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Sample records for short rotation poplar

  1. Harvesting systems and costs for short rotation poplar

    Treesearch

    B. Rummer; D. Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to compare the cost of coppice and longer rotation poplar harvesting technology. Harvesting technology for short rotation poplar has evolved over the years to address both coppice harvest and single-stem harvest systems. Two potential approaches for coppice harvesting are modified forage harvesters and modified mulcher-balers. Both of...

  2. Yield physiology of short rotation intensively cultured poplars

    Treesearch

    J. G. Isebrands; N. D. Nelson; D. I. Dickmann; D. A. Michael

    1983-01-01

    An integrated research approach is described for studying yield physiology of short rotation intensively cultured (SRIC) poplar plantations. Branch architecture differs with clone and stand density, but the clonal ranking of important branch characteristics does not change with spacing.

  3. Economic investigations of short rotation intensively cultured hybrid poplars

    Treesearch

    David C. Lothner

    1983-01-01

    The history of the economic analyses is summarized for short rotation intensively cultured hybrid poplar at the North Central Forest Experiment Station. Early break-even analyses with limited data indicated that at a price of $25-30 per dry ton for fiber and low to medium production costs, several systems looked profitable. Later cash flow analyses indicated that two...

  4. Assessing Changes in Soil Carbon Quantity and Chemistry in Short-Rotation Hybrid Poplar Plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, C. M.; Magrini, K. A.; Davis, M. F.

    2003-12-01

    There is increasing interest in using short-rotation woody biomass plantations as a source of fiber and as a carbon neutral energy supply. Willow, poplar, and alder are currently used in plantations in areas ranging from the Lake States to the Northwest. As with any cropping system, maintaining soil productivity through succeeding rotations is a key management goal. Where plantations are used to provide carbon sequestration benefits (i.e. bioenergy production), building and maintaining soil carbon stocks is of particular concern. We sampled three hybrid poplar farms in the Northwestern United States; all three farms are in the rain shadow of the Cascades and are on sandy soils. The farms share a similar land use history; originally sagebrush, the land was in annual crops such as peas, onions, and alfalfa, before conversion to poplar. At each farm, soil cores were taken from a field in annual crops, a first rotation poplar stand, and a second rotation poplar stand. Although results varied by farm, soil carbon concentrations were generally higher in the first and second rotation poplar stands than in the row-cropped fields; this was more pronounced in the 0-5 cm and 5-10 cm depths. There were no apparent declines in soil carbon concentration between the first and second rotations. Soil carbon concentrations under poplar were also higher than those in soils from native sagebrush, the original land cover. Analysis of the chemical composition of the carbon using pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry indicates that by the second rotation, the chemical signature of the carbon resembled that found in materials taken from the poplar trees.

  5. Can we use short rotation coppice poplar for sugar based biorefinery feedstock? Bioconversion of 2-year-old poplar grown as short rotation coppice.

    PubMed

    Dou, Chang; Marcondes, Wilian F; Djaja, Jessica E; Bura, Renata; Gustafson, Rick

    2017-01-01

    Feedstock cost is a substantial barrier to the commercialization of lignocellulosic biorefineries. Poplar grown using a short rotation coppice (SRC) system has the potential to provide a low-cost feedstock and economically viable sugar yields for fuels and chemicals production. In the coppice management regime, poplars are harvested after 2 years' growth to develop the root system and establish the trees. The biomass from these 2-year-old trees is very heterogeneous, and includes components of leaf, bark, branch, and wood chip. This material is quite different than the samples that have been used in most poplar bioconversion research, which come from mature trees of short rotation forestry (SRF) plantations. If the coppice management regime is to be used, it is important that feedstock growers maximize their revenue from this initial harvest, but the heterogeneous nature of the biomass may be challenging for bioconversion. This work evaluates bioconversion of 2-year-old poplar coppice and compares its performance to whitewood chips from 12-year-old poplar. The 2-year-old whole tree coppice (WTC) is comprised of 37% leaf, 9% bark, 12% branch, and 42% wood chip. As expected, the chemical compositions of each component were markedly different. The leaf has a low sugar content but is high in phenolics, ash, and extractives. By removing the leaves, the sugar content of the biomass increased significantly, while the phenolic, ash, and extractives contents decreased. Leaf removal improved monomeric sugar yield by 147 kg/tonne of biomass following steam pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Bioconversion of the no-leaf coppice (NLC) achieved a 67% overall sugar recovery, showing no significant difference to mature whitewood from forestry plantation (WWF, 71%). The overall sugar yield of NLC was 135 kg/tonne less than that of WWF, due to the low inherent sugar content in original biomass. An economic analysis shows the minimum ethanol selling price required to cover the

  6. Impact of RAV1-engineering on poplar biomass production: a short-rotation coppice field trial.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cortés, Alicia; Ramos-Sánchez, José Manuel; Hernández-Verdeja, Tamara; González-Melendi, Pablo; Alves, Ana; Simões, Rita; Rodrigues, José Carlos; Guijarro, Mercedes; Canellas, Isabel; Sixto, Hortensia; Allona, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Early branching or syllepsis has been positively correlated with high biomass yields in short-rotation coppice (SRC) poplar plantations, which could represent an important lignocellulosic feedstock for the production of second-generation bioenergy. In prior work, we generated hybrid poplars overexpressing the chestnut gene RELATED TO ABI3/VP1 1 (CsRAV1), which featured c. 80% more sylleptic branches than non-modified trees in growth chambers. Given the high plasticity of syllepsis, we established a field trial to monitor the performance of these trees under outdoor conditions and a SRC management. We examined two CsRAV1-overexpression poplar events for their ability to maintain syllepsis and their potential to enhance biomass production. Two poplar events with reduced expression of the CsRAV1 homologous poplar genes PtaRAV1 and PtaRAV2 were also included in the trial. Under our culture conditions, CsRAV1-overexpression poplars continued developing syllepsis over two cultivation cycles. Biomass production increased on completion of the first cycle for one of the overexpression events, showing unaltered structural, chemical, or combustion wood properties. On completion of the second cycle, aerial growth and biomass yields of both overexpression events were reduced as compared to the control. These findings support the potential application of CsRAV1-overexpression to increase syllepsis in commercial elite trees without changing their wood quality. However, the syllepsis triggered by the introduction of this genetic modification appeared not to be sufficient to sustain and enhance biomass production.

  7. Short rotation coppice culture of willows and poplars as energy crops on metal contaminated agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Ruttens, Ann; Boulet, Jana; Weyens, Nele; Smeets, Karen; Adriaensen, Kristin; Meers, Erik; Van Slycken, Stijn; Tack, Filip; Meiresonne, Linda; Thewys, Theo; Witters, Nele; Carleer, Robert; Dupae, Joke; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2011-01-01

    Phytoremediation, more precisely phytoextraction, has been placed forward as an environmental friendly remediation technique, that can gradually reduce increased soil metal concentrations, in particular the bioavailable fractions. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of growing willows and poplars under short rotation coppice (SRC) on an acid, poor, sandy metal contaminated soil, to combine in this way soil remediation by phytoextraction on one hand, and production of biomass for energy purposes on the other. Above ground biomass productivities were low for poplars to moderate for willows, which was not surprising, taking into account the soil conditions that are not very favorable for growth of these trees. Calculated phytoextraction efficiency was much longer for poplars than these for willows. We calculated that for phytoextraction in this particular case it would take at least 36 years to reach the legal threshold values for cadmium, but in combination with production of feedstock for bioenergy processes, this type of land use can offer an alternative income for local farmers. Based on the data of the first growing cycle, for this particular case, SRC of willows should be recommended.

  8. Yield and spatial supply of bioenergy poplar and willow short-rotation coppice in the UK.

    PubMed

    Aylott, Matthew J; Casella, E; Tubby, I; Street, N R; Smith, P; Taylor, Gail

    2008-01-01

    Limited information on likely supply and spatial yield of bioenergy crops exists for the UK. Here, productivities are reported of poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.) grown as short-rotation coppice (SRC), using data from a large 49-site yield trial network. A partial least-squares regression technique was used to upscale actual field trial observations across England and Wales. Spatial productivity was then assessed under different land-use scenarios. Mean modelled yields ranged between 4.9 and 10.7 oven-dry tonnes (odt) ha(-1) yr(-1). Yields were generally higher in willow than in poplar, reflecting the susceptibility of older poplar genotypes to rust and their tendency for single stem dominance. Replacing 10% of arable land, 20% of improved grassland and 100% of set-aside grassland in England and Wales with the three most productive genotypes would yield 13 Modt of biomass annually (supplying 7% of UK electricity production or 48% of UK combined heat and power (CHP) production). Results show existing SRC genotypes have the immediate potential to be an important component of a mixed portfolio of renewables and that, in future, as new and improved genotypes become available, higher yields could extend this potential further.

  9. Conversion from cropland to short rotation coppice willow and poplar: Accumulation of soil organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiadis, Petros; Stupak, Inge; Vesterdal, Lars; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    2015-04-01

    Increased demand for bioenergy has intensified the production of Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) willow and poplar in temperate zones. We used a combined chronosequence and paired plot approach to study the potential of SRC willow and poplar stands to increase the soil carbon stock compared to stocks of the previous arable land-use. The study focused on well-drained soils. We sampled soil from 30 SRC stands in Denmark and southern Sweden including soils from their adjacent arable fields. The 18 willow and 12 poplar stands formed a chronosequence ranging between 4 and 29 years after conversion. The soil was sampled both with soil cores taken by fixed depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, 15-25, and 25-40 cm and by genetic horizons from soil pits to 1m depth. The aim of the study was to estimate the difference and the ratio between soil carbon contents of the SRC and annual crop land and analyze the results as a chronosequence to examine the effect of age after conversion on the difference. Covariates such as soil type, fertilization type and harvest frequency were also taken into account. Preliminary results suggest an overall increase in carbon stocks over time with average accumulation rates ranging from 0.25 to 0.4 Mg ha-1 yr-1 in willow and poplar stands. Poplar stands had higher rates of C gain, probably due to less frequent harvesting. The differences in carbon between the SRC and the paired cropland were initially negative but changed to positive over time, implying loss of carbon after conversion and a later gain in soil carbon with stand age. Pairwise differences ranged from -25 Mg C ha-1 to 37 Mg C ha-1 for the top 40 cm. The carbon stock ratio of the SRC stand to the arable land was estimated to minimize the effect of site-related factors. The results of this analysis suggested that the ratio increased significantly with age after conversion for the top 10 cm of the soil, both for poplar and willow. A slight increase with age was also noticed at the deeper depths, but

  10. GHGs balance in a land use change process from grassland to short rotation coppice of poplar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, Simone; Arriga, Nicola; Baiocco, Andrea; Boschi, Alessio; Castaldi, Simona; Consalvo, Claudia; Gioli, Beniamino; Matteucci, Giorgio; Tomassucci, Michele; Zaldei, Alessandro; Papale, Dario

    2013-04-01

    At present one of the fastest spreading renewable energy sources are bioenergy cultivations. Millions of hectares of traditional crops all over the Europe are expected to be converted in energy crops in the near future, in order to produce green energy and contrast global warming. Last year, in the context of the GHG-Europe FP7 project we set up an experiment to verify the effects on the green-house gases balance of a land use change from traditional agriculture to short rotation coppice of poplar clones in central Italy. CO2 fluxes measured during the last growing season through three Eddy Covariance masts - two on poplar plantations of different ages and one over a reference site (grassland) - have been analysed. We also monitored CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes from soil measured using chambers in order to better understand the contribution of other GHGs. The two poplar plantations showed a similar uptake of Carbon, 368 g C m-2 year-1 and 358 g C m-2 year-1, while the grassland absorbed 220 g C m-2 year-1 during the same period. Soil respiration in average was higher for the youngest plantation of poplar and for the grassland, lower for the oldest one, where soil is undisturbed from more time. In all the sites we measured low emissions during the winter (between 80 and 150 mg CO2 m-2 h-1), progressively higher in the spring and early summer with growing temperatures (up to 650 mg CO2 m-2 h-1), quite low during the summer because of a strong drought, while the highest values were recorded in September (ca. 1100 mg CO2 m-2 h-1 in the grassland and youngest poplar) after important rain events. Fluxes of N2O and CH4 from soil are very low: little absorption of CH4 in the grassland (values between 0 and -18.75 μg m-2 h-1), with peak after fertilization; in the SRC little absorption or emission with no clear seasonal pattern. Insignificant fluxes of N2O in all crops (even in the grassland after fertilization). The carbon fluxes measured are strongly related to the particular

  11. Comparing Soil Carbon of Short Rotation Poplar Plantations with Agricultural Crops and Woodlots in North Central United States

    Treesearch

    Mark D. Coleman; J.G. Isebrands; David N. Tolsted; Virginia R. Tolbert

    2004-01-01

    We collected soil samples from 27 study sites across North Central United States to compare the soil carbon of short rotation poplar plantations to adjacent agricultural crops and woodlots. Soil organic carbon (SOC) ranged from 20 to more than 160 Mg/ha across the sampled sites. Lowest SOC levels were found in uplands and highest levels in riparian soils. We attributed...

  12. Predicting yields of short-rotation hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) for the United States through model-data synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; LeBauer, David; Dietze, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) is an important biomass crop being evaluated for cellulosic ethanol production. Predictions of poplar growth, rotation period, and soil carbon sequestration under various growing conditions, soils, and climates are critical for farmers and managers planning to establish short-rotation forestry (SRF) plantations. In this study, we used an ecoinformatics workflow, the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn), to integrate literature data and field measurements into the Ecosystem Demography 2 (ED2) model to estimate yield potential of poplar plantations. Within PEcAn 164 records of seven different traits from the literature were assimilated using a Bayesian meta-analysis. Next, variance decomposition identified seven variables for further constraint that contributed > 80% to the uncertainty in modeled yields: growth respiration, dark respiration, quantum efficiency, mortality coefficient, water conductance, fine-root allocation, and root turnover rate. Assimilation of observed yields further constrained uncertainty in model parameters (especially dark respiration and root turnover rate) and biomass estimates. Additional measurements of growth respiration, mortality, water conductance, and quantum efficiency would provide the most efficient path toward further constraint of modeled yields. Modeled validation demonstrated that ED2 successfully captured the interannual and spatial variability of poplar yield observed at nine independent sites. Site-level analyses were conducted to estimate the effect of land use change to SRF poplar on soil C sequestration compared to alternate land uses. These suggest that poplar plantations became a C sink within 18 years of conversion from corn production or existing forest. Finally, poplar yields were estimated for the contiguous United States at a half degree resolution in order to determine potential productivity, estimate the optimal rotation period, and compare poplar to perennial grass yields. This

  13. Effect of drought on fine roots productivity in poplar-based short rotation coppice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani Tripathi, Abhishek; Fischer, Milan; Berhongaray, Gonzalo; Orság, Matěj; Trnka, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    Short rotation woody crops (SRWC) are alternative source of bioenergy, which apart from their 'carbon neutrality' have potential to store carbon (C) into soil and mitigate the increasing CO2 emission. Studies of below ground biomass of trees are divided into two types according to root diameter - analysis of fine roots (less than 2 mm) and coarse roots (more than 2 mm). Trees roots are spatially highly heterogeneous and it requires large number of samples to obtain a representative estimate of belowground biomass. For this study we used hybrid poplar clone J-105 (Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii) grown under short rotation coppice system in the region of Bohemian-Moravian Highland (49o32'N, 16o15'E and altitude 530 m a.s.l.) since April 2000. The plantation with planting density of 9,216 trees ha-1 was established on the former agricultural land and the length of the rotation cycle was set to 6-8 years. While mean annual rainfall was 609 mm with mean annual temperature 7.2oC during 1981-2013 significant increase of temperature and more frequent droughts are expected. In 2011, we established drought experiment based on throughfall exclusion system, reducing up to 70 % of throughfall precipitation. Thus 2 treatments with normal and lowered soil moisture levels were introduced. In January and February 2014, we cored 18 places including drought and control using root bipartite auger. The main goal of the study is to assess the response of fine roots productivity and fine roots vertical distribution on the reduced soil water availability. Results will be presented at the conference. Acknowledgements: This study was funded by research project IGA Mendel University 2014 "Study of below ground biomass in short rotation poplar coppice (J-105) in the Czech-Moravian Highlands", project PASED (KONTAKT II LH12037 ʺDevelopment of models for the assessment of abiotic stresses in selected energy woody plantsʺ and "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific team focused on drought

  14. Greenhouse gas balance of cropland conversion to bioenergy poplar short-rotation coppice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, S.; Arriga, N.; Bertolini, T.; Castaldi, S.; Chiti, T.; Consalvo, C.; Njakou Djomo, S.; Gioli, B.; Matteucci, G.; Papale, D.

