS iron benchmark experiment using the HYBRID method

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B.J.; Liu, Y.W.H.; Wun, C.C. ); Rief, H. )

    1992-09-01

    In this paper, the HYBRID method is used in the calculations of the iron benchmark experiment at the EURACOS-II device. The saturation activities of the [sup 32]S(n,p)[sup 32]P reaction at different depths in an iron block are computed with ENDF/B-IV data to compare with the measurements. At the outer layers of the iron block, the HYBRID calculation gives increasingly higher results than the VITAMIN-C multigroup calculation. With the adjustment of the two- to one-dimensional ratios, the HYBRID results agree with the measurements to within 10% at most penetration depths, a considerable improvement over the VITAMIN-C multigroup results. The development of a collapsing method for the HYBRID cross sections provides a more direct and practical way of using the HYBRID method in the two-dimensional calculations. It is observed that half of the window effect is smeared in the collapsing treatment, but it still provides a better cross-section set than the VITAMIN-C cross sections for the deep-penetration calculations.

  19. Optimization of the National Ignition Facility primary shield design

    SciTech Connect

    Annese, C.E.; Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E.; Miller, W.F.; Latkowski, J.; Lee, J.D.; Soran, P.; Tobin, M.L.

    1993-10-01

    Minimum cost design concepts of the primary shield for the National Ignition laser fusion experimental Facility (NIF) are searched with the help of the optimization code SWAN. The computational method developed for this search involves incorporating the time dependence of the delayed photon field within effective delayed photon production cross sections. This method enables one to address the time-dependent problem using relatively simple, time-independent transport calculations, thus significantly simplifying the design process. A novel approach was used for the identification of the optimal combination of constituents that will minimize the shield cost; it involves the generation, with SWAN, of effectiveness functions for replacing materials on an equal cost basis. The minimum cost shield design concept was found to consist of a mixture of polyethylene and low cost, low activation materials such as SiC, with boron added near the shield boundaries.

  20. Thermocouple shield

    DOEpatents

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  1. Fast calculation method of complex space targets' optical cross section.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi; Sun, Huayan; Li, Yingchun; Guo, Huichao

    2013-06-10

    This paper utilizes the optical cross section (OCS) to characterize the optical scattering characteristics of a space target under the conditions of Sun lighting. We derive the mathematical expression of OCS according to the radiometric theory, and put forward a fast visualization calculation method of complex space targets' OCS based on an OpenGL and 3D model. Through the OCS simulation of Lambert bodies (cylinder and sphere), the computational accuracy and speed of the algorithm were verified. By using this method, the relative error for OCS will not exceed 0.1%, and it only takes 0.05 s to complete a complex calculation. Additionally, we calculated the OCS of three actual satellites with bidirectional reflectance distribution function model parameters in visible bands, and results indicate that it is easy to distinguish the three targets by comparing their OCS curves. This work is helpful for the identification and classification of unresolved space target based on photometric characteristics.

  2. A method to calculate synthetic waveforms in stratified VTI media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Wen, L.

    2012-12-01

    Transverse isotropy with a vertical axis of symmetry (VTI) may be an important material property in the Earth's interior. In this presentation, we develop a method to calculate synthetic seismograms for wave propagation in stratified VTI media. Our method is based on the generalized reflection and transmission method (GRTM) (Luco & Apsel 1983). We extend it to transversely isotropic VTI media. GRTM has the advantage of remaining stable in high frequency calculations compared to the Haskell Matrix method (Haskell 1964), which explicitly excludes the exponential growth terms in the propagation matrix and is limited to low frequency computation. In the implementation, we also improve GRTM in two aspects. 1) We apply the Shanks transformation (Bender & Orszag 1999) to improve the convergence rate of convergence. This improvement is especially important when the depths of source and receiver are close. 2) We adopt a self-adaptive Simpson integration method (Chen & Zhang 2001) in the discrete wavenumber integration so that the integration can still be efficiently carried out at large epicentral distances. Because the calculation is independent in each frequency, the program can also be effectively implemented in parallel computing. Our method provides a powerful tool to synthesize broadband seismograms of VIT media at a large epicenter distance range. We will present examples of using the method to study possible transverse isotropy in the upper mantle and the lowermost mantle.

  3. A method for calculating externally blown flap noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M. R.

    1978-01-01

    Several basic noise components were described. These components are: (1) compact lift dipoles associated with the wing and flaps; (2) trailing edge noise associated with the last trailing edge; and (3) quadrupole noise associated with the undeflected exhaust jet and the free jet located downstream of the trailing edge. These noise components were combined to allow prediction of directivity and spectra for under the wing (UTW) slotted flaps with conventional or mixer nozzles, UTW slotless flaps, upper surface blowing (USB) slotless flaps, and engine in front of the wing slotted flaps. A digital computer program listing was given for this calculation method. Directivities and spectra calculated by this method were compared with free field data for UTW and USB configurations. The UTRC method best predicted the details of the measured noise emission, but the ANOP method best estimated the noise levels directly below these configurations.

  4. Calculating Resonance Positions and Widths Using the Siegert Approximation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapedius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Here, we present complex resonance states (or Siegert states) that describe the tunnelling decay of a trapped quantum particle from an intuitive point of view that naturally leads to the easily applicable Siegert approximation method. This can be used for analytical and numerical calculations of complex resonances of both the linear and nonlinear…

  5. Emergy Algebra: Improving Matrix Methods for Calculating Tranformities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transformity is one of the core concepts in Energy Systems Theory and it is fundamental to the calculation of emergy. Accurate evaluation of transformities and other emergy per unit values is essential for the broad acceptance, application and further development of emergy method...

  6. LEGO-Method--New Strategy for Chemistry Calculation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Jozsef; Molnar-Hamvas, Livia

    2011-01-01

    The presented strategy of chemistry calculation is based on mole-concept, but it uses only one fundamental relationship of the amounts of substance as a basic panel. The name of LEGO-method comes from the famous toy of LEGO[R] because solving equations by grouping formulas is similar to that. The relations of mole and the molar amounts, as small…

  7. Emergy Algebra: Improving Matrix Methods for Calculating Tranformities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transformity is one of the core concepts in Energy Systems Theory and it is fundamental to the calculation of emergy. Accurate evaluation of transformities and other emergy per unit values is essential for the broad acceptance, application and further development of emergy method...

  8. Further Stable methods for the calculation of partition functions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B G; Gilleron, F; Pain, J

    2007-06-27

    The extension to recursion over holes of the Gilleron and Pain method for calculating partition functions of a canonical ensemble of non-interacting bound electrons is presented as well as a generalization for the efficient computation of collisional line broadening.

  9. Simplified method for calculating shear deflections of beams.

    Treesearch

    I. Orosz

    1970-01-01

    When one designs with wood, shear deflections can become substantial compared to deflections due to moments, because the modulus of elasticity in bending differs from that in shear by a large amount. This report presents a simplified energy method to calculate shear deflections in bending members. This simplified approach should help designers decide whether or not...

  10. Calculating Resonance Positions and Widths Using the Siegert Approximation Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapedius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Here, we present complex resonance states (or Siegert states) that describe the tunnelling decay of a trapped quantum particle from an intuitive point of view that naturally leads to the easily applicable Siegert approximation method. This can be used for analytical and numerical calculations of complex resonances of both the linear and nonlinear…

  11. A Method of Calculating Bending Stresses Due to Torsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-12-01

    eaeh hay. The foundation for such general methods was laid by Boner in a comprehensive paper (reference l); subsequent authors h’nve followed Ebner...8217 B lead more or less closely.. Numerical calculations made by Boner nnd others lead to the conclusion that bending stresses due to torsion are of

  12. Calculating coherent pair production with Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bottcher, C.; Strayer, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    We discuss calculations of the coherent electromagnetic pair production in ultra-relativistic hadron collisions. This type of production, in lowest order, is obtained from three diagrams which contain two virtual photons. We discuss simple Monte Carlo methods for evaluating these classes of diagrams without recourse to involved algebraic reduction schemes. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  13. 30 CFR 282.41 - Method of royalty calculation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Method of royalty calculation. 282.41 Section 282.41 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF FOR MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR Payments § 282.41...

  14. Thick-Restart Lanczos Method for Electronic StructureCalculations

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Horst D.; Wang, L.-W.; Wu, Kesheng

    1999-03-12

    This paper describes two recent innovations related to the classic Lanczos method for eigen- value problems, namely the thick-restart technique and dynamic restarting schemes. Combining these two new techniques we are able to implement an efficient eigenvalue problem solver. This paper will demonstrate its effectiveness on one particular class of problems for which this method is well suited: linear eigenvalue problems generated from non-selfconsistent electronic structure calculations.

  15. Cluster-cell calculation using the method of generalized homogenization

    SciTech Connect

    Laletin, N.I.; Boyarinov, V.F.

    1988-05-01

    The generalized-homogenization method (GHM), used for solving the neutron transfer equation, was applied to calculating the neutron distribution in the cluster cell with a series of cylindrical cells with cylindrically coaxial zones. Single-group calculations of the technological channel of the cell of an RBMK reactor were performed using GHM. The technological channel was understood to be the reactor channel, comprised of the zirconium rod, the water or steam-water mixture, the uranium dioxide fuel element, and the zirconium tube, together with the adjacent graphite layer. Calculations were performed for channels with no internal sources and with unit incoming current at the external boundary as well as for channels with internal sources and zero current at the external boundary. The PRAKTINETs program was used to calculate the symmetric neutron distributions in the microcell and in channels with homogenized annular zones. The ORAR-TsM program was used to calculate the antisymmetric distribution in the microcell. The accuracy of the calculations were compared for the two channel versions.

  16. First Principles Structure Calculations Using the General Potential Lapw Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Su-Huai

    We have developed a completely general first principles self-consistent full-potential linearized-augmented-plane -wave (LAPW) method program within the density functional formalism to calculate electronic band structure, total energy, pressure and other quantities. No symmetry assumptions are used for the crystal structure. Shape unrestricted charge densities and potentials are calculated inside muffin -tin (MT) spheres as well as in the interstitial regions. All contributions to the Hamiltonian matrix elements are completely taken into account. The core states are treated fully relativistically using the spherical part of the potential only. Scalar relativistic effects are included for the band-states, and spin-orbit coupling is included using a second variation procedure. Both core states and valence states are treated self-consistently, the frozen core approximation is not required. The fast Fourier transformation method is used wherever it is applicable, and this greatly improves the efficiency. This state-of-the-art program has been tested extensively to check the accuracy and convergence properties by comparing calculated electronic band structures, ground state properties, equations of state and cohesive energies for bulk W and GaAs with other theoretical calculations and experimental results. It has been successfully applied to calculate and predict structural and metal-insulator phase transitions for close-packed crystal BaSe and BaTe and the geometric structure of the d-band metal W(001) surface. The results are in generally good agreement with experiment.

  17. Calculation of free-fall trajectories using numerical optimization methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, D. G.; Fowler, W. T.; Gottlieb, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An important problem in space flight is the calculation of trajectories for nonthrusting vehicles between fixed points in a given time. A new procedure based on Hamilton's principle for solving such two-point boundary-value problems is presented. It employs numerical optimization methods to perform the extremization required by Hamilton's principle. This procedure is applied to the calculation of an Earth-Moon trajectory. The results show that the initial guesses required to obtain an iteration procedure which converges are not critical and that convergence can be obtained to any predetermined degree of accuracy.

  18. Calculations of photoabsorption by atoms using a linear response method

    SciTech Connect

    Doolen, G.; Liberman, D.A.

    1986-06-19

    We have made extensive calculations of photoabsorption by all neutral atoms from hydrogen to lawrencium for photon energies up to one kilovolt. Our method was the relativistic time-dependent local density approximation with the usual configuration average for open shells. The most important collective effects are included through an induced field. Expected features such as resonant photoemission and autoionization are seen. Examples of the calculations will be shown. The computer program used is available from the Computer Physics Communications Program Library. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Calculation of free-fall trajectories using numerical optimization methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, D. G.; Fowler, W. T.; Gottlieb, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An important problem in space flight is the calculation of trajectories for nonthrusting vehicles between fixed points in a given time. A new procedure based on Hamilton's principle for solving such two-point boundary-value problems is presented. It employs numerical optimization methods to perform the extremization required by Hamilton's principle. This procedure is applied to the calculation of an Earth-Moon trajectory. The results show that the initial guesses required to obtain an iteration procedure which converges are not critical and that convergence can be obtained to any predetermined degree of accuracy.

  20. Real-space method for highly parallelizable electronic transport calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Baruch; Seideman, Tamar; Hod, Oded; Kronik, Leeor

    2014-07-01

    We present a real-space method for first-principles nanoscale electronic transport calculations. We use the nonequilibrium Green's function method with density functional theory and implement absorbing boundary conditions (ABCs, also known as complex absorbing potentials, or CAPs) to represent the effects of the semi-infinite leads. In real space, the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian matrix is highly sparse. As a result, the transport problem parallelizes naturally and can scale favorably with system size, enabling the computation of conductance in relatively large molecular junction models. Our use of ABCs circumvents the demanding task of explicitly calculating the leads' self-energies from surface Green's functions, and is expected to be more accurate than the use of the jellium approximation. In addition, we take advantage of the sparsity in real space to solve efficiently for the Green's function over the entire energy range relevant to low-bias transport. We illustrate the advantages of our method with calculations on several challenging test systems and find good agreement with reference calculation results.

  1. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  2. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  3. Comparison of analytical methods for calculation of wind loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minderman, Donald J.; Schultz, Larry L.

    1989-01-01

    The following analysis is a comparison of analytical methods for calculation of wind load pressures. The analytical methods specified in ASCE Paper No. 3269, ANSI A58.1-1982, the Standard Building Code, and the Uniform Building Code were analyzed using various hurricane speeds to determine the differences in the calculated results. The winds used for the analysis ranged from 100 mph to 125 mph and applied inland from the shoreline of a large open body of water (i.e., an enormous lake or the ocean) a distance of 1500 feet or ten times the height of the building or structure considered. For a building or structure less than or equal to 250 feet in height acted upon by a wind greater than or equal to 115 mph, it was determined that the method specified in ANSI A58.1-1982 calculates a larger wind load pressure than the other methods. For a building or structure between 250 feet and 500 feet tall acted upon by a wind rangind from 100 mph to 110 mph, there is no clear choice of which method to use; for these cases, factors that must be considered are the steady-state or peak wind velocity, the geographic location, the distance from a large open body of water, and the expected design life and its risk factor.

  4. Accelerating molecular property calculations with nonorthonormal Krylov space methods

    SciTech Connect

    Furche, Filipp; Krull, Brandon T.; Nguyen, Brian D.; Kwon, Jake

    2016-05-03

    Here, we formulate Krylov space methods for large eigenvalue problems and linear equation systems that take advantage of decreasing residual norms to reduce the cost of matrix-vector multiplication. The residuals are used as subspace basis without prior orthonormalization, which leads to generalized eigenvalue problems or linear equation systems on the Krylov space. These nonorthonormal Krylov space (nKs) algorithms are favorable for large matrices with irregular sparsity patterns whose elements are computed on the fly, because fewer operations are necessary as the residual norm decreases as compared to the conventional method, while errors in the desired eigenpairs and solution vectors remain small. We consider real symmetric and symplectic eigenvalue problems as well as linear equation systems and Sylvester equations as they appear in configuration interaction and response theory. The nKs method can be implemented in existing electronic structure codes with minor modifications and yields speed-ups of 1.2-1.8 in typical time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional applications without accuracy loss. The algorithm can compute entire linear subspaces simultaneously which benefits electronic spectra and force constant calculations requiring many eigenpairs or solution vectors. The nKs approach is related to difference density methods in electronic ground state calculations, and particularly efficient for integral direct computations of exchange-type contractions. By combination with resolution-of-the-identity methods for Coulomb contractions, three- to fivefold speed-ups of hybrid time-dependent density functional excited state and response calculations are achieved.

  5. Accelerating molecular property calculations with nonorthonormal Krylov space methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furche, Filipp; Krull, Brandon T.; Nguyen, Brian D.; Kwon, Jake

    2016-05-01

    We formulate Krylov space methods for large eigenvalue problems and linear equation systems that take advantage of decreasing residual norms to reduce the cost of matrix-vector multiplication. The residuals are used as subspace basis without prior orthonormalization, which leads to generalized eigenvalue problems or linear equation systems on the Krylov space. These nonorthonormal Krylov space (nKs) algorithms are favorable for large matrices with irregular sparsity patterns whose elements are computed on the fly, because fewer operations are necessary as the residual norm decreases as compared to the conventional method, while errors in the desired eigenpairs and solution vectors remain small. We consider real symmetric and symplectic eigenvalue problems as well as linear equation systems and Sylvester equations as they appear in configuration interaction and response theory. The nKs method can be implemented in existing electronic structure codes with minor modifications and yields speed-ups of 1.2-1.8 in typical time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional applications without accuracy loss. The algorithm can compute entire linear subspaces simultaneously which benefits electronic spectra and force constant calculations requiring many eigenpairs or solution vectors. The nKs approach is related to difference density methods in electronic ground state calculations and particularly efficient for integral direct computations of exchange-type contractions. By combination with resolution-of-the-identity methods for Coulomb contractions, three- to fivefold speed-ups of hybrid time-dependent density functional excited state and response calculations are achieved.

