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Sample records for shita genshiryoku bunya

  1. Viruses of the Bunya- and Togaviridae families: potential as bioterrorism agents and means of control.

    PubMed

    Sidwell, Robert W; Smee, Donald F

    2003-01-01

    When considering viruses of potential importance as tools for bioterrorism, several viruses in the Bunya- and Togaviridae families have been cited. Among those in the Bunyaviridae family are Rift Valley fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, hanta, and sandfly fever viruses, listed in order of priority. Those particularly considered in the Togaviridae family are Venezuelan, eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses. Factors affecting the selection of these viruses are the ability for them to induce a fatal or seriously incapacitating illness, their ease of cultivation in order to prepare large volumes, their relative infectivity in human patients, their ability to be transmitted by aerosol, and the lack of measures available for their control. Each factor is fully considered in this review. Vaccines for the control of infections induced by these viruses are in varying stages of development, with none universally accepted to date. Viruses in the Bunyaviridae family are generally sensitive to ribavirin, which has been recommended as an emergency therapy for infections by viruses in this family although has not yet been FDA-approved. Interferon and interferon inducers also significantly inhibit these virus infections in animal models. Against infections induced by viruses in the Togaviridae family, interferon-alpha would appear to currently be the most useful for therapy.

  2. Psoralen Inactivation of Viruses: A Process for the Safe Manipulation of Viral Antigen and Nucleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Katherine; Wronka-Edwards, Loni; Leggett-Embrey, Melissa; Walker, Eric; Sun, Peifang; Ondov, Brian; Wyman, Travis H; Rosovitz, M J; Bohn, Sherry S; Burans, James; Kochel, Tadeusz

    2015-11-12

    High consequence human pathogenic viruses must be handled at biosafety level 2, 3 or 4 and must be rendered non-infectious before they can be utilized for molecular or immunological applications at lower biosafety levels. Here we evaluate psoralen-inactivated Arena-, Bunya-, Corona-, Filo-, Flavi- and Orthomyxoviruses for their suitability as antigen in immunological processes and as template for reverse transcription PCR and sequencing. The method of virus inactivation using a psoralen molecule appears to have broad applicability to RNA viruses and to leave both the particle and RNA of the treated virus intact, while rendering the virus non-infectious.

  3. [Viral haemorrhagic fevers--evolution of the epidemic potential].

    PubMed

    Markin, V A; Markov, V I

    2002-01-01

    In this review modern data on dangerous and particularly dangerous viral haemorrhagic fevers caused by a group of viruses belonging to the families of phylo-, arena-, flavi-, bunya- and togaviruses are presented. Morbidity rates and epidemics caused by Marburg virus, Ebola fever virus, Lassa fever virus, Argentinian and Bolivian haemorrhagic fever viruses, dengue haemorrhagic fever virus, Crimean haemorrhagic fever virus, Hantaviruses are analyzed. Mechanisms of the evolution of the epidemic manifestation of these infections are considered. The importance of the development of tools and methods of diagnosis, rapid prevention and treatment of exotic haemorrhagic fevers is emphasized.

  4. The geological processes time scale of the Ingozersky block TTG complex (Kola Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitkina, Elena