    2016-01-01

    The production of bioenergy in Europe is one of the strategies conceived to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The suitability of the land use change from a cropland (REF site) to a short-rotation coppice plantation of hybrid poplar (SRC site) was investigated by comparing the GHG budgets of these two systems over 24 months in Viterbo, Italy. This period corresponded to a single rotation of the SRC site. The REF site was a crop rotation between grassland and winter wheat, i.e. the same management of the SRC site before the conversion to short-rotation coppice. Eddy covariance measurements were carried out to quantify the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (FCO2), whereas chambers were used to measure N2O and CH4 emissions from soil. The measurements began 2 years after the conversion of arable land to SRC so that an older poplar plantation was used to estimate the soil organic carbon (SOC) loss due to SRC establishment and to estimate SOC recovery over time. Emissions from tractors and from production and transport of agricultural inputs (FMAN) were modelled. A GHG emission offset, due to the substitution of natural gas with SRC biomass, was credited to the GHG budget of the SRC site. Emissions generated by the use of biomass (FEXP) were also considered. Suitability was finally assessed by comparing the GHG budgets of the two sites. CO2 uptake was 3512 ± 224 g CO2 m-2 at the SRC site in 2 years, and 1838 ± 107 g CO2 m-2 at the REF site. FEXP was equal to 1858 ± 240 g CO2 m-2 at the REF site, thus basically compensating for FCO2, while it was 1118 ± 521 g CO2 m-2 at the SRC site. The SRC site could offset 379.7 ± 175.1 g CO2eq m-2 from fossil fuel displacement. Soil CH4 and N2O fluxes were negligible. FMAN made up 2 and 4 % in the GHG budgets of SRC and REF sites respectively, while the SOC loss was 455 ± 524 g CO2 m-2 in 2 years. Overall, the REF site was close to neutrality from a GHG perspective (156 ± 264 g CO2eq m-2), while the SRC site was a net sink of

  15. Water use of a multigenotype poplar short-rotation coppice from tree to stand scale.

    PubMed

    Bloemen, Jasper; Fichot, Régis; Horemans, Joanna A; Broeckx, Laura S; Verlinden, Melanie S; Zenone, Terenzio; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2017-02-01

    Short-rotation coppice (SRC) has great potential for supplying biomass-based heat and energy, but little is known about SRC's ecological footprint, particularly its impact on the water cycle. To this end, we quantified the water use of a commercial scale poplar (Populus) SRC plantation in East Flanders (Belgium) at tree and stand level, focusing primarily on the transpiration component. First, we used the AquaCrop model and eddy covariance flux data to analyse the different components of the stand-level water balance for one entire growing season. Transpiration represented 59% of evapotranspiration (ET) at stand scale over the whole year. Measured ET and modelled ET were lower as compared to the ET of reference grassland, suggesting that the SRC only used a limited amount of water. Secondly, we compared leaf area scaled and sapwood area scaled sap flow (Fs) measurements on individual plants vs. stand scale eddy covariance flux data during a 39-day intensive field campaign in late summer 2011. Daily stem diameter variation (∆D) was monitored simultaneously with Fs to understand water use strategies for three poplar genotypes. Canopy transpiration based on sapwood area or leaf area scaling was 43.5 and 50.3 mm, respectively, and accounted for 74%, respectively, 86%, of total ecosystem ET measured during the intensive field campaign. Besides differences in growth, the significant intergenotypic differences in daily ∆D (due to stem shrinkage and swelling) suggested different water use strategies among the three genotypes which were confirmed by the sap flow measurements. Future studies on the prediction of SRC water use, or efforts to enhance the biomass yield of SRC genotypes, should consider intergenotypic differences in transpiration water losses at tree level as well as the SRC water balance at stand level.

  16. Productivity of poplar grown on short rotation in Spain: Influence of the rotation age and plant density

    SciTech Connect

    Ciria, M.P.; Mazon, P.; Carrasco, J.

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the growth potential and biomass productivity of poplar on short rotation for different growth cycles and plant densities in southern Europe. Five poplar clones have been tested: Unal, Beaupre, Hunnegen, Boelare and Raspalje, all are hybrid clones P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides. For each clone, plant densities of 10000, 5000, 2500 and 1666 trees/ha have been assayed, for growth cycles of 2, 3, 4 and 5 years. The experimentation was initiated in 1986 at Castilla y Leon, region in Spain. The situation of the plantation is 41{degrees}36`N and 2{degrees}30`E (Greenwich meridiane), at an altitude of 1010 m above the sea level. The average rain precipitation is of about 550 mm/year and the average temperature, 10.5{degrees}C. The parameters evaluated for each plant after harvesting have been: total dry weight of the aerial part and dry weight, height and basal diameter of the stems. The highest biomass productivity, next to 20 t/ha.year, was achieved for Raspalje clone, utilizing 10000 trees/ha plantation density and growth cycle of 5 years. Under these conditions the average diameter of the stems was 9.5 cm and the average height of the trees was 7.9 m.

  17. Greenhouse gas balance of cropland conversion to bioenergy poplar short rotation coppice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, S.; Arriga, N.; Bertolini, T.; Castaldi, S.; Chiti, T.; Consalvo, C.; Njakou Djomo, S.; Gioli, B.; Matteucci, G.; Papale, D.

    2015-05-01

    The production of bioenergy in Europe is one of the strategies conceived to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The suitability of the land use change from a cropland (REF site) to a short rotation coppice plantation of hybrid poplar (SRC site) was investigated by comparing the GHG budgets of these two systems over 24 months in Viterbo, Italy. Eddy covariance measurements were carried out to quantify the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (FCO2), whereas chambers were used to measure N2O and CH4 emissions from soil. Soil organic carbon (SOC) of an older poplar plantation was used to estimate via a regression the SOC loss due to SRC establishment. Emissions from tractors and from production and transport of agricultural inputs (FMAN) were modelled and GHG emission offset due to fossil fuel substitution was credited to the SRC site considering the C intensity of natural gas. Emissions due to the use of the biomass (FEXP) were also considered. The suitability was finally assessed comparing the GHG budgets of the two sites. FCO2 was the higher flux in the SRC site (-3512 ± 224 g CO2 eq m-2 in two years), while in the REF site it was -1838 ± 107 g CO2 m-2 in two years. FEXP was equal to 1858 ± 240 g CO2 m-2 in 24 months in the REF site, thus basically compensating FCO2, while it was 1118 ± 521 g CO2 eq m-2 in 24 months in the SRC site. This latter could offset -379.7 ± 175.1 g CO2 eq m-2 from fossil fuel displacement. Soil CH4 and N2O fluxes were negligible. FMAN weighed 2 and 4% in the GHG budgets of SRC and REF sites respectively, while the SOC loss weighed 455 ± 524 g CO2 m-2 in two years. Overall, the REF site was close to neutrality in a GHG perspective (156 ± 264 g CO2 eq m-2), while the SRC site was a net sink of -2202 ± 792 g CO2 eq m-2. In conclusion the experiment led to a positive evaluation of the conversion of cropland to bioenergy SRC from a GHG viewpoint.

  18. Evaluation of Water Use Efficiency of Short Rotation Poplar Coppice at Bohemian-Moravian Highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlaváčová, Marcela; Fischer, Milan; Mani Tripathi, Abhishek; Orság, Matěj; Trnka, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    The water availability of the locality constitutes one of the main constraint for short rotation coppices grown on arable land. As a convenient characteristic assessing how the water use is coupled with the biomass yields, so called water use efficiency (WUE) is proposed. One method of water use efficiency determination is presented within this study. The study was carried out at short rotation poplar coppice (poplar clone J-105) at the Test Station Domanínek, Ltd. at Bohemian-Moravian Highlands during the growing season 2013. Diameters at breast height (DBH) were measured for 16 sample trees where sap flow measuring systems (Granier's Thermal Dissipation Probe, TDP) were installed. TDP outputs are expressed as temperature differences (ΔT) between the heated and non-heated probes. Estimation of sap flux density (Fd) by the Granier method relies on the measurement of temperature difference (ΔT). Determination of maximum temperature difference (ΔTmax) is fundamental for sap flux density (Fd) calculation. Although ΔTmax can be theoretically defined as ΔT at Fd = 0, many factors may prevent the occurrence of the zero flow state, such as night-time water movement for new growth (vegetative or reproductive) or water loss from the canopy due to high vapour pressure deficit (VPD). Therefore, the VPD condition was established for determination of ΔTmax. VPD condition was established as follows: VPD reaching values 0.2 at least 6 hours during night (from 21 p. m. to 3 a. m. and when the condition was fullfilled, the value at 3 a. m. was taken) because it is a supposed time after that the tree has no transpiration. The programmable part of Mini 32 software (www.emsbrno.cz) was used for application of the script establishing ΔTmax values under this VPD condition. Nevertheless, another script was applied on ΔT data set to determination of ΔTmax values for every night at 3 a. m. (as this is when ΔT should be at its daily maximum) without VPD condition restriction for

  19. Impact of elevated CO(2) and nitrogen fertilization on foliar elemental composition in a short rotation poplar plantation.

    PubMed

    Marinari, Sara; Calfapietra, Carlo; De Angelis, Paolo; Mugnozza, Giuseppe Scarascia; Grego, Stefano

    2007-06-01

    The experiment was carried out on a short rotation coppice culture of poplars (POP-EUROFACE, Central Italy), growing in a free air carbon dioxide enriched atmosphere (FACE). The specific objective of this work was to study whether elevated CO(2) and fertilization (two CO(2) treatments, elevated CO(2) and control, two N fertilization treatments, fertilized and unfertilized), as well as the interaction between treatments caused an unbalanced nutritional status of leaves in three poplar species (P. x euramericana, P. nigra and P. alba). Finally, we discuss the ecological implications of a possible change in foliar nutrients concentration. CO(2) enrichment reduced foliar nitrogen and increased the concentration of magnesium; whereas nitrogen fertilization had opposite effects on leaf nitrogen and magnesium concentrations. Moreover, the interaction between elevated CO(2) and N fertilization amplified some element unbalances such as the K/N-ratio.

  20. Genetic variation of the bud and leaf phenology of seventeen poplar clones in a short rotation coppice culture.

    PubMed

    Pellis, A; Laureysens, I; Ceulemans, R

    2004-01-01

    Leaf phenology of 17 poplar ( Populus spp.) clones, encompassing spring phenology, length of growth period and end-of-year phenology, was examined over several years of different rotations. The 17 poplar clones differed in their latitude of origin (45 degrees 30'N to 51 degrees N) and were studied on a short rotation experimental field plantation, situated in Boom (province of Antwerpen, Belgium; 51 degrees 05'N, 04 degrees 22'E). A similar, clear pattern of bud burst was observed during the different years of study for all clones. Clones Columbia River, Fritzi Pauley, Trichobel (Populus trichocarpa) and Balsam Spire (Populus trichocarpa x Populus balsamifera) from 45 degrees 30'N to 49 degrees N reached bud burst (expressed as day of the year or degree day sums) almost every year earlier than clones Wolterson (Populus nigra), Gaver, Gibecq and Primo (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra) (50 degrees N to 51 degrees N). This observation could not be generalised to end-of-season phenology, for which a yearly returning pattern for all clones was lacking. Late bud burst and early leaf fall of some clones (Beaupré, Boelare, IBW1, IBW2, IBW3) was brought about by increasing rust incidence during the years of observation. For these clones, the variability in leaf phenology was reflected in high coefficients of variation among years. The patterns of genetic variation in leaf phenology have implications for short rotation intensive culture forestry and management of natural populations. Moreover, the variation in phenology reported here is relevant with regard to the genetic mapping of poplar.

  1. Can the agricultural AquaCrop model simulate water use and yield of a poplar short-rotation coppice?

    PubMed

    Horemans, Joanna A; Van Gaelen, Hanne; Raes, Dirk; Zenone, Terenzio; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2017-06-01

    We calibrated and evaluated the agricultural model AquaCrop for the simulation of water use and yield of a short-rotation coppice (SRC) plantation with poplar (Populus) in East Flanders (Belgium) during the second and the third rotation (first 2 years only). Differences in crop development and growth during the course of the rotations were taken into account during the model calibration. Overall, the AquaCrop model showed good performance for the daily simulation of soil water content (R(2) of 0.57-0.85), of green canopy cover (R(2) > 0.87), of evapotranspiration (ET; R(2) > 0.76), and of potential yield. The simulated, total yearly water use of the SRC ranged between 55% and 85% of the water use of a reference grass ecosystem calculated under the same environmental conditions. Crop transpiration was between 67% and 93% of total ET, with lower percentages in the first than in the second year of each rotation. The observed (dry mass) yield ranged from 6.61 to 14.76 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1). A yield gap of around 30% was observed between the second and the third rotation, as well as between simulated and observed yield during the third rotation. This could possibly be explained by the expansion of the understory (weed) layer; the relative cover of understory weeds was 22% in the third year of the third rotation. The agricultural AquaCrop model simulated total water use and potential yield of the operational SRC in a reliable way. As the plantation was extensively managed, potential effects of irrigation and/or fertilization on ET and on yield were not considered in this study.

  2. Evapotranspiration and crop coefficient of poplar and willow short-rotation coppice used as vegetation filter.

    PubMed

    Guidi, Werther; Piccioni, Emiliano; Bonari, Enrico

    2008-07-01

    Ten-day evapotranspiration (ETc) and crop coefficient (k(c)) of willow and poplar SRC used as vegetation filter and grown under fertilised (F) and unfertilised (NF) conditions, were determined for two successive growing seasons using volumetric lysimeters. During the first growing season, total ETc observed was, respectively, 620 (NF)-1190 (F)mm in willow and 590 (NF)-725 (F) in poplar. During the second growing season, ETc showed a general increase, mainly in fertilised lysimeters where it ranged between 890 (NF)-1790 mm (F) in willow and 710 (NF)-1100 mm (NF) in poplar. kc reached in both years its maximum between the end of August and the beginning of September. In 2004 maximum kc ranged from 1.25-2.84 in willow and 1.06-1.90 in poplar, whereas in 2005 it ranged from 1.97-5.30 in willow and 1.71-4.28 in poplar. ETc seemed to be strongly correlated to plant development and mainly dependent on its nutritional status rather than on the differences between the species.

  3. Tree and stand water fluxes of hybrid poplar clone (Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii) in short rotation coppice culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M.; Trnka, M.; Kucera, J.; Zalud, Z.

    2010-09-01

    This study reports on evapotranspiration and tree water use in short rotation coppice culture of hybrid poplar (Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii) for biomass energy in the Czech Republic. The high density poplar plantation (10 000 trees per ha) was established in 2003 on arable land in Czech-Moravian Highland (49°32´ N, 16°15´ E, 530 m a.s.l.) and has been coppiced in rotation period of 7 years. Firstly, evapotranspiration of the stand has been estimated by applying the Bowen ratio-energy budget method, which is considered as reliable, robust, quite simple and inexpensive technique with comparable results to eddy covariance and lysimeters. The gaps in evapotranspiration diurnal patterns caused by limitation of the bowen ratio method were filled with simple linear regression model based on relation between potential and actual evapotranspiration with regard to soil water availability and leaf area index and thus the daily, monthly and seasonal totals could be calculated. The amount of evapotranspiration during the growing season 2009 (1 March - 31 October) was 593 mm with highest monthly total 116 mm in June. Mean daily water loss over the season reached 2.43 mm per day. During the hot summer day, the maximal value 5.73 mm per day, which presented 89 % of potential evapotranspiration calculated by Penman equation, was recorded with a peak rate 0.94 mm per hour. Secondly, the transpiration was measured by sap flow tissue heat balance techniques on four individual trees with greatest stem diameters (11 - 12 cm d.b.h.) and height of 12 - 12.5 m. Relatively high transpiration values by the poplars were found during the measured part of growing season (18 June - 31 October), with maximum and mean daily transpiration of 44.41 dm3 and 16.69 dm3 per day, respectively. The seasonal transpiration of the most vigorous from the investigated individuals amounted 2542 dm3. Because in this study we didńt evaluate the transpiration of thinner trees (technical features of sap

  4. The use of short rotation willows and poplars for the recycling of saline waste waters

    Treesearch

    Jaconette Mirck; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny; Ioannis Dimitriou; Jill A. Zalesny; Timothy A. Volk; Warren E. Mabee

    2009-01-01

    The production of high-salinity waste waters by landfills and other waste sites causes environmental concerns. This waste water often contains high concentrations of sodium and chloride, which may end up in local ground and surface waters. Vegetation filter systems comprised of willows and poplars can be used for the recycling of saline waste water. These vegetation...

  5. Biomass production and carbon sequestration of a short-rotation forest with different poplar clones in northwest China.

    PubMed

    Meifang, Yan; Lu, Wang; Honghui, Ren; Xinshi, Zhang

    2017-05-15

    Short Rotation Forestry (SRF) is of interest as producers of biomass for bio-energy, but also as carbon (C) sinks to mitigate CO2 emission. To investigate biomass production and C sequestration of SRF, ecosystem C stock (including C stored in tree biomass, litter and soil), NPP (net primary productivity), heterotrophic respiration (Rh) and NEP (net ecosystem productivity) of three poplar clone plantations were estimated by repeated field sampling in northwest China. Ecosystem C stock (105.62MgCha(-1)) was significantly lower in PB (P. balsamifera) stand than in PD (P. deltoids) and PE (P.×euramericana) stands (P<0.01). Biomass C stock was greatly affected by clone type (P<0.01), while significant difference in soil C stock was not detected. Averaged NPP was 8.80MgCha(-1)yr(-1) across all clone stands, but the most productive clone of PD yielded up to 10.72MgCha(-1)yr(-1). NEP was found to be significantly different among the clone stands, increasing from 0.21MgCha(-1)yr(-1) in PB to 6.77MgCha(-1)yr(-1) in PD stand. With soil C outputs (Rh) being smaller than C sequestrations, the plantations all acted as C sinks, averagely absorbing 3.45MgCha(-1) during a year. Our results suggest that clone type is a main factor influencing C sequestration capacity of a plantation, along with determining the amount of biomass yield. The success of poplar plantations as a bio-energy resource largely depends on the selection of hybrid varieties.

  6. Genetic Modification of Short Rotation Poplar Biomass Feedstock for Efficient Conversion to Ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Dinus, R.J.