  6. Accelerating molecular property calculations with nonorthonormal Krylov space methods

    SciTech Connect

    Furche, Filipp; Krull, Brandon T.; Nguyen, Brian D.; Kwon, Jake

    2016-05-03

    Here, we formulate Krylov space methods for large eigenvalue problems and linear equation systems that take advantage of decreasing residual norms to reduce the cost of matrix-vector multiplication. The residuals are used as subspace basis without prior orthonormalization, which leads to generalized eigenvalue problems or linear equation systems on the Krylov space. These nonorthonormal Krylov space (nKs) algorithms are favorable for large matrices with irregular sparsity patterns whose elements are computed on the fly, because fewer operations are necessary as the residual norm decreases as compared to the conventional method, while errors in the desired eigenpairs and solution vectors remain small. We consider real symmetric and symplectic eigenvalue problems as well as linear equation systems and Sylvester equations as they appear in configuration interaction and response theory. The nKs method can be implemented in existing electronic structure codes with minor modifications and yields speed-ups of 1.2-1.8 in typical time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional applications without accuracy loss. The algorithm can compute entire linear subspaces simultaneously which benefits electronic spectra and force constant calculations requiring many eigenpairs or solution vectors. The nKs approach is related to difference density methods in electronic ground state calculations, and particularly efficient for integral direct computations of exchange-type contractions. By combination with resolution-of-the-identity methods for Coulomb contractions, three- to fivefold speed-ups of hybrid time-dependent density functional excited state and response calculations are achieved.

  7. Expected Energy Method for Electro-Optical SNR Calculations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-02

    r’AD-Ri39 984 EXPECTED ENERGY METHOD FOR ELECTPO-OPTICRL SNR i/i CALCULRTIONS(U) MASSRCHUSETTS INST OF TECH LEXINGTON LINCOLN LAB G J MAYER 82 FEB 84...ENERGY METHOD FOR ELECTRO-OPTICAL SNR CALCULATIONS * Ci. MA YER Group 9 TECHNICAL REPORT 634 2 FEBRUARY 1984 Approved for public release; distribution...analysis of image and sensor element configuration. This method allows the optimal pixel size to be selected to maximize the expected SNR for any point

  8. Application de la methode des sous-groupes au calcul Monte-Carlo multigroupe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas

    This thesis is dedicated to the development of a Monte Carlo neutron transport solver based on the subgroup (or multiband) method. In this formalism, cross sections for resonant isotopes are represented in the form of probability tables on the whole energy spectrum. This study is intended in order to test and validate this approach in lattice physics and criticality-safety applications. The probability table method seems promising since it introduces an alternative computational way between the legacy continuous-energy representation and the multigroup method. In the first case, the amount of data invoked in continuous-energy Monte Carlo calculations can be very important and tend to slow down the overall computational time. In addition, this model preserves the quality of the physical laws present in the ENDF format. Due to its cheap computational cost, the multigroup Monte Carlo way is usually at the basis of production codes in criticality-safety studies. However, the use of a multigroup representation of the cross sections implies a preliminary calculation to take into account self-shielding effects for resonant isotopes. This is generally performed by deterministic lattice codes relying on the collision probability method. Using cross-section probability tables on the whole energy range permits to directly take into account self-shielding effects and can be employed in both lattice physics and criticality-safety calculations. Several aspects have been thoroughly studied: (1) The consistent computation of probability tables with a energy grid comprising only 295 or 361 groups. The CALENDF moment approach conducted to probability tables suitable for a Monte Carlo code. (2) The combination of the probability table sampling for the energy variable with the delta-tracking rejection technique for the space variable, and its impact on the overall efficiency of the proposed Monte Carlo algorithm. (3) The derivation of a model for taking into account anisotropic

  9. Dose calculation for electron therapy using an improved LBR method

    SciTech Connect

    Gebreamlak, Wondesen T.; Alkhatib, Hassaan A.; Tedeschi, David J.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To calculate the percentage depth dose (PDD) of any irregularly shaped electron beam using a modified lateral build-up ratio (LBR) method.Methods: Percentage depth dose curves were measured using 6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV electron beam energies for applicator cone sizes of 6 Multiplication-Sign 6, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10, 14 Multiplication-Sign 14, and 20 Multiplication-Sign 20 cm{sup 2}. Circular cutouts for each cone were prepared from 2.0 cm diameter to the maximum possible size for each cone. In addition, three irregular cutouts were prepared.Results: The LBR for each circular cutout was calculated from the measured PDD curve using the open field of the 14 Multiplication-Sign 14 cm{sup 2} cone as the reference field. Using the LBR values and the radius of the circular cutouts, the corresponding lateral spread parameter [{sigma}{sub R}(z)] of the electron shower was calculated. Unlike the commonly accepted assumption that {sigma}{sub R}(z) is independent of cutout size, it is shown that its value increases linearly with circular cutout size (R). Using this characteristic of the lateral spread parameter, the PDD curves of irregularly shaped cutouts were calculated. Finally, the calculated PDD curves were compared with measured PDD curves.Conclusions: In this research, it is shown that the lateral spread parameter {sigma}{sub R}(z) increases with cutout size. For radii of circular cutout sizes up to the equilibrium range of the electron beam, the increase of {sigma}{sub R}(z) with the cutout size is linear. The percentage difference of the calculated PDD curve from the measured PDD data for irregularly shaped cutouts was under 1.0% in the region between the surface and therapeutic range of the electron beam. Similar results were obtained for four electron beam energies (6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV)

  10. The Multi-Step CADIS method for shutdown dose rate calculations and uncertainty propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Grove, Robert E.; Peterson, Joshua L.; Johnson, Seth R.

    2015-12-01

    Shutdown dose rate (SDDR) analysis requires (a) a neutron transport calculation to estimate neutron flux fields, (b) an activation calculation to compute radionuclide inventories and associated photon sources, and (c) a photon transport calculation to estimate final SDDR. In some applications, accurate full-scale Monte Carlo (MC) SDDR simulations are needed for very large systems with massive amounts of shielding materials. However, these simulations are impractical because calculation of space- and energy-dependent neutron fluxes throughout the structural materials is needed to estimate distribution of radioisotopes causing the SDDR. Biasing the neutron MC calculation using an importance function is not simple because it is difficult to explicitly express the response function, which depends on subsequent computational steps. Furthermore, the typical SDDR calculations do not consider how uncertainties in MC neutron calculation impact SDDR uncertainty, even though MC neutron calculation uncertainties usually dominate SDDR uncertainty.

  11. The Multi-Step CADIS method for shutdown dose rate calculations and uncertainty propagation

    DOE PAGES

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Grove, Robert E.; ...

    2015-12-01

    Shutdown dose rate (SDDR) analysis requires (a) a neutron transport calculation to estimate neutron flux fields, (b) an activation calculation to compute radionuclide inventories and associated photon sources, and (c) a photon transport calculation to estimate final SDDR. In some applications, accurate full-scale Monte Carlo (MC) SDDR simulations are needed for very large systems with massive amounts of shielding materials. However, these simulations are impractical because calculation of space- and energy-dependent neutron fluxes throughout the structural materials is needed to estimate distribution of radioisotopes causing the SDDR. Biasing the neutron MC calculation using an importance function is not simple becausemore » it is difficult to explicitly express the response function, which depends on subsequent computational steps. Furthermore, the typical SDDR calculations do not consider how uncertainties in MC neutron calculation impact SDDR uncertainty, even though MC neutron calculation uncertainties usually dominate SDDR uncertainty.« less

  12. Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  13. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  14. Boundary element method calculation of individual head-related transfer function. I. Rigid model calculation.

    PubMed

    Katz, B F

    2001-11-01

    Human spatial perception of sound is a complex phenomenon. The Head-Related Transfer Function (HRTF) is a vital component to spatial sound perception. In order improve the understanding of the correlation between the HRTF and specific geometry of the head and pinna, a Boundary Element Method (BEM) has been used to calculate a portion of the HRTF of an individual based on precise geometrical data. Advantages of this approach include the ability to alter the geometry of the individual through the model in ways which are not possible with real subjects. Several models are used in the study, including a head with no pinna and several sized spheres. Calculations are performed for various source locations around the head. Results are presented for rigid model cases. Effects of variations on impedance and comparisons to measured data will be presented in the subsequent paper.

  15. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  16. A New Method for Calculating Added Mass using CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimbala, John M.

    2003-11-01

    When a body accelerates in a flow field, fluid surrounding the body also accelerates, and pressure forces on the body must increase to push the fluid out of the way. Energy is required to accelerate the fluid to a higher level of total kinetic energy, and this energy is felt on the accelerating body as an additional drag force. It is common to express this additional force in terms of added mass. Many methods have been developed for calculating added mass, typically using the potential flow approximation. We have developed a very simple technique for calculating the translational added mass of a body of arbitrary shape, based on the fundamental definition of added mass. The translational added mass can be approximated by m_added ≈ 2( KE2 - KE1 ) \\over U_2^2 - U_1^2 We use CFD to calculate the total kinetic energy KE1 of the fluid surrounding the body as it moves at constant speed U_1. Then we increase the speed by a small amount to U_2, repeat the CFD calculations, and use the above equation to calculate added mass. Results for the classical test case, a sphere, agree with the theoretical value to within a few percent.

  17. Description of an exact recursive method to simplify shading calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, A.D.; Kammerud, R.

    1981-04-01

    An exact, recursive method called SHADE is described which attempts to simplify shading calculations as performed by a programmable calculator or microcomputer. Preliminary applications of SHADE using a Hewlett Packard HP-41C programmable calculation are outlined. In particular, for a given solar hour, SHADE is used to compute the following quantities for overhang and side fin combinations which shade various openings: the percentage of the total area of the opening which is shaded; the shaded area itself; the cosine of the angle of incidence between sun and glazing surface; the direct insolation at this surface, with and without shading; and the direct solar power at this surface, with and without shading. Hence, in its present HP-41C application, SHADE can be used in preliminary design and comparative analyses of shading devices on an hourly, daily, or seasonal basis, provided that: (1) the fins and overhangs be square or rectangular, and lie in planes perpendicular to the plane of the opening; and (2) the opening itself be vertical and rectangular with arbitrary building azimuths. Design candidates include conventional overhangs and side fins, porches, and reveals. In principle, SHADE can be extended to awnings, slatted sun screens, and bevelled recesses; in addition, its HP-41C application can be extended to calculations of direct solar gain through vertical and non-vertical glazings, thereby providing a more useful tool in building heating and cooling load calculations.

  18. A new method for calculation of Efimov resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnou-Seeuws, Francoise; Blandon, Juan; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav

    2007-06-01

    The recent observation of Efimov resonances in a cold gas [1] opens a new field. We have developed a method to calculate accurately the positions, widths and wave functions of three-body resonances. The calculations combine the hyperspherical adiabatic approach [2] and the slow variable discretization method of Ref.[3]. A sine grid basis set is used with a mapping procedure to introduce a variable grid step in the hyper-radius and in the two hyperangles; moreover, a complex absorbing potential is introduced. The method can be used to determine accurately both the short range and the long range wavefunctions. It has been checked on a model potential and compared with a R-matrix method [4] which necessitates a much larger basis set: the two calculations are in good agreement. [1] T. Kraemer et al., Nature 440, 315 (2006), [2] V.Kokoouline and F.Masnou-Seeuws, Phys. Rev. A 73, 012702 (2006), [3] O.I.Tolstikhin, S.Watanabe, and M.Matsuzawa, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 29, L389 (1996), [4] E. Nielsen, H. Suno, and B. D. Esry, Phys. Rev. A 66, 012705 (2002).

  19. Tumor dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy: Methods of calculation for beta particles

    SciTech Connect

    Leichner, P.K. ); Kwok, C.S. )

    1993-03-01

    Calculational methods of beta-particle dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are reviewed for clinical and experimental studies and computer modeling of tumors. In clinical studies, absorbed-dose estimates are usually based on the [ital in]-[ital vivo] quantitation of the activity in tumors from gamma camera images. Because of the limited spatial resolution of gamma cameras, clinical dosimetry is necessarily limited to the macroscopic level (macrodosimetry) and the MIRD formalism for absorbed-dose calculations is appropriate. In experimental RIT, tumor dimensions are often comparable to or smaller than the beta-particle range of commonly used radionuclides (for example, [sup 131]I, [sup 67]Cu, [sup 186]Re, [sup 188]Re, [sup 90]Y) and deviations from the equilibrium dose must be taken into account in absorbed-dose calculations. Additionally, if small tumors are growing rapidly at the time of RIT, the effects of tumor growth will need to be included in absorbed-dose estimates. In computer modeling of absorbed-dose distributions, analytical, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods have been used to investigate the consequences of uniform and nonuniform activity distributions and the effects of inhomogeneous media. Measurements and calculations of the local absorbed dose at the multicellular level have shown that variations in this dose are large. Knowledge of the absorbed dose is essential for any form of radiotherapy. Therefore, it is important that clinical, experimental, and theoretical investigations continue to provide information on tumor dosimetry that is necessary for a better understanding of the radiobiological effects of RIT.

  20. Parameterizations for shielding electron accelerators based on Monte Carlo studies

    SciTech Connect

    P. Degtyarenko; G. Stapleton

    1996-10-01

    Numerous recipes for designing lateral slab neutron shielding for electron accelerators are available and each generally produces rather similar results for shield thicknesses of about 2 m of concrete and for electron beams with energy in the 1 to 10 GeV region. For thinner or much thicker shielding the results tend to diverge and the standard recipes require modification. Likewise for geometries other than lateral to the beam direction further corrections are required so that calculated results are less reliable and hence additional and costly conservatism is needed. With the adoption of Monte Carlo (MC) methods of transporting particles a much more powerful way of calculating radiation dose rates outside shielding becomes available. This method is not constrained by geometry, although deep penetration problems need special statistical treatment, and is an excellent approach to solving any radiation transport problem providing the method has been properly checked against measurements and is free from the well known errors common to such computer methods. This present paper utilizes the results of MC calculations based on a nuclear fragmentation model named DINREG using the MC transport code GEANT and models them with the normal two parameter shielding expressions. Because the parameters can change with electron beam energy, angle to the electron beam direction and target material, the parameters are expressed as functions of some of these variables to provide a universal equations for shielding electron beams which can used rather simply for deep penetration problems in simple geometry without the time consuming computations needed in the original MC programs. A particular problem with using simple parameterizations based on the uncollided flux is that approximations based on spherical geometry might not apply to the more common cylindrical cases used for accelerator shielding. This source of error has been discussed at length by Stevenson and others. To study

  1. A simplified method for the calculation of airfoil pressure distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, H Julian

    1939-01-01

    A method is presented for the rapid calculation of the pressure distribution over an airfoil section when the normal-force distribution and the pressure distribution over the "base profile" (i.e., the profile of the same airfoil were the camber line straight and the resulting airfoil at zero angle of attack) are known. This note is intended as a supplement to N.A.C.A. Report Nos. 631 and 634 wherein methods are presented for the calculation of the normal-force distribution over plain and flapped airfoils, respectively, but not of the pressures on the individual surfaces. Base-profile pressure-coefficient distributions for the usual N.A.C.A. family of airfoils, which are also suitable for several other commonly employed airfoils, are included in tabular form. With these tabulated base-profile pressures and the computed normal-force distributions, pressure distributions adequate for most engineering purposes can be obtained.

  2. Shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations via transmission line analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Campione, Salvatore; Basilio, Lorena I.; Warne, Larry Kevin; ...

    2016-06-25

    Our paper reports on a transmission-line model for calculating the shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations. Since the shields are not perfect conductors and apertures in the shields permit external magnetic and electric fields to penetrate into the interior regions of the cable, we use this model to estimate the effects of the outer shield current and voltage (associated with the external excitation and boundary conditions associated with the external conductor) on the inner conductor current and voltage. It is commonly believed that increasing the number of shields of a cable will improve the shielding performance. But thismore » is not always the case, and a cable with multiple shields may perform similar to or worse than a cable with a single shield. Furthermore, we want to shed more light on these situations, which represent the main focus of this paper.« less

  3. Shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations via transmission line analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, Salvatore; Basilio, Lorena I.; Warne, Larry Kevin; Hudson, Howard Gerald; Langston, William L.

    2016-06-25

    Our paper reports on a transmission-line model for calculating the shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations. Since the shields are not perfect conductors and apertures in the shields permit external magnetic and electric fields to penetrate into the interior regions of the cable, we use this model to estimate the effects of the outer shield current and voltage (associated with the external excitation and boundary conditions associated with the external conductor) on the inner conductor current and voltage. It is commonly believed that increasing the number of shields of a cable will improve the shielding performance. But this is not always the case, and a cable with multiple shields may perform similar to or worse than a cable with a single shield. Furthermore, we want to shed more light on these situations, which represent the main focus of this paper.

  4. Shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations via transmission line analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Campione, Salvatore; Basilio, Lorena I.; Warne, Larry Kevin; Hudson, Howard Gerald; Langston, William L.

    2016-06-25

    Our paper reports on a transmission-line model for calculating the shielding effectiveness of multiple-shield cables with arbitrary terminations. Since the shields are not perfect conductors and apertures in the shields permit external magnetic and electric fields to penetrate into the interior regions of the cable, we use this model to estimate the effects of the outer shield current and voltage (associated with the external excitation and boundary conditions associated with the external conductor) on the inner conductor current and voltage. It is commonly believed that increasing the number of shields of a cable will improve the shielding performance. But this is not always the case, and a cable with multiple shields may perform similar to or worse than a cable with a single shield. Furthermore, we want to shed more light on these situations, which represent the main focus of this paper.