    2013-04-01

    complex rocks, the following age-formation stages are determined: protolith of the biotite gneisses - 3149±46 Ma; metamorphism, deformation of rocks, foliation - 2727±5 - 2725±2 - 2697±9 - 2667±7 Ma, granite bodies formation - 2615±8 Ma and biotite gneisses migmatization - 2549±30 Ma, formation of different pegmatite and granite veins -1644±7 Ma. Author are grateful to Akad. Mitrofanov F.P. and Bayanova T.B. for the consultations. The work is supported by RFBR 12-05-31063, 11-05-00570. 1.Batieva I.D., Belkov I.V. Granitoidnie formacii Kolskogo poluostrova. // Ocgerki po petrologiy, mineralogiy i metallogeniy Kolskogo poluostrova. L.: Nauka. 1968. p. 5-143. (in russian) 2. Belkov I.V., Zagorodny V.G., Predovsky A.A. et al. Stratigraficheskoe raschlenenie i korrelyacia dokembria severo-vostochoi chasty Baltiyskogo shita. L.: Nauka. 1971. p. 141-150. (in russian) 3. Docembriskaya tektonica severo-vostochoi chasty Baltiyskogo shita (Ob'asnitelnaya zapiska k tektonicheskoi karte severo-vostochoi chasty Baltiyskogo shita 1:500000) / ed.: F.P.Mitrofanov. Apatity: KFAN SSSR. 1992. 112 P. (in russian) 4. Zagorodny V.G., Radchenko A.T. Tectonika i glubinnoe stroenie severo-vostochoi chasty Baltiyskogo shita. Apatity: KFA SSSR. 1978. p. 3-12. (in russian) 5. Kozlov N.E., Sorohtin N.O., Glaznev V.N. et al. Geologia Arhea Baltiskogo shita. S.Pb.: Nauka. 2006. 329 p. (in russian) 6. Mitrofanov F.P. Sovremennie problemy i nekotorie resheniya dokembriskoy geologii kratonov. (2001) Litosphera.2001. V 1. P. 5-14. (in russian) 7. Ob'asnitelnaya zapiska k geologicheskoy karte severo-vostochoi chasty Baltiyskogo shita 1:500000 / ed.: F.P.Mitrofanov. Apatity: KFAN SSSR. 1994. 95 P. (in russian) 8. Haritonov L.Y. Structura i stratigraphia karelid vostoka Baltiskogo shita. M.: Nedra. 1966. 354 P. (in russian)

  5. Phylogenetic relationships within Araucariaceae based on rbcL gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Setoguchi, H; Asakawa Osawa, T; Pintaud, J C; Jaffré, T; Veillon, J M

    1998-11-01

    Phylogenetic relationships were determined in the Araucariaceae, which are now found mainly in the Southern Hemisphere. This conifer family was well diversified and widely distributed in both hemispheres during the Mesozoic era. The sequence of 1322 bases of the rbcL gene of cpDNA was determined from 29 species of Araucariaceae, representing almost all the species of the family. Phylogenetic trees determined by the parsimony method indicate that Araucariaceae are well defined by rbcL sequences and also that the monophyly of Agathis or Araucaria is well supported by high bootstrap values. The topology of these trees revealed that Wollemia had derived prior to Agathis and Araucaria. The rbcL phylogeny agrees well with the present recognition of four sections within Araucaria: Araucaria, Bunya, Eutacta, and Intermedia. Morphological characteristics of the number of cotyledons, position of male cone, and cuticular micromorphologies were evaluated as being phylogenetically informative. Section Bunya was found to be derived rather than to be the oldest taxon. Infrageneric relationships of Agathis could not be well elucidated because there are few informative site changes in the rbcL gene, suggesting the more recent differentiation of the species as their fossil records indicate. The New Caledonian Araucaria and Agathis species each formed a monophyletic group with very low differentiation in rbcL sequences among them, indicating rapid adaptive radiation to new edaphic conditions, i.e., ultramafic soils, in the post-Eocene era.

  6. Carbocyclic adenosine analogues as S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors and antiviral agents: recent advances.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, E

    1998-01-01

    Various carbocyclic analogues of adenosine, including aristeromycin (carbocyclic adenosine), carbocyclic 3-deazaadenosine, neplanocin A, 3-deazaneplanocin A, the 5'-nor derivatives of aristeromycin, carbocylic 3-deazaadenosine, neplanocin A and 3-deazaneplanocin A, and the 2-halo (i.e., 2-fluoro) and 6'-R-alkyl (i.e., 6'-R-methyl) derivatives of neplanocin A have been recognized as potent inhibitors of S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) hydrolase. This enzyme plays a key role in methylation reactions depending on S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) as methyl donor. AdoHcy hydrolase inhibitors have been shown to exert broad-spectrum antiviral activity against pox-, paramyxo-, rhabdo-, filo-, bunya-, arena-, and reoviruses. They also interfere with the replication of human immunodeficiency virus through inhibition of the Tat transactivation process. PMID:9708366

  7. Conservation challenge: human-herbivore conflict in Chebera Churchura National Park, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Datiko, Demeke; Bekele, Afework