    2000-08-30

    The Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing poplars (Populus species and hybrids) as sources of renewable energy, i.e., ethanol. Notable increases in adaptability, volume productivity, and pest/stress resistance have been achieved via classical selection and breeding and intensified cultural practices. Significant advances have also been made in the efficiencies of harvesting and handling systems. Given these and anticipated accomplishments, program leaders are considering shifting some attention to genetically modifying feedstock physical and chemical properties, so as to improve the efficiency with which feedstocks can be converted to ethanol. This report provides an in-depth review and synthesis of opportunities for and feasibilities of genetically modifying feedstock qualities via classical selection and breeding, marker-aided selection and breeding, and genetic transformation. Information was collected by analysis of the literature, with emphasis on that published since 1995, and interviews with prominent scientists, breeders, and growers. Poplar research is well advanced, and literature is abundant. The report therefore primarily reflects advances in poplars, but data from other species, particularly other shortrotation hardwoods, are incorporated to fill gaps. An executive summary and recommendations for research, development, and technology transfer are provided immediately after the table of contents. The first major section of the report describes processes most likely to be used for conversion of poplar biomass to ethanol, the various physical and chemical properties of poplar feedstocks, and how such properties are expected to affect process efficiency. The need is stressed for improved understanding of the impact of change on both overall process and individual process step efficiencies. The second part documents advances in trait measurement instrumentation and methodology

  7. Soil trace gas emissions (CH4 and N2O) offset the CO2 uptake in poplar short rotation coppice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenone, Terenzio; Zona, Donatella; Gelfand, Iya; Gielen, Bert; camino serrano, Marta; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    The need for renewable energy sources will lead to a considerable expansion in the planting of dedicated fast-growing biomass crops across Europe. Among them poplar (Populus spp) is the most widely planted as short rotation coppice (SRC) and an increase in the surface area of large-scale SRC poplar plantations might thus be expected. In this study we report the greenhouse gas fluxes (GHG) of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) measured using the eddy covariance technique in a SRC plantation for bioenergy production during the period 2010-2013. The plantation was established in April 2010 on 18.4 ha of former agricultural land with a density of 8000 plants ha-1; the above-ground biomass was harvested on February 2012 and 2014.The whole GHG balance of the four years of the study was 1.90 (± 1.37) Mg CO2eq ha-1; this indicated that soil trace gas emissions offset the CO2 uptake by the plantation. CH4 and N2O almost equally contributed to offset the CO2 uptake of -5.28 (±0.67) Mg CO2eq ha-1 with an overall emission of 3.56 (± 0.35) Mg CO2eq ha-1 of N2O and of 3.53 (± 0.85) Mg CO2eq ha-1 of CH4. N2O emissions mostly occurred during a single peak a few months after the site was converted into SRC and represented 44% of the entire N2O loss during the entire study. Accurately capturing these emission events proved to be critical for correct estimates of the GHG balance. The self-organizing map (SOM) technique graphically showed the relationship between the CO2 fluxes and the principal environmental variables but failed to explain the variability of the soil trace gas emissions. The nitrogen content in the soil and the water table depth were the two drivers that best explained the variability in N2O and CH4 respectively. This study underlines the importance of the "non-CO2 GHG" on the overall balance as well as the impact of the harvest on the CO2 uptake rate. Further long-term investigations of soil trace gas emissions should also monitor the N

  8. CO2 uptake is offset by CH4 and N2O emissions in a poplar short-rotation coppice

    DOE PAGES

    Zenone, Terenzio; Zona, Donatella; Gelfand, Ilya; ...

    2015-04-18

    The need for renewable energy sources will lead to a considerable expansion in the planting of dedicated fast-growing biomass crops across Europe. These are commonly cultivated as short-rotation coppice (SRC), and currently poplar (Populus spp.) is the most widely planted. In this study, we report the greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) measured using eddy covariance technique in an SRC plantation for bioenergy production. Measurements were made during the period 2010–2013, that is, during the first two rotations of the SRC. The overall GHG balance of the 4 years of the studymore » was an emission of 1.90 (±1.37) Mg CO2eq ha-1; this indicated that soil trace gas emissions offset the CO2 uptake by the plantation. CH4 and N2O contributed almost equally to offset the CO2 uptake of -5.28 (±0.67) Mg CO2eq ha-1 with an overall emission of 3.56 (±0.35) Mg CO2eq ha-1 of N2O and of 3.53 (±0.85) Mg CO2eq ha-1 of CH4. N2O emissions mostly occurred during one single peak a few months after the site was converted to SRC; this peak comprised 44% of the total N2O loss during the two rotations. Accurately capturing emission events proved to be critical for deriving correct estimates of the GHG balance. The nitrogen (N) content of the soil and the water table depth were the two drivers that best explained the variability in N2O and CH4, respectively. Here, this study underlines the importance of the ‘non-CO2 GHGs’ on the overall balance. Further long-term investigations of soil trace gas emissions should monitor the N content and the mineralization rate of the soil, as well as the microbial community, as drivers of the trace gas emissions.« less

  9. Limitations for phytoextraction management on metal polluted soils with poplar short rotation coppice - evidence from a 6 year field trial.

    PubMed

    Annicaert, B; De Moor, S; Van Nevel, L; Michels, E; De Fraeye, M; Meiresonne, L; Vangronsveld, J; Tack, F M G; Meers, E

    2016-12-08

    Poplar clones were studied for their phytoextraction capacity in the second growth cycle (6 growth years) on a site in the Belgian Campine region which is contaminated with Cd and Zn via historic atmospheric deposition of nearby zinc smelter activities. The field trial revealed regrowth problems for some clone that could not be predicted in the first growth cycle. Four allometric relations were assessed for their capacity to predict biomass yield in the second growth cycle. A power function based on the shootdiameter best estimate the biomass production of poplar with R² values between 0.94 and 0.98. The woody biomass yield ranged from 2.1 to 4.8 ton woody DM ha(-1) y(-1). The primary goal was to reduce soil concentrations of metals caused by phytoextraction. Nevertheless increased metal concentrations were determined in the topsoil. This increase can partially be explained by the input of metals from deeper soil layers in the top soil through litter fall. The phytoextraction option with poplar short rotation coppice in this setup did not lead to the intended soil remediation in a reasonable time span. Therefore, harvest of the leaf biomass is put forward as a crucial part of the strategy for soil remediation through Cd/Zn phytoextraction.

  10. Assessing the carbon sequestration potential of poplar and black locust short rotation coppices on mine reclamation sites in Eastern Germany - Model development and application.

    PubMed

    Quinkenstein, A; Jochheim, H

    2016-03-01

    In the temperate zone short rotation coppice systems for the production of woody biomass (SRC) have gained great interest as they offer a pathway to both sustainable bioenergy production and the potential sequestration of CO2 within the biomass and the soil. This study used the carbon model SHORTCAR to assess the carbon cycle of a poplar (Populus suaveolens Fisch. x Populus trichocarpa Torr. et Gray cv. Androscoggin) and a black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) SRC. The model was calibrated using data from established SRC plantations on reclaimed mine sites in northeast Germany and validated through the determination of uncertainty ranges of selected model parameters and a sensitivity analysis. In addition to a 'reference scenario', representing the actual site conditions, 7 hypothetical scenarios, which varied in climate conditions, rotation intervals, runtimes, and initial soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks, were defined for each species. Estimates of carbon accumulation within the biomass, the litter layer, and the soil were compared to field data and previously published results. The model was sensitive to annual stem growth and initial soil organic carbon stocks. In the reference scenario net biome production for SRC on reclaimed sites in Lusatia, Germany amounted to 64.5 Mg C ha(-1) for R. pseudoacacia and 8.9 Mg C ha(-1) for poplar, over a period of 36 years. These results suggest a considerable potential of SRC for carbon sequestration at least on marginal sites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Seasonal variations in photosynthesis, intrinsic water-use efficiency and stable isotope composition of poplar leaves in a short-rotation plantation

    PubMed Central

    Broeckx, L.S.; Fichot, R.; Verlinden, M.S.; Ceulemans, R.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic carbon assimilation and transpirational water loss play an important role in the yield and the carbon sequestration potential of bioenergy-devoted cultures of fast-growing trees. For six poplar (Populus) genotypes in a short-rotation plantation, we observed significant seasonal and genotypic variation in photosynthetic parameters, intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) and leaf stable isotope composition (δ13C and δ18O). The poplars maintained high photosynthetic rates (between 17.8 and 26.9 μmol m−2 s−1 depending on genotypes) until late in the season, in line with their fast-growth habit. Seasonal fluctuations were mainly explained by variations in soil water availability and by stomatal limitation upon photosynthesis. Stomatal rather than biochemical limitation was confirmed by the constant intrinsic photosynthetic capacity (Vcmax) during the growing season, closely related to leaf nitrogen (N) content. Intrinsic water-use efficiency scaled negatively with carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13Cbl) and positively with the ratio between mesophyll diffusion conductance (gm) and stomatal conductance. The WUEi – Δ13Cbl relationship was partly influenced by gm. There was a trade-off between WUEi and photosynthetic N-use efficiency, but only when soil water availability was limiting. Our results suggest that seasonal fluctuations in relation to soil water availability should be accounted for in future modelling studies assessing the carbon sequestration potential and the water-use efficiency of woody energy crops. PMID:25074859

  12. Carbon isotope compositions (δ(13) C) of leaf, wood and holocellulose differ among genotypes of poplar and between previous land uses in a short-rotation biomass plantation.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, M S; Fichot, R; Broeckx, L S; Vanholme, B; Boerjan, W; Ceulemans, R

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of water use to produce biomass is a key trait in designing sustainable bioenergy-devoted systems. We characterized variations in the carbon isotope composition (δ(13) C) of leaves, current year wood and holocellulose (as proxies for water use efficiency, WUE) among six poplar genotypes in a short-rotation plantation. Values of δ(13) Cwood and δ(13) Cholocellulose were tightly and positively correlated, but the offset varied significantly among genotypes (0.79-1.01‰). Leaf phenology was strongly correlated with δ(13) C, and genotypes with a longer growing season showed a higher WUE. In contrast, traits related to growth and carbon uptake were poorly linked to δ(13) C. Trees growing on former pasture with higher N-availability displayed higher δ(13) C as compared with trees growing on former cropland. The positive relationships between δ(13) Cleaf and leaf N suggested that spatial variations in WUE over the plantation were mainly driven by an N-related effect on photosynthetic capacities. The very coherent genotype ranking obtained with δ(13) C in the different tree compartments has some practical outreach. Because WUE remains largely uncoupled from growth in poplar plantations, there is potential to identify genotypes with satisfactory growth and higher WUE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Farm-gate budget of energy crops: an experiment to assess changes in GHGs balance due to a land use change from grassland to short rotation coppice of poplar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbatini, S.; Arriga, N.; Baiocco, A.; Boschi, A.; Castaldi, S.; Consalvo, C.; Gioli, B.; Matteucci, G.; Tomassucci, M.; Zaldei, A.; Papale, D.

    2012-04-01

    Over the last decades the rising in the prices of oil pushed many farmers all over the Europe to exploit part of their fields to produce biomass for energy. Government funding promoted this trend in order to contrast global warming and Green-House Gases (GHG) emissions. Nevertheless energy crops entail, in addition to a land use change, a sum of treatments that leads again to emissions of GHG. In the context of the GHG-Europe FP7 project we set-up an experiment to study a case of land use change from grassland to Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) of poplar clones in central Italy. Through the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique, we measure carbon and energy fluxes over two different poplar SRC with different ages, and over a reference site (grassland) representing the original land use. Furthermore, we measured additional fluxes such as soil respiration, CH4 and N2O fluxes using chambers. To compute the Farm-Gate Budget (FGB) of both the grassland and the poplar plantations, we collect also additional data that contribute to GHG budget such as management (tillage, fertilizations, irrigations, harvesting) and disturbances. In this poster we present the experiment set-up and the first results resulting from the measurements.

  14. Short-rotation plantations

    Treesearch

    Philip E. Pope; Jeffery O. Dawson

    1989-01-01

    Short-rotation plantations offer several advantages over longer, more traditional rotations. They enhance the natural productivity of better sites and of tree species with rapid juvenile growth. Returns on investment are realized in a shorter period and the risk of loss is reduced compared with long term investments. Production of wood and fiber can be maximized by...

  15. CO2 uptake is offset by CH4 and N2O emissions in a poplar short-rotation coppice

    SciTech Connect

    Zenone, Terenzio; Zona, Donatella; Gelfand, Ilya; Gielen, Bert; Camino-Serrano, Marta; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-18

    The need for renewable energy sources will lead to a considerable expansion in the planting of dedicated fast-growing biomass crops across Europe. These are commonly cultivated as short-rotation coppice (SRC), and currently poplar (Populus spp.) is the most widely planted. In this study, we report the greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) measured using eddy covariance technique in an SRC plantation for bioenergy production. Measurements were made during the period 2010–2013, that is, during the first two rotations of the SRC. The overall GHG balance of the 4 years of the study was an emission of 1.90 (±1.37) Mg CO2eq ha-1; this indicated that soil trace gas emissions offset the CO2 uptake by the plantation. CH4 and N2O contributed almost equally to offset the CO2 uptake of -5.28 (±0.67) Mg CO2eq ha-1 with an overall emission of 3.56 (±0.35) Mg CO2eq ha-1 of N2O and of 3.53 (±0.85) Mg CO2eq ha-1 of CH4. N2O emissions mostly occurred during one single peak a few months after the site was converted to SRC; this peak comprised 44% of the total N2O loss during the two rotations. Accurately capturing emission events proved to be critical for deriving correct estimates of the GHG balance. The nitrogen (N) content of the soil and the water table depth were the two drivers that best explained the variability in N2O and CH4, respectively. Here, this study underlines the importance of the ‘non-CO2 GHGs’ on the overall balance. Further long-term investigations of soil trace gas emissions should monitor the N content and the mineralization rate of the soil, as well as the microbial community, as drivers of the trace gas emissions.

  16. Short Rotation Coppice in Austria - Management and Producticivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochbichler, E.; Hofmann, H.; Bellos, N.; Zeitlinger, C.; Liebhard, P.

    2012-04-01

    In Austria energy wood production in short rotation coppice systems (SRC) becomes increasingly important to meet the demands of the growing bio-energy sector. In order to successfully develop the SRC market, the achievement of high and constant yields in SRC management is just as important as a reliable harvesting technology, which facilitates the production of high quality wood chips. Yield models and site-specific knowledge about productivity are needed with respect to clones, site factors and management alternatives. Therefore in the years 2007 and 2008 experimental plots (Marchfeld; 16 poplar clones and 19 willow clones) and a network of demonstration plots (different regions in Lower Austria; 7 poplar clones, 4 willow clones) were established. Single shoot surveys and biomass functions in combination with stand inventories form the general basis for estimating yield and productivity. They also help to optimize yield and rotation length by taking the maximum harvestable tree diameter into account, which is determined by harvesting techniques. For optimizing the yield estimation of SRC stands, preliminary clone specific yield functions for poplar and willow clones were developed. These specific yield functions were based on common yield estimation functions with respect to the newly used clones (e.g. faster growth, lower wood density), using a regression analytical approach. Standard stand surveys were carried out in autumn 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010. We were able to show a high variety in biomass production of poplar and willow clones on the specific site. For the first and second rotation cycle the mean productivity of poplar clones was within a range of 4 - 12 t/y/ha and for willow clones within a range of 3 - 17 t/y/ha. These results were compared with the productivity of older experimental plots in Austria. Based on the preliminary results of productivity of poplar and willow clones for various site factors and management alternatives (planting design

  17. Variability in the composition of short rotation woody feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.F.; Johnson, D.K.; Deutch, S.

    1995-11-01

    This paper discusses the variability in chemical composition caused by clonal, geographical, and environmental effects on short rotation woody feedstocks, mainly hybrid clones of poplar. The concentrations of major and minor components have been determined by chemical analysis and pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (PY-MBMS). The chemical composition was determined for a sample set consisting of debarked wood chips from three clones of deltoides x nigra (DN) and one clone of tristis x balsamifera that were grown on four replicate plots at two locations in Wisconsin. The composition of the wood chips determined by chemical analysis and Py-MBMS showed that the tristic clone was significantly different from that of all the DN clones. The composition of the DN clones studied in this sample set were relatively similar to other hybrid poplar samples that have been analyzed over the past three years. The level of compositional variation due to clonal, geographical and environmental factors observed in short rotation woody species to date indicates that they are a consistent and stable feedstock for biofuels production. The effects of storage on different short rotation woody crops has been studied. Results of the analysis of fresh and stored hybrid poplar using traditional wet chemical analysis showed differences in the chemical composition of the feedstocks because of storage. Also presented are results from a rapid analytical technique using pyrolysis-mass spectroscopy combined with multivariate statistical analysis to assess the influence of storage on the composition of different short rotation feedstocks. Because of the rapid nature of this technique, a large number of samples could be screened to determine the extent of degradation throughout the piles. The application of this technique to the samples in this study indicated changes in chemical composition occurred during the storage period.

  18. Hyd-Mech FB7 short rotation hardwood feller-buncher test

    Treesearch

    Dennis Curtin; Bryce Stokes; Doug Fredericks

    1985-01-01

    The FB7 is a first-generation prototype continuous feller-buncher manufactured by Hyd-Mech Engineering, Ltd. of Woodstock, Ontario. It was developed and funded by the National Research Council of Canada to harvest short-rotational bioenergy plantations of hybrid poplar. The development specifications were for stumps with diameters of up to eight inches and with a...

  19. Future market scenarios for pulpwood supply from agricultural short-rotation woody crops

    Treesearch

    Alexander N. Moiseyev; Daniel G. de la Torre Ugarte; Peter J. Ince

    2000-01-01

    The North American Pulp And Paper (NAPAP) model and USDA POLYSYS agricultural policy analysis model were linked to project future market scenarios for pulpwood supply from agricultural short-rotation woody crops in the United States. Results suggest that pulpwood supply from fast- growing hybrid poplars and cottonwoods will become marginally economical but fairly...

  20. Mycorrhizae of poplars

    Treesearch

    R. C. Schultz; J. G. Isebrands; P. P. Kormanik

    1983-01-01

    Poplar hybrids, being screened for short-rotation intensive culture, can form ecto-, endo-, or ectendo-mycorrhizae or may be autotrophic. Different sections of the genus Populus tend to be selective in the type of mycorrhizae formed. Knowledge of which types are formed influences the kinds of propagule production, site preparation, and herbicide...

  1. Production of Hybrid Poplar under Short-Term, Intensive Culture in Western Colorado

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An irrigated study was conducted at the Western Colorado Research Center at Fruita for 6 yr to evaluate eight hybrid poplar clones under short-term, intensive culture. The eight clones included in the study were Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii (NM6), P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides (52225, OP367), and...

  2. Economic potential of short-rotation woody crops on agricultural land for pulp fiber production in the United States.

    Treesearch

    Ralph J. Alig; Darius M. Adams; Bruce A. McCarl; Peter J. Ince

    2000-01-01

    A model of the U.S. forestry and agricultural sectors is used to simulate the consequences of growing short-rotation woody crops on agricultural lands as a fiber source for pulp and paper production. Hybrid poplar, a short-rotation woody crop, annually produces 4 to 7 dry tons per acre of hardwood pulpwood over a 6- to 10-year rotation. When harvested, the material...