  5. Three Articles on New Calculation Methods in Aeronautics (Selected Articles),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-17

    carried out over 300 flutter analysis calcula- tions of 29 conditions of 10 wings with different types of plane forms (delta wings , uniform chord...34 Chinese Aerodynamic Research and Development Center, 1977.12. [6] Tuovila, W.J. and McCarty, J.L., "Experimental Flutter Results for Cantilever - Wing ...on a wing neglected in the piston theory is approximated by the conical flow theory. This method was used in this paper for flutter calculations of 29

  6. Flux calculation of short turbulent events - comparison of three methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Carsten; Göckede, Mathias; Foken, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The eddy covariance method is commonly used to calculate vertical turbulent exchange fluxes between ecosystems and the atmosphere. Besides other assumptions, it requires steady-state flow conditions. If this requirement is not fulfilled over the averaging interval of, for example, 30 min, the fluxes might be miscalculated. Here two further calculation methods, conditional sampling and wavelet analysis, which do not need the steady-state assumption, were implemented and compared to eddy covariance. All fluxes were calculated for 30 min averaging periods, while the wavelet method - using both the Mexican hat and the Morlet wavelet - additionally allowed us to obtain a 1 min averaged flux. The results of all three methods were compared against each other for times with best steady-state conditions and well-developed turbulence. An excellent agreement of the wavelet results to the eddy covariance reference was found, where the deviations to eddy covariance were of the order of < 2 % for Morlet as well as < 7 % for Mexican hat and thus within the typical error range of eddy covariance measurements. The conditional sampling flux also showed a very good agreement to the eddy covariance reference, but the occurrence of outliers and the necessary condition of a zero mean vertical wind velocity reduced its general reliability. Using the Mexican hat wavelet flux in a case study, it was possible to locate a nightly short time turbulent event exactly in time, while the Morlet wavelet gave a trustworthy flux over a longer period, e.g. 30 min, under consideration of this short-time event. At a glance, the Mexican hat wavelet flux offers the possibility of a detailed analysis of non-stationary times, where the classical eddy covariance method fails. Additionally, the Morlet wavelet should be used to provide a trustworthy flux in those 30 min periods where the eddy covariance method provides low-quality data due to instationarities.

  7. Comparison of optimization methods for electronic-structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, J.; Das, S. G.; Min, B. I.; Woodward, C.; Benedek, R.

    1989-06-01

    The performance of several local-optimization methods for calculating electronic structure is compared. The fictitious first-order equation of motion proposed by Williams and Soler is integrated numerically by three procedures: simple finite-difference integration, approximate analytical integration (the Williams-Soler algorithm), and the Born perturbation series. These techniques are applied to a model problem for which exact solutions are known, the Mathieu equation. The Williams-Soler algorithm and the second Born approximation converge equally rapidly, but the former involves considerably less computational effort and gives a more accurate converged solution. Application of the method of conjugate gradients to the Mathieu equation is discussed.

  8. Relativistic effects on the nuclear magnetic shielding in the MF (M=Cu, Ag, Au) series

    SciTech Connect

    David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2007-11-15

    Relativistic effects on the nuclear magnetic shielding {sigma}(M) of the series of diatomics MF (M=Cu, Ag, Au) are calculated and analyzed using the Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method in the random phase approximation (RPA). Significant differences due to relativistic effects on the shielding constant {sigma}(M) are found in this series of atoms. The high electronegativity of the fluorine atom works in conjunction with the spin-orbit coupling to increase the calculated value for {sigma}(Au). An unusually large diamagnetic contribution to the shielding constant is observed. Nonrelativistic nuclear magnetic shielding [{sigma}{sup NR}(M)] shows very good linear correlation with the nuclear charge (Z) of the metal, while the relativistic shielding [{sigma}{sup rel}(M)] varies as Z{sup 2.26}.

  9. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  10. Comparison of dose calculation methods for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Finger, Paul T.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Mourtada, Firas; Napolitano, Mary E.; Rogers, D. W. O.; Thomson, Rowan M.; Nath, Ravinder

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric differences among several clinical treatment planning systems (TPS) and Monte Carlo (MC) codes for brachytherapy of intraocular tumors using {sup 125}I or {sup 103}Pd plaques, and to evaluate the impact on the prescription dose of the adoption of MC codes and certain versions of a TPS (Plaque Simulator with optional modules). Methods: Three clinical brachytherapy TPS capable of intraocular brachytherapy treatment planning and two MC codes were compared. The TPS investigated were Pinnacle v8.0dp1, BrachyVision v8.1, and Plaque Simulator v5.3.9, all of which use the AAPM TG-43 formalism in water. The Plaque Simulator software can also handle some correction factors from MC simulations. The MC codes used are MCNP5 v1.40 and BrachyDose/EGSnrc. Using these TPS and MC codes, three types of calculations were performed: homogeneous medium with point sources (for the TPS only, using the 1D TG-43 dose calculation formalism); homogeneous medium with line sources (TPS with 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes); and plaque heterogeneity-corrected line sources (Plaque Simulator with modified 2D TG-43 dose calculation formalism and MC codes). Comparisons were made of doses calculated at points-of-interest on the plaque central-axis and at off-axis points of clinical interest within a standardized model of the right eye. Results: For the homogeneous water medium case, agreement was within {approx}2% for the point- and line-source models when comparing between TPS and between TPS and MC codes, respectively. For the heterogeneous medium case, dose differences (as calculated using the MC codes and Plaque Simulator) differ by up to 37% on the central-axis in comparison to the homogeneous water calculations. A prescription dose of 85 Gy at 5 mm depth based on calculations in a homogeneous medium delivers 76 Gy and 67 Gy for specific {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources, respectively, when accounting for COMS-plaque heterogeneities. For off

  11. SOLAR OPACITY CALCULATIONS USING THE SUPER-TRANSITION-ARRAY METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Krief, M.; Feigel, A.; Gazit, D.

    2016-04-10

    A new opacity model has been developed based on the Super-Transition-Array (STA) method for the calculation of monochromatic opacities of plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The atomic code, named STAR (STA-Revised), is described and used to calculate spectral opacities for a solar model implementing the recent AGSS09 composition. Calculations are carried out throughout the solar radiative zone. The relative contributions of different chemical elements and atomic processes to the total Rosseland mean opacity are analyzed in detail. Monochromatic opacities and charge-state distributions are compared with the widely used Opacity Project (OP) code, for several elements near the radiation–convection interface. STAR Rosseland opacities for the solar mixture show a very good agreement with OP and the OPAL opacity code throughout the radiation zone. Finally, an explicit STA calculation was performed of the full AGSS09 photospheric mixture, including all heavy metals. It was shown that, due to their extremely low abundance, and despite being very good photon absorbers, the heavy elements do not affect the Rosseland opacity.

  12. Green Function Calculation for Full-potential Multiple Scattering Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Nicholson, Don

    2001-03-01

    The Green function in the multiple scattering theory of Korringa(J.Korringa, Physica) 13, 392 (1947)., Kohn and Rostoker(W.Kohn and N.Rostoker, Phys. Rev.) 94, 1111 (1954). provides a very convenient approach to the electronic structure calculation for solids. The Green function was originally developed for muffin-tin potentials(J.S. Faulkner and G.M. Stocks, Phys. Rev.) B 21, 3222 (1980)., but can be generalized to the full potential case in which the one-electron potential associated with each atom is of arbitrary geometric shape. In this talk, we present our numerical techniques for Green function calculation in our newly developed full potential multiple scattering method code. We test the calculated Green function against the analytical expression for the case of three dimensional space filling simple analytic potentials. We show how the surface integral technique is used for the calculation of the single site scattering matrices and irregular solutions. We also discuss the L-convergence properties of the Green function.

  13. Accelerating molecular property calculations with nonorthonormal Krylov space methods

    DOE PAGES

    Furche, Filipp; Krull, Brandon T.; Nguyen, Brian D.; ...

    2016-05-03

    Here, we formulate Krylov space methods for large eigenvalue problems and linear equation systems that take advantage of decreasing residual norms to reduce the cost of matrix-vector multiplication. The residuals are used as subspace basis without prior orthonormalization, which leads to generalized eigenvalue problems or linear equation systems on the Krylov space. These nonorthonormal Krylov space (nKs) algorithms are favorable for large matrices with irregular sparsity patterns whose elements are computed on the fly, because fewer operations are necessary as the residual norm decreases as compared to the conventional method, while errors in the desired eigenpairs and solution vectors remainmore » small. We consider real symmetric and symplectic eigenvalue problems as well as linear equation systems and Sylvester equations as they appear in configuration interaction and response theory. The nKs method can be implemented in existing electronic structure codes with minor modifications and yields speed-ups of 1.2-1.8 in typical time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional applications without accuracy loss. The algorithm can compute entire linear subspaces simultaneously which benefits electronic spectra and force constant calculations requiring many eigenpairs or solution vectors. The nKs approach is related to difference density methods in electronic ground state calculations, and particularly efficient for integral direct computations of exchange-type contractions. By combination with resolution-of-the-identity methods for Coulomb contractions, three- to fivefold speed-ups of hybrid time-dependent density functional excited state and response calculations are achieved.« less

  14. Effective method for calculating modes of multilayer waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. K.; Dimitrov, P. D.

    2017-01-01

    A fast and efficient numerical method for finding the modes of a multilayered waveguide is proposed. Using the complex vector of the Riemann-Silberstein has resulted in a reduction of the order of the differential equations describing the passage of light through the different layers, as well as a double reduction of the searched variables. The approximation of the differential equations is made by the method of Galyorkin by a suitable choice of the base functions. The calculation of the effective indices and their corresponding wave configurations is realized by the inverse-shifting power method with Rayleigh’s quantity. The method was successfully applied waveguide systems, generating values close in the effective indices.

  15. A comparison of internal energy calculation methods for diatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Shakib, Farzin; Vinokur, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    Various methods of calculating the internal energy of diatomic molecules are studied. An accurate and efficient method for computing the eigenvalues of the vibrational Schroedinger equation for an arbitrary potential is developed. The method is based on a finite-element discretization using the cubic Lobatto element. A combination of spectrum slicing and the Laguerre algorithm is used to solve for the eigenvalues. A simple method to compute the quasi-bound states is presented. For N2 molecules, all vibrational-rotational states of eleven available electronic potentials are computed, and summed to obtain the exact internal energy function with temperature. The total computation required 314 seconds of CPU-time on NASA's Cray 2 computer. Various approximate models are discussed and compared with the exact numerical simulation. It is shown that the splitting of the macroscopic internal energy into separate electronic, rotational, and vibrational energies is not justified at high temperatures.

  16. A comparison of internal energy calculation methods for diatomic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yen; Shakib, Farzin; Vinokur, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    Various methods of calculating the internal energy of diatomic molecules are studied. An accurate and efficient method for computing the eigenvalues of the vibrational Schroedinger equation for an arbitrary potential is developed. The method is based on a finite-element discretization using the cubic Lobatto element. A combination of spectrum slicing and the Laguerre algorithm is used to solve for the eigenvalues. A simple method to compute the quasi-bound states is presented. For N2 molecules, all vibrational-rotational states of eleven available electronic potentials are computed, and summed to obtain the exact internal energy function with temperature. The total computation required 314 seconds of CPU-time on NASA's Cray 2 computer. Various approximate models are discussed and compared with the exact numerical simulation. It is shown that the splitting of the macroscopic internal energy into separate electronic, rotational, and vibrational energies is not justified at high temperatures.

  17. Shielding calculations with SCALE/MAVRIC and comparison with measurements for the TN85 cask with vitrified high level radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Holger; Börst, Frank-Michael

    2017-09-01

    A series of dose rate/spectra measurements in the German interim storage facility Gorleben was carried out at a TN85 cask in April 2009. This type of cask is used for the transport and interim storage of vitrified high level radioactive waste (HAW) from reprocessing. The aim of this work is to assess the shielding component MAVRIC of the SCALE code system with these measurements for the use in the German Bundesamt für Kerntechnische Entsorgungssicherheit (BfE).

  18. An inverse method for flue gas shielded metal surface temperature measurement based on infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Xu, C. L.; Wang, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    The infrared temperature measurement technique has been applied in various fields, such as thermal efficiency analysis, environmental monitoring, industrial facility inspections, and remote temperature sensing. In the problem of infrared measurement of the metal surface temperature of superheater surfaces, the outer wall of the metal pipe is covered by radiative participating flue gas. This means that the traditional infrared measurement technique will lead to intolerable measurement errors due to the absorption and scattering of the flue gas. In this paper, an infrared measurement method for a metal surface in flue gas is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The spectral emissivity of the metal surface, and the spectral absorption and scattering coefficients of the radiative participating flue gas are retrieved simultaneously using an inverse method called quantum particle swarm optimization. Meanwhile, the detected radiation energy simulated using a forward simulation method (named the source multi-flux method) is set as the input of the retrieval. Then, the temperature of the metal surface detected by an infrared CCD camera is modified using the source multi-flux method in combination with these retrieved physical properties. Finally, an infrared measurement system for metal surface temperature is built to assess the proposed method. Experimental results show that the modified temperature is closer to the true value than that of the direct measured temperature.

  19. A Novel TRM Calculation Method by Probabilistic Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audomvongseree, Kulyos; Yokoyama, Akihiko; Verma, Suresh Chand; Nakachi, Yoshiki

    In a new competitive environment, it becomes possible for the third party to access a transmission facility. From this structure, to efficiently manage the utilization of the transmission network, a new definition about Available Transfer Capability (ATC) has been proposed. According to the North American ElectricReliability Council (NERC)’s definition, ATC depends on several parameters, i. e. Total Transfer Capability (TTC), Transmission Reliability Margin (TRM), and Capacity Benefit Margin (CBM). This paper is focused on the calculation of TRM which is one of the security margin reserved for any uncertainty of system conditions. The TRM calculation by probabilistic method is proposed in this paper. Based on the modeling of load forecast error and error in transmission line limitation, various cases of transmission transfer capability and its related probabilistic nature can be calculated. By consideration of the proposed concept of risk analysis, the appropriate required amount of TRM can be obtained. The objective of this research is to provide realistic information on the actual ability of the network which may be an alternative choice for system operators to make an appropriate decision in the competitive market. The advantages of the proposed method are illustrated by application to the IEEJ-WEST10 model system.

  20. Calculation of protein form birefringence using the finite element method.

    PubMed Central

    Pantic-Tanner, Z; Eden, D

    1999-01-01

    An approach based on the finite element method (FEM) is employed to calculate the optical properties of macromolecules, specifically form birefringence. Macromolecules are treated as arbitrarily shaped particles suspended in a solvent of refraction index n1. The form birefringence of the solution is calculated as the difference in its refractive index when all the particles of refractive index n2 are either parallel to or normal to the direction of the polarization of light. Since the particles of interest are small compared to the wavelength of light, a quasi-static approximation for the refractive index is used, i.e., that it is equal to the square root of the dielectric constant of the suspension. The average dielectric constant of the mixture is calculated using the finite element method. This approach has been tested for ellipsoidal particles and a good agreement with theoretical results has been obtained. Also, numerical results for the motor domains of ncd and kinesin, small arbitrarily shaped proteins with known x-ray structures, show reasonable agreement with the experimental data obtained from transient electric birefringence experiments. PMID:10354422

  1. Auxiliary Density Matrix Methods for Hartree-Fock Exchange Calculations.

    PubMed

    Guidon, Manuel; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2010-08-10

    The calculation of Hartree-Fock exchange (HFX) is computationally demanding for large systems described with high-quality basis sets. In this work, we show that excellent performance and good accuracy can nevertheless be obtained if an auxiliary density matrix is employed for the HFX calculation. Several schemes to derive an auxiliary density matrix from a high-quality density matrix are discussed. Key to the accuracy of the auxiliary density matrix methods (ADMM) is the use of a correction based on standard generalized gradient approximations for HFX. ADMM integrates seamlessly in existing HFX codes and, in particular, can be employed in linear scaling implementations. Demonstrating the performance of the method, the effect of HFX on the structure of liquid water is investigated in detail using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations (300 ps) of a system of 64 molecules. Representative for large systems are calculations on a solvated protein (Rubredoxin), for which ADMM outperforms the corresponding standard HFX implementation by approximately a factor 20.

  2. The new performance calculation method of fouled axial flow compressor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huadong; Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail.

  3. The New Performance Calculation Method of Fouled Axial Flow Compressor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fouling is the most important performance degradation factor, so it is necessary to accurately predict the effect of fouling on engine performance. In the previous research, it is very difficult to accurately model the fouled axial flow compressor. This paper develops a new performance calculation method of fouled multistage axial flow compressor based on experiment result and operating data. For multistage compressor, the whole compressor is decomposed into two sections. The first section includes the first 50% stages which reflect the fouling level, and the second section includes the last 50% stages which are viewed as the clean stage because of less deposits. In this model, the performance of the first section is obtained by combining scaling law method and linear progression model with traditional stage stacking method; simultaneously ambient conditions and engine configurations are considered. On the other hand, the performance of the second section is calculated by averaged infinitesimal stage method which is based on Reynolds' law of similarity. Finally, the model is successfully applied to predict the 8-stage axial flow compressor and 16-stage LM2500-30 compressor. The change of thermodynamic parameters such as pressure ratio, efficiency with the operating time, and stage number is analyzed in detail. PMID:25197717

  4. Computational method for general multicenter electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Batcho, P F

    2000-06-01

    Here a three-dimensional fully numerical (i.e., chemical basis-set free) method [P. F. Batcho, Phys. Rev. A 57, 6 (1998)], is formulated and applied to the calculation of the electronic structure of general multicenter Hamiltonian systems. The numerical method is presented and applied to the solution of Schrödinger-type operators, where a given number of nuclei point singularities is present in the potential field. The numerical method combines the rapid "exponential" convergence rates of modern spectral methods with the multiresolution flexibility of finite element methods, and can be viewed as an extension of the spectral element method. The approximation of cusps in the wave function and the formulation of multicenter nuclei singularities are efficiently dealt with by the combination of a coordinate transformation and a piecewise variational spectral approximation. The complete system can be efficiently inverted by established iterative methods for elliptical partial differential equations; an application of the method is presented for atomic, diatomic, and triatomic systems, and comparisons are made to the literature when possible. In particular, local density approximations are studied within the context of Kohn-Sham density functional theory, and are presented for selected subsets of atomic and diatomic molecules as well as the ozone molecule.

