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Sample records for shorea robusta resin

  1. Wound healing activity of extracts derived from Shorea robusta resin.

    PubMed

    Yaseen Khan, Mohammad; Ali, Saleh Abbas; Pundarikakshudu, Kilambi

    2016-01-01

    Shorea robusta Gaertn.f. (Dipterocarpaceae) resin is used for treating infected wounds and burns by tribals in India. The objective of this study was to investigate wound-healing activity of S. robusta resin extracts and essential oil in rats. Methanol extract (SRME), petroleum ether, benzene insoluble fraction of methanol extract (SRPEBIME), and essential oil (SREO) of S. robusta resin were incorporated in soft yellow paraffin (10% w/w) and applied once daily on incision and excision wounds of Wistar rats. Framycetin ointment (1.0% w/w) was applied to the standard group. Tensile strength (on the 10th day), wound contraction, and scar area (on the 14th day) were recorded. On the 15th day, granulation tissues of excision wounds were analyzed for total protein, hydroxyproline, and hexosamine contents and activities of lipid peroxidation and super oxide dismutase (SOD). Histopathology of the wounds was also studied. SRPEBIME and SREO healed incision and excision wounds faster than plain ointment base and framycetin. Tensile strength of SRPEBIME-treated incision wounds was 53% higher than that of control animals. In excision wounds, wound contraction and scar areas were found to be 99% and 7.7 mm(2) (SRPEBIME) and 71.7% and 21 mm(2) (control). Protein and hydroxyproline contents were higher in SRPEBIME (20.8 and 3.5% w/w) and SREO (17.4 and 2.8% w/w) groups as against 9.95 and 1.48% w/w in control groups. Histopathology revealed complete epithelization and new blood vessel formation in SRPEBIME groups. SRPEBIME and SREO have significant wound-healing activities on incision and excision wounds.

  2. Influence of Moisture Content and Compression Axis on Physico-mechanical Properties of Shorea robusta Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashikumar, C.; Pradhan, R. C.; Mishra, S.

    2018-06-01

    Shorea robusta (Sal) is mainly harvested and processed for its seed oil, which has diverse application in commercial food and non-food based industries. Before extraction of its oil, seeds undergo into various post-harvest unit operations. Physical and mechanical properties play an important role in the handling and other processing activity. In this study influence of moisture content and compression axis of sal seed on physico-mechanical properties were studied and their application are highlighted. The experiments were conducted at five different moisture levels of 6.38, 10.49, 13.63, 17.64, and 21.95% (d.b) at two different orientations. The first orientation is on major axis (LEN) of the seed, and the other orientation is on intermediate or minor axis (WID), which is right angle to the major axis. It was observed that 68% of sal seeds were of medium size group at initial moisture content of 10.49% (d.b). The mean length and width of sal seed was found to be 26.7 mm and 12.8 mm, respectively. It was found that values of hardness, deformation at hardness, deformation at hardness percentage and energy for rupture were higher in minor axis (WID) as compared to the major axis (LEN). The results provide necessary data that may be useful to engineers, scientists, industries in the design of a suitable post-harvest processing machine.

  3. Influence of Moisture Content and Compression Axis on Physico-mechanical Properties of Shorea robusta Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashikumar, C.; Pradhan, R. C.; Mishra, S.

    2018-02-01

    Shorea robusta (Sal) is mainly harvested and processed for its seed oil, which has diverse application in commercial food and non-food based industries. Before extraction of its oil, seeds undergo into various post-harvest unit operations. Physical and mechanical properties play an important role in the handling and other processing activity. In this study influence of moisture content and compression axis of sal seed on physico-mechanical properties were studied and their application are highlighted. The experiments were conducted at five different moisture levels of 6.38, 10.49, 13.63, 17.64, and 21.95% (d.b) at two different orientations. The first orientation is on major axis (LEN) of the seed, and the other orientation is on intermediate or minor axis (WID), which is right angle to the major axis. It was observed that 68% of sal seeds were of medium size group at initial moisture content of 10.49% (d.b). The mean length and width of sal seed was found to be 26.7 mm and 12.8 mm, respectively. It was found that values of hardness, deformation at hardness, deformation at hardness percentage and energy for rupture were higher in minor axis (WID) as compared to the major axis (LEN). The results provide necessary data that may be useful to engineers, scientists, industries in the design of a suitable post-harvest processing machine.

  4. Application of response surface methodology for optimization of biosorption of fluoride from groundwater using Shorea robusta flower petal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, G.; Kumari, M.; Adhikari, K.; Dutta, S.

    2017-12-01

    Fluoride pollution in groundwater is a major concern in rural areas. The flower petal of Shorea robusta, commonly known as sal tree, is used in the present study both in its native form and Ca-impregnated activated form to eradicate excess fluoride from simulated wastewater. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used for experimental designing and analyzing optimum condition for carbonization vis-à-vis calcium impregnation for preparation of adsorbent. During carbonization, temperature, time and weight ratio of calcium chloride to sal flower petal (SFP) have been considered as input factors and percentage removal of fluoride as response. Optimum condition for carbonization has been obtained as temperature, 500 °C; time, 1 h and weight ratio, 2.5 and the sample prepared has been termed as calcium-impregnated carbonized sal flower petal (CCSFP). Optimum condition as analyzed by one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) method is initial fluoride concentration, 2.91 mg/L; pH 3 and adsorbent dose, 4 g/L. CCSFP shows maximum removal of 98.5% at this condition. RSM has also been used for finding out optimum condition for defluoridation considering initial concentration, pH and adsorbent dose as input parameters. The optimum condition as analyzed by RSM is: initial concentration, 5 mg/L; pH 3.5 and adsorbent dose, 2 g/L. Kinetic and equilibrium data follow Ho pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model, respectively. Adsorption capacity of CCSFP has been found to be 5.465 mg/g. At optimized condition, CCSFP has been found to remove fluoride (80.4%) efficiently from groundwater collected from Bankura district in West Bengal, a fluoride-contaminated province in India.

  5. Above-ground biomass and carbon estimates of Shorea robusta and Tectona grandis forests using QuadPOL ALOS PALSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, M. D.; Tripathi, P.; Mishra, B.; Kumar, Shashi; Chitale, V. S.; Behera, Soumit K.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms to mitigate climate change in tropical countries such as India require information on forest structural components i.e., biomass and carbon for conservation steps to be implemented successfully. The present study focuses on investigating the potential use of a one time, QuadPOL ALOS PALSAR L-band 25 m data to estimate above-ground biomass (AGB) using a water cloud model (WCM) in a wildlife sanctuary in India. A significant correlation was obtained between the SAR-derived backscatter coefficient (σ°) and the field measured AGB, with the maximum coefficient of determination for cross-polarized (HV) σ° for Shorea robusta, and the weakest correlation was observed with co-polarized (HH) σ° for Tectona grandis forests. The biomass of S. robusta and that of T. grandis were estimated on the basis of field-measured data at 444.7 ± 170.4 Mg/ha and 451 ± 179.4 Mg/ha respectively. The mean biomass values estimated using the WCM varied between 562 and 660 Mg/ha for S. robusta; between 590 and 710 Mg/ha for T. grandis using various polarized data. Our results highlighted the efficacy of one time, fully polarized PALSAR data for biomass and carbon estimate in a dense forest.

  6. Determination of wood wettability properties of oil palm trunk, Shorea sp. and Paraserianthes falcataria by contact angle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucipto, T.; Hartono, R.; Dwianto, W.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the wettability of the inner part of oil palm trunk (OPT), the outer part of OPT, OPT that densified 50%, Shorea sp. and Paraserianthes falcataria wood, as raw material for laminated beams. The wettability of the wood was measured by using cosine-contact angle (CCA) method, which is measuring the angle between dripped resin liquid and the wood surface. The resins that used in this study is phenol formaldehyde (PF) and urea formaldehyde (UF). The results showed that the Shorea sp. and P. falcataria woods have the smallest contact angle or the best wettability properties than OPT. Shorea sp. has the best wettability on PF resin (83.00°), while P. falcataria on UF resin (90.89°), this is due to the levels of starch and extractive substances in Shorea sp. and P. falcataria wood are smaller than OPT. Furthermore, Shorea sp. and P. falcataria wood surfaces are flatter and smoother than OPT, so that the resin will flow easier and wetting the wood surface. In this condition, the liquid resin will flow easier and formed a smaller contact angle. The good wettability of wood will enhance the adhesion properties of laminated beams.

  7. Resveratrol tetramer of hopeaphenol isolated from Shorea johorensis (Dipterocarpaceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisha, Farra; Din, Laily B.; Yaacob, W. A.

    2014-09-01

    Hopeaphenol (1) as a resveratrol tetramer was isolated from the bark of Shorea johorensis collected from Imbak Canyon, Sabah, Malaysia. The structure of this compound was determined by the spectroscopic evidences using 1H- and 13C-NMR assigned with HSQC, HMBC, 1H-1H COSY and 1H-1H NOESY spectra, mass spectrum, and by comparison with reported data.

  8. Resveratrol tetramer of hopeaphenol isolated from Shorea johorensis (Dipterocarpaceae)

    SciTech Connect

    Aisha, Farra; Din, Laily B.; Yaacob, W. A.

    2014-09-03

    Hopeaphenol (1) as a resveratrol tetramer was isolated from the bark of Shorea johorensis collected from Imbak Canyon, Sabah, Malaysia. The structure of this compound was determined by the spectroscopic evidences using {sup 1}H- and {sup 13}C-NMR assigned with HSQC, HMBC, {sup 1}H−{sup 1}H COSY and {sup 1}H−{sup 1}H NOESY spectra, mass spectrum, and by comparison with reported data.

  9. Air-drying of Robusta eucalyptus lumber

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1964-01-01

    A study of air-drying 4/4 Eucalyptus robusta lumber in Hilo, Hawaii showed that during typical summer weather it can be dried to below 20 percent moisture content in 2-1/2 months. Grade reduction in 36 percent of the lumber was caused by end splits, insect damage, warp, and surface checking.

  10. Pressure treatment of robusta and ohia posts...final report

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1973-01-01

    Round posts of ohia and robusta pressure-treated with one of two preservatives are being tested for durability at the Makiki Exposure Site, Honolulu, Hawaii. After more than 10½ years, all posts treated with pentachlorophenol are still sound. And all but one robusta post treated with chromated copper aresenate are still sound. Life of untreated posts of both species...

  11. Preservatives extend service life of ohia and robusta posts

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1968-01-01

    Posts of ohia and robusta, pressure- treated with two preservatives--chromated copper arsenate and pentachlorophenol, are being tested for durability at the Makiki Exposure Site, Honolulu, Hawaii. All treated posts are still sound after 5 years. Untreated ohia posts averaged 4 years of service life before failing; untreated robusta posts averaged 4 ½ years....

  12. Sapling structure and regeneration strategy in 18 Shorea species co-occurring in a tropical rainforest.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Masahiro; Nakashizuka, Tohru

    2005-08-01

    Inevitable trade-offs in structure may be a basis for differentiation in plant strategies. Juvenile trees in different functional groups are characterized by specific suites of structural traits such as crown architecture and biomass distribution. The relationship between juvenile tree structure and function was tested to find out if it is robust among functionally and taxonomically similar species of the genus Shorea that coexist sympatrically in a tropical rain forest in Borneo. The sapling structures of 18 species were compared for standardized dry masses of 5 and 30 g. Pairwise simple correlation and multiple correlation patterns among structural traits of juveniles (0.1-1.5 m in height) of 18 Shorea species were examined using Pearson's correlation and principal component analysis (PCA), respectively. The correlation was then tested between the PCA results and three indices of shade tolerance: the net photosynthetic rate, the wood density of mature trees and seed size. The structural variation in saplings of the genus Shorea was as large as that found in sets of species with much more diverse origins. The PCA showed that both crown architecture and allocation to leaves are major sources of variation in the structures of the 18 species investigated. Of these two axes, allocation to leaves was significantly correlated with wood density and showed a limited correlation with photosynthetic rate, whereas crown architecture was significantly correlated to seed size. Overall, the results suggest that an allocation trade-off between leaves and other organs, which co-varied with wood density and to a certain extent with photosynthetic capacity, accounts for the difference in shade tolerance among congeneric, functionally similar species. In contrast, the relationship between the architecture and regeneration strategy differed from the pattern found between functional groups, and the function of crown architecture was ambiguous.

  13. Lumber grade recoverey from Hawaii-grown robusta Eucalyptus logs

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1970-01-01

    In part to supplement meager data on lumber grade yield of Hawaii-grown timber, 30 robusta eucalyptus logs were shipped to a Michigan sawmill for processing. The logs were from 12 trees in three different stands. The lumber produced was graded according to National Hardwood Lumber Association standards. The sample was too small to provide a basis for predicting grade...

  14. Anti-babesial activity of some central kalimantan plant extracts and active oligostilbenoids from Shorea balangeran.

    PubMed

    Subeki; Nomura, Shinkichi; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Yamato, Osamu; Maede, Yoshimitsu; Katakura, Ken; Suzuki, Mamoru; Trimurningsih; Chairul; Yoshihara, Teruhiko

    2005-05-01

    Bark extracts from a total of 22 species of Central Kalimantan plants were evaluated for their anti-babesial activity against Babesia gibsoni in vitro. Of these plant species, extracts of Calophyllum tetrapterum, Garcinia rigida, Lithocarpus sp., Sandoricum emarginatum, and Shorea balangeran showed more than 90% inhibition of the parasite growth at a test concentration of 1000 microg/mL. Activity-guided fractionation of the bark of S. balangeran (Dipterocarpaceae) led to the reisolation of oligostilbenoids, vaticanol A(1), B(2), and G(3). The structures were determined on the basis of spectral evidence. Compounds 1 and 3 showed complete inhibition on the growth of Babesia gibsoni in vitro at a concentration of 25 microg/mL, and compound 2 at concentration of 50 microg/mL.

  15. Quantification of the Robusta fraction in a coffee blend via Raman spectroscopy: proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Wermelinger, Thomas; D'Ambrosio, Lucio; Klopprogge, Babette; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2011-09-14

    Among the 100 different known Coffea species, Coffea arabica L. (Arabica) and Coffea canephora Pierre (Robusta) are the only two of commercial interest. They differ in a range of agronomic, genetic, and chemical properties. Due to the significant price difference between Arabica and Robusta, there is an economic incentive to illicitly replace Arabica with Robusta. Therefore, it is crucial to have accurate methods to determine the Robusta-to-Arabica-ratio in blends. This paper presents the proof of principle of a new and fast approach to determine the Robusta fraction in a blend based on Raman spectroscopy. The oils of two references (a pure Robusta and pure Arabica coffee) and six blends thereof consisting of different Robusta and Arabica fractions were extracted using a Soxhlet system. The solutes were analyzed by means of Raman spectroscopy without further workup. Using the intensity ratio between two Raman peaks, one characteristic for kahweol and one characteristic for fatty acids, allowed determinination of the Robusta content in a given mixture. The intensity ratio is linearly dependent on the Robusta content of the compound. Above a Robusta content of 75 wt %, kahweol was not detectable. The Raman data are in agreement with results obtained from the very time-consuming multistep DIN 10777 procedures based on HPLC.

  16. Specific gravity variation in robusta eucalyptus grown in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Roger G. Skolmen

    1972-01-01

    The specific gravity (air-dry volume, ovendry weight) of Eucalyptus robusta wood was tested within and between trees from 10 stands. Mean specific gravity was 0.603, but the range in individual samples for 50 trees was 0.331 to 0.869, and was 0.357 to 0.755 within one cross section. A consistent increase was recorded in all trees from pith to cambium and from butt to...

  17. Geographic origin and individual assignment of Shorea platyclados (Dipterocarpaceae) for forensic identification

    PubMed Central

    Diway, Bibian; Khoo, Eyen

    2017-01-01

    The development of timber tracking methods based on genetic markers can provide scientific evidence to verify the origin of timber products and fulfill the growing requirement for sustainable forestry practices. In this study, the origin of an important Dark Red Meranti wood, Shorea platyclados, was studied by using the combination of seven chloroplast DNA and 15 short tandem repeats (STRs) markers. A total of 27 natural populations of S. platyclados were sampled throughout Malaysia to establish population level and individual level identification databases. A haplotype map was generated from chloroplast DNA sequencing for population identification, resulting in 29 multilocus haplotypes, based on 39 informative intraspecific variable sites. Subsequently, a DNA profiling database was developed from 15 STRs allowing for individual identification in Malaysia. Cluster analysis divided the 27 populations into two genetic clusters, corresponding to the region of Eastern and Western Malaysia. The conservativeness tests showed that the Malaysia database is conservative after removal of bias from population subdivision and sampling effects. Independent self-assignment tests correctly assigned individuals to the database in an overall 60.60−94.95% of cases for identified populations, and in 98.99−99.23% of cases for identified regions. Both the chloroplast DNA database and the STRs appear to be useful for tracking timber originating in Malaysia. Hence, this DNA-based method could serve as an effective addition tool to the existing forensic timber identification system for ensuring the sustainably management of this species into the future. PMID:28430826

  18. Rapid photosynthetic acclimation of Shorea johorensis seedlings after logging disturbance in Central Kalimantan.

    PubMed

    Clearwater, M J; Susilawaty, R; Effendi, R; van Gardingen, P R

    1999-12-01

    This study examined the photosynthetic acclimation of pre-existing Shorea johorensis (Dipterocarpaceae) seedlings to the change in conditions that occurs at the time of logging in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. The hypothesis was that the seedlings would be unable to acclimate beyond partially open conditions after canopy disturbance caused by logging, therefore limiting the potential for regeneration in the most open areas. Bleaching and reductions in the predawn ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence (F v /F m ) indicated chronic photoinhibition and damage to the previously shade-adapted leaves of seedlings in an area logged 2 weeks earlier. The majority of seedlings in partially open and open environments of an area logged 3 months earlier were already growing fast. Leaves that had developed in the new environment showed only small reductions in predawn F v /F m and large increases in the light saturated rate of photosynthesis (A max ) per unit area when compared to shaded seedlings. Leaves in the most open environments had higher but more variable nitrogen concentrations, A max per unit area and A max per unit mass when compared to seedlings in partially open environments. Increases in dark respiration were disproportionately large compared to increases in A max , and may have been the result of increased investment in photoprotective mechanisms. The response of stomatal conductance to the vapour pressure deficit and leaf temperature was examined, but it suggested only a 10% reduction in daily leaf level carbon gain in open environments. The ratio of leaf area to fine root mass was highest in shade-suppressed and newly exposed seedlings, suggesting a potential hydraulic limitation to transpiration during acclimation. However, rainfall during this period was high and leaf water potentials did not differ between disturbed and undisturbed environments. S. johorensis seedlings were capable of significant acclimation to conditions more extreme than partial canopy

  19. Winged fruits and associated leaves of Shorea (Dipterocarpaceae) from the Late Eocene of South China and their phytogeographic and paleoclimatic implications.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xinxin; Tang, Biao; Kodrul, Tatiana M; Jin, Jianhua

    2013-03-01

    Dipterocarps are the representative component of tropical rain forests in Southeast Asia and hold important economic and ecological significance, but their origin and migration are controversial. Information on dipterocarpaceous fossils, particularly the more convincing reproductive structures, not only can improve the phylogenetic and phytogeographic studies of this family, but also provide important information for reconstructing paleoclimate. • Morphologically preserved winged fruits and associated leaves were collected from the Late Eocene Huangniuling Formation, Maoming Basin, South China. We determined their taxonomic positions based on comparative morphology with similar extant and fossil specimens and discuss their phytogeographic and paleoclimatic implications by consulting the distribution and habitat of fossil and modern populations. • The Late Eocene winged fruits are attributed to Shorea Roxburgh ex Gaertner (Dipterocarpaceae) as Shorea maomingensis sp. nov. The associated leaves are recognized as Shorea sp. based on leaf architecture, and they are likely to be conspecific with the winged fruits. • The discovery of dipterocarps indicates that they had arrived in tropical and humid South China by the Late Eocene. Dipterocarps including Shorea exhibit a wide range of physiological tolerance to climate; palynological analysis suggests an increase in aridity and seasonality in the Maoming Basin from the Late Eocene. Dipterocarps became adapted to this seasonal climate from the Late Eocene to Early Miocene, expanded northward in the climatic optimum of the Middle Miocene, and declined and gradually disappeared from the southeastern part of the continent from the Late Miocene.

  20. Alkaloids of Stipa robusta (sleepygrass) infected with an Acremonium endophyte.

    PubMed

    Petroski, R J; Powell, R G; Clay, K

    1992-01-01

    Stipa robusta (= Stipa vaseyi) is a perennial grass found in certain areas of the southwestern United States. It is commonly known as sleepygrass, as horses that ingest this grass may become profoundly somnolent or stuporous for periods of time lasting up to several days. In an attempt to determine the active principle(s), fractionation of a methanolic extract of sleepygrass infected with an Acremonium endophyte has yielded lysergic acid amide (20 micrograms/g dry wt), isolysergic amide (8), 8-hydroxylsergic acid amide (0.3), ergonovine (7), chanoclavine-I (15), and N-formylloline (18). Related alkaloids have been found in many endophyte-infected grasses. The dominant alkaloid constituent in sleepygrass, lysergic acid amide, has not previously been identified in a grass in such high concentration. Lysergic acid amide is likely to be the basis for the extreme sedative effects on animals, given past pharmacological work on the compound from the ergot fungus Claviceps paspali.

  1. Comparative effect of coffee robusta and coffee arabica (Qahwa) on memory and attention.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Waheeb D M; Azmat, Aisha; Ahmed, Muhammad

    2018-04-13

    The comparative effects of coffee robusta and coffee arabica (Qahwa) on different attention and memory related assignments were measured in a double-blind study of 300 healthy young adult women who were randomly assigned to one of three different drinks: Group I (coffee robusta sachet dissolved in 100 ml of hot water): Group II (coffee arabica): and group III (100 ml water only). Cognitive function was assessed by standardized tests. Several monitoring cognitive tests and tasks were specifically chosen and performed to investigate the comparative effects of coffee robusta (CR) and coffee arabica (Qahwa; AC) on sleepiness (sleep and clear headed scale), attention (trail A & B, symbol digit, letter cancellation), general cognitive ability (stroop test) and memory (card test). Data was interpreted by analysis of variance (ANOVA). The present study revealed that coffee robusta has beneficial effects on attention, general cognitive ability and memory. Higher though non-significant cognitive scores were associated with coffee robusta consumption. Although, consumption of coffee arabica (Qahwa) has significant effects (P < 0.05) on sleepiness, attention, general cognitive ability and memory and it significantly improve reaction time and correct responses. Since different tasks were related to the sustained attention and working memory processes, results would suggest that coffee arabica (qahwa) could increase the memory and efficiency of the attentional system might be due to the presence of chlorogenic acids (CGA) which are found in less quantity in coffee robusta. However, more studies using larger samples and different tasks are necessary to better understand the effects of coffee robusta and arabica (Qahwa) on attention and memory.

  2. Allergic contact dermatitis from exposure to Grevillea robusta in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Derraik, José G B; Rademaker, Marius

    2009-05-01

    There are a number of reports in the literature of allergic contact dermatitis as a result of exposure to the sawdust and plant parts of Grevillea robusta. While this tree is prevalent in New Zealand, there seems to have been no previous published accounts of contact dermatitis, although anecdotal evidence indicates that such cases may be common. Two brief case reports are provided regarding severe phytodermatitis to G. robusta among professional arborists in New Zealand. As with other common plants capable of inducing allergic contact dermatitis, greater awareness among arborists, orchardists, forestry workers, gardeners, and health professionals will likely result in a reduction of cases.

  3. Population structure and demographic history of a tropical lowland rainforest tree species Shorea parvifolia (Dipterocarpaceae) from Southeastern Asia.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Hiroko; Teshima, Kosuke M; Khatab, Ismael A; Inomata, Nobuyuki; Finkeldey, Reiner; Siregar, Iskandar Z; Siregar, Ulfah J; Szmidt, Alfred E

    2012-07-01

    Distribution of tropical rainforests in Southeastern Asia has changed over geo-logical time scale, due to movement of tectonic plates and/or global climatic changes. Shorea parvifolia is one of the most common tropical lowland rainforest tree species in Southeastern Asia. To infer population structure and demographic history of S. parvifolia, as indicators of temporal changes in the distribution and extent of tropical rainforest in this region, we studied levels and patterns of nucleotide polymorphism in the following five nuclear gene regions: GapC, GBSSI, PgiC, SBE2, and SODH. Seven populations from peninsular Malaysia, Sumatra, and eastern Borneo were included in the analyses. STRUCTURE analysis revealed that the investigated populations are divided into two groups: Sumatra-Malay and Borneo. Furthermore, each group contained one admixed population. Under isolation with migration model, divergence of the two groups was estimated to occur between late Pliocene (2.6 MYA) and middle Pleistocene (0.7 MYA). The log-likelihood ratio tests of several demographic models strongly supported model with population expansion and low level of migration after divergence of the Sumatra-Malay and Borneo groups. The inferred demographic history of S. parvifolia suggested the presence of a scarcely forested land bridge on the Sunda Shelf during glacial periods in the Pleistocene and predominance of tropical lowland rainforest at least in Sumatra and eastern Borneo.

  4. Resin characterization

    Treesearch

    Robert L. Geimer; Robert A. Follensbee; Alfred W. Christiansen; James A. Koutsky; George E. Myers

    1990-01-01

    Currently, thermosetting adhesives are characterized by physical andchemical features such as viscosity, solids content, pH, and molecular distribution, and their reaction in simple gel tests. Synthesis of a new resin for a particular application is usually accompanied by a series of empirical laboratory and plant trials. The purpose of the research outlined in this...

  5. Homostachydrine (pipecolic acid betaine) as authentication marker of roasted blends of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora (Robusta) beans.

    PubMed

    Servillo, Luigi; Giovane, Alfonso; Casale, Rosario; Cautela, Domenico; D'Onofrio, Nunzia; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa; Castaldo, Domenico

    2016-08-15

    The occurrence of pipecolic acid betaine (homostachydrine) and its biosynthetic precursor N-methylpipecolic acid was detected for the first time in green coffee beans of Robusta and Arabica species. The analyses were conducted by HPLC-ESI tandem mass spectrometry and the metabolites identified by product ion spectra and comparison with authentic standards. N-methylpipecolic acid was found at similar levels in green coffee beans of Robusta and Arabica, whereas a noticeable difference of homostachydrine content was observed between the two green coffee bean species. Interestingly, homostachydrine content was found to be unaffected by coffee bean roasting treatment because of a noticeable heat stability, a feature that makes this compound a candidate marker to determine the content of Robusta and Arabica species in roasted coffee blends. To this end, a number of certified pure Arabica and Robusta green beans were analyzed for their homostachydrine content. Results showed that homostachydrine content was 1.5±0.5mg/kg in Arabica beans and 31.0±10.0mg/kg in Robusta beans. Finally, to further support the suitability of homostachydrine as quality marker of roasted blends of Arabica and Robusta coffee beans, commercial samples of roasted ground coffee blends were analyzed and the correspondence between the derived percentages of Arabica and Robusta beans with those declared on packages by manufacturers was verified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The girdles of the oldest fossil turtle, Proterochersis robusta, and the age of the turtle crown

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proterochersis robusta from the Late Triassic (Middle Norian) of Germany is the oldest known fossil turtle (i.e. amniote with a fully formed turtle shell), but little is known about its anatomy. A newly prepared, historic specimen provides novel insights into the morphology of the girdles and vertebral column of this taxon and the opportunity to reassess its phylogenetic position. Results The anatomy of the pectoral girdle of P. robusta is similar to that of other primitive turtles, including the Late Triassic (Carnian) Proganochelys quenstedti, in having a vertically oriented scapula, a large coracoid foramen, a short acromion process, and bony ridges that connect the acromion process with the dorsal process, glenoid, and coracoid, and by being able to rotate along a vertical axis. The pelvic elements are expanded distally and suturally attached to the shell, but in contrast to modern pleurodiran turtles the pelvis is associated with the sacral ribs. Conclusions The primary homology of the character “sutured pelvis” is unproblematic between P. robusta and extant pleurodires. However, integration of all new observations into the most complete phylogenetic analysis that support the pleurodiran nature of P. robusta reveals that this taxon is more parsimoniously placed along the phylogenetic stem of crown Testudines. All current phylogenetic hypotheses therefore support the basal placement of this taxon, imply that the sutured pelvis of this taxon developed independently from that of pleurodires, and conclude that the age of the turtle crown is Middle Jurassic. PMID:24314094

  7. Variations in diameter measurements of Robusta Eucalyptus due to swelling and shrinking of bark

    Treesearch

    Robert E. Burgan

    1971-01-01

    Trunk diameters of Eucalyptus robusta trees shrink and swell as bark moisture content changes. Diameter variations from this cause as measured on six trees with a dial-gage dendrometer were less than 1 percent of trunk diameter. To compare this variation with the variation in d.b.h. measurements that can result from personal techiques of using a...

  8. Moisture content of wood for interior use...Douglas-fir and robusta eucalyptus samples studied

    Treesearch

    R. Sidney Boone

    1967-01-01

    Panels of Douglas-fir and robusta eucalyptus blocks showed little seasonal variation in Equilibrium Moisture Content (EMC) of wood at 19 indoor locations on Oahu, Hawaii. Differences in EMC between locations were more variable. Minimum EMC at nonair-conditioned locations was 10 percent;at air-conditioned locations. 8 percent. Maximum EMC at nonairconditioned locations...

  9. Evaluation of the antiulcerogenic activity of Maytenus robusta (Celastraceae) in different experimental ulcer models.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni; Lemos, Marivane; Comunello, Eros; Noldin, Vânia Floriani; Filho, Valdir Cechinel; Niero, Rivaldo

    2007-09-05

    Maytenus robusta (Celastraceae) is used in folk medicine for the treatment of stomach ulcers and is very well adapted to the South of Brazil. Maytenus ilicifolia is the main species of the Celastraceae family, and is used in the treatment of gastric ulcers. However, Maytenus ilicifolia is presently at the stage of extinction, due to indiscriminate use in Brazil. Thus, the use of Maytenus robusta in phytotherapeutic preparations, instead of Maytenus ilicifolia, is suggested. However, there have been no reports regarding the antiulcer activity of Maytenus robusta extract. Therefore, this study was carried out to evaluate the antiulcerogenic property of the hydroalcoholic extract of aerial parts of Maytenus robusta. The antiulcer assays were performed using the following protocols: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced ulcer, ethanol-induced ulcer, and stress-induced ulcer. The effects of the extract on gastric content volume, pH and total acidity, using the pylorus ligated model, were also evaluated. In the ethanol-induced ulcer model, it was observed that the treatment with Maytenus robusta extract significantly reduced the lesion index in 75.1 +/- 8.6, 85.0 +/- 9.2, 86.6 +/- 7.4 and 75.5 +/- 5.3 for the groups treated with 50, 250 and 500 mg/kg of Maytenus robusta and positive control (omeprazole 30 mg/kg), respectively. Also were observed significant inhibition in lesion index in the indomethacin-induced ulcer model, being the decrease of the 62.5 +/- 7.1, 62.5 +/- 6.1, 63.6 +/- 5.5 and 96.2 +/- 3.6 for groups treated with 50, 250 and 500 mg/kg of Maytenus robusta and positive control (cimetidine 100 mg/kg), respectively. Results similar were observed in the stress-induced ulcer model, where the inhibition of ulcer lesions were 71.3 +/- 5.5, 72.7 +/- 6.3, 76.5 +/- 7.1 and 92.3 +/- 7.5 for the groups treated with 50, 250 and 500 mg/kg of Maytenus robusta and positive control (cimetidine 100 mg/kg), respectively. Regarding the model of gastric

  10. Elemental detection of arabica and robusta green bean coffee using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Meilina, Hesti; Hedwig, Rinda; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    The elemental detection of green bean of arabica and robusta coffee from Gayo Highland, Aceh-Indonesia, has been identified by using fundamental Nd-YAG Laser at 10 Torr of surrounding air gas pressure for distinguishing the characteristics of both coffees. As the preliminary study, we have detected the elements of K 766.49 nm, Na 588.9 nm, Ca 393.3 nm, CN band at 388.3 nm, N 337.13 nm and C 247.8 nm of both coffees. It is noticed that the order of elements concentration from highest to lowest are Ca>K>CN> Na>N> C for arabica and K>Ca>CN >Na>C>N for robusta. The emission intensity of K 766.49 nm is almost same for both of coffee. However, the emission intensity of Na 588.9 nm is lower in Arabica coffee. To distinguish the Arabica coffee and Robusta Coffee, we take the ratio intensity of K/C, Na/C, CN/C, and Ca/C. It is found that the ratio intensities of CN/C and Ca/C in arabica bean are significantly different with robusta bean. That ratio intensities can be used as a marker to discriminate kind of coffee. We also noted that the arabica green bean is 1.3 harder than robusta green bean. These findings prove that the technique of laser-induced plasma spectroscopy can be used to make rapid identification of elements in coffee and can potentially be applied to measure the concentration of blended coffee for the purpose of authentication.

  11. Rapid approach to identify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Ruge, Winfried; Kuballa, Thomas; Ilse, Maren; Winkelmann, Ole; Diehl, Bernd; Thomas, Freddy; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2015-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy was used to verify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee. Lipophilic extracts of authentic roasted and green coffees showed the presence of established markers for Robusta (16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC)) and for Arabica (kahweol). The integration of the 16-OMC signal (δ 3.165 ppm) was used to estimate the amount of Robusta in coffee blends with an approximate limit of detection of 1-3%. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of 77 commercial coffee samples (coffee pods, coffee capsules, and coffee beans). Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectra of lipophilic and aqueous extracts of 20 monovarietal authentic samples. Clusters of the two species were observed. NMR spectroscopy can be used as a rapid prescreening tool to discriminate Arabica and Robusta coffee species before the confirmation applying the official method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cytogenetic data on the threatened leafcutter ant Atta robusta Borgmeier, 1939 (Formicidae: Myrmicinae: Attini).

    PubMed

    Barros, Luísa Antônia Campos; Aguiar, Hilton Jeferson Alves Cardoso de; Teixeira, Gisele Amaro; Mariano, Cléa Dos Santos Ferreira; Teixeira, Marcos da Cunha; Delabie, Jacques Hubert Charles; Pompolo, Silvia das Graças

    2015-10-01

    The karyotype of the threatened ant species Atta robusta is described so as to establish the evolutionary relationships of this taxon with other leafcutter ants. Standard Giemsa staining, C-banding, NOR banding, fluorochromes CMA3/DAPI, Hsc-FA technique and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) using 18S rDNA probe were conducted on a population from Aracruz, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil, allowing for comparisons with data available on Atta and other fungus-growing ant species. The diploid chromosome number observed for A. robusta was 2n=22, and the karyotypic formula was 18m+2sm+2st. Heterochromatic blocks were observed in the centromeric region of most chromosomes, where one pair of metacentric chromosomes is characterized by a GC-rich heterochromatic band in the interstitial region of its long arm. The detection of 18S rDNA using FISH confirmed the presence of single NOR for A. robusta. This is the first report of rDNA 18S detection using FISH for leafcutter ants. The cytogenetic results of this study confirm the information available for Atta and allow us to confirm the conserved chromosome number, morphology and banding pattern within the genus for the taxa studied to date, which included species from three out of the four groups of Atta indicated by molecular data. The accumulation of cytogenetic data on fungus-growing ants enhances the understanding of the genomic evolutionary patterns of Atta, since it belongs to a group of recent origin between the most well studied ants. Cytogenetic data does not indicate restrictions in relocation or reintroduction in areas where populations were extinct due to the conserved karyotype. This study allows for cytogenetic comparison of A. robusta with other ants of Atta, emphasizing the importance of chromosomal information for species conservation. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Evidence of gastric ulcer healing activity of Maytenus robusta Reissek: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Boeing, Thaise; Somensi, Lincon Bordignon; Cury, Benhur Judah; Steimbach, Viviane Miranda Bispo; Silveria, Alessandro Conrado de Oliveira; Niero, Rivaldo; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Santin, José Roberto; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni

    2015-12-04

    Maytenus robusta Reissek (Celastraceae) is traditionally used in Brazilian folk medicine to treat gastric ulcer, as a substitute for M. ilicifolia, which is almost extinct. The gastroprotective properties of M. robusta were demonstrated previously using only preventive approaches, such as acute gastric ulcer models. However, the healing effect of M. robusta in gastric ulcers remains unclear. The current study was carried out to investigate the healing effectiveness of M. robusta hydroalcoholic extract (HEMR) from aerial parts in the acetic acid-induced chronic ulcer model and to determine its effect on cell proliferation, scavenging free radicals, and inflammatory and oxidative damage. To evaluate the healing properties of HEMR in vivo, chronic gastric ulcer was induced in rats by 80% acid acetic. Next, different groups of animals (n=6) were treated orally with vehicle (water plus 1% tween, 1 ml/kg), omeprazole (20mg/kg), or HEMR (1-10mg/kg), twice daily for 7 days. At the end of the treatment, the total ulcer area (mm(2)) was measured and a sample of gastric tissue was taken for histological and histochemical analysis. Evaluation of GSH and LOOH levels, GST, SOD, CAT and MPO activity was also performed at the site of the lesion. In parallel, radical scavenging activity, cytoprotective effect, and cell proliferation activity in fibroblasts (L929 cells) were determined by in vitro trials. The antisecretory properties were evaluated using the pylorus ligature model in rats, and the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity was determined in vitro. Acute toxicity was evaluated by relative organ weight and biochemical parameters in serum. The prokinetic properties were also evaluated in mice. Oral administration of HEMR (10mg/kg) reduced the gastric ulcer area by 53%, compared to the vehicle group (120.0 ± 8.3mm(2)), the regeneration of gastric mucosa was evidenced in histological analysis. Moreover, HEMR treatment increased gastric mucin content and reduced oxidative stress

  14. Recognition of spectral identifier from green coffee beans of arabica and robusta varieties using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anggraeni, Karina; Nasution, Aulia; Suyanto, Hery

    2016-11-01

    Coffee is one of the world's commodity that is cultivated in more than 50 countries. Production of coffee in Indonesia is positioned of fourth rank in the world, after Brazil, Vietnam, and Colombia. There are two varieties of coffee grown in Indonesia, i.e. the arabica and robusta. The chemical compositions between arabica and robusta are different each other. A trained coffee tester can distinguish these differences from its taste, but it is very subjective. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a spectroscopic technique based on the analysis of micro-plasma induced on the surface sample after being shot with a laser pulse. In this study, elemental spectra acquired using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique were analysed to differentate between green coffee beans of arabica and robusta, which are collected from plantations in Malang, Bondowoso, Prigen, and Pasuruan. Results show that optimum conditions for acquiring spectra from green coffee beans using LIBS are at 120 mJ of laser energy and 1,0 μs of delay time. Green coffee beans of arabica and robusta contain some elements such as Ca, W, Sr, Mg, Be, Na, H, N, K, Rb, and O. Discriminant analysis method was then applied to distinguish the green beans of arabica and robusta coffee. Element identifiers of green coffee beans are Ca, W, Mg, Be, Na, and Sr. The abundant element in green coffee beans is Calcium (Ca), and depth-profile testing shows that Ca is homogeneous inside the beans.

  15. Resin-Powder Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standfield, Clarence E.

    1994-01-01

    Resin-powder dispenser used at NASA's Langley Research Center for processing of composite-material prepregs. Dispenser evenly distributes powder (resin polymer and other matrix materials in powder form) onto wet uncured prepregs. Provides versatility in distribution of solid resin in prepreg operation. Used wherever there is requirement for even, continuous distribution of small amount of powder.

  16. Development of Genic and Genomic SSR Markers of Robusta Coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre Ex A. Froehner)

    PubMed Central

    Hendre, Prasad S.; Aggarwal, Ramesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Coffee breeding and improvement efforts can be greatly facilitated by availability of a large repository of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) based microsatellite markers, which provides efficiency and high-resolution in genetic analyses. This study was aimed to improve SSR availability in coffee by developing new genic−/genomic-SSR markers using in-silico bioinformatics and streptavidin-biotin based enrichment approach, respectively. The expressed sequence tag (EST) based genic microsatellite markers (EST-SSRs) were developed using the publicly available dataset of 13,175 unigene ESTs, which showed a distribution of 1 SSR/3.4 kb of coffee transcriptome. Genomic SSRs, on the other hand, were developed from an SSR-enriched small-insert partial genomic library of robusta coffee. In total, 69 new SSRs (44 EST-SSRs and 25 genomic SSRs) were developed and validated as suitable genetic markers. Diversity analysis of selected coffee genotypes revealed these to be highly informative in terms of allelic diversity and PIC values, and eighteen of these markers (∼27%) could be mapped on a robusta linkage map. Notably, the markers described here also revealed a very high cross-species transferability. In addition to the validated markers, we have also designed primer pairs for 270 putative EST-SSRs, which are expected to provide another ca. 200 useful genetic markers considering the high success rate (88%) of marker conversion of similar pairs tested/validated in this study. PMID:25461752

  17. Classification of andisol soil on robusta coffee plantation in Silima Pungga - Pungga District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marbun, P.; Nasution, Z.; Hanum, H.; Karim, A.