  3. Short day length-induced decrease of cesium uptake without altering potassium uptake manner in poplar

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Yusaku; Furukawa, Jun; Aohara, Tsutomu; Nihei, Naoto; Hirose, Atsushi; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Satoh, Shinobu

    2016-01-01

    Short day length-induced alteration of potassium (K) localization in perennial trees is believed to be a mechanism for surviving and adapting to severe winters. To investigate the relationship between cesium (Cs) and K localizations, a model tree poplar, hybrid aspen T89, was employed. Under short day length conditions, the amount of 137Cs absorbed through the root and translocated to the root was drastically reduced, but 42K was not. Potassium uptake from the rhizosphere is mediated mainly by KUP/HAK/KT and CNGC transporters. In poplar, however, these genes were constantly expressed under short-day conditions except for a slight increase in the expression a KUP/HAK/KT gene six weeks after the onset of the short-day treatment. These results indicated that the suppression of 137Cs uptake was triggered by short day length but not regulated by competitive Cs+ and K+ transport. We hypothesize that there are separately regulated Cs+ and K+ transport systems in poplar. PMID:27924824

  4. Ecology and silviculture of poplar plantations.

    SciTech Connect

    Stanturf, John A.; Van Oosten, Cees; Netzer, Daniel A.

    2002-07-01

    D.I.; Isebrands, J.G.; Eckenwalder, J.E.; Richardson, J., eds. Poplar culture in North America, part A, chapter 5. Ottawa: NRC Research Press, National Research Council of Canada: 153-206. ABSTRACT. Poplars are some of the fastest growing trees in North America and foresters have sought to capitalize on this potential since the 1940s. Interest in growing poplars has fluctuated, and objectives have shifted between producing sawlogs, pulp-wood, or more densely spaced "woodgrass" or biofuels. Currently, most poplar plantations are established for pulpwood or chip production on rotations of 10 years or less, but interest in sawlog production is increasing. Sid McKnight characterized cottonwood as a prima donna species: under ideal conditions, growth rates are just short of spectacular. Just as this can be applied to all poplars, it is equally true that all poplars are demanding of good sites and careful establishment. Growing poplars in plantations is challenging, and good establishment the first year is critical to long-term success. If a grower lacks the commitment or resources to provide needed treatments at critical times, then species other than poplars should be considered. Our objective in this chapter is to provide growers with current information for establishing and tending poplar plantations, as practiced in North America. Where we have sufficient information, differences between the poplar-growing regions of the United States and Canada will be noted. Mostly information is available on eastern and black cottonwood and their hybrids.

  5. Short rotation Wood Crops Program

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Ehrenshaft, A.R.

    1990-08-01

    This report synthesizes the technical progress of research projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program for the year ending September 30, 1989. The primary goal of this research program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, is the development of a viable technology for producing renewable feedstocks for conversion to biofuels. One of the more significant accomplishments was the documentation that short-rotation woody crops total delivered costs could be $40/Mg or less under optimistic but attainable conditions. By taking advantage of federal subsidies such as those offered under the Conservation Reserve Program, wood energy feedstock costs could be lower. Genetic improvement studies are broadening species performance within geographic regions and under less-than-optimum site conditions. Advances in physiological research are identifying key characteristics of species productivity and response to nutrient applications. Recent developments utilizing biotechnology have achieved success in cell and tissue culture, somaclonal variation, and gene-insertion studies. Productivity gains have been realized with advanced cultural studies of spacing, coppice, and mixed-species trials. 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  6. Field performance of Populus in short-rotation intensive culture plantations in the north-central U.S.

    Treesearch

    Edward A. Hansen; Michael E. Ostry; Wendell D. Johnson; David N. Tolsted; Daniel A. Netzer; William E. Berguson; Richard B. Hall

    1994-01-01

    Describes a network of short-rotation, Populus research and demonstration plantations that has been established across a 5-state region in the north-central U.S. to identify suitable hybrid poplar clones for large-scale biomass plantations in the region. Reports 6-year results.

  7. Economic impacts of short-rotation woody crops for energy or oriented strand board: a Minnesota case study

    Treesearch

    William F. Lazarus; Douglas G. Tiffany; Ronald S. Zalesny Jr.; Don E. Riemenschneider

    2011-01-01

    Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) such as hybrid poplars are becoming increasingly competitive with agriculture on marginal land. The trees can be grown for energy and for traditional uses such as oriented strandboard. Using IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) software, we modeled the impacts of shifting land use from hay and pasture for cow-calf beef operations to...

  8. [Seasonal dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in fine roots and their differences between successive rotation poplar plantations].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-ping; Xu, Tan; Zhu, Wan-rui; Wang, Hua-tian; Zhang, Guang-can; Li, Chuan-rong; Jiang, Yue-zhong

    2015-11-01

    In this study, poplar fine roots in two successive rotation plantations were sampled over seasons. Root samples were grouped from first to five orders to examine the seasonal dynamics of carbon and nitrogen contents of poplar fine roots with orders, and compared their differences between two successive rotation plantations, and finally to find the relationships between the fine root growth and the productivity decline of successive rotation poplar plantations. The results showed that non-structure carbohydrates (NSC) content increased significantly with root orders, while nitrogen content decreased. The contents of total carbon and NSC were significantly related to total nitrogen content. Root orders explained 98.2% variance of carbon and nitrogen contents of poplar fine roots, and the difference between rotations only explained 1.7% of variance. Poplar fine roots consisted of more carbon and less nitrogen with root orders, and the seasonal changes in contents of total carbon, total nitrogen and NSC showed significant difference between rotations, while.that of the C:N ratio didn' t show significant difference. Root order and season showed interaction effect on carbon and nitrogen dynamic. The C:N ratio was about 20:1 in lower order roots, and more than 30:1 in higher order roots. The C:N ratio in summer and autumn was significantly less than those in other seasons, while NSC content was the highest in November. This study indicated that the allocation of carbon and nitrogen in fine roots was closely correlated with fine root orders. Both NSC content and C:N ratio were of greatly important ecological significance in fine root turnover and growth regulation.

  9. Phasing Variants in Poplar Trees using a Hybrid of Short & Long Read Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Schackwitz, Wendy; Martin, Joel; Lipzen, Anna; Pennacchio, Len; Tuskan, Gerald

    2013-03-26

    Poplar grow throughout the West coast & are adapted to extremely variable conditions. To examine what allows for this wide range of growth conditions, Jerry Tuskan's team has collected 1000 different individuals from British Columbia to California. In 2009, three Common Gardens were established where each individual was cloned in triplicate. Nearly all of these trees have been sequenced using short read technology, revealing a huge degree of variation in genotype. Correlating this genomic variation to phenotype would be greatly be strengthened if the variants could be phased into long haplotype blocks.

  10. [Seasonal dynamics of quantitative and morphological traits of poplar fine roots and their differences between successive rotation plantations].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-ping; Xu, Tan; Zhu, Wan-rui; Wang, Qi-tong; Liu, Meng-ling; Wang, Hua-tian; Li, Chuan-rong; Dong, Yu-feng

    2016-02-01

    Based on the fine root samples of the first and second generations of poplar (Populus x euramericana ' Neva'), this study examined the response of quantitative and morphological traits of fine roots of different orders and the difference between generations. The results showed that, the quantitative traits of fine roots, such as root length, root surface area and root biomass, presented obvious seasonal variation, and the fine root traits had obvious difference among root orders. The quantitative traits of lower-order fine roots showed significant seasonal difference, and the fine root biomass increased in the growing season and then decreased significantly. The specific root length (SRL) of higher-order roots also showed significant change with season, while the root length density (RLD) and root tissue density (RTD) changed a little. The successive rotation resulted in the significant increase of root length, root biomass, SRL and RLD of 1-2 orders in the growing season. The quantitative traits of first order root significantly positively correlated with soil temperature and moisture, and significantly negatively correlated with the soil organic matter and soil available nitrogen content. However, the quantitative traits of second order root only showed significant correlation with soil nutrient content. The seasonal dynamics of poplar fine roots and the difference between successive rotation plantations implied carbon investment change of poplar to roots. Soil nutrient deficiency induced more carbon investment into roots, and this carbon allocation pattern might affect the aboveground productivity of poplar plantation.

  11. A comprehensive database of poplar research in North America from 1980 - 2010

    Treesearch

    David R. Coyle; Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny

    2010-01-01

    Short rotation woody crops such as Populus species and hybrids (hereafter referred to as poplars) are renewable energy feedstocks that can potentially be used to offset electricity generation and natural gas use in many temperature regions. Highly productive poplars grown primarily on marginal agricultural sites are an important component of the...

  12. An approach for siting poplar energy production systems to increase productivity and associated ecosystem services

    Treesearch

    R.S. Jr. Zalesny; D.M. Donner; D.R. Coyle; W.L. Headlee; R.B. Hall

    2010-01-01

    Short rotation woody crops (SRWC) such as Populus species and hybrids (i.e., poplars) are renewable energy feedstocks that are vital to reducing our dependence on non-renewable and foreign sources of energy used for heat, power, and transportation fuels. Highly productive poplars grown primarily on marginal agricultural sites are an important...

  13. Industry/government collaborations on short-rotation woody crops for energy, fiber and wood products

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.; Berg, S.

    1996-12-31

    More than twenty-five organizations can be identified in the US and Canada that have research plantings of 20 ha in size or greater of short-rotation woody crops and most of those are well-established forest products companies. In 1990, only 9 forest products companies had commercial or substantial research plantings of short-rotation woody crops. The recent harvest and use of hybrid poplars for pulp and paper production in the Pacific Northwest has clearly stimulated interest in the use of genetically superior hybrid poplar clones across North America. Industry and government supported research cooperatives have been formed to develop sophisticated techniques for producing genetically superior hybrid poplars and willows suited for a variety of locations in the US. While the primary use of commercially planted short-rotation woody crops is for pulp and paper, energy is a co-product in most situations. A document defining a year 2020 technology vision for America`s forest, wood and paper industry affirms that {open_quotes}biomass will be used not only for building materials and paper and paperboard products, but also increasingly for steam, power, and liquid fuel production.{close_quotes} To accomplish the goals of {open_quotes}Agenda 2020{close_quotes} a new collaborative research effort on sustainable forestry has been initiated by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the American Forest and Paper Association (AF&PA). Both the new and old collaborative efforts are focusing on achieving substantial and sustainable gains in U.S. wood production for both energy and traditional wood products. AF&PA and DOE hope that industry and government partnerships addressing the competitiveness and energy efficiency of U.S. industries, can serve as a model for future research efforts.

  14. Woody biomass from short rotation energy crops

    Treesearch

    R.S. Zalesny; M.W. Cunningham; R.B. Hall; J. Mirck; D.L. Rockwood; John Stanturf; T.A. Volk

    2011-01-01

    Short rotation woody crops (SRWCs) are ideal for woody biomass production and management systems because they are renewable energy feedstocks for biofuels, bioenergy, and bioproducts that can be strategically placed in the landscape to conserve soil and water, recycle nutrients, and sequester carbon. This chapter is a synthesis of the regional implications of producing...

  15. Short rotation forestry harvesting - systems and costs

    Treesearch

    Bruce R. Hartsough; Bryce J. Stokes

    1997-01-01

    Single stem short rotation plantations in the United States are largely dedicated to pulp production, with fuel as a secondary product. There are very limited plantings for fuel production, and others where the primary purpose is treatment of various wastewater's. All production harvesting of single stem plantations is conducted with conventional forestry...

  16. Changes in bird community composition in response to growth changes in short-rotation woody crop plantings

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, V.R.; Hanowski, J.; Christian, D.; Hoffman, W.; Schiller, A.; LIndberg, J.

    1997-10-01

    Hybrid poplar established as intensively managed short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) former agricultural lands can provide habitat for wildlife. Studies of bird use of SRWC for nesting and during fall migration have shown that the numbers and kinds of breeding birds using mature plantings of hybrid poplar are similar to natural-forested lands. In Minnesota, the number and species of breeding birds using habitat provided by clonal-trial plantings and young larger-scale plantings (12--64 ha) of hybrid poplar were initially most similar to those using grasslands and row-crops. As the plantings approached canopy closure, successional species became predominant. In the Pacific Northwest, breeding bird composition and density were very similar for mature plantings and forested areas; however, fall migrants were found primarily in forested areas. In the Southeast, preliminary comparisons of breeding bird use of plantings of sweetgum and sycamore with naturally regenerating forests of different ages and sizes and vegetation structure are showing no size effect on use. As with hybrid poplar, species use of the more mature plantings of sweetgum and sycamore was most similar to that of natural forests.

  17. Genetic improvement and evaluation of black cottonwood for short- rotation biomass production. Final report, 1987--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Stettler, R.F.; Hinckley, T.M.; Heilman, P.E.; Bradshaw, H.D. Jr.

    1993-04-30

    This project was initiated in 1978 to serve three objectives: (1) develop genetically improved poplar cultivars offering increased productivity under short-rotation culture; (2) identify the major components of productivity in poplar and determine ways in which they can be manipulated, genetically and culturally; and (3) engage in technology transfer to regional industry and agencies so as to make poplar culture in the Pacific Northwest economically feasible. The project is aimed at capturing natural variation in the native black cottonwood. Populus trichocarpa T & G, and enhancing it through selective breeding. Major emphasis has been placed on hybridization of black cottonwood with P deltoides and P maximowiczii, more recently with p nigra. First-generation (F{sub 1}) hybrids have consistently outperformed black cottonwood by a factor of 1.5.-2. The high yields of woody biomass obtained from these clonally propagated hybrids, in rotations of 4-7 years, have fostered the establishment of large-scale plantations by the pulp and paper industry in the region. Physiological studies have helped to elucidate hybrid superiority and several of the underlying mechanisms.

  18. Reduced Expression of the SHORT-ROOT Gene Increases the Rates of Growth and Development in Hybrid Poplar and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiehua; Andersson-Gunnerås, Sara; Gaboreanu, Ioana; Hertzberg, Magnus; Tucker, Matthew R.; Zheng, Bo; Leśniewska, Joanna; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.; Laux, Thomas; Sandberg, Göran; Jones, Brian

    2011-01-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) is a well characterized regulator of cell division and cell fate determination in the Arabidopsis primary root. However, much less is known about the functions of SHR in the aerial parts of the plant. In this work, we cloned SHR gene from Populus trichocarpa (PtSHR1) as an AtSHR ortholog and down-regulated its expression in hybrid poplar (Populus tremula×P. tremuloides Michx-clone T89) in order to determine its physiological functions in shoot development. Sharing a 90% similarity to AtSHR at amino acid level, PtSHR1 was able to complement the Arabidopsis shr mutant. Down regulation of PtSHR1 led to a strong enhancement of primary (height) and secondary (girth) growth rates in the transgenic poplars. A similar approach in Arabidopsis showed a comparable accelerated growth and development phenotype. Our results suggest that the response to SHR could be dose-dependent and that a partial down-regulation of SHR could lead to enhanced meristem activity and a coordinated acceleration of plant growth in woody species. Therefore, SHR functions in plant growth and development as a regulator of cell division and meristem activity not only in the roots but also in the shoots. Reducing SHR expression in transgenic poplar was shown to lead to significant increases in primary and secondary growth rates. Given the current interest in bioenergy crops, SHR has a broader role as a key regulator of whole plant growth and development and SHR suppression has considerable potential for accelerating biomass accumulation in a variety of species. PMID:22194939

  19. Facing the Future: Effects of Short-Term Climate Extremes on Isoprene-Emitting and Nonemitting Poplar.

    PubMed

    Vanzo, Elisa; Jud, Werner; Li, Ziru; Albert, Andreas; Domagalska, Malgorzata A; Ghirardo, Andrea; Niederbacher, Bishu; Frenzel, Juliane; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Asard, Han; Rennenberg, Heinz; Sharkey, Thomas D; Hansel, Armin; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2015-09-01

    Isoprene emissions from poplar (Populus spp.) plantations can influence atmospheric chemistry and regional climate. These emissions respond strongly to temperature, [CO2], and drought, but the superimposed effect of these three climate change factors are, for the most part, unknown. Performing predicted climate change scenario simulations (periodic and chronic heat and drought spells [HDSs] applied under elevated [CO2]), we analyzed volatile organic compound emissions, photosynthetic performance, leaf growth, and overall carbon (C) gain of poplar genotypes emitting (IE) and nonemitting (NE) isoprene. We aimed (1) to evaluate the proposed beneficial effect of isoprene emission on plant stress mitigation and recovery capacity and (2) to estimate the cumulative net C gain under the projected future climate. During HDSs, the chloroplastidic electron transport rate of NE plants became impaired, while IE plants maintained high values similar to unstressed controls. During recovery from HDS episodes, IE plants reached higher daily net CO2 assimilation rates compared with NE genotypes. Irrespective of the genotype, plants undergoing chronic HDSs showed the lowest cumulative C gain. Under control conditions simulating ambient [CO2], the C gain was lower in the IE plants than in the NE plants. In summary, the data on the overall C gain and plant growth suggest that the beneficial function of isoprene emission in poplar might be of minor importance to mitigate predicted short-term climate extremes under elevated [CO2]. Moreover, we demonstrate that an analysis of the canopy-scale dynamics of isoprene emission and photosynthetic performance under multiple stresses is essential to understand the overall performance under proposed future conditions.

  20. Reduced expression of the SHORT-ROOT gene increases the rates of growth and development in hybrid poplar and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiehua; Andersson-Gunnerås, Sara; Gaboreanu, Ioana; Hertzberg, Magnus; Tucker, Matthew R; Zheng, Bo; Leśniewska, Joanna; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Laux, Thomas; Sandberg, Göran; Jones, Brian

    2011-01-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) is a well characterized regulator of cell division and cell fate determination in the Arabidopsis primary root. However, much less is known about the functions of SHR in the aerial parts of the plant. In this work, we cloned SHR gene from Populus trichocarpa (PtSHR1) as an AtSHR ortholog and down-regulated its expression in hybrid poplar (Populus tremula×P. tremuloides Michx-clone T89) in order to determine its physiological functions in shoot development. Sharing a 90% similarity to AtSHR at amino acid level, PtSHR1 was able to complement the Arabidopsis shr mutant. Down regulation of PtSHR1 led to a strong enhancement of primary (height) and secondary (girth) growth rates in the transgenic poplars. A similar approach in Arabidopsis showed a comparable accelerated growth and development phenotype. Our results suggest that the response to SHR could be dose-dependent and that a partial down-regulation of SHR could lead to enhanced meristem activity and a coordinated acceleration of plant growth in woody species. Therefore, SHR functions in plant growth and development as a regulator of cell division and meristem activity not only in the roots but also in the shoots. Reducing SHR expression in transgenic poplar was shown to lead to significant increases in primary and secondary growth rates. Given the current interest in bioenergy crops, SHR has a broader role as a key regulator of whole plant growth and development and SHR suppression has considerable potential for accelerating biomass accumulation in a variety of species.