  5. An overrelaxation method for transonic flow calculations by Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, E.

    An overrelaxation scheme is proposed which is similar to those proposed by Desideri and Tennehill (1977) and Wirz (1977) except that artificial state variables are avoided. The relaxation process is based on preliminary values of the natural state variables. When a new value of the state variables is calculated, the old value and the preliminary values are no longer used. Steady state an be reached in one relaxation sweep. The present method was applied to one-dimensional Euler equations and optimal relaxation factors are presented for 28-, 56-, 84-, and 112-element schemes. The one-dimensional scheme may be immediately extended to two-dimensional applications for line relaxation on a mesh, and the discretization is done by the finite volume technique. Results of two-dimensional calculations with up to 8 x 56 elements prove that the number of nodes in the transversal direction has no influence on the convergence rate.

  6. Micromagnetics of side shielded perpendicular magnetic recording heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Kenichi; Liu, Yue; Liu, Kowang; Bai, Daniel Z.; Min, Tai; Wu, Yan; Dovek, Moris

    Micromagnetic models of side shielded perpendicular magnetic recording heads show detailed magnetization configuration of the trailing and side shield during the dynamic writing process. The calculation result indicates possible origins of three kinds. The leakage field at the side shield edge, the side shield saturation, and trailing and side shield domain switching. The side shield edge and the saturation induced fields are based on the geometric boundary and they are limited to just around the side shield edge. However the shield switching field can spread to far track position from the side shield to the trailing shield, and it originates from magnetic boundary of the domains and wall formed during the dynamic writing process. As a result, it produces bump field at far track positions in some trailing and side shields.

  7. A literature-driven method to calculate similarities among diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjin; Yoon, Youngmi; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Park, Sanghyun

    2015-11-01

    "Our lives are connected by a thousand invisible threads and along these sympathetic fibers, our actions run as causes and return to us as results". It is Herman Melville's famous quote describing connections among human lives. To paraphrase the Melville's quote, diseases are connected by many functional threads and along these sympathetic fibers, diseases run as causes and return as results. The Melville's quote explains the reason for researching disease-disease similarity and disease network. Measuring similarities between diseases and constructing disease network can play an important role in disease function research and in disease treatment. To estimate disease-disease similarities, we proposed a novel literature-based method. The proposed method extracted disease-gene relations and disease-drug relations from literature and used the frequencies of occurrence of the relations as features to calculate similarities among diseases. We also constructed disease network with top-ranking disease pairs from our method. The proposed method discovered a larger number of answer disease pairs than other comparable methods and showed the lowest p-value. We presume that our method showed good results because of using literature data, using all possible gene symbols and drug names for features of a disease, and determining feature values of diseases with the frequencies of co-occurrence of two entities. The disease-disease similarities from the proposed method can be used in computational biology researches which use similarities among diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations using Quantum Chemistry Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1998-03-01

    This talk will address our recent efforts in developing fast, linear scaling electronic structure methods for large scale applications. Of special importance is our fast multipole method( M. C. Strain, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Science 271), 51 (1996). (FMM) for achieving linear scaling for the quantum Coulomb problem (GvFMM), the traditional bottleneck in quantum chemistry calculations based on Gaussian orbitals. Fast quadratures(R. E. Stratmann, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Chem. Phys. Lett. 257), 213 (1996). combined with methods that avoid the Hamiltonian diagonalization( J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 106), 5569 (1997) have resulted in density functional theory (DFT) programs that can be applied to systems containing many hundreds of atoms and ---depending on computational resources or level of theory-- to many thousands of atoms.( A. D. Daniels, J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 107), 425 (1997). Three solutions for the diagonalization bottleneck will be analyzed and compared: a conjugate gradient density matrix search (CGDMS), a Hamiltonian polynomial expansion of the density matrix, and a pseudo-diagonalization method. Besides DFT, our near-field exchange method( J. C. Burant, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, J. Chem. Phys. 105), 8969 (1996). for linear scaling Hartree-Fock calculations will be discussed. Based on these improved capabilities, we have also developed programs to obtain vibrational frequencies (via analytic energy second derivatives) and excitation energies (through time-dependent DFT) of large molecules like porphyn or C_70. Our GvFMM has been extended to periodic systems( K. N. Kudin and G. E. Scuseria, Chem. Phys. Lett., in press.) and progress towards a Gaussian-based DFT and HF program for polymers and solids will be reported. Last, we will discuss our progress on a Laplace-transformed \\cal O(N^2) second-order pertubation theory (MP2) method.

  9. Shielding and activity estimator for template-based nuclide identification methods

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Karl Einar

    2013-04-09

    According to one embodiment, a method for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides includes receiving one or more templates, the one or more templates corresponding to one or more radio-nuclides which contribute to a probable solution, receiving one or more weighting factors, each weighting factor representing a contribution of one radio-nuclide to the probable solution, computing an effective areal density for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective atomic number (Z) for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective metric for each of the one or more radio-nuclides, and computing an estimated activity for each of the one or more radio-nuclides. In other embodiments, computer program products, systems, and other methods are presented for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides.

  10. Tank Car Head Shield Fatigue Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    shields and to record measurements which reflect the dynamic response of the head shield (and its attachments) and then to devise a method for...areas were instrumented for measuring strains. Other positions were also instrumented to obtain a breader understanding of the response of the shield ...center sill of four feet six inches, measured in a straight line between extreme edges; (ii) A minimum width at the top of shield of nine feet

  11. Analysis and Evaluation of Suppressive Shields

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    resistance of the shield to fragment penetration, and 7. attenuation of thermal effects by the shield . Other aspects of the design include problems of entry...propellant, 2. methods to predict the thermal environment outside of a suppressive shield , 3. comparisons between measured and predicted pressures... SHIELDS by P. A. Co- x P. S. Westine CD J. J. Kulesz L.LJ E. D. Espurza c-.- January 1978 SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE Post Office Drawer 28510, 6220

  12. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  13. Preparation of flower-like CuS by solvothermal method for photocatalytic, UV protection and EMI shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Sai; Shen, Yong; Xu, Li-Hui; Wang, Li-Ming; Lu, Li-sha; Zhang, Ya-ting

    2016-11-01

    The flower-like CuS hierarchical structures were synthesized by solvothermal method. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared(FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-vis optical absorption spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results demonstrated that the as-prepared flower-like CuS with the diameter of 1-5 um was pure hexagonal phase CuS and had well-defined flower-like structures. (1) The as-prepared CuS was proved to possess high photocatalytic performance with band gap of 1.45 eV. The degradation rate of Methylene blue (MB) was up to, 98.26%, 100% after 30 min under UV and visible irradiation. (2)The UPF of cotton fabric treated with CuS reached up to 174 compared with the original untreated fabric with the UPF 20.62. (3) The electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness (EMI SE) of CuS coating was up to 27-31 dB when the content of CuS increased to 28.6%wt in the frequency of 300 KHz-3 GHz. Furthermore, the influence of reaction conditions on the morphology of the as-prepared CuS was investigated systematically and the possible formation mechanism of the CuS hierarchical structure was also proposed.

  14. Efficient hybrid-symbolic methods for quantum mechanical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, T. C.; Zhang, Wenxing

    2015-06-01

    We present hybrid symbolic-numerical tools to generate optimized numerical code for rapid prototyping and fast numerical computation starting from a computer algebra system (CAS) and tailored to any given quantum mechanical problem. Although a major focus concerns the quantum chemistry methods of H. Nakatsuji which has yielded successful and very accurate eigensolutions for small atoms and molecules, the tools are general and may be applied to any basis set calculation with a variational principle applied to its linear and non-linear parameters.

  15. Empirically corrected HEAT method for calculating atomization energies

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, Holmann V

    2008-01-01

    We describe how to increase the accuracy ofthe most recent variants ofthe HEAT method for calculating atomization energies of molecules by means ofextremely simple empirical corrections that depend on stoichiometry and the number ofunpaired electrons in the molecule. Our corrections reduce the deviation from experiment for all the HEAT variants. In particular, our corrections reduce the average absolute deviation and the root-mean-square deviation ofthe 456-QP variant to 0.18 and 0.23 kJoule/mol (i.e., 0.04 and 0.05 kcallmol), respectively.

  16. An approximate method for calculating aircraft downwash on parachute trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    An approximate method for calculating velocities induced by aircraft on parachute trajectories is presented herein. A simple system of quadrilateral vortex panels is used to model the aircraft wing and its wake. The purpose of this work is to provide a simple analytical tool which can be used to approximate the effect of aircraft-induced velocities on parachute performance. Performance issues such as turnover and wake recontact may be strongly influenced by velocities induced by the wake of the delivering aircraft, especially if the aircraft is maneuvering at the time of parachute deployment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  17. Newton like: Minimal residual methods applied to transonic flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Y. S.

    1984-01-01

    A computational technique for the solution of the full potential equation is presented. The method consists of outer and inner iterations. The outer iterate is based on a Newton like algorithm, and a preconditioned Minimal Residual method is used to seek an approximate solution of the system of linear equations arising at each inner iterate. The present iterative scheme is formulated so that the uncertainties and difficulties associated with many iterative techniques, namely the requirements of acceleration parameters and the treatment of additional boundary conditions for the intermediate variables, are eliminated. Numerical experiments based on the new method for transonic potential flows around the NACA 0012 airfoil at different Mach numbers and different angles of attack are presented, and these results are compared with those obtained by the Approximate Factorization technique. Extention to three dimensional flow calculations and application in finite element methods for fluid dynamics problems by the present method are also discussed. The Inexact Newton like method produces a smoother reduction in the residual norm, and the number of supersonic points and circulations are rapidly established as the number of iterations is increased.

  18. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOEpatents

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  19. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

  20. Atomic spectral methods for molecular electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Langhoff, P W; Boatz, J A; Hinde, R J; Sheehy, J A

    2004-11-15

    Theoretical methods are reported for ab initio calculations of the adiabatic (Born-Oppenheimer) electronic wave functions and potential energy surfaces of molecules and other atomic aggregates. An outer product of complete sets of atomic eigenstates familiar from perturbation-theoretical treatments of long-range interactions is employed as a representational basis without prior enforcement of aggregate wave function antisymmetry. The nature and attributes of this atomic spectral-product basis are indicated, completeness proofs for representation of antisymmetric states provided, convergence of Schrodinger eigenstates in the basis established, and strategies for computational implemention of the theory described. A diabaticlike Hamiltonian matrix representative is obtained, which is additive in atomic-energy and pairwise-atomic interaction-energy matrices, providing a basis for molecular calculations in terms of the (Coulombic) interactions of the atomic constituents. The spectral-product basis is shown to contain the totally antisymmetric irreducible representation of the symmetric group of aggregate electron coordinate permutations once and only once, but to also span other (non-Pauli) symmetric group representations known to contain unphysical discrete states and associated continua in which the physically significant Schrodinger eigenstates are generally embedded. These unphysical representations are avoided by isolating the physical block of the Hamiltonian matrix with a unitary transformation obtained from the metric matrix of the explicitly antisymmetrized spectral-product basis. A formal proof of convergence is given in the limit of spectral closure to wave functions and energy surfaces obtained employing conventional prior antisymmetrization, but determined without repeated calculations of Hamiltonian matrix elements as integrals over explicitly antisymmetric aggregate basis states. Computational implementations of the theory employ efficient recursive

  1. Efficient parallel implicit methods for rotary-wing aerodynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissink, Andrew M.

    Euler/Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods are commonly used for prediction of the aerodynamics and aeroacoustics of modern rotary-wing aircraft. However, their widespread application to large complex problems is limited lack of adequate computing power. Parallel processing offers the potential for dramatic increases in computing power, but most conventional implicit solution methods are inefficient in parallel and new techniques must be adopted to realize its potential. This work proposes alternative implicit schemes for Euler/Navier-Stokes rotary-wing calculations which are robust and efficient in parallel. The first part of this work proposes an efficient parallelizable modification of the Lower Upper-Symmetric Gauss Seidel (LU-SGS) implicit operator used in the well-known Transonic Unsteady Rotor Navier Stokes (TURNS) code. The new hybrid LU-SGS scheme couples a point-relaxation approach of the Data Parallel-Lower Upper Relaxation (DP-LUR) algorithm for inter-processor communication with the Symmetric Gauss Seidel algorithm of LU-SGS for on-processor computations. With the modified operator, TURNS is implemented in parallel using Message Passing Interface (MPI) for communication. Numerical performance and parallel efficiency are evaluated on the IBM SP2 and Thinking Machines CM-5 multi-processors for a variety of steady-state and unsteady test cases. The hybrid LU-SGS scheme maintains the numerical performance of the original LU-SGS algorithm in all cases and shows a good degree of parallel efficiency. It experiences a higher degree of robustness than DP-LUR for third-order upwind solutions. The second part of this work examines use of Krylov subspace iterative solvers for the nonlinear CFD solutions. The hybrid LU-SGS scheme is used as a parallelizable preconditioner. Two iterative methods are tested, Generalized Minimum Residual (GMRES) and Orthogonal s-Step Generalized Conjugate Residual (OSGCR). The Newton method demonstrates good

  2. A method of rapped selection and calculating formed milling cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongping; Gong, Yilong; Mo, Li; Qian, Yangshun

    2010-12-01

    With center distance between machining and workpiece reduced, formed milling cutter in cutting edge after persistent cutting and grinding can lead to blunt, thereby spiral gear-shape error of cutter produces surface. When the precision of helicoids section shape of workpiece is lower, it can use ordinary, batch of milling cutter to cutting workpiece through the installation debugging in parameters, such as the center distance and axial intersection angle, etc, in order to reduce workpiece gear-shape error. This paper introduces a method of calculating parameters of the section workpiece helicoids of tooth head profile according to the shaft section milling cutter tooth shape. Through this method can rapidly determine the selected milling machining precision of tooth profile is whether or not within the allowed in the workpiece gearshape error range.

  3. A method of rapped selection and calculating formed milling cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongping; Gong, Yilong; Mo, Li; Qian, Yangshun

    2011-05-01

    With center distance between machining and workpiece reduced, formed milling cutter in cutting edge after persistent cutting and grinding can lead to blunt, thereby spiral gear-shape error of cutter produces surface. When the precision of helicoids section shape of workpiece is lower, it can use ordinary, batch of milling cutter to cutting workpiece through the installation debugging in parameters, such as the center distance and axial intersection angle, etc, in order to reduce workpiece gear-shape error. This paper introduces a method of calculating parameters of the section workpiece helicoids of tooth head profile according to the shaft section milling cutter tooth shape. Through this method can rapidly determine the selected milling machining precision of tooth profile is whether or not within the allowed in the workpiece gearshape error range.

  4. Method for calculating multidimensional electric fields in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallis, J. M.; Trucker, D. C.; Cuddihy, E. F.; Garcia, A., III

    1984-05-01

    A finite element method for evaluating the electrical isolation characteristics of photovoltaic modules was developed; its accuracy was verified by comparison with an exact solution for a geometry similar to that of solar cells. Tests on a square test coupon, employed in electrical isolation tests, and a group of disc-shaped solar cells illustrated the finite element method's usefulness in evaluating module encapsulation designs. Finite element models had to avoid adjacent large and small elements and elements with large aspect ratios, and the NASTRAN output had to be curve fitted to calculate the maximum field. Geometric limits were indicated: cells with very sharp edges, and cells much thinner or thicker than the dielectric pottant layer.

  5. Method for calculating multidimensional electric fields in photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kallis, J. M.; Trucker, D. C.; Cuddihy, E. F.; Garcia, A., III

    1984-01-01

    A finite element method for evaluating the electrical isolation characteristics of photovoltaic modules was developed; its accuracy was verified by comparison with an exact solution for a geometry similar to that of solar cells. Tests on a square test coupon, employed in electrical isolation tests, and a group of disc-shaped solar cells illustrated the finite element method's usefulness in evaluating module encapsulation designs. Finite element models had to avoid adjacent large and small elements and elements with large aspect ratios, and the NASTRAN output had to be curve fitted to calculate the maximum field. Geometric limits were indicated: cells with very sharp edges, and cells much thinner or thicker than the dielectric pottant layer.

  6. Modelling and Optimization of Four-Segment Shielding Coils of Current Transformers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yucheng; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Qing; Qu, Kaifeng; Li, He; Shao, Haiming; Huang, Songling

    2017-01-01

    Applying shielding coils is a practical way to protect current transformers (CTs) for large-capacity generators from the intensive magnetic interference produced by adjacent bus-bars. The aim of this study is to build a simple analytical model for the shielding coils, from which the optimization of the shielding coils can be calculated effectively. Based on an existing stray flux model, a new analytical model for the leakage flux of partial coils is presented, and finite element method-based simulations are carried out to develop empirical equations for the core-pickup factors of the models. Using the flux models, a model of the common four-segment shielding coils is derived. Furthermore, a theoretical analysis is carried out on the optimal performance of the four-segment shielding coils in a typical six-bus-bars scenario. It turns out that the “all parallel” shielding coils with a 45° starting position have the best shielding performance, whereas the “separated loop” shielding coils with a 0° starting position feature the lowest heating value. Physical experiments were performed, which verified all the models and the conclusions proposed in the paper. In addition, for shielding coils with other than the four-segment configuration, the analysis process will generally be the same. PMID:28587137

  7. Modelling and Optimization of Four-Segment Shielding Coils of Current Transformers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yucheng; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Qing; Qu, Kaifeng; Li, He; Shao, Haiming; Huang, Songling

    2017-05-26

    Applying shielding coils is a practical way to protect current transformers (CTs) for large-capacity generators from the intensive magnetic interference produced by adjacent bus-bars. The aim of this study is to build a simple analytical model for the shielding coils, from which the optimization of the shielding coils can be calculated effectively. Based on an existing stray flux model, a new analytical model for the leakage flux of partial coils is presented, and finite element method-based simulations are carried out to develop empirical equations for the core-pickup factors of the models. Using the flux models, a model of the common four-segment shielding coils is derived. Furthermore, a theoretical analysis is carried out on the optimal performance of the four-segment shielding coils in a typical six-bus-bars scenario. It turns out that the "all parallel" shielding coils with a 45° starting position have the best shielding performance, whereas the "separated loop" shielding coils with a 0° starting position feature the lowest heating value. Physical experiments were performed, which verified all the models and the conclusions proposed in the paper. In addition, for shielding coils with other than the four-segment configuration, the analysis process will generally be the same.