    2013-12-01

    An investigation on human-herbivore conflict was carried out in CCNP between 2011 and 2012 in seven randomly selected villages (Chebera, Serri, Yora, Shita, Delba, Chuchra, Chewda) around the Park. A total of 312 household samples were identified for interview. Group discussion and field observation were also carried out. Among the respondents, the majority (83.9%) faced crop damage. African elephant (Loxodonta africana), Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibious), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), Desert warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), Wild pig (Sus scrofa), Porcupine (Hystrix cristata), Vervet monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) and Anubis baboon (Papio anubis) were identified as the most problematic animals in the area. However, buffalo, monkey and warthog were considered as the notorious pest. Crop damage and threats to human safety were the major problems encountered resulting in conflict between human and wildlife. Most respondents had a negative attitude towards the problem-posing animals. This will lead to a change in public attitude from one that supports wildlife conservation to sees wild herbivores as a threat and a potential negative consequence for wildlife conservation. Active measures have to be implemented to solve the problems and safeguard the future of the wildlife management in the park. PMID:24506044

  8. Conservation challenge: human-herbivore conflict in Chebera Churchura National Park, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Datiko, Demeke; Bekele, Afework

    2013-12-01

    An investigation on human-herbivore conflict was carried out in CCNP between 2011 and 2012 in seven randomly selected villages (Chebera, Serri, Yora, Shita, Delba, Chuchra, Chewda) around the Park. A total of 312 household samples were identified for interview. Group discussion and field observation were also carried out. Among the respondents, the majority (83.9%) faced crop damage. African elephant (Loxodonta africana), Hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibious), African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), Desert warthog (Phacochoerus aethiopicus), Wild pig (Sus scrofa), Porcupine (Hystrix cristata), Vervet monkey (Cercopithecus aethiops) and Anubis baboon (Papio anubis) were identified as the most problematic animals in the area. However, buffalo, monkey and warthog were considered as the notorious pest. Crop damage and threats to human safety were the major problems encountered resulting in conflict between human and wildlife. Most respondents had a negative attitude towards the problem-posing animals. This will lead to a change in public attitude from one that supports wildlife conservation to sees wild herbivores as a threat and a potential negative consequence for wildlife conservation. Active measures have to be implemented to solve the problems and safeguard the future of the wildlife management in the park.

  9. Highlights in antiviral drug research: antivirals at the horizon.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2013-11-01

    This review highlights ten "hot topics" in current antiviral research: (i) new nucleoside derivatives (i.e., PSI-352938) showing high potential as a direct antiviral against hepatitis C virus (HCV); (ii) cyclopropavir, which should be further pursued for treatment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections; (iii) North-methanocarbathymidine (N-MCT), with a N-locked conformation, showing promising activity against both α- and γ-herpesviruses; (iv) CMX001, an orally bioavailable prodrug of cidofovir with broad-spectrum activity against DNA viruses, including polyoma, adeno, herpes, and pox; (v) favipiravir, which is primarily pursued for the treatment of influenza virus infections, but also inhibits the replication of other RNA viruses, particularly (-)RNA viruses such as arena, bunya, and hanta; (vi) newly emerging antiarenaviral compounds which should be more effective (and less toxic) than the ubiquitously used ribavirin; (vii) antipicornavirus agents in clinical development (pleconaril, BTA-798, and V-073); (viii) natural products receiving increased attention as potential antiviral drugs; (ix) antivirals such as U0126 targeted at specific cellular kinase pathways [i.e., mitogen extracellular kinase (MEK)], showing activity against influenza and other viruses; and (x) two structurally unrelated compounds (i.e., LJ-001 and dUY11) with broad-spectrum activity against virtually all enveloped RNA and DNA viruses.

  10. The LANL hemorrhagic fever virus database, a new platform for analyzing biothreat viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kuiken, Carla; Thurmond, Jim; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Yoon, Hyejin

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse set of over 80 viral species, found in 10 different genera comprising five different families: arena-, bunya-, flavi-, filo- and togaviridae. All these viruses are highly variable and evolve rapidly, making them elusive targets for the immune system and for vaccine and drug design. About 55 000 HFV sequences exist in the public domain today. A central website that provides annotated sequences and analysis tools will be helpful to HFV researchers worldwide. The HFV sequence database collects and stores sequence data and provides a user-friendly search interface and a large number of sequence analysis tools, following the model of the highly regarded and widely used Los Alamos HIV database [Kuiken, C., B. Korber, and R.W. Shafer, HIV sequence databases. AIDS Rev, 2003. 5: p. 52–61]. The database uses an algorithm that aligns each sequence to a species-wide reference sequence. The NCBI RefSeq database [Sayers et al. (2011) Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Nucleic Acids Res., 39, D38–D51.] is used for this; if a reference sequence is not available, a Blast search finds the best candidate. Using this method, sequences in each genus can be retrieved pre-aligned. The HFV website can be accessed via http://hfv.lanl.gov. PMID:22064861