  1. Facing the Future: Effects of Short-Term Climate Extremes on Isoprene-Emitting and Nonemitting Poplar1

    PubMed Central

    Vanzo, Elisa; Jud, Werner; Li, Ziru; Albert, Andreas; Domagalska, Malgorzata A.; Ghirardo, Andrea; Niederbacher, Bishu; Frenzel, Juliane; Beemster, Gerrit T.S.; Asard, Han; Rennenberg, Heinz; Sharkey, Thomas D.; Hansel, Armin; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Isoprene emissions from poplar (Populus spp.) plantations can influence atmospheric chemistry and regional climate. These emissions respond strongly to temperature, [CO2], and drought, but the superimposed effect of these three climate change factors are, for the most part, unknown. Performing predicted climate change scenario simulations (periodic and chronic heat and drought spells [HDSs] applied under elevated [CO2]), we analyzed volatile organic compound emissions, photosynthetic performance, leaf growth, and overall carbon (C) gain of poplar genotypes emitting (IE) and nonemitting (NE) isoprene. We aimed (1) to evaluate the proposed beneficial effect of isoprene emission on plant stress mitigation and recovery capacity and (2) to estimate the cumulative net C gain under the projected future climate. During HDSs, the chloroplastidic electron transport rate of NE plants became impaired, while IE plants maintained high values similar to unstressed controls. During recovery from HDS episodes, IE plants reached higher daily net CO2 assimilation rates compared with NE genotypes. Irrespective of the genotype, plants undergoing chronic HDSs showed the lowest cumulative C gain. Under control conditions simulating ambient [CO2], the C gain was lower in the IE plants than in the NE plants. In summary, the data on the overall C gain and plant growth suggest that the beneficial function of isoprene emission in poplar might be of minor importance to mitigate predicted short-term climate extremes under elevated [CO2]. Moreover, we demonstrate that an analysis of the canopy-scale dynamics of isoprene emission and photosynthetic performance under multiple stresses is essential to understand the overall performance under proposed future conditions. PMID:26162427

  2. Short Rotation Woody Crops Program: Project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    This document is a compilation of summaries describing research efforts in the US Department of Energy's Short Rotation Woody Crops Program (SRWCP). The SRWCP is sponsored by DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division and is field-managed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The SRWCP is an integrated basic research program with 18 field research projects throughout the United States. The overall objective of the program is to improve the productivity and increase the cost efficiency of growing and harvesting woody trees and shrubs. In a competitive technical review, 25 projects were chosen to form a new research program. Although some of the original projects have ended and new ones have begun, many of the long-term research projects still form the core of the SRWCP. This document contains individual summaries of each of the 18 research projects in the SRWCP from October 1985 to October 1986. Each summary provides the following information: name and address of the contracting institution, principal investigator, project title, current subcontract or grant number, period of performance, and annual funding through fiscal year 1986. In addition, each summary contains a brief description of the project rationale, objective, approach, status, and future efforts. A list of publications that have resulted from DOE-sponsored research follows many of the summaries.

  3. Short Rotation Crops in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L L

    1998-06-04

    The report is based primarily on the results of survey questions sent to approximately 60 woody and 20 herbaceous crop researchers in the United States and on information from the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program. Responses were received from 13 individuals involved in woody crops research or industrial commercialization (with 5 of the responses coming from industry). Responses were received from 11 individuals involved in herbaceous crop research. Opinions on market incentives, technical and non-technical barriers, and highest priority research and development areas are summarized in the text. Details on research activities of the survey responders are provided as appendices to the paper. Woody crops grown as single-stem systems (primarily Populus and Eucalyptus species) are perceived to have strong pulp fiber and oriented strand board markets, and the survey responders anticipated that energy will comprise 25% or less of the utilization of single-stem short-rotation woody crops between now and 2010. The only exception was a response from California where a substantial biomass energy market does currently exist. Willows (Salix species) are only being developed for energy and only in one part of the United States at present. Responses from herbaceous crop researchers suggested frustration that markets (including biomass energy markets) do not currently exist for the crop, and it was the perception of many that federal incentives will be needed to create such markets. In all crops, responses indicate that a wide variety of research and development activities are needed to enhance the yields and profitability of the crops. Ongoing research activities funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Feedstock Development Program are described in an appendix to the paper.

  4. Selected Harvesting Machines For Short Rotation Intensive Culture Biomass Plantations

    Treesearch

    Sammy Woodfin; Doug Frederick; Bryce Stokes

    1987-01-01

    Three different harvesting systems were observed and analyzed for productivity and costs in a short rotation.intensive culture plantation of 2 to 5 year old sycamore. Individual machines were compared to create an optimum system.

  5. Regeneration and productivity of aspen grown on repeated short rotations.

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Perala

    1979-01-01

    Regeneration and productivity of aspen cannot be sustained on rotations shorter than about 8 years. Productivity losses on short rotations are physiological and morphological rather than nutritional in nature. Stump and root collar sprouts, which are rare in mature stands, were more numerous than root suckers.

  6. Successional changes of phytodiversity on a short rotation coppice plantation in Oberschwaben, Germany.

    PubMed

    Birmele, Janine; Kopp, Gabriele; Brodbeck, Frank; Konold, Werner; Sauter, Udo H

    2015-01-01

    To allow for information on successional changes in phytodiversity over time and space, as well as information on differences between clones and treatments, phytodiversity was monitored on a poplar short rotation coppice plantation in Oberschwaben, Southwest Germany, in four consecutive years. The investigated plantation was divided into two core areas, one planted with poplar clone Max4, the other with Monviso; each core area was divided into two blocks with alternating treatments: (i) irrigation and fertilization; (ii) irrigation; and (iii) no treatment. All vascular plant species of the ground vegetation were recorded in 72 permanent sampling plots of 25 m(2) each during vegetation periods using the Braun-Blanquet scale. Results showed that total number of species increased in first 2 years and declined after harvest of the SRC-trees. Total vegetation cover decreased during the 4 years of study. Especially for the two clones there was an opposed trend: grass layer had a high cover on Monviso plots, but low cover on Max4 plots; herb layer the very reverse. However, there was no significant difference between the three treatments compared within each year. Perennial species were dominating over all years, as well as light-demanding species, but their proportion decreased steadily. Our results confirm the conclusion of previous studies which indicate that plant community succession takes place in ground vegetation of SRC and imply that species composition is age-dependent. The selection of clones for SRC can influence ground vegetation; some floristic changes for example caused by different treatments may be visible only when monitored over a longer period of time.

  7. Successional changes of phytodiversity on a short rotation coppice plantation in Oberschwaben, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Birmele, Janine; Kopp, Gabriele; Brodbeck, Frank; Konold, Werner; Sauter, Udo H.

    2015-01-01

    To allow for information on successional changes in phytodiversity over time and space, as well as information on differences between clones and treatments, phytodiversity was monitored on a poplar short rotation coppice plantation in Oberschwaben, Southwest Germany, in four consecutive years. The investigated plantation was divided into two core areas, one planted with poplar clone Max4, the other with Monviso; each core area was divided into two blocks with alternating treatments: (i) irrigation and fertilization; (ii) irrigation; and (iii) no treatment. All vascular plant species of the ground vegetation were recorded in 72 permanent sampling plots of 25 m2 each during vegetation periods using the Braun-Blanquet scale. Results showed that total number of species increased in first 2 years and declined after harvest of the SRC-trees. Total vegetation cover decreased during the 4 years of study. Especially for the two clones there was an opposed trend: grass layer had a high cover on Monviso plots, but low cover on Max4 plots; herb layer the very reverse. However, there was no significant difference between the three treatments compared within each year. Perennial species were dominating over all years, as well as light-demanding species, but their proportion decreased steadily. Our results confirm the conclusion of previous studies which indicate that plant community succession takes place in ground vegetation of SRC and imply that species composition is age-dependent. The selection of clones for SRC can influence ground vegetation; some floristic changes for example caused by different treatments may be visible only when monitored over a longer period of time. PMID:25806036

  8. Natural flood retention in mountain areas by forests and forest like short rotation coppices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt-Imjela, Christian; Schulte, Achim; Hartwich, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Natural water retention is an important element of flood risk management in flood generating headwater areas in the low mountain ranges of Central Europe. In this context forests are of particular interest because of the high infiltration capacities of the soils and to increase water retention reforestation of agricultural land would be worthwhile. However competing claims for land use in intensely cultivated regions in Central Europe impede reforestation plans so the potential for a significant increase of natural water retention in forests is strongly limited. Nevertheless the development of innovative forms of land use and crop types opens new perspectives for a combination of agricultural land use with the water retention potential of forests. Recently the increasing demand for renewable energy resources leads to the cultivation of fast growing poplar and willow hybrids on agricultural land in short rotation coppices (SRC). Harvested in cycles of three to six years the wood from the plantations can be used as wood chips for heat and electricity production in specialized power plants. With short rotation plantations a crop type is established on arable land which is similar to forests so that an improvement of water retention can be expected. To what extend SRC may contribute to flood attenuation in headwater areas is investigated for the Chemnitzbach watershed (48 km2) in the Eastern Ore Mountains (Free State of Saxony, Germany), a low mountain range which is an important source of flood runoff in the Elbe basin. The study is based on a rainfall-runoff model of flood events using the conceptual modelling system NASIM. First results reveal a significant reduction of the flood peaks after the implementation of short rotation coppices. However the effect strongly depends on two factors. The first factor is the availability of areas for the plantations. For a substantial impact on the watershed scale large areas are required and with decreasing percentages of SRC

  9. Biochar mineralization and priming effect on SOM decomposition. Results from a field trial in a short rotation coppice in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Maurizio; Alberti, Giorgio; Panzacchi, Pietro; Delle Vedove, Gemini; Miglietta, Franco; Tonon, Giustino

    2016-04-01

    Biochar application to soil has been proposed as a promising strategy for carbon (C) sequestration and climate change mitigation, helping at the same time to maintain soil fertility. However, most of the knowledge on biochar stability is based on short-term lab incubation experiments, as field studies are scarce. Therefore, little is known about the interactions between biochar and roots and the related effects on biochar stability in field conditions. The present study aimed to assess the stability of biochar, its effect on original soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition, and the effect of plant roots on biochar stability in field conditions in Northern Italy, for a three-year monitoring period within the EuroChar project. The experiment was conducted in a poplar short rotation coppice (SRC). Biochar produced from maize (δ13C = -13.8‰) silage pellets in a gasification plant was applied in a poplar short rotation coppice (SRC) plantation in Northern Italy. Root exclusion subplots were established using the trenching method to measure heterotrophic respiration. Total (Rtot) and heterotrophic (Rh) respiration were measured every 2 hours in control and biochar-treated soil, with a closed dynamic soil respiration system. δ13C of the soil-emited CO2 was periodically measured using the Keeling plot method. The percentage of biochar-derived soil respiration (fB), was calculated using an isotopic mass balance. Results showed that fB varied between 7% and 37% according to the sampling date, and was generally higher in the presence of roots than in trenched plots where the root growth was excluded. Without roots, only the 14% of the carbon originally added with biochar was decomposed. In the presence of roots, this percentage increased to 21%, suggesting a positive priming effect of roots on biochar decomposition. On the other hand, biochar decreased the decomposition of original SOM by about 17%, suggesting a protective effect of biochar on SOM.

  10. Evaluation of researchers' decisions in short-rotation forestry

    SciTech Connect

    Fege, A.S.

    1987-03-01

    A survey of short-rotation forestry research from 1966-82 provided insights into the political, socioeconomic, institutional, and personal factors influencing decisions made by forestry researchers. Scientists first entered short rotation forestry research because of personal contacts with other scientists, because they considered this a productive research area, because funds were available, and because of the energy crisis. They attributed their success primarily to cooperation with other scientists and potential users and to adequate financial support. These findings offer insight into the individual decisions and the economic and political factors that will shape other forestry research frontiers.

  11. Environmental assessment of different harvesting solutions for Short Rotation Coppice plantations.

    PubMed

    Bacenetti, Jacopo; Pessina, Domenico; Fiala, Marco

    2016-01-15

    Although several studies have been carried out on Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) plantations and on their environmental performances, there is a lack of information about the environmental impact of the harvesting operations. In this study, using LCA approach, the environmental performance of two different harvesting solutions for Short Rotation Coppice plantations was evaluated. In more details, for 2-years cutting time poplar plantations, harvesting with a self-propelled forager equipped with a specific header was compared in terms of environmental impact with a tractor-based solution. The LCI was built with experimental data collected during field tests carried out over about 70 ha of SRC plantation in Northern Italy. The following nine impact potentials were evaluated according to the selected method: climate change (CC), ozone depletion (OD), particulate matter (PM), photochemical ozone formation (POF), acidification (TA), freshwater eutrophication (FE), terrestrial eutrophication (TE), marine eutrophication (ME) and mineral, fossil and renewable resource depletion (MFRD). Although harvesting with self-propelled foragers requires higher power and higher diesel consumption, it achieves better environmental performances respect to the harvest with the tractor-based solution. The tractor-based option is characterized by lower operative field capacity (about - 70% for all the evaluated impact categories except for MFRD, which is - 94% compared to the first option). The environmental differences are mainly related to the different machine productivity. From an environmental point of view, respect to the harvesting with self-propelled foragers, the tractor-based solution can achieve a lower environmental impact only in small SRC plantations (<1-2 ha). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of reduced soil water availability on productivity of short rotation coppice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orság, Matěj; Fischer, Milan; Mani Tripathi, Abhishek; Trnka, Miroslav

    2015-04-01

    "Wood, in fact, is the unsung hero of the technological revolution that has brought us from a stone and bone culture to our present age.'' Perlin and Journey (1991). Given its high-energy content and versatile use, biomass in a form of wood has been used for energy purposes since millennia and through times has been preferred source of biomass. Ever since, the production and use of woody biomass resources expands globally. Main drivers for its use as a source of energy are diversification and the mitigation of energy related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through partial substitution of fossil fuels. An alternative option for wood biomass sourcing from natural forests is short rotation woody coppice. Its productivity is largely dependent on the environment in terms of climatic conditions. Especially drought is the major constraint of woody biomass production involving serious economic consequences. In the central Europe, increased global radiation and air temperature together with decreased relative humidity increases the reference evapotranspiration resulting in an increased demand for soil water during growing season. For that reason, our field experiment was designed to evaluate impact of decreased soil water availability on productivity of poplar based short rotation coppice plantation during multiple growing seasons. Throughfall exclusion system based on plastic roof strips placed under the canopy was used to drain up to 70 % of the incoming rain water. Usual methods were used to assess the annual above ground biomass increment expressed in dry matter content. Not surprisingly our results show systematic decline in the productivity of plots subjected to decreased soil water availability but also considerable resilience of the drought-stressed trees which will be also discussed. This study was supported by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific team focused on drought", No. CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0248 and PASED - project supported by Czech program

  13. An economic and energy analysis of poplar intensive cultures in the Lake States.

    Treesearch

    Dietmar Rose; Karen Ferguson; David C. Lothner; J. Zavitkovski

    1981-01-01

    Short- (5 to 10 years) and long- (15 years) rotation, irrigated and nonirrigated intensive cultures of hybrid poplar were analyzed economically via cash flow analysis. Energy balances we also calculated for each alternative. Nonirrigated systems offer reasonable economic returns whereas irrigated systems do not. All systems produce more energy than they use as...

  14. Fiber Recovery with Chain Flail Delimbing/Debarking and Chipping of Hybrid Poplar

    Treesearch

    Bruce Hartsough; Raffaele Spinelli; Steve Pottle; John Klepac

    2000-01-01

    This study determined how much wood was potentially available From short rotation hybrid poplar, and how mtich was actually recovered when trees were delimbed and debarked with chain flails and chipped. 3 1 groups of five trees each were measured and then processed. For trees larger than 50 kg total dry weight, potentially recoverable wood averaged 75% oftotal weight...

  15. An approach for siting poplar energy production systems to increase productivity and associated ecosystem services

    Treesearch

    Ronald S. Zalesny; Deahn M. Donner; David R. Coyle; William L. Headlee

    2012-01-01

    Short rotation woody crops such as Populus spp. and their hybrids (i.e., poplars) are a significant component of the total biofuels and bioenergy feedstock resource in the USA. Production of these dedicated energy crops may result in large-scale land conversion, which leads to questions about their economic, logistic, and ecologic feasibility. To...

  16. Field evaluation of willow under short rotation coppice for phytomanagement of metal-polluted agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Van Slycken, Stijn; Witters, Nele; Meiresonne, Linda; Meers, Erik; Ruttens, Ann; Van Peteghem, Pierre; Weyens, Nele; Tack, Filip M G; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2013-01-01

    Short rotation coppice (SRC) of willow and poplar might be a promising phytoremediation option since it uses fast growing, high biomass producing tree species with often a sufficient metal uptake. This study evaluates growth, metal uptake and extraction potentials of eight willow clones (Belders, Belgisch Rood, Christina, Inger, Jorr, Loden, Tora and Zwarte Driebast) on a metal-contaminated agricultural soil, with total cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) concentrations of 6.5 +/- 0.8 and 377 +/- 69 mg kg(-1) soil, respectively. Although, during the first cycle, on average generally low productivity levels (3.7 ton DM (dry matter) ha(-1) y(-1)) were obtained on this sandy soil, certain clones exhibited quite acceptable productivity levels (e.g. Zwarte Driebast 12.5 ton DM ha(-1) y(-1)). Even at low biomass productivity levels, SRC of willow showed promising removal potentials of 72 g Cd and 2.0 kg Zn ha(-1) y(-1), which is much higher than e.g. energy maize or rapeseed grown on the same soil Cd and Zn removal can be increased by 40% if leaves are harvested as well. Nevertheless, nowadays the wood price remains the most critical factor in order to implement SRC as an acceptable, economically feasible alternative crop on metal-contaminated agricultural soils.

  17. A prototype harvester for short-rotation plantations

    Treesearch

    James A. Mattson; Michael A. Wehr

    1983-01-01

    A promising approach to increasing the supply of wood fiber for pulp and energy is short-rotation intensively cultured (SRIC) forestry. To apply the principles of agriculture to the growing of wood fiber, designers of harvesting equipment must consider a unique set of operating criteria. This paper summarizes the design criteria relevant to the SRIC concept and...