  8. Source terms and attenuation lengths for estimating shielding requirements or dose analyses of proton therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lai, Bo-Lun; Lin, Uei-Tyng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2013-08-01

    Proton therapy accelerators in the energy range of 100-300 MeV could potentially produce intense secondary radiation, which must be carefully evaluated and shielded for the purpose of radiation safety in a densely populated hospital. Monte Carlo simulations are generally the most accurate method for accelerator shielding design. However, simplified approaches such as the commonly used point-source line-of-sight model are usually preferable on many practical occasions, especially for scoping shielding design or quick sensitivity studies. This work provides a set of reliable shielding data with reasonable coverage of common target and shielding materials for 100-300 MeV proton accelerators. The shielding data, including source terms and attenuation lengths, were derived from a consistent curve fitting process of a number of depth-dose distributions within the shield, which were systematically calculated by using MCNPX for various beam-target shield configurations. The general characteristics and qualities of this data set are presented. Possible applications in cases of single- and double-layer shielding are considered and demonstrated.

  9. MCNPX vs. DORT for SNS shielding design studies.

    PubMed

    Popova, Irina I

    2005-01-01

    Radiation transport occurs through the 18 m long access way adjacent to the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator tunnel and the 2.2 m thick massive shielding door which closes the access way. A variety of typical materials for accelerator shielding, such as concrete and steel, were used for construction of the door to study radiation penetration. A comparison was carried out using both Monte Carlo (code MCNPX) and discrete ordinates (code DORT) methods. The beam losses during the accelerator operation are the sources for the radiation calculations. Analyses show that the results from the two methods are in good agreement.

  10. Status of reactor shielding research in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Bartine, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Shielding research in the United States continues to place emphasis on: (1) the development and refinement of shielding design calculational methods and nuclear data; and (2) the performance of confirmation experiments, both to evaluate specific design concepts and to verify specific calculational techniques and input data. The successful prediction of the radiation levels observed within the now-operating Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has demonstrated the validity of this two-pronged approach, which has since been applied to US fast breeder reactor programs and is now being used to determine radiation levels and possible further shielding needs at operating light water reactors, especially under accident conditions. A similar approach is being applied to the back end of the fission fuel cycle to verify that radiation doses at fuel element storage and transportation facilities and within fuel reprocessing plants are kept at acceptable levels without undue economic penalties.

  11. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  12. Corium shield

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Douglas B.; Buchholz, Carol E.

    1994-01-01

    A shield for restricting molten corium from flowing into a water sump disposed in a floor of a containment vessel includes upper and lower walls which extend vertically upwardly and downwardly from the floor for laterally bounding the sump. The upper wall includes a plurality of laterally spaced apart flow channels extending horizontally therethrough, with each channel having a bottom disposed coextensively with the floor for channeling water therefrom into the sump. Each channel has a height and a length predeterminedly selected for allowing heat from the molten corium to dissipate through the upper and lower walls as it flows therethrough for solidifying the molten corium therein to prevent accumulation thereof in the sump.

  13. Calculation method of the Strehl Definition for decentral optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Songlin; Chen, Huai'an

    1991-01-01

    A new method is proposed to calculate the Strehi Definition for optical systems lacking rotational symmetry. The Strehi Definition(S. D) is one of the commonly used criterion for evaluating the quality of an optical system especially for the microscopic objectives. It is will known that the S. D is defined as follows S. D 7-2 J1J1exp[-27riW(x y)dxdy I 2 (1) Where w(x y) is wave aberrations and (x y) is the coordinate of the pupil plane. For a high quality optical system S. D can be expressed as S. D 1 (2)2[W2(x W(x y) 2j (2) In order to calculate the S. D of the decentral optical system precisely both lateral and longitudinal defocus should be considered simultaneously. The corresponding aberration coefficients are C C01 (along y-direction) and C0 (along x-direction). Owing to the optical systems lacking relational symmetry the asymmetrical aberrations central astigmatism C21 and central coma C should be added in the wave aberration function i. e. the wave aberration for the system lacking symmetry is W(x y) C(x+ y) + C(x + y)2 + C(x + y)3 + C(x + + C02y2+ C22(x2 +y)y + C42(x+?)Y + C62(x+?)3? + Cy4 + C24(x2 + y)y4 + C + y)2y4 + C(x2 + + C41(x2 + y2)2y + C61(x2 + y)3y + Cd + C + y2)y3 +C43(x2+y2)+C01y+C1 x+Cx2+C1 (x2+?)x (3) After tedious but straightforward integral calculation equation

  14. New method for calculation of nuclear cluster structure of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibishi, A.I.

    2005-05-06

    In the calculations of the many-nucleon bound states, using the realistic nucleon-nucleon potential, and a three- and four-nucleon potential, the Exact Many-Body Nuclear Cluster Model (EMBNCM) was found to give accurate results, that converege much more rapidly, than those obtained by the Faddeev equation calculations. With the use of realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and many-nucleon potentials, containing strong tensor, Majorana, and repulsive core components, the many-body cluster structure of 16O, 27Al, 44Ti, and 48Ti is discussed. In 27Al(p,x)Na reactions we assume that two different nuclear cluster structures of 27Al, gives us two different isotopes of Na: 22Na and 24Na. But the most important result is the existence of two different permutations symmetries of 27Al. Using new method for calculation of nuclear cluster structure of 27Al, we have found two different nuclear cluster structures of 27Al: 24Na+3He and 25Na+d. The internal nuclear cluster wave functions of different nuclear cluster models (nuclear cluster isomers) of the same isotope are not equivalent, if we take into account Many-Body Nuclear Forces, such as 3BF and 4BF. The core clusters of 16O, 27Al, 44Ti, and 48Ti nuclei have a trigonal-pyramide Td, D2d, and C3v symmetry, while exterior clusters in 16O and 27Al[(24Na +3 He)model] nuclei have a trigonal symmetry C2v, and D3h. We have developed a new system of Jacobi coordinates for our EMBNCM model with the symmetry above. The new computer code for determination of direct nuclear cluster reactions has been written in Mathematica 5 programming language. We have found a high level of dependence of the nuclear cluster wave functions from the center of mass and cluster effects.

  15. New method for calculation of nuclear cluster structure of nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibishi, A. I.

    2005-05-01

    In the calculations of the many-nucleon bound states, using the realistic nucleon-nucleon potential, and a three- and four-nucleon potential, the Exact Many-Body Nuclear Cluster Model (EMBNCM) was found to give accurate results, that converege much more rapidly, than those obtained by the Faddeev equation calculations. With the use of realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, and many-nucleon potentials, containing strong tensor, Majorana, and repulsive core components, the many-body cluster structure of 16O, 27Al, 44Ti, and 48Ti is discussed. In 27Al(p,x)Na reactions we assume that two different nuclear cluster structures of 27Al, gives us two different isotopes of Na: 22Na and 24Na. But the most important result is the existence of two different permutations symmetries of 27Al. Using new method for calculation of nuclear cluster structure of 27Al, we have found two different nuclear cluster structures of 27Al: 24Na+3He and 25Na+d. The internal nuclear cluster wave functions of different nuclear cluster models (nuclear cluster isomers) of the same isotope are not equivalent, if we take into account Many-Body Nuclear Forces, such as 3BF and 4BF. The core clusters of 16O, 27Al, 44Ti, and 48Ti nuclei have a trigonal-pyramide Td, D2d, and C3v symmetry, while exterior clusters in 16O and 27Al[(24Na +3 He)model] nuclei have a trigonal symmetry C2v, and D3h. We have developed a new system of Jacobi coordinates for our EMBNCM model with the symmetry above. The new computer code for determination of direct nuclear cluster reactions has been written in Mathematica 5 programming language. We have found a high level of dependence of the nuclear cluster wave functions from the center of mass and cluster effects.

  16. Measurements for the JASPER Program radial shield attenuation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mukenthaler, F.J.

    1987-05-01

    The Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Tower Shielding Facility during FY 1986 to: provide data for calculating the shielding effectiveness of combinations of stainless steel, graphite, and boron carbide shield designs; verify the accuracy of related radiation transport methods and nuclear data; and substantiate the effectiveness of shield designs currently proposed by advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) designers in Japan and the United States. The Tower Shielding Reactor source was modified to represent neutron spectra at a specified location near the core and in the sodium pool of a typical liquid-metal-cooled reactor. The experimental configurations resulted from successive additions of the various layers of material as specified in the program plan. Integral neutron fluxes were measured behind each of the configurations at specified locations, and neutron spectra were obtained for selected mockups. The experimental data are presented in both tabular and graphical form. This experiment is the first in a series of six experiments to be performed as part of a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy and the Japan Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. The research program is intended to provide support for the development of advanced sodium-cooled reactors.

  17. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  18. Transfer impedance simulation and measurement methods to analyse shielding behaviour of HV cables used in Electric-Vehicles and Hybrid-Electric-Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaq, Abid; Frei, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    In the power drive system of the Electric Vehicles (EVs) and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs), High Voltage (HV) cables play a major role in evaluating the EMI of the whole system. Transfer impedance (ZT) is the most commonly used performance parameter for the HV cable. To analyse and design HV cables and connectors with better shielding effectiveness (SE), appropriate measurement and simulation methods are required. In this paper, Ground Plate Method (GPM) with improvements has been proposed to measure ZT. Use of low-frequency ferrites to avoid ground-loop effects has also been investigated. Additionally, a combination of analytical model with a circuit model has been implemented to simulate limitations (frequency response) of the test setup. Also parametrical studies using the analytical model have been performed to analyse the shielding behaviour of HV cables.

  19. Simplified method for calculation of equilibrium plasma composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydalevskaya, Maria A.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a simplified method for the evaluation of equilibrium composition of plasmas consisted of monoatomic species is proposed. Multicomponent gas systems resulting from thermal ionization of spatially uniform mixtures are assumed enough rarefied to be treated as ideal gases even after multiple ionization steps. The method developed for the calculation of equilibrium composition of these mixtures makes use of the fundamental principles of statistical physics. Equilibrium concentrations of mixture components are determined by integration of distribution functions over the space of momentum and summation over electronic energy levels. These functions correspond to the entropy maximum. To determine unknown parameters, the systems of equations corresponding to the normalization conditions are derived. It is shown that the systems may be reduced to one algebraic equation if the equilibrium temperature is known. Numeral method to solve this equation is proposed. Special attention is given to the ionized mixtures, generated from the atoms of a single chemical species and the situations, when in the gas only the first- or the first- and second-order ionization are possible.

  20. New method for calculating a mathematical expression for streamflow recession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutledge, Albert T.

    1991-01-01

    An empirical method has been devised to calculate the master recession curve, which is a mathematical expression for streamflow recession during times of negligible direct runoff. The method is based on the assumption that the storage-delay factor, which is the time per log cycle of streamflow recession, varies linearly with the logarithm of streamflow. The resulting master recession curve can be nonlinear. The method can be executed by a computer program that reads a data file of daily mean streamflow, then allows the user to select several near-linear segments of streamflow recession. The storage-delay factor for each segment is one of the coefficients of the equation that results from linear least-squares regression. Using results for each recession segment, a mathematical expression of the storage-delay factor as a function of the log of streamflow is determined by linear least-squares regression. The master recession curve, which is a second-order polynomial expression for time as a function of log of streamflow, is then derived using the coefficients of this function.

  1. Improving stochastic estimates with inference methods: Calculating matrix diagonals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selig, Marco; Oppermann, Niels; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2012-02-01

    Estimating the diagonal entries of a matrix, that is not directly accessible but only available as a linear operator in the form of a computer routine, is a common necessity in many computational applications, especially in image reconstruction and statistical inference. Here, methods of statistical inference are used to improve the accuracy or the computational costs of matrix probing methods to estimate matrix diagonals. In particular, the generalized Wiener filter methodology, as developed within information field theory, is shown to significantly improve estimates based on only a few sampling probes, in cases in which some form of continuity of the solution can be assumed. The strength, length scale, and precise functional form of the exploited autocorrelation function of the matrix diagonal is determined from the probes themselves. The developed algorithm is successfully applied to mock and real world problems. These performance tests show that, in situations where a matrix diagonal has to be calculated from only a small number of computationally expensive probes, a speedup by a factor of 2 to 10 is possible with the proposed method.

  2. Free energy calculations: an efficient adaptive biasing potential method.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Bradley M; Legoll, Frédéric; Lelièvre, Tony; Stoltz, Gabriel; Fleurat-Lessard, Paul

    2010-05-06

    We develop an efficient sampling and free energy calculation technique within the adaptive biasing potential (ABP) framework. By mollifying the density of states we obtain an approximate free energy and an adaptive bias potential that is computed directly from the population along the coordinates of the free energy. Because of the mollifier, the bias potential is "nonlocal", and its gradient admits a simple analytic expression. A single observation of the reaction coordinate can thus be used to update the approximate free energy at every point within a neighborhood of the observation. This greatly reduces the equilibration time of the adaptive bias potential. This approximation introduces two parameters: strength of mollification and the zero of energy of the bias potential. While we observe that the approximate free energy is a very good estimate of the actual free energy for a large range of mollification strength, we demonstrate that the errors associated with the mollification may be removed via deconvolution. The zero of energy of the bias potential, which is easy to choose, influences the speed of convergence but not the limiting accuracy. This method is simple to apply to free energy or mean force computation in multiple dimensions and does not involve second derivatives of the reaction coordinates, matrix manipulations nor on-the-fly adaptation of parameters. For the alanine dipeptide test case, the new method is found to gain as much as a factor of 10 in efficiency as compared to two basic implementations of the adaptive biasing force methods, and it is shown to be as efficient as well-tempered metadynamics with the postprocess deconvolution giving a clear advantage to the mollified density of states method.

  3. Three-dimensional boundary layer calculation by a characteristic method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houdeville, R.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the three-dimensional boundary layer equations for bodies of arbitrary shape is presented. In laminar flows, the application domain extends from incompressible to hypersonic flows with the assumption of chemical equilibrium. For turbulent boundary layers, the application domain is limited by the validity of the mixing length model used. In order to respect the hyperbolic nature of the equations reduced to first order partial derivative terms, the momentum equations are discretized along the local streamlines using of the osculator tangent plane at each node of the body fitted coordinate system. With this original approach, it is possible to overcome the use of the generalized coordinates, and therefore, it is not necessary to impose an extra hypothesis about the regularity of the mesh in which the boundary conditions are given. By doing so, it is possible to limit, and sometimes to suppress, the pre-treatment of the data coming from an inviscid calculation. Although the proposed scheme is only semi-implicit, the method remains numerically very efficient.

  4. Intercalated graphite fiber composites as EMI shields in aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    The requirements for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding in aerospace structures are complicated over that of ground structures by their weight limitations. As a result, the best EMI shielding materials must blend low density, high strength, and high elastic modulus with high shielding ability. In addition, fabrication considerations including penetrations and joints play a major role. The EMI shielding properties are calculated for shields formed from pristine and intercalated graphite fiber/epoxy composites and compared to preliminary experimental results and to shields made from aluminum. Calculations indicate that EMI shields could be fabricated from intercalated graphite composites which would have less than 12 percent of the mass of conventional aluminum shields, based on mechanical properties and shielding properties alone.

  5. Are accurate computations of the 13C' shielding feasible at the DFT level of theory?

    PubMed

    Vila, Jorge A; Arnautova, Yelena A; Martin, Osvaldo A; Scheraga, Harold A

    2014-02-05

    The goal of this study is twofold. First, to investigate the relative influence of the main structural factors affecting the computation of the (13)C' shielding, namely, the conformation of the residue itself and the next nearest-neighbor effects. Second, to determine whether calculation of the (13)C' shielding at the density functional level of theory (DFT), with an accuracy similar to that of the (13)C(α) shielding, is feasible with the existing computational resources. The DFT calculations, carried out for a large number of possible conformations of the tripeptide Ac-GXY-NMe, with different combinations of X and Y residues, enable us to conclude that the accurate computation of the (13)C' shielding for a given residue X depends on the: (i) (ϕ,ψ) backbone torsional angles of X; (ii) side-chain conformation of X; (iii) (ϕ,ψ) torsional angles of Y; and (iv) identity of residue Y. Consequently, DFT-based quantum mechanical calculations of the (13)C' shielding, with all these factors taken into account, are two orders of magnitude more CPU demanding than the computation, with similar accuracy, of the (13)C(α) shielding. Despite not considering the effect of the possible hydrogen bond interaction of the carbonyl oxygen, this work contributes to our general understanding of the main structural factors affecting the accurate computation of the (13)C' shielding in proteins and may spur significant progress in effort to develop new validation methods for protein structures.