    2018-02-01

    The survey study aims to classify the Inceptisol soil on Robusta coffee plantation in Silima Pugga-Pungga District, from Order level to Sub Group level. The study was conducted on location of sample soil profiles which were determined based on Soil Map Unit (SMU) with the main Andisol Order, i.e. SMU 12, SMU 15 and SMU 17 of 18 existing SMU. The soil profiles were described to determine the morphological characteristics of the soil, while the physical and chemical properties were done by laboratory analysis. The soil samples were taken from each horizon in each profile and analyzed in the laboratory in the form of soil texture, bulk density, pH H2O, pH KCl, pH NaF, C-organic, exchangeable bases (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, Na+), ZPC (zero point charge), base saturation, cation exchange capasity (CEC), P-retention, Al-Oxalate (Al-O) and Si-Oxalate (Si-O). The results showed that the classification of Andisol soil based on Soil Taxonomy only has one Sub Group namely Typic Hapludand. It is expected that the results of this study can provide information for more appropriate land management in order to increase the production of Robusta coffee plant in Silima Pungga-Pungga Sub district.

  18. Personal exposure to dust and endotoxin in Robusta and Arabica coffee processing factories in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Sakwari, Gloria; Mamuya, Simon H D; Bråtveit, Magne; Larsson, Lennart; Pehrson, Christina; Moen, Bente E

    2013-03-01

    Endotoxin exposure associated with organic dust exposure has been studied in several industries. Coffee cherries that are dried directly after harvest may differ in dust and endotoxin emissions to those that are peeled and washed before drying. The aim of this study was to measure personal total dust and endotoxin levels and to evaluate their determinants of exposure in coffee processing factories. Using Sidekick Casella pumps at a flow rate of 2l/min, total dust levels were measured in the workers' breathing zone throughout the shift. Endotoxin was analyzed using the kinetic chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Separate linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate exposure determinants for dust and endotoxin. Total dust and endotoxin exposure were significantly higher in Robusta than in Arabica coffee factories (geometric mean 3.41 mg/m(3) and 10 800 EU/m(3) versus 2.10 mg/m(3) and 1400 EU/m(3), respectively). Dry pre-processed coffee and differences in work tasks explained 30% of the total variance for total dust and 71% of the variance for endotoxin exposure. High exposure in Robusta processing is associated with the dry pre-processing method used after harvest. Dust and endotoxin exposure is high, in particular when processing dry pre-processed coffee. Minimization of dust emissions and use of efficient dust exhaust systems are important to prevent the development of respiratory system impairment in workers.

  19. Hepatoprotective Effect of Opuntia robusta and Opuntia streptacantha Fruits against Acetaminophen-Induced Acute Liver Damage

    PubMed Central

    González-Ponce, Herson Antonio; Martínez-Saldaña, María Consolación; Rincón-Sánchez, Ana Rosa; Sumaya-Martínez, María Teresa; Buist-Homan, Manon; Faber, Klaas Nico; Moshage, Han; Jaramillo-Juárez, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced acute liver failure (ALF) is a serious health problem in developed countries. N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), the current therapy for APAP-induced ALF, is not always effective, and liver transplantation is often needed. Opuntia spp. fruits are an important source of nutrients and contain high levels of bioactive compounds, including antioxidants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of Opuntia robusta and Opuntia streptacantha extracts against APAP-induced ALF. In addition, we analyzed the antioxidant activities of these extracts. Fruit extracts (800 mg/kg/day, orally) were given prophylactically to male Wistar rats before intoxication with APAP (500 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Rat hepatocyte cultures were exposed to 20 mmol/L APAP, and necrosis was assessed by LDH leakage. Opuntia robusta had significantly higher levels of antioxidants than Opuntia streptacantha. Both extracts significantly attenuated APAP-induced injury markers AST, ALT and ALP and improved liver histology. The Opuntia extracts reversed APAP-induced depletion of liver GSH and glycogen stores. In cultured hepatocytes, Opuntia extracts significantly reduced leakage of LDH and cell necrosis, both prophylactically and therapeutically. Both extracts appeared to be superior to NAC when used therapeutically. We conclude that Opuntia extracts are hepatoprotective and can be used as a nutraceutical to prevent ALF. PMID:27782042

  20. The AMT1 family genes from Malus robusta display differential transcription features and ammonium transport abilities.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Yang, Qing-Song; Liu, Wei; Lin, Jing; Chang, You-Hong

    2017-10-01

    Ammonium is an important nitrogen sources for plant growth. In this study, we report on the gene characterization of the ammonium transporter AMT1 subfamily in the apple rootstock Malus robusta Rehd. Thirteen AMT genes were comprehensively evaluated from the apple genome (version 1.0). Then the gene features and expression patterns of five AMT1 members from M. robusta were analyzed. These genes fell into four clusters in the AMT phylogenetic tree: clade I (MrAMT1;1 and MrAMT1;3), clade II (MrAMT1;4), clade III (MrAMT1;2), and clade IV (MrAMT1;5). All the AMT1s, apart from MrAMT1;4, were expressed in vegetative organs and strongly responded to nitrogen concentration changes. For example, MrAMT1;2 and MrAMT1;3 had high transcript accumulation levels in the leaves and roots, respectively. Finally, the functions of these AMT1s were studied in detail by heterologous expression in yeast. These genes allowed strain 31019b to assimilate nitrogen, but their 15 NH 4 + uptake kinetics varied. These results revealed the functional roles of AMT1 during ammonium absorption in the AMT-defective mutant yeast system.

  1. Attraction Pheromone of The Benthic Diatom Seminavis robusta: Studies on Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Lembke, Christine; Stettin, Daniel; Speck, Franziska; Ueberschaar, Nico; De Decker, Sam; Vyverman, Wim; Pohnert, Georg

    2018-04-01

    Recently the first pheromone of a marine diatom was identified to be the diketopiperazine (S,S)-diproline. This compound facilitates attraction between mating partners in the benthic diatom Seminavis robusta. Interestingly, sexualized S. robusta cells are attracted to both the natural pheromone (S,S)-diproline as well as to its enantiomer (R,R)-diproline. Usually stereospecificity is a prerequisite for successful substrate-receptor interactions, and especially pheromone perception is often highly enantioselective. Here we introduce a structure-activity relationship study, to learn more about the principles of pheromone reception in diatoms. We analyzed the activity of nine different diketopiperazines in attraction and interference assays. The pheromone diproline itself, as well as a pipecolic acid derived diketopiperazine with two expanded aliphatic ring systems, showed the highest attractivity. Hydroxylatoin of the aliphatic rings abolished any bioactivity. Diketopiperazines derived from acyclic amino acids were not attrative as well. All stereoisomers of both the diproline and the pipecolic acid derived diketopiperazine were purified by enantioselective high-performance liquid chromatography, and application in bioactivity tests confirmed that attraction pheromone perception in this diatom is indeed not stereospecific. However, the lack of activity of diketopiperazines derived from acyclic amino acids suggests a specificity that prevents misguidance to sources of other naturally occurring diketopiperazines.

  2. Personal Exposure to Dust and Endotoxin in Robusta and Arabica Coffee Processing Factories in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Sakwari, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Endotoxin exposure associated with organic dust exposure has been studied in several industries. Coffee cherries that are dried directly after harvest may differ in dust and endotoxin emissions to those that are peeled and washed before drying. The aim of this study was to measure personal total dust and endotoxin levels and to evaluate their determinants of exposure in coffee processing factories. Methods: Using Sidekick Casella pumps at a flow rate of 2l/min, total dust levels were measured in the workers’ breathing zone throughout the shift. Endotoxin was analyzed using the kinetic chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Separate linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate exposure determinants for dust and endotoxin. Results: Total dust and endotoxin exposure were significantly higher in Robusta than in Arabica coffee factories (geometric mean 3.41mg/m3 and 10 800 EU/m3 versus 2.10mg/m3 and 1400 EU/m3, respectively). Dry pre-processed coffee and differences in work tasks explained 30% of the total variance for total dust and 71% of the variance for endotoxin exposure. High exposure in Robusta processing is associated with the dry pre-processing method used after harvest. Conclusions: Dust and endotoxin exposure is high, in particular when processing dry pre-processed coffee. Minimization of dust emissions and use of efficient dust exhaust systems are important to prevent the development of respiratory system impairment in workers. PMID:23028014

  3. Patterns of gene variation in central and marginal populations of Drosophila robusta.

    PubMed

    Prakash, S

    1973-10-01

    The central and marginal populations of D. robusta differ greatly in the level of inversion polymorphism; the marginal populations are monomorphic or nearly so and the central populations are highly polymorphic. This paper presents the frequencies of alleles at forty gene loci in various populations of D. robusta, studied by electrophoresis of proteins and enzymes. Population samples were obtained from eight widely separated populations of D. robusta which included the central, the extreme marginal and the intervening populations between the center and the margins. We find that the proportion of polymorphic loci and average heterozygosity per individual is slightly higher in the marginal populations than the central populations. In D. robusta on an average, 39% of the loci are polymorphic and the average proportion of loci heterozygous per individual is 11%. A breakdown of loci in three categories, viz, hydrolytic enzymes and some other enzymes, larval proteins and glycolytic and Kreb's cycle enzymes, shows that in all populations the level of polymorphism is highest in the hydrolytic enzymes, intermediate in larval proteins and least in the glycolytic and Kreb's cycle enzymes. On the average, the proportion of loci heterozygous per individual for three groups of loci is: hydrolytic enzymes and others (.164), larval proteins (.115) and glycolytic and Kreb's cycle enzymes (.037). We also observe that in all populations the level of polymorphism on the X chromosome is far less than the expected 38%; in salivary gland cells the euchromatic length of the X chromosome is 38% of the entire genome. Lower levels of polymorphism for the X chromosome loci are explained due to low probability of balanced polymorphisms for the X-linked loci since the conditions for establishment of balanced polymorphism for X-linked loci are more restrictive than for the autosomal loci.-The polymorphic loci can be grouped according to pattern of allele frequencies in different populations as

  4. Patterns of Gene Variation in Central and Marginal Populations of DROSOPHILA ROBUSTA

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Satya

    1973-01-01

    The central and marginal populations of D. robusta differ greatly in the level of inversion polymorphism; the marginal populations are monomorphic or nearly so and the central populations are highly polymorphic. This paper presents the frequencies of alleles at forty gene loci in various populations of D. robusta, studied by electrophoresis of proteins and enzymes. Population samples were obtained from eight widely separated populations of D. robusta which included the central, the extreme marginal and the intervening populations between the center and the margins. We find that the proportion of polymorphic loci and average heterozygosity per individual is slightly higher in the marginal populations than the central populations. In D. robusta on an average, 39% of the loci are polymorphic and the average proportion of loci heterozygous per individual is 11%. A breakdown of loci in three categories, viz, hydrolytic enzymes and some other enzymes, larval proteins and glycolytic and Kreb's cycle enzymes, shows that in all populations the level of polymorphism is highest in the hydrolytic enzymes, intermediate in larval proteins and least in the glycolytic and Kreb's cycle enzymes. On the average, the proportion of loci heterozygous per individual for three groups of loci is: hydrolytic enzymes and others (.164), larval proteins (.115) and glycolytic and Kreb's cycle enzymes (.037). We also observe that in all populations the level of polymorphism on the X chromosome is far less than the expected 38%; in salivary gland cells the euchromatic length of the X chromosome is 38% of the entire genome. Lower levels of polymorphism for the X chromosome loci are explained due to low probability of balanced polymorphisms for the X-linked loci since the conditions for establishment of balanced polymorphism for X-linked loci are more restrictive than for the autosomal loci.—The polymorphic loci can be grouped according to pattern of allele frequencies in different populations as

  5. Studies on physico-chemical changes during artificial ripening of banana (Musa sp) variety 'Robusta'.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Shyamrao Gururao; Kudachikar, V B; Keshava Prakash, M N

    2011-12-01

    Banana (Musa sp var 'Robusta') fruits harvested at 75-80% maturity were dip treated with different concentrations of ethrel (250-1,000 ppm) solution for 5 min. Ethrel at 500 ppm induced uniform ripening without impairing taste and flavour of banana. Untreated control banana fruits remained shriveled, green and failed to ripen evenly even after 8 days of storage. Fruits treated with 500 ppm of ethrel ripened well in 6 days at 20 ± 1 °C. Changes in total soluble solids, acidity, total sugars and total carotenoids showed increasing trends up to 6 days during ripening whereas fruit shear force values, pulp pH and total chlorophyll in peel showed decreasing trends. Sensory quality of ethrel treated banana fruits (fully ripe) were excellent with respect to external colour, taste, flavour and overall quality.

  6. Polyester Resin Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.

    1963-01-01

    Polyester resins are being increasingly used in industry. These resins require the addition of catalysts and accelerators. The handling of polyester resin system materials may give rise to skin irritations, allergic reactions, and burns. The burns are probably due to styrene and organic peroxides. Atmospheric pollution from styrene and explosion and fire risks from organic peroxides must be prevented. Where dimethylaniline is used scrupulous cleanliness and no-touch technique must be enforced. Handling precautions are suggested. Images PMID:14014495

  7. BVOC emissions from 2 Asian Eucalyptus species,E.camadulensis and E.robusta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsui, J.; Guenther, A. B.; Chan, C. K.; Lau, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    Eucalyptus species dominate native forests in Australia and are planted over vast regions in Asia and other continents for afforestation and for pulp due to their fast growth rates. However, they have also been identified as high emitters of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). BVOCs, when emitted to the atmosphere, react to form air pollutants such as ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The large areas of Eucalyptus forests in Australia and Asia, and high BVOC emission rates of Eucalyptus species, imply a potential significant effect of BVOC emissions from Eucalyptus on the air quality of these regions. A better understanding of BVOC emissions from this genus is thus needed. Here we present data of BVOC measurements from E.camadulensis and E.robusta. BVOC emissions of the 2 Eucalyptus species were measured by a branch enclosure approach in an environmental chamber, in which light and temperature were carefully controlled to mimic their changes throughout the day under natural conditions. E. camadulensis was found to emit isoprene, α-pinene, camphene and limonene, while E. robusta was found to emit isoprene, α-pinene, β-pinene, α-phellandrene, 3-carene and ocimene. Diurnal variations in BVOC emissions from the 2 species were observed. The 2 Eucalyptus species were also treated with methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a plant hormone which has found to induce elevated BVOC emissions similar to response to insect attacks in other plant species. The emission profiles of the 2 species before and after MeJA treatment were contrasted to examine the effects of the MeJA on their BVOC emissions. Acknowledgment: This work was supported by the General Research Fund of the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. 610909).

  8. Leaf turnover and growth responses of shade-grown saplings of four Shorea rain forest species to a sudden increase in light.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Michiru; Ishida, Atsushi; Tange, Takeshi; Yagi, Hisayoshi

    2006-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that sapling growth following a sudden increase in solar irradiance is related to recovery from photoinhibition and the balance between rate of production of new leaves and rate of abscision of old leaves. Leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and relative growth rate (RGR) of stem basal area were measured following the sudden exposure of shade-grown (7% of full sunlight) saplings of four Shorea species to full sunlight. Sudden exposure to full sunlight resulted in an immediate and substantial reduction in dark-adapted quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), followed by a gradual recovery in all species. Near light-saturated net assimilation rate (A max) and area-based leaf chlorophyll concentration ([Chl area]) also declined immediately after exposure. Eleven days after exposure, A max had recovered to pre-exposure values in all species, whereas [Chl area] had not recovered. Across species, RGR of stem basal area increased with increasing RGR of the number of leaves following exposure to full sunlight. The interspecific variations in RGR of stem basal area suggest that new leaf production is crucial for determining the potential growth of saplings following gap formation.

  9. Incombustible resin composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Incombustible resin compositions composed of aromatic compounds were obtained through (1) combustion polymer material and (2) bisphenol A or halogenated bisphenol A and bisphenol A diglycidl ether or halogenated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether. The aromatic compound is an adduct of bifunctional phenols and bifunctional epoxy resins.

  10. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-08-12

    Prior art polybismaleimides begin to polymerize at or just above the melting point of the monomer. This patent describes new bismaleimide resins which have an increased pot life and provide longer time periods in which the monomer remains fluid. The resins can be polymerized into molded articles with a high uniformity of properties. (DLC)

  11. Genetic diversity and structure of Atta robusta (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Attini), an endangered species endemic to the restinga ecoregion.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, Evelyze Pinheiro; Fernandes Salomão, Tânia Maria; de Oliveira Campos, Lucio Antonio; Tavares, Mara Garcia

    2014-09-01

    The genetic diversity and structure of the ant Atta robusta were assessed by ISSR (inter-simple sequence repeats) in 72 colonies collected from 10 localities in the Brazilian states of Espírito Santo (48 colonies) and Rio de Janeiro (24 colonies). The ISSR pattern included 67 bands, 51 of them (76.1%) polymorphic. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed a high level (57.4%) of inter-population variation, which suggested a high degree of genetic structure that was confirmed by UPGMA (unweighted pair-group method using an arithmetic average) cluster analysis. The significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances (r = 0.64, p < 0.05) indicated isolation that reflected the distance between locations. Overall, the populations were found to be genetically divergent. This finding indicates the need for management plans to preserve and reduce the risk of extinction of A. robusta.

  12. Genetic diversity and structure of Atta robusta (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Attini), an endangered species endemic to the restinga ecoregion

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Evelyze Pinheiro; Fernandes Salomão, Tânia Maria; de Oliveira Campos, Lucio Antonio; Tavares, Mara Garcia

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity and structure of the ant Atta robusta were assessed by ISSR (inter-simple sequence repeats) in 72 colonies collected from 10 localities in the Brazilian states of Espírito Santo (48 colonies) and Rio de Janeiro (24 colonies). The ISSR pattern included 67 bands, 51 of them (76.1%) polymorphic. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed a high level (57.4%) of inter-population variation, which suggested a high degree of genetic structure that was confirmed by UPGMA (unweighted pair-group method using an arithmetic average) cluster analysis. The significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances (r = 0.64, p < 0.05) indicated isolation that reflected the distance between locations. Overall, the populations were found to be genetically divergent. This finding indicates the need for management plans to preserve and reduce the risk of extinction of A. robusta. PMID:25249782

  13. Development of resins for composites by resin transfer molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Edmund P.; Puckett, Paul M.; Maynard, Shawn J.

    1991-01-01

    Designed to cover a wide range of resin technology and to meet the near-term and long-term needs of the aircraft industry, this research has three objectives: to produce resin transfer molding (RES) resins with improved processability, to produce prepreg systems with high toughness and service temperature, and to produce new resin systems. Progress on reaching the objectives is reported.

  14. Seasonal variation of gastroprotective terpenoids in Maytenus robusta (Celastraceae) quantified by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID).

    PubMed

    Zermiani, Tailyn; Junior, Antonio A S; Ferreira, Renê A; Wagner, Theodoro M; Machado, Marina S; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir; Niero, Rivaldo

    2016-11-01

    The triterpenes friedelin (1), β-friedelinol (2) and 3,15-dioxo-21α-hydroxyfriedelane (3) in the aerial parts of Maytenus robusta, a Brazilian medicinal plant with antiulcer potential, were seasonally quantified by gas chromatography flame-ionization detection (GC-FID) using an external standard. The method was found to be linear, precise and sensitive. Compounds 1 and 2 were found in M. robusta leaves and branches, with highest concentrations in the leaves collected in autumn, i.e. 3.21 ± 0.16 and 12.60 ± 1.49 mg g-1 dry weight of 1 and 2, respectively. On the other hand, compound 3 was found only in the branches, with the highest concentrations in winter and autumn (0.21 ± 0.01 and 0.20 ± 0.02 mg g-1). The results allow to define the optimal season and plant parts for the collection of M. robusta as a phytotherapeutic drug.

  15. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Sayed Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concerns about their degradation and substances which may be segregated into oral cavity. PMID:23372592

  16. Biocidal quaternary ammonium resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Activated carbon (charcoal) and polymeric resin sorbents are widely used in the filtration and treatment of drinking water, mainly to remove dissolved organic and inorganic impurities and to improve the taste. Earlier hopes that activated carbon might "disinfect' water proved to be unfounded. The feasibility of protecting against microbial infestation in charcoal and resin beds such as those to be incorporated into total water reuse systems in spacecraft was investigated. The biocidal effect of IPCD (insoluable polymeric contact disinfectants) in combination with a representative charcoal was assessed. The ion exchange resins (IPCD) were shown to adequately protect charcoal and ion exchange beds.

  17. δ 18O in the Tropical Conifer Agathis robusta Records ENSO-Related Precipitation Variations

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, Bjorn M. M.; Evans, Michael N.; Baker, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Long-lived trees from tropical Australasia are a potential source of information about internal variability of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), because they occur in a region where precipitation variability is closely associated with ENSO activity. We measured tree-ring width and oxygen isotopic composition (O) of -cellulose from Agathis robusta (Queensland Kauri) samples collected in the Atherton Tablelands, Queensland, Australia. Standard ring-width chronologies yielded low internal consistency due to the frequent presence of false ring-like anatomical features. However, in a detailed examination of the most recent 15 years of growth (1995–2010), we found significant correlation between O and local precipitation, the latter associated with ENSO activity. The results are consistent with process-based forward modeling of the oxygen isotopic composition of -cellulose. The O record also enabled us to confirm the presence of a false growth ring in one of the three samples in the composite record, and to determine that it occurred as a consequence of anomalously low rainfall in the middle of the 2004/5 rainy season. The combination of incremental growth and isotopic measures may be a powerful approach to development of long-term (150+ year) ENSO reconstructions from the terrestrial tropics of Australasia. PMID:25062034

  18. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  19. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  20. Covering the different steps of the coffee processing: Can headspace VOC emissions be exploited to successfully distinguish between Arabica and Robusta?

    PubMed

    Colzi, Ilaria; Taiti, Cosimo; Marone, Elettra; Magnelli, Susanna; Gonnelli, Cristina; Mancuso, Stefano

    2017-12-15

    This work was performed to evaluate the possible application of PTR-ToF-MS technique in distinguishing between Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora var. robusta (Robusta) commercial stocks in each step of the processing chain (green beans, roasted beans, ground coffee, brews). volatile organic compounds (VOC) spectra from coffee samples of 7 Arabica and 6 Robusta commercial stocks were recorded and submitted to multivariate statistical analysis. Results clearly showed that, in each stage of the coffee processing, the volatile composition of coffee is highly influenced by the species. Actually, with the exception of green beans, PTR-ToF-MS technique was able to correctly recognize Arabica and Robusta samples. Particularly, among 134 tentatively identified VOCs, some masses (16 for roasted coffee, 12 for ground coffee and 12 for brewed coffee) were found to significantly discriminate the two species. Therefore, headspace VOC analyses was showed to represent a valuable tool to distinguish between Arabica and Robusta. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

  2. Identification and Analysis of Jasmonate Pathway Genes in Coffea canephora (Robusta Coffee) by In Silico Approach.

    PubMed

    Bharathi, Kosaraju; Sreenath, H L

    2017-07-01

    Coffea canephora is the commonly cultivated coffee species in the world along with Coffea arabica . Different pests and pathogens affect the production and quality of the coffee. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a plant hormone which plays an important role in plants growth, development, and defense mechanisms, particularly against insect pests. The key enzymes involved in the production of JA are lipoxygenase, allene oxide synthase, allene oxide cyclase, and 12-oxo-phytodienoic reductase. There is no report on the genes involved in JA pathway in coffee plants. We made an attempt to identify and analyze the genes coding for these enzymes in C. canephora . First, protein sequences of jasmonate pathway genes from model plant Arabidopsis thaliana were identified in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. These protein sequences were used to search the web-based database Coffee Genome Hub to identify homologous protein sequences in C. canephora genome using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST). Homologous protein sequences for key genes were identified in the C. canephora genome database. Protein sequences of the top matches were in turn used to search in NCBI database using BLAST tool to confirm the identity of the selected proteins and to identify closely related genes in species. The protein sequences from C. canephora database and the top matches in NCBI were aligned, and phylogenetic trees were constructed using MEGA6 software and identified the genetic distance of the respective genes. The study identified the four key genes of JA pathway in C. canephora , confirming the conserved nature of the pathway in coffee. The study expected to be useful to further explore the defense mechanisms of coffee plants. JA is a plant hormone that plays an important role in plant defense against insect pests. Genes coding for the 4 key enzymes involved in the production of JA viz., LOX, AOS, AOC, and OPR are identified in C. canephora (robusta coffee) by

  3. Chemical and Physical Defense Traits in Two Sexual Forms of Opuntia robusta in Central Eastern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Janczur, Mariusz Krzysztof; León Solano, Héctor Javier; Solache Rámos, Lupita Tzenyatze; Mendoza Reyes, Citlalli Hypatia; Oro Cerro, María del Carmen; Mariezcurrena Berasain, María Dolores; Rivas Manzano, Irma Victoria; Manjarrez, Javier; Villareal Benitez, José Luis; Czarnoleski, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic plants provide an excellent opportunity for examining the differences in the extent of their defense against herbivores because they exhibit sex-related differences in reproductive investment. Such differences enable comparison of the sex with high reproduction expenses with the sex that expends less. The more costly sex is usually also better defended against herbivores. Generally, females are considered more valuable than hermaphrodites in terms of fitness; however, hermaphrodites are more valuable if they can produce seed by autonomous selfing, provided that the inbreeding depression is low and pollen is limited. We studied a gynodioecious population of Opuntia robusta from Central-Eastern Mexico, which has been reported to be trioecious, dioecious, or hermaphrodite, and addressed the following questions: 1) Is the hermaphrodite's reproductive output higher than the female's, and are hermaphrodites thus better defended? 2) Are plant tissues differentially defended? 3) Do trade-offs exist among different physical defense traits? and 4) among physical and chemical defense traits? We found that 1) hermaphrodites had a higher seed output and more spines per areola than females and that their spines contained less moisture. Non-reproductive hermaphrodite cladodes contained more total phenolic compounds (TPCs) than female ones. In addition, 2) hermaphrodite reproductive cladodes bore more spines than female cladodes, and 3) and 4) we found a negative relationship between spine number per areola and areola number per cladode and a positive relationship between spine number per areola per plant and TPC concentration per plant. Non-reproductive hermaphrodite cladodes contained a higher concentration of TPCs than female cladodes, and parental cladodes contained fewer TPCs than both reproductive and empty cladodes. PMID:24599143

  4. Wound Healing Activity of Topical Application Forms Based on Ayurveda

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Hema Sharma; Mitra, Shankar Kumar; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    The traditional Indian medicine—Ayurveda, describes various herbs, fats, oils and minerals with anti-aging as well as wound healing properties. With aging, numerous changes occur in skin, including decrease in tissue cell regeneration, decrease in collagen content, loss of skin elasticity and mechanical strength. We prepared five topical anti-aging formulations using cow ghee, flax seed oil, Phyllanthus emblica fruits, Shorea robusta resin, Yashada bhasma as study materials. For preliminary efficacy evaluation of the anti-aging activity we chose excision and incision wound healing animal models and studied the parameters including wound contraction, collagen content and skin breaking strength which in turn is indicative of the tissue cell regeneration capacity, collagenation capacity and mechanical strength of skin. The group treated with the formulations containing Yashada bhasma along with Shorea robusta resin and flax seed oil showed significantly better wound contraction (P < .01), higher collagen content (P < .05) and better skin breaking strength (P < .01) as compared to control group; thus proposing them to be effective prospective anti-aging formulations. PMID:19252191

  5. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  6. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  7. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  8. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  9. Spectral identifiers from roasting process of Arabica and Robusta green beans using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirani, Ayu Puspa; Nasution, Aulia; Suyanto, Hery

    2016-11-01

    Coffee (Coffea spp.) is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. World coffee consumption is around 70% comes from Arabica, 26% from Robusta , and the rest 4% from other varieties. Coffee beverages characteristics are related to chemical compositions of its roasted beans. Usually testing of coffee quality is subjectively tasted by an experienced coffee tester. An objective quantitative technique to analyze the chemical contents of coffee beans using LIBS will be reported in this paper. Optimum experimental conditions was using of 120 mJ of laser energy and delay time 1 μs. Elements contained in coffee beans are Ca, W, Sr, Mg, Na, H, K, O, Rb, and Be. The Calcium (Ca) is the main element in the coffee beans. Roasting process will cause the emission intensity of Ca decreased by 42.45%. In addition, discriminant analysis was used to distinguish the arabica and robusta variants, either in its green and roasted coffee beans. Observed identifier elements are Ca, W, Sr, and Mg. Overall chemical composition of roasted coffee beans are affected by many factors, such as the composition of the soil, the location, the weather in the neighborhood of its plantation, and the post-harvesting process of the green coffee beans (drying, storage, fermentation, and roasting methods used).

  10. Revealing the Diversity of Introduced Coffea canephora Germplasm in Ecuador: Towards a National Strategy to Improve Robusta.

    PubMed

    Loor Solórzano, Rey Gastón; De Bellis, Fabien; Leroy, Thierry; Plaza, Luis; Guerrero, Hilton; Subia, Cristian; Calderón, Darío; Fernández, Fabián; Garzón, Iván; Lopez, Diana; Vera, Danilo

    2017-01-01

    Genetic resources of Coffea canephora have been introduced in several tropical countries with potential for crop development. In Ecuador, the species has been cultivated since the mid-20th century. However, little is known about the diversity and genetic structure of introduced germplasm. This paper provides an overview of the genetic and phenotypic diversity of C. canephora in Ecuador and some proposals for implementing a breeding program. Twelve SSR markers were used to analyze 1491 plants of C. canephora grown in different living collections in Ecuador, compared to 29 genotypes representing the main genetic and geographic diversity groups identified within the species. Results indicated that most of the genotypes introduced are of Congolese origin, with accessions from both main subgroups, SG1 and SG2. Some genotypes were classed as hybrids between both subgroups. Substantial phenotypic diversity was also found, and correlations were observed with genetic diversity. Ecuadorian Robusta coffee displays wide genetic diversity and we propose some ways of improving Robusta in Ecuador. A breeding program could be based on three operations: the choice of elite clones, the introduction of new material from other countries (Ivory Coast, Uganda), and the creation of new hybrid material using genotypes from the different diversity groups.

  11. Revealing the Diversity of Introduced Coffea canephora Germplasm in Ecuador: Towards a National Strategy to Improve Robusta

    PubMed Central

    De Bellis, Fabien; Leroy, Thierry; Plaza, Luis; Guerrero, Hilton; Subia, Cristian; Calderón, Darío; Fernández, Fabián; Garzón, Iván; Lopez, Diana; Vera, Danilo

    2017-01-01

    Genetic resources of Coffea canephora have been introduced in several tropical countries with potential for crop development. In Ecuador, the species has been cultivated since the mid-20th century. However, little is known about the diversity and genetic structure of introduced germplasm. This paper provides an overview of the genetic and phenotypic diversity of C. canephora in Ecuador and some proposals for implementing a breeding program. Twelve SSR markers were used to analyze 1491 plants of C. canephora grown in different living collections in Ecuador, compared to 29 genotypes representing the main genetic and geographic diversity groups identified within the species. Results indicated that most of the genotypes introduced are of Congolese origin, with accessions from both main subgroups, SG1 and SG2. Some genotypes were classed as hybrids between both subgroups. Substantial phenotypic diversity was also found, and correlations were observed with genetic diversity. Ecuadorian Robusta coffee displays wide genetic diversity and we propose some ways of improving Robusta in Ecuador. A breeding program could be based on three operations: the choice of elite clones, the introduction of new material from other countries (Ivory Coast, Uganda), and the creation of new hybrid material using genotypes from the different diversity groups. PMID:29214204

  12. The relationship between climate change and the endangered rainforest shrub Triunia robusta (Proteaceae) endemic to southeast Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu-Kimura, Yoko; Accad, Arnon; Shapcott, Alison

    2017-04-01

    Threatened species in rainforests may be vulnerable to climate change, because of their potentially narrow thermal tolerances, small population sizes and restricted distributions. This study modelled climate induced changes on the habitat distribution of the endangered rainforest plant Triunia robusta, endemic to southeast Queensland, Australia. Species distribution models were developed for eastern Australia at 250 m grids and southeast Queensland at 25 m grids using ground-truthed presence records and environmental predictor data. The species’ habitat distribution under the current climate was modelled, and the future potential habitat distributions were projected for the epochs 2030, 2050 and 2070. The eastern Australia model identified several spatially disjunct, broad habitat areas of coastal eastern Australia consistent with the current distribution of rainforests, and projected a southward and upslope contraction driven mainly by average temperatures exceeding current range limits. The southeast Queensland models suggest a dramatic upslope contraction toward locations where the majority of known populations are found. Populations located in the Sunshine Coast hinterland, consistent with past rainforest refugia, are likely to persist long-term. Upgrading the level of protection for less formal nature reserves containing viable populations is a high priority to better protect refugial T. robusta populations with respect to climate change.

  13. Phytochemical analysis of the ethanolic extract of Agathis robusta (C. Moore ex F. Muell.) F.M. Bailey.

    PubMed

    Venditti, Alessandro; Frezza, Claudio; Campanelli, Chiara; Foddai, Sebastiano; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Serafini, Mauro

    2017-07-01

    This work reports the phytochemical analysis of the ethanolic extract obtained from the leaves of Agathis robusta (C. Moore ex F. Muell.) F.M. Bailey. The methodology utilised during this study comprised classical chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. Six compounds were identified: agathisflavone (1), 7″-O-methyl-agathisflavone (2), cupressuflavone (3), rutin (4), shikimic acid (5) and (2S)-1,2-Di-O-[(9Z,12Z,15Z)-octadeca-9,12,15-trienoyl]-3-O-β-d-galactopyranosyl glycerol (6). These belong to four major classes of natural compounds: bi-flavonoids (1-3); diglycosidic flavonoids (4); cycloexen-carboxylic acids (5); glycerol-glycolipids (6). To the best of our knowledge, compounds (3-6) were identified for the first time in this study as constituents of A. robusta. Anyway, the majority of these compounds has chemotaxonomic relevance and is mostly in accordance with the current botanical classification of this species. Moreover, they also present several pharmacological properties among which, the antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and protective ones are the most important and may explain why this species is used in the ethno-medicinal field.

  14. HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n) analysis of phenolic compounds for quality control of Grindelia robusta Nutt. and bioactivities.

    PubMed

    Ferreres, Federico; Grosso, Clara; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Valentão, Patrícia; Azevedo, Carolina; Andrade, Paula B

    2014-06-01

    The phenolic composition of herbal tea (HT) and hydromethanolic extract (HME) obtained from Grindelia robusta Nutt. was studied by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n). Thirty six flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acids were detected, from which thirty are described for the first time in this species. Quantification by HPLC-DAD showed that diosmetin-7-O-glucuronide-3'-O-pentoside+apigenin-7-O-glucuronide-4'-O-pentoside, apigenin-7-O-glucuronide+diosmetin-7-O-glucuronide and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid+3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid were the major compounds. Since the health-promoting effects of natural phenolic compounds against brain disorders is of increasing interest, HT and HME were also tested against oxygen and nitrogen reactive species and against enzymes related with Alzheimer's disease and depression. Extracts displayed strong in vitro scavenging activity and monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) inhibitory activity. The anti-MAO-A capacity was observed at non-toxic concentrations for SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line, reinforcing the benefits of G. robusta HT. However, no protection against hydrogen peroxide treatment was observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The relationship between climate change and the endangered rainforest shrub Triunia robusta (Proteaceae) endemic to southeast Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu-Kimura, Yoko; Accad, Arnon; Shapcott, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Threatened species in rainforests may be vulnerable to climate change, because of their potentially narrow thermal tolerances, small population sizes and restricted distributions. This study modelled climate induced changes on the habitat distribution of the endangered rainforest plant Triunia robusta, endemic to southeast Queensland, Australia. Species distribution models were developed for eastern Australia at 250 m grids and southeast Queensland at 25 m grids using ground-truthed presence records and environmental predictor data. The species’ habitat distribution under the current climate was modelled, and the future potential habitat distributions were projected for the epochs 2030, 2050 and 2070. The eastern Australia model identified several spatially disjunct, broad habitat areas of coastal eastern Australia consistent with the current distribution of rainforests, and projected a southward and upslope contraction driven mainly by average temperatures exceeding current range limits. The southeast Queensland models suggest a dramatic upslope contraction toward locations where the majority of known populations are found. Populations located in the Sunshine Coast hinterland, consistent with past rainforest refugia, are likely to persist long-term. Upgrading the level of protection for less formal nature reserves containing viable populations is a high priority to better protect refugial T. robusta populations with respect to climate change. PMID:28422136

  16. Nontoxic Resins Advance Aerospace Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year, PETI-330, is a polyimide matrix resin that performs well at high temperatures and is easily processed into composites in a simple, short curing cycle. Invented by scientists at Langley Research Center, PETI-330 is now licensed to Ube Industries, based in Japan with its American headquarters in New York. In addition to being durable and lightweight, the resin is also nontoxic, which makes it safe for workers to handle. PETI-330 was created specifically for heat-resistant composites formed with resin transfer molding and resin infusion, which formerly could only be used with low temperature resin systems.

  17. Productivity, nutrient cycling, and succession in single- and mixed-species plantations of Casuarina equisetifolia, Eucalyptus robusta, and Leucaena leucocephala in Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    1999-01-01

    Tree growth, biomass productivity, litterfall mass and nutrient content, changes in soil chemical properties and understory forest succession were evaluated over a 8.5-year period in single- and mixed-species (50 : 50) plantations of two N2-®xing species, Casuarina equisetifolia and Leucaena leucocephala, and a non-®xing species, Eucalyptus robusta. At the optimal...

  18. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  19. High-temperature resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    The basic chemistry, cure processes, properties, and applications of high temperature resins known as polyimides are surveyed. Condensation aromatic polymides are prepared by reacting aromatic diamines with aromatic dianhydrides, aromatic tetracarboxylic acids, or with dialkyl esters of aromatic tetracarboxylic acids, depending on the intended end use. The first is for coatings or films while the latter two are more suitable for polyimide matrix resins. Prepreg solutions are made by dissolving reactants in an aprotic solvent, and advances in the addition of a diamine on the double bond and radical polymerization of the double bond are noted to have yielded a final cure product with void-free characteristics. Attention is given to properties of the Skybond, Pyralin, and NR-150B polyimide prepreg materials and characteristics of aging in the NP-150 polyimides. Finally, features of the NASA-developed PMR polyimides are reviewed.

  20. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  1. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.; Gerken, N. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight thermoplastic polyimide resin systems were evaluated as composite matrix materials. Two resins were selected for more extensive mechanical testing and both were versions of LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center - Thermoplastic Polyimide). One resin was made with LaRC-TPI and contained 2 weight percent of a di(amic acid) dopant as a melt flow aid. The second system was a 1:1 slurry of semicrystalline LaRC-TPI powder in a polyimidesulfone resin diglyme solution. The LaRC-TPI powder melts during processing and increases the melt flow of the resin. Testing included dynamic mechanical analysis, tension and compression testing, and compression-after-impact testing. The test results demonstrated that the LaRC-TPI resins have very good properties compared to other thermoplastics, and that they are promising matrix materials for advanced composite structures.

  2. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Workman, Rhonda Jackson

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  3. [Viability of nematophagous fungi Arthrobotrys robusta, Duddingtonia flagrans and Monacrosporium thaumasium after sporulation in different culture media].

    PubMed

    Maciel, Alessandro S; de Araujo, Jackson V; Campos, Artur K

    2006-01-01

    Due to the shortage of studies that indicate the culture mediums that optimize the sporulation of namatophagous fungi for use in researche, the sporulation of the fungal isolates A. robusta (I31), D. flagrans (CG768) and M. thaumasium (NF34A) was evaluated in laboratorial conditions for 10 days in the means water-agar 2% (WA 2%), potato-dextrose-agar 2% (PDA 2%), corn-meal-agar 2% (CMA 2%) and yeast-phosphate-sulphate-sucrose-agar (YPSSA). The largest conidia production (P < 0.05) for the isolate CG768 happened in BDA 2% while in the isolates I31 and NF34A produced larger conidia number in YPSSA (P < 0.05). The viability of the conidia to prey infective Ancylostoma spp. larvae did not lose its effectiveness (P < 0.05) independent of the culture medium. The middle of culture did not influence in the viability of the conidia (P > 0.05).