  18. Autumnal photosynthesis in short-rotation intensively cultured Populus clones

    Treesearch

    N.D. Nelson; D.I. Dickmann; K.W. Gottschalk

    1982-01-01

    Many exotic hybrid Populus clones grown under short-rotation intensive culture (SRIC) in the Lake States region of the U.S.A. retain green leaves in the autumn for 2-6 weeks after native aspen (P. tremuloides and P. grandidentata) have lost their leaves. Leaves on the terminal shoots of five such clones tested in...

  19. Simulation of hydrology of short rotation hardwood plantations

    Treesearch

    John E. Parsons; Carl C. Trettin

    2001-01-01

    A 76 ha hardwood plantation at Trice Research Forest near Sumter, SC is being usedto study forest hydrology on an operational scale. The overall objective of this project is to develop tools to enable forest managers to assess and manage sustainable short rotation woody crop production systems. This paper reports on the use of the water management model, WATRCOM, as a...

  20. Woody biomass from short rotation energy crops. Chapter 2

    Treesearch

    R.S., Jr. Zalesny Jr.; M.W. Cunningham; R.B. Hall; J. Mirck; D.L. Rockwood; J.A. Stanturf; T.A. Volk

    2011-01-01

    Short rotation woody crops (SRWCs) are ideal for woody biomass production and management systems because they are renewable energy feedstocks for biofuels, bioenergy, and bioproducts that can be strategically placed in the landscape to conserve soil and water, recycle nutrients, and sequester carbon. This chapter is a synthesis of the regional implications of producing...

  1. Cut-to-length harvesting of short-rotation Eucalyptus

    Treesearch

    Bruce R. Hartsough; David J. Cooper

    1999-01-01

    Traditional whole-tree harvesting systems work well in short-rotation hardwood plantations, but other methods are needed where it is desirable to leave the residues on the site. We tested a system consisting of a cut-to-length harvester, forwarder, mobile chipper, and chip screen to clearcut a 7-year-old plantation of Eucalyptus viminalis. Three...

  2. Economic and operational feasibility of short rotation hardwood inventory

    Treesearch

    Tom Gallagher; Robert Shaffer

    2002-01-01

    Procuring wood during the winter months for a pulpmill in the Southeast has some difficulties, especially in hardwood. Soft ground reduces the operational feasibility of many sites, forcing companies to store hardwood in woodyards for retrieval during wet weather. Intensively managed, short rotation hardwood grown on dry sites could economically supply a pulpmill...

  3. Nitrogen supply and demand in short-rotation sweetgum plantations

    Treesearch

    D. Andrew Scott; James A. Burger; Donald J. Kaczmarek; Michael B. Kane

    2004-01-01

    Intensive management is crucial for optimizing hardwood plantation success, and nitrogen (N) nutrition management is one of the most important practices in intensive management. Because management of short-rotation woody crop plantations is a mixture of row-crop agriculture and plantation forestry, we tested the usefulness of an agronomic budget modified for deciduous...

  4. Analyzing the impact of climate and management factors on the productivity and soil carbon sequestration of poplar plantations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Fan, Jiazhi; Jing, Panpan; Cheng, Yong; Ruan, Honghua

    2016-01-01

    It is crucial to investigate how climate and management factors impact poplar plantation production and soil carbon sequestration interactively. We extracted above-ground net primary production (ANPP), climate and management factors from peer-reviewed journal articles and analyzed impact of management factor and climate on the mean annual increment (MAI) of poplar ANPP statistically. Previously validated mechanistic model (ED) is used to perform case simulations for managed poplar plantations under different harvesting rotations. The meta-analysis indicate that the dry matter MAI was 6.3 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1) (n=641, sd=4.9) globally, and 5.1 (n=292, sd=4.0), 8.1 (n=224, sd=4.7) and 4.4 Mg ha(-1) yr(-1) (n=125, sd=3.2) in Europe, the US and China, respectively. Poplar MAI showed a significant response to GDD, precipitation and planting density and formed a quadratic relationship with stand age. The low annual production for poplar globally was probably caused by suboptimal water availability, rotation length and planting density. SEM attributes the variance of poplar growth rate more to climate than to management effects. Case simulations indicated that longer rotation cycle significantly increased soil carbon storage. Findings of this work suggests that management factor of rotation cycle alone could have dramatic impact on the above ground growth, as well as on the soil carbon sequestration of poplar plantations and will be helpful to quantify the long-term carbon sequestration through short rotation plantation. The findings of this study are useful in guiding further research, policy and management decisions towards sustainable poplar plantations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Weed control using herbicides in short-rotation intensively cultured poplar plantations.

    Treesearch

    Edward A. Hansen; Daniel A. Netzer

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes a series of studies that investigated chemical weed control from time of planting to the end of the second growing season. The studies confirm the importance of weed control with preemergents at the time of planting and the importance of additional weed control before the start of the second growing season.

  6. Soil organic carbon stock change by short rotation coppice cultivation on croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Katja; Don, Axel; Flessa, Heinz

    2013-04-01

    Bioenergy is a means to climate mitigation if the overall greenhouse gas balance of the respective crop is better than that of the replaced fossil fuel. The change in soil organic carbon (SOC) by land use change to bioenergy has to be integrated into the greenhouse gas balance. One promising way to provide biomass for energy purposes is the cultivation of fast growing trees in short rotation coppices (SRC), because their energy input is low compared to their energy output. Moreover, due to high litter input and no-till management we hypothesize that SOC is accumulating in SRC on the long term. To study this long term effect 18 old poplar and willow SRC plantations and adjacent croplands with the same land use history were sampled throughout Germany using a standardized sampling protocol with a sampling depth down to 80 cm. The age of SRC ranged from 8 to 35 years and they were harvested every 3 to 15 years. Soil organic carbon content, bulk density, pH value and texture were determined. The SOC stocks were calculated and corrected for equivalent soil masses. In the top 10 cm, SOC increased under poplar and willow plantations at all sites by 4.8 +/- 3.2 Mg ha-1, which is an accumulation rate of 0.3 Mg ha-1 a-1. Regarding the whole profile to 80 cm depth, the SOC change was not significant with 0.8 +/- 13.5 Mg ha-1. At 8 sites SOC stocks increased compared to the respective cropland, at 10 sites SOC stocks decreased (-18 Mg C ha-1 to +30 Mg C ha-1). The litter accumulation was low compared to afforestations, ranging from 0.4 Mg C ha-1 to 3.2 Mg C ha-1 which is a litter C accumulation rate of 0.2 Mg ha-1 a-1. Including the respective litter carbon, the average SOC accumulation rate was 0.1 ± 0.8 Mg C ha-1 a-1. Taking into account the large scatter of SOC stock changes among different sites, the hypothesis of long-term SOC accumulation by SRC cannot generally be confirmed. Nevertheless, SRC may substantially increase SOC if installed on carbon depleted croplands and

  7. Nutrient enhanced short rotation coppice for biomass in central Wales

    SciTech Connect

    Hodson, R.W.; Slater, F.M.; Lynn, S.F.; Randerson, P.F.

    1993-12-31

    Two projects involving short rotation willow coppice are taking place on the eastern side of the Cambrian Mountains in central Wales. One project examines, as an alternative land use, the potential of short rotation willow coppice variously enhanced by combinations of lime, phosphorous and potassium fertilizers and also digested sewage sludge on an acidic upland site at an altitude of 260m. The first year results of this project are described in detail, showing the necessity for limestone additions and also demonstrating that of the four willow varieties established, Salix dasyclados is the only possible, profitable fuel crop. The other project involving willow in a filter bed system is outlined along with an additional project investigating the effect of sewage sludge additions on the Rubus fruticosus production in a birch dominated mixed deciduous woodland.

  8. Autocovariance prediction of short period Earth rotation parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosek, W.

    The autocovariance prediction of equidistant model and Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) time series are presented. It enables computation of a forecast without any a priori information. It has been applied to short period polar motion and Length of Day (LOD) time series. The differences between the predicted short-period polar motion and LOD data computed for the 7th, 14th and 21st day in the future for different starting prediction epochs point out on irregular variations in Earth rotation. Similar computations were made using the autoregressive prediction method. The irregular (unpredictable) variations computed by the autoregressive prediction are very similar to those computed by the autocovariance prediction. The frequency and time-frequency analysis of these irregular variations shows that they affect oscillations with different periods from about 20 to ≡130 days and in different epochs.

  9. Late-Rotation Nitrogen Management in Deciduous Short Rotation Woody Crops

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Idle agricultural land has the potential for producing woody crops as an energy or chemical feedstock. Short rotation woody crops (SRWCs) may improve soil health, water quality, and sequester soil carbon in these intensively farmed fields. Frequently, nitrogen is the limiting nutrient in these sys...

  10. Background CH4 and N2O fluxes in low-input short rotation coppice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Zenone, Terenzio; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2016-04-01

    Extensively managed short rotation coppice systems are characterized by low fluxes of CH4 and N2O. However due to the large global warming potential of these trace gases (GWP100: CH4: 34, N2O: 298), such background fluxes can still significantly contribute to offsetting the CO2 uptake of short rotation coppice systems. Recent technological advances in fast-response CH4 and N2O analysers have improved our capability to capture these background fluxes, but their quantification still remains a challenge. As an example, we present here CH4 and N2O fluxes from a short-rotation bioenergy plantation in Belgium. Poplars have been planted in a double-row system on a loamy sand in 2010 and coppiced in the beginning of 2012 and 2014 (two-year rotation system). In 2013 (June - November) and 2014 (April - August), the plantation's CH4 and N2O fluxes were measured in parallel with an eddy covariance tower (EC) and an automated chamber system (AC). The EC had a detection limit of 13.68 and 0.76 μmol m-2 h-1 for CH4 and N2O, respectively. The median detection limit of the AC was 0.38 and 0.08 μmol m-2 h-1 for CH4 and N2O, respectively. The EC picked up a few high CH4 emission events with daily averages >100 μmol m-2 h-1, but a large proportion of the measured fluxes were within the EC's detection limit. The same was true for the EC-derived N2O fluxes where the daily average flux was often close to the detection limit. Sporadically, some negative (uptake) fluxes of N2O were observed. On the basis of the EC data, no clear link was found between CH4 and N2O fluxes and environmental variables. The problem with fluxes within the EC detection limit is that a significant amount of the values can show the opposite sign, thus "mirroring" the true flux. Subsequently, environmental controls of background trace gas fluxes might be disguised in the analysis. As a next step, it will be tested if potential environmental drivers of background CH4 and N2O fluxes at the plantation can be

  11. Short-term Jovian rotation profiles, 1970-1972.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inge, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a study of the motions of features in Jupiter's atmosphere noted on blue-light photographs from three 25-day periods centered on opposition in 1970, 1971, and 1972. Short-term rotation profiles for these years are obtained which, at certain latitudes, differ significantly from a mean multiple-year profile and from each other. In particular, it is found that in 1970 and 1971 the rotational period was slightly shorter near the edges of the equatorial jet than at its center, while in 1972 it was not. This center-to-edge shear of 1970 and 1971 amounted to about 10 m/sec. In addition, a feature observed in 1972 at 37 N was found to exhibit an abrupt change in period amounting to an increase of 95.1 sec.

  12. Short rotation plantations policy history in Europe: lessons from the past and recommendations for the future.

    PubMed

    Lindegaard, Kevin N; Adams, Paul W R; Holley, Martin; Lamley, Annette; Henriksson, Annika; Larsson, Stig; von Engelbrechten, Hans-Georg; Esteban Lopez, Gonzalo; Pisarek, Marcin

    2016-08-01

    Short rotation plantations (SRPs) are fast-growing trees (such as willow (Salix spp.), poplar (Populus spp.) and Eucalyptus) grown closely together and harvested in periods of 2-20 years. There are around 50,000 hectares of SRPs in Europe, a relatively small area considering that there have been supportive policy measures in many countries for 30 years. This paper looks at the effect that the policy measures used in different EU countries have had, and how other external factors have impacted on the development of the industry. Rokwood was a 3-year European funded project which attempted to understand the obstacles and barriers facing the woody energy crops sector using well established methods of SWOT and PESTLE analysis. Stakeholder groups were formed in six different European regions to analyze the market drivers and barriers for SRP and propose ways that the industry could make progress through targeted research and development and an improved policy framework. Based upon the outcomes of the SWOT and PESTLE analysis, each region produced a series of recommendations for policymakers, public authorities, and government agencies to support the development, production, and use of SRP-derived wood fuel in each of the partner countries. This study provides details of the SRP policy analysis and reveals that each region shared a number of similarities with broad themes emerging. There is a need to educate farmers and policymakers about the multifunctional benefits of SRPs. Greater financial support from regional and/or national government is required in order to grow the SRP market. Introducing targeted subsidies as an incentive for growers could address lack of local supply chains. Long-term policy initiatives should be developed while increasing clarity within Government departments. Research funding should enable closer working between universities and industry with positive research findings developed into supportive policy measures.

  13. Greenhouse gas emissions from short-rotation forestry on a drained and rewetted fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaipfer, Martina; Fuertes Sánchez, Alicia; Drösler, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    More than 95 % of German peatlands have been drained, primarily for agricultural and forestry use. They constitute a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHG) with emissions of approximately 47 million tons per year. Propelled by the German energy turnaround farmers have increasingly converted their cropland to short rotation forestry (SRF), amongst them some who are cultivating drained peatland. In this study GHG emissions from alder and poplar short rotation plantations with differing groundwater levels near Rosenheim, Bavaria, were monitored over the course of three-and-a-half years. Moreover, the effect of ploughing for SRF establishment was investigated as well. Understorey GHG fluxes were measured using closed-chamber approaches. Gas samples were enclosed in vials every second week and analysed for their CH4 and N2O concentrations by gas chromatography at a laboratory. On-site measurements of CO2 fluxes were carried out over the course of a day every three to four weeks with a dynamic closed-chamber technique. Allometric methods were employed to estimate carbon sequestration into trees. Sheet piling was installed around a set of measurement sites in December 2014 to accentuate the difference between the sites with high and low water tables. As a result the water level around those sites rose from an average of -36.1 ± 6.1 cm in 2013 and 2014 to -20.8 ± 3.7 cm in 2015. The water table outside the sheet piling showed values of -61.8 ± 5.7 cm and -72.1 ± 6.2 cm in those years, respectively. First results suggest a limited effect of ploughing for SRF establishment on understorey GHG emissions. However, there seems to be a distinct impact on tree productivity. CO2 fluxes in the understorey seem to be strongly influenced by water table, but also land management (mulching of understorey vegetation to reduce weed competition for trees during the first year and for pest control in subsequent years) and shading of the understorey vegetation by trees. There is a

  14. Short-rotation forestry for energy production in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, V.C.; Liu, W.; Merriam, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    In Hawaii, imports of fossil fuels continue to accelerate and now provide over 90% of the total energy supply at a cost exceeding $1 {times} 10{sup 9} annually exported from the local economy. Concurrently, sugarcane and pineapple crops, the traditional mainstays of the state`s economy, have declined such that as much as 80,000 hectares of agricultural land are now available for alternative land uses. The feasibility of short-rotation forestry for sustainable energy production on these former sugarcane and pineapple plantation lands is being evaluated using species- and site-specific empirical models to predict yields of Eucalyptus grandis, E. saligna, and Leucaena leucocephala, a system model to estimate delivered costs, and a geographic information system to extend the analysis to areas where no field trials exist and to present results in map form. The island of Hawaii is showcased as an application of the methodology. Modeling results of methanol, ethanol, and electricity production from tropical hardwoods are presented. Short-rotation forestry appears to hold promise for the greening of Hawaii`s energy system and agricultural lands for the benefit of the state`s citizens and visitors. The methodology is readily transferable to other regions of the United States and rest of the world.

  15. Closed Loop Short Rotation Woody Biomass Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, Michael

    2012-09-30

    CRC Development LLC is pursuing commercialization of shrub willow crops to evaluate and confirm estimates of yield, harvesting, transportation and renewable energy conversion costs and to provide a diverse resource in its supply portfolio.The goal of Closed Loop Short Rotation Woody Biomass Energy Crops is supply expansion in Central New York to facilitate the commercialization of willow biomass crops as part of the mix of woody biomass feedstocks for bioenergy and bioproducts. CRC Development LLC established the first commercial willow biomass plantation acreage in North America was established on the Tug Hill in the spring of 2006 and expanded in 2007. This was the first 230- acres toward the goal of 10,000 regional acres. This project replaces some 2007-drought damaged acreage and installs a total of 630-acre new planting acres in order to demonstrate to regional agricultural producers and rural land-owners the economic vitality of closed loop short rotation woody biomass energy crops when deployed commercially in order to motivate new grower entry into the market-place. The willow biomass will directly help stabilize the fuel supply for the Lyonsdale Biomass facility, which produces 19 MWe of power and exports 15,000 pph of process steam to Burrows Paper. This project will also provide feedstock to The Biorefinery in New York for the manufacture of renewable, CO2-neutral liquid transportation fuels, chemicals and polymers. This project helps end dependency on imported fossil fuels, adds to region economic and environmental vitality and contributes to national security through improved energy independence.

  16. Male poplars have a stronger ability to balance growth and carbohydrate accumulation than do females in response to a short-term potassium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanni; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Maolin; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2015-12-01

    Potassium (K) deficiency influences plant performance, such as ion uptake and carbohydrate transport. However, little is known about differences between males and females in response to K deficiency. In this study, dry matter accumulation, photosynthetic capacity, allocation patterns of K(+) , Na(+) and carbohydrates, and ultrastructural changes in males and females of Populus cathayana exposed to K deficiency were investigated. The results indicated that males maintained a significantly higher K(+) content and K(+) /Na(+) ratio in leaves and stems than did females under K deficiency. Moreover, K deficiency significantly increased the sucrose content of females, whereas no significant effect on males was detected. In addition, a comparative analysis showed that males allocated more resources to roots, while females allocated more to leaves, which resulted in sexually different root/shoot (R/S) ratios. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observations showed that males suffered fewer injuries than did females. These results suggested that males have a better ability to cope with K deficiency. In addition, the combined effects of salinity and K deficiency on poplars were studied. The results indicated that salt stress aggravates the negative effects caused by K deficiency. Taken together, our study provided evidence for gender-specific strategies in ion and carbohydrate allocation in poplars exposed to a short-term K deficiency. In leaves and stems, the lower K(+) accumulation inhibited sucrose translocation and resulted in a decreased R/S ratio, which may contribute to males having a stronger ability to balance growth and carbohydrate accumulation when compared with females. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  17. Using a process-based model (3-PG) to predict and map hybrid poplar biomass productivity in Minnesota and Wisconsin, USA

    Treesearch

    William L. Headlee; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny; Deahn M. Donner; Richard B. Hall

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid poplars have demonstrated high biomass productivity in the North Central USA as short rotation woody crops (SRWCs). However, our ability to quantitatively predict productivity for sites that are not currently in SRWCs is limited. As a result, stakeholders are also limited in their ability to evaluate different areas within the region as potential supply sheds...