  6. Radiation shielding quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Dallsun

    For the radiation shielding quality assurance, the validity and reliability of the neutron transport code MCNP, which is now one of the most widely used radiation shielding analysis codes, were checked with lot of benchmark experiments. And also as a practical example, follows were performed in this thesis. One integral neutron transport experiment to measure the effect of neutron streaming in iron and void was performed with Dog-Legged Void Assembly in Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in 1991. Neutron flux was measured six different places with the methane detectors and a BF-3 detector. The main purpose of the measurements was to provide benchmark against which various neutron transport calculation tools could be compared. Those data were used in verification of Monte Carlo Neutron & Photon Transport Code, MCNP, with the modeling for that. Experimental results and calculation results were compared in both ways, as the total integrated value of neutron fluxes along neutron energy range from 10 KeV to 2 MeV and as the neutron spectrum along with neutron energy range. Both results are well matched with the statistical error +/-20%. MCNP results were also compared with those of TORT, a three dimensional discrete ordinates code which was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. MCNP results are superior to the TORT results at all detector places except one. This means that MCNP is proved as a very powerful tool for the analysis of neutron transport through iron & air and further it could be used as a powerful tool for the radiation shielding analysis. For one application of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) to neutron and gamma transport problems, uncertainties for the calculated values of critical K were evaluated as in the ANOVA on statistical data.

  7. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  8. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  9. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  10. NMR chemical shielding and spin-spin coupling constants of liquid NH3: a systematic investigation using the sequential QM/MM method.

    PubMed

    Gester, Rodrigo M; Georg, Herbert C; Canuto, Sylvio; Caputo, M Cristina; Provasi, Patricio F

    2009-12-31

    The NMR spin coupling parameters, (1)J(N,H) and (2)J(H,H), and the chemical shielding, sigma((15)N), of liquid ammonia are studied from a combined and sequential QM/MM methodology. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to generate statistically uncorrelated configurations that are submitted to density functional theory calculations. Two different Lennard-Jones potentials are used in the liquid simulations. Electronic polarization is included in these two potentials via an iterative procedure with and without geometry relaxation, and the influence on the calculated properties are analyzed. B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J calculations were used to compute the (1)J(N,H) constants in the interval of -67.8 to -63.9 Hz, depending on the theoretical model used. These can be compared with the experimental results of -61.6 Hz. For the (2)J(H,H) coupling the theoretical results vary between -10.6 to -13.01 Hz. The indirect experimental result derived from partially deuterated liquid is -11.1 Hz. Inclusion of explicit hydrogen bonded molecules gives a small but important contribution. The vapor-to-liquid shifts are also considered. This shift is calculated to be negligible for (1)J(N,H) in agreement with experiment. This is rationalized as a cancellation of the geometry relaxation and pure solvent effects. For the chemical shielding, sigma((15)N) calculations at the B3LYP/aug-pcS-3 show that the vapor-to-liquid chemical shift requires the explicit use of solvent molecules. Considering only one ammonia molecule in an electrostatic embedding gives a wrong sign for the chemical shift that is corrected only with the use of explicit additional molecules. The best result calculated for the vapor to liquid chemical shift Delta sigma((15)N) is -25.2 ppm, in good agreement with the experimental value of -22.6 ppm.

  11. NMR Chemical Shielding and Spin-Spin Coupling Constants of Liquid NH3: A Systematic Investigation using the Sequential QM/MM Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gester, Rodrigo M.; Georg, Herbert C.; Canuto, Sylvio; Caputo, M. Cristina; Provasi, Patricio F.

    2009-09-01

    The NMR spin coupling parameters, 1J(N,H) and 2J(H,H), and the chemical shielding, σ(15N), of liquid ammonia are studied from a combined and sequential QM/MM methodology. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to generate statistically uncorrelated configurations that are submitted to density functional theory calculations. Two different Lennard-Jones potentials are used in the liquid simulations. Electronic polarization is included in these two potentials via an iterative procedure with and without geometry relaxation, and the influence on the calculated properties are analyzed. B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ-J calculations were used to compute the 1J(N,H) constants in the interval of -67.8 to -63.9 Hz, depending on the theoretical model used. These can be compared with the experimental results of -61.6 Hz. For the 2J(H,H) coupling the theoretical results vary between -10.6 to -13.01 Hz. The indirect experimental result derived from partially deuterated liquid is -11.1 Hz. Inclusion of explicit hydrogen bonded molecules gives a small but important contribution. The vapor-to-liquid shifts are also considered. This shift is calculated to be negligible for 1J(N,H) in agreement with experiment. This is rationalized as a cancellation of the geometry relaxation and pure solvent effects. For the chemical shielding, σ(15N) calculations at the B3LYP/aug-pcS-3 show that the vapor-to-liquid chemical shift requires the explicit use of solvent molecules. Considering only one ammonia molecule in an electrostatic embedding gives a wrong sign for the chemical shift that is corrected only with the use of explicit additional molecules. The best result calculated for the vapor to liquid chemical shift Δσ(15N) is -25.2 ppm, in good agreement with the experimental value of -22.6 ppm.

  12. Methane emissions from a small wind shielded lake determined by eddy covariance, flux chambers, anchored funnels, and boundary model calculations: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Carsten J; Diem, Torsten; Eugster, Werner

    2012-04-17

    Lakes are large sources of methane, held to be responsible for 18% of the radiative forcing, to the atmosphere. Periods of lake overturn (during fall/winter) are short and therefore difficult to capture with field campaigns but potentially one of the most important periods for methane emissions. We studied methane emissions using four different methods, including eddy covariance measurements, floating chambers, anchored funnels, and boundary model calculations. Whereas the first three methods agreed rather well, boundary model estimates were 5-30 times lower leading to a strong underestimation of methane fluxes from aquatic systems. These results show the importance of ebullition as the most important flux pathway and the need for continuous measurements with a large footprint covering also shallow parts of lakes. Although fluxes were high, on average 4 mmol m(-2) d(-1) during the overturn period, water column microbial methane oxidation removed 75% of the methane and only 25% of potential emissions were released to the atmosphere. Hence, this study illustrates second the importance of considering methane oxidation when estimating the flux of methane from lakes during overturn periods.

  13. Vibrational spectra, NBO analysis, first order hyperpolarizabilities, thermodynamic functions and NMR chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA) parameters of 5-nitro-2-furoic acid by ab initio HF and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, V; Rajeswari, S; Lalitha, S

    2013-09-01

    In this work, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra are recorded on the solid phase of 5-nitro-2-furoic acid (abbreviated as NFA) in the regions 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-100 cm(-1) respectively. The geometrical parameters, vibrational assignments, HOMO-LUMO energies and NBO calculations are obtained for the monomer and dimer of NFA from HF and DFT (B3LYP) with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set calculations. Second order perturbation energies and electron density (ED) transfer from filled lone pairs of Lewis base to unfilled Lewis acid sites of NFA are discussed on the basis of NBO analysis. Intermolecular hydrogen bonds exist through COOH groups; give the evidence for the formation of dimer entities in the title molecule. The theoretically calculated harmonic frequencies are scaled by common scale factor. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The thermodynamic functions were obtained for the range of temperature 100-1000 K. The polarizability, first hyperpolarizability, anisotropy polarizability invariant has been computed using quantum chemical calculations. The chemical parameters were calculated from the HOMO and LUMO values. The NMR chemical shielding anisotropy (CSA) parameters were also computed for the title molecule.

  14. Evaluation Of Methods To Measure Hydrogen Generation Rate In A Shielded Cell Environment And A Method Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, M. E.

    2012-11-07

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the art for determination of hydrogen generation rates of radioactive slurries and solutions to provide a basis for design, fabrication, testing, and implementation of a measurement method for Hydrogen Generation Rate (HGR) during qualification of waste feeds for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The HGR measurement will be performed on samples of the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and High Level Waste (HLW) staged waste feeds for the WTP as well as on samples from selected unit operations testing during the qualification program. SRNL has performed a review of techniques utilized to measure HGR of high level radioactive waste slurries, evaluated the Hanford 222-S Laboratory method for measurement of hydrogen, and reviewed the hydrogen generation rate models for Hanford waste.Based on the literature review, method evaluation, and SRNL experience with measuring hydrogen generation rate, SRNL recommends that a continuous flow system with online gas analysis be used as the HGR measurement method during waste qualification.

  15. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). By increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate concept MLI blankets for MMOD shields. In conjunction, these MLI blankets and the subsequent MMOD shields were also evaluated for their radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. These concepts were evaluated against the ISS MLI blankets and the ISS MMOD shield, which acted as the baseline. These radiation shielding assessments were performed using the high charge and energy transport software (HZETRN). This software is based on a one-dimensional formula of the Boltzmann transport equation with a straight-ahead approximation. Each configuration was evaluated against the following environments to provide a diverse view of radiation shielding effectiveness in most space environments within the heliosphere: August 1972 solar particle event, October 1989 solar particle event, 1982 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar maximum), 1987 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar minimum), and a low earth orbit environment in 1970 that corresponded to an altitude of 400 km and inclination of 51.6 . Both the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were analyzed, but the focus of the discussion was on the dose equivalent since the data is most concerned with radiation shielding of the crew. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for

  16. Space reactor shielding fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of space reactor neutron shielding by a melting and casting process utilizing lithium hydride is described. The first neutron shield fabricated is a large pancake shape 86 inches in diameter, containing about 1700 pounds of lithium hydride. This shield, fabricated by the unique melting and casting process, is the largest lithium hydride shield ever built.

  17. A computerized implementation of a non-linear equation to predict barrier shielding requirements.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, A C; Strydom, W J

    1997-04-01

    A non-linear equation to predict barrier shielding thickness from the work function of x- and gamma-ray generators is presented. This equation is incorporated into a model that takes into account primary, scatter, and leakage radiation components to determine the amount of shielding necessary. The case of multiple wall materials is also considered. The equation accurately models the radiation attenuation curves given in NCRP 49 for concrete and lead, thus eliminating the necessity to use graphical or tabular methods to calculate shielding thickness, which can be inaccurate.

  18. The ORNL-SNAP shielding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mynatt, F. R.; Clifford, C. E.; Muckenthaler, F. J.; Gritzner, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    The effort in the ORNL-SNAP shielding program is directed toward the development and verification of computer codes using numerical solutions to the transport equation for the design of optimized radiation shields for SNAP power systems. A brief discussion is given for the major areas of the SNAP shielding program, which are cross-section development, transport code development, and integral experiments. Detailed results are presented for the integral experiments utilizing the TSF-SNAP reactor. Calculated results are compared with experiments for neutron and gamma-ray spectra from the bare reactor and as transmitted through slab shields.

  19. EMI Shields made from intercalated graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Terry, Jennifer

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding typically makes up about twenty percent of the mass of a spacecraft power system. Graphite fiber/polymer composites have significantly lower densities and higher strengths than aluminum, the present material of choice for EMI shields, but they lack the electrical conductivity that enables acceptable shielding effectiveness. Bromine intercalated pitch-based graphite/epoxy composites have conductivities fifty times higher than conventional structural graphite fibers. Calculations are presented which indicate that EMI shields made from such composites can have sufficient shielding at less than 20% of the mass of conventional aluminum shields. EMI shields provide many functions other than EMI shielding including physical protection, thermal management, and shielding from ionizing radiation. Intercalated graphite composites perform well in these areas also. Mechanically, they have much higher specific strength and modulus than aluminum. They also have shorter half thicknesses for x-rays and gamma radiation than aluminum. Thermally, they distribute infra-red radiation by absorbing and re-radiating it rather than concentrating it by reflection as aluminum does. The prospects for intercalated graphite fiber/polymer composites for EMI shielding are encouraging.

  20. First-principles calculation of 17O and 25Mg NMR shieldings in MgO at finite temperature: rovibrational effect in solids.

    PubMed

    Rossano, Stéphanie; Mauri, Francesco; Pickard, Chris J; Farnan, Ian

    2005-04-21

    The temperature dependence of (17)O and (25)Mg NMR chemical shifts in solid MgO have been calculated using a first-principles approach. Density functional theory, pseudopotentials, a plane-wave basis set, and periodic boundary conditions were used both to describe the motion of the nuclei and to compute the NMR chemical shifts. The chemical shifts were obtained using the gauge-including projector augmented wave method. In a crystalline solid, the temperature dependence is due to both (i) the variation of the averaged equilibrium structure and (ii) the fluctuation of the atoms around this structure. In MgO, the equilibrium structure at each temperature is uniquely defined by the cubic lattice parameters, which we take from experiment. We evaluate the effect of the fluctuations within a quasiharmonic approximation. In particular, the dynamical matrix, defining the harmonic Hamiltonian, has been computed for each equilibrium volume. This harmonic Hamiltonian was used to generate nuclear configurations that obey quantum statistical mechanics. The chemical shifts were averaged over these nuclear configurations. The results reproduce the previously published experimental NMR data measured on MgO between room temperature and 1000 degrees C. It is shown that the chemical shift behavior with temperature cannot be explained by thermal expansion alone. Vibrational corrections due to the fluctuations of atoms around their equilibrium position are crucial to reproduce the experimental results.

  1. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). Increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate a concept MLI blanket for an MMOD shield. In conjunction, this MLI blanket and the subsequent MMOD shield was also evaluated for its radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. The overall MMOD shielding system using the concept MLI blanket proved to only have a marginal increase in the radiation mitigating properties. Therefore, subsequent analysis was performed on various conceptual MMOD shields to determine the combination of materials that may prove superior for radiation mitigating purposes. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for radiation shielding effectiveness.

  2. Nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water: Insights from hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Nielsen, Christian B.; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Christiansen, Ove; Ruud, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    We present a gauge-origin independent method for the calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors of molecules in a structured and polarizable environment. The method is based on a combination of density functional theory (DFT) or Hartree-Fock wave functions with molecular mechanics. The method is unique in the sense that it includes three important properties that need to be fulfilled in accurate calculations of nuclear magnetic shielding constants: (i) the model includes electron correlation effects, (ii) the model uses gauge-including atomic orbitals to give gauge-origin independent results, and (iii) the effect of the environment is treated self-consistently using a discrete reaction-field methodology. The authors present sample calculations of the isotropic nuclear magnetic shielding constants of liquid water based on a large number of solute-solvent configurations derived from molecular dynamics simulations employing potentials which treat solvent polarization either explicitly or implicitly. For both the O17 and H1 isotropic shielding constants the best predicted results compare fairly well with the experimental data, i.e., they reproduce the experimental solvent shifts to within 4ppm for the O17 shielding and 1ppm for the H1 shielding.

  3. Analysis of embedded shock waves calculated by relaxation methods.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, E. M.

    1973-01-01

    The requirements for uniqueness of the calculated jump conditions across embedded shock waves are investigated for type-dependent difference systems used in transonic flow studies. A mathematical analysis shows that sufficient conditions are (1) the equations should be differenced in conservative form and (2) a special difference operator should be used when switching from a hyperbolic to an elliptic operator. The latter results in a consistency condition on the integral equations, rather than the differential, at these points. Calculated jump conditions for several embedded and detached shock waves are analyzed in the physical and hodograph planes. Comparisons are made with previous results, a time-dependent calculation, and data.

  4. Exploratory Environmental Tests of Several Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, George P.; Betts, John, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted with several conceptual radiative heat shields of composite construction. Measured transient temperature distributions were obtained for a graphite heat shield without insulation and with three types of insulating materials, and for a metal multipost heat shield, at surface temperatures of approximately 2,000 F and 1,450 F, respectively, by use of a radiant-heat facility. The graphite configurations suffered loss of surface material under repeated irradiation. Temperature distribution calculated for the metal heat shield by a numerical procedure was in good agreement with measured data. Environmental survival tests of the graphite heat shield without insulation, an insulated multipost heat shield, and a stainless-steel-tile heat shield were made at temperatures of 2,000 F and dynamic pressures of approximately 6,000 lb/sq ft, provided by an ethylene-heated jet operating at a Mach number of 2.0 and sea-level conditions. The graphite heat shield survived the simulated aerodynamic heating and pressure loading. A problem area exists in the design and materials for heat-resistant fasteners between the graphite shield and the base structure. The insulated multipost heat shield was found to be superior to the stainless-steel-tile heat shield in retarding heat flow. Over-lapped face-plate joints and surface smoothness of the insulated multi- post heat shield were not adversely affected by the test environment. The graphite heat shield without insulation survived tests made in the acoustic environment of a large air jet. This acoustic environment is random in frequency and has an overall noise level of 160 decibels.

  5. Dose-to-water conversion for the backscatter-shielded EPID: A frame-based method to correct for EPID energy response to MLC transmitted radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zwan, Benjamin J. O’Connor, Daryl J.; King, Brian W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a frame-by-frame correction for the energy response of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) to radiation that has transmitted through the multileaf collimator (MLC) and to integrate this correction into the backscatter shielded EPID (BSS-EPID) dose-to-water conversion model. Methods: Individual EPID frames were acquired using a Varian frame grabber and iTools acquisition software then processed using in-house software developed inMATLAB. For each EPID image frame, the region below the MLC leaves was identified and all pixels in this region were multiplied by a factor of 1.3 to correct for the under-response of the imager to MLC transmitted radiation. The corrected frames were then summed to form a corrected integrated EPID image. This correction was implemented as an initial step in the BSS-EPID dose-to-water conversion model which was then used to compute dose planes in a water phantom for 35 IMRT fields. The calculated dose planes, with and without the proposed MLC transmission correction, were compared to measurements in solid water using a two-dimensional diode array. Results: It was observed that the integration of the MLC transmission correction into the BSS-EPID dose model improved agreement between modeled and measured dose planes. In particular, the MLC correction produced higher pass rates for almost all Head and Neck fields tested, yielding an average pass rate of 99.8% for 2%/2 mm criteria. A two-sample independentt-test and fisher F-test were used to show that the MLC transmission correction resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the mean and the standard deviation of the gamma values, respectively, to give a more accurate and consistent dose-to-water conversion. Conclusions: The frame-by-frame MLC transmission response correction was shown to improve the accuracy and reduce the variability of the BSS-EPID dose-to-water conversion model. The correction may be applied as a preprocessing step

  6. NMR shielding and spin-rotation constants in XCO (X = Ni, Pd, Pt) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Taye B.; Jaszuński, Michał; Malkin, Elena; Komorovský, Stanislav; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Ab initio nonrelativistic and four-component relativistic DFT (density functional theory) methods are combined to study the spin-rotation and absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants of group 10 transition metal monocarbonyls. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated and available experimental data for the spin-rotation constants and shielding spans for PdCO and PtCO. These data allow us to determine accurate absolute chemical shielding constants for all the nuclei, as well as for the unknown spin-rotation constants. We compare the four-component shielding constants with those obtained from the spin-orbit zeroth-order regular approximation, together with an assessment of the performance of different basis sets. For the first time, relativistically optimised basis sets for the heavy atoms used in the four-component calculations are shown to give converged results for both magnetic properties studied. We dedicate this article to the memory of Professor Nicholas C. Handy.