  4. Effect of different drying techniques on bioactive components, fatty acid composition, and volatile profile of robusta coffee beans.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenjiang; Hu, Rongsuo; Chu, Zhong; Zhao, Jianping; Tan, Lehe

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of different drying techniques, namely, room-temperature drying (RTD), solar drying (SD), heat-pump drying (HPD), hot-air drying (HAD), and freeze drying (FD), on bioactive components, fatty acid composition, and the volatile compound profile of robusta coffee beans. The data showed that FD was an effective method to preserve fat, organic acids, and monounsaturated fatty acids. In contrast, HAD was ideal for retaining polyunsaturated fatty acids and amino acids. Sixty-two volatile compounds were identified in the differently dried coffee beans, representing 90% of the volatile compounds. HPD of the coffee beans produced the largest number of volatiles, whereas FD resulted in the highest volatile content. A principal component analysis demonstrated a close relationship between the HPD, SD, and RTD methods whereas the FD and HAD methods were significantly different. Overall, the results provide a basis for potential application to other similar thermal sensitive materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A sex-inducing pheromone triggers cell cycle arrest and mate attraction in the diatom Seminavis robusta

    PubMed Central

    Moeys, Sara; Frenkel, Johannes; Lembke, Christine; Gillard, Jeroen T. F.; Devos, Valerie; Van den Berge, Koen; Bouillon, Barbara; Huysman, Marie J. J.; De Decker, Sam; Scharf, Julia; Bones, Atle; Brembu, Tore; Winge, Per; Sabbe, Koen; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Clement, Lieven; De Veylder, Lieven; Pohnert, Georg; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Although sexual reproduction is believed to play a major role in the high diversification rates and species richness of diatoms, a mechanistic understanding of diatom life cycle control is virtually lacking. Diatom sexual signalling is controlled by a complex, yet largely unknown, pheromone system. Here, a sex-inducing pheromone (SIP+) of the benthic pennate diatom Seminavis robusta was identified by comparative metabolomics, subsequently purified, and physicochemically characterized. Transcriptome analysis revealed that SIP+ triggers the switch from mitosis-to-meiosis in the opposing mating type, coupled with the transcriptional induction of proline biosynthesis genes, and the release of the proline-derived attraction pheromone. The induction of cell cycle arrest by a pheromone, chemically distinct from the one used to attract the opposite mating type, highlights the existence of a sophisticated mechanism to increase chances of mate finding, while keeping the metabolic losses associated with the release of an attraction pheromone to a minimum. PMID:26786712

  6. Effect of brewing technique and particle size of the ground coffee on sensory profiling of brewed Dampit robusta coffee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fibrianto, K.; Febryana, Y. R.; Wulandari, E. S.

    2018-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of different brewing techniques with the use of appropriate particle size standard of Apresiocoffee cafe (Category 1) compared to the difference brewing techniques with the use of the same particle size (coarse) (Category 2) of the sensory attributes Dampit robusta coffee. Rate-All-That-Apply (RATA) method was applied in this study, and the data was analysed by ANOVA General Linier Model (GLM) on Minitab-16. The influence of brewing techniques (tubruk, French-press, drips, syphon) and type of particle size ground coffee (fine, medium, coarse) were sensorially observed. The result showed that only two attributes, including bitter taste, and astringent/rough-mouth-feel were affected by brewing techniques (p-value <0.05) as observed for brewed coarse coffee powder.

  7. Variability of single bean coffee volatile compounds of Arabica and robusta roasted coffees analysed by SPME-GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Caporaso, Nicola; Whitworth, Martin B; Cui, Chenhao; Fisk, Ian D

    2018-06-01

    We report on the analysis of volatile compounds by SPME-GC-MS for individual roasted coffee beans. The aim was to understand the relative abundance and variability of volatile compounds between individual roasted coffee beans at constant roasting conditions. Twenty-five batches of Arabica and robusta species were sampled from 13 countries, and 10 single coffee beans randomly selected from each batch were individually roasted in a fluidised-bed roaster at 210 °C for 3 min. High variability (CV = 14.0-53.3%) of 50 volatile compounds in roasted coffee was obtained within batches (10 beans per batch). Phenols and heterocyclic nitrogen compounds generally had higher intra-batch variation, while ketones were the most uniform compounds (CV < 20%). The variation between batches was much higher, with the CV ranging from 15.6 to 179.3%. The highest variation was observed for 2,3-butanediol, 3-ethylpyridine and hexanal. It was also possible to build classification models based on geographical origin, obtaining 99.5% and 90.8% accuracy using LDA or MLR classifiers respectively, and classification between Arabica and robusta beans. These results give further insight into natural variation of coffee aroma and could be used to obtain higher quality and more consistent final products. Our results suggest that coffee volatile concentration is also influenced by other factors than simply the roasting degree, especially green coffee composition, which is in turn influenced by the coffee species, geographical origin, ripening stage and pre- and post-harvest processing. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of...

  9. Putative resistance gene markers associated with quantitative trait loci for fire blight resistance in Malus ‘Robusta 5’ accessions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breeding of fire blight resistant scions and rootstocks is a goal of several international apple breeding programs, as options are limited for management of this destructive disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora. A broad, large-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL) for fire blight resistance has been reported on linkage group 3 of Malus ‘Robusta 5’. In this study we identified markers derived from putative fire blight resistance genes associated with the QTL by integrating further genetic mapping studies with bioinformatics analysis of transcript profiling data and genome sequence databases. Results When several defined E.amylovora strains were used to inoculate three progenies from international breeding programs, all with ‘Robusta 5’ as a common parent, two distinct QTLs were detected on linkage group 3, where only one had previously been mapped. In the New Zealand ‘Malling 9’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora ICMP11176, the proximal QTL co-located with SNP markers derived from a leucine-rich repeat, receptor-like protein ( MxdRLP1) and a closely linked class 3 peroxidase gene. While the QTL detected in the German ‘Idared’ X ‘Robusta 5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea222_JKI or ICMP11176 was approximately 6 cM distal to this, directly below a SNP marker derived from a heat shock 90 family protein gene ( HSP90). In the US ‘Otawa3’ X ‘Robusta5’ population inoculated with E. amylovora strains Ea273 or E2002a, the position of the LOD score peak on linkage group 3 was dependent upon the pathogen strains used for inoculation. One of the five MxdRLP1 alleles identified in fire blight resistant and susceptible cultivars was genetically associated with resistance and used to develop a high resolution melting PCR marker. A resistance QTL detected on linkage group 7 of the US population co-located with another HSP90 gene-family member and a WRKY transcription factor

  10. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J. Brock

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  11. Chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Hou, T. H.; Bai, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A chemoviscosity model, which describes viscosity rise profiles accurately under various cure cycles, and correlates viscosity data to the changes of physical properties associated with structural transformations of the thermosetting resin system during cure, was established. Work completed on chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins is reported.

  12. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  13. Synthesis of silver nano-materials from Grevillea robusta A Cunn (Silver-oak tree) leaves extract and shape directing role of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Rabia; Faisal, Qamer; Hussain, Sajjad

    Grevillea robusta (Silver-oak tree) tree is a medicinal tree. Conventional UV-visible spectrophotometric and transmission electron microscopic technique were used to determine the morphology of silver nanoplates (AgNP) using Grevillea robusta (Silver-oak tree) aqueous leaves extract for the first time. The visible spectra showed the presence of three well defined surface plasmon absorption (SPR) bands at 500, 550 and 675 nm which was attributed to the anisotropic growth of Ag-nanoplates. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis of AgNP showed formation of truncated triangular, polyhedral with some irregular shapes nanoplates in the size range 8-20 nm. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) has no significant effect on themore » shape of the spectra, position of SPR bands, size and size distribution of AgNP.« less

  14. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000×). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the restorations were removed out leaving only middle part. One side of the cavity was finished with course diamond bur and the other was air-abraded with 50 μm Al2O3. They were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10) to receive: Group 1: Adper Single Bond 2; Group 2: All Bond 3; Group 3: ClearfilSE; Group 4: BeautiBond, before being repaired with the same resin composite (Filtek Z250). The specimens were re-thermocycled (1000×), sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin, sectioned mesiodistally and photographed digitally. The extent of dye penetration was measured by image analysis software (ImageJ) for both bur-finished and air-abraded surfaces at resin-tooth and resin-resin interfaces. The data were analyzed statistically. Results: BeautiBond exhibited the most microleakage at every site. Irrespective of adhesive and initial composite type, air-abrasion showed less microleakage except for BeautiBond. The type of initial repaired restorative material did not affect the microleakage. BeautiBond adhesive may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. Conclusions: Surface treatment with air-abrasion produced the lowest microleakage scores, independent of the adhesive systems and the pre-existing resin composite type. Pre-existing composite type does not affect the microleakage issue. All-in-one adhesive resin (BeautiBond) may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. PMID:25713491

  15. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the XMT and DXMT N-methyltransferases from Coffea canephora (robusta)

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Andrew A., E-mail: andrewmc@embl.fr; Biget, Laurent; Lin, Chenwei

    2007-04-01

    The genes encoding XMT and DXMT, the enzymes from Coffea canephora (robusta) that catalyse the three independent N-methyl transfer reactions in the caffeine-biosynthesis pathway, have been cloned and the proteins have been expressed in Escherichia coli. Both proteins have been crystallized in the presence of the demethylated cofactor S-adenosyl-l-cysteine (SAH) and substrate (xanthosine for XMT and theobromine for DXMT). Caffeine is a secondary metabolite produced by a variety of plants including Coffea canephora (robusta) and there is growing evidence that caffeine is part of a chemical defence strategy protecting young leaves and seeds from potential predators. The genes encoding XMTmore » and DXMT, the enzymes from Coffea canephora (robusta) that catalyse the three independent N-methyl transfer reactions in the caffeine-biosynthesis pathway, have been cloned and the proteins have been expressed in Escherichia coli. Both proteins have been crystallized in the presence of the demethylated cofactor S-adenosyl-l-cysteine (SAH) and substrate (xanthosine for XMT and theobromine for DXMT). The crystals are orthorhombic, with space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} for XMT and C222{sub 1} for DXMT. X-ray diffraction to 2.8 Å for XMT and to 2.5 Å for DXMT have been collected on beamline ID23-1 at the ESRF.« less

  16. Chromatography resin support

    DOEpatents

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  17. Flammability screening tests of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arhart, R. W.; Farrar, D. G.; Hughes, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    Selected flammability characteristics of glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins are evaluated. A protocol for the evaluation of the flammability hazards presented by glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins and the usefulness of that protocol with two laminates are presented. The glass laminates of an epoxy resin, M-751 are evaluated for: (1) determination of smoke generation from the laminates; (2) analysis of products of oxidative degradation of the laminates; (3) determination of minimum oxygen necessary to maintain flaming oxidation; (4) evaluation of toxicological hazards.

  18. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1998-01-27

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

  19. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-04-08

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  20. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1997-01-01

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  1. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    High temperature resin matrices suitable for use in advanced graphite fiber composites for jet engine applications were evaluated. A series of planned, sequential screening experiments with resin systems in composite form were performed to reduce the number of candidates to a single A-type polyimide resin that repetitively produced void-free, high strength and modulus composites acceptable for use in the 550 F range for 1000 hours. An optimized processing procedure was established for this system. Extensive mechanical property studies characterized this single system, at room temperature, 500 F, 550 F and 600 F, for various exposure times.

  2. Effects of blood contamination on resin-resin bond strength.

    PubMed

    Eiriksson, Sigurdur O; Pereira, Patricia N R; Swift, Edward J; Heymann, Harald O; Sigurdsson, Asgeir

    2004-02-01

    Incremental placement and curing of resin composites has been recommended. However, this requires longer operating time, and therefore, increased risk of contamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination on microtensile bond strengths (microTBS) between resin interfaces and to determine the best decontamination method to re-establish the original resin-resin bond strength. The top surfaces of 64, 4-mm composite blocks (Z-250, Renew, APX, Pertac II) were untreated as the control, or were treated as follows: blood applied and dried on the surface (Treatment 1), blood applied, rinsed, dried (Treatment 2), blood applied, rinsed, and an adhesive applied (Single Bond, One-Step, Clearfil SE, Prompt L-Pop) (Treatment 3). Fresh composite was applied and light-cured in 2-mm increments. After 24 h storage in water, the specimens were sectioned into 0.7-mm thick slabs, trimmed to a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2), and loaded to failure at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min using an Instron universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test (p<0.05). Control values ranged from 45.1 MPa for Pertac II to 71.5 MPa for APX. Untreated blood contamination resulted in resin-resin bond strengths of only 1.0-13.1 MPa. Rinsing raised bond strengths to over 40 MPa for each material. Use of an adhesive further increased bond strengths except for Pertac II. Rinsing blood from contaminated surfaces increases the resin-resin bond strength significantly and the application of an appropriate adhesive increases the bond strength to control levels.

  3. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  4. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    DOEpatents

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  5. Gene-for-gene relationship in the host-pathogen system Malus × robusta 5-Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Isabelle; Wöhner, Thomas; Richter, Klaus; Flachowsky, Henryk; Sundin, George W; Wensing, Annette; Savory, Elizabeth A; Geider, Klaus; Day, Brad; Hanke, Magda-Viola; Peil, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Fire blight is a destructive bacterial disease caused by Erwinia amylovora affecting plants in the family Rosaceae, including apple. Host resistance to fire blight is present mainly in accessions of Malus spp. and is thought to be quantitative in this pathosystem. In this study we analyzed the importance of the E. amylovora effector avrRpt2(EA) , a homolog of Pseudomonas syringae avrRpt2, for resistance of Malus × robusta 5 (Mr5). The deletion mutant E. amylovora Ea1189ΔavrRpt2(EA) was able to overcome the fire blight resistance of Mr5. One single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), resulting in an exchange of cysteine to serine in the encoded protein, was detected in avrRpt2(EA) of several Erwinia strains differing in virulence to Mr5. E. amylovora strains encoding serine (S-allele) were able to overcome resistance of Mr5, whereas strains encoding cysteine (C-allele) were not. Allele specificity was also observed in a coexpression assay with Arabidopsis thaliana RIN4 in Nicotiana benthamiana. A homolog of RIN4 has been detected and isolated in Mr5. These results suggest a system similar to the interaction of RPS2 from A. thaliana and AvrRpt2 from P. syringae with RIN4 as guard. Our data are suggestive of a gene-for-gene relationship for the host-pathogen system Mr5 and E. amylovora. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. [Taphonomy of the gastropod cf. Donaldina robusta (Heterobranchia: Streptacididae) from the Middle Pennsylvanian, La Joya Formation, Sonora, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Gómez E, Catalina; Buitrón S, Blanca; Vachard, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Gastropods are an important component in most of the fossil record; however, investigations have focused mainly on the characterization of the tafofacies and signatures in determined environments. We present qualitative and quantitative taphonomic data for the gastropod cf. Donaldina robusta assemblages from the La Joya Formation of the Sierra Agua Verde, Sonora State, (NW) Mexico. We analyzed 176 shells. Good preservation received ahigh taphonomic grade (A) and poor preservation a D. The shells were complete in 72% of cases (taphonomic grade B). Less than 10% are corroded or are parallel to the layer (grade A). This rock is petrographycally classified as wackestone, sedimentologically it is characterized by middle sorting (grade B) and low grading (grade A). The fossiliferous assemblage grades as A and B. Biostratinomic features of the skeletal assemblage are characteristic of sedimentologic concentrations of autochthonous-parautochthonous elements at the accumulation site. There was minimal reworking and transport in an environment of low energy, locally produced during a short period of accumulation.

  7. Influence of conjunctive use of coffee effluent and fresh water on performance of robusta coffee and soil properties.

    PubMed

    Salakinkop, S R; Shivaprasad, P

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the influence of treated coffee effluent irrigation on performance of established robusta coffee, nutrient contribution and microbial activities in the soil. The results revealed that the field irrigated with coffee effluent from aerobic tank having COD of 1009 ppm, did not affect the yield of clean coffee (1309 kg/ha) and it was statistically similar (on par) with the plots irrigated with fresh water (1310 kg/ha) with respect to clean coffee yield. Effluent irrigation increased significantly the population bacteria, yeast, fungi, actinomycetes and PSB (122, 52, 12, 34 and 6 x 104/g respectively)) in the soil compared to the soil irrigated with fresh water (87, 22, 5, 24 and 2 x 10(4)/g respectively). The organic carbon (2.60%), available nutrients in the soil like P (57.2 kg/ha), K (401.6 kg/ha, Ca (695.3 ppm), S (5.3 ppm),Cu (4.09 ppm) and Zn(4.78 ppm) were also increased due to effluent irrigation compared to fresh water irrigation. Thus analysis of coffee effluent for major and minor plant nutrients content revealed its potential as source of nutrients and water for plant growth.

  8. Antiulcerogenic activity of fractions and 3,15-dioxo-21alpha-hydroxy friedelane isolated from Maytenus robusta (Celastraceae).

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni; Comunello, Eros; Noldin, Vânia Floriani; Monache, Franco Delle; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Niero, Rivaldo

    2008-01-01

    The hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and aqueous-soluble fractions from leaves of Maytenus robusta (Celastraceae) were evaluated for their protective actions against ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats. The treatment with all fractions (150 mg/kg) and omeprazol (30 mg/kg) significantly reduced the lesion index, the total lesion area, and the percentage of lesion, in comparison with the control group (p<0.05). Since the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction was found to be most active in the pylorus ligated model, this fraction was further investigated and resulted in the isolation of triterpene 3,15-dioxo-21alpha-hydroxy friedelane. The triterpene was evaluated in the HCl/ethanol-induced ulcer model in mice. In this assay, both the groups treated with 3,15-dioxo-21alpha-hydroxy friedelane and omeprazol, at a dose of 30 mg/kg, presented a significant reduction in lesion index, total lesion area, and in the percentage of the lesion, when compared with the control group (p<0.05). The result suggests that the antiulcer effect observed in the extract and fractions may be attributed, at least in part, to this compound. Further experiments are underway to determine which antiulcer mechanisms involved in gastroprotection.

  9. Low Melt Viscosity Resins for Resin Transfer Molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, resin transfer molding (RTM) has become one of the methods of choice for high performance composites. Its cost effectiveness and ease of fabrication are major advantages of RTM. RTM process usually requires resins with very low melt viscosity (less than 10 Poise). The optimum RTM resins also need to display high thennal-oxidative stability, high glass transition temperature (T(sub g)), and good toughness. The traditional PMR-type polyimides (e.g. PMR-15) do not fit this requirement, because the viscosities are too high and the nadic endcap cures too fast. High T(sub g), low-melt viscosity resins are highly desirable for aerospace applications and NASA s Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) program. The objective of this work is to prepare low-melt viscosity polyimide resins for RTM or resin film infusion (RFI) processes. The approach involves the synthesis of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers. These materials have been designed to minimize their melt viscosity so that they can be readily processed. During the cure, the oligomers undergo both chain extension and crosslinking via the thermal polymerization of the phenylethynyl groups. The Phenylethynyl endcap is preferred over the nadic group due to its high curing temperature, which provides broader processing windows. This work involved the synthesis and polymerization of oligomers containing zig-zag backbones and twisted biphenyl structures. Some A-B type precursors which possessed both nitro and anhydride functionality, or both nitro and amine functionality, were also synthesized in order to obtain the well defined oligomers. The resulting zig-zag structured oligomers were then end-capped with 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) for further cure. The properties of these novel imide oligomers are evaluated.

  10. Effect of modified atmosphere packaging on quality and shelf life of 'Robusta' banana (Musa sp.) stored at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Kudachikar, V B; Kulkarni, S G; Prakash, M N Keshava

    2011-06-01

    Banana (Musa sp var. 'Robusta') stored under active and passive modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) at 12 ± 1°C and 85-90% RH for 2 seasons were evaluated for fruit quality and shelf-life. A steady state of about 8.6 and 8.2% of CO2 and 2.8 and 2.6% of O2 in passive MAP and MAP+GK (Green Keeper) packages, respectively, were established after 3 weeks of storage. Passive MAP and MAP+GK treatments of banana resulted in reduction in physiological loss in weight (PLW) of 0.7 and 0.8% after 5 and 7 weeks of storage, respectively as against 5% PLW in openly kept green banana after 3 weeks. Both MAP and MAP+GK treatments delayed colour, texture, pulp to peel ratio and total soluble solids (TSS) content as compared to openly kept control banana. Results indicated that the shelf life of fruits packed under MAP and MAP+GK could be extended up to 5 and 7 weeks, respectively as compared to 3 weeks for openly kept control fruits. Sensory quality of fully ripe fruits of both passive MAP and MAP+GK treatments, 5 days after ethrel dip was very good. Thus, MAP+GK at 12 ± 1°C and 85-90% RH could be commercially used for long term storage and long distance transportation of banana with maximum shelf-life of 7 weeks.

  11. Epoxy Resins in Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Finck, Henry

    1960-01-01

    A method of embedding biological specimens in araldite 502 (Ciba) has been developed for materials available in the United States. Araldite-embedded tissues are suitable for electron microscopy, but the cutting qualities of the resin necessitates more than routine attention during microtomy. The rather high viscosity of araldite 502 also seems to be an unnecessary handicap. The less viscous epoxy epon 812 (Shell) produces specimens with improved cutting qualities, and has several features—low shrinkage and absence of specimen damage during cure, minimal compression of sections, relative absence of electron beam-induced section damage, etc.—which recommends it as a routine embedding material. The hardness of the cured resin can be easily adjusted by several methods to suit the materials embedded in it. Several problems and advantages of working with sections of epoxy resins are also discussed. PMID:13822825

  12. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  13. Action of ionizing radiation on epoxy resins

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Voorde, M. E.

    1970-12-01

    The resistance of classical and experimental epoxy resins to irradiation was studied. The resistance to irradiation of epoxy resins of diverse compositions as well as the development of resins having a radioresistance that approaches that of certain ceramics are discussed. Sources of irradiation and the techniques of dosimetry used are described. The structures of certain epoxy resins and of hardeners are given. The preparation of these resins and their physical properties is described. The effects of radiation on epoxy resins, as well as conditions of irradiation, and suggested mechanisms for degradation of the irradiated resins are discussed. The relationship betweenmore » chemical structure of the resins and their physical properties is evaluated. (115 references) (JCB)« less

  14. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... solution intrinsic viscosity of the polyestercarbonate resins shall be a minimum of 0.44 deciliter per gram, as determined by a method entitled “Intrinsic Viscosity (IV) of Lexan ® Polyestercarbonate Resin by a...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... solution intrinsic viscosity of the polyestercarbonate resins shall be a minimum of 0.44 deciliter per gram, as determined by a method entitled “Intrinsic Viscosity (IV) of Lexan ® Polyestercarbonate Resin by a...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... intrinsic viscosity of the polyestercarbonate resins shall be a minimum of 0.44 deciliter per gram, as determined by a method entitled “Intrinsic Viscosity (IV) of Lexan ® Polyestercarbonate Resin by a Single...

  17. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  18. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  19. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... solution intrinsic viscosity of the polyestercarbonate resins shall be a minimum of 0.44 deciliter per gram, as determined by a method entitled “Intrinsic Viscosity (IV) of Lexan ® Polyestercarbonate Resin by a...

  20. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  1. Method for loading resin beds

    DOEpatents

    Notz, Karl J.; Rainey, Robert H.; Greene, Charles W.; Shockley, William E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H.sup.+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145.degree.-200.degree. C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145.degree. C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO.sub.3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate.

  2. Biodegradation of resin acid sodium salts

    Treesearch

    Richard W. Hemingway; H. Greaves

    1973-01-01

    The sodium salts of resin acids were readily degraded by microflora from two types of river water and from an activated sewage sludge. A lag phase with little or no resin acid salt degradation but rapid bacterial development occurred which was greatly extended by a decrease in incubation temperature. After this initial lag phase, the resin acid salts were rapidly...

  3. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  4. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; Delaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2007-08-07

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  5. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  6. Diterpene resin acids in conifers.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2006-11-01

    Diterpene resin acids are a significant component of conifer oleoresin, which is a viscous mixture of terpenoids present constitutively or inducibly upon herbivore or pathogen attack and comprises one form of chemical resistance to such attacks. This review focuses on the recent discoveries in the chemistry, biosynthesis, molecular biology, regulation, and biology of these compounds in conifers.

  7. Synthesis of improved phenolic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.; Mcleod, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    Twenty seven addition cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to give char residues comparable to state-of-the-art phenolic resins. Cyanate, epoxy, allyl, acrylate, methacrylate and ethynyl derivatized phenolic oligomers were investigated. The novolac-cyanate and propargyl-novolac resins provided anaerobic char yields at 800 C of 58 percent. A 59 percent char yield was obtained from modified epoxy novolacs. A phosphonitrilic derivative was found to be effective as an additive for increasing char yields. The novolac-cyanate, epoxy-novolac and methacrylate-epoxy-novolac systems were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. All three resins showed good potential as composite matrices. The free radical cured methacrylate-epoxy-novolac graphite composite provided short beam shear strengths at room temperature of 93.3 MPa (13.5 ksi). The novolac-cyanate graphite composite produced a short beam shear strength of 74 MPa (10.7 ksi) and flexural strength of 1302 MPa (189 ksi) at 177 C. Air heat aging of the novolac-cyanate and epoxy novolac based composites for 12 weeks at 204 C showed good property retention.

  8. Chemical characterisation of non-defective and defective green arabica and robusta coffees by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Juliana C F; Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S; Nunes, Marcella

    2008-11-15

    The coffee roasted in Brazil is considered to be of low quality, due to the presence of defective coffee beans that depreciate the beverage quality. These beans, although being separated from the non-defective ones prior to roasting, are still commercialized in the coffee trading market. Thus, it was the aim of this work to verify the feasibility of employing ESI-MS to identify chemical characteristics that will allow the discrimination of Arabica and Robusta species and also of defective and non-defective coffees. Aqueous extracts of green (raw) defective and non-defective coffee beans were analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and this technique provided characteristic fingerprinting mass spectra that not only allowed for discrimination of species but also between defective and non-defective coffee beans. ESI-MS profiles in the positive mode (ESI(+)-MS) provided separation between defective and non-defective coffees within a given species, whereas ESI-MS profiles in the negative mode (ESI(-)-MS) provided separation between Arabica and Robusta coffees. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Performance of Natural Dye and Counter Electrode from Robusta Coffee Beans Peel Waste for Fabrication of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, T.; Subekti, W. Y.; Nur'Adya, S. S.; Ilmiah, K.; Ulfa, S. M.

    2018-01-01

    The DSSC prototype using activated carbon (AC) and natural dye from Robusta coffee bean peels have been investigated. The natural dye obtained from the extraction of Robusta coffee bean peels is identified as anthocyanin by UV-Vis spectrophotometer at maximum wavelength 219.5 nm and 720.0 nm in methanol. From the FT-IR analysis, the vibration of O-H observed at 3385 cm-1, C=O at 1618 cm-1, and C-O-C at 1065 cm-1. The counter electrode prepared by calcined the peels at 300°C. Surface analyser of AC showed the larger surface area compared prior activation. The DSSC prototype was prepared using FTO glass (2x2 cm) coated with carbon paste in various thickness. The working electrode is coated with the TiO2 paste. The optimum voltage measured was 395mV (300 μL of CA), 334 mV (200 μL AC), and 254 mV (100 μL AC). From this result, we understand that the thickness of counter electrode influent the voltage of the DSSC.

  10. Quantification of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta concentration in blends by means of synchronous fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Dankowska, A; Domagała, A; Kowalewski, W

    2017-09-01

    The potential of fluorescence, UV-Vis spectroscopies as well as the low- and mid-level data fusion of both spectroscopies for the quantification of concentrations of roasted Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta in coffee blends was investigated. Principal component analysis was used to reduce data multidimensionality. To calculate the level of undeclared addition, multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) models were used with lowest root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) of 3.6% and root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 7.9%. LDA analysis was applied to fluorescence intensities and UV spectra of Coffea arabica, canephora samples, and their mixtures in order to examine classification ability. The best performance of PCA-LDA analysis was observed for data fusion of UV and fluorescence intensity measurements at wavelength interval of 60nm. LDA showed that data fusion can achieve over 96% of correct classifications (sensitivity) in the test set and 100% of correct classifications in the training set, with low-level data fusion. The corresponding results for individual spectroscopies ranged from 90% (UV-Vis spectroscopy) to 77% (synchronous fluorescence) in the test set, and from 93% to 97% in the training set. The results demonstrate that fluorescence, UV, and visible spectroscopies complement each other, giving a complementary effect for the quantification of roasted Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta concentration in blends. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxygen index tests of thermosetting resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The flammability characteristics of nine thermosetting resins under evaluation for use in aircraft interiors are described. These resins were evaluated using the Oxygen Index (ASTM 2863) testing procedure. The test specimens consisted of both neat resin and glass reinforced resin. When testing glass-reinforced samples it was observed that Oxygen Index values varied inversely with resin content. Oxygen values were also obtained on specimens exposed to temperatures up to 300 C. All specimens experienced a decline in Oxygen Index when tested at an elevated temperature.

  12. Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.; Havens, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    As part of an effort on tougher/solvent resistant matrix resins for composites, research was directed towards exploring methods to improve the solvent resistance of linear amorphous thermoplastics. Ethyl reactive groups were placed on the ends of oligomers and pendent along the polymer chain and subsequently thermally reacted to provide crosslinking and thus improvement in solvent resistance. This concept is extended to another thermoplastic, a phenoxy resin. A commercially available phenoxy resin (PKHH) was systematically modified by reaction of the pendent hydroxyl groups on the phenoxy resin with various amounts of 4-ethynylbenzoyl chloride. As the pendent ethynyl group content in the phenoxy resin increased, the cured resin exhibited a higher glass transition temperature, better solvent resistance and less flexibility. The solvent resistance was further improved by correcting a low molecular weight diethynyl compound, 2,2-bis(4-ethynylbenzoyloxy-4'-phenyl)propane, with a phenoxy resin containing pendent ethynyl groups.

  13. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor); Cranston, John A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  14. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. M.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.

    1991-01-01

    High temperature structural resins are required for use on advanced aerospace vehicles as adhesives and composite matrices. NASA-Langley developed polyimide resins were evaluated as high temperature structural adhesives for metal to metal bonding and as composite matrices. Adhesive tapes were prepared on glass scrim fabric from solutions of polyamide acids of the semicrystalline polyimide LARC-CPI, developed at the NASA-Langley Research Center. Using 6Al-4V titanium adherends, high lap shear bond strengths were obtained at ambient temperature (45.2 MPa, 6550 psi) and acceptable strengths were obtained at elevated temperature (14.0 MPa, 2030 psi) using the Pasa-Jell 107 conversion coating on the titanium and a bonding pressure of 1.38 MPa (200 psi). Average zero degree composite tensile and compressive strengths of 1290 MPa (187 ksi) and 883 MPa (128 ksi) respectively were obtained at ambient temperature with unsized AS-4 carbon fiber reinforcement.

  15. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    High temperature resins containing phenylethynyl groups that are processable by transfer molding have been prepared. These phenylethynyl containing oligomers were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynlphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form a mixture of imide compounds in one step. This synthetic approach is advantageous since the products are a mixture of compounds and consequently exhibit a relatively low melting temperature. In addition, these materials exhibit low melt viscosities which are stable for several hours at 210-275 C, and since the thermal reaction of the phenylethynyl group does not occur to any appreciable extent at temperatures below 300 C, these materials have a broad processing window. Upon thermal cure at approximately 300-350 C, the phenylethynyl groups react to provide a crosslinked resin system. These new materials exhibit excellent properties and are potentially useful as adhesives, coatings, films, moldings and composite matrices.

  16. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, David P.

    2005-04-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchange resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchange process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange resins are provided. The utility of these agents to stabilize drugs are evaluated. Commonly occurring chemical and physical incompatibilities are reviewed. Ion-exchange resins have found applicability as inactive pharmaceutical constituents, particularly as disintegrants (inactive tablet ingredient whose function is to rapidly disrupt the tablet matrix on contact with gastric fluid). One of the more elegant approaches to improving palatability of ionizable drugs is the use of ion-exchange resins as taste-masking agents. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a review of scaleup of typical manufacturing processes for taste-masked products are provided. Ion-exchange resins have been extensively utilized in oral sustained-release products. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a summary of commonly occurring commercial sustained-release products are discussed. Ion-exchange resins have also been used in topical products for local application to the skin, including those where drug flux is controlled by a differential electrical current (ionotophoretic delivery). General applicability of ion-exchange resins, including ophthalmic delivery, nasal delivery, use as drugs in their own right (e.g., colestyramine, formerly referred to as cholestyramine), as well as measuring gastrointestinal transit times, are discussed. Finally, pharmaceutical monographs for ion-exchange resins are reviewed.

  17. Phosphorus-containing imide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Flame-resistant reinforced bodies are disclosed which are composed of reinforcing fibers, filaments or fabrics in a cured body of bis- and tris-imide resins derived from tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides by reaction with maleic anhydride or its derivatives, or of addition polymers of such imides, including a variant in which a mono-imide is condensed with a dianhydride and the product is treated with a further quantity of maleic anhydride.

  18. ELUTION OF URANIUM FROM RESIN

    DOEpatents

    McLEan, D.C.

    1959-03-10

    A method is described for eluting uranium from anion exchange resins so as to decrease vanadium and iron contamination and permit recycle of the major portion of the eluats after recovery of the uranium. Diminution of vanadium and iron contamination of the major portion of the uranium is accomplished by treating the anion exchange resin, which is saturated with uranium complex by adsorption from a sulfuric acid leach liquor from an ore bearing uranium, vanadium and iron, with one column volume of eluant prepared by passing chlorine into ammonium hydroxide until the chloride content is about 1 N and the pH is about 1. The resin is then eluted with 8 to 9 column volumes of 0.9 N ammonium chloride--0.1 N hydrochloric acid solution. The eluants are collected separately and treated with ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate which is filtered therefrom. The uranium salt from the first eluant is contaminated with the major portion of ths vanadium and iron and is reworked, while the uranium recovered from the second eluant is relatively free of the undesirable vanadium and irons. The filtrate from the first eluant portion is discarded. The filtrate from the second eluant portion may be recycled after adding hydrochloric acid to increase the chloride ion concentration and adjust the pH to about 1.

  19. Synthesis of improved polyester resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcleod, A. H.; Delano, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    Eighteen aromatic unsaturated polyester prepolymers prepared by a modified interfacial condensation technique were investigated for their solubility in vinyl monomers and ability to provide high char yield forming unsaturated polyester resins. The best resin system contained a polyester prepolymer of phthalic, fumaric and diphenic acids reacted with 2,7-naphthalene diol and 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)fluorene. This prepolymer is very soluble in styrene, divinyl benzene, triallyl cyanurate, diallyl isophthalate and methylvinylpyridine. It provided anaerobic char yields as high as 41 percent at 800 C. The combination of good solubility and char yield represents a significant improvement over state-of-the-art unsaturated polyester resins. The majority of the other prepolymers had only low or no solubility in vinyl monomers. Graphite composites from this prepolymer with styrene were investigated. The cause for the observed low shear strengths of the composites was not determined, however 12-week aging of the composites at 82 C showed that essentially no changes in the composites had occurred.

  20. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used... fluoride resins consist of basic resins produced by the polymerization of vinylidene fluoride. (b) The...

  1. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  2. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  3. Characterization of PMR polyimide resin and prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindenmeyer, P. H.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures for the chemical characterization of PMR-15 resin solutions and graphite-reinforced prepregs were developed, and a chemical data base was established. In addition, a basic understanding of PMR-15 resin chemistry was gained; this was translated into effective processing procedures for the production of high quality graphite composites. During the program the PMR monomers and selected model compounds representative of postulated PMR-15 solution chemistry were acquired and characterized. Based on these data, a baseline PMR-15 resin was formulated and evaluated for processing characteristics and composite properties. Commercially available PMR-15 resins were then obtained and chemically characterized. Composite panels were fabricated and evaluated.

  4. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION...,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The resins identified in paragraph (a) of... condensation of xylene-formaldehyde resin and 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to...

  5. Levels of Antioxidant Activity and Fluoride Content in Coffee Infusions of Arabica, Robusta and Green Coffee Beans in According to their Brewing Methods.

    PubMed

    Wolska, J; Janda, Katarzyna; Jakubczyk, K; Szymkowiak, M; Chlubek, D; Gutowska, I

    2017-10-01

    Coffee is a rich source of dietary antioxidants, and this property links with the fact that coffee is one of the world's most popular beverages. Moreover, it is a source of macro- and microelements, including fluoride. The aim of this work was to determine antioxidant activity of coffee beverages and fluoride content depending on different coffee species and conditions of brewing. Three species of coffee, arabica, robusta and green coffee beans obtained from retail stores in Szczecin (Poland) were analyzed. Five different techniques of preparing drink were used: simple infusion, french press, espresso maker, overflow espresso and Turkish coffee. Antioxidant potential of coffee beverages was investigated spectrophotometrically by DPPH method. Fluoride concentrations were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Statistical analysis was performed using Stat Soft Statistica 12.5. Antioxidant activity of infusions was high (71.97-83.21% inhibition of DPPH) depending on coffee species and beverage preparing method. It has been shown that the method of brewing arabica coffee and green coffee significantly affects the antioxidant potential of infusions. The fluoride concentration in the coffee infusions changed depending, both, on the species and conditions of brewing, too (0.013-0.502 mg/L). Methods of brewing didn't make a difference to the antioxidant potential of robusta coffee, which had also the lowest level of fluoride among studied species. Except overflow espresso, the fluoride content was the highest in beverages from green coffee. The highest fluoride content was found in Turkish coffee from green coffee beans.

  6. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear

  7. Phosphorus-containing imide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polymers of bis and tris-imides derived from tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides by reaction with maleic anhydride or its derivatives, and addition polymers of such imides, including a variant in which a monoimide is condensed with a dianhydride and the product is treated with a further quantity of maleic anhydride prior to curing are disclosed and claimed. Such polymers are flame resistant. Also disclosed are an improved method of producing tris(m-aminophenyl) phosphine oxides from the nitro analogues by reduction with hydrazine hydrate using palladized charcoal or Raney nickel as the catalyst and fiber reinforced cured resin composites.

  8. Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as

  9. Resin Viscosity Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2018-06-01

    Viscosity of the liquid resin effects the chemical and mechanical properties of the pultruded composite. In resin injection pultrusion manufacturing the liquid resin is injected into a specially designed tapered injection chamber through the injection slots present on top and bottom of the chamber. The resin is injected at a pressure so as to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements inside the tapered injection chamber. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the center of chamber causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to efficaciously penetrate through the compacted fibers and achieve complete wetout. The impact of resin viscosity on resin flow, fiber compaction, wetout and on the final product is further discussed. Injection chamber design predominantly effects the resin flow inside the chamber and the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. Therefore, a desirable injection chamber design is such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures and at low internal pressures inside the injection chamber.

  10. Resin Viscosity Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2017-08-01

    Viscosity of the liquid resin effects the chemical and mechanical properties of the pultruded composite. In resin injection pultrusion manufacturing the liquid resin is injected into a specially designed tapered injection chamber through the injection slots present on top and bottom of the chamber. The resin is injected at a pressure so as to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements inside the tapered injection chamber. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the center of chamber causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to efficaciously penetrate through the compacted fibers and achieve complete wetout. The impact of resin viscosity on resin flow, fiber compaction, wetout and on the final product is further discussed. Injection chamber design predominantly effects the resin flow inside the chamber and the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. Therefore, a desirable injection chamber design is such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures and at low internal pressures inside the injection chamber.

  11. Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W.

    1982-01-01

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  12. 21 CFR 177.2440 - Polyethersulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2440 Polyethersulfone resins. Polyethersulfone resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended... Petition Control (HFS-215), Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, 1110 Vermont Ave. NW., suite 1200...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1595 - Polyetherimide resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... polyetherimide resin identified in this section may be safely used as an article or component of an article... substances required in the production of basic resins or finished food-contact articles. The optional... and Applied Nutrition (HFS-200), Food and Drug Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Epoxy Resins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-07

    1. INTRODUCTION ..................................................... ..... ol 2. EPR EXPERIMENTS ON EPOXY RESINS...Calculated sizes of cube-shaped rigid regions.......................... 59 1. INTRODUCTION Epoxy resin polymers are important matrix materials for... information on this network microstructure. The experiments involved measurements made as a function of either temperature or solvent content. In the latter

  15. Modified resins for solid-phase extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, James S.; Sun, Jeffrey J.

    1993-07-27

    A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

  16. Modified resins for solid-phase extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, James S.; Sun, Jeffrey J.

    1991-12-10

    A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

  17. Optical and color stabilities of paint-on resins for shade modification of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji; Homma, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Hideo

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the optical and color stabilities of the paint-on resin used for shade modification of restorative resins. Three shades of paint-on resin and two crown and bridge resins were used. The light transmittance characteristics of the materials during accelerated aging tests such as water immersion, toothbrush abrasion, ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, and staining tests were measured. Discolorations of materials resulting from tests were also determined. There were no significant effects of water immersion, toothbrush abrasion and UV light irradiation on the light transmittance and visible color change of paint-on resins, whereas the staining tests significantly decreased the light transmittance and increased color change of the translucent shades of materials. Our results indicate that the paint-on resins exhibit stable optical properties and color appearance, which are at least as good as the crown and bridge resins.

  18. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques were developed that provided thermo-oxidatively stable A-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites using the approach of in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on reinforcing fibers, rather than employing separately prepared prepolymer varnish. This was accomplished by simply mixing methylene dianiline and two ester-acids and applying this solution to the fibers for subsequent molding. Five different formulated molecular weight resins were examined, and an optimized die molding procedure established for the 1500 formulated molecular weight system. Extensive ultrasonic inspection of composites was successfully utilized as a technique for monitoring laminate quality. Composite mechanical property studies were conducted with this polyimide resin at room temperature and after various time exposures in a thermo-oxidative environment at 561 K (550 F), 589 K (600 F) and 617 K (650 F). It was determined that such composites have a long term life in the temperature range of 561 K to 589 K. The final phase involved the fabrication and evaluation of a series of demonstration airfoil specimens.