  18. Modelling short-rotation coppice and tree planting for urban carbon management - a citywide analysis.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Nicola; Edmondson, Jill L; Gaston, Kevin J; Leake, Jonathan R; O'Sullivan, Odhran S

    2015-10-01

    The capacity of urban areas to deliver provisioning ecosystem services is commonly overlooked and underutilized. Urban populations have globally increased fivefold since 1950, and they disproportionately consume ecosystem services and contribute to carbon emissions, highlighting the need to increase urban sustainability and reduce environmental impacts of urban dwellers. Here, we investigated the potential for increasing carbon sequestration, and biomass fuel production, by planting trees and short-rotation coppice (SRC), respectively, in a mid-sized UK city as a contribution to meeting national commitments to reduce CO 2 emissions.Iterative GIS models were developed using high-resolution spatial data. The models were applied to patches of public and privately owned urban greenspace suitable for planting trees and SRC, across the 73 km(2) area of the city of Leicester. We modelled tree planting with a species mix based on the existing tree populations, and SRC with willow and poplar to calculate biomass production in new trees, and carbon sequestration into harvested biomass over 25 years.An area of 11 km(2) comprising 15% of the city met criteria for tree planting and had the potential over 25 years to sequester 4200 tonnes of carbon above-ground. Of this area, 5·8 km(2) also met criteria for SRC planting and over the same period this could yield 71 800 tonnes of carbon in harvested biomass.The harvested biomass could supply energy to over 1566 domestic homes or 30 municipal buildings, resulting in avoided carbon emissions of 29 236 tonnes of carbon over 25 years when compared to heating by natural gas. Together with the net carbon sequestration into trees, a total reduction of 33 419 tonnes of carbon in the atmosphere could be achieved in 25 years by combined SRC and tree planting across the city. Synthesis and applications. We demonstrate that urban greenspaces in a typical UK city are underutilized for provisioning ecosystem services by trees and

  19. Fertilization in short-rotation woody crops plantations

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.

    1984-08-27

    Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) plantations may be more responsive to fertilization than mature forests because they are in a nutrient-accumulating rather than a steady-state stage of stand development. On the other hand, the nutrient removals with more frequent harvesting (via biomass removal, leaching, erosion, etc.) may cause greater fertilizer loss from SRWC plantations than from mature forests. A knowledge of the mechanisms of fertilizer response is needed to optimize fertilization schemes for maximum response and to minimize losses and the undesirable environmental consequences associated with such losses. Nitrogen does not accumulate in mineral forms in soils, and, thus, responses must be due primarily to N conservation within plants themselves (translocation), within nutrient cycles, or by elevating non-mineral but labile soil N fractions. Nitrogen fertilization schemes in SRWC plantations most probably must rely on conservation within plants and elevating soil labile N levels to provide prolonged growth response. Attempts to keep soil mineral N levels elevated may very well lead to excessive nitrification, nitrate leaching, and associated problems with groundwater pollution. On the other hand, phosphorus and potassium may be retained in ionic forms in soils, and fertilizer schemes may be designed to take advantage of this property, as well as internal plant conservation in the case of phosphorus, to promote long-term responses. 27 references, 1 figure.

  20. Selectivity and delignification kinetics for oxidative short-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood, Part I: Constant-pressure.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Ramírez, Rocío; Garcia, Laura A; Holtzapple, Mark Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Kinetic models applied to oxygen bleaching of paper pulp focus on the degradation of polymers, either lignin or carbohydrates. Traditionally, they separately model different moieties that degrade at three different rates: rapid, medium, and slow. These models were successfully applied to lignin and carbohydrate degradation of poplar wood submitted to oxidative pretreatment with lime at the following conditions: temperature 110-180°C, total pressure 7.9-21.7 bar, and excess lime loading of 0.5 g Ca(OH)2 per gram dry biomass. These conditions were held constant for 1-6 h. The models properly fit experimental data and were used to determine pretreatment selectivity in two fashions: differential and integral. By assessing selectivity, the detrimental effect of pretreatment on carbohydrates at high temperatures and at low lignin content was determined. The models can be used to identify pretreatment conditions that selectively remove lignin while preserving carbohydrates. Lignin removal≥50% with glucan preservation≥90% was observed for differential glucan selectivities between ∼10 and ∼30 g lignin degraded per gram glucan degraded. Pretreatment conditions complying with these reference values were preferably observed at 140°C, total pressure≥14.7 bars, and for pretreatment times between 2 and 6 h depending on the total pressure (the higher the pressure, the less time). They were also observed at 160°C, total pressure of 14.7 and 21.7 bars, and pretreatment time of 2 h. Generally, at 110°C lignin removal is insufficient and at 180°C carbohydrates do not preserve well.

  1. Energy product options for Eucalyptus species grown as short rotation woody crops

    Treesearch

    Donald Rockwood; Alan W. Rudie; Sally A. Ralph; J.Y. Zhu; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2008-01-01

    Eucalyptus species are native to Australia but grown extensively worldwide as short rotation hardwoods for a variety of products and as ornamentals. We describe their general importance with specific emphasis on existing and emerging markets as energy products and the potential to maximize their productivity as short rotation woody crops. Using experience in Florida...

  2. Energy Product Options for Eucalyptus Species Grown as Short Rotation Woody Crops

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, Donald L.; Rudie, Alan W.; Ralph, Sally A.; Zhu, J.Y.; Winandy, Jerrold E.

    2008-01-01

    Eucalyptus species are native to Australia but grown extensively worldwide as short rotation hardwoods for a variety of products and as ornamentals. We describe their general importance with specific emphasis on existing and emerging markets as energy products and the potential to maximize their productivity as short rotation woody crops. Using experience in Florida USA and similar locations, we document their current energy applications and assess their productivity as short-term and likely long-term energy and related products. PMID:19325808

  3. Short paper: The rotation period of asteroid (4080) Galinskij

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymock, R.

    2009-12-01

    A rotation period of 7.35+/-0.02 hours was derived for asteroid (4080) Galinskij from V-filter images on three nights in 2009 August. The absolute magnitude (H=13.3) in the MPC database appears to be rather too low since the present observations yield a value of 13.75+/-0.05 for H in agreement with recent visual estimates. The rotational lightcurve exhibited an amplitude of 0.91+/-0.05 magnitudes. Non-refereed articles

  4. Net assimilation and photosynthate allocation of Populus clones grown under short-rotation intensive culture: Physiological and genetic responses regulating yield

    SciTech Connect

    Dickmann, D.I.; Pregitzer, K.S.; Nguyen, P.V.

    1996-08-01

    The overall objective of this project was to determine the differential responses of poplar clones from sections Tacamahaca and Aigeiros of the genus Populus to varying levels of applied water and nitrogen. Above- and below-ground phenology and morphology, photosynthate allocation, and physiological processes were examined. By manipulating the availability of soil resources, we have been able to separate inherent clonal differences from plastic responses, and to determine genotype-environment interactions. We also have been able to make some contrasts between trees grown from hardwood cuttings and coppice sprouts. Our overall hypothesis was that carbon allocation during growth is greatly influenced by interactions among moisture, nitrogen, and genotype, and that these interactions greatly influence yield in short-rotation plantations. As is true of any project, some of our original expectations were not realized, whereas other initially unforeseen results were obtained. The reduced funding from the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) during the last few years of the project slowed us down to some extent, so progress was not been as rapid as we might have hoped. The major problem associated with this funding shortfall was the inability to employ skilled and unskilled student labor. Nonetheless, we were able to accomplish most of our original goals. All of the principal investigators on this project feel that we have made progress in advancing the scientific underpinning of short-rotation woody biomass production.

  5. The role of short-rotation woody crops in sustainable development

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, J.P.; Tolbert, V.R.

    1996-12-31

    One answer to increase wood production is by increasing management intensity on existing timberland, especially in plantation forests. Another is to convert land currently in agriculture to timberland. Short-rotation woody crops can be used in both cases. But, what are the environmental consequences? Short-rotation woody crops can provide a net improvement in environmental quality at both local and global scales. Conversion of agricultural land to short-rotation woody crops can provide the most environmental quality enhancement by reducing erosion, improving soil quality, decreasing runoff, improving groundwater quality, and providing better wildlife habitat. Forest products companies can use increased production from intensively managed short-rotation woody crop systems to offset decreased yield from the portion of their timberland that is managed less intensively, e.g. streamside management zones and other ecologically sensitive or unique areas. At the global scale, use of short-rotation woody crops for bioenergy is part of the solution to reduce greenhouse gases produced by burning fossil fuels. Incorporating short-rotation woody crops into the agricultural landscape also increases storage of carbon in the soil, thus reducing atmospheric concentrations. In addition, use of wood instead of alternatives such as steel, concrete, and plastics generally consumes less energy and produces less greenhouse gases. Cooperative research can be used to achieve energy, fiber, and environmental goals. This paper will highlight several examples of ongoing cooperative research projects that seek to enhance the environmental aspects of short-rotation woody crop systems. Government, industry, and academia are conducting research to study soil quality, use of mill residuals, nutrients in runoff and groundwater, and wildlife use of short-rotation woody crop systems in order to assure the role of short-rotation crops as a sustainable way of meeting society`s needs.

  6. Short-Rotation Woody-Crops Program. Annual progress report for 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Ranney, J.W.; Cushman, J.H.

    1982-07-01

    This report is a summary of work sponsored by the US Department of Energy in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program. The program is concerned with new wood production techniques that attain high productivity levels. Sometimes known as short rotation intensive culture, experimentation concentrated on hardwood tree species that stump sprout and can be re-harvested every 3 to 10 years. Research focused on the screening of fastgrowing species and techniques of short-rotation wood crop management, although plant propagation, new wood recovery systems, and economic evaluations are within the scope of the program. The program's objective is to attain high productivity rates at competitive prices.

  7. Rotational polarons and transport in short molecular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulloa, Sergio E.; Sierra-Ortega, J.; Zhang, Wei

    2003-03-01

    In many organic materials and/or complex molecular structures, there are twist/rotational modes that appear at low temperature and are easily excitable. The interaction between these rotational phonon modes and electrons generates a new quasiparticle, the rotational polaron. We study here a two-site rotational Holstein polaron. Our model gives nontrivial polaron physics due to anharmonic oscillations and nonlinear electron-phonon interactions. The results are relevant for molecular electronic devices composed of two molecular units with excitable intra-molecular rotations. Analytical and numerical calculations allow a full quantum mechanical description. We study all frequency and coupling regimes, paying special attention to the transition/crossover between different coupling ratios. We find that under resonant conditions between the electron level splitting and the phonon frequency, complex level crossings and anticrossings occur, indicating mixing of excited states with different characters, which depend on underlying symmetries of the system. The mixing is accompanied by charge and phonon amplitude transfer which yields observable signatures in electronic transport through this system. Supported by NSF-NIRT, US-DOE, and OU-CMSS.

  8. Modelling supply and demand of bioenergy from short rotation coppice and Miscanthus in the UK.

    PubMed

    Bauen, A W; Dunnett, A J; Richter, G M; Dailey, A G; Aylott, M; Casella, E; Taylor, G

    2010-11-01

    Biomass from lignocellulosic energy crops can contribute to primary energy supply in the short term in heat and electricity applications and in the longer term in transport fuel applications. This paper estimates the optimal feedstock allocation of herbaceous and woody lignocellulosic energy crops for England and Wales based on empirical productivity models. Yield maps for Miscanthus, willow and poplar, constrained by climatic, soil and land use factors, are used to estimate the potential resource. An energy crop supply-cost curve is estimated based on the resource distribution and associated production costs. The spatial resource model is then used to inform the supply of biomass to geographically distributed demand centres, with co-firing plants used as an illustration. Finally, the potential contribution of energy crops to UK primary energy and renewable energy targets is discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimation of above ground biomass for multi-stemmed short-rotation woody crops

    Treesearch

    Brian A. Byrd; Wilson G. Hood; Michael C. Tyree; Dylan N. Dillaway

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing interest in short-rotation woody crop (SRWC) systems, an accurate yet quick, non-destructive means for determining aboveground biomass is necessary from both management and research perspectives.

  10. Water consumption and biomass production of protoplast fusion lines of poplar hybrids under drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Anne; Kleinschmit, Jörg R. G.; Schoneberg, Sebastian; Löffler, Sonja; Janßen, Alwin; Polle, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Woody crops such as poplars (Populus) can contribute to meet the increasing energy demand of a growing human population and can therefore enhance the security of energy supply. Using energy from biomass increases ecological sustainability as biomass is considered to play a pivotal role in abating climate change. Because areas for establishing poplar plantations are often confined to marginal sites drought tolerance is one important trait for poplar genotypes cultivated in short rotation coppice. We tested 9-month-old plants of four tetraploid Populus tremula (L.) × P. tremuloides (Michx.) lines that were generated by protoplast fusion and their diploid counterpart for water consumption and drought stress responses in a greenhouse experiment. The fusion lines showed equivalent or decreased height growth, stem biomass and total leaf area compared to the diploid line. The relative height increment of the fusion lines was not reduced compared to the diploid line when the plants were exposed to drought. The fusion lines were distinguished from the diploid counterpart by stomatal characteristics such as increased size and lower density. The changes in the stomatal apparatus did not affect the stomatal conductance. When exposed to drought the carbohydrate concentrations increased more strongly in the fusion lines than in the diploid line. Two fusion lines consumed significantly less water with regard to height growth, producing equivalent or increased relative stem biomass under drought compared to their diploid relative. Therefore, these tetraploid fusion lines are interesting candidates for short rotation biomass plantation on dry sites. PMID:26042130

  11. Water consumption and biomass production of protoplast fusion lines of poplar hybrids under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Anne; Kleinschmit, Jörg R G; Schoneberg, Sebastian; Löffler, Sonja; Janßen, Alwin; Polle, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Woody crops such as poplars (Populus) can contribute to meet the increasing energy demand of a growing human population and can therefore enhance the security of energy supply. Using energy from biomass increases ecological sustainability as biomass is considered to play a pivotal role in abating climate change. Because areas for establishing poplar plantations are often confined to marginal sites drought tolerance is one important trait for poplar genotypes cultivated in short rotation coppice. We tested 9-month-old plants of four tetraploid Populus tremula (L.) × P. tremuloides (Michx.) lines that were generated by protoplast fusion and their diploid counterpart for water consumption and drought stress responses in a greenhouse experiment. The fusion lines showed equivalent or decreased height growth, stem biomass and total leaf area compared to the diploid line. The relative height increment of the fusion lines was not reduced compared to the diploid line when the plants were exposed to drought. The fusion lines were distinguished from the diploid counterpart by stomatal characteristics such as increased size and lower density. The changes in the stomatal apparatus did not affect the stomatal conductance. When exposed to drought the carbohydrate concentrations increased more strongly in the fusion lines than in the diploid line. Two fusion lines consumed significantly less water with regard to height growth, producing equivalent or increased relative stem biomass under drought compared to their diploid relative. Therefore, these tetraploid fusion lines are interesting candidates for short rotation biomass plantation on dry sites.

  12. Mental rotation requires visual short-term memory: evidence from human electric cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Prime, David J; Jolicoeur, Pierre

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to seek evidence that mental rotation is accomplished by transforming a representation held in visual short-term memory (VSTM). In order to accomplish this goal, we utilized the sustained posterior contralateral negativity (SPCN), an electrophysiological index of the maintenance of information in VSTM. We hypothesized that if mental rotation is accomplished by transforming a representation held in VSTM, then the duration that this representation is maintained in VSTM should be related to the degree to which the representation must be rotated to reach the desired orientation. Therefore, the SPCN should offset at progressively longer latencies as the degree of rotation required increases. We tested this prediction in two experiments utilizing rotated alphanumeric characters. Experiment 1 utilized a normal versus mirror discrimination task that is known to require mental rotation. Experiment 2 utilized a letter versus digit discrimination, a task that does not require mental rotation. In Experiment 1, the offset latency of the SPCN wave increased with increases in the angle of rotation of the target. This effect indicates that targets were maintained in VSTM for longer durations as the angle of rotation increased. Experiment 2 revealed that target orientation did not affect SPCN offset latency when subjects did not adopt a mental rotation strategy, confirming that the effects on the SPCN latency effects observed in Experiment 1 were not due to the mere presentation of rotated patterns. Thus, these two experiments provide clear evidence that mental rotation involves representations maintained in VSTM.

  13. Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbies, Mark; Volk, Timothy; Abrahamson, Lawrence; Shuren, Richard; Stanton, Brian; Posselius, John; McArdle, Matt; Karapetyan, Samvel; Patel, Aayushi; Shi, Shun; Zerpa, Jose

    2014-10-03

    Biomass for biofuels, bioproducts and bioenergy can be sourced from forests, agricultural crops, various residue streams, and dedicated woody or herbaceous crops. Short rotation woody crops (SRWC), like willow and hybrid poplar, are perennial cropping systems that produce a number of environmental and economic development benefits in addition to being a renewable source of biomass that can be produced on marginal land. Both hybrid poplar and willow have several characteristics that make them an ideal feedstock for biofuels, bioproducts, and bioenergy; these include high yields that can be obtained in three to four years, ease of cultivar propagation from dormant cuttings, a broad underutilized genetic base, ease of breeding, ability to resprout after multiple harvests, and feedstock composition similar to other sources of woody biomass. Despite the range of benefits associated with SRWC systems, their deployment has been restricted by high costs, low market acceptance associated with inconsistent chip quality (see below for further explanation), and misperceptions about other feedstock characteristics (see below for further explanation). Harvesting of SRWC is the largest single cost factor (~1/3 of the final delivered cost) in the feedstock supply system. Harvesting is also the second largest input of primary fossil energy in the system after commercial N fertilizer, accounting for about one third of the input. Therefore, improving the efficiency of the harvesting system has the potential to reduce both cost and environmental impact. At the start of this project, we projected that improving the overall efficiency of the harvesting system by 25% would reduce the delivered cost of SRWC by approximately $0.50/MMBtu (or about $7.50/dry ton). This goal was exceeded over the duration of this project, as noted below.