  11. The LANL hemorrhagic fever virus database, a new platform for analyzing biothreat viruses.

    PubMed

    Kuiken, Carla; Thurmond, Jim; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Yoon, Hyejin

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are a diverse set of over 80 viral species, found in 10 different genera comprising five different families: arena-, bunya-, flavi-, filo- and togaviridae. All these viruses are highly variable and evolve rapidly, making them elusive targets for the immune system and for vaccine and drug design. About 55,000 HFV sequences exist in the public domain today. A central website that provides annotated sequences and analysis tools will be helpful to HFV researchers worldwide. The HFV sequence database collects and stores sequence data and provides a user-friendly search interface and a large number of sequence analysis tools, following the model of the highly regarded and widely used Los Alamos HIV database [Kuiken, C., B. Korber, and R.W. Shafer, HIV sequence databases. AIDS Rev, 2003. 5: p. 52-61]. The database uses an algorithm that aligns each sequence to a species-wide reference sequence. The NCBI RefSeq database [Sayers et al. (2011) Database resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Nucleic Acids Res., 39, D38-D51.] is used for this; if a reference sequence is not available, a Blast search finds the best candidate. Using this method, sequences in each genus can be retrieved pre-aligned. The HFV website can be accessed via http://hfv.lanl.gov. PMID:22064861

  12. Comparative Structural and Functional Analysis of Bunyavirus and Arenavirus Cap-Snatching Endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Juan; Gerlach, Piotr; Rosenthal, Maria; Gaudon, Stephanie; Coscia, Francesca; Günther, Stephan; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Segmented negative strand RNA viruses of the arena-, bunya- and orthomyxovirus families uniquely carry out viral mRNA transcription by the cap-snatching mechanism. This involves cleavage of host mRNAs close to their capped 5' end by an endonuclease (EN) domain located in the N-terminal region of the viral polymerase. We present the structure of the cap-snatching EN of Hantaan virus, a bunyavirus belonging to hantavirus genus. Hantaan EN has an active site configuration, including a metal co-ordinating histidine, and nuclease activity similar to the previously reported La Crosse virus and Influenza virus ENs (orthobunyavirus and orthomyxovirus respectively), but is more active in cleaving a double stranded RNA substrate. In contrast, Lassa arenavirus EN has only acidic metal co-ordinating residues. We present three high resolution structures of Lassa virus EN with different bound ion configurations and show in comparative biophysical and biochemical experiments with Hantaan, La Crosse and influenza ENs that the isolated Lassa EN is essentially inactive. The results are discussed in the light of EN activation mechanisms revealed by recent structures of full-length influenza virus polymerase. PMID:27304209

  13. Immuno-Chromatographic Wicking Assay for the Rapid Detection of Chikungunya Viral Antigens in Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Hinson, Juanita M; Davé, Sonia; McMenamy, Scott S; Davé, Kirti; Turell, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    The outbreak of disease caused by chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in 2006 and the recent spread of this virus to the Americas in 2013 indicate the potential for this virus to spread and cause significant disease. However, there are currently no accurate and reliable field-usable, diagnostic methods to provide critical, real-time information for early detection of CHIKV within the vector populations in order to implement appropriate vector control and personal protective measures. In this article, we report the ability of an immuno-chromatographic assay developed by VecTOR Test Systems Inc. to detect CHIKV in a pool of female Aedes mosquitoes containing a single CHIKV-infected mosquito. The CHIKV dipstick assay was simple to use, did not require a cold chain, and provided clear results within 1 h. It was highly specific and did not cross-react with samples spiked with a variety of other alpha, bunya, and flaviviruses. The CHIKV assay can provide real-time critical information on the presence of CHIKV in mosquitoes to public health personnel. Results from this assay will allow a rapid threat assessment and the focusing of vector control measures in high-risk areas.