  19. Physical Properties of Synthetic Resin Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, Meyer

    1939-01-01

    A study was made to determine the physical properties of synthetic resins having paper, canvas, and linen reinforcements, and of laminated wood impregnated with a resin varnish. The results show that commercial resins have moduli of elasticity that are too low for structural considerations. Nevertheless, there do exist plastics that have favorable mechanical properties and, with further development, it should be possible to produce resin products that compare favorably with the light-metal alloys. The results obtained from tests on Compound 1840, resin-impregnated wood, show that this material can stand on its own merit by virtue of a compressive strength four times that of the natural wood. This increase in compressive strength was accomplished with an increase of density to a value slightly below three times the normal value and corrected one of the most serious defects of the natural product.

  20. Chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    A new analytical model for simulating chemoviscosity of thermosetting resin was formulated. The model is developed by modifying the Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) theory in polymer rheology for thermoplastic materials. By assuming a linear relationship between the glass transition temperature and the degree of cure of the resin system under cure, the WLF theory can be modified to account for the factor of reaction time. Temperature dependent functions of the modified WLF theory constants were determined from the isothermal cure data of Lee, Loos, and Springer for the Hercules 3501-6 resin system. Theoretical predictions of the model for the resin under dynamic heating cure cycles were shown to compare favorably with the experimental data reported by Carpenter. A chemoviscosity model which is capable of not only describing viscosity profiles accurately under various cure cycles, but also correlating viscosity data to the changes of physical properties associated with the structural transformations of the thermosetting resin systems during cure was established.

  1. Composite resins in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Willems, G; Lambrechts, P; Braem, M; Vanherle, G

    1993-09-01

    Human enamel and dentin should be used as the physiologic standards with which to compare composite resins, especially in the posterior region. The intrinsic surface roughness of composite resins must be equal to or lower than the surface roughness of human enamel on enamel-to-enamel occlusal contact areas (Ra = 0.64 microns). Roughness determines the biologic strength of composite resins. The nanoindentation hardness value of the filler particles (2.91 to 8.84 GPa) must not be higher than that of the hydroxyapatite crystals of human enamel (3.39 GPa). Composite resins intended for posterior use should have a Young's modulus at least equal to, and preferably higher than, that of dentin (18.500 MPa). The compressive strength of enamel (384 MPa) and dentin (297 MPa) and the fracture strength of a natural tooth (molar = 305 MPa; premolar = 248 MPa) offer excellent mechanical standards to select the optimal strength for posterior composite resins. The in vivo occlusal contact area wear rate of composite resins must be comparable to the attritional enamel wear rate (about 39 microns/y) in molars. Differential wear between enamel and composite resin on the same tooth is a new criterion for visualizing and quantifying the wear resistance of composite resins in a biologic way. Posterior resins must have a radiographic opacity that is slightly in excess of that of human enamel (198% Al). Based on these standard criteria, it can be concluded that in the 21st century the ultrafine compact-filled composite resins may be the materials of choice for restoring posterior cavities.

  2. Structure Property Relationships of Biobased Epoxy Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorana, Anthony Surraht

    The thesis is about the synthesis, characterization, development, and application of epoxy resins derived from sustainable feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose, plant oils, and other non-food feedstocks. The thesis can be divided into two main topics 1) the synthesis and structure property relationship investigation of new biobased epoxy resin families and 2) mixing epoxy resins with reactive diluents, nanoparticles, toughening agents, and understanding co-curing reactions, filler/matrix interactions, and cured epoxy resin thermomechanical, viscoelastic, and dielectric properties. The thesis seeks to bridge the gap between new epoxy resin development, application for composites and advanced materials, processing and manufacturing, and end of life of thermoset polymers. The structures of uncured epoxy resins are characterized through traditional small molecule techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, high resolution mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy. The structure of epoxy resin monomers are further understood through the process of curing the resins and cured resins' properties through rheology, chemorheology, dynamic mechanical analysis, tensile testing, fracture toughness, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and notched izod impact testing. It was found that diphenolate esters are viable alternatives to bisphenol A and that the structure of the ester side chain can have signifi-cant effects on monomer viscosity. The structure of the cured diphenolate based epoxy resins also influence glass transition temperature and dielectric properties. Incorporation of reactive diluents and flexible resins can lower viscosity, extend gel time, and enable processing of high filler content composites and increase fracture toughness. Incorpora-tion of high elastic modulus nanoparticles such as graphene can provide increases in physical properties such as elastic modulus and fracture toughness. The synthesis

  3. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for the fabrication of both polyphenylquinoxaline and polyimide composites by the in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on the graphite reinforcing fibers, rather than using previously prepared prepolymer varnishes. Void-free polyphenylquinoxaline composites were fabricated and evaluated for room and elevated flexure and shear properties. The technology of the polyimide system was advanced to the point where the material is ready for commercial exploitation. A reproducible processing cycle free of operator judgment factors was developed for fabrication of void-free composites exhibiting excellent mechanical properties and a long time isothermal life in the range of 288 C to 316 C. The effects of monomer reactant stoichiometry and process modification on resin flow were investigated. Demonstration of the utility and quality of this polyimide system was provided through the successful fabrication and evaluation of four complex high tip speed fan blades.

  4. [Physical behavior of 5 autopolymerizing dental resins].

    PubMed

    Laredo Sánchez, G C; Pérez de Alba, M del C

    1990-01-01

    The Tests described in the American Dental Association Standard No. 27 were carried out with five commercial dental resins available in mexican market. These are: Adaptic, Concise, Miradapt, Degufill and Finesse. Two of them are of the macrofilled type (II), one is of the hybrid type (mix of macro and micro particles; type II) and two of the microfilled type (I). All the resins tested met satisfactorily the specifications of the A.D.A. standard No. 27 for dental componsed resins, according with their classification.

  5. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175... Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride... the purpose of this section, poly(vinyl fluoride) resins consist of basic resins produced by the...

  6. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. 175.270 Section 175... Substances for Use as Components of Coatings § 175.270 Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins. Poly(vinyl fluoride... the purpose of this section, poly(vinyl fluoride) resins consist of basic resins produced by the...

  7. Traumatic resin ducts as indicators of bark beetle outbreaks

    Treesearch

    R. Justin DeRose; Matthew F. Bekker; James N. Long

    2017-01-01

    The formation of traumatic resin ducts (TRDs) represents an important induced defense in woody plants that enhances oleoresin production and flow in response to environmental perturbations. In some genera (Pinus), resin ducts are copious and conspicuous; however, in others (Picea), resin ducts are relatively rare. The occurrence and strength of resin ducts, in...

  8. Melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin for bonding particleboards

    Treesearch

    Chung-Yun Hse; Feng Fu; Hui Pan

    2008-01-01

    For the development of a cost-effective melamine-modified urea formaldehyde resin (MUF), the study evaluated the effects of reaction pH and melamine content on resin properties and bond performance of the MUF resin adhesive systems. Eight resins, each with three replicates, were prepared in a factorial experiment that included two formulation variables: two reaction...

  9. 49 CFR 173.165 - Polyester resin kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Polyester resin kits. 173.165 Section 173.165... Polyester resin kits. (a) Except for transportation by aircraft, polyester resin kits consisting of a base... resin kits consisting of a base material component (Class 3, Packing Group II or III) and an activator...

  10. 21 CFR 177.2260 - Filters, resin-bonded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Filters, resin-bonded. 177.2260 Section 177.2260... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2260 Filters, resin-bonded. Resin-bonded filters may... of this section. (a) Resin-bonded filters are prepared from natural or synthetic fibers to which have...

  11. 21 CFR 177.2260 - Filters, resin-bonded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Filters, resin-bonded. 177.2260 Section 177.2260... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2260 Filters, resin-bonded. Resin-bonded filters may... of this section. (a) Resin-bonded filters are prepared from natural or synthetic fibers to which have...

  12. 21 CFR 177.2260 - Filters, resin-bonded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Filters, resin-bonded. 177.2260 Section 177.2260... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2260 Filters, resin-bonded. Resin-bonded filters may... of this section. (a) Resin-bonded filters are prepared from natural or synthetic fibers to which have...

  13. 21 CFR 177.2260 - Filters, resin-bonded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Filters, resin-bonded. 177.2260 Section 177.2260... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2260 Filters, resin-bonded. Resin-bonded filters may... of this section. (a) Resin-bonded filters are prepared from natural or synthetic fibers to which have...

  14. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  15. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  16. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  17. 21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. 175.380 Section 175.380 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The...′-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins, to which may have been added certain optional adjuvant substances...

  18. Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups and cured resins obtained therefrom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups, the process for preparing the same, and the cured resin products obtained therefrom are disclosed. Upon the application of heat, the ethynyl groups react to provide branching and crosslinking with the cure temperature being lowered by using a catalyst if desired but not required. The cured phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups have improved solvent resistance and higher use temperature than linear uncrosslinked phenoxy resins and are applicable for use as coatings, films, adhesives, composited matrices and molding compounds.

  19. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  20. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  1. Determining resin/fiber content of laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, G. G.; Houston, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Article discusses procedure where hydrazine is used to extract graphite fibers from cured polyimide resin. Method does not attack graphite fibers and is faster than hot-concentrated-acid digestion process.

  2. 21 CFR 177.1595 - Polyetherimide resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Polyetherimide resin identified in paragraph (a) of this section shall have an intrinsic viscosity in chloroform... Viscosity of ULTEM Polyetherimide Using Chloroform as the Solvent,” which is incorporated by reference...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...)(2) of this section. (c) Polysulfone resins, when extracted at reflux temperatures for 6 hours with... acetic acid in distilled water, and n-heptane, yield total extractives in each extracting solvent not to...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...)(2) of this section. (c) Polysulfone resins, when extracted at reflux temperatures for 6 hours with... acetic acid in distilled water, and n-heptane, yield total extractives in each extracting solvent not to...

  5. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...)(2) of this section. (c) Polysulfone resins, when extracted at reflux temperatures for 6 hours with... acetic acid in distilled water, and n-heptane, yield total extractives in each extracting solvent not to...

  6. [Characterization of glass ionomer cements containing resin].

    PubMed

    Gladys, S; Van Meerbeek, B; Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1996-01-01

    Recently, several new resin-modified glassionomers have been introduced on the dental market. At the moment a real confusion exists over the right terminology of the products and its limits in use. Therefore, an in vitro and in vivo study with simultaneously a comparison with conventional glassionomers and composite resins was really necessary. This study revealed that resin-modified glassionomers have physico-mechanical properties that are situated between those of conventional glassionomers and composite resins. The manufacturers have a different approach concerning the particle size distribution. The new materials give a rough surface. They are not indicated for posterior restorations, because their surface hardness is too low compared to that of enamel, and their fatigue resistance is insufficient. The elasticity decreases during setting and maturation. Consequently, they are mainly indicated in situations that require a moderate strength and esthetics, for patients with a high caries activity and when ease in use is requested.

  7. [Characterization of resin-containing glass ionomers].

    PubMed

    Gladys, S; Van Meerbeek, B; Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1996-01-01

    Recently, several new resin-modified glassionomers have been introduced on the dental market. At the moment a real confusion exists over the right terminology of the products and its limits in use. Therefore, an in vitro and in vivo study with simultaneously a comparison with conventional glassionomers and composite resins was really necessary. This study revealed that resin-modified glassionomers have physico-mechanical properties that are situated between those of conventional glassionomers and composite resins. The manufacturers have a different approach concerning the particle size distribution. The new materials give a rough surface. They are not indicated for posterior restorations, because their surface hardness is too low compared to that of enamel, and their fatigue resistance is insufficient. The elasticity decreases during setting and maturation. Consequently, they are mainly indicated in situations that require a moderate strength and esthetics, for patients with a high caries activity and when ease in use is requested.

  8. Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

    1979-01-01

    The development of silicon modified resins for graphite fiber laminates which will prevent the dispersal of graphite fibers when the composites are burned is discussed. Eighty-five silicone modified resins were synthesized and evaluated including unsaturated polyesters, thermosetting methacrylates, epoxies, polyimides, and phenolics. Neat resins were judged in terms of Si content, homogeneity, hardness, Char formation, and thermal stability. Char formation was estimated by thermogravimetry to 1,000 C in air and in N2. Thermal stability was evaluated by isothermal weight loss measurements for 200 hrs in air at three temperatures. Four silicone modified epoxies were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 25 to 50%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 140 kpsi and a modulus of 10 Mpsi. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 5.3 kpsi.

  9. Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delano, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

  10. Improved high-temperature resistant matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Chang, G. E.; Wright, W. F.; Ueda, K.; Orell, M. K.

    1989-01-01

    A study was performed with the objective of developing matrix resins that exhibit improved thermo-oxidative stability over state-of-the-art high temperature resins for use at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and air pressures up to 0.7 MPa (100 psia). The work was based upon a TRW discovered family of polyimides currently licensed to and marketed by Ethyl Corporation as EYMYD(R) resins. The approach investigated to provide improved thermo-oxidative properties was to use halogenated derivatives of the diamine, 2, 2-bis (4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF). Polyimide neat resins and Celion(R) 12,000 composites prepared from fluorine substituted 4-BDAF demonstrated unexpectedly lower glass transition temperatures (Tg) and thermo-oxidative stabilities than the baseline 4-BDAF/PMDA polymer.

  11. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.

    1995-08-15

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio. 2 figs.

  12. Biocompatibility of Resin-based Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Moharamzadeh, Keyvan; Brook, Ian M.; Van Noort, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Oral and mucosal adverse reactions to resin-based dental materials have been reported. Numerous studies have examined the biocompatibility of restorative dental materials and their components, and a wide range of test systems for the evaluation of the biological effects of these materials have been developed. This article reviews the biological aspects of resin-based dental materials and discusses the conventional as well as the new techniques used for biocompatibility assessment of dental materials.

  13. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Bibler, Jane P.; Wallace, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio.

  14. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... conditions of use A through H in table 2 of § 176.170(c) of this chapter. The resins intended for single-service food-contact use may be used only under condition of use H described in table 2 of § 176.170(c) of... purpose of this section, polysulfone resins are: (1) Poly(oxy-p-phenylenesulfonyl-p-phenyleneoxy-p...

  15. Evaluation of the effect of roasting process on the energy transition and the crystalline structures of Arabica, Robusta, and Liberica coffee from Jambi Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdana, B. M.; Manihuruk, R.; Ashyar, R.; Heriyanti; Sutrisno

    2018-04-01

    The effect of the roasting process has been evaluated to determine of the energy transition and the crystalline structure of three types of coffee, Arabica, Robusta, and Liberica coffee both green and roasted coffee with the roasted temperature at 200°C and 230°C. The crystalline structure of the coffee was evaluated with X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The result exposes that the three types of green coffee showed that an amorphous structure whereas the roasted coffee denotes a crystal structure of sucrose. The varied temperature in the roasting process leads to changes in the crystal structure shown by the peak shift of 2θ for all types of coffee. The added cations, such as Fe2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ ions on Liberica coffee induced of changes in the crystal structures, which are assigned by the peak shift, that imply of metal ions of the sucrose complexes happened in the solution, except for the addition of Mg2+ ion.

  16. Meloidogyne daklakensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Meloidogynidae), a new root-knot nematode associated with Robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner) in the Western Highlands, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Q P; Le, T M L; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen, H T; Liebanas, G; Nguyen, T A D

    2018-04-05

    The root-knot nematode species Meloidogyne daklakensis n. sp. was discovered on the roots of Robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner) in Dak Lak Province, Vietnam. This species is characterized by the females having rounded or oval perineal patterns, smooth, regular, continuous striae, and reduced lateral lines. The dorsal arch is low, rounded and encloses a quite distinct vulva and tail tip. The stylet is normally straight with well-developed and posteriorly sloped knobs. The males have a rounded cap that extends posteriorly into the lip region. The procorpus is outlined distinctly, and is three times longer than the metacorpus. The metacorpus is ovoid, with a strong valve apparatus. The species closely resembles M. marylandi, M. naasi, M. ovalis, M. panyuensis, M. lopezi, M. mali and M. baetica in the perineal pattern of the females, and the morphology of the males and the second-stage juveniles. Nonetheless, it can be differentiated from other species by a combination of morphometric, morphological and molecular characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis was conducted based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and 28S rDNA as well as the region between the cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) and cytochrome c oxidase II (COII) mitochondrial genes. Herein, this nematode is described, illustrated, and designated as a new species, Meloidogyne daklakensis sp. n., based on morphometric, morphological and molecular analyses.

  17. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  18. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... *Ethylene-Methacrylic Acid Copolymers *Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate Copolymers *Fatty Acid Resins *Fluorocarbon..., Acrylates (Latex) *PVC Copolymers, Ethylene-Vinyl Chloride *Rosin Derivative Resins *Rosin Modified Resins...

  19. Tooth brush abrasion of paint-on resins for shade modification of crown and bridge resins.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Koichi; Ban, Seiji; McCabe, John F

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and resistance to toothbrush abrasion of three experimental paint-on composite resins developed for the shade modification of crown and bridge resins. The paint-on resins had less filler volume fraction than restorative composites or the crown and bridge resins and consequently were of low viscosity. The maximum surface roughness (Rmax) and the maximum depth loss by abrasion for the paint-on resins following 40,000 cycles of brushing ranged from 2.45 to 4.07 microm and 8.63 to 13.67 microm, respectively. Rmax values were 37.7-67.5% lower than that for the crown and bridge resin subjected to the same test. Wear depth was 19.9-49.4% lower than for the crown and bridge resin. These results suggest that the paint-on resins are expected to have adequate resistance to toothbrush abrasion and may therefore be suitable for clinical use.

  20. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of a heterogeneous laminating resin system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biermann, T. F.; Hopper, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    The factors which effect the impact resistance of laminating resin systems and yet retain equivalent performance with the conventional 450 K curing epoxy matrix systems in other areas were studied. Formulation work was conducted on two systems, an all-epoxy and an epoxy/bismaleimide, to gain fundamental information on the effect formulation changes have upon neat resin and composite properties. The all-epoxy work involved formulations with various amounts and combinations of eight different epoxy resins, four different hardeners, fifteen different toughening agents, a filler, and a catalyst. The epoxy/bismaleimide effort improved formulations with various amounts and combinations of nine different resins, four different hardeners, eight different toughening agents, four different catalysts, and a filler. When a formulation appeared to offer the proper combination of properties required for a laminating resin Celion 3K-70P fabric was prepregged. Initial screening tests on composites primarily involved Gardner type impact and measurement of short beam shear strengths under dry and hot/wet conditions.

  2. Diffusion of residual monomer in polymer resins.

    PubMed Central

    Piver, W T

    1976-01-01

    A simplified mathematical model which made use of Fick's laws of diffusion written in spherical coordinates was developed to describe the rate of diffusion of residual monomers from polymer resins. The properties of the monomer-polymer system which influenced the amount of monomer remaining in the polymer as a function of time were the diffusivity and solubility of the monomer in the polymer, and the particle size of the polymer resin. This model was used to analyze literature data on the diffusion of residual vinyl chloride monomer in polyvinyl chloride resins made by the suspension process. It was concluded that particle size of the resin was a significant parameter which should be taken advantage of in process equipment designed to remove residual monomer from PVC resins. The diffusivity of the monomer in the polymer was a function of the solubility of the monomer in the polymer. Monomer solubility can be determined from Henry's law. It was suggested that this model could be adapted to describe diffusion of monomers from any monomer-polymer system, and would be a useful approach to modeling the transport of nonreactive chemical additives from plastics. PMID:1026410

  3. Characterization of Polyimide Matrix Resins and Prepregs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maximovich, M. G.; Galeos, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/polyimide composite materials are attractive candidates for a wide range of aerospace applications. They have many of the virtues of graphite/epoxies, i.e., high specific strengths and stiffness, and also outstanding thermal/oxidative stability. Yet they are not widely used in the aerospace industry due to problems of procesability. By their nature, modern addition polyimide (PI) resins and prepregs are more complex than epoxies; the key to processing lies in characterizing and understanding the materials. Chemical and rheological characterizations are carried out on several addition polyimide resins and graphite reinforced prepregs, including those based on PMR-15, LARC 160 (AP 22), LARC 160 (Curithane 103) and V378A. The use of a high range torque transducer with a Rheometrics mechanical spectrometer allows rheological data to be generated on prepreg materials as well as neat resins. The use of prepreg samples instead of neat resins eliminates the need for preimidization of the samples and the data correlates well with processing behavior found in the shop. Rheological characterization of the resins and prepregs finds significant differences not readily detected by conventional chemical characterization techniques.

  4. Tree species diversity and distribution patterns in tropical forests of Garo Hills.

    Treesearch

    A. Kumar; B.G. Marcot; A. Saxena

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed phytosociological characteristics and diversity patterns of tree species of tropical forests of Garo Hills, western Meghalaya, northeast India. The main vegetation of the region included primary forests, secondary forests, and sal (Shorea robusta) plantations, with 162, 132, and 87 tree species, respectively. The Shannon-Wiener...

  5. Ponderosa pine resin defenses and growth: metrics matter.

    PubMed

    Hood, Sharon; Sala, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) cause widespread tree mortality in coniferous forests worldwide. Constitutive and induced host defenses are important factors in an individual tree's ability to survive an attack and in bottom-up regulation of bark beetle population dynamics, yet quantifying defense levels is often difficult. For example, in Pinus spp., resin flow is important for resistance to bark beetles but is extremely variable among individuals and within a season. While resin is produced and stored in resin ducts, the specific resin duct metrics that best correlate with resin flow remain unclear. The ability and timing of some pine species to produce induced resin is also not well understood. We investigated (i) the relationships between ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) resin flow and axial resin duct characteristics, tree growth and physiological variables, and (ii) if mechanical wounding induces ponderosa pine resin flow and resin ducts in the absence of bark beetles. Resin flow increased later in the growing season under moderate water stress and was highest in faster growing trees. The best predictors of resin flow were nonstandardized measures of resin ducts, resin duct size and total resin duct area, both of which increased with tree growth. However, while faster growing trees tended to produce more resin, models of resin flow using only tree growth were not statistically significant. Further, the standardized measures of resin ducts, density and duct area relative to xylem area, decreased with tree growth rate, indicating that slower growing trees invested more in resin duct defenses per unit area of radial growth, despite a tendency to produce less resin overall. We also found that mechanical wounding induced ponderosa pine defenses, but this response was slow. Resin flow increased after 28 days, and resin duct production did not increase until the following year. These slow induced responses may allow

  6. The Creep of Laminated Synthetic Resin Plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkuhn, H

    1941-01-01

    The long-time loading strength of a number of laminated synthetic resin plastics was ascertained and the effect of molding pressure and resin content determined. The best value was observed with a 30 to 40 percent resin content. The long-time loading strength also increases with increasing molding pressure up to 250 kg/cm(exp 2); a further rise in pressure affords no further substantial improvement. The creep strength is defined as the load which in the hundredth hour of loading produces a rate of elongation of 5 X 10(exp -4) percent per hour. The creep strength values of different materials were determined and tabulated. The effect of humidity during long-term tests is pointed out.

  7. Improved high temperature resistant matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, G. E.; Powell, S. H.; Jones, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The objective was to develop organic matrix resins suitable for service at temperatures up to 644 K (700 F) and at air pressures up to 0.4 MPa (60 psia) for time durations of a minimum of 100 hours. Matrix resins capable of withstanding these extreme oxidative environmental conditions would lead to increased use of polymer matrix composites in aircraft engines and provide significant weight and cost savings. Six linear condensation, aromatic/heterocyclic polymers containing fluorinated and/or diphenyl linkages were synthesized. The thermo-oxidative stability of the resins was determined at 644 K and compressed air pressures up to 0.4 MPa. Two formulations, both containing perfluoroisopropylidene linkages in the polymer backbone structure, exhibited potential for 644 K service to meet the program objectives. Two other formulations could not be fabricated into compression molded zero defect specimens.

  8. Effect of Resin Infiltration on Artificial Caries: An in vitro Evaluation of Resin Penetration and Microhardness.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Deepesh; Nayak, Rashmi; Pai, Deepika; Upadhya, Nagraj; K Bhaskar, Vipin; Kamath, Pujan

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of resin infiltration on artificial caries lesion by assessing the depth of resin penetration and the change in microhardness of lesion postinfiltration. Totally 45 human extracted premolars were used to create an artificial demineralized lesion in enamel using demineralizing solution. A total of 15 samples (group I) were infiltrated with resin. The depth of resin penetration was studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Other half (n = 30) of samples was equally divided into three subgroups and Vickers hardness number (VHN) values were obtained to measure the surface microhardness as group 11 a-before demineralization, 11 b-after demineralization, IIc-postresin infiltration. Mean depth of penetration in group I was 516.8 urn. There was statistically significant increase in VHN values of demineralized lesion postresin infiltration (independent Student's t-test, p < 0.001). Penetration depth of the resin infiltrant was deep enough to render beneficial effects, while significant increase in microhardness was observed postresin infiltration. Infiltrant used can be considered as a valid treatment option for noncavitated lesions. Prajapati D, Nayak R, Pai D, Upadhya N, Bhaskar VK, Kamath P. Effect of Resin Infiltration on Artificial Caries: An in vitro Evaluation of Resin Penetration and Microhardness. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(3):250-256.

  9. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  10. 76 FR 8774 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-386 (Third Review)] Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Termination of five... revocation of the antidumping duty order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Japan would be likely...

  11. 21 CFR 177.2450 - Polyamide-imide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) For the purpose of this section the polyamide-imide resins are derived from the condensation reaction...) The polyamide-imide resins (CAS Reg. No. 31957-38-7) derived from the condensation reaction of...

  12. 21 CFR 177.2450 - Polyamide-imide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) For the purpose of this section the polyamide-imide resins are derived from the condensation reaction...) The polyamide-imide resins (CAS Reg. No. 31957-38-7) derived from the condensation reaction of...

  13. Performance Properties of Graphite Reinforced Composites with Advanced Resin Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1980-01-01

    This article looks at the effect of different resin matrices on thermal and mechanical properties of graphite composites, and relates the thermal and flammability properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins. The processing parameters of graphite composites utilizing graphite fabric and epoxy or other advanced resins as matrices are presented. Thermoset resin matrices studied were: aminecured polyfunctional glycidyl aminetype epoxy (baseline), phenolicnovolac resin based on condensation of dihydroxymethyl-xylene and phenol cured with hexamine, two types of polydismaleimide resins, phenolic resin, and benzyl resin. The thermoplastic matrices studied were polyethersulfone and polyphenylenesulfone. Properties evaluated in the study included anaerobic char yield, limiting oxygen index, smoke evolution, moisture absorption, and mechanical properties at elevated temperatures including tensile, compressive, and short-beam shear strengths. Generally, it was determined that graphite composites with the highest char yield exhibited optimum fire-resistant properties.

  14. Fluorinated Alkyl Ether Epoxy Resin Compositions and Applications Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Wohl, Christopher J. (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Gardner, John M. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G. (Inventor); Palmieri, Frank M. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Epoxy resin compositions prepared using amino terminated fluoro alkyl ethers. The epoxy resin compositions exhibit low surface adhesion properties making them useful as coatings, paints, moldings, adhesives, and fiber reinforced composites.

  15. Standard tests for toughened resin composites, revised edition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Several toughened resin systems are evaluated to achieve commonality for certain kinds of tests used to characterize toughened resin composites. Specifications for five tests were standardized; these test standards are described.

  16. Resin additive improves performance of high-temperature hydrocarbon lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Loomis, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    Paraffinic resins, in high temperature applications, improve strength of thin lubricant film in Hertzian contacts even though they do not increase bulk oil viscosity. Use of resin circumvents corrosivity and high volatility problems inherent with many chemical additives.

  17. Resin transfer molding of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falcone, Anthony; Dursch, Harry; Nelson, Karl; Avery, William

    1993-01-01

    The design and manufacture of textile composite panels, tubes, and angle sections that were provided to NASA for testing and evaluation are documented. The textile preform designs and requirements were established by NASA in collaboration with Boeing and several vendors of textile reinforcements. The following four types of preform architectures were used: stitched uniweave, 2D-braids, 3D-braids, and interlock weaves. The preforms consisted primarily of Hercules AS4 carbon fiber; Shell RSL-1895 resin was introduced using a resin transfer molding process. All the finished parts were inspected using ultrasonics.

  18. Technical assessment for quality control of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosnell, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Survey visits to companies involved in the manufacture and use of graphite-epoxy prepregs were conducted to assess the factors which may contribute to variability in the mechanical properties of graphite-epoxy composites. In particular, the purpose was to assess the contributions of the epoxy resins to variability. Companies represented three segments of the composites industry - aircraft manufacturers, prepreg manufacturers, and epoxy resin manufacturers. Several important sources of performance variability were identified from among the complete spectrum of potential sources which ranged from raw materials to composite test data interpretation.

  19. Advances in the history of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Minguez, Nieves; Ellacuria, Joseba; Soler, José Ignacio; Triana, Rodrigo; Ibaseta, Guillermo

    2003-11-01

    The use of composite resins as direct restoration material in posterior teeth has demonstrated a great increase, due to esthetic requirements and the controversy regarding the mercury content in silver amalgams. In this article, we have reviewed the composition modifications which have occurred in materials based on resins since their introduction over a half a century ago which have enabled great improvements in their physical and mechanical properties. Likewise, we have highlighted current lines of research, centered on finding the ideal material for replacing silver amalgam as a direct filling material.

  20. Rapid viscosity measurements of powdered thermosetting resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, H. L.; Burks, H. D.; Dalal, S. K.

    1978-01-01

    A rapid and inexpensive method of obtaining processing-related data on powdered thermosetting resins has been investigated. The method involved viscosity measurements obtained with a small specimen (less than 100 mg) parallel plate plastometer. A data acquisition and reduction system was developed which provided a value of viscosity and strain rate about 12-13 second intervals during a test. The effects of specimen compaction pressure and reduction of adhesion between specimen and parallel plates were examined. The plastometer was used to measure some processing-related viscosity changes of an addition polyimide resin, including changes caused by pre-test heat treatment, test temperature, and strain rate.

  1. Differential Curing In Fiber/Resin Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Charles N.

    1989-01-01

    Modified layup schedule counteracts tendency toward delamination. Improved manufacturing process resembles conventional process, except prepregs partially cured laid on mold in sequence in degree of partial cure decreases from mold side to bag side. Degree of partial cure of each layer at time of layup selected by controlling storage and partial-curing temperatures of prepreg according to Arrhenius equation for rate of gel of resin as function of temperature and time from moment of mixing. Differential advancement of cure in layers made large enough to offset effect of advance bag-side heating in oven or autoclave. Technique helps prevent entrapment of volatile materials during manufacturing of fiber/resin laminates.

  2. Resin Dermatitis in a Car Factory

    PubMed Central

    Engel, H. O.; Calnan, C. D.

    1966-01-01

    An outbreak of dermatitis in a car assembly factory is described; it affected 50 workers who handled rubber weatherstrips coated with an adhesive. The adhesive was found to contain para-tertiary butyl phenol (P.T.B.P.) formaldehyde resin. Of those patch tested 70% gave positive reactions to the adhesive and 65% to the resin. Improved methods of handling and personal protection succeeded in arresting the occurrence of dermatitis. Barrier creams gave no protection in these circumstances. The episode illustrates the different preventive control methods which have to be tried when dealing with a simple skin hazard which cannot be abolished. Images PMID:5904100

  3. Evaluation of an Experimental Adhesive Resin for Orthodontic Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgesh, B. H.; Alkheraif, A. A.; Pavithra, D.; Hashem, M. I.; Alkhudhairy, F.; Elsharawy, M.; Divakar, D. D.; Vallittu, P. K.; Matinlinna, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of an experimental adhesive resin for orthodontic bonding by measuring some the chemical and mechanical properties. The resin demonstrated increased values of nanohardness and elastic modulus, but the differences were not significant compared with those for the Transbond XT adhesives. The experimental adhesive resin could be a feasible choice or a substitute for the traditional bis-GMA-based resins used in bonding orthodontic attachments.

  4. The Fracture of Thermosetting Resins after Exposure to Water.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    formaldehyde , urea - formaldehyde and melamine - formaldehyde resins , epoxides, unsaturated polyesters, diallyl phthalate resins , furanes and certain kinds...linked phenol- formaldehyde (27) and epoxy resins (22), but some work on the fracture surfaces of polyesters with varying flexibiliser additions has been...AO0-A099 975 KINGSTON POLYTECHNIC KINGSTON UPON THAMES (ENGLAND) F/G 11/9 THE FRACTURE OF THERMOSETTING RESINS AFTER EXPOSURE TO WATER.(U) SEP 80 6

  5. 49 CFR 173.165 - Polyester resin kits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Polyester resin kits. 173.165 Section 173.165... Polyester resin kits. (a) Except for transportation by aircraft, polyester resin kits consisting of a base... will not interact dangerously in the event of leakage. (b) For transportation by aircraft, polyester...

  6. 21 CFR 177.2430 - Polyether resins, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyether resins, chlorinated. 177.2430 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2430 Polyether resins, chlorinated. Chlorinated polyether resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated...

  7. 21 CFR 177.2430 - Polyether resins, chlorinated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyether resins, chlorinated. 177.2430 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2430 Polyether resins, chlorinated. Chlorinated..., in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The chlorinated polyether resins are...

  8. Bismaleimide resins for flame resistant honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A 60 kg batch of Resin M751 was produced in pilot plant scale. The resin was delivered to the prepreg company as an NMP solution. 100 kg of glass-fabric prepregs were fabricated. Prepreg characteristics and curing cycles for laminate fabrication were provided. A new batch of Resin M756 (Code M756 - 2) was synthesized.

  9. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated use...

  10. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated use...

  11. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2755 - Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic... Substances § 721.2755 Cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as cycloaliphatic epoxy resin (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  4. Resin impregnation of cellulose nanofibril films facilitated by water swelling

    Treesearch

    Yan Qing; Ronald Sabo; Zhiyong Cai; Yiqiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Flexible composite films were produced by impregnating aqueous phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin into water-swollen cellulose nanofibril (CNF) films. CNF films were prepared using a pressurized filtration method in combination with freeze drying. The freeze-dried films were swollen with water then impregnated with PF resin by soaking in aqueous resin solutions of varying...

  5. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated use...

  6. 21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated use...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating process. The device consists of a resin material, such as methyl methacrylate, and is used to form a...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating process. The device consists of a resin material, such as methyl methacrylate, and is used to form a...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such as...

  10. 40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN P...

  11. 40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified phenolic resin (PMN...

  12. Reusable chelating resins concentrate metal ions from highly dilute solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J.; Weetal, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Column chromatographic method uses new metal chelating resins for recovering heavy-metal ions from highly dilute solutions. The absorbed heavy-metal cations may be removed from the chelating resins by acid or base washes. The resins are reusable after the washes are completed.

  13. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2752 - Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Epoxy resin containing phosphorus... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2752 Epoxy resin containing phosphorus (generic). (a) Chemical substance... epoxy resin containing phosphorus (PMN P-00-912) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  15. Synthesis and toughness properties of resins and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, N. J.

    1984-01-01

    Tensile and shear moduli of four ACEE (Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program) resins are presented along with ACEE composite material modulus predictions based on micromechanics. Compressive strength and fracture toughness of the resins and composites were discussed. In addition, several resin synthesis techniques are reviewed.

  16. Photosensitive filler minimizes internal stresses in epoxy resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    Photosensitive filler is added to curable epoxy resins to minimize stress from internal shrinkage during curing or polymerization. Cinnamic acid resins and cinnamal ketones may be added in the amount of 1 to 3 percent by weight of the resin mixture.

  17. 21 CFR 177.2260 - Filters, resin-bonded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Filters, resin-bonded. 177.2260 Section 177.2260... Use § 177.2260 Filters, resin-bonded. Resin-bonded filters may be safely used in producing... filters are prepared from natural or synthetic fibers to which have been added substances required in...

  18. ELUTION OF URANIUM VALUES FROM ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, R.H.

    1959-11-24

    A process is described for eluting complex uranium ions absorbed on ion exchange resins. The resin is subjected to the action of an aqueous eluting solution contuining sulfuric acid and an alkali metal, ammonium, or magnesium chloride or nitrate, the elution being carried out until the desired amount of the uranium is removed from the resin.

  19. 40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380... Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418) is...

  20. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in producing...

  1. 21 CFR 176.110 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. 176.110 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.110 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resins may be safely used as components of articles intended for use in producing...

  2. 21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as articles...

  3. 21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as articles...

  4. 21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as articles...

  5. 21 CFR 177.2355 - Mineral reinforced nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mineral reinforced nylon resins. 177.2355 Section... Repeated Use § 177.2355 Mineral reinforced nylon resins. Mineral reinforced nylon resins identified in... accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section the mineral...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such as...

  7. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573...

  8. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573...

  9. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573...

  10. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573...

  11. 21 CFR 573.120 - Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.120 Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Acrylamide-acrylic acid resin. 573.120 Section 573...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  17. Demonstration of New, Highly Perchlorate-Selective Ion Exchange Resin Coupled with Resin-Optimized, Single-Vessel Engineering Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    effluent by ion chromatography (method described in Appendix A) Resin Separation Will remove >95% of fully exhausted resin (below mid-lateral...and retain >95% of the unexhausted resin (above the mid-lateral). 1) Mass balance on ClO4- during each cycle using ion chromatography and resin...Application Note 134, “Determination of Low Concentrations of Perchlorate in Drinking and Ground Waters Using Ion Chromatography ” and Product Note

  18. Carbohydrate modified phenol-formaldehyde resins

    Treesearch

    Anthony H. Conner; Linda F. Lorenz

    1986-01-01

    For adhesive self-sufficiency, the wood industry needs new adhesive systems in which all or part of the petroleum-derived phenolic component is replaced by a renewable material without sacrificing high durability or ease of bonding. We tested the bonding of wood veneers, using phenolic resins in which part of the phenol-formaldehyde was replaced with carbohydrates. Our...

  19. Resin transfer molding speeds composite making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, Michael

    1992-11-01

    Fabrication resin transfer molding (RTM) composite parts for different industrial applications is discussed. These applications include composite aerospace parts, sports car components, and high performance sporting equipment. It is pointed out that RTM parts are lighter than metals and can be formulated to have superior durability. But like all composite parts, they are expensive and are made in limited runs.

  20. Resin char oxidation retardant for composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.; Gluyas, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Boron powder stabilizes char, so burned substances are shiny, smooth, and free of loose graphite fibers. Resin weight loss of laminates during burning in air is identical for the first three minutes for unfilled and boron-filled samples, then boron samples stabilize.

  1. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Polyestercarbonate resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for use in producing.... Copies are available from the Office of Premarket Approval, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition... examined at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Library, Food and Drug Administration, 5100...

  2. 21 CFR 177.1580 - Polycarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... tested shall be ground or cut into small particles that will pass through a U.S. standard sieve No. 6 and that will be held on a U.S. standard sieve No. 10. (i) Polycarbonate resins, when extracted with...

  3. 21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Terpene resins. 178.3930 Section 178.3930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants...

  4. 21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Terpene resins. 178.3930 Section 178.3930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants...

  5. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... condensation of adipic acid, 1,3-benzenedimethanamine, and alpha-(3-aminopropyl)-omega-(3-amino-propoxy)poly- oxyethylene under such conditions that the alpha-(3-amino-propyl)-omega-(3-aminopropoxy) polyoxyethylene... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nylon resins. 177.1500 Section 177.1500 Food and...

  6. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... condensation of adipic acid, 1,3-benzenedimethanamine, and alpha-(3-aminopropyl)-omega-(3-amino-propoxy)poly- oxyethylene under such conditions that the alpha-(3-amino-propyl)-omega-(3-aminopropoxy) polyoxyethylene... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nylon resins. 177.1500 Section 177.1500 Food and...

  7. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... condensation of adipic acid, 1,3-benzenedimethanamine, and alpha-(3-aminopropyl)-omega-(3-amino-propoxy)poly- oxyethylene under such conditions that the alpha-(3-amino-propyl)-omega-(3-aminopropoxy) polyoxyethylene... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nylon resins. 177.1500 Section 177.1500 Food and...

  8. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-benzenedimethanamine, and alpha-(3-aminopropyl)-omega-(3-amino-propoxy)poly- oxyethylene under such conditions that the alpha-(3-amino-propyl)-omega-(3-aminopropoxy) polyoxyethylene monomer content does not exceed 7 percent... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nylon resins. 177.1500 Section 177.1500 Food and...

  9. 21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... condensation of adipic acid, 1,3-benzenedimethanamine, and alpha-(3-aminopropyl)-omega-(3-amino-propoxy)poly- oxyethylene under such conditions that the alpha-(3-amino-propyl)-omega-(3-aminopropoxy) polyoxyethylene... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nylon resins. 177.1500 Section 177.1500 Food and...