  7. Neutron streaming along ducts and labyrinths at the JET biological shielding: Effect of concrete composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilopoulou, T.; Stamatelatos, I. E.; Batistoni, P.; Conroy, S.; Obryk, B.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, D. B.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were performed at the Joint European Torus (JET) in order to validate the computational tools and methods applied for neutron streaming calculations through penetrations in the JET Hall biological shielding. In the present work the sensitivity of the simulations on the hydrogen and boron content in concrete shielding was investigated. MCNP code was used to simulate neutron streaming along the JET Hall personnel entrance labyrinth for deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasma sources for different concrete wall compositions. Neutron fluence and ambient dose equivalent along the labyrinth were calculated. Simulation results for the "as built" JET concrete composition were compared against measurements performed using thermoluminescence detectors. This study contributes to the optimization of the radiation shielding of JET and, furthermore, provides information from JET experience that may assist in optimizing and validating the radiation shielding design methodology used in its successor fusion devices ITER and DEMO.

  8. Comparison of Methods for Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred; Abbate, M J

    2012-01-19

    Various approximations for calculating radioactive heat transfer between parallel surfaces are evaluated. This is done by applying the approximations based on total emissivities to a special case of known spectral emissivities, for which exact heat transfer calculations are possible. Comparison of results indicates that the best approximation is obtained by basing the emissivity of the receiving surface primarily on the temperature of the emitter. A specific model is shown to give excellent agreement over a very wide range of values.

  9. Shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Santoro, R. T.; Barish, J.; Claiborne, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    The available information on the shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles is summarized. The emphasis is placed on shielding against Van Allen belt protons and against solar-flare protons and alpha particles, but information on shielding against galactic cosmic rays is also presented. The approximation methods for use by nonexperts in the space shielding field are those that are standard in the space shielding literature.

  10. Anisotropy in the flexural response of the Indian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Rajesh R.; Singh, Yudhvir; Trivedi, Deshraj; Kandpal, Suresh Ch.

    2012-04-01

    We seek to determine the strain field which has accumulated in the Indian Shield due to the continental drift of Gondwanaland. We have used a method which involves the calculation of the 2D isostatic coherence response function between Bouguer gravity and topography as a function of azimuth by way of multispectrogram analysis. The average coherence is maximum consistently in the Indian Shield in a direction, which is at an angle of 45° to the major trend of suture zones within the shield, a result which is in good agreement with the strain inferred from absolute plate motion (APM) in a hot spot reference frame. This directionality of mechanical plate weakness suggests that all paleostress fields were erased due to the movement of the Indian plate during the Himalayan orogeny.

  11. Radiation Shielding Properties of Some Marbles in Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Guenoglu, K.; Akkurt, I.

    2011-12-26

    Especially after development of technology, radiation started to be used in a large fields such as medicine, industry and energy. Using radiation in those fields bring hazardous effect of radiation into humancell. Thus radiation protection becomes important in physics. Although there are three ways for radiation protection, shielding of the radiation is the most commonly used method. Natural Stones such as marble is used as construction material especially in critical building and thus its radiation shielding capability should be determined.In this study, gamma ray shielding properties of some different types of marble mined in Turkey, have been measured using a NaI(Tl) scintillator detector. The measured results were also compared with the theoretical calculations XCOM.

  12. Resonance Self-Shielding Methodologies in SCALE 6

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark L

    2011-01-01

    SCALE 6 includes several problem-independent multigroup (MG) libraries that were processed from the evaluated nuclear data file ENDF/B using a generic flux spectrum. The library data must be self-shielded and corrected for problem-specific spectral effects for use in MG neutron transport calculations. SCALE 6 computes problem-dependent MG cross sections through a combination of the conventional Bondarenko shielding-factor method and a deterministic continuous-energy (CE) calculation of the fine-structure spectra in the resolved resonance and thermal energy ranges. The CE calculation can be performed using an infinite medium approximation, a simplified two-region method for lattices, or a one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport calculation with pointwise (PW) cross-section data. This paper describes the SCALE-resonance self-shielding methodologies, including the deterministic calculation of the CE flux spectra using PW nuclear data and the method for using CE spectra to produce problem-specific MG cross sections for various configurations (including doubly heterogeneous lattices). It also presents results of verification and validation studies.

  13. Heat-shield design for glovebox applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Frigo, A. A.

    1998-07-10

    Heat shields can often be used in place of insulation materials as an effective means of insulating glovebox furnace vessels. If used properly, shields can accomplish two important objectives: thermal insulation of the vessel to maintain a desired process temperature and protection of the glovebox, equipment, and user. A heat-shield assembly can be described as an arrangement of thin, properly-spaced, metal sheets that reduce radiation heat transfer. The main problem encountered in the design of a heat shield assembly is choosing the number of shields. In determining the heat transfer characteristics of a heat-shield assembly, a number of factors must be taken into consideration. The glovebox or outside environment, material properties, geometry, and operating temperature all have varying effects on the expected results. A simple method, for planar-horizontal and cylindrical-vertical shields, allowing the approximation of the outermost shield temperature, the practical number of shields, and the net heat-transfer rate will be presented. Methods used in the fabrication of heat-shield assemblies will also be discussed.

  14. Methods for calculating SEU rates for bipolar and NMOS circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNulty, P. J.; Abdel-Kader, W. G.; Bisgrove, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    Computer codes developed at Clarkson for simulating charge generation by proton-induced nuclear reactions in well-defined silicon microstructures can be used to calculate SEU rates for specific devices when the critical charge and the dimensions of all SEU sensitive junctions on the device are known, provided one can estimate the contribution from externally-generated charge which enters the sensitive junction by drift and diffusion. Calculations for two important bipolar devices, the AMD 2901B bit slice and the Fairchild 93L422 RAM, for which the dimensions of the sensitive volumes were estimated from available heavy-ion test data, have been found to be in agreement with experimental data. Circuit data for the Intel 2164A, an alpha sensitive dRAM, was provided by the manufacturer. Calculations based on crude assumptions regarding which nuclear recoils and which alphas trigger upsets in the 2164A were found to agree with experimental data.

  15. Improving the calculation of magnetic coupling constants in MRPT methods.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Mariano; Angeli, Celestino; Calzado, Carmen J; de Graaf, Coen

    2014-09-05

    The magnetic coupling in transition metal compounds with more than one unpaired electron per magnetic center has been studied with multiconfigurational perturbation theory. The usual shortcomings of these methodologies (severe underestimation of the magnetic coupling) have been overcome by describing the Slater determinants with a set of molecular orbitals that maximally resemble the natural orbitals of a high-level multiconfigurational reference configuration interaction calculation. These orbitals have significant delocalization tails onto the bridging ligands and largely increase the coupling strengths in the perturbative calculation. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  17. Beta Bremsstrahlung dose in concrete shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjunatha, H. C.; Chandrika, B. M.; Rudraswamy, B.; Sankarshan, B. M.

    2012-05-01

    In a nuclear reactor, beta nuclides are released during nuclear reactions. These betas interact with shielding concrete and produces external Bremsstrahlung (EB) radiation. To estimate Bremsstrahlung dose and shield efficiency in concrete, it is essential to know Bremsstrahlung distribution or spectra. The present work formulated a new method to evaluate the EB spectrum and hence Bremsstrahlung dose of beta nuclides (32P, 89Sr, 90Sr-90Y, 90Y, 91Y, 208Tl, 210Bi, 234Pa and 40K) in concrete. The Bremsstrahlung yield of these beta nuclides in concrete is also estimated. The Bremsstrahlung yield in concrete due to 90Sr-90Y is higher than those of other given nuclides. This estimated spectrum is accurate because it is based on more accurate modified atomic number (Zmod) and Seltzer's data, where an electron-electron interaction is also included. Presented data in concrete provide a quick and convenient reference for radiation protection. The present methodology can be used to calculate the Bremsstrahlung dose in nuclear shielding materials. It can be quickly employed to give a first pass dose estimate prior to a more detailed experimental study.

  18. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  19. Approximate Method of Calculating Heating Rates at General Three-Dimensional Stagnation Points During Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, H. H., II

    1982-01-01

    An approximate method for calculating heating rates at general three dimensional stagnation points is presented. The application of the method for making stagnation point heating calculations during atmospheric entry is described. Comparisons with results from boundary layer calculations indicate that the method should provide an accurate method for engineering type design and analysis applications.

  20. Preconditioned minimal residual methods for Chebyshev spectral calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, C.; Quarteroni, A.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of preconditioning the pseudospectral Chebyshev approximation of an elliptic operator is considered. The numerical sensitiveness to variations of the coefficients of the operator are investigated for two classes of preconditioning matrices: one arising from finite differences, the other from finite elements. The preconditioned system is solved by a conjugate gradient type method, and by a Dufort-Frankel method with dynamical parameters. The methods are compared on some test problems with the Richardson method and with the minimal residual Richardson method.

  1. Revised method for calculating cloud densities in equilibrium models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, M. H.; Atreya, S. K.; Kuhn, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    Models of cloud condensation under thermodynamic equilibrium in planetary atmospheres are simple but still useful for several reasons. They calculate the wet adiabatic lapse rate, they determine saturation-limited mixing ratios of condensing species, and they calculate the stabilizing effect of latent heat release and molecular weight stratification. Equilibrium cloud condensation models (ECCMs) also calculate a type of condensate density---a condensate "unit density"---that only equates to cloud density under specific circumstances, because microphysics and dynamics are not considered in ECCMs. Unit densities are calculated for every model altitude by requiring that condensed material remains at the level where it condenses. Many ECCMs in use trace their heritage to Weidenschilling and Lewis (1973; Icarus 20, 465--476; hereafter WL73), which contains an error that affects only the calculation of condensate unit density. The error led to densities too high by a factor of the atmospheric scale height divided by unit length, which is about 3x10^6 at Jupiter's ammonia cloud level. We will describe the condensate unit density calculation error in WL73, and provide a new algorithm based on the local change in vapor mixing ratio, rather than the difference between integrated column masses as in WL73. The new algorithm satisfies conservation of mass. Using a simple scaling law to parameterize dynamics in terms of updraft speed and duration, condensate unit densities from ECCMs can be converted to cloud densities. We validate the technique for the terrestrial case, by comparing model predictions with representative densities of cirrus and cumulus clouds. For cirrus and cumulus updraft parameters, respectively, we find cloud densities of 0.01--0.2 g m-3 and 0.8--7 g m-3, in excellent agreement with observations and models of terrestrial clouds of these types. Implications for models of planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres will be discussed. [This material is based upon

  2. A coupled numerical analysis of shield temperatures, heat losses and residual gas pressures in an evacuated super-insulation using thermal and fluid networks - Part I: Stationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H.

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes numerical simulations, using thermal networks, of shield temperatures and radiative and conductive heat losses of a super-insulated cryogenic storage tank operating at 77 K. Interactions between radiation and conductive heat transfer modes in the shields are investigated, by calculation of local shield temperatures. As a new method, fluid networks are introduced for calculation of stationary residual gas pressure distribution in the evacuated multilayer super-insulation. Output from the fluid network is coupled to the iterative thermal network calculations. Parameter tests concern thickness and emissivity of shields, degree of perforation, residual gas sources like desorption from radiation shields, spacers and container walls, and permeation from the inner container to the evacuated insulation space. Variations of either a conductive (thickness of Al-film on Mylar) or a radiative parameter (thermal emissivity) exert crosswise influences on the radiative or conductive heat losses of the tank, respectively.

  3. CDF forward shielding for Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Krivosheev, O.E.; Mokhov, N.V.

    1998-03-16

    Detailed calculations of the accelerator related background in the CDF forward muon spectrometer have been performed with the MARS13 code and a newly developed C++ code for particle tracking in accelerator lattices. Calculated space distributions of background hits are in a good agreement with data taken in Run I. Several shielding configurations in the CDF hall and Tevatron tunnel have been studied. The optimal one provides a 30-fold shielding efficiency compatible with CDF Run II requirements.

  4. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    SciTech Connect

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  5. A Proposed Method for Upper Eyelid and Infrabrow Tightening Using a Transcutaneous Temperature Controlled Radiofrequency Device With Opaque Plastic Eye Shields.

    PubMed

    Key, Douglas J; Boudreaux, Lauren

    2016-11-01

    Laxity of the eyelid and periorbital area, a common manifestation of aging, is usually addressed via blepharoplasty and/ or fat transfer. Given the trend toward safer, less invasive treatments preferred by those patients reticent to undergo more invasive procedures, viable alternatives have been sought. Transcutaneous temperature controlled radiofrequency (TTCRF) integrates non- invasive super cial RF treatment with automatic temperature feedback control of energy deposition, as a stimulator of overall collagen remodeling; however, the globe of the eye is particularly sensitive to RF energy. The purpose of the study was to propose a method by which TTCRF and other non-ablative modalities could be used to treat eyelid and infrabrow laxity, with autoclavable opaque black haptic scleral contact lenses protecting the globe of the eye. Subjects (n=40, 36 women and 4 men, age range, 33-72) with mild to moderate laxity of the eyelid and infrabrow were treated with TTCRF using black plastic eye shields (Oculoplastik, Montreal, Quebec, Canada) to protect the globe of the eye from heat and RF energy. With the shields in place subjects were treated with the 10 mm small monopolar emitter of the ThermiSmooth device (Thermi, Irving, Tex.), using small circular looping motions to safely elevate the temperature of target tissue to the therapeutically rel- evant range for approximately 6 minutes; tissue temperature was measured in real time using the device's forward-looking infrared imaging. No major adverse events were recorded. Treatment was safe and tolerable for all subjects. The use of autoclavable opaque black plastic eye shields provides a safe method of treating the upper eye lid and infrabrow using TTCRF. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(11):1302-1305..

  6. Fabrication of nano-Fe3O4 3D structure on carbon fibers as a microwave absorber and EMI shielding composite by modified EPD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholampoor, Mahdi; Movassagh-Alanagh, Farid; Salimkhani, Hamed

    2017-02-01

    Recently, electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials have absorbed a lot of attention due to a growing need for application in the area of electronic and wireless devices. In this study, a carbon-based EMI shielding composite was fabricated by electrophoretic deposition of Fe3O4 nano-particles on carbon fibers (CFs) as a 3D structure incorporated with an epoxy resin. Co-precipitation method was employed to synthesize Fe3O4 nano-particles. This as-synthesized Fe3O4 nano-powder was then successfully deposited on CFs using a modified multi-step electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. The results of structural studies showed that the Fe3O4 nano-particles (25 nm) were successfully and uniformly deposited on CFs. The measured magnetic properties of as-synthesized Fe3O4 nano-powder and nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite showed that the saturation magnetization of bare Fe3O4 was decreased from Ms = 72.3 emu/g to Ms = 33.1 emu/g for nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite and also corecivity of Fe3O4 was increased from Hc = 4.9 Oe to Hc = 168 Oe for composite. The results of microwave absorption tests revealed that the reflection loss (RL) of an epoxy-based nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite are significantly influenced by layer thickness. The maximum RL value of -10.21 dB at 10.12 GHz with an effective absorption bandwidth about 2 GHz was obtained for the sample with the thickness of 2 mm. It also exhibited an EMI shielding performance of -23 dB for whole the frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz.

  7. Design of Fracture Fixation Plate for Necessary and Sufficient Bone Stress Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, Kotlanka; Sridhar, Idapalapati; Sivashanker, Sathiamoorthy; Khong, Kok Sun; Ghista, Dhanjoo N.

    The objective of treating the fractured bone is to achieve painless functioning of the bone and undisturbed healing at the fracture. Internal fixation by stiff bone-plate is one of the standard methods to achieve these objectives. Recently, there is considerable interest in the usage of compliant plates to enhance bone healing with reduced stress shielding. Herein, first an analytical solution is developed to determine screw forces in the bone-plate assembly that conforms the plate and the bone under bending load. Based on the analytical calculations, an optimal fixator plate selection criterion for necessary and sufficient stress shielding is proposed. Second, effectiveness of employing a non-homogeneous stiffness graded (SG) plate rather than a homogeneous stainless steel (SS) plate for stress shielding is investigated using a finite element method. It is found that stress shielding on bone by SG plate is less compared to SS plate.

  8. Testing the bioelectric shield.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Susan J; Rose, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    A pendant was claimed to provide numerous health benefits, including reduced stress, increased strength, and protection from electromagnetic radiation from computers and mobile phones. Three experiments tested the effectiveness of this pendant's effect as a bioelectric shield. In the first experiment, 12 subjects who work with computers wore shields (6 real, 6 sham) for several weeks and were regularly tested for hand strength and mood changes. Both types of shield increased calmness, but the real shields did not have any greater effect. In 2 further studies (in each N=40) hand strength was measured at baseline, with mobile phone, and with mobile phone and bioelectric or sham shield. The shields did not differ in their effects. Both studies showed a significant correlation between the change in strength with and without the shield and subjects'scores on a questionnaire concerning their belief in and use of alternative therapies. The shields appear to produce a measurable placebo effect but are otherwise ineffective.