  14. Comparative Structural and Functional Analysis of Bunyavirus and Arenavirus Cap-Snatching Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Reguera, Juan; Gerlach, Piotr; Rosenthal, Maria; Gaudon, Stephanie; Coscia, Francesca; Günther, Stephan; Cusack, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Segmented negative strand RNA viruses of the arena-, bunya- and orthomyxovirus families uniquely carry out viral mRNA transcription by the cap-snatching mechanism. This involves cleavage of host mRNAs close to their capped 5′ end by an endonuclease (EN) domain located in the N-terminal region of the viral polymerase. We present the structure of the cap-snatching EN of Hantaan virus, a bunyavirus belonging to hantavirus genus. Hantaan EN has an active site configuration, including a metal co-ordinating histidine, and nuclease activity similar to the previously reported La Crosse virus and Influenza virus ENs (orthobunyavirus and orthomyxovirus respectively), but is more active in cleaving a double stranded RNA substrate. In contrast, Lassa arenavirus EN has only acidic metal co-ordinating residues. We present three high resolution structures of Lassa virus EN with different bound ion configurations and show in comparative biophysical and biochemical experiments with Hantaan, La Crosse and influenza ENs that the isolated Lassa EN is essentially inactive. The results are discussed in the light of EN activation mechanisms revealed by recent structures of full-length influenza virus polymerase. PMID:27304209

  15. Polyanion inhibitors of HIV and other viruses. 7. Polyanionic compounds and polyzwitterionic compounds derived from cyclodextrins as inhibitors of HIV transmission.

    PubMed

    Leydet, A; Moullet, C; Roque, J P; Witvrouw, M; Pannecouque, C; Andrei, G; Snoeck, R; Neyts, J; Schols, D; De Clercq, E

    1998-12-01

    New polyanionic compounds were obtained from radical addition of thiomalic acid and mercaptopropionic acid onto perallylated cyclodextrins (CDs) under UV irradiation with a catalytic amount of alpha,alpha'-azobis(isobutyronitrile). All these polyanions, bearing 18-48 carboxylate groups, inhibited human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain IIIB replication in MT-4 cells at a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.1-2.9 microM, while not being toxic to the host cells at concentrations up to 62 microM. These compounds were also active against a clinical HIV-1 isolate (HE) at >/=4-fold higher concentrations. Only some compounds showed activity against the two HIV-2 strains (ROD and EHO) but at higher concentrations than those required to inhibit HIV-1 (IIIB and HE) replication. In addition, these compounds were not active against the M-tropic HIV-1 strain BaL but were active against simian immunodeficiency virus [SIV (MAC251)]. These compounds were also inhibitory to the replication of human cytomegalovirus at an IC50 of 1-10 microM, but not herpes simplex virus (type 1 and type 2) or other (picorna-, toga-, reo-, orthomyxo-, paramyxo-, bunya-, rhabdo-, and poxvirus) viruses. Radical addition on perallylated CDs of a protected cysteine gave polyzwitterionic compounds. None of these last compounds proved inhibitory to the replication of HIV-1, HIV-2, or any of the other viruses tested. PMID:9836609

  16. [Ebola: "a fatal syndrome"].

    PubMed

    Martínez, G A; Ramírez Ronda, C H

    1996-01-01

    No other clinical entity has attached more attention now-a-day than those precipitated by the infection with a Hemorrhagic Fever Virus. Potentially caused by Arena, Bunya, Flavi, and Filoviradae, only the latter has had such a major impact throughout the world. Two major genuses have been recognized since they become evident for the first time in 1967, the single-species Marburg, and the 3-species-Ebola (E. zaire, sudan and reston). With the exception of the 2 outbreaks of E. reston (Washington, USA 1989-1993), all of them have taken place in Africa, where the virus is still hiding among the wild-life of the Tropical Rain Forest. Currently (in April 1995) the reemergence of Ebola virus has once more proven its fatality, leaving around 170 deaths in Zaire, 250 miles from its capital, Kinshasa. There is worldwide alert, sponsored by the CDC in Atlanta, the World Health Organization and the authorities in Zaire regarding its potential spreading to naive regions, in and out of Africa. The characteristic clinical picture of a viral hemorrhagic fever has no match. After a 2-21 days incubation period a viral-like illness develops. As days go by, symptoms worsen, and by the 7th day, a severe and diffuse bleeding tendency ensues. The individual's death is the most likely outcome in the great majority of cases. As a lethal virus, without an available treatment and a possible airborne-route of transmission, Ebola virus will always be considered a persistent threat to the global health.