  10. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  11. Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elder, David

    2005-01-01

    The historical uses of ion-exchanged resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchanged process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange are provided that include drug stabilization, pharmaceutical excipients, taste-masking agents, oral sustained-release products, topical products for local application…

  12. 21 CFR 172.280 - Terpene resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Terpene resin. 172.280 Section 172.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Coatings, Films and Related Substances § 172.280...

  13. [Study of purity tests for silicone resins].

    PubMed

    Sato, Kyoko; Otsuki, Noriko; Ohori, Akio; Chinda, Mitsuru; Furusho, Noriko; Osako, Tsutomu; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    In the 8th edition of Japan's Specifications and Standards for Food Additives, the purity test for silicone resins requires the determination of the refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the extracted silicone oil, and allows for only a limited amount of silicon dioxide. In the purity test, carbon tetrachloride is used to separate the silicone oil and silicon dioxide. To exclude carbon tetrachloride, methods were developed for separating the silicone oil and silicon dioxide from silicone resin, which use hexane and 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane. For silicone oil, the measured refractive index and kinetic viscosity of the silicone oil obtained from the hexane extract were shown to be equivalent to those of the intact silicone oil. In regard to silicon dioxide, it was confirmed that, following the separation with 10% n-dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid in hexane, the level of silicon dioxide in silicone resin can be accurately determined. Therefore, in this study, we developed a method for testing the purity of silicone resins without the use of carbon tetrachloride, which is a harmful reagent.

  14. Studies on chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, J. M.; Hou, T. H.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    A new analytical model for simulating chemoviscosity of thermosetting resins has been formulated. The model is developed by modifying the well-established Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) theory in polymer rheology for thermoplastic materials. By introducing a relationship between the glass transition temperature Tg(t) and the degree of cure alpha(t) of the resin system under cure, the WLF theory can be modified to account for the factor of reaction time. Temperature dependent functions of the modified WLF theory constants C sub 1 (t) and C sub 2 (t) were determined from the isothermal cure data. Theoretical predictions of the model for the resin under dynamic heating cure cycles were shown to compare favorably with the experimental data. This work represents progress toward establishing a chemoviscosity model which is capable of not only describing viscosity profiles accurately under various cure cycles, but also correlating viscosity data to the changes of physical properties associated with the structural transformation of the thermosetting resin systems during cure.

  15. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... resin pellets, when extracted with 100 milliliters of distilled water at reflux temperature for 8 hours... distilled water at reflux temperature for 8 hours, shall yield total extractives not to exceed 0.003 percent... milliliters of n-heptane at reflux temperature for 8 hours, shall yield total extractives not to exceed 0.01...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... resin pellets, when extracted with 100 milliliters of distilled water at reflux temperature for 8 hours... distilled water at reflux temperature for 8 hours, shall yield total extractives not to exceed 0.003 percent... milliliters of n-heptane at reflux temperature for 8 hours, shall yield total extractives not to exceed 0.01...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... resin pellets, when extracted with 100 milliliters of distilled water at reflux temperature for 8 hours... distilled water at reflux temperature for 8 hours, shall yield total extractives not to exceed 0.003 percent... milliliters of n-heptane at reflux temperature for 8 hours, shall yield total extractives not to exceed 0.01...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1380 - Fluorocarbon resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... resin pellets, when extracted with 100 milliliters of distilled water at reflux temperature for 8 hours... distilled water at reflux temperature for 8 hours, shall yield total extractives not to exceed 0.003 percent... milliliters of n-heptane at reflux temperature for 8 hours, shall yield total extractives not to exceed 0.01...

  19. 21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... molecular weight of 20,000 grams per mole, as determined by light scattering measurements in sulfuric acid at room temperature. (b) Optional adjuvant substances. The basic polyaryletherketone resins... centimeter) of food-contact surface, when extracted at reflux temperature for 2 hours with the following...

  20. 21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... molecular weight of 20,000 grams per mole, as determined by light scattering measurements in sulfuric acid at room temperature. (b) Optional adjuvant substances. The basic polyaryletherketone resins... centimeter) of food-contact surface, when extracted at reflux temperature for 2 hours with the following...

  1. 21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... molecular weight of 20,000 grams per mole, as determined by light scattering measurements in sulfuric acid at room temperature. (b) Optional adjuvant substances. The basic polyaryletherketone resins... centimeter) of food-contact surface, when extracted at reflux temperature for 2 hours with the following...

  2. 21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... molecular weight of 20,000 grams per mole, as determined by light scattering measurements in sulfuric acid at room temperature. (b) Optional adjuvant substances. The basic polyaryletherketone resins... centimeter) of food-contact surface, when extracted at reflux temperature for 2 hours with the following...

  3. Resin film infusion mold tooling and molding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, Roger (Inventor); Grossheim, Brian (Inventor); Mouradian, Karbis (Inventor); Thrash, Patrick J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A mold apparatus and method for resin film infusion molding including an outer mold tool having a facing sheet adapted to support a resin film and preform assembly. The facing sheet includes attachment features extending therefrom. An inner mold tool is positioned on the facing sheet to enclose the resin film and preform assembly for resin film infusion molding. The inner mold tool includes a plurality of mandrels positioned for engagement with the resin film and preform assembly. Each mandrel includes a slot formed therein. A plurality of locating bars cooperate with the slots and with the attachment features for locating the mandrels longitudinally on the outer mold tool.

  4. NITRATE CONVERSION OF HB-LINE REILLEXTM HPQ RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.; Williams, M.; Steeper, T.

    Reillex{trademark} HPQ ion exchange resin is used by HB Line to remove plutonium from aqueous streams. Reillex{trademark} HPQ resin currently available from Vertellus Specialties LLC is a chloride ionic form, which can cause stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels. Therefore, HB Line Engineering requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) convert resin from chloride form to nitrate form in the Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL). To perform this task, SRNL treated two batches of resin in 2012. The first batch of resin from Reilly Industries Batch 80302MA was initially treated at SRNL in 2001 to remove chloride. This batch of resin,more » nominally 30 liters, has been stored wet in carboys since that time until being retreated in 2012. The second batch of resin from Batch 23408 consisted of 50 kg of new resin purchased from Vertellus Specialties in 2012. Both batches were treated in a column designed to convert resin using downflow of 1.0 M sodium nitrate solution through the resin bed followed by rinsing with deionized water. Both batches were analyzed for chloride concentration, before and after treatment, using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The resin specification [Werling, 2003] states the total chlorine and chloride concentration shall be less than 250 ppm. The resin condition for measuring this concentration is not specified; however, in service the resin would always be fully wet. Measurements in SRNL showed that changing from oven dry resin to fully wet resin, with liquid in the particle interstices but no supernatant, increases the total weight by a factor of at least three. Therefore, concentration of chlorine or chloride expressed as parts per million (ppm) decreases by a factor of three. Therefore, SRNL recommends measuring chlorine concentration on an oven dry basis, then dividing by three to estimate chloride concentration in the fully wet condition. Chloride concentration in the first batch (No.80302MA) was nearly the

  5. Ectomycorrhizal fungi of the Seychelles: diversity patterns and host shifts from the native Vateriopsis seychellarum (Dipterocarpaceae) and Intsia bijuga (Caesalpiniaceae) to the introduced Eucalyptus robusta (Myrtaceae), but not Pinus caribea (Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Tedersoo, Leho; Suvi, Triin; Beaver, Katy; Kõljalg, Urmas

    2007-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi form highly diverse communities in temperate forests, but little is known about their community ecology in tropical ecosystems. Using anatomotyping and rDNA sequencing, ECM fungi were identified on root tips of the introduced Eucalyptus robusta and Pinus caribea as well as the endemic Vateriopsis seychellarum and indigenous Intsia bijuga in the Seychelles. Sequencing revealed 30 species of ECM fungi on root tips of V. seychellarum and I. bijuga, with three species overlapping. Eucalyptus robusta shared five of these taxa, whereas P. caribea hosted three unique species of ECM fungi that were likely cointroduced with containerized seedlings. The thelephoroid (including the anamorphic genus Riessiella), euagaric, boletoid and hymenochaetoid clades of basidiomycetes dominated the ECM fungal community of native trees. Two species of Annulatascaceae (Sordariales, Ascomycota) were identified and described as ECM symbionts of V. seychellarum. The low diversity of native ECM fungi is attributed to deforestation and long-term isolation of the Seychelles. Native ECM fungi associate with exotic eucalypts, whereas cointroduced ECM fungi persist in pine plantations for decades.

  6. Synthesis and characterizations of melamine-based epoxy resins.

    PubMed

    Ricciotti, Laura; Roviello, Giuseppina; Tarallo, Oreste; Borbone, Fabio; Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Catauro, Michelina; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-09-05

    A new, easy and cost-effective synthetic procedure for the preparation of thermosetting melamine-based epoxy resins is reported. By this innovative synthetic method, different kinds of resins can be obtained just by mixing the reagents in the presence of a catalyst without solvent and with mild curing conditions. Two types of resins were synthesized using melamine and a glycidyl derivative (resins I) or by adding a silane derivative (resin II). The resins were characterized by means of chemical-physical and thermal techniques. Experimental results show that all the prepared resins have a good thermal stability, but differ for their mechanical properties: resin I exhibits remarkable stiffness with a storage modulus value up to 830 MPa at room temperature, while lower storage moduli were found for resin II, indicating that the presence of silane groups could enhance the flexibility of these materials. The resins show a pot life higher than 30 min, which makes these resins good candidates for practical applications. The functionalization with silane terminations can be exploited in the formulation of hybrid organic-inorganic composite materials.

  7. Synthesis and Characterizations of Melamine-Based Epoxy Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ricciotti, Laura; Roviello, Giuseppina; Tarallo, Oreste; Borbone, Fabio; Ferone, Claudio; Colangelo, Francesco; Catauro, Michelina; Cioffi, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    A new, easy and cost-effective synthetic procedure for the preparation of thermosetting melamine-based epoxy resins is reported. By this innovative synthetic method, different kinds of resins can be obtained just by mixing the reagents in the presence of a catalyst without solvent and with mild curing conditions. Two types of resins were synthesized using melamine and a glycidyl derivative (resins I) or by adding a silane derivative (resin II). The resins were characterized by means of chemical-physical and thermal techniques. Experimental results show that all the prepared resins have a good thermal stability, but differ for their mechanical properties: resin I exhibits remarkable stiffness with a storage modulus value up to 830 MPa at room temperature, while lower storage moduli were found for resin II, indicating that the presence of silane groups could enhance the flexibility of these materials. The resins show a pot life higher than 30 min, which makes these resins good candidates for practical applications. The functionalization with silane terminations can be exploited in the formulation of hybrid organic-inorganic composite materials. PMID:24013372

  8. Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Snowden, Jr., Thomas M.; Wells, Barbara J.

    1987-01-01

    A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40.degree. to 365.degree. C. to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

  9. Electrically conductive resinous bond and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Snowden, T.M. Jr.; Wells, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    A method of bonding elements together with a bond of high strength and good electrical conductivity which comprises: applying an unfilled polyimide resin between surfaces of the elements to be bonded, heat treating said unfilled polyimide resin in stages between a temperature range of about 40 to 365/sup 0/C to form a strong adhesive bond between said elements, applying a metal-filled polyimide resin overcoat between said elements so as to provide electrical connection therebetween, and heat treating said metal-filled polyimide resin with substantially the same temperature profile as the unfilled polyimide resin. The present invention is also concerned with an adhesive, resilient, substantially void free bonding combination for providing a high strength, electrically conductive adhesive attachment between electrically conductive elements which comprises a major amount of an unfilled polyimide resin and a minor amount of a metal-filled polyimide resin.

  10. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification in Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Cicero-Herman, C.A.; Workman, P.; Poole, K.

    1998-05-01

    Bench-scale studies were performed to determine the feasibility of vitrification treatment of six resins representative of those used in the commercial nuclear industry. Each resin was successfully immobilized using the same proprietary borosilicate glass formulation. Waste loadings varied from 38 to 70 g of resin/100 g of glass produced depending on the particular resin, with volume reductions of 28 percent to 68 percent. The bench-scale results were used to perform a melter demonstration with one of the resins at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). The resin used was a weakly acidic meth acrylic cation exchange resin. The vitrification processmore » utilized represented a approximately 64 percent volume reduction. Glass characterization, radionuclide retention, offgas analyses, and system compatibility results will be discussed in this paper.« less

  11. [Physical properties of resins for veneer crown. (Part 1) Bending strength of thermosetting methacrylic resins (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kashiwada, T

    1979-01-01

    The physical properties of thermosetting methacrylic resins contain a kind or more than two kinds of cross linking agents were investigated. Knoop hardness and bending strength after drying, water sorption and thermal cycling were listed in table 4 and 5. Hydrophilic resins absorbed water about 3 times as much as hydrophobic resins. The materials contain a small amount of hydrophobic cross linking agents in MMA indicate comparatively excellent properties after drying, water sorption and thermal cycling. Knoop hardness of resins generally reduced by water sorption, especially in the case of the resin contains a large amount of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate.

  12. Nanomechanical properties of dental resin-composites.

    PubMed

    El-Safty, S; Akhtar, R; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2012-12-01

    To determine by nanoindentation the hardness and elastic modulus of resin-composites, including a series with systematically varied filler loading, plus other representative materials that fall into the categories of flowable, bulk-fill and conventional nano-hybrid types. Ten dental resin-composites: three flowable, three bulk-fill and four conventional were investigated using nanoindentation. Disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material using a metallic mold. Specimens were irradiated in the mold at top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points (40s each) with light curing unit at 650mW/cm(2). Specimens were then mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. After grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were investigated using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius). Each specimen was loaded at one loading rate and three different unloading rates (at room temperature) with thirty indentations, per unloading rate. The maximum load applied by the nanoindenter to examine the specimens was 10mN. Dependent on the type of the resin-composite material, the mean values ranged from 0.73GPa to 1.60GPa for nanohardness and from 14.44GPa to 24.07GPa for elastic modulus. There was a significant positive non-linear correlation between elastic modulus and nanohardness (r(2)=0.88). Nonlinear regression revealed a significant positive correlation (r(2)=0.62) between elastic moduli and filler loading and a non-significant correlation (r(2)=0.50) between nanohardness and filler loading of the studied materials. Varying the unloading rates showed no consistent effect on the elastic modulus and nanohardness of the studied materials. For a specific resin matrix, both elastic moduli and nanohardness correlated positively with filler loading. For the resin-composites investigated, the group-average elastic

  13. Using Sr Resin with mixed acid matrices

    DOE PAGES

    McLain, Derek R.; Liu, Christine; Sudowe, Ralf

    2018-03-02

    Here, the quantification of radioactive material dispersed following the release of 90Sr, whether accidental or intentional, would be of high importance. Depending on the circumstances, it is possible that the contaminated materials would need to be completely digested prior to quantification. Many sample matrices require a mixture of different acids be employed to achieve total dissolution. Unfortunately, one the most common approaches for the separation of strontium, extraction chromatography with Sr Resin, has only been fully characterized in pure mineral acid solutions. This work shows that Sr Resin can be used effectively with high concentration mixtures of nitric and hydrochloricmore » acids in the presence or absence of hydrofluoric acid, thereby potentially negating the need for conversion to a pure mineral acid matrix.« less

  14. Epoxy resins in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ton; Van Duivenbooden, Cor; Terwoert, Jeroen

    2006-09-01

    Epoxy resins are used as coatings, adhesives, and in wood and concrete repair. However, epoxy resins can be highly irritating to the skin and are strong sensitizers. Some hardeners are carcinogenic. Based on the results of earlier Dutch studies, an international project on "best practices,"--Epoxy Code--with epoxy products was started. Partners were from Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK. The "Code" deals with substitution, safe working procedures, safer tools, and skin protection. The feasibility of an internationally agreed "ranking system" for the health risks of epoxy products was studied. Such a ranking system should inform the user of the harmfulness of different epoxies and stimulate research on less harmful products by product developers.

  15. Flammability of Epoxy Resins Containing Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.; Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G.; Connell, J. W.; Hinkley, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire-resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial and general aviation aircraft, flame-retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured neat epoxy formulations were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis, microscale combustion calorimetry, and fire calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness and compressive strength of several cured formulations showed no detrimental effect due to phosphorus content. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  16. Using Sr Resin with mixed acid matrices

    SciTech Connect

    McLain, Derek R.; Liu, Christine; Sudowe, Ralf

    Here, the quantification of radioactive material dispersed following the release of 90Sr, whether accidental or intentional, would be of high importance. Depending on the circumstances, it is possible that the contaminated materials would need to be completely digested prior to quantification. Many sample matrices require a mixture of different acids be employed to achieve total dissolution. Unfortunately, one the most common approaches for the separation of strontium, extraction chromatography with Sr Resin, has only been fully characterized in pure mineral acid solutions. This work shows that Sr Resin can be used effectively with high concentration mixtures of nitric and hydrochloricmore » acids in the presence or absence of hydrofluoric acid, thereby potentially negating the need for conversion to a pure mineral acid matrix.« less

  17. Early hardness of self-adhesive resin cements cured under indirect resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Giráldez, Isabel; Ceballos, Laura; Garrido, Miguel A; Rodríguez, Jesús

    2011-04-01

    To determine the influence of curing mode on the surface hardness of seven resin cements used to lute indirect composite restorations. Seven commercial dual-curing resin cements were tested: two were total-etch (RelyX ARC [3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA] and Variolink II [Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein]); one was self-etch (Multilink Automix [Ivoclar Vivadent]), and four were self-adhesive (RelyX Unicem [3M ESPE], Maxcem Elite [Kerr Corp., Orange, CA, USA], SmartCem2 [Dentsply, Detrey, GmbH, Konstanz, Germany], and G-Cem [GC CORPORATION, Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo, Japan]). Three specimens (0.5 × 6.5mm) of each material were prepared for each of three experimental groups: Group 1 (cements allowed to self cure); Group 2 (cements light-cured for 40 seconds); and Group 3 (cements light-cured for 80 seconds). All specimens were cured through a 4-mm-thick composite cylinder (Filtek Z250-A3). Surface microhardness numbers were determined at 20 min after preparation. Results were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (p<0.05). Superficial hardness was significantly influenced by the resin cement tested (p<0.0001), the curing mode (p<0.0001), and their interaction (p<0.0001). RelyX ARC exhibited the highest mean microhardness values regardless of the curing mode. Light-curing significantly increased the microhardness of all resin cements studied, and these values increased even further with a doubling of irradiation time. Self-adhesive cements exhibited different behavior according to the curing mode. RelyX Unicem was highly sensitive to light irradiation, showing the lowest mean values in the self-curing mode. After light irradiation for 40 or 80 seconds, Maxcem Elite exhibited the lowest mean hardness values of all the resin cements tested. The microhardness of resin cements is highly dependent on the brand. Dual-curing resin cements should always be light irradiated for longer periods than that recommended by manufacturers. Dual

  18. Contact allergy to epoxy resin: risk occupations and consequences.

    PubMed

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mortz, Charlotte G; Paulsen, Evy; Sommerlund, Mette; Veien, Niels Kren; Laurberg, Grete; Kaaber, Knud; Thormann, Jens; Andersen, Bo Lasthein; Danielsen, Anne; Avnstorp, Christian; Kristensen, Berit; Kristensen, Ove; Vissing, Susanne; Nielsen, Niels Henrik; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2012-08-01

    Epoxy resin monomers are strong skin sensitizers that are widely used in industrial sectors. In Denmark, the law stipulates that workers must undergo a course on safe handling of epoxy resins prior to occupational exposure, but the effectiveness of this initiative is largely unknown. To evaluate the prevalence of contact allergy to epoxy resin monomer (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A; MW 340) among patients with suspected contact dermatitis and relate this to occupation and work-related consequences. The dataset comprised 20 808 consecutive dermatitis patients patch tested during 2005-2009. All patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test were sent a questionnaire. A positive patch test reaction to epoxy resin was found in 275 patients (1.3%), with a higher proportion in men (1.9%) than in women (1.0%). The prevalence of sensitization to epoxy resin remained stable over the study period. Of the patients with an epoxy resin-positive patch test, 71% returned a questionnaire; 95 patients had worked with epoxy resin in the occupational setting, and, of these, one-third did not use protective gloves and only 50.5% (48) had participated in an educational programme. The 1% prevalence of epoxy resin contact allergy is equivalent to reports from other countries. The high occurrence of epoxy resin exposure at work, and the limited use of protective measures, indicate that reinforcement of the law is required. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Composites with improved fiber-resin interfacial adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cizmecioglu, Muzaffer (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The adhesion of fiber reinforcement such as high modulus graphite to a matrix resin such as polycarbonate is greatly enhanced by applying a very thin layer, suitably from 50 Angstroms to below 1000 Angstroms, to the surface of the fiber such as by immersing the fiber in a dilute solution of the matrix resin in a volatile solvent followed by draining to remove excess solution and air drying to remove the solvent. The thin layer wets the fiber surface. The very dilute solution of matrix resin is able to impregnate multifilament fibers and the solution evenly flows onto the surface of the fibers. A thin uniform layer is formed on the surface of the fiber after removal of the solvent. The matrix resin coated fiber is completely wetted by the matrix resin during formation of the composite. Increased adhesion of the resin to the fibers is observed at fracture. At least 65 percent of the surface of the graphite fiber is covered with polycarbonate resin at fracture whereas uncoated fibers have very little matrix resin adhering to their surfaces at fracture and epoxy sized graphite fibers exhibit only slightly higher coverage with matrix resin at fracture. Flexural modulus of the composite containing matrix resin coated fibers is increased by 50 percent and flexural strength by 37 percent as compared to composites made with unsized fibers.

  20. 4-META opaque resin--a new resin strongly adhesive to nickel-chromium alloy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Nagata, K; Takeyama, M; Atsuta, M; Nakabayashi, N; Masuhara, E

    1981-09-01

    1) A new adhesive opaque resin containing a reactive monomer, 4-methacryloxy-ethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), was prepared, and its application to thermosetting acrylic resin veneer crowns was studied. 2) The 4-META opaque resin was applied to a variety of nickel-chromium dental alloy specimens which had undergone different treatment, and endurance tests were conducted to evaluate the durability of adhesion. 3) Stable adhesion against water penetration was achieved with metal surfaces first etched with HCl and then oxidized with HNO3. A bond strength of 250 kg/cm2 was maintained even after immersion in water at 37 degrees C for 30 wk or at 80 degrees C for ten wk. Furthermore, this value did not decrease even after the specimens were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. 4) The 4-META opaque resin studied can eliminate the necessity for retention devices on metal castings. 5) The smooth 4-META opaque resin should have no adverse effects on gingivae.

  1. Fire- and Heat-Resistant Laminating Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Mikroyannidis, John A.

    1987-01-01

    Imide compounds containing phosphourus thermally polymerized. New maleimido- or citraconimido-end-capped monomers, have relatively low melting temperatures, polymerized at moderate temperatures to rigid bisimide resins without elimination of volatiles. Monomers dissolve in such solvents as methyl ethyl ketone, acetone, and tetrahydrofuran, suitable and perferred as "varnish solvents" for composite fabrication. Low melting points of these componds allow use as adhesives without addition of solvents.

  2. Volatility and vapor saturation of pine resins

    Treesearch

    Richard H. Smith

    1963-01-01

    Volatility and vapor saturation were obtained for closed-faced collected resin of 10 pine species and 4 hybrids in California. Volatility ranged from 2 to 32 percent at 25°C., and from 14 to 36 percent at 100°C. Hybrids were usually less volatile than either parent. Vapor saturation ranged widely between species, from 2 to 20 mg. per 150 cc., but only...

  3. Dental resins properties studied by Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, Hypolito José; Gebert de Oliveira Franco, Ana Paula; Karam, Leandro Zen

    2017-08-01

    Fibre Bragg sensors are a key device in biomedical research for simultaneous measurement of deformations and temperature. The present study shows results from the characterization of dental resin materials with different composition and applications. The results show that all investigated polymer materials demonstrate a temperature rise within the first few seconds after starting activation procedure. The mode of activation and the material composition influence the polymerization shrinkage values.

  4. Processing Science of Epoxy Resin Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-15

    3 2.2 LAMINATE FABRICATION 30 2.2.1 Baseline Laminate Fabrication 30 2.2.2 Large Laminate Fabrication 36 2.3 DIFFUSIVITY AND SOLUBILITY...Thick Laminate 42 28 Baseline Cure Cycle With Specimen Advancement Levels 45 29 Composite Panel Fabrication 47 30 Composite Panel Fabrication 48 31...first change was the elimination of the different 1 resin formulations and concentration on the normal or baseline 5208/T300 prepreg as produced by

  5. Processable polyimide adhesive and matrix composite resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Progar, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature polyimide composition prepared by reacting 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride with metaphenylenediamine is employed to prepare matrix resins, adhesives, films, coatings, moldings, and laminates, especially those showing enhanced flow with retention of mechanical and adhesive properties. It can be used in the aerospace industry, for example, in joining metals to metals or metals to composite structures. One area of application is in the manufacture of lighter and stronger aircraft and spacecraft structures.

  6. Chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resin systems, 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.; Huang, Joan Y. Z.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study on the changes of chemorheological properties has been conducted and analyzed on commercial Hercules 3501-6 resin system cured under several isothermal conditions between 375 and 435 K. For the cure temperatures equal to or greater than 385 K, the storage modulus curing curves, G prime (t), exhibited abrupt changes in slope which occurred at various times depending on the curing temperatures and were attributed to the onset of gelation reactions. The crossover points between G prime (t) and G double prime (t) curves were observed for curing temperatures equal to or greater than 400 K. The gelation and the crossover points obtained from the chemorheological measurements, therefore, defined two characteristic resin states during cure. Approximately the same value for the degree of cure was reached by the advancement of the reaction at each of these states. The temperature dependency of the viscosities for the characteristic resin states and the rate constants of increase in moduli at different stages of curing were analyzed. Various G prime (t) and G double prime (t) isothermal curing curves were also shown to be capable of being superimposed on one another by the principle of time-temperature superposition. The resultant shift factors a sub t(t) and a Eta(T) were shown to follow the Arrhenius type relationship. Values of the activation energy suggested that the reaction kinetics, instead of the diffusion mechanism, was the limiting step in the overall resin advancement for the cure at temperatures equal to or greater than 385 K.

  7. Analysis of Commercial Unsaturated Polyester Repair Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    resins utilizing renewable fatty acid -based monomers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS vinyl ester, styrene, fatty acid monomers, HAP, triglycerides 16. SECURITY...criteria for selecting the appropriate repair include whether the component can be removed and whether the back side is accessible. For a typical moderate...field repair, any remaining coating in the repair area is removed by hand sanding or portable tools. Damage is cut out in an appropriate

  8. Potential contribution of exposed resin to ecosystem emissions of monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, Allyson S. D.; Harley, Peter; Monson, Russell K.

    2013-10-01

    Conifers, especially pines, produce and store under pressure monoterpene-laden resin in canals located throughout the plant. When the plants are damaged and resin canals punctured, the resin is exuded and the monoterpenes are released into the atmosphere, a process that has been shown to influence ecosystem-level monoterpene emissions. Less attention has been paid to the small amounts of resin that are exuded from branches, expanding needles, developing pollen cones, and terminal buds in the absence of any damage. The goal of this study was to provide the first estimate of the potential of this naturally-exposed resin to influence emissions of monoterpenes from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) ecosystems. When resin is first exuded as small spherical beads from undamaged tissues it emits monoterpenes to the atmosphere at a rate that is four orders of magnitude greater than needle tissue with an equivalent exposed surface area and the emissions from exuded beads decline exponentially as the resin dries. We made measurements of resin beads on the branches of ponderosa pine trees in the middle of the growing season and found, on average, 0.15 cm2 of exposed resin bead surface area and 1250 cm2 of total needle surface area per branch tip. If the resin emerged over the course of 10 days, resin emissions would make up 10% of the ecosystem emissions each day. Since we only accounted for exposed resin at a single point in time, this is probably an underestimate of how much total resin is exuded from undamaged pine tissues over the course of a growing season. Our observations, however, reveal the importance of this previously unrecognized source of monoterpenes emitted from pine forests and its potential to influence regional atmospheric chemistry dynamics.

  9. Chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins - I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.

    1984-01-01

    A new analytical model for chemoviscosity variation during cure of thermosetting resins was developed. This model is derived by modifying the widely used WLF (Williams-Landel-Ferry) Theory in polymer rheology. Major assumptions involved are that the rate of reaction is diffusion controlled and is linearly inversely proportional to the viscosity of the medium over the entire cure cycle. The resultant first order nonlinear differential equation is solved numerically, and the model predictions compare favorably with experimental data of EPON 828/Agent U obtained on a Rheometrics System 4 Rheometer. The model describes chemoviscosity up to a range of six orders of magnitude under isothermal curing conditions. The extremely non-linear chemoviscosity profile for a dynamic heating cure cycle is predicted as well. The model is also shown to predict changes of glass transition temperature for the thermosetting resin during cure. The physical significance of this prediction is unclear at the present time, however, and further research is required. From the chemoviscosity simulation point of view, the technique of establishing an analytical model as described here is easily applied to any thermosetting resin. The model thus obtained is used in real-time process controls for fabricating composite materials.

  10. Cross-reactivity among epoxy acrylates and bisphenol F epoxy resins in patients with bisphenol A epoxy resin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han N; Pokorny, Christopher D; Law, Sandra; Pratt, Melanie; Sasseville, Denis; Storrs, Frances J

    2002-09-01

    The study's objective was 2-fold: first, to evaluate the potential cross-reactivity between Bis-A epoxy resins and epoxy acrylates and second, to study the cross reactivity between Bis-A epoxy resins and newer Bis-F epoxy resins in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to epoxy resins and had positive patch test to the standard epoxy resin based on bisphenol A. Forty-one patients were patch tested to 23 chemicals including epoxy acrylates, Bis-A epoxy resins, and Bis-F epoxy resins, as well as reactive diluents and nonbisphenol epoxy resins. Questions concerning exposure to epoxy resins, occupational history, and problems with dental work were completed. All patients included in the study had positive reactions to the standard Bis-A epoxy resin. Twenty percent (8 of 41) of the patients reacted to at least one of the epoxy acrylates; the most common reaction was to Bis-GMA. Five of 8 patients who reacted to the epoxy acrylates had dental work, but only one patient had problems from her dental work. Six of 8 patients (75%) who reacted to epoxy resins and epoxy acrylates did not react to aliphatic acrylates. Thirty-two percent (13 of 41) reacted to tosylamide epoxy resin, and none reacted to triglycidyl isocyanurate resin. In addition, all patients (100%) had positive reactions to at least one of the Bis-F epoxy resins that were tested. Most patients with sensitivity to Bis-A epoxy resins do not cross-react with epoxy acrylates. Patients with positive patch test reactions to epoxy acrylates used in dentistry usually do not have symptoms from their dental work. To our knowledge, this is the largest series of patients with sensitivity to the standard Bis-A epoxy resin that have been patch tested with the more recently introduced Bis-F epoxy resins. There is significant cross-reactivity between Bis-A and Bis-F epoxy resins, which can be explained by their structural similarity. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  11. Correlations of norbornenyl crosslinked polyimide resin structures with resin thermo-oxidative stability, resin glass transition temperature and composite initial mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, William B.

    1988-01-01

    PMR (polymerization of monomeric reactants) methodology was used to prepare 70 different polyimide oligomeric resins and 30 different unidirectional graphite fiber/polyimide composites. Monomeric composition as well as chain length between sites of crosslinks were varied to examine their effects on resin thermo-oxidative stability and glass transition temperature (Tg) of the cured/postcured resins. A linear correlation of decreasing 316 C resin weight loss/surface area versus (1) decreasing aliphatic content, or (2) increasing benzylic/aliphatic content stoichiometry ratio over a wide range of resin compositions was observed. An almost linear correlation of Tg versus molecular distance between the crosslinks was also observed. An attempt was made to correlate Tg with initial composite mechanical properties (flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength). However, the scatter in mechanical strength data prevented obtaining a clear correlation. Instead, only a range of composite mechanical properties was obtained at 25, 288, and 316 C. Perhaps more importantly, what did become apparent during the correlation study was (1) the PMR methodology could be used to prepare composites from resins containing a wide variety of monomer modifications, (2) that these composites almost invariably provided satisfactory initial mechanical properties as long as the resins formulated exhibited satisfactory processing flow, and (3) that PMR resins exhibited predictable rates of 316 C weight loss/surface area based on their benzylic/aliphatic stoichiometery ratio.

  12. Assessment of cross-reactivity of new less sensitizing epoxy resin monomers in epoxy resin-allergic individuals.

    PubMed

    Hagvall, Lina; Niklasson, Ida B; Rudbäck, Johanna; O'Boyle, Niamh M; Niklasson, Eva; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2016-09-01

    Measures to prevent occupational exposure to epoxy resins, including education, medical examination, and voluntary agreements between employers and workers, have not been effective enough to protect against skin sensitization. Therefore, alternatives to the major epoxy resin haptens that have been found to be less sensitizing in the local lymph node assay have been developed. To study the cross-reactivity of two newly designed epoxy resin monomers, with decreased skin-sensitizing potency and good technical properties as compared with diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA), in subjects with known contact allergy to epoxy resin of DGEBA type. Eleven individuals with previous positive patch test reactions to epoxy resin of DGEBA participated in the study. The two alternative epoxy resin monomers were synthesized and patch tested in dilution series in parallel with epoxy resin of DGEBA from the baseline series (containing 92% DGEBA). All participants reacted to epoxy resin of DGEBA on retesting. Three participants reacted to monomer 1. No reactions were seen to monomer 2. The alternative monomers studied showed little or no cross-reactivity with epoxy resin of DGEBA. Decreasing the risk of sensitization by using less sensitizing compounds is important, as contact allergy to epoxy resins is common in spite of thorough preventive measures. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Machine for applying a two component resin to a roadway surface

    DOEpatents

    Huszagh, Donald W.

    1985-01-01

    A portable machine for spraying two component resins onto a roadway, the machine having a pneumatic control system, including apparatus for purging the machine of mixed resin with air and then removing remaining resin with solvent. Interlocks prevent contamination of solvent and resin, and mixed resin can be purged in the event of a power failure.

  14. Machine for applying a two component resin to a roadway surface

    DOEpatents

    Huszagh, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    A portable machine for spraying two component resins onto a roadway, the machine having a pneumatic control system, including means for purging the machine of mixed resin with air and then removing remaining resin with solvent. Interlocks prevent contamination of solvent and resin, and mixed resin can be purged in the event of a power failure.

  15. Bismaleimide resins for flame resistant honeycomb sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzenberger, H. D.

    1978-01-01

    Bismaleimide resins are prime candidates for nonflammable aircraft interior panels. Three resin types with different structures and processing characteristics were formulated. Resin M 751 was used to fabricate 100 kg of glass fabric prepregs which were used for the preparation of face sheets for honeycomb sandwich panels. Prepreg characteristics and curing cycles for laminate fabrication are provided. In order to advance beyond the current solvent resin technology for fibre and fabric impregnation, a hot melt solvent-less resin system was prepared and characterized. Preliminary tests were performed to develop a wet bonding process for the fabrication of advanced sandwich honeycomb panels by use of polybismaleimide glass fabric face sheets and polybismaleimide Nomex honeycomb core. B-stage material was used for both the core and the face sheet, providing flatwise tensile properties equivalent to those obtained by the state-of-the-art 3-step process which includes an epoxy adhesive resin.

  16. Health Problems of Epoxy Resins and Amine-curing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.; Alberman, K. B.

    1959-01-01

    Epoxy resins were first introduced about 10 years ago. Toxic effects, particularly dermatitis, have been frequently described. An investigation into the possible causes of pathological sequelae following the use of epoxy resin/amine mixtures has been undertaken. The cause of most cases of dermatitis and sensitization appears to be uncombined amine which is present in recent mixtures and persists in hardened resin for long periods. The results of experiments with two of the most commonly used resin/amine mixtures confirm this. Cold-cured resins are more dangerous and remain so even when hardened. A simple theory is suggested for the mechanism of the reaction between epoxy resins, amines, and biological systems. This theory leads logically to the handling precautions outlined. Images PMID:13651551

  17. Inorganic resins for clinical use of .sup.213Bi generators

    DOEpatents

    DePaoli, David W [Knoxville, TN; Hu, Michael Z [Knoxville, TN; Mirzadeh, Saed [Knoxville, TN; Clavier, John W [Elizabethton, TN

    2011-03-29

    Applicant's invention is a radionuclide generator resin material for radiochemical separation of daughter radionuclides, particularly .sup.213Bi, from a solution of parental radionuclides, the resin material capable of providing clinical quantities of .sup.213Bi of at least 20-mCi, wherein the resin material comprises a silica-based structure having at least one bifunctional ligand covalently attached to the surface of the silica-based structure. The bifunctional ligand comprises a chemical group having desirable surface functionality to enable the covalent attachment of the bifunctional ligand thereon the surface of the structure and the bifunctional ligand further comprises a second chemical group capable of binding and holding the parental radionuclides on the resin material while allowing the daughter radionuclides to elute off the resin material. The bifunctional ligand has a carbon chain with a limited number of carbons to maintain radiation stability of the resin material.

  18. Internal stabilization of polycarbonate resins by two stage radiation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Liang, Ranty H. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A new polycarbonate copolymer resin is formed by internal generation of stabilizers bound to the polymer chain. Irradiation of a solid piece or a deoxygenated solution of the resin at a first frequency below 300 nm generates 2 to 8 mol percent of phenyl salicylate groups which are rearranged to dihydroxybenzophenone groups by irradiating the resin under oxygen excluding conditions at a second frequency from 300 to 320 nm.

  19. Color change of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging.

    PubMed

    Tornavoi, Denise Cremonezzi; Agnelli, José Augusto Marcondes; Panzeri, Heitor; Dos Reis, Andréa Cândido

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of accelerated artificial aging (AAA) on the color change of composite resins used in dentistry. Three composite resins were evaluated: Two microhybrids and one hybrid of higher viscosity, with different amounts and sizes of filler particles, shades C2 and B2. A total of 54 specimens were obtained (18 for each composite resin), made of a Teflon matrix (15 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height). The color measurements were obtained with a Spectrophotometer, (PCB 6807 BYK Gardner) before and after AAA. Data were submitted to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (α >0.05), ANOVA and Tukey test (α <0.05). After statistical analysis, the color difference among composite resins with the same shades was analyzed. All composite resins showed unacceptable color changes after AAA (ΔE > 3). Considering the variable ∆E, it was observed that the color tone C2 was already statistically different for the microhybrid composite resin prior to AAA (P < 0.05) and in shade B2 for hybrid of higher viscosity and microhybrid with barium glass fluoride aluminum and silica dioxide (P < 0.01). After this process, a statistically significant difference was observed only for shade B2 between microhybrid composite resins (P < 0.01) and for hybrid of higher viscosity and microhybrid with barium glass fluoride aluminum and silica dioxide (P < 0.05). Regarding the color difference within a same composite resin group, before aging the composite resin hybrid of higher viscosity B2 showed the highest color variation rate and microhybrid with zirconium/silica C2 showed the lowest. All composite resins presented unacceptable color changes after 382 h of aging and different composite resins with same hue, presented different colors before being subjected to the aging process (B2 and C2) and after (B2). It was also observed color difference within a group of the same composite resin and same hue.

  20. Method for Improving Acoustic Impedance of Epoxy Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-11

    neoprene, ethylene propylene diene monomer ( EPDM ) and polyurethane rubbers . Typical applications of these materials encapsulate and protect acoustic...different material (e.g., rubber ) cannot be used. Thus, a hard, strong and acoustically transparent material is needed. Suitable high modulus...epoxy resin. In this method, an epoxy resin component is mixed with a rubber component. The epoxy resin component is preferably a bisphenol A

  1. Method for Improving Acoustic Impedance of Epoxy Resins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-21

    include neoprene, ethylene propylene diene monomer ( EPDM ) and polyurethane rubbers . Typical applications of these materials encapsulate and protect...a different material (e.g., rubber ) cannot be used. Thus, a hard, strong and acoustically transparent material is needed. Suitable high modulus...an epoxy resin. In this method, an epoxy resin component is mixed with a rubber component. The epoxy resin component is preferably a bisphenol A

  2. Versatile composite resins simplifying the practice of restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Margeas, Robert

    2014-01-01

    After decades of technical development and refinement, composite resins continue to simplify the practice of restorative dentistry, offering clinicians versatility, predictability, and enhanced physical properties. With a wide range of products available today, composite resins are a reliable, conservative, multi-functional restorative material option. As manufacturers strive to improve such properties as compression strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, water sorption, and wear resistance, several classification systems of composite resins have been developed.

  3. High performance mixed bisimide resins and composites based thereon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; ations.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of bismaleimide/biscitraconirnide resins produces materials which have better handling, processing or mechanical and thermal properties, particularly in graphite composites, than materials made with the individual resins. The mechanical strength of cured graphite composites prepared from a 1:1 copolymer of such bisimide resins is excellent at both ambient and elevated temperatures. The copolymer mixture provides improved composites which are lighter than metals and replace metals in many aerospace applications.