  9. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  10. Watching a disappearing shield

    SciTech Connect

    Stolarski, R.S.

    1988-10-01

    The remote-sensing techniques used to monitor atmospheric ozone levels are reviewed, and recent results are discussed. The importance of the ozone layer as a shield for UV radiation is stressed, and the impact of human activities generating ozone-destroying compounds is considered. Ground-based, airborne, balloon-borne, and satellite remote-sensing methods are shown to complement each other to provide both global coverage and detailed structural information. Data obtained with the Nimbus-7 TOMS and solar-backscatter UV instruments are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  11. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  12. Fuel Assembly Calculations Using the Method of Discrete Ordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Pautz, Andreas; Langenbuch, Siegfried

    2005-02-15

    The discrete ordinates code DORT is employed to treat pin cell and fuel assembly configurations in two spatial dimensions. Despite DORT's restriction to regular (i.e., Cartesian) coordinates, we demonstrate its ability to calculate accurate pin power distributions and eigenvalues of typical reactor fuel lattices. Several numerical experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of spatial, angular, and energy discretization and to quantify their impact on the results. DORT is also used to homogenize and collapse cross-section sets within the framework of the coupled transport/burnup code system KENOREST.

  13. The universal plane method for calculating the dimensions of heliostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perres, L. B.; Baum, I. V.

    It is pointed out that heliostat dimensions are crucial in ensuring that sunlight is properly reflected during the day in solar furnaces and solar power stations. In determining these dimensions, allowance must be made for changes in the sun's position during the day, changes which depend on the latitude of the installation. To construct unique algorithms for calculating the dimensions, a procedure involving general concepts must be formulated and this formulation introduces a universal frame of reference. An example of this which has attracted considerable interest involves a flat round receiver that is parallel either to the horizontal plane or to the universal plane considered here.

  14. Dietary analysis with programmable calculator: a simplified method.

    PubMed

    Dorea, J G; Horner, M R; Johnson, N E

    1981-02-01

    The use and applications of programmable calculator in dietary analysis are presented. Results which approximate those of large computers can be obtained with considerably less time, money, and data manipulation. Program flexibility allows operators to determine the number of foods and nutrients to be analyzed. Input, data checking, and results of total nutrient consumption are achieved within minutes. The dietary analysis described in this article is well suited for small hospitals and clinics, for teaching purposes and dietary surveys and for use by non-nutritionists who have a one-time or regular need to incorporate dietary information into their work.

  15. 7 CFR 51.308 - Methods of sampling and calculation of percentages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Methods of sampling and calculation of percentages. 51..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Methods of Sampling and Calculation of Percentages § 51.308 Methods of sampling and calculation of percentages. (a) When the numerical...

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

    1957-09-24

    The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

  17. Shielding Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.

    1998-09-17

    The shielding design is important for the construction of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) due to its impact on conventional facility design, maintenance operations, and since the cost for the radiation shielding shares a considerable part of the total facility costs. A calculational strategy utilizing coupled high energy Monte Carlo calculations and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations, along with semi-empirical calculations, was implemented to perform the conceptual design shielding assessment of the proposed SNS. Biological shields have been designed and assessed for the proton beam transport system and associated beam dumps, the target station, and the target service cell and general remote maintenance cell. Shielding requirements have been assessed with respect to weight, space, and dose-rate constraints for operating, shutdown, and accident conditions. A discussion of the proposed facility design, conceptual design shielding requirements, calculational strategy, source terms, preliminary results and conclusions, and recommendations for additional analyses are presented.

  18. Calculating PI Using Historical Methods and Your Personal Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Provides a software program for determining PI to the 15th place after the decimal. Explores the history of determining the value of PI from Archimedes to present computer methods. Investigates Wallis's, Liebniz's, and Buffon's methods. Written for Tandy GW-BASIC (IBM compatible) with 384K. Suggestions for Apple II's are given. (MVL)

  19. Calculating PI Using Historical Methods and Your Personal Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandell, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Provides a software program for determining PI to the 15th place after the decimal. Explores the history of determining the value of PI from Archimedes to present computer methods. Investigates Wallis's, Liebniz's, and Buffon's methods. Written for Tandy GW-BASIC (IBM compatible) with 384K. Suggestions for Apple II's are given. (MVL)

  20. The Inverse-Square Law and the Exponential Attenuation Law Used to the Shielding Calculation in Radiotherapy on a High School Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paiva, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Every year millions of people contract cancer in the world, and according to prediction of the World Health Organization by the year 2030 there will be about 27 million new cases. Because of these figures and the resulting social and economic implications of this disease, radiotherapy, which is one form of treatment that uses ionizing radiation, has a great importance. In the classroom the teacher can introduce the subject of the use of ionizing radiation in medicine and the basic physical principles to calculate the thickness of the walls of the rooms that house ionizing radiation sources.

  1. OPTIMAL BETA-RAY SHIELDING THICKNESSES FOR DIFFERENT THERAPEUTIC RADIONUCLIDES AND SHIELDING MATERIALS.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong In; Kim, Ja Mee; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2016-04-06

    To better understand the distribution of deposited energy of beta and gamma rays according to changes in shielding materials and thicknesses when radionuclides are used for therapeutic nuclear medicine, a simulation was conducted. The results showed that due to the physical characteristics of each therapeutic radionuclide, the thicknesses of shielding materials at which beta-ray shielding takes place varied. Additional analysis of the shielding of gamma ray was conducted for radionuclides that emit both beta and gamma rays simultaneously with results showing shielding effects proportional to the atomic number and density of the shielding materials. Also, analysis of bremsstrahlung emission after beta-ray interactions in the simulation revealed that the occurrence of bremsstrahlung was relatively lower than theoretically calculated and varied depending on different radionuclides.

  2. A comparison of methods for calculating O(1S) lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, G. B.; Reid, J. S.

    It is shown theoretically and with simulated data that O(1S) lifetimes determined by the cross-spectral method (Paulson and Shepherd, 1965) are significant overestimates. A comparison is made of the cross-spectral and impulse function analysis (Burns and Reid, 1984) methods using photometric data collected at Macquarie Island (54.5 deg S, 159.0 deg E geographic). The results support the view that the O(1S) state is excited predominantly by an indirect process.

  3. New analysis methods for the calculation of interior noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Franzoni, Linda P.

    2002-11-01

    Recently developed analysis methods applicable to the prediction of aircraft interior noise are described. Analytical-numerical matching (ANM) and Local-global homogenization (LGH) are methods for the low- to mid-frequency range. Energy-intensity boundary elements are applicable for high frequencies. ANM is a method that replaces the effect of structural discontinuities (ribs, stringers, attachments) with dynamically equivalent smooth force distributions, thereby removing the need for high-resolution numerics in the overall computational problem. LGH, which applies for periodic and quasiperiodic structures, provides a means to solve directly for the long wavelength spatial content of the structure. This part of the structural motion is strongly coupled most to the interior sound field. Energy-intensity boundary elements provide a very efficient means to predict high-frequency broadband sound fields in a fundamentally correct manner. Current research on this boundary element method involves its extension to handle coupling with structural surfaces vibrating at high frequency. The strengths and limitations of each of the above methods is discussed in the context of the interior noise problem. Innovative methods for the reduction of interior noise, as suggested by these approaches, are also mentioned.

  4. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  5. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  6. High-lift calculations using Navier-Stokes methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Torbjoern

    Wing sections on an aircraft are designed for optimal cruise performance, whereas during the take-off and landing phase totally different lift-to-drag characteristics are needed. High lift and low drag is essential while taking off, on the other hand high lift and high drag is favorable when landing. The design and shaping of the high-lift system can have a major influence on the overall economy and safety of the aircraft. In a historical perspective experimental investigations have been the only way to gain any deeper knowledge of the performance of a given wing-flap configuration. Today, computational methods for high-lift systems based on the viscid-inviscid interaction approach with integral methods for boundary layers and wakes are quite common. Although fast solutions can be obtained with these methods it is highly desirable to have a numerical method that captures the flow physics in a more detailed and adequate way. The present wotk demonstrates that Navier-Stokes methods can be used with good results for simulating high-lift flow fields, but also points to the area where further research is needed.

  7. Gamma heating in reflector heat shield of gas core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofthouse, J. H.; Kunze, J. F.; Young, T. E.; Young, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Heating rate measurements made in a mock-up of a BeO heat shield for a gas core nuclear rocket engine yields results nominally a factor of two greater than calculated by two different methods. The disparity is thought to be caused by errors in neutron capture cross sections and gamma spectra from the low cross-section elements, D, O, and Be.

  8. Neutron shielding material based on colemanite and epoxy resin.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Koichi

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a need for compact shielding design such as self-shielding of a PET cyclotron or upgradation of radiation machinery in existing facilities. In these cases, high performance shielding materials are needed. Concrete or polyethylene have been used for a neutron shield. However, for compact shielding, they fall short in terms of performance or durability. Therefore, a new type of neutron shielding material based on epoxy resin and colemanite has been developed. Slab attenuation experiments up to 40 cm for the new shielding material were carried out using a 252Cf neutron source. Measurement was carried out using a REM-counter, and compared with calculation. The results show that the shielding performance is better than concrete and polyethylene mixed with 10 wt% boron oxide. From the result, we confirmed that the performance of the new material is suitable for practical use.

  9. Potential theoretic methods for far field sound radiation calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Stenger, Edward J.; Scott, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    In the area of computational acoustics, procedures which accurately predict the far-field sound radiation are much sought after. A systematic development of such procedures are found in a sequence of papers by Atassi. The method presented here is an alternate approach to predicting far field sound based on simple layer potential theoretic methods. The main advantages of this method are: it requires only a simple free space Green's function, it can accommodate arbitrary shapes of Kirchoff surfaces, and is readily extendable to three-dimensional problems. Moreover, the procedure presented here, though tested for unsteady lifting airfoil problems, can easily be adapted to other areas of interest, such as jet noise radiation problems. Results are presented for lifting airfoil problems and comparisons are made with the results reported by Atassi. Direct comparisons are also made for the flat plate case.

  10. Comparison of optimization methods for electronic-structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, J.; Das, S. G.; Min, B. I.; Woodward, C.; Benedek, R.

    1989-06-15

    The performance of several local-optimization methods for calculatingelectronic structure is compared. The fictitious first-order equation of motionproposed by Williams and Soler is integrated numerically by three procedures:simple finite-difference integration, approximate analytical integration (theWilliams-Soler algorithm), and the Born perturbation series. These techniquesare applied to a model problem for which exact solutions are known, the Mathieuequation. The Williams-Soler algorithm and the second Born approximationconverge equally rapidly, but the former involves considerably lesscomputational effort and gives a more accurate converged solution. Applicationof the method of conjugate gradients to the Mathieu equation is discussed.

  11. Volumetric calculations in an oil field: The basis method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olea, R.A.; Pawlowsky, V.; Davis, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The basis method for estimating oil reserves in place is compared to a traditional procedure that uses ordinary kriging. In the basis method, auxiliary variables that sum to the net thickness of pay are estimated by cokriging. In theory, the procedure should be more powerful because it makes full use of the cross-correlation between variables and forces the original variables to honor interval constraints. However, at least in our case study, the practical advantages of cokriging for estimating oil in place are marginal. ?? 1993.

  12. A probabilistic method of calculating circulation-induced trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brox Nilsen, Irene; Stagge, James Howard; Merete Tallaksen, Lena

    2015-04-01

    The water cycle in Europe has changed substantially over the past three decades. Increasing runoff is observed during winter and at northern latitudes in particular. Spring and summer months, as well as southern latitudes, are facing drier conditions. To understand what is driving large-scale changes in runoff, we look into changes in precipitation and temperature and link these to changes in atmospheric circulation. Previous studies have used the method of trend ratios (Cahynová and Huth, 2009) to attribute precipitation and temperature trends to changes in the frequency of circulation types. A trend ratio is the ratio of hypothetical trend, i.e., the trend that would result due to changes in circulation type frequency only, to the observed trend. However, the method of trend ratios has two drawbacks. First, if the observed trend is small, division by a very low value results in a meaningless trend ratio and thus requires a cut-off value to keep the trend ratio within meaningful boundaries. Second, the method does not allow a comparison of the observed trend to the spread of possible outcomes, because the method of hypothetical trends is based on a deterministic model. We propose a new, more robust method for detecting the importance of circulation-induced changes in explaining the observed trends, which has the benefit of being a non-parametric statistical test that assesses the entire range of hypothetical trends. Instead of creating a hypothetical series by replacing the observation on a given day with the long-term climatic mean of a certain month and circulation type (as in the existing trend ratio method), the new approach replaces the observation on a given day with a random sample from the distribution of the variable for the given month and circulation type. The method introduces the possibility to assign a rejection rate, thus allowing statistical significance to be assessed. We apply the method on time series of precipitation and temperature from the

  13. An eddy viscosity calculation method for a turbulent duct flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonia, R. A.; Bisset, D. K.; Kim, J.

    1991-01-01

    The mean velocity profile across a fully developed turbulent duct flow is obtained from an eddy viscosity relation combined with an empirical outer region wake function. Results are in good agreement with experiments and with direct numerical simulations in the same flow at two Reynolds numbers. In particular, the near-wall trend of the Reynolds shear stress and its variation with Reynolds number are similar to those of the simulations. The eddy viscosity method is more accurate than previous mixing length or implicit function methods.

  14. Subtleties in Energy Calculations in the Image Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taddei, M. M.; Mendes, T. N. C.; Farina, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this pedagogical work, we point out a subtle mistake that can be made by undergraduate or graduate students in the computation of the electrostatic energy of a system containing charges and perfect conductors if they naively use the image method. Specifically, we show that naive expressions for the electrostatic energy for these systems…

  15. Evaluation of Methods for Calculating Soil Thermal Conductivity,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    coarse or fine, unsaturated, saturated or dry. The applicability of each of the methods under various conditions is determined and recommendations are...to( uifrozen soils ............................................... 55 Applicability to flo/en soils ................................................ 55... Applicability to saturated soils .................................................................................. 56 F ttcc t of soil mineral

  16. Numerical methods and calculations for droplet flow, heating and ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwyer, H. A.; Sanders, B. R.; Dandy, D.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical method was devised and employed to solve a variety of problems related to liquid droplet combustion. The basic transport equations of mass, momentum and energy were formulated in terms of generalized nonorthogonal coordinates, which allows for adaptive griding and arbitrary particle shape. Example problems are solved for internal droplet heating, droplet ignition and high Reynolds number flow over a droplet.

  17. Subtleties in Energy Calculations in the Image Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taddei, M. M.; Mendes, T. N. C.; Farina, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this pedagogical work, we point out a subtle mistake that can be made by undergraduate or graduate students in the computation of the electrostatic energy of a system containing charges and perfect conductors if they naively use the image method. Specifically, we show that naive expressions for the electrostatic energy for these systems…

  18. The effects of intramolecular and intermolecular coordination on (31)P nuclear shielding: phosphorylated azoles.

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, Kirill A; Larina, Ludmila I; Chirkina, Elena A; Krivdin, Leonid B

    2012-02-01

    The effects of intramolecular and intermolecular coordination on (31)P nuclear shielding have been investigated in the series of tetracoordinated, pentacoordinated and hexacoordinated N-vinylpyrazoles and intermolecular complexes of N-vinylimidazole and 1-allyl-3,5-dimethylpyrazole with phosphorous pentachloride both experimentally and theoretically. It was shown that either intramolecular or intermolecular coordination involving phosphorous results in a dramatic (31)P nuclear shielding amounting to approximately 150 ppm on changing the phosphorous coordination number by one. A major importance of solvent effects on (31)P nuclear shielding of intramolecular and intermolecular complexes involving N → P coordination bond has been demonstrated. It was found that the zeroth-order regular approximation-gauge-including atomic orbital-B1PW91/DZP method was sufficiently accurate for the calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts, provided relativistic corrections are taken into account, the latter being of crucial importance in the description of (31)P nuclear shielding.

  19. High field septum magnet using a superconducting shield for the Future Circular Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Dániel

    2017-04-01

    A zero-field cooled superconducting shield is proposed to realize a high-field (3-4 T) septum magnet for the Future Circular Collider hadron-hadron (FCC-hh) ring. Three planned prototypes using different materials and technical solutions are presented, which will be used to evaluate the feasibility of this idea as a part of the FCC study. The numerical simulation methods are described to calculate the field patterns around such a shield. A specific excitation current configuration is presented that maintains a fairly homogeneous field outside of a rectangular shield in a wide range of field levels from 0 to 3 Tesla. It is shown that a massless septum configuration (with an opening in the shield) is also possible and gives satisfactory field quality with realistic superconducting material properties.

  20. DABCO mono-betaine hydrate studied by X-ray diffraction, DFT calculations and spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barczyński, P.; Dega-Szafran, Z.; Katrusiak, A.; Perdoch, W.; Szafran, M.

    2009-09-01

    A new DABCO mono-betaine (1-carboxymethyl-1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane inner salt) has been synthesized. It crystallizes as monohydrate in orthorhombic space group Pmn2 1. The DABCO mono-betaine and water molecules are located on a mirror plane. The water molecules link DABCO mono-betaine into linear chains through the H-O-H⋯OOC and H-O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds of 2.709(2) and 2.875(2) Å. The structure of the title compound optimized at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory is consistent with X-ray diffraction. The absorption bands in the FTIR spectrum have been assigned. The calculated magnetic isotropic shielding tensors confirm the assignments of the 13C NMR resonance signals.