  4. Chromium Ions Improve Moisure Resistance of Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Stoakley, D. M.; Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Broad spectrum of thermosetting epoxy resins used on commercial and military aircraft, primarily as composite matrices and adhesives. In new technique, chromium-ion containing epoxy with improved resistance to moisture produced where chromium ions believed to prevent absorption of water molecules by coordinating themselves to hydroxyl groups on epoxy chain. Anticipated that improved epoxy formulation useful as composite matrix resin, adhesive, or casting resin for applications on commercial and advanced aircraft. Improvement made without sacrifice in mechanical properties of polymer.

  5. Hydrolyzable polyester resins, varnishes and coating compositions containing the same

    DOEpatents

    Yamamori, Naoki; Yokoi, Junji; Yoshikawa, Motoyoshi

    1984-01-01

    Preparation of hydrolyzable polyester resin comprising reacting polycarboxylic acid and polyhydric alcohol components, which is characterized by using, as at least part of said polyhydric alcohol component, a metallic salt of hydroxy carboxylic acid of the formula defined and effecting the polycondensation at a temperature which is no more than the decomposition temperature of said metallic salt. The polyester resins are useful as resinous vehicle of varnishes and antifouling paints.

  6. Maleimido substituted cyclotriphosphazene resins for fire and heat resistant composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, D.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A new class of fire- and heat-resistant matrix resins have been synthesized by the thermal polymerization of maleimido substituted phenoxycyclotriphosphazenes. The resins have exhibited a char yield of 82 percent at 800 C in nitrogen and 81 percent at 700 C in air. Graphite-fabric laminates based on a resin of this class have shown a limiting oxygen index of 100 percent even at 300 C. Details of the fabrication of the resins and the composites and testing procedures are discussed.

  7. Resin-Bound Crypto-Thioester for Native Chemical Ligation.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Naoto; Ohkawachi, Kento; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Shigenaga, Akira; Otaka, Akira

    2018-04-20

    The resin-bound N-sulfanylethylanilide (SEAlide) peptide was found to function as a crypto-thioester peptide. Exposure of the peptide resin to an aqueous solution under neutral conditions in the presence of thiols affords thioesters without accompanying racemization of C-terminal amino acids. Furthermore, the resin-bound SEAlide peptides react with N-terminal cysteinyl peptides in the absence of phosphate salts to afford ligated products, whereas soluble SEAlide peptides do not. This unexpected difference in reactivity of the SEAlide peptides allows for a one-pot/three-fragment ligation using resin-bound and unbound peptides.

  8. Acetylene-chromene terminated resins as high temperature thermosets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godschalx, J. P.; Inbasekaran, M. N.; Bartos, B. R.; Scheck, D. M.; Laman, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    A novel phase transfer catalyzed process for the preparation of propargyl ethers has been developed. The propargyl ethers serve as precursors to a new class of thermosetting resins called acetylene-chromene terminated (ACT) resins. Heat treatment of a solution of propargyl ethers with various catalysts, followed by removal of solvent leads to the ACT resins via partial conversion of the propargyl ether groups to chromenes. This process reduces the energy content of the resin systems and reduces the amount of shrinkage found during cure. Due to the presence of the solvent the process is safe and gives rise to low viscosity products suitable for resin transfer molding and filament winding type applications. Due to the high glass transition temperature, high modulus, and low moisture uptake the cured resins display better than 232 C/wet performance. The thermal stability of the ACT resins in air at 204 C is superior to that of conventional bismaleimide resins. The resins also display excellent electrical properties.

  9. Spherical powder for retaining thermosetting acrylic resin veneers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Atsuta, M; Uchiyama, Y; Nakabayashi, N; Masuhara, E

    1978-03-01

    1. Nine different sizes of spherical powder were prepared, and their effectiveness as retentive devices was evaluated against those available commercially. 2. Smaller-diameter spherical powder (No. 5) gave the best results of all retaining devices tested. 3. The physical properties of the resins play an important role in the retentive strength with No. 5 retention beads. The retentive strength was reduced when brittle resin was used. 4. The retentive strength of the resin veneer was greatly affected by the angle of stress at the incisal resin. The retentive strength increased as the angle between the longitudinal axis of the specimen and the direction of stress decreased.

  10. Synthesis and Thermal Degradation Studies of Melamine Formaldehyde Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Sami; Bustam, M. A.; Nadeem, M.; Tan, W. L.; Shariff, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Melamine formaldehyde (MF) resins have been synthesized at different reaction temperature and pH values. Different molar ratios of melamine and formaldehyde were used to synthesize the corresponding resins. The prepared resin samples were characterized by using molecular weight determination viscometry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The maximum percentage of solid content (69.7%) was obtained at pH 8.5 and 75°C temperature. The molecular weight of MF resin was increased with an increase of melamine monomer concentration. The highest residual weight 14.125 wt.% was obtained with sample 10. PMID:25436237

  11. Characterization of product capture resin during microbial cultivations.

    PubMed

    Frykman, Scott; Tsuruta, Hiroko; Galazzo, Jorge; Licari, Peter

    2006-06-01

    Various bioactive small molecules produced by microbial cultivation are degraded in the culture broth or may repress the formation of additional product. The inclusion of hydrophobic adsorber resin beads to capture these products in situ and remove them from the culture broth can reduce or prevent this degradation and repression. These product capture beads are often subjected to a dynamic and stressful microenvironment for a long cultivation time, affecting their physical structure and performance. Impact and collision forces can result in the fracturing of these beads into smaller pieces, which are difficult to recover at the end of a cultivation run. Various contaminating compounds may also bind in a non-specific manner to these beads, reducing the binding capacity of the resin for the product of interest (fouling). This study characterizes resin bead binding capacity (to monitor bead fouling), and resin bead volume distributions (to monitor bead fracture) for an XAD-16 adsorber resin used to capture epothilone produced during myxobacterial cultivations. Resin fouling was found to reduce the product binding capacity of the adsorber resin by 25-50%. Additionally, the degree of resin bead fracture was found to be dependent on the cultivation length and the impeller rotation rate. Microbial cultivations and harvesting processes should be designed in such a way to minimize bead fragmentation and fouling during cultivation to maximize the amount of resin and associated product harvested at the end of a run.

  12. Effect of repair resin type and surface treatment on the repair strength of polyamide denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Gundogdu, Mustafa; Yanikoglu, Nuran; Bayindir, Funda; Ciftci, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different repair resins and surface treatments on the repair strength of a polyamide denture base material. Polyamide resin specimens were prepared and divided into nine groups according to the surface treatments and repair materials. The flexural strengths were measured with a 3-point bending test. Data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance, and the post-hoc Tukey test (α=0.05). The effects of the surface treatments on the surface of the polyamide resin were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The repair resins and surface treatments significantly affected the repair strength of the polyamide denture base material (p<0.05); however, no significant differences were observed interaction between the factors (p>0.05). The flexural strength of the specimens repaired with the polyamide resin was significantly higher than that of those repaired with the heat-polymerized and autopolymerizing acrylic resins.

  13. A fifth species of the genus Euparkerella (Griffths, 1959), the advertisement calls of E. robusta Izecksohn, 1988 and E. tridactyla Izecksohn, 1988, and a key for the Euparkerella species (Anura: Brachycephaloidea: Craugastoridae).

    PubMed

    Hepp, Fábio; Carvalho-E-Silva, Sergio P De; Carvalho-E-Silva, Ana M P Telles De; Folly, Manuella

    2015-06-17

    A new species of the anuran genus Euparkerella is described from a rainforest area in the state of Rio de Janeiro, southeastern Brazil. Morphologically, the species resembles E. brasiliensis and E. cochranae, but differs from them in acoustic features. Relative to its congeners, the new species is characterized by: (1) medium size; (2) slender body; (3) narrow head; (4) long Finger IV, Toes I and V; (5) tubercles of the hand and foot protuberant; (6) duration of advertisement call longer than three seconds; (7) pulse-section rate slower than two sections/second; and (8) exhibiting pulse clusters. The advertisement calls of E. robusta and E. tridactyla are described and a key based on morphological and acoustic characters is presented for species in the genus.

  14. Reactive Additives for Phenylethynyl-Containing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Rommel, Monica L.

    2005-01-01

    Phenylethynyl-containing reactive additive (PERA) compounds and mixtures have been found to be useful for improving the processability of oligomers, polymers, co-oligomers, and copolymers that contain phenylethynyl groups. The additives can be incorporated in different forms: A solution of an amide acid or an imide of a PERA can be added to a solution of phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer; or An imide powder of a PERA can be mixed with a dry powder of a phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer. The effect of a given PERA on the processability and other properties of the resin system depends on whether the PERA is used in the amide acid or an imide form. With proper formulation, the PERA reduces the melt viscosity of the resin and thereby reduces the processing pressures needed to form the adhesive bonds, consolidate filled or unfilled moldings, or fabricate fiber-reinforced composite laminates. During thermal cure, a PERA reacts with itself as well as with the phenylethynyl-containing host resin and thereby becomes chemically incorporated into the resin system. The effects of the PERA on mechanical properties, relative to those of the host resin, depend on the amount of PERA used. Typically, the incorporation of the PERA results in (1) increases in the glass-transition temperature (Tg), modulus of elasticity, and parameters that characterize behavior under compression, and (2) greater retention of the aforementioned mechanical properties at elevated temperatures without (3) significant reduction of toughness or damage tolerance. Of the formulations tested thus far, the ones found to yield the best overall results were those for which the host resin was the amide acid form of a phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) co-oligomer having a molecular weight of 5,000 g/mole [hence, designated PETI-5] and a PERA denoted as PERA-1. PETI-5 was made from 3,3',4'4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride, 3

  15. Characterization of Composite Fan Case Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvoracek, Charlene M.

    2004-01-01

    The majority of commercial turbine engines that power today s aircraft use a large fan driven by the engine core to generate thrust which dramatically increases the engine s efficiency. However, if one of these fan blades fails during flight, it becomes high energy shrapnel, potentially impacting the engine or puncturing the aircraft itself and thus risking the lives of passengers. To solve this problem, the fan case must be capable of containing a fan blade should it break off during flight. Currently, all commercial fan cases are made of either just a thick metal barrier or a thinner metal wall surrounded by Kevlar-an ultra strong fiber that elastically catches the blade. My summer 2004 project was to characterize the resins for a composite fan case that will be lighter and more efficient than the current metal. The composite fan case is created by braiding carbon fibers and injecting a polymer resin into the braid. The resin holds the fibers together, so at first using the strongest polymer appears to logically lead to the strongest fan case. Unfortunately, the stronger polymers are too viscous when melted. This makes the manufacturing process more difficult because the polymer does not flow as freely through the braid, and the final product is less dense. With all of this in mind, it is important to remember that the strength of the polymer is still imperative; the case must still contain blades with high impact energy. The research identified which polymer had the right balance of properties, including ease of fabrication, toughness, and ability to transfer the load to the carbon fibers. Resin deformation was studied to better understand the composite response during high speed impact. My role in this research was the testing of polymers using dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile, compression, and torsion testing. Dynamic mechanical analysis examines the response of materials under cyclic loading. Two techniques were used for dynamic mechanical analysis

  16. Evaluating resin-enamel bonds by microshear and microtensile bond strength tests: effects of composite resin

    PubMed Central

    de ANDRADE, Andrea Mello; MOURA, Sandra Kiss; REIS, Alessandra; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; GARCIA, Eugenio Jose; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of resin composite (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Flow Z350) and adhesive system [(Solobond Plus, Futurabond NR (VOCO) and Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE)] on the microtensile (µTBS) and microshear bond strength (µSBS) tests on enamel, and to correlate the bond strength means between them. Material and methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were sectioned to obtain two tooth halves: one for µTBS and the other one for µSBS. Adhesive systems and resin composites were applied to the enamel ground surfaces and light-cured. After storage (37ºC/24 h) specimens were stressed (0.5 mm/ min). Fracture modes were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results The correlation between tests was estimated with Pearson's product-moment correlation statistics (α =0.05). For both tests only the main factor resin composite was statistically significant (p<0.05). The correlation test detected a positive (r=0.91) and significant (p=0.01) correlation between the tests. Conclusions The results were more influenced by the resin type than by the adhesives. Both microbond tests seem to be positive and linearly correlated and can therefore lead to similar conclusions. PMID:21308290

  17. Solidifying process and flame retardancy of epoxy resin cured with boron-containing phenolic resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Peng; Shi, Yan; Liu, Yuansen; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Qi

    2018-01-01

    For the sake of improving the charring performance and flame retardancy of epoxy resin (EP), boron-containing phenolic resin (BPR) instead of a conventional curing agent, linear phenolic resin (LPR) was employed to cure EP. Of several possible chemical structures for BPR, the existence of benzyl hydroxy groups in BPR chains has been confirmed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The resonance of these groups may reasonably explain the higher curing reactivity of BPR-cured EP than that of LPR-cured EP. Thermogravimetric analysis, observation of the morphologies of the char residues and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic were performed to characterize the charring process. Due to the presence of B2O3 produced on the char surface from decomposition of phenyl borates and the facile high self-crosslinking reaction of BPR, a more continuous and stronger char barrier was formed for BPR-cured EP compared to that for the LPR-cured EP system. Therefore the former exhibited much better flame retardancy. In addition, BPR-cured EP also displayed better dynamic mechanical properties, than those observed for LPR-cured EP. It is not subject to the significant lowering the glass transition temperature of the polymer which accompanies curing with LPR. This suggests that BPR cured resin may meet the requirement for utilization at high temperature.

  18. Radiopacity of conventional, resin-modified glass ionomer, and resin-based luting materials.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Takuma

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the radiopacity of currently available dental luting materials. Five conventional cements, six resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs), two methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based acrylic resins (eight shades), and nine composite luting materials were evaluated. Radiographs of the specimens were taken together with tooth slices and aluminum step wedges. The density of the specimens was determined with a densitometer and was expressed in terms of the equivalent thickness of aluminum per 2.0-mm unit thickness of specimen. The radiopacity values for human enamel and dentin were 4.3 and 2.3 mm Al/2.0 mm specimen, respectively. The values for materials ranged from 5.1 to 12.9 for conventional luting materials, from 3.4 to 6.3 for RMGIs, from less than 0.5 to 7.3 for MMA resins, and from 2.3 to 9.9 for the composite luting materials. A zinc phosphate cement showed the highest value (12.9), whereas five shades of MMA resin resulted in the lowest value (less than 0.5). Two RMGIs and three composite luting materials exhibited radiopacity values between those of enamel (4.3) and dentin (2.3). It can be concluded that the radiopacity value of luting materials varies considerably, and that care must be taken when selecting luting materials, considering the material composition of restorations.

  19. Polymerization shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements - What do we need to know?

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos José; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Rodrigues, Monise de Paula; Vilela, Andomar Bruno Fernandes; Pfeifer, Carmem Silvia; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis

    2017-08-28

    Polymerization shrinkage stress of resin-based materials have been related to several unwanted clinical consequences, such as enamel crack propagation, cusp deflection, marginal and internal gaps, and decreased bond strength. Despite the absence of strong evidence relating polymerization shrinkage to secondary caries or fracture of posterior teeth, shrinkage stress has been associated with post-operative sensitivity and marginal stain. The latter is often erroneously used as a criterion for replacement of composite restorations. Therefore, an indirect correlation can emerge between shrinkage stress and the longevity of composite restorations or resin-bonded ceramic restorations. The relationship between shrinkage and stress can be best studied in laboratory experiments and a combination of various methodologies. The objective of this review article is to discuss the concept and consequences of polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress of composite resins and resin cements. Literature relating to polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress generation, research methodologies, and contributing factors are selected and reviewed. Clinical techniques that could reduce shrinkage stress and new developments on low-shrink dental materials are also discussed.

  20. 21 CFR 175.260 - Partial phosphoric acid esters of polyester resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... resins are prepared by the reaction of trimellitic anhydride with 2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediol followed by reaction of the resin thus produced with phosphoric acid anhydride to produce a resin having an...

  1. Microshear bond strength of composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates utilizing unfilled versus filled resins.

    PubMed

    Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Siamak; Ghasemi, Amir; Kotick, Philip G

    2014-11-01

    Failures such as marginal discoloration and composite chipping are still the problems of tooth-colored restorations on the substrate of enamel and porcelain, which some of these problems are consequently as a result of failures in the bonding layer. Using filled resin has been recently introduced to increase the bond strength of this layer. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins to enamel incubated in periods of 24 h and 9 months and porcelain with unfilled resin and flowable composites (filled resin). In this in vitro study, two groups of 75 enamel samples with different storage times (24 h and 9 months) and a group of 75 porcelain samples were used. They were divided into 5 experimental groups of 15 samples in each. Composite cylinders in tygon tubes were bonded on the surface of acid-etched enamel and pretreated porcelain. Wave, Wave MV, Wave HV, Grandioflow and Margin Bond were used as bonding agents. The μ-SBS was measured at the speed of 1.0 mm/min. The bond strengths were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey test. P < 0.05 was selected as the level of statistical significance in this study. The results showed that for enamel (24 h), the μ-SBS of the Wave MV and Wave HV groups were significantly lower than the Margin Bond group. Tukey test indicated the absence of a significant difference between the μ-SBS of the Wave group and the Margin Bond group. However, the μ-SBS of the Grandioflow group was significantly higher than the one for the Margin Bond as a bonding agent. In enamel (9 months), there was a significant difference between the Grandioflow and Margin Bond groups. Regarding bonding to the porcelain the one-way ANOVA test did not show a significant difference among the groups. This study revealed that flowable composites (filled resins) can be used instead of unfilled resins in bonding composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates.

  2. Isothermal aging effects on PMR-15 resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Jayne, Douglas; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1992-01-01

    Specimens of PMR-15 polyimide neat resin were aged in air at temperatures of 288, 316, and 343 C. Weight losses and dimensional changes were monitored during the course of the exposure time. Physical changes were also observed by optical and electron microscopy. It was found that polyimide polymer degradation occurred within a thin surface layer that developed and grew during thermal aging. The cores of the polymer specimens were protected from oxidative degradation, and they were relatively unchanged by the thermal treatment. Surface cracking was observed at 343 C and was probably due to an interaction between voids and stresses that developed in the surface layer.

  3. Resin catalysts and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1986-01-01

    Heat stabilized catalyst compositions are prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  4. Electroactive polymer gels based on epoxy resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samui, A. B.; Jayakumar, S.; Jayalakshmi, C. G.; Pandey, K.; Sivaraman, P.

    2007-04-01

    Five types of epoxy gels have been synthesized from common epoxy resins and hardeners. Fumed silica and nanoclay, respectively, were used as fillers and butyl methacrylate/acrylamide were used as monomer(s) for making interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) in three compositions. Swelling study, tensile property evaluation, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and electroactive property evaluation were done. The gels have sufficient mechanical strength and the time taken for bending to 20° was found to be 22 min for forward bias whereas it was just 12 min for reverse bias.

  5. Resin catalysts and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1986-12-16

    Heat stabilized catalyst compositions are prepared from nuclear sulfonic acid, for example, macroporous crosslinked polyvinyl aromatic compounds containing sulfonic acid groups are neutralized with a metal of Al, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, ions or mixtures and alkali, alkaline earth metals or ammonium ions by contacting the resin containing the sulfonic acid with aqueous solutions of the metals salts and alkali, alkaline earth metal or ammonium salts. The catalysts have at least 50% of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with metal ions and the balance of the sulfonic acid groups neutralized with alkali, alkaline earth ions or ammonium ions.

  6. Bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity influence on dentine bond strength.

    PubMed

    Niem, Thomas; Schmidt, Alexander; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the influence of bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity on dentine tubule penetration, blister formation and consequently on dentine bond strength as a function of air-blowing pressure (air-bp) intensity. Two HEMA-free, acetone-based, one-bottle self-etch adhesives with similar composition except disparate silica filler contents and different bonding resin viscosities were investigated. The high-filler-containing adhesive (G-Bond) featured a lower viscous bonding resin with inherent thixotropic resin (TR) properties compared to the low-filler-containing adhesive (iBond) exhibiting a higher viscous bonding resin with non-thixotropic resin (NTR) properties. Shear bond strength tests for each adhesive with low (1.5bar; 0.15MPa; n=16) and high (3.0bar; 0.30MPa; n=16) air-bp application were performed after specimen storage in distilled water (24h; 37.0±1.0°C). Results were analysed using a Student's t-test to identify statistically significant differences (p<0.05). Fracture surfaces of TR adhesive specimens were morphologically characterised by SEM. Statistically significant bond strength differences were obtained for the thixotropic resin adhesive (high-pressure: 24.6MPa, low-pressure: 9.6MPa). While high air-bp specimens provided SEM images revealing resin-plugged dentine tubules, resin tags and only marginally blister structures, low air-bp left copious droplets and open dentine tubules. In contrast, the non-thixotropic resin adhesive showed no significant bond strength differences (high-pressure: 9.3MPa, low-pressure: 7.6MPa). A pressure-dependent distinct influence of bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity on dentine bond strength has been demonstrated. Stronger adhesion with high air-bp application is explained by improved resin fluidity and facilitated resin penetration into dentine tubules. Filler particles used in adhesive systems may induce thixotropic effects in bonding resin layers, accounting for improved free-flowing resin properties. In

  7. Effect of various teas on color stability of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Dinç Ata, Gül; Gokay, Osman; Müjdeci, Arzu; Kivrak, Tugba Congara; Mokhtari Tavana, Armin

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of various teas on color stability of resin composites. Two methacrylate-based (Arabesk Top, Grandio) and a silorane-based (Filtek Silorane) resin composites were used. 110 cylindrical samples of each resin composite were prepared (2 mm thickness and 8 mm diameter), polished and stored in distilled water (37°C for 24 hours). They were randomly divided into 11 groups (n= 10) and color measurements were taken. Then the samples were immersed in tap water (control), a black tea, a green tea or one of the eight herbal-fruit teas (37°C for 1 week) and subsequently subjected to the final color measurements. The color change of samples (ΔE*) was calculated, data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests. Teas, resin composites and their interactions were significant (P= 0.000). All the teas and control caused color changes in all three resin composites. Rosehip tea caused the most color changes, while tap water showed the least in all resin composites. Arabesk Top had the most staining potential in all the teas and control, whereas Filtek Silorane was the most stain resistant except Grandio immersed in sage tea. Color stability of all resin composites used were affected from both structure of resin materials and constituents of teas used. All resin composites were susceptible to staining by all teas especially rosehip tea. Arabesk Top composite showed the greatest color susceptibility in all teas and Filtek Silorane the least with one exception. Color of resin composites can be negatively affected from teas consumed. Clinicians should advise patients that drinking different kind of teas could intensify surface staining of resin based restorations.

  8. Selective adsorption of flavor-active components on hydrophobic resins.

    PubMed

    Saffarionpour, Shima; Sevillano, David Mendez; Van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Noordman, T Reinoud; Brouwer, Eric; Ottens, Marcel

    2016-12-09

    This work aims to propose an optimum resin that can be used in industrial adsorption process for tuning flavor-active components or removal of ethanol for producing an alcohol-free beer. A procedure is reported for selective adsorption of volatile aroma components from water/ethanol mixtures on synthetic hydrophobic resins. High throughput 96-well microtiter-plates batch uptake experimentation is applied for screening resins for adsorption of esters (i.e. isoamyl acetate, and ethyl acetate), higher alcohols (i.e. isoamyl alcohol and isobutyl alcohol), a diketone (diacetyl) and ethanol. The miniaturized batch uptake method is adapted for adsorption of volatile components, and validated with column breakthrough analysis. The results of single-component adsorption tests on Sepabeads SP20-SS are expressed in single-component Langmuir, Freundlich, and Sips isotherm models and multi-component versions of Langmuir and Sips models are applied for expressing multi-component adsorption results obtained on several tested resins. The adsorption parameters are regressed and the selectivity over ethanol is calculated for each tested component and tested resin. Resin scores for four different scenarios of selective adsorption of esters, higher alcohols, diacetyl, and ethanol are obtained. The optimal resin for adsorption of esters is Sepabeads SP20-SS with resin score of 87% and for selective removal of higher alcohols, XAD16N, and XAD4 from Amberlite resin series are proposed with scores of 80 and 74% respectively. For adsorption of diacetyl, XAD16N and XAD4 resins with score of 86% are the optimum choice and Sepabeads SP2MGS and XAD761 resins showed the highest affinity towards ethanol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A criterion for maximum resin flow in composite materials curing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo I.; Um, Moon-Kwang

    1993-06-01

    On the basis of Springer's resin flow model, a criterion for maximum resin flow in autoclave curing is proposed. Validity of the criterion was proved for two resin systems (Fiberite 976 and Hercules 3501-6 epoxy resin). The parameter required for the criterion can be easily estimated from the measured resin viscosity data. The proposed criterion can be used in establishing the proper cure cycle to ensure maximum resin flow and, thus, the maximum compaction.

  10. Organic geochemistry of resins from modern Agathis australis and Eocene resins from New Zealand: Diagenetic and taxonomic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, P.C.; Mastalerz, Maria; Orem, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    A maturation series of resins and fossil resins from New Zealand, ranging in age from Modern to Eocene and ranging from uncoalified to high volatile C bituminous coal, were analyzed by elemental, pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC), Fourier Transform infrared (FTir), and solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR) techniques. For comparison, four resin samples from the Latrobe Valley, Australia, were analyzed. All of the resins and fossil resins of this study show very high H/C atomic ratios, and are characterized by dominant peaks in the 10-60??ppm range of solid-state 13C NMR spectra and prominent bands in the aliphatic stretching region (2800-3000??cm- 1) of FTir spectra, all indicating a highly aliphatic molecular structure. The 13C NMR and FTir data indicate a diterpenoid structure for these resins. There is an abrupt loss of oxygen that occurs at the Lignite A/Subbituminous C stage, which is attributed to a dramatic loss of carboxyl (COOH) from the diterpenoid molecule. This is a new finding in the diagenesis of resins. This important loss in oxygenated functional groups is attributed to a maturation change. Also, there is a progressive loss of exomethylene (CH2) groups with increasing degree of maturation, as shown by both 13C NMR and FTir data. This change has been noted by previous investigators. Exomethylene is absent in the fossil resins from the Eocene high volatile C bituminous coals. This progressive loss is characteristic of Class I resinites. FTir data indicate that the oxygenated functional groups are strong in all the resin samples except the fossil resin from high volatile C bituminous coal. This important change in oxygenated functional groups is attributed to maturation changes. The 13C NMR and FTir data indicate there are minor changes in the Agathis australis resin from the living tree and soil, which suggests that alteration of A. australis resins begins shortly after deposition in the soil for as little as 1000??years. The Morwell

  11. Modeling of process-induced residual stresses and resin flow behavior in resin transfer molded composites with woven fiber mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestanian, Hossein

    This research focuses on modeling Resin Transfer Molding process for manufacture of composite parts with woven fiber mats. Models are developed to determine cure dependent stiffness matrices for composites manufactured with two types of woven fiber mats. Five-harness carbon and eight-harness fiberglass mats with EPON 826 resin composites are considered. The models presented here take into account important material/process parameters with emphasis on; (1) The effects of cure-dependent resin mechanical properties, (2) Fiber undulation due to the weave of the fiber fill and warp bundles, and (3) Resin interaction with the fiber bundles at a microscopic scale. Cure-dependent mechanical properties were then used in numerical models to determine residual stresses and deformation in the composite parts. The complete cure cycle was modeled in these analyses. Also the cool down stage after the composite cure was analyzed. The effect of 5% resin shrinkage on residual stresses and deformations was also investigated. In the second part of the study, Finite Element models were developed to simulate mold filling in RTM processes. Resin flow in the fiber mats was modeled as flow through porous media. Physical models were also developed to investigate resin flow behavior into molds of rectangular and irregular shapes. Silicone fluids of 50 and 100 centistoke viscosities as well as EPON 826 epoxy resin were used in the mold filling experiments. The reinforcements consisted of several layers of woven fiberglass and carbon fiber mats. The effects of injection pressure, fluid viscosity, type of reinforcement, and mold geometry on mold filling times were investigated. Fiber mat permeabilities were determined experimentally for both types of reinforcements. Comparison of experimental and numerical resin front positions indicated the importance of edge effects in resin flow behavior in small cavities. The resin front positions agreed well for the rectangular mold geometry.

  12. High-Performance, Low-Energy-Curing Resins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    with a phenolic resin 0. Quinlivan, private communication). Although in this system, the phenolic resin requires curing well above room temperature...34 -4 JOHN T. QUINLIVAN received a B.S. degree from Gonzaga University and M.A. *1 and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry from Princeton University. After

  13. Method and solvent composition for regenerating an ion exchange resin

    DOEpatents

    Even, William R.; Irvin, David J.; Irvin, Jennifer A.; Tarver, Edward E.; Brown, Gilbert M.; Wang, James C. F.

    2002-01-01

    A method and composition for removing perchlorate from a highly selective ion exchange resin is disclosed. The disclosed approach comprises treating the resin in a solution of super critical or liquid carbon dioxide and one or more quaternary ammonium chloride surfactant compounds.

  14. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... resins used in food-packaging adhesives complying with § 175.105 of this chapter. ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600 Section 177.1600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... resins used in food-packaging adhesives complying with § 175.105 of this chapter. ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600 Section 177.1600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  16. Resin distribution in second-growth ponderosa pine

    Treesearch

    B.H. Paul

    1955-01-01

    In a study of specific gravity of second-growth ponderosa pine, there was visible evidence of resin in a part of the specific gravity specimens. Each specimen contained 10 annual growth rings in cross sections taken at 4 heights in the merchantable length of the trees. Since the presence of resin introduced an uncertain amount of error in the specific gravity values,...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3200 - Resin tooth bonding agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Resin tooth bonding agent. 872.3200 Section 872.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3200 Resin tooth bonding agent. (a) Identification...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... resins used in food-packaging adhesives complying with § 175.105 of this chapter. ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600 Section 177.1600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  19. 21 CFR 177.1600 - Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... resins used in food-packaging adhesives complying with § 175.105 of this chapter. ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyethylene resins, carboxyl modified. 177.1600 Section 177.1600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  20. Guayule resin detection and influence on guayule rubber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Guayule (Parthenium argentatum) is a natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) producing crop, native to North America. Guayule also produces organic resins, complex mixtures of terpenes, triglycerides, guayulins, triterpenoids and other components. During natural rubber extraction, guayule resins can b...

  1. Resin collection and social immunity in honey bees

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We determined if the use of resins, complex plant secretions with diverse antimicrobial properties, acts as a colony-level immune defense by honey bees. Colonies were enriched with extracts of Brazilian or Minnesotan propolis (a bee mixture of resins and wax) or were left as controls. We measured ge...

  2. Glass Fiber Resin Composites and Components at Arctic Temperatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited GLASS FIBER RESIN...3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GLASS FIBER RESIN COMPOSITES AND COMPONENTS AT ARCTIC TEMPERATURES 5...public release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) Glass fiber reinforced composites (GFRC

  3. Advanced Thermoplastic Resins for Manufacturing Wind Turbine Blades |

    Science.gov Websites

    Turbine Blades Advanced Thermoplastic Resins for Manufacturing Wind Turbine Blades At its Composites Arkema's Elium liquid thermoplastic resin. Photo of men working on turbine blades in a dome-shaped building composite structures of wind turbine blades. Capabilities Learn more about NREL's IACMI projects and its

  4. 21 CFR 175.300 - Resinous and polymeric coatings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... paragraph (b)(3)(i) of this section to form esters with: Butylene glycol. Ethylene glycol. Pentaerythritol...) Natural fossil resins, as the basic resin: Copal. Damar. Elemi. Gilsonite. Glycerol ester of damar, copal... section) modified by reaction with: Maleic anhydride. o-, m-, and p-substituted phenol-form-alde-hydes...

  5. 21 CFR 175.300 - Resinous and polymeric coatings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... paragraph (b)(3)(i) of this section to form esters with: Butylene glycol. Ethylene glycol. Pentaerythritol...) Natural fossil resins, as the basic resin: Copal. Damar. Elemi. Gilsonite. Glycerol ester of damar, copal... section) modified by reaction with: Maleic anhydride. o-, m-, and p-substituted phenol-form-alde-hydes...

  6. 21 CFR 175.300 - Resinous and polymeric coatings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... paragraph (b)(3)(i) of this section to form esters with: Butylene glycol. Ethylene glycol. Pentaerythritol...) Natural fossil resins, as the basic resin: Copal. Damar. Elemi. Gilsonite. Glycerol ester of damar, copal... section) modified by reaction with: Maleic anhydride. o-, m-, and p-substituted phenol-form-alde-hydes...

  7. 21 CFR 175.300 - Resinous and polymeric coatings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... paragraph (b)(3)(i) of this section to form esters with: Butylene glycol. Ethylene glycol. Pentaerythritol...) Natural fossil resins, as the basic resin: Copal. Damar. Elemi. Gilsonite. Glycerol ester of damar, copal... section) modified by reaction with: Maleic anhydride. o-, m-, and p-substituted phenol-form-alde-hydes...

  8. 21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... gram of dry resin (expressed in terms of water regain), and a particle size of 10 to 300 microns. (b) The molecular sieve resins are thoroughly washed with potable water prior to their first use in... purification of partially delactosed whey. The gel bed shall be maintained in a sanitary manner in accordance...

  9. 21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... gram of dry resin (expressed in terms of water regain), and a particle size of 10 to 300 microns. (b) The molecular sieve resins are thoroughly washed with potable water prior to their first use in... purification of partially delactosed whey. The gel bed shall be maintained in a sanitary manner in accordance...

  10. 21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... gram of dry resin (expressed in terms of water regain), and a particle size of 10 to 300 microns. (b) The molecular sieve resins are thoroughly washed with potable water prior to their first use in... purification of partially delactosed whey. The gel bed shall be maintained in a sanitary manner in accordance...

  11. 21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... water regain), and a particle size of 10 to 300 microns. (b) The molecular sieve resins are thoroughly washed with potable water prior to their first use in contact with food. (c) Molecular sieve resins are used as the gel filtration media in the final purification of partially delactosed whey. The gel bed...

  12. 21 CFR 173.40 - Molecular sieve resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... gram of dry resin (expressed in terms of water regain), and a particle size of 10 to 300 microns. (b) The molecular sieve resins are thoroughly washed with potable water prior to their first use in... purification of partially delactosed whey. The gel bed shall be maintained in a sanitary manner in accordance...

  13. Oligosilylarylnitrile: The Thermoresistant Thermosetting Resin with High Comprehensive Properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingcun; Ning, Yi

    2018-04-11

    One of the highest thermoresistant thermosetting resins ever studied so far, oligosilylarylnitrile resin, was investigated first in this study. Oligosilylarylnitrile was synthesized by lithium-reduced Wurtz-Fittig condensation reaction, and the prepared viscous resin exhibited moderate rheological behaviors while heated purely or together with 20% polysilazane as a cross-linking agent. The thermal curing temperatures were found by differential scanning calorimetry at 268 °C (pure) and 158 °C (with the polysilazane cross-linking agent), which is comparably close to that of polysilylarylacetylene resin (normally at 220-250 °C) but much lower than those of polyimide and phthalonitrile resins (normally >300 °C), indicating the admirable material processability of oligosilylnitrile. The cured oligosilylarylnitrile resins have extremely high thermal resistance, indicated by the results of thermogravimetric analysis (the mass residue at 800 °C is >90% under N 2 ) and dynamic mechanical analysis (the glass-transition temperature is >420 °C). The mechanical property of the oligosilylarylnitrile-matrixed silica-cloth reinforced laminate is comparably close to those of polyimide and phthalonitrile but much higher than that of polysilylarylacetylene, indicating the enviable thermal and mechanical properties of oligosilylnitrile. Thus, among the high-temperature resins ever studied so far, the oligosilylarylnitrile resin was found to have the almost best comprehensive characteristics of processability and properties.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872.3820 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification...

  16. Infrared spectroscopic monitoring of urea addition to oriented strandboard resins

    Treesearch

    Chi-Leung So; Thomas L. Eberhardt; Ernest Hsu; Brian K. Via; Chung Y. Hse

    2007-01-01

    One of the variables in phenol formaldehyde adhesive resin formulation is the addition of urea, which allows the resin manufacturer to manipulate both product functionality and cost. Nitrogen content can be used as a measure of the level of urea addition because most of the nitrogen present is derived from urea added at the end of the preparation process. Nitrogen...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1650 - Polysulfide polymer-polyepoxy resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polysulfide polymer-polyepoxy resins. 177.1650... (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: POLYMERS Substances for Use as Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1650 Polysulfide polymer-polyepoxy resins. Polysulfide polymer...

  18. Effect of different catalysts on urea-formaldehyde resin synthesis

    Treesearch

    Qi-Ning Sun; Chung-Yun Hse; Todd F. Shupe

    2014-01-01

    Four catalysts (H2SO4, HCl, H3PO4, and NaOH/NH4OH) were studied in the preparation of melamine modified urea– formaldehyde (UFM) resins. 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of the UFM resins at different synthesis stages revealed the...

  19. Resin Glycosides from the Morning Glory Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereda-Miranda, Rogelio; Rosas-Ramírez, Daniel; Castañeda-Gómez, Jhon

    Resin glycosides are part of a very extensive family of secondary metabolites known as glycolipids or lipo-oligosaccharides and are constituents of complex resins (glycoresins) (1) unique to the morning glory family, Convolvulaceae (2). These active principles are responsible for the drastic purgative action of all the important Convolvulaceous species used in traditional medicine throughout the world since ancient times. Several commercial purgative crude drugs can be prepared from the roots of different species of Mexican morning glories. Their incorporation as therapeutic agents in Europe is an outstanding example of the assimilation of botanical drugs from the Americas as substitutes for traditional Old World remedies (3). Even though phytochemical investigations on the constituents of these drugs were initiated during the second half of the nineteenth century, the structure of their active ingredients still remains poorly known for some examples of these purgative roots. During the last two decades, the higher resolution capabilities of modern analytical isolation techniques used in conjunction with powerful spectroscopic methods have facilitated the elucidation of the active principles of these relevant herbal products.

  20. Resin bleed improvement on surface mount semiconductor device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajoo, Indra Kumar; Tahir, Suraya Mohd; Aziz, Faieza Abdul; Shamsul Anuar, Mohd

    2018-04-01

    Resin bleed is a transparent layer of epoxy compound which occurs during molding process but is difficult to be detected after the molding process. Resin bleed on the lead on the unit from the focused package, SOD123, can cause solderability failure at end customer. This failed unit from the customer will be considered as a customer complaint. Generally, the semiconductor company has to perform visual inspection after the plating process to detect resin bleed. Mold chase with excess hole, split cavity & stepped design ejector pin hole have been found to be the major root cause of resin bleed in this company. The modifications of the mold chase, changing of split cavity to solid cavity and re-design of the ejector pin proposed were derived after a detailed study & analysis conducted to arrive at these solutions. The solutions proposed have yield good results during the pilot run with zero (0) occurrence of resin bleed for 3 consecutive months.

  1. Chromium removal from ground water by Ion exchange resins

    SciTech Connect

    Skiadas, P.

    1994-05-06

    The ground water at several monitoring wells at LLNL has been found to exceed the Surface Water Discharge Limits for Cr(VI). Ion exchange resins have been selected for its removal. A research study is underway to determine which commercial resin is preferred for LLNL`s ground water. The choice of an appropriate resin will be based on Cr(VI) exchange capacity, regeneration efficiency, and pH stabilization. A sequestering agent must also be selected to be used for the elimination of scaling at the treatment facilities. The chemistry of ion exchange resins, and instrumentation and procedures are explained and described in the followingmore » paper. Comparison of the different resins tested lead us to the selection of the most effective one to be used in the treatment facilities.« less

  2. Bio-phenolic resin from oil palm empty fruit bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Zuhaili; Zakaria, Sarani; Roslan, Rasidi; Chia, Chin Hua; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Amran, Umar Adli

    2018-04-01

    Utilization of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) in the production of bio-phenolic resin is an alternative way to reduce the dependency of petroleum-based phenol. In this study, resol type bio-phenolic resin (BPR) was synthesized from EFB fibers using sulfuric acid as the catalyst to produce liquefied empty fruit bunches (LEFB) followed by resinification reaction with formaldehyde in alkaline condition. The SEM image of LEFB residue showed separation of fiber bundles into individual fibers. This indicate that lignin was destroyed during the liquefaction process. The increased of formaldehyde/LEFB molar ratio has resulted an increase of viscosity, solid content and pH of the resin. The obtained FTIR spectra confirmed that functional groups of BPR resins was almost similar with commercial resin.

  3. Chemical signatures of fossilized resins and recent plant exudates.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Joseph B; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A; Anderson, Ken B

    2008-01-01

    Amber is one of the few gemstones based on an organic structure. Found over most of the world, it is the fossil form of sticky plant exudates called resins. Investigation of amber by modern analytical techniques provides structural information and insight into the identity of the ancient plants that produced the source resin. Mass spectrometric analysis of materials separated by gas chromatography has identified specific compounds that are the basis of a reliable classification of the different types of amber. NMR spectroscopy of bulk, solid amber provides a complementary classification. NMR spectroscopy also can be used to characterize modern resins as well as other types of plant exudates such as gums, gum resins, and kinos, which strongly resemble resins in appearance but have very different molecular constitutions.

  4. Preparation and characterization of antibacterial orthodontic resin containing silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Heo, Min; Lee, Donghyun; Han, Seungheui; Moon, Ji-Hoi; Lim, Ho-Nam; Kwon, Il Keun

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we developed a hybrid dental resin containing silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) to eliminate periodontal disease causing bacteria such as streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and streptococcus sobrinus (S. sobrinus). The silver nanoparticles enables the resin to prevent oral pathogen growth during orthodontic therapy. First, AgNPs were directly synthesized in dimethylformamide (DMF) solvent with a capping agent. Second, pure orthodontic primer was mixed with the synthesized AgNPs solvent-slurry followed by photocuring. The resultant material was characterized by physicochemical characterization. Finally, an in vitro antimicrobial test was carried out. The results showed that the AgNPs were fully synthesized and clearly embedded in dental resin. In the bacterial test, the dental resin containing AgNPs showed potent antimicrobial activity against two kinds of bacteria. In conclusion, our methodology may allow for the generation of a wide range of dental resin and composite products which inhibit periodontitis causing bacteria.

  5. Impregnation of soft biological specimens with thermosetting resins and elastomers.

    PubMed

    von Hagens, G

    1979-06-01

    A new method for impregnation of biological specimens with thermosetting resins and elastomers is described. The method has the advantage that the original relief of the surface is retained. The impregnation is carried out by utilizing the difference between the high vapor tension of the intermedium (e.g., methylene chloride) and the low vapor tension of the solution to be polymerized. After impregnation, the specimen is subject to polymerization conditions without surrounding embedding material. The optical and mechanical properties can be selected by proper choice from various kinds of resins and different procedures, for example, by complete or incomplete impregnation. Acrylic resins, polyester resins, epoxy resins, polyurethanes and silicone rubber have been found suitable for the method. Excellent results have been obtained using transparent silicone rubber since after treatment the specimens are still flexible and resilient, and have retained their natural appearance.

  6. Optical properties of paint-on resins for shade modification of crown and bridge resins--light transmittance characteristics--.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Fujii, Koichi; Homma, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Hideo; Ban, Seiji

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the light transmittance characteristics of the paint-on resins for shade modification. Three shades of paint-on resin, one crown and bridge resin, and human enamel were used. Specimens with four different thicknesses (75-150 microm) were prepared. The light transmittances including its wavelength distribution and diffusion characteristics were measured. The color values and the color differences among thicknesses of specimens were also determined. The light transmittance values of the paint-on resins ranged from 60.3% to 88.3% at 100 microm thickness, which were lower or nearly equal in comparison with the crown and bridge resin and enamel. Although differences in the wavelength distribution of transmittance among materials were found at lower wavelengths, all materials showed similar diffusion characteristics. The thin layer of paint-on resin effectively changed the color of restorative resin. The paint-on resin may be an effective material for the modification of the color appearance matching required.

  7. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    PubMed

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p < 0.01). Belle-Glass® had the highest mean shear bond strength when bonded to StickNet substrate using both Prime & Bond NT and OptiBond Solo Plus. Sinfony® composite resin exhibited the lowest shear bond strength values when used with the same adhesive resins. The adhesive mode of failure was higher than cohesive with all laboratory composite resins bonded to the StickNet substructure at both storage times. Water storage had a tendency to lower the bond strengths of all laboratory composites, although the statistical differences were not significant. Within the limitations of this study, it was found that bonding of the veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Relined fiberglass post: an ex vivo study of the resin cement thickness and dentin-resin interface.

    PubMed

    Souza, Niélli Caetano de; Marcondes, Maurem Leitão; Breda, Ricardo Vaz; Weber, João Batista Blessmann; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2016-08-18

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the thickness of resin cements in the root thirds when using conventional fiberglass posts (CP) and relined fiberglass posts (RP) in weakened roots and to evaluate the morphological characteristics of the dentin-resin interface. Forty human maxillary anterior teeth had the crown sectioned below the cemento-enamel junction. The canals were endodontically treated and weakened with diamond burs. Teeth were divided into four groups (n = 10): Group 1 - CP + RelyX ARC; Group 2 - CP + RelyX U200; Group 3 - RP + RelyX ARC; and Group 4 - RP + RelyX U200. Prior to luting, 0.1% Fluorescein and 0.1% Rhodamine B dyes were added to an adhesive and resin cement, respectively. Slices were obtained from the apical, middle, and cervical thirds of the root. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images were recorded in four areas (buccal, lingual, mesial, distal) of each third. In each area, four equidistant measures of the resin cement were made and the mean value was calculated. The interface morphology was observed. The data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The interaction between fiberglass posts, resin cement, and root thirds was significant (p < 0.0001). The resin cement thicknesses were significantly lower for RP in comparison with CP, except in the apical third. There was no significant difference between the resin cements for RP. There was formation of resin cement tags and adhesive tags along the root for RP. RP favored the formation of thin and uniform resin cement films and resin tags in weakened roots.

  9. Fractography of a bis-GMA resin.

    PubMed

    Davis, D M; Waters, N E

    1989-07-01

    The fracture behavior of a bis-GMA resin was studied by means of the double-torsion test. The fracture parameter measured was the stress-intensity factor. Fracture occurred in either a stick-slip (unstable) or continuous (stable) manner, depending upon the test conditions. When stick-slip propagation occurred, the fracture surfaces showed characteristic crack-arrest lines. The fracture surfaces were examined by use of a reflected-light optical microscope. The stress-intensity factor for crack initiation was found to be related to the size of the crack-arrest line which, in turn, could be related to the Dugdale model for plastic zone size. The evidence supported the concept that the behavior of the crack during propagation was controlled by the amount of plastic deformation occurring at the crack tip.

  10. Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuji, Luis C.; McManus, Hugh L.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermo-oxidative aging produces a non-uniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed to separate the properties of the oxidized surface layer from the properties of interior material. Test specimens were aged at 316 C in either air or nitrogen, for durations of up to 800 hours. The thickness of the oxidized surface layer in air aged specimens, and the shrinkage and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of nitrogen aged specimens were measured directly. Four-point-bend tests were performed to determine modulus of both the oxidized surface layer and the interior material. Bimaterial strip specimens consisting of oxidized surface material and unoxidized interior material were constructed and used to determine surface layer shrinkage and CTE. Results confirm that the surface layer and core materials have substantially different properties.

  12. VALIDATION FOR THE PERMANGANATE DIGESTION OF REILLEX HPQ ANION RESIN

    SciTech Connect

    Kyser, E.

    2009-09-23

    The flowsheet for the digestion of Reillex{trademark} HPQ was validated both under the traditional alkaline conditions and under strongly acidic conditions. Due to difficulty in performing a pH adjustment in the large tank where this flowsheet must be performed, the recommended digestion conditions were changed from pH 8-10 to 8 M HNO{sub 3}. Thus, no pH adjustment of the solution is required prior to performing the permanganate addition and digestion and the need to sample the digestion tank to confirm appropriate pH range for digestion may be avoided. Neutralization of the acidic digestion solution will be performed after completion ofmore » the resin digestion cycle. The amount of permanganate required for this type of resin (Reillex{trademark} HPQ) was increased from 1 kg/L resin to 4 kg/L resin to reduce the amount of residual resin solids to a minimal amount (<5%). The length of digestion time at 70 C remains unchanged at 15 hours. These parameters are not optimized but are expected to be adequate for the conditions. The flowsheet generates a significant amount of fine manganese dioxide (MnO{sub 2}) solids (1.71 kg/L resin) and involves the generation of a significant liquid volume due to the low solubility of permanganate. However, since only two batches of resin (40 L each) are expected to be digested, the total waste generated is limited.« less

  13. Mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Takahashi, Yutaka; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, one polyethylene terephthalate, one polycarbonate) and, as a control, a conventional heat-polymerized polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), were used in this study. The flexural strength at the proportional limit (FS-PL), the elastic modulus, and the Charpy impact strength of the denture base resins were measured according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 1567 and ISO 1567:1999/Amd 1:2003. The descending order of the FS-PL was: conventional PMMA > polyethylene terephthalate, polycarbonate > two polyamides. The descending order of the elastic moduli was: conventional PMMA > polycarbonate > polyethylene terephthalate > two polyamides. The descending order of the Charpy impact strength was: polyamide (Nylon PACM12) > polycarbonate > polyamide (Nylon 12), polyethylene terephthalate > conventional PMMA. All of the injection-molded thermoplastic resins had significantly lower FS-PL, lower elastic moduli, and higher or similar impact strength compared to the conventional PMMA. The polyamide denture base resins had low FS-PL and low elastic moduli; one of them possessed very high impact strength, and the other had low impact strength. The polyethylene terephthalate denture base resin showed a moderately high FS-PL, moderate elastic modulus, and low impact strength. The polycarbonate denture base resin had a moderately high FS-PL, moderately high elastic modulus, and moderate impact strength.

  14. Liquid chromatographic characterization of PMR-15 resin and prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic method has been developed capable of providing a chemical fingerprint of PMR-15 resin solutions and prepreg. The amounts of two of the monomers can be quantified so their experimentally determined molar ratio can be compared to the formulated one. Only the monomers were detected in fresh resin solution, whereas several additional components, resulting from an association or reaction between the norbornenyl endcap and the amine, were detected in a resin solution aged for three days. Two commercial prepregs exhibited fingerprints similar to that of laboratory material, but three others contained additional components corresponding to higher esters and nadimides.

  15. Glass Fibre/Epoxy Resin Interface Life-Time Prediction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    RD-Ai32 26 GLASS FIBRE /POXY RESIN INTERFACE LIFE-TIME PREDICTION 1/1 (U) BRISTOL UNIV (ENGLAND) H H WILLS PHYSICS LAB K H RSHBEE ET AL. APR 83...D 3005-MS GLASS FIBRE /EPOXY RESIN INTERFACE LIFE-TIME PREDICTION - Final Report by K H G Ashbee, Principal Investigator R Ho~l J P Sargent Elizabeth...REPORT h PERIOD COVERED. Glass Fibre /Epoxy Resin Interface Life-time F-inal Technical 11’ port PreictonApril 1981 - A:’ril 1983 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT

  16. Physical Aging of Linear and Network Epoxy Resins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-13

    8217 - methylene dianiline (MDA) (Tm=39°C) 6 00 n0 Polyglycidyl ether of phenol -formaldehyde Novolac (n : 1.6) The resin components 3 and 4 were supplied by...k AO-A097 017 VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INST AND STATE UNIV BLACKSBURG -ETC F/G 11/9 PH YSI CAL AGING OF LINEAR AND NETWORK EPOXY RESINS U) IMAR Al J E...0629 Task No. NR 356-692 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 3 Physical Aging of Linear and Network Epoxy Resins by Eric Siu-Wai Kong, Garth L. Wilkes, James E. McGrath

  17. Composite resins in 2013: an update on their progress.

    PubMed

    Radz, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    Having steadily evolved and improved over the past several decades, composite resins are providing clinicians with an increased array of options for successfully restoring teeth in a minimally invasive manner. Numerous advances compared to early composite resin systems, such as increased shade availability, reduced polymerization shrinkage, and the development of nanoparticles, have enabled composite resins to offer long-term esthetic solutions for patients. This article summarizes the changes that have occurred, discusses popular applications for the use of composite materials, and presents brief case studies demonstrating their capabilities.

  18. Resin in bisulfite pulp from Pinus radiata wood and its relationship to pitch troubles

    Treesearch

    P.J. Nelson; Richard W. Hemingway

    1971-01-01

    The resin content of bisulfite pulp from Pinus radiata D. Don was determined at various stages in its manufacture and the changes in the composition of the resin studied. About 50% of the resin present in the wood was removed during cooking, an additional 11% by blowpit washing, and a further 8% by screening. Resin acids and fatty acids were...

  19. Differential scanning calorimetry of the effects of temperature and humidity on phenol-formaldehyde resin cure

    Treesearch

    X.-M. Wang; B. Riedl; A.W. Christiansen; R.L. Geimer

    1994-01-01

    Phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin is a widely used adhesive in the manufacture of wood composites. However, curing behaviour of the resin under various environmental conditions is not well known. A differential scanning calorimeter was employed to characterize the degree of resin cure in this study. Resin-impregnated glass cloth samples with varied moisture contents (0,31...

  20. 40 CFR 63.11960 - What are my initial and continuous compliance requirements for stripped resin?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Demonstration of initial compliance. You must demonstrate initial compliance for each resin stripper or for each group of resin strippers used to process the same resin type. (1) You must conduct an initial performance test for the resin stripper, measuring the concentration of vinyl chloride and total non-vinyl...

  1. 40 CFR 63.11960 - What are my initial and continuous compliance requirements for stripped resin?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Demonstration of initial compliance. You must demonstrate initial compliance for each resin stripper or for each group of resin strippers used to process the same resin type. (1) You must conduct an initial performance test for the resin stripper, measuring the concentration of vinyl chloride and total non-vinyl...

  2. 40 CFR 63.11960 - What are my initial and continuous compliance requirements for stripped resin?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Demonstration of initial compliance. You must demonstrate initial compliance for each resin stripper or for each group of resin strippers used to process the same resin type. (1) You must conduct an initial performance test for the resin stripper, measuring the concentration of vinyl chloride and total non-vinyl...

  3. Microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composite to resin-coated dentin: interaction between diamond bur roughness and coating material.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Oishi, Takumi; Sugawara, Toyotarou; Hirai, Yoshito

    2009-02-01

    This aim of this study was to determine the effect of type of bur and resin-coating material on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of indirect composite to dentin. Dentin surfaces were first ground with two types of diamond bur and resin-coated using UniFil Bond (UB) or Adper Single Bond (SB), and then bonded to a resin composite disc for indirect restoration with adhesive resin cement. After storage for 24 hr in distilled water at 37 degrees C, microTBS was measured (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). When UB was applied to dentin prepared using the regular-grit diamond bur, microTBS was significantly lower than that in dentin prepared using the superfine-grit bur. In contrast, no significant difference was found between regular-grit and superfine-grit bur with SB. However, more than half of the superfine-grit specimens failed before microTBS testing. These results indicate that selection of bur type is important in improving the bond strength of adhesive resin cement between indirect resin composite and resin-coated dentin.

  4. Infiltration/cure modeling of resin transfer molded composite materials using advanced fiber architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loos, Alfred C.; Weideman, Mark H.; Long, Edward R., Jr.; Kranbuehl, David E.; Kinsley, Philip J.; Hart, Sean M.

    1991-01-01

    A model was developed which can be used to simulate infiltration and cure of textile composites by resin transfer molding. Fabric preforms were resin infiltrated and cured using model generated optimized one-step infiltration/cure protocols. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing (FDEMS) was used to monitor in situ resin infiltration and cure during processing. FDEMS measurements of infiltration time, resin viscosity, and resin degree of cure agreed well with values predicted by the simulation model. Textile composites fabricated using a one-step infiltration/cure procedure were uniformly resin impregnated and void free. Fiber volume fraction measurements by the resin digestion method compared well with values predicted using the model.

  5. Low-density resin impregnated ceramic article and method for making the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K. (Inventor); Henline, William D. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-ta S. (Inventor); Rasky, Daniel J. (Inventor); Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A low-density resin impregnated ceramic article advantageously employed as a structural ceramic ablator comprising a matrix of ceramic fibers. The fibers of the ceramic matrix are coated with an organic resin film. The organic resin can be a thermoplastic resin or a cured thermosetting resin. In one embodiment, the resin is uniformly distributed within the ceramic article. In a second embodiment, the resin is distributed so as to provide a density gradient along at least one direction of the ceramic article. The resin impregnated ceramic article is prepared by providing a matrix of ceramic fibers; immersing the matrix of ceramic fibers in a solution of a solvent and an organic resin infiltrant; and removing the solvent to form a resin film on the ceramic fibers.

  6. Effect of repair resin type and surface treatment on the repair strength of heat-polymerized denture base resin.

    PubMed

    Alkurt, Murat; Yeşil Duymuş, Zeynep; Gundogdu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Acrylic resin denture fracture is common in prosthodontic practice. When fractured denture bases are repaired, recurrent fractures frequently occur at the repair surface interface or adjacent areas. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the flexural strength of the acrylic resin denture base repaired with heat-polymerized acrylic resin, autopolymerizing resin, and light-polymerized acrylic resin. Ninety-six specimens of heat-polymerized acrylic resin were prepared according to the American Dental Association Specification No. 12 (65.0 × 10.0 × 2.5 mm) and sectioned into halves to create a repair gap (3.0 × 10 × 2.5 mm). The sectioned specimens were divided into 3 groups according to their repair materials. The specimens from each group were divided into 4 subgroups according to their surface treatments: a control group without any surface treatment; an experimental group treated with methyl methacrylate monomer (MMA group); an experimental group treated with airborne-particle abrasion with aluminum oxide particles of 250-μm particle size (abrasion group); and an experimental group treated with erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser (laser group). After the surface treatments, the 3 materials were placed into the repair gaps and then polymerized. After all of the specimens had been ground and polished, they were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 1 week and subjected to a 3-point bend test. Data were analyzed with a 2-way analysis of variance, and the Tukey honestly significant difference test was performed to identify significant differences (α=.05). The effects of the surface treatments and repair resins on the surface of the denture base resin were examined with scanning electron microscopy. Significant differences were found among the groups in terms of repair resin type (P<.001). All surface-treated specimens had higher flexural strength than controls, except the surface treated with the methyl

  7. Comparison of Microleakage of Composite Resin Veneering Systems at the Alloy Interface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    of oral fluids at the metal- resin interface and breakdown of the acrylic resin were factors that have limited the acceptance and widespread use of...percolation of oral fluids at the resin -metal interface, and low resistance to toothbrush abrasion. If chemical means could be used to achieve resin -metal...bonding, 1) esthetics could be improved because of a more uniform layer of the opaque and composite resin , and 2) percolation of fluids at the metal

  8. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  9. Metabolomics Reveals the Origins of Antimicrobial Plant Resins Collected by Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael B.; Spivak, Marla; Hegeman, Adrian D.; Rendahl, Aaron; Cohen, Jerry D.

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of antimicrobial plant resins in honey bee, Apis mellifera, nests has important physiological benefits. Resin foraging is difficult to approach experimentally because resin composition is highly variable among and between plant families, the environmental and plant-genotypic effects on resins are unknown, and resin foragers are relatively rare and often forage in unobservable tree canopies. Subsequently, little is known about the botanical origins of resins in many regions or the benefits of specific resins to bees. We used metabolomic methods as a type of environmental forensics to track individual resin forager behavior through comparisons of global resin metabolite patterns. The resin from the corbiculae of a single bee was sufficient to identify that resin's botanical source without prior knowledge of resin composition. Bees from our apiary discriminately foraged for resin from eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), and balsam poplar (P. balsamifera) among many available, even closely related, resinous plants. Cottonwood and balsam poplar resin composition did not show significant seasonal or regional changes in composition. Metabolomic analysis of resin from 6 North American Populus spp. and 5 hybrids revealed peaks characteristic to taxonomic nodes within Populus, while antimicrobial analysis revealed that resin from different species varied in inhibition of the bee bacterial pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae. We conclude that honey bees make discrete choices among many resinous plant species, even among closely related species. Bees also maintained fidelity to a single source during a foraging trip. Furthermore, the differential inhibition of P. larvae by Populus spp., thought to be preferential for resin collection in temperate regions, suggests that resins from closely related plant species many have different benefits to bees. PMID:24204850

  10. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  11. Rheological characterization of geopolymer binder modified by organic resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekalová, M.; Kovárík, T.; Rieger, D.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is going to investigate properties of alkali-activated powder (calcined kaoilinitic clay and granulated blast furnace slag) prepared as a geopolymer paste and modified by various amount of organic resin. Hybrid organic-inorganic binders were prepared as a mix of organic resin and geopolymer inorganic paste under vacuum conditions. The process of solidification was investigated by measurements of storage (G’) and loss modulus ( G’) in torsion. The measurement was conducted in oscillatory mode by constant strain of 0.01 %. This strain is set in linear visco-elastic region for minimization influence of paste structure. The effect of organic resin is presented and determined by changes of viscosity (‘n*), modules in torsion and tangent of loss angle (tan 8). Results indicate that addition of organic resin significantly affects the initial viscosity and hardening kinetics.

  12. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface betweenmore » the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.« less

  13. Photonic patterns printed in chiral nematic mesoporous resins.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mostofa K; Bsoul, Anas; Walus, Konrad; Hamad, Wadood Y; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2015-03-27

    Chiral nematic mesoporous phenol-formaldehyde resins, which were prepared using cellulose nanocrystals as a template, can be used as a substrate to produce latent photonic images. These resins undergo swelling, which changes their reflected color. By writing on the films with chemical inks, the density of methylol groups in the resin changes, subsequently affecting their degree of swelling and, consequently, their color. Writing on the films gives latent images that are revealed only upon swelling of the films. Using inkjet printing, it is possible to make higher resolution photonic patterns both as text and images that can be visualized by swelling and erased by drying. This novel approach to printing photonic patterns in resin films may be applied to anti-counterfeit tags, signage, and decorative applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Degradation, fatigue and failure of resin dental composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, James L.

    2008-01-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle or fiber filler containing, indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed mode loading on the flexure strength and fracture toughness. Next several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading and then an examination of 3D tomography using multiaxial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection) and after that time period from secondary decay. PMID:18650540

  15. Resin Permeation Through Compressed Glass Insulation for Iter Central Solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R.; Roundy, F.; Martovetsky, N.; Miller, J.; Mann, T.

    2010-04-01

    Concern has been expressed about the ability of the resin system to penetrate the compressed dry glass of the turn and layer insulation during vacuum-pressure impregnation of ITER Central Solenoid (CS) modules. The stacked pancake layers of each module result in compression loads up to 9×104 kg (100 tons) on the lowest layers of each segment. The objective of this program was to assess the effects of this compressive load on resin permeation under resin-transfer conditions and with materials identical to that expected to be used in actual coil fabrication [45-50 °C, vacuum of 133 Pa (1 torr), DGEBF/anhydride epoxy resin system, E-glass satin weave, applied pressure of 125 kPa]. The experimental conditions and materials are detailed and the permeation results presented in this paper.

  16. 21 CFR 177.2450 - Polyamide-imide resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... polyamide-imide resins are derived from the condensation reaction of substantially equimolar parts of.... 31957-38-7) derived from the condensation reaction of equimolar parts of benzoyl chloride-3,4...

  17. 21 CFR 177.2420 - Polyester resins, cross-linked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... following prescribed conditions: (a) The cross-linked polyester resins are produced by the condensation of... fiber Polyester fiber produced by the condensation of one or more of the acids listed in paragraph (a)(1...

  18. 21 CFR 177.2420 - Polyester resins, cross-linked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... polyester resins are produced by the condensation of one or more of the acids listed in paragraph (a)(1) of.... Reinforcements: Asbestos Glass fiber Polyester fiber produced by the condensation of one or more of the acids...

  19. 21 CFR 177.2420 - Polyester resins, cross-linked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... polyester resins are produced by the condensation of one or more of the acids listed in paragraph (a)(1) of.... Reinforcements: Asbestos Glass fiber Polyester fiber produced by the condensation of one or more of the acids...

  20. Matrix resin effects in composite delamination - Mode I fracture aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, Donald L.; Moulton, Richard J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    A number of thermoset, toughened thermoset, and thermoplastic resin matrix systems were characterized for Mode I critical strain energy release rates, and their composites were tested for interlaminar critical strain energy release rates using the double cantilever beam method. A clear correlation is found between the two sets of data. With brittle resins, the interlaminar critical strain energy release rates are somewhat larger than the neat resin values due to a full transfer of the neat resin toughness to the composite and toughening mechanisms associated with crack growth. With tougher matrices, the higher critical strain energy release rates are only partially transferred to the composites, presumably because the fibers restrict the crack-tip deformation zones.

  1. 21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... polyphenylene sulfide with peracetic acid such that the finished resins meet the specifications set forth in... glass transition temperature of the polymer is 360±5 °C as determined by the use of differential...

  2. 21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... consist of basic resin produced by reacting polyphenylene sulfide with peracetic acid such that the... sanction or approval. (c) Specifications. The glass transition temperature of the polymer is 360±5 °C as...

  3. 21 CFR 177.2500 - Polyphenylene sulfone resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... consist of basic resin produced by reacting polyphenylene sulfide with peracetic acid such that the... sanction or approval. (c) Specifications. The glass transition temperature of the polymer is 360±5 °C as...

  4. An Engineering Evaluation of Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell Jr, Joseph F; Lee, Denise L; Taylor, Paul Allen

    2010-09-01

    A small column ion exchange (SCIX) system has been proposed for removal of cesium from caustic, supernatant, and dissolved salt solutions stored or generated from high-level tank wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and Savannah River Sites. In both instances, deployment of SCIX systems, either in-tank or near-tank, is a means of expediting waste pretreatment and dispositioning with minimal or no new infrastructure requirements. Conceptually, the treatment approach can utilize a range of ion exchange media. Previously, both crystalline silicotitanate (CST), an inorganic, nonelutable sorbent, and resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), an organic, elutable resin, have been considered formore » cesium removal from tank waste. More recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated use of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, an elutable ion exchange medium, for the subject application. Results of testing indicate hydraulic limitations of the SuperLig{reg_sign} resin, specifically a high pressure drop through packed ion exchange columns. This limitation is likely the result of swelling and shrinkage of the irregularly shaped (granular) resin during repeated conversions between sodium and hydrogen forms as the resin is first loaded then eluted. It is anticipated that a similar flow limitation would exist in columns packed with conventional, granular RF resin. However, use of spherical RF resin is a likely means of mitigating processing limitations due to excessive pressure drop. Although size changes occur as the spherical resin is cycled through loading and elution operations, the geometry of the resin is expected to effectively mitigate the close packing that leads to high pressure drops across ion exchange columns. Multiple evaluations have been performed to determine the feasibility of using spherical RF resin and to obtain data necessary for design of an SCIX process. The work performed consisted of examination of radiation effects on resin performance

  5. Urea-formaldehyde resins: production, application, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryawan, A.; Risnasari, I.; Sucipto, T.; Heri Iswanto, A.; Rosmala Dewi, R.

    2017-07-01

    Urea-formaldehyde (UF) resin, one of the most important formaldehyde resin adhesives, is a polymeric condensation product of formaldehyde with urea, and being widely used for the manufacture of wood-based composite panels, such as plywood, particleboard, and fiberboard. In spite of its benefits such as fast curing, good performance in the panels (colorless), and lower cost; formaldehyde emission (FE) originated from either UF resin itself or composite products bonded by UF resins is considered a critical drawback as it affects human health particularly in indoor environment. In order to reduce the FE, lowering formaldehyde/urea (F/U) mole ratio in the synthesis of the UF resin was done. In this study, synthesis of UF resins was carried out following the conventional alkaline-acid two-step reaction with a second addition of urea, resulting in F/U mole ratio around 1.0, namely 0.95; 1.05, and 1.15. The UF resins produced were used as binder for particleboard making. The board was manufactured in the laboratory using shaving type particle of Gmelina wood, 8% UF resin based on oven dry particle, and 1% NH4Cl (20%wt) as hardener for the resin. The target of the thickness was 10 mm and the dimension was 25 cm x 25 cm. The resulted particleboard then was evaluated the physical and the mechanical properties by Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) A 5908 (2003). Further, the resulted particleboard also was used for the mice cage’s wall in order to mimic the real living environment. After four weeks exposure in the cages, the mice then were evaluated their mucous organs as well as their blood. The experiment results were as follows: 1) It was possible to synthesis UF resins with low F/U mole ratio; 2) However, the particleboard bonded UF resins with low F/U mole ratio showed poor properties, particularly on the thickness swelling and modulus of elasticity; 3) There was no significant differences among the mucous organs of the mice after a month exposure FE originated from

  6. Wetting characteristic of ceramic to water and adhesive resin.

    PubMed

    Oh, Won-Suck; Shen, Chiayi; Alegre, Brandon; Anusavice, Kenneth J

    2002-12-01

    Maximum wetting of ceramic by adhesive resin is required to achieve optimal adhesion of the resin to ceramic. It is unknown whether the adhesion of the resin to the ceramic is affected by the surface topography and wetting by water or the adhesive resin. This study was designed to characterize the effect of surface topography on the wetting of ceramics by water and adhesive resin. Three materials, a veneering ceramic, Eris (ERV), and 2 core ceramics, Empress 1 core ceramic (E1C) and an experimental core ceramic (EXC), were used. Four surface-roughening procedures were used. They included polishing through 1200-grit SiC paper (P), air abrasion with 50 microm Al(2)O(3) (A), etching with 5% hydrofluoric acid gel (E), and a combination of airborne particle abrasion and etching (A/E). Forty bar specimens (15 x 10 x 1.5 mm) were prepared from each material (N=120). Twelve groups of 10 specimens each were prepared for the 4 surface-roughening procedures. Advancing (theta(A)) and receding (theta(R)) contact angles were measured with a CAHN Dynamic Contact Analyzer, on the basis of the Wilhelmy plate technique, with water and adhesive resin. The work of adhesion (W(A)) by the probing media was calculated by use of advancing contact angle data. The data were analyzed by t testing, analysis of variance, and Duncan's tests (alpha=0.05) to determine the statistical significance of differences in the contact angles between ceramic and water or resin as a function of surface roughening. In general, the mean theta(A) values were higher than the mean theta(R) values except for groups of E or A/E specimens with water used as a probing medium. E and A/E treatments yielded the lowest contact angle values, followed by A and P treatments (P<.001). The E1C exhibited the highest mean contact angles, whereas EXC exhibited the lowest mean contact angle except for the theta(R) with resin. The corresponding values for ERV were between those of E1C and EXC except for theta(R) values with resin

  7. Color stainability of CAD/CAM and nanocomposite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Acar, Ozlem; Yilmaz, Burak; Altintas, Subutay Han; Chandrasekaran, Indumathi; Johnston, William M

    2016-01-01

    The color stainability of recently introduced computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) hybrid ceramic and resin nanoceramic is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effect of coffee staining on the color of 3 different CAD/CAM restorative materials and a nanocomposite resin. Specimens from a hybrid dental ceramic (VITA Enamic), a resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate), a lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max CAD), and a nanocomposite resin (Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal) were evaluated for color change due to thermocycling in coffee (n=5). Specimens 0.5 to 0.7 mm and 1 to 1.2 mm in thickness were thermocycled for 5000 cycles. CIEDE2000 color differences (ΔE00) due to thermocycling in coffee were calculated using the color coordinates obtained from a spectroradiometer. ANCOVA was used to analyze the color differences among the materials with thickness as the covariate. Significant differences at average thickness were analyzed with the Tukey-Kramer test. For color difference due to staining, thickness was a significant covariate (P<.001). Regarding the analysis of color differences, every pair of the tested materials was significantly different (P<.001). Least squares means of color differences (ΔE00) at mean thickness were 4.34 for the nanohybrid composite resin, 3.66 for the resin nanoceramic, 1.35 for the hybrid ceramic, and 0.43 for the lithium disilicate ceramic. When exposed to hot and cold coffee, the color change was beyond clinical acceptability for the tested resin nanoceramic and nanocomposite resin materials. The average color change of the hybrid ceramic was clinically perceivable over the tested thickness values. The color change of lithium disilicate ceramic was not clinically perceivable at any tested thickness. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Interactions of proteins in human plasma with modified polystyrene resins.

    PubMed

    Boisson-Vidal, C; Jozefonvicz, J; Brash, J L

    1991-01-01

    Investigations are reported on the composition of protein layers adsorbed from plasma to various modified polystyrene resins. As well as polystyrene itself, polystyrene bearing sulfonate groups in the benzene rings, and polystyrene sulfonate in which the sulfonate groups were converted to amino acid sulfamide, were investigated. Some of these resins were shown in previous work to have anticoagulant properties. To study the adsorption of proteins from plasma, the resins were exposed to citrate anticoagulated human plasma for 3 h. Adsorbed proteins were then eluted sequentially by 1M Tris buffer and 4% SDS solution, and examined by SDS-PAGE. The gel patterns were similar on all resins except polystyrene. From the MWs of the gel bands, the major protein component appeared to be fibrinogen. Smaller amounts of plasminogen, transferrin, albumin, and IgG were also present. In addition, Ouchterlony immunoassay of the eluates from one resin gave positive identification of complement C3, fibronectin, IgG, and IgM. Many other minor gel bands remain unidentified. A consistent finding for all resins was the presence of plasmin-type fibrinogen degradation products though the amounts varied with resin type. It is concluded from this (and from experiments showing FDP formation when fibrinogen was absorbed to the resins, from buffer containing a trace of plasminogen) that the functional groups in these materials promote the adsorption of plasminogen and its activation to a plasmin-like molecule. It appears from the substantial quantities of fibrinogen adsorbed to these materials after 3 h exposure to plasma that the Vroman effect (giving transient adsorption of fibrinogen) is not operative on these materials. It is hypothesized that specific interactions occur between fibrinogen and sulfonate groups.

  9. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W.; Roybal, Herman E.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  10. Alternatives to silver amalgam and resin composite in pediatric dentistry.

    PubMed

    Croll, T P

    1998-11-01

    Silver amalgam has become a less attractive dental restorative material for restoration of primary teeth. After many decades of scientific and nonscientific controversy, use of silver amalgam for primary teeth is waning, not because of its mercury content but because dentistry has come up with more suitable materials. This article reviews the development and use of glass-ionomer silver-cermet cements, resin-modified glass-ionomer cements, and polyacid-modified resin composites (compomers) for restoration of primary teeth.

  11. Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

  12. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

    1983-11-14

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  13. Flammability Characteristics of Some Epoxy Resins and Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    MACHIONE ET AL. SEP 83 UNCLASSIFIED AMMRC-TR-83-53 F/6 ii/9 N 1.0 M2 MICROCOP RESOUTIn TMST CHAT NiTOM BIJWfA OV SIAROPMC-1W3-A AMMRC TR 83-53 [111h do...resin systems. The increase in the oxygen index of these resin systems in the 100OC- 2000 C range could be caused by the release of some compound in the

  14. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching.

    PubMed

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab(*)) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  15. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. Materials and Methods: The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L*a*b* system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab*) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Conclusions: Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested. PMID:23559921

  16. Enhanced DOC removal using anion and cation ion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Arias-Paic, Miguel; Cawley, Kaelin M; Byg, Steve; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Hardness and DOC removal in a single ion exchange unit operation allows for less infrastructure, is advantageous for process operation and depending on the water source, could enhance anion exchange resin removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Simultaneous application of cationic (Plus) and anionic (MIEX) ion exchange resin in a single contact vessel was tested at pilot and bench scales, under multiple regeneration cycles. Hardness removal correlated with theoretical predictions; where measured hardness was between 88 and 98% of the predicted value. Comparing bench scale DOC removal of solely treating water with MIEX compared to Plus and MIEX treated water showed an enhanced DOC removal, where removal was increased from 0.5 to 1.25 mg/L for the simultaneous resin application compared to solely applying MIEX resin. A full scale MIEX treatment plant (14.5 MGD) reduced raw water DOC from 13.7 mg/L to 4.90 mg/L in the treated effluent at a bed volume (BV) treatment rate of 800, where a parallel operation of a simultaneous MIEX and Plus resin pilot (10 gpm) measured effluent DOC concentrations of no greater than 3.4 mg/L, even at bed volumes of treatment 37.5% greater than the full scale plant. MIEX effluent compared to simultaneous Plus and MIEX effluent resulted in differences in fluorescence intensity that correlated to decreases in DOC concentration. The simultaneous treatment of Plus and MIEX resin produced water with predominantly microbial character, indicating the enhanced DOC removal was principally due to increased removal of terrestrially derived organic matter. The addition of Plus resin to a process train with MIEX resin allows for one treatment process to remove both DOC and hardness, where a single brine waste stream can be sent to sewer at a full-scale plant, completely removing lime chemical addition and sludge waste disposal for precipitative softening processes. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Static and cyclic loading of fiber-reinforced dental resin.

    PubMed

    Drummond, James L; Bapna, Mahendra S

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the flexure strength of unidirectional fiber-reinforced resins under static and cyclic loading with and without thermal cycling. The fiber-reinforced resin materials chosen for this project were commercially available endodontic posts and commercially procured bar samples. For all materials, controls for flexure strength were tested in air and in water using three-point loading. Specimens were thermal cycled between 7 and 63 degrees C for 6000 cycles. A staircase approach was used to determine the flexure fatigue limit and scanning microscopy was used to examine the microstructure. The carbon/graphite fiber-reinforced resin posts and the glass FiberKor posts were significantly stronger than the ceramic (zirconia) and the other glass-reinforced resin materials. Thermal cycling caused a significant lowering (11-24%) of the flexure strength for each resin based post system. The ceramic post system decreased only by 2%. Further, for standard size glass fiber-reinforced resin bars, no significant differences between testing in air and water was observed, but a significant difference between static and cyclic loading was noted. The decreases in the strength property due to thermal cycling and the cyclic loading of these materials indicates that their utilization in the oral environment enhances their degradation, and potentially shortens their clinical life.

  18. Method for rigless zone abandonment using internally catalyzed resin system

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.

    1980-02-19

    A zone of a subterranean formation penetrated by a well bore is permanently plugged by injecting a liquid resin system containing at least one thermosetting resin and at least one curing agent or catalyst therefor into the formation and injecting into the wellbore following the resin system, a second liquid containing at least one chain stopping compound to react with one component in the resin system to prevent any of the resin system remaining in the well bore from crosslinking to a sufficient crosslink density to form a solid in the wellbore. Preferably, the second liquid also contains a fluidmore » loss additive to minimize loss of the second liquid from the wellbore to the formation. The method permits a zone to be plugged off and abandoned without the need to erect a drilling rig to drill out excess plugging material remaining in the wellbore. In a preferred embodiment, the resin system comprises the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol a and polymethylene phenylamine in ethylene glycol ethyl ether, and the preferred second liquid is monoethanolamine in ethylene glycol ethyl ether as a solvent with ethylcellulose and silic flour to control fluid loss.« less

  19. Resin transfer molding of textile preforms for aircraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasko, Gregory H.; Dexter, H. Benson; Weideman, Mark H.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA LaRC is conducting and supporting research to develop cost-effective fabrication methods that are applicable to primary composite aircraft structures. One of the most promising fabrication methods that has evolved is resin transfer molding (RTM) of dry textile material forms. RTM has been used for many years for secondary structures, but has received increased emphasis because it is an excellent method for applying resin to damage-tolerant textile preforms at low cost. Textile preforms based on processes such as weaving, braiding, knitting, stitching, and combinations of these have been shown to offer significant improvements in damage tolerance compared to laminated tape composites. The use of low-cost resins combined with textile preforms could provide a major breakthrough in achieving cost-effective composite aircraft structures. RTM uses resin in its lowest cost form, and storage and spoilage costs are minimal. Near net shape textile preforms are expected to be cost-effective because automated machines can be used to produce the preforms, post-cure operations such as machining and fastening are minimized, and material scrap rate may be reduced in comparison with traditional prepreg molding. The purpose of this paper is to discuss experimental and analytical techniques that are under development at NASA Langley to aid the engineer in developing RTM processes for airframe structural elements. Included are experimental techniques to characterize preform and resin behavior and analytical methods that were developed to predict resin flow and cure kinetics.

  20. Resin cement to indirect composite resin bonding: effect of various surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Kirmali, Omer; Barutcugil, Cagatay; Harorli, Osman; Kapdan, Alper; Er, Kursat

    2015-01-01

    Debonding at the composite-adhesive interface is a major problem for indirect composite restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength (BS) of an indirect composite resin after various surface treatments (air-abrasion with Al2O3, phosphoric acid-etchig and different applications of NdYAG laser irradiations). Fifty composite disks were subjected to secondary curing to complete polymerization and randomly divided into five experimental groups (n = 10) including Group 1, untreated (control); Group 2, phosphoric acid-etched; Group 3, air-abrasion with Al2 O3 ; Group 4, Nd:YAG laser irradiated with non-contact and Group 5, Nd:YAG laser irradiated with contact. They were then bonded to resin cement and shear BS was determined in a universal testing device at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to analyze the BS values. The highest BS value was observed in Group 4 and followed by Group 3. Tukey test showed that there was no statistical difference between Group1, 2 and 5. Furthermore, differences in BSs between Group 4 and the other groups except Group 3 were significant (p < 0.05) and also there were significant differences in BSs between Group 3 to 1 and Group 3 to 2 (p < 0.05). This study reveals that air-abrasion with Al2 O3 and Nd:YAG laser irradiation with non-contact provided a significant increase in BS between indirect composite and resin cement. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Interactions between resin monomers and commercial composite resins with human saliva derived esterases.

    PubMed

    Jaffer, F; Finer, Y; Santerre, J P

    2002-04-01

    Cholesterol esterase (CE) and pseudocholinesterase (PCE) have been reported to degrade commercial and model composite resins containing bisphenylglycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) or the latter in combination with urethane modified BisGMA monomer systems. In addition, human saliva has been shown to contain esterase like activities similar to CE and PCE. Hence, it was the aim of the current study to determine to what extent human saliva could degrade two common commercial composite resins (Z250 from 3M Inc. and Spectrum TPH from L.D. Caulk) which contain the above monomer systems. Saliva samples from different volunteers were collected, processed, pooled, and freeze-dried. TEGDMA and BisGMA monomers were incubated with human saliva derived esterase activity (HSDEA) and their respective hydrolysis was monitored using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both monomers were completely hydrolyzed within 25 h by HSDEA. Photopolymerized composites were incubated with buffer or human saliva (pH 7.0 and 37 C) for 2, 8 and 16 days. The incubation solutions were analyzed using HPLC and mass spectrometry. Surface morphology characterization was carried out using scanning electron microscopy. Upon biodegradation, the Z250 composite yielded higher amounts of BisGMA and TEGDMA related products relative to the TPH composite. However, there were higher amounts of ethoxylated bis-phenol A released from the TPH material. In terms of total mass of products released, human saliva demonstrated a greater ability to degrade Z250. In summary, HSDEA has been shown to contain esterase activities that can readily catalyze the biodegradation of current commercial composite resins.

  2. Toothbrush abrasion of paint-on resins for shade modification and crown resins: effect of water absorption.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Koichi; Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Ban, Seiji

    2004-06-01

    In order to investigate the clinical application of paint-on resins, the effect of water absorption on toothbrush abrasion and light transmittance of ten crown resins including three paint-on resins was examined. Water absorption into each material ranged from 0.29 to 0.89 mg/cm2 after storage in distilled-water for 6 weeks and their hardnesses decreased by 3.5-22.3%. Maximum surface roughness (Rmax) of the materials stored in distilled water for 6 weeks increased with an increasing number of toothbrush abrasion cycles and ranged from 1.9 to 10.5 microm after 100,000 cycles. Also, Maximum depth and weight loss as an indicator of the amount of each material lost by abrasion showed similar behaviors similar to Rmax. These results indicated that the abrasion resistance of paint-on resins was located in the middle among all materials examined.

  3. Resin Flow Behavior Simulation of Grooved Foam Sandwich Composites with the Vacuum Assisted Resin Infusion (VARI) Molding Process

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenhui; Zhang, Guangcheng; Wu, Yibo

    2012-01-01

    The resin flow behavior in the vacuum assisted resin infusion molding process (VARI) of foam sandwich composites was studied by both visualization flow experiments and computer simulation. Both experimental and simulation results show that: the distribution medium (DM) leads to a shorter molding filling time in grooved foam sandwich composites via the VARI process, and the mold filling time is linearly reduced with the increase of the ratio of DM/Preform. Patterns of the resin sources have a significant influence on the resin filling time. The filling time of center source is shorter than that of edge pattern. Point pattern results in longer filling time than of linear source. Short edge/center patterns need a longer time to fill the mould compared with Long edge/center sources.

  4. The Physical Mechanisms Responsible for the Weathering of Epoxy Resins and Glass Fibre Reinforced Expoxy Resins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    during service. Stress analysis using polarized light has been simplified by representing the changing state of polarization by the Poincare sphere...Section Page LIST OF FIGURES 1. INTRODUCTION 1 2. DEBONDING OF FIBRES IN AN EPOXY RESIN MATRIX 2 2.1 POINCARE 2 2.2 DISCUSSION OF THE EXPERIMENTS 6 2.3...examined in plane and circularly polarised light. After immersion in water at 80°C for 4 days. The fibres are arranged in a periodic array. Figure 24 Shzpe

  5. Mechanical Properties of Degraded PMR-15 Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuji, Luis C.

    2000-01-01

    Thermo-oxidative aging produces a nonuniform degradation state in PMR-15 resin. A surface layer, usually attributed to oxidative degradation, forms. This surface layer has different properties from the inner material. A set of material tests was designed to separate the properties of the oxidized surface layer from the properties of interior material. Test specimens were aged at 316 C in either air or nitrogen, for durations of up to 800 hr. The thickness of the oxidized surface layer in air aged specimens, and the shrinkage and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of nitrogen aged specimens were measured directly. The nitrogen-aged specimens were assumed to have the same properties as the interior material in the air-aged specimens. Four-point-bend tests were performed to determine modulus of both the oxidized surface layer and the interior material. Bimaterial strip specimens consisting of oxidized surface material and unoxidized interior material were constructed and used to determine surface layer shrinkage and CTE. Results confirm that the surface layer and core materials have substantially different properties.

  6. Simultaneous uptake of NOM and Microcystin-LR by anion exchange resins: Effect of inorganic ions and resin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Fuhar; Barbeau, Benoit; Mohseni, Madjid

    2018-02-01

    This study investigated the efficiency of a strongly basic macroporous anion exchange resin for the co-removal of Microcystin-LR (MCLR) and natural organic matter (NOM) in waters affected by toxic algal blooms. Environmental factors influencing the uptake behavior included MCLR and resin concentrations, NOM and anionic species, specifically nitrate, sulphate and bicarbonate. A860 resin exhibited an excellent adsorption capacity of 3800 μg/g; more than 60% of the MCLR removal was achieved within 10 min with a resin dosage of 200 mg/L (∼1 mL/L). Further, kinetic studies revealed that the overall removal of MCLR is influenced by both external diffusion and intra-particle diffusion. Increasing NOM concentration resulted in a significant reduction of MCLR uptake, especially at lower resin dosages, where a competitive uptake between the charged NOM fractions and MCLR was observed due to limited active sites. In addition, MCLR uptake was significantly reduced in the presence of sulphate and nitrate in the water matrix. Moreover, performance of the resin proved to be stable from one regeneration cycle to another. Approximately 80% of MCLR and 50% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were recovered in the regenerated brine. Evidences of resin saturation and site reduction were also observed after 2000 bed volumes (BV) of operation. For all the investigated water matrices, a resin dosage of 1000 mg/L (∼4.5 mL/L) was sufficient to lower MCLR concentration from 100 μg/L to below the World Health Organization guideline of 1 μg/L, while simultaneously providing more than 80% NOM removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Engineering fire blight resistance into the apple cultivar 'Gala' using the FB_MR5 CC-NBS-LRR resistance gene of Malus × robusta 5.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Giovanni A L; Wöhner, Thomas; Fahrentrapp, Johannes; Kost, Thomas D; Flachowsky, Henryk; Peil, Andreas; Hanke, Maria-Viola; Richter, Klaus; Patocchi, Andrea; Gessler, Cesare

    2014-08-01

    The fire blight susceptible apple cultivar Malus × domestica Borkh. cv. 'Gala' was transformed with the candidate fire blight resistance gene FB_MR5 originating from the crab apple accession Malus × robusta 5 (Mr5). A total of five different transgenic lines were obtained. All transgenic lines were shown to be stably transformed and originate from different transgenic events. The transgenic lines express the FB_MR5 either driven by the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter and the ocs terminator or by its native promoter and terminator sequences. Phenotyping experiments were performed with Mr5-virulent and Mr5-avirulent strains of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. Significantly less disease symptoms were detected on transgenic lines after inoculation with two different Mr5-avirulent E. amylovora strains, while significantly more shoot necrosis was observed after inoculation with the Mr5-virulent mutant strain ZYRKD3_1. The results of these experiments demonstrated the ability of a single gene isolated from the native gene pool of apple to protect a susceptible cultivar from fire blight. Furthermore, this gene is confirmed to be the resistance determinant of Mr5 as the transformed lines undergo the same gene-for-gene interaction in the host-pathogen relationship Mr5-E. amylovora. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Identification of the meiotic toolkit in diatoms and exploration of meiosis-specific SPO11 and RAD51 homologs in the sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shrikant; Moeys, Sara; von Dassow, Peter; Huysman, Marie J J; Mapleson, Daniel; De Veylder, Lieven; Sanges, Remo; Vyverman, Wim; Montresor, Marina; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata

    2015-11-14

    Sexual reproduction is an obligate phase in the life cycle of most eukaryotes. Meiosis varies among organisms, which is reflected by the variability of the gene set associated to the process. Diatoms are unicellular organisms that belong to the stramenopile clade and have unique life cycles that can include a sexual phase. The exploration of five diatom genomes and one diatom transcriptome led to the identification of 42 genes potentially involved in meiosis. While these include the majority of known meiosis-related genes, several meiosis-specific genes, including DMC1, could not be identified. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses supported gene identification and revealed ancestral loss and recent expansion in the RAD51 family in diatoms. The two sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta were used to explore the expression of meiosis-related genes: RAD21, SPO11-2, RAD51-A, RAD51-B and RAD51-C were upregulated during meiosis, whereas other paralogs in these families showed no differential expression patterns, suggesting that they may play a role during vegetative divisions. An almost identical toolkit is shared among Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Fragilariopsis cylindrus, as well as two species for which sex has not been observed, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, suggesting that these two may retain a facultative sexual phase. Our results reveal the conserved meiotic toolkit in six diatom species and indicate that Stramenopiles share major modifications of canonical meiosis processes ancestral to eukaryotes, with important divergences in each Kingdom.

  9. Methyl Jasmonate Induces Traumatic Resin Ducts, Terpenoid Resin Biosynthesis, and Terpenoid Accumulation in Developing Xylem of Norway Spruce Stems1

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Diane; Tholl, Dorothea; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2002-01-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) produces an oleoresin characterized by a diverse array of terpenoids, monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, and diterpene resin acids that can protect conifers against potential herbivores and pathogens. Oleoresin accumulates constitutively in resin ducts in the cortex and phloem (bark) of Norway spruce stems. De novo formation of traumatic resin ducts (TDs) is observed in the developing secondary xylem (wood) after insect attack, fungal elicitation, and mechanical wounding. Here, we characterize the methyl jasmonate-induced formation of TDs in Norway spruce by microscopy, chemical analyses of resin composition, and assays of terpenoid biosynthetic enzymes. The response involves tissue-specific differentiation of TDs, terpenoid accumulation, and induction of enzyme activities of both prenyltransferases and terpene synthases in the developing xylem, a tissue that constitutively lacks axial resin ducts in spruce. The induction of a complex defense response in Norway spruce by methyl jasmonate application provides new avenues to evaluate the role of resin defenses for protection of conifers against destructive pests such as white pine weevils (Pissodes strobi), bark beetles (Coleoptera, Scolytidae), and insect-associated tree pathogens. PMID:12114556

  10. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  11. Cellulose whisker/epoxy resin nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liming; Weder, Christoph

    2010-04-01

    New nanocomposites composed of cellulose nanofibers or "whiskers" and an epoxy resin were prepared. Cellulose whiskers with aspect ratios of approximately 10 and approximately 84 were isolated from cotton and sea animals called tunicates, respectively. Suspensions of these whiskers in dimethylformamide were combined with an oligomeric difunctional diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A with an epoxide equivalent weight of 185-192 and a diethyl toluenediamine-based curing agent. Thin films were produced by casting these mixtures and subsequent curing. The whisker content was systematically varied between 4 and 24% v/v. Electron microscopy studies suggest that the whiskers are evenly dispersed within the epoxy matrix. Dynamic mechanical thermoanalysis revealed that the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the materials was not significantly influenced by the incorporation of the cellulose filler. Between room temperature and 150 degrees C, i.e., below T(g), the tensile storage moduli (E') of the nanocomposites increased modestly, for example from 1.6 GPa for the neat polymer to 4.9 and 3.6 GPa for nanocomposites comprising 16% v/v tunicate or cotton whiskers. The relative reinforcement was more significant at 185 degrees C (i.e., above T(g)), where E' was increased from approximately 16 MPa (neat polymer) to approximately 1.6 GPa (tunicate) or approximately 215 MPa (cotton). The mechanical properties of the new materials are well-described by the percolation model and are the result of the formation of a percolating whisker network in which stress transfer is facilitated by strong interactions between the whiskers.

  12. Phenylethynyl Containing Polyarylene Ethers/Polyimides Resin Infiltration of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, DeRome O.

    1998-01-01

    The following tasks were performed at NCA&TSU during the second year in performance of the grant. LaRC-LV-1 13 resin was synthesized at NCA&TSU. In order to perform the synthesis, glassware and needed apparatus were purchased with grant funds along with the appropriate monomers. It was found that the LaRC-LV-1 13 resin was easily synthesized by the NMP solvent/toluene imminization/distilled water precipitation process. However, in use this resin exhibited a bubbling/foaming behavior during cure that was detrimental leading to the production of composite panels having a high void content. Composite panels were fabricated using compression molding and resin transfer molding (RTM) techniques. Initial fiber volume determinations were computed at NCA&TSU along with NASA-Langley measured c-scans on the panels produced. The initial results indicated a unsatisfactory level of approximately 20% by volume of voids. Testing of uniaxial coupons in compression to failure also agreed with these results. The uniaxial coupons delaminated as the major mode of failure indicative of an unacceptably low level of resin and to much void content in the final composites produced. In discussions with Dr. Brian Jensen, it was suggested the void fraction needs to be reduced to at least 2% by volume for a useful composite. The panels produced used both resin synthesized at NASA-Langley and NCA&TSU. In reviewing our progress over the past year, it was noted that the resin as formulated by the current synthesis process bubbled at elevated temperature. This was especially observed in neat resin slugs cured at the recommended one, four and eight hour cure temperatures. Pressurized cures where then performed with pressures up to 200 psi and simultaneously the lowest eight hour cure temperatures. Although this procedure reduced the amount of bubbles to some extent in the neat resin slugs it did not completely eliminate them. The cure reaction appears to be very energetic even at the lowest

  13. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus <15 GPa. Chemical additives can also effectively raise the hardness to as much as 1.34 GPa. Besides>alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with

  14. Competitive light absorbers in photoactive dental resin-based materials.

    PubMed

    Hadis, Mohammed A; Shortall, Adrian C; Palin, William M

    2012-08-01

    The absorbance profile of photoinitiators prior to, during and following polymerization of light curable resin-based materials will have a significant effect on the cure and color properties of the final material. So-called "colorless" photoinitiators are used in some light-activated resin-based composite restorative materials to lessen the yellowing effect of camphoroquinone (CQ) in order to improve the esthetic quality of dental restorations. This work characterizes absorption properties of commonly used photoinitiators, an acylphosphine oxide (TPO) and CQ, and assesses their influence on material discoloration. Dimethacrylate resin formulations contained low (0.0134 mol/dm(3)), intermediate (0.0405 mol/dm(3)) or high (0.0678 mol/dm(3)) concentrations of the photoinitiators and the inhibitor, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) at 0, 0.1 or 0.2% by mass. Disc shaped specimens (n = 3) of each resin were polymerized for 60s using a halogen light curing unit. Dynamic measurements of photoinitiator absorption, polymer conversion and reaction temperature were performed. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the color change before and after cure. GLM three-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences (p<0.001), where photoinitiator concentration (df = 2; F = 618.83)>photoinitiator type (df = 1; F = 176.12)>% BHT (df = 2, F = 13.17). BHT concentration affected the rate of polymerization and produced lower conversion in some of the CQ-based resins. Significant differences between photoinitiator type and concentrations were seen in color (where TPO resins became yellower and camphoroquinone resins became less yellow upon irradiation). Reaction temperature, kinetics and conversion also differed significantly for both initiators (p<0.001). Despite TPO-based resins producing a visually perceptible color change upon polymerization, the color change was significantly less than that produced with CQ-based resins. Although some photoinitiators such as TPO may be a

  15. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored with Biodentine, Resin Modified GIC and Hybrid Composite Resin as a Core Material.

    PubMed

    Subash, Dayalan; Shoba, Krishnamma; Aman, Shibu; Bharkavi, Srinivasan Kumar Indu; Nimmi, Vijayan; Abhilash, Radhakrishnan

    2017-09-01

    The restoration of a severely damaged tooth usually needs a post and core as a part of treatment procedure to provide a corono - radicular stabilization. Biodentine is a class of dental material which possess high mechanical properties with excellent biocompatibility and bioactive behaviour. The sealing ability coupled with optimum physical properties could make Biodentine an excellent option as a core material. The aim of the study was to determine the fracture resistance of Biodentine as a core material in comparison with resin modified glass ionomer and composite resin. Freshly extracted 30 human permanent maxillary central incisors were selected. After endodontic treatment followed by post space preparation and luting of Glass fibre post (Reforpost, Angelus), the samples were divided in to three groups based on the type of core material. The core build-up used in Group I was Biodentine (Septodont, France), Group II was Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (GC, Japan) and Group III was Hybrid Composite Resin (TeEconom plus, Ivoclar vivadent). The specimens were subjected to fracture toughness using Universal testing machine (1474, Zwick/Roell, Germany) and results were compared using One-way analysis of variance with Tukey's Post hoc test. The results showed that there was significant difference between groups in terms of fracture load. Also, composite resin exhibited highest mean fracture load (1039.9 N), whereas teeth restored with Biodentine demonstrated the lowest mean fracture load (176.66 N). Resin modified glass ionomer exhibited intermediate fracture load (612.07 N). The primary mode of failure in Group I and Group II was favourable (100%) while unfavourable fracture was seen in Group III (30%). Biodentine, does not satisfy the requirements to be used as an ideal core material. The uses of RMGIC's as a core build-up material should be limited to non-stress bearing areas. Composite resin is still the best core build-up material owing to its high fracture

  16. Fiber Reinforced Polyester Resins Polymerized by Microwave Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visco, A. M.; Calabrese, L.; Cianciafara, P.; Bonaccorsi, L.; Proverbio, E.

    2007-12-01

    Polyester resin based composite materials are widely used in the manufacture of fiberglass boats. Production time of fiberglass laminate components could be strongly reduced by using an intense energy source as well as microwaves. In this work a polyester resin was used with 2% by weight of catalyst and reinforced with chopped or woven glass fabric. Pure resin and composite samples were cured by microwaves exposition for different radiation times. A three point bending test was performed on all the cured samples by using an universal testing machine and the resulting fracture surfaces were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of mechanical and microscopy analyses evidenced that microwave activation lowers curing time of the composite while good mechanical properties were retained. Microwaves exposition time is crucial for mechanical performance of the composite. It was evidenced that short exposition times suffice for resin activation while long exposure times cause fast cross linking and premature matrix fracture. Furthermore high-radiation times induce bubbles growth or defects nucleation within the sample, decreasing composite performance. On the basis of such results microwave curing activation of polyester resin based composites could be proposed as a valid alternative method for faster processing of laminated materials employed for large-scale applications.

  17. Copper resinate: preparation, characterisation and study of degradation.

    PubMed

    Colombini, M P; Lanterna, G; Mairani, A; Matteini, M; Modugno, F; Rizzi, M

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the synthesis of Copper Resinate, which disappeared from artists' palettes in the eighteenth century. This was carried out by interpreting ancient recipes following a scientific approach. Its characterisation using Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry demonstrated that it is a mixture containing copper and oxidised abietic acids, mainly dehydroabietic and 7-oxo-dehydroabietic acids, formed during the preparation of the pigment and the curing of the paint layer. The composition of copper resinate paint layers, artificially aged by U.V. irradiation at 365 nm (UV), heating (T), and exposed to atmospheric pollutants (NOX) in a climatic chamber, was investigated. The combination of irradiation and temperature produced a change in colour along with a significant increase in the recovered amount of 7-oxo-dehydroabietic acid. The identification of copper resinate in a sample from an old painting should be related to the presence of the following resin compounds which are stable in the ageing process: dehydroabietic and 7-oxo-dehydroabietic acid pimaradienic acids. Photo-oxidation of the resin acids co-ordinated with copper seem to be the most probable decay mechanism responsible for the colour change in the pigment.

  18. Future perspectives of resin-based dental materials.

    PubMed

    Jandt, Klaus D; Sigusch, Bernd W

    2009-08-01

    This concise review and outlook paper gives a view of selected potential future developments in the area of resin-based biomaterials with an emphasis on dental composites. A selection of key publications (1 book, 35 scientific original publications and 1 website source) covering the areas nanotechnology, antimicrobial materials, stimuli responsive materials, self-repairing materials and materials for tissue engineering with direct or indirect relations and/or implications to resin-based dental materials is critically reviewed and discussed. Connections between these fields and their potential for resin-based dental materials are highlighted and put in perspective. The need to improve shrinkage properties and wear resistance is obvious for dental composites, and a vast number of attempts have been made to accomplish these aims. Future resin-based materials may be further improved in this respect if, for example nanotechnology is applied. Dental composites may, however, reach a completely new quality by utilizing new trends from materials science, such as introducing nanostructures, antimicrobial properties, stimuli responsive capabilities, the ability to promote tissue regeneration or repair of dental tissues if the composites were able to repair themselves. This paper shows selected potential future developments in the area of resin-based dental materials, gives basic and industrial researchers in dental materials science, and dental practitioners a glance into the potential future of these materials, and should stimulate discussion about needs and future developments in the area.

  19. Monitoring the Cure State of Thermosetting Resins by Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lionetto, Francesca; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2013-09-05

    The propagation of low intensity ultrasound in a curing resin, acting as a high frequency oscillatory excitation, has been recently proposed as an ultrasonic dynamic mechanical analysis (UDMA) for cure monitoring. The technique measures sound velocity and attenuation, which are very sensitive to changes in the viscoelastic characteristics of the curing resin, since the velocity is related to the resin storage modulus and density, while the attenuation is related to the energy dissipation and scattering in the curing resin. The paper reviews the results obtained by the authors' research group in the last decade by means of in-house made ultrasonic set-ups for both contact and air-coupled ultrasonic experiments. The basics of the ultrasonic wave propagation in polymers and examples of measurements of the time-evolution of ultrasonic longitudinal modulus and chemical conversion of different thermosetting resins are presented. The effect of temperature on the cure kinetics, the comparison with rheological, low frequency dynamic mechanical and calorimetric results, and the correlation between ultrasonic modulus and crosslinking density will be also discussed. The paper highlights the reliability of ultrasonic wave propagation for monitoring the physical changes taking place during curing and the potential for online monitoring during polymer and polymer matrix composite processing.

  20. Monitoring the Cure State of Thermosetting Resins by Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lionetto, Francesca; Maffezzoli, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of low intensity ultrasound in a curing resin, acting as a high frequency oscillatory excitation, has been recently proposed as an ultrasonic dynamic mechanical analysis (UDMA) for cure monitoring. The technique measures sound velocity and attenuation, which are very sensitive to changes in the viscoelastic characteristics of the curing resin, since the velocity is related to the resin storage modulus and density, while the attenuation is related to the energy dissipation and scattering in the curing resin. The paper reviews the results obtained by the authors’ research group in the last decade by means of in-house made ultrasonic set-ups for both contact and air-coupled ultrasonic experiments. The basics of the ultrasonic wave propagation in polymers and examples of measurements of the time-evolution of ultrasonic longitudinal modulus and chemical conversion of different thermosetting resins are presented. The effect of temperature on the cure kinetics, the comparison with rheological, low frequency dynamic mechanical and calorimetric results, and the correlation between ultrasonic modulus and crosslinking density will be also discussed. The paper highlights the reliability of ultrasonic wave propagation for monitoring the physical changes taking place during curing and the potential for online monitoring during polymer and polymer matrix composite processing. PMID:28788306

  1. Phenol-Formaldehyde Resin for Optical-Chemical Temperature Sensing.

    PubMed

    Claucherty, Steven; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2018-05-30

    The application of phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin as an optical temperature sensor is investigated. Recent developments in optical luminescent sensors allow for global measurements to be made over the surface of a test article, extending beyond conventional point measurements. Global temperature distributions are particularly helpful when validating computational models or when mapping temperature over complex geometries, and can be used to calculate surface heat flux values. Temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) is a novel chemical approach to obtaining these global temperature measurements, but there are still challenges to overcome to make it a reliable tool. A sensor with a wide range of temperature sensitivity is desired to provide the maximum amount of utility, especially for tests spanning large temperature gradients. Naturally luminescent materials such as PF resin provide an attractive alternative to chemical sensor coatings, and PF resin is studied for this reason. Static tests of different PF resin samples are conducted using two binder materials to strengthen the material: cloth and paper. The material shows temperature sensitivities up to -0.8%/K, demonstrating the usefulness of PF resin as a temperature sensor.

  2. Copper and boron fixation in wood by pyrolytic resins.

    PubMed

    Mourant, Daniel; Yang, Dian-Qing; Lu, Xiao; Riedl, Bernard; Roy, Christian

    2009-02-01

    A phenol-formaldehyde (PF)-resin designed to penetrate wood and immobilize copper and boron in wood cells for protection against decay was investigated. The phenol portion of the PF-resin was partially substituted with pyrolysis oil derived from softwood bark. The objective was to reduce the environmental impact associated with the production of petroleum-borne phenol, as well as to improve the product economics. Leaching tests were conducted with three different formulas of resins containing 50%, 75% or 85% by weight of pyrolytic oil on a total phenol basis. The leachates were analyzed for the presence of copper by atomic absorption spectroscopy while inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy was used for boron detection. Copper leaching was reduced up to 18 times when comparing the treatments with and without the resin. Preservative leaching varied between wood species as well as between the resins containing different concentrations of pyrolytic oil. The organic leachates were measured using gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. Trace amounts of organics, mostly acetic acid, were found in the leachates.

  3. Selection of UV Resins for Nanostructured Molds for Thermal-NIL.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zheng; Choi, Junseo; Park, Sunggook

    2018-06-18

    Nanoimprint molds made of soft polymeric materials have advantages of low demolding force and low fabrication cost over Si or metal-based hard molds. However, such advantages are often sacrificed by their reduced replication fidelity associated with the low mechanical strength. In this paper, we studied replication fidelity of different UV-resin molds copied from a Si master mold via UV nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and their thermal imprinting performance into a thermoplastic polymer. Four different UV resins were studied: two were high surface energy UV resins based on tripropyleneglycol diacrylate (TPGDA resin) and polypropyleneglycol diacrylate (PPGDA resin), and the other two were commercially available, low surface energy poly-urethane acrylate (PUA resin) and fluorine-containing (MD 700) UV resins. The replication fidelity among the four UV-resins during UV nanoimprint lithograph from a Si master with sharp nanostructures was in the increasing order of (poorest) PUA resin < MD 700 < PPGDA resin < TPGDA resin (best). The results show that the high surface energy and small monomer size are keys to achieving good UV resin filling into sharp nanostructures over the viscosity of the resin solution. When the four UV-resin molds were used for thermal-NIL into a thermoplastic polymer, the replication fidelity was in the increasing order of (poorest) MD 700 < TPGDA resin < PUA resin (best), which follows the same order of their Young's moduli. Our results indicate that the selection of an appropriate UV resin for NIL molds requires consideration of the replication fidelities in the mold fabrication and the subsequent thermal-NIL into thermoplastic polymers. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  4. Microhardness of dual-polymerizing resin cements and foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keiichi; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2014-06-01

    The optimal luting material for fiber-reinforced posts to ensure the longevity of foundation restorations remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the suitability of 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements and 2 dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins for luting fiber-reinforced posts by assessing their Knoop hardness number. Five specimens of dual-polymerizing resin cements (SA Cement Automix, G-Cem LincAce, and Panavia F2.0) and 5 specimens of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins (Clearfil DC Core Plus and Unifil Core EM) were polymerized from the top by irradiation for 40 seconds. Knoop hardness numbers were measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours and 7 days after irradiation. Data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey compromise post hoc test (α=.05). At both times after irradiation, the 5 resins materials showed the highest Knoop hardness numbers at the 0.5-mm depth. At 7 days after irradiation, the Knoop hardness numbers of the resin materials did not differ significantly between the 8.0-mm and 10.0-mm depths (P>.05). For all materials, the Knoop hardness numbers at 7 days after irradiation were significantly higher than those at 0.5 hours after irradiation at all depths (P<.05). At 7 days after irradiation, the Knoop hardness numbers of the 5 resin materials were found to decrease in the following order: DC Core Plus, Unifil Core EM, Panavia F2.0, SA Cement Automix, and G-Cem LincAce (P<.05). The Knoop hardness number depends on the depth of the cavity, the length of time after irradiation, and the material brand. Although the Knoop hardness numbers of the 2 dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins were higher than those of the 3 dual-polymerizing resin cements, notable differences were seen among the 5 materials at all depths and at both times after irradiation. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

  5. New processable modified polyimide resins for adhesive and matrix applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, D.

    1985-01-01

    A broad product line of bismaleimide modified epoxy adhesives which are cured by conventional addition curing methods is described. These products fill a market need for 232 C (450 F) service adhesives which are cured in a manner similar to conventional 177 C (350 F) epoxy adhesives. The products described include film adhesives, pastes, and a primer. Subsequent development work has resulted in a new bismaleimide modified epoxy resin which uses a unique addition curing mechanism. This has resulted in products with improved thermomechanical properties compared to conventional bismaleimide epoxy resins. A film adhesive, paste, and matrix resin for composites using this new technology are described. In all cases, the products developed are heat cured by using typical epoxy cure cycles i.e., 1 hour at 177 C (350 F) followed by 2 hours postcure at 246 C (475 F).

  6. Porcelain veneer post-bonding crack repair by resin infiltration.

    PubMed

    Gresnigt, Marco; Magne, Michel; Magne, Pascal

    Ceramic laminate veneer restorations are indicated in several clinical situations. Indirect restorations are usually chosen if the less-invasive options - bleaching, resin infiltration, or composite resin restorations - are not possible, or when it is too difficult to achieve an esthetically pleasing result in the long term. Bonded indirect partial restorations are highly dependent on their adhesive interface, as these thin restorations have a relatively low cohesive strength. Therefore, preservation of sound enamel, conditioning of the restorations and of the substrate, and luting procedures are of paramount importance for a successful outcome. Even when utmost care is taken during every step of the procedure, failures such as fractures, chipping, or marginal discoloration and defects sometimes occur. Only very few of these cases of failure are presented or are a subject of interest. In this case presentation, a fracture repair is performed using an infiltration technique with a resin composite material.

  7. Dental fiber-post resin base material: a review

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chun; Zhang, Fu-qiang

    2014-01-01

    Teeth that have short clinical crown, which are not alone enough to support the definitive restoration can be best treated using the post and core system. The advantages of fiber post over conventional metallic post materials have led to its wide acceptance. In addition to that the combination of aesthetic and mechanical benefits of fiber post has provided it with a rise in the field of dentistry. Also the results obtained from some clinical trials have encouraged the clinicians to use the fiber posts confidently. Fiber posts are manufactured from pre-stretched fibers impregnated within a resin matrix. The fibers could that be of carbon, glass/silica, and quartz, whereas Epoxy and bis-GMA are the most widely used resin bases. But recently studies are also found to be going on for polyimide as possible material for the fiber post resin base as a substitute for the conventional materials. PMID:24605208

  8. Raman spectroscopy of different types of Mexican copal resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenabeele, Peter; Grimaldi, Dulce Maria; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Moens, Luc

    2003-08-01

    Dispersive Raman spectra of six copal resins, that were purchased in local markets in Mexico, are presented. The spectra were interpreted and compared with each other. For all these spectra, the relative intensity of the Raman band at approximately 1645 cm -1, attributed to the exomethylene ν(CC) stretching vibration, was rather low, especially as fresh samples are involved. In one resin, viz. Incienso, CaCO 3 was detected. Probably this inorganic pigment was added as a whitener. In the spectrum of Lágrima a starch fraction was present. Raman spectra of a sample from an Aztec figurine were recorded. It was shown that its composition was inhomogeneous at the micrometer level. Here, too, CaCO 3 was observed. It was not possible to identify the resin applied in the antique figurine due to material degradation by age and environmental exposure.

  9. Antibacterial effect of composite resins containing quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudovin-Farber, Ira; Beyth, Nurit; Weiss, Ervin I.; Domb, Abraham J.

    2010-02-01

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine (QA-PEI)-based nanoparticles were synthesized by crosslinking with dibromopentane followed by N-alkylation with various alkyl halides and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. Insoluble pyridinium-type particles were prepared by suspension polymerization of 4-vinyl pyridine followed by N-alkylation with alkyl halides. Polyamine-based nanoparticles embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w were tested for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans using direct contact test. Activity analysis revealed that the alkyl chain length of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl-alkylated QA-PEI embedded in restorative composite resin at 1% w/w that totally inhibited S. mutans growth in 3-month-aged samples. This data indicates that restorative composite resin with antibacterial properties can be produced by the incorporation of QA-PEI nanoparticles.

  10. Shrinkage Stresses Generated during Resin-Composite Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Luis Felipe J.; Cavalcante, Larissa Maria; Silikas, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Many developments have been made in the field of resin composites for dental applications. However, the manifestation of shrinkage due to the polymerization process continues to be a major problem. The material's shrinkage, associated with dynamic development of elastic modulus, creates stresses within the material and its interface with the tooth structure. As a consequence, marginal failure and subsequent secondary caries, marginal staining, restoration displacement, tooth fracture, and/or post-operative sensitivity are clinical drawbacks of resin-composite applications. The aim of the current paper is to present an overview about the shrinkage stresses created during resin-composite applications, consequences, and advances. The paper is based on results of many researches that are available in the literature. PMID:20948573

  11. Epoxy foams using multiple resins and curing agents

    DOEpatents

    Russick, Edward M.; Rand, Peter B.

    2000-01-01

    An epoxy foam comprising a plurality of resins, a plurality of curing agents, at least one blowing agent, at least one surfactant and optionally at least one filler and the process for making. Preferred is an epoxy foam comprising two resins of different reactivities, two curing agents, a blowing agent, a surfactant, and a filler. According to the present invention, an epoxy foam is prepared with tailorable reactivity, exotherm, and pore size by a process of admixing a plurality of resins with a plurality of curing agents, a surfactant and blowing agent, whereby a foamable mixture is formed and heating said foamable mixture at a temperature greater than the boiling temperature of the blowing agent whereby said mixture is foamed and cured.

  12. Biobased Epoxy Resins from Deconstructed Native Softwood Lignin.

    PubMed

    van de Pas, Daniel J; Torr, Kirk M

    2017-08-14

    The synthesis of novel epoxy resins from lignin hydrogenolysis products is reported. Native lignin in pine wood was depolymerized by mild hydrogenolysis to give an oil product that was reacted with epichlorohydrin to give epoxy prepolymers. These were blended with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether or glycerol diglycidyl ether and cured with diethylenetriamine or isophorone diamine. The key novelty of this work lies in using the inherent properties of the native lignin in preparing new biobased epoxy resins. The lignin-derived epoxy prepolymers could be used to replace 25-75% of the bisphenol A diglycidyl ether equivalent, leading to increases of up to 52% in the flexural modulus and up to 38% in the flexural strength. Improvements in the flexural strength were attributed to the oligomeric products present in the lignin hydrogenolysis oil. These results indicate lignin hydrogenolysis products have potential as sustainable biobased polyols in the synthesis of high performance epoxy resins.

  13. Glass Reinforcement of Various Epoxy Resins-Polyurea Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Medha; Jauhari, Smita

    2012-07-01

    Polyureas (PUs) were prepared by the polycondensation reaction of disperse dyes containing -NH2 group and toluene 2, 4-diisocyanate. The disperse dyes have been prepared by coupling of various 2-diazobenzothiazoles with 1,3-benzenediamine. All the PUs were characterized by elemental analysis, spectral studies, number average molecular weight ( {overline{{Mn}} } ), and thermogravimetry. Further reaction of PUs was carried out with an epoxy resin (i.e., DGEBA). The curing study of prepared resins was monitored by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Based on DSC, thermograms glass fiber-reinforced composites have been laminated and characterized by chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties. The unreinforced cured resins were subjected to thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The laminated composites showed excellent resistance properties against chemicals and good mechanical and electrical properties.

  14. Development of new addition-type composite resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kray, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The most promising of a number of new addition type polyimides and polyaromatic melamine (NCNS) resins for use in high performance composite materials. Three different cure temperature ranges were of interest: 530-560 K (500-550 F), 475-530 K (400-500 F), and 450 K (350 F). Examined were a wide variety of polyimide precursors terminated with 5 norbornene groups and addition polymerized at 560 K similar to PMR-15 and LARC-160 polyimides. In addition, a number of lower curing cinnamal end capped polyimides and a bismaleimide were investigated but were not found promising. A group of NCNS resins were investigated and some were found to be superior to current epoxy resins in moisture resistance, oxidative aging and flame and smoke properties.

  15. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    PubMed

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  16. Bismaleimides and related maleimido polymers as matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.; Fohlen, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Significant processing and property improvements can be achieved by copolymerization of state-of-the-art bisimides with various vinyl stilbazole derivatives to give both fire resistance and high-temperature properties from hot-melt compositions. Significant improvement in mechanical properties is achieved through these modifications, which may make these new matrix resins ideal candidates for fireworthy secondary graphite composite structures. Phosphorous modifications of maleimido polymers through phosphonate structure and tricyclophosphazene derivatives provide families of new matrix resins for short-time applications in severe thermo-oxidative environments. With further research these may provide matrix resins for long-term thermo-oxidative stability of advanced composites at temperatures up to 400 to 500 C.

  17. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cementation, specimens were stored in distilled water (at 37 °C) for 24 h and shear test was performed. The highest shear bond strength values were observed in Groups IV and V. The lowest shear bond strength values were observed in Group I. Using 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogenphosphate monomer-containing priming agents, e.g. Monobond Plus and Z-PRIME Plus, combined with sandblasting can be an effective method for resin bonding of zirconia restorations. PMID:26019653

  18. Quantitative analysis of PMR-15 polyimide resin by HPLC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Lauver, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of individual components and of total solids of 50 wt pct PMR-15 resin solutions was determined using reverse-phase HPLC to within + or - 8 percent accuracy. Acid impurities, the major source of impurities in 3,3', 4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDE), were eliminated by recrystallizing the BTDE prior to esterification. Triester formation was not a problem because of the high rate of esterification of the anhydride relative to that of the carboxylic acid. Aging of PMR-15 resin solutions resulted in gradual formation of the mononadimide and bisnadimide of 4,4'-methylenedianiline, with the BTDE concentration remaining constant. Similar chemical reactions occurred at a reduced rate in dried films of PMR-15 resin.

  19. Monoclonal antibody fragment removal mediated by mixed mode resins.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Ellen; Aspelund, Matthew; Bartnik, Frank; Berge, Mark; Coughlin, Kelly; Kambarami, Mutsa; Spencer, David; Yan, Huiming; Wang, William

    2017-05-26

    Efforts to increase monoclonal antibody expression in cell culture can result in the presence of fragmented species requiring removal in downstream processing. Capto adhere, HEA Hypercel, and PPA Hypercel anion exchange/hydrophobic interaction mixed mode resins were evaluated for their fragment removal capabilities and found to separate large hinge IgG1 antibody fragment (LHF) from monomer. Removal of greater than 75% of LHF population occurred at pH 8 and low conductivity. The mechanism of fragment removal was investigated in two series of experiments. The first experimental series consisted of comparison to chromatographic behavior on corresponding single mode resins. Both single mode anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction resins failed to separate LHF. The second experimental series studied the impact of phase modifiers, ethylene glycol, urea, and arginine on the mixed mode mediated removal. The addition of ethylene glycol decreased LHF removal by half. Further decreases in LHF separation were seen upon incubation with urea and arginine. Therefore, it was discovered that the purification is the result of a mixed mode phenomena dominated by hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding effects. The site of interaction between the LHF and mixed mode resin was determined by chemical labeling of lysine residues with sulfo-NHS acetate. The labeling identified the antibody hinge and light chain regions as mediating the fragment separation. Sequence analysis showed that under separation conditions, a hydrophobic proline patch and hydrogen bonding serine and threonine residues mediate the hinge interaction with the Capto adhere ligand. Additionally, a case study is presented detailing the optimization of fragment removal using Capto adhere resin to achieve purity and yield targets in a manufacturing facility. This study demonstrated that mixed mode resins can be readily integrated into commercial antibody platform processes when additional chromatographic abilities

  20. Substitution determination of Fmoc‐substituted resins at different wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Kley, Markus; Bächle, Dirk; Loidl, Günther; Meier, Thomas; Samson, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In solid‐phase peptide synthesis, the nominal batch size is calculated using the starting resin substitution and the mass of the starting resin. The starting resin substitution constitutes the basis for the calculation of a whole set of important process parameters, such as the number of amino acid derivative equivalents. For Fmoc‐substituted resins, substitution determination is often performed by suspending the Fmoc‐protected starting resin in 20% (v/v) piperidine in DMF to generate the dibenzofulvene–piperidine adduct that is quantified by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. The spectrometric measurement is performed at the maximum absorption wavelength of the dibenzofulvene–piperidine adduct, that is, at 301.0 nm. The recorded absorption value, the resin weight and the volume are entered into an equation derived from Lambert–Beer's law, together with the substance‐specific molar absorption coefficient at 301.0 nm, in order to calculate the nominal substitution. To our knowledge, molar absorption coefficients between 7100 l mol−1 cm−1 and 8100 l mol−1 cm−1 have been reported for the dibenzofulvene–piperidine adduct at 301.0 nm. Depending on the applied value, the nominal batch size may differ up to 14%. In this publication, a determination of the molar absorption coefficients at 301.0 and 289.8 nm is reported. Furthermore, proof is given that by measuring the absorption at 289.8 nm the impact of wavelength accuracy is reduced. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Peptide Science published by European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:28635051