  14. Comparing soil carbon of short rotation poplar plantations with agricultural crops and woodlots in north central United States

    Treesearch

    Mark D. Coleman; J.G. Isebrands; David N. Tolsted; Virginia R. Tolbert

    2004-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has increased dramatically since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution as a result of human activities (Keeling and others 1995, Houghton and others 2001). The primary cause of CO2 increases are worldwide fossil fuel burning, biomass burning, and cement manufacturing. These activities...

  15. The Influence of Hip Rotation on Femoral Offset Following Short Stem Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boese, Christoph K; Bredow, Jan; Ettinger, Max; Eysel, Peer; Thorey, Fritz; Lechler, Philipp; Budde, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Short stem total hip arthroplasty (THA) is thought to be an advantageous surgical option for young patients. Femoral offset has been identified as an important factor for clinical outcome of THA. However, little is known on functional implications of femoral offset after short stem THA. Importantly, hip rotation influences the projected femoral offset and may lead to significant underestimation. Therefore, a novel method to identify and account for hip rotation was applied to a prospectively enrolled series of 37 patients (48 radiographs) undergoing short stem THA. Repeated measurements were performed and intraobserver and interobserver reliability was assessed and femoral offset was corrected for rotation. Based on this study, rotation-correction of femoral offset is of highest relevance for the correct interpretation in future studies.

  16. Is there a need for site productivity functions for short-rotation woody crop plantings?

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, M.; Tuskan, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    For over a decade, researchers have used small-scale research plots to assist development and selection of high yielding, pest-resistant clones of fast-growing hardwoods such as hybrid poplar (Populus spp.). Substantial advances have been made in the techniques and criteria for screening species and selecting clones. Data from these research plots indicate that the ultimate performance of selected clones is dependent upon variable factors in the environment. Until now, researchers could only determine the suitability of a given site for such clones, not the actual yield potential of the site. Recently in the north central United States, several clones were planted on larger-than-research-scale plots on private land recontracted under the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). The historical database could not provide a framework which would allow producers to predict the yield potential of a particular clone on a specific site. Through a systematic combination of clonal trials on experimental research-scale plots and operational plantings on 50 to 100 acre agricultural-scale field plots, it may be possible to develop yield functions or site quality equations which would predict biomass yields at rotation for selected clones. Such estimates will (1) reduce the probability of planting failure, (2) allow maximum expression of the genetic potential of selected superior clones, and thus (3) facilitate accurate economic planning for both the producer and conversion facility manager.

  17. Is there a need for site productivity functions for short-rotation woody crop plantings?

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, M.; Tuskan, G.A.

    1995-07-06

    For over a decade, researchers have used small-scale research plots to assist development and selection of high yielding, pest-resistant clones of fast-growing hardwoods such as hybrid poplar (Populus spp.). Substantial advances have been made in the techniques and criteria for screening species and selecting clones. Data from these research plots indicate that the ultimate performance of selected clones is dependent upon variable factors in the environment. Until now, researchers could only determine the suitability of a given site for such clones, not the actual yield potential of the site. Recently in the north central US, several clones were planted on larger-than-research-scale plots on private land recontracted under the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). The historical database could not provide a framework which would allow producers to predict the yield potential of a particular clone on a specific site. Through a systematic combination of clonal trials on experimental research-scale plots and operational plantings on 50 to 100 acre agricultural-scale field plots, it may be possible to develop yield functions or site quality equations which would predict biomass yields at rotation for selected clones. Such estimates will (1) reduce the probability of planting failure, (2) allow maximum expression of the genetic potential of selected superior clones, and thus (3) facilitate accurate economic planning for both the producer and conversion facility manager.

  18. How Are Short Rotations Woody Crops Affected By Institutional Factors in the Southern United States?

    Treesearch

    Donald L. Grebner; Rodney L. Busby

    2004-01-01

    Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) produce a variety of forest products useful to consumers such as pulp, energy biomass, and solid wood. The establishment and management of these crops before conversion into manufactured products are affected by several institutional factors. The first objective of this study was to identify and document institutional structures and...

  19. Short-rotation management of Eucalyptus: guidelines for plantations in Hawaii

    Treesearch

    Craig D. Whitesell; Dean S. DeBell; Thomas H. Schubert; Robert F. Strand; Thomas B. Crabb

    1992-01-01

    A 10-year research and development program was conducted by the BioEnergy Development Corporation, USDA Forest Service, and U.S. Department of Energy on the island of Hawaii, where nearly 230,000 acres are suitable for growing biomass in short-rotation Eucalyptus plantations. Successful techniques are described for seedling production, plantation establishment (site...

  20. Coppicing evaluation of short rotation coppice in the southeast of the U.S

    Treesearch

    Rafael Santiago; Tom Gallagher; Matthew Smidt; Dana Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Renewable fuels are being tested as an alternative for fossil fuels. For the Southeast U.S., the use of woody biomass has proven to be an excellent source of renewable energy in terms of cost benefit and availability. Short rotation woody crops (SRWC) are timber plantations with exclusive characteristics that can meet the intensive demand for wood due to their fast...

  1. Evaluation of short-rotation woody crops to stabilize a decommissioned swine lagoon

    Treesearch

    K.C. Dipesh; Rodney E. Will; Thomas C. Hennessey; Chad J. Penn

    2012-01-01

    Fast growing tree stands represent an environmentally friendly, less expensive method for stabilization of decommissioned animal production lagoons than traditional lagoon closure. We tested the feasibility of using short-rotation woody crops (SRWCs) in central Oklahoma to close a decommissioned swine lagoon by evaluating the growth performance and nutrient uptake of...

  2. Field trials of a short-rotation biomass feller buncher and selected harvesting systems

    Treesearch

    Bryce J. Stokes; Douglas J. Frederick; Dennis T. Curtin

    1986-01-01

    A continuous-speed felling and bunching prototype machine was evaluated in harvesting a three-year-old, short-rotation sycamore plantation. A small tractor, grapple skidder, and large chipper were evaluate along with the prototype machine as complete harvesting systems. Prediction equations, production rates, and costs were developed for each component of the systems....

  3. Unique technical innovations for short rotation woody crops research and development

    Treesearch

    Adam H. Wiese; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny

    2006-01-01

    Often technology that is available to conduct short rotation woody crops (SRWC) research is too expensive, difficult to operate, cumbersome, and/or impractical for meeting sample size requirements. Thus, we have designed, constructed, and tested technical innovations that have allowed us to meet our specific experimental needs.

  4. Using short-rotation hardwood plantations as “green” inventory for southeastern pulp mills

    Treesearch

    Thomas Gallagher; Robert Shaffer

    2003-01-01

    As a routine wood source for a pulp mill, recent past studies have shown that intensively-managed, short-rotation hardwood plantations are not cost effective. The objective of this study was to determine if these plantations may be cost effective as "green" inventory, replacing some portion of high cost remote woodyard inventory. Three southeastern pulp mills...

  5. Extracting whole short rotation trees with a skidder and a front-end loader

    Treesearch

    R. Spinelli; B.R. Hartsough

    2001-01-01

    We time-studied a Caterpillar 950F front-end loader and a Caterpillar 528 grapple skidder used to extract bunched whole trees to a landing in a short rotation Eucalyptus plantation. The loader was 40-60% more productive than the grapple skidder, depending on extraction distance. Alternatively, the single loader could both extract trees and handle the landing duties,...

  6. Software for inference of dynamic ground strains and rotations and their errors from short baseline array observations of ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spudich, Paul; Fletcher, Jon B.

    2009-01-01

    In two previous articles we presented a formulation for inferring the strains and rotations of the ground beneath a seismic array having a finite footprint. In this article we derive expressions for the error covariance matrices of the inferred strains and rotations, and we present software for the calculation of ground strains, rotations, and their variances from short baseline array ground-motion data.

  7. Software for inference of dynamic ground strains and rotations and their errors from short baseline array observations of ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spudich, P.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2009-01-01

    In two previous articles we presented a formulation for inferring the strains and rotations of the ground beneath a seismic array having a finite footprint. In this article we derive expressions for the error covariance matrices of the inferred strains and rotations, and we present software for the calculation of ground strains, rotations, and their variances from short baseline array ground-motion data.

  8. The Short Rotation Period of Hi’iaka, Haumea’s Largest Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Danielle M.; Ragozzine, Darin; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Burkhart, Luke D.; Fuentes, Cesar; Margot, Jean-Luc; Brown, Michael E.; Holman, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    Hi’iaka is the larger outer satellite of the dwarf planet Haumea. Using relative photometry from the Hubble Space Telescope and Magellan and a phase dispersion minimization analysis, we have identified the rotation period of Hi’iaka to be ˜9.8 hr (double peaked). This is ˜120 times faster than its orbital period, creating new questions about the formation of this system and possible tidal evolution. The rapid rotation suggests that Hi’iaka could have a significant obliquity and spin precession that could be visible in light curves within a few years. We then turn to an investigation of what we learn about the (currently unclear) formation of the Haumea system and family based on this unexpectedly rapid rotation rate. We explore the importance of the initial semimajor axis and rotation period in tidal evolution theory and find that they strongly influence the time required to despin to synchronous rotation, relevant to understanding a wide variety of satellite and binary systems. We find that despinning tides do not necessarily lead to synchronous spin periods for Hi’iaka, even if it formed near the Roche limit. Therefore, the short rotation period of Hi’iaka does not rule out significant tidal evolution. Hi’iaka’s spin period is also consistent with formation near its current location and spin-up due to Haumea-centric impactors.

  9. Environmental benefits of poplar culture

    Treesearch

    J. G. Isebrands; D.F. Karnosky.

    2001-01-01

    Poplars have important values above and beyond wood or fiber production. Poplars have been planted for environmental purposes for centuries. There are reports of poplar plantings dating back to early Chinese history and biblical times in the Middle East, When immigrants came to North America in the 18th and 19th century, they often brought cuttings of their favorite...

  10. How to predict hydrological effects of local land use change: how the vegetation parameterisation for short rotation coppices influences model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, F.; Döring, C.; Jansen, M.; Panferov, O.; Spank, U.; Bernhofer, C.

    2015-08-01

    Among the different bioenergy sources, short rotation coppices (SRC) with poplar and willow trees are one of the promising options in Europe. SRC provide not only woody biomass but also additional ecosystem services. However, a known shortcoming is the potentially lower groundwater recharge caused by the potentially higher evapotranspiration demand compared to annual crops. The complex feedbacks between vegetation cover and water cycle can be only correctly assessed by application of well-parameterised and calibrated numerical models. In the present study, the hydrological model system WaSim (Wasserhaushalts-Simulations-Model) is implemented for assessment of the water balance. The focus is the analysis of simulation uncertainties caused by the use of guidelines or transferred parameter sets from scientific literature compared to "actual" parameterisations derived from local measurements of leaf area index (LAI), stomatal resistance (Rsc) and date of leaf unfolding (LU). The analysis showed that uncertainties in parameterisation of vegetation lead to implausible model results. LAI, Rsc and LU are the most sensitive plant physiological parameters concerning the effects of enhanced SRC cultivation on water budget or groundwater recharge. Particularly sensitive is the beginning of the growing season, i.e. LU. When this estimation is wrong, the accuracy of LAI and Rsc description plays a minor role. Our analyses illustrate that the use of locally measured vegetation parameters, like maximal LAI, and meteorological variables, like air temperature, to estimate LU give better results than literature data or data from remote network stations. However, the direct implementation of locally measured data is not always advisable or possible. Regarding Rsc, the adjustment of local measurements gives the best model evaluation. For local and accurate studies, measurements of model sensitive parameters like LAI, Rsc and LU are valuable information. The derivation of these model

  11. Rotational Properties of the Haumea Family Members and Candidates: Short-term Variability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirouin, Audrey; Sheppard, Scott S.; Noll, Keith S.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Ortiz, Jose Luis; Doressoundiram, Alain

    2016-06-01

    Haumea is one of the most interesting and intriguing trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). It is a large, bright, fast rotator, and its spectrum indicates nearly pure water ice on the surface. It has at least two satellites and a dynamically related family of more than 10 TNOs with very similar proper orbital parameters and similar surface properties. The Haumean family is the only one currently known in the trans-Neptunian belt. Various models have been proposed, but the formation of the family remains poorly understood. In this work, we have investigated the rotational properties of the family members and unconfirmed family candidates with short-term variability studies, and report the most complete review to date. We present results based on five years of observations and report the short-term variability of five family members and seven candidates. The mean rotational periods, from Maxwellian fits to the frequency distributions, are 6.27 ± 1.19 hr for the confirmed family members, 6.44 ± 1.16 hr for the candidates, and 7.65 ± 0.54 hr for other TNOs (without relation to the family). According to our study, there is a possibility that Haumea family members rotate faster than other TNOs; however, the sample of family members is still too limited for a secure conclusion. We also highlight the fast rotation of 2002 GH32. This object has a 0.36 ± 0.02 mag amplitude lightcurve and a rotational period of about 3.98 hr. Assuming 2002 GH32 is a triaxial object in hydrostatic equilibrium, we derive a lower limit to the density of 2.56 g cm-3. This density is similar to Haumea’s and much more dense than other small TNO densities.

  12. Rotational Properties of the Haumea Family Members and Candidates: Short-Term Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thirouin, Audrey; Sheppard, Scott S.; Noll, Keith S.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Oritiz, Jose Luis; Doressoundiram, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Haumea is one of the most interesting and intriguing trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). It is a large, bright, fast rotator, and its spectrum indicates nearly pure water ice on the surface. It has at least two satellites and a dynamically related family of more than 10 TNOs with very similar proper orbital parameters and similar surface properties. The Haumean family is the only one currently known in the trans-Neptunian belt. Various models have been proposed, but the formation of the family remains poorly understood. In this work, we have investigated the rotational properties of the family members and unconfirmed family candidates with short-term variability studies, and report the most complete review to date. We present results based on five years of observations and report the short-term variability of five family members, and seven candidates. The mean rotational periods, from Maxwellian fits to the frequency distributions, are 6.27 +/- 1.19 hr for the confirmed family members, 6.44 +/- 1.16 hr for the candidates, and 7.65 +/- 0.54 hr for other TNOs (without relation to the family). According to our study, there is a possibility that Haumea family members rotate faster than other TNOs, however, the sample of family member is still too limited for a secure conclusion. We also highlight the fast rotation of 2002 GH(sub 32). This object has a 0.36 +/- 0.02 mag amplitude lightcurve and a rotational period of about 3.98 hr. Assuming 2002 GH(sub 32) is a triaxial object in hydrostatic equilibrium, we derive a lower limit to the density of 2.56 g cm(exp -3). This density is similar to Haumea's and much more dense than other small TNO densities.

  13. The effects of harvesting short rotation cottonwood with tree shears in Arkansas

    Treesearch

    Matthew H. Pelkki; Michael Blazier; Jonathan Hartley; Hal Liechty; Bryce Zimmermann

    2016-01-01

    Short-rotation cottonwood plantations were established on a marginal agricultural site in the lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley in southeast Arkansas using two known clones (S7C20 and ST-66) and nurseryrun cottonwood stock (MIXED) from the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry nursery. The cottonwood was grown for five seasons and harvested in the winter of...

  14. Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending May 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Progress of twenty projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period March 1 through May 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major project activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

  15. Short-rotation woody-crops program. Quarterly progress report for period ending August 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, J.H.; Ranney, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Progress of twenty-one projects in the Short Rotation Woody Crops Program is summarized for the period June 1 through August 31, 1981. Individual quarterly reports included from each of the projects discuss accomplishments within specific project objectives and identify recent papers and publications resulting from the research. The major program activities are species screening and genetic selection, stand establishment and cultural treatment, and harvest, collection, transportation, and storage.

  16. Small scale gasification of short rotation coppice willow for electricity generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, W.M.; Forbes, G.; McCracken, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    Conversion technologies for wood chip produced from short rotation coppice willow have concentrated on small dispersed systems suitable for the farm structure found in Northern Ireland. The development of a 100 kW downdraft gasification, combined heat and power system identified a number of problems including fuel characteristics and gas clean up. Modifications to fuel feed systems, hearth design and particulate and tar removal methods have resulted consistent production of high quality gas for the diesel engine used for electricity generation.

  17. Precipitation partitioning in short rotation bioenergy crops: implications for downstream water availability.

    Treesearch

    Peter Caldwell; Chelcy F. Miniat; Doug Aubrey; Rhett Jackson; Jeff McDonnell; Ken W. Krauss; James S. Latimer

    2016-01-01

    The southern United States is a potential leader in producing biofuels from intensively managed, short rotation (8–12 years) woody crops such as southern pines, and native and non-native hardwoods. However, their accelerated development under intensive management has raised concerns that fast-growing bioenergy crops could reduce recharge to stream flows and groundwater...

  18. Interaction of nitrogen nutrition and salinity in Grey poplar (Populus tremula x alba).

    PubMed

    Ehlting, B; Dluzniewska, P; Dietrich, H; Selle, A; Teuber, M; Hänsch, R; Nehls, U; Polle, A; Schnitzler, J-P; Rennenberg, H; Gessler, A

    2007-07-01

    Salinity represents an increasing environmental problem in managed ecosystems. Populus spp. is widely used for wood production by short-rotation forestry in fertilized plantations and can be grown on saline soil. Because N fertilization plays an important role in salt tolerance, we analysed Grey poplar (Populus tremula x alba, syn. Populus canescens) grown with either 1 mM nitrate or ammonium subjected to moderate 75 mM NaCl. The impact of N nutrition on amelioration of salt tolerance was analysed on different levels of N metabolism such as N uptake, assimilation and N (total N, proteins and amino compounds) accumulation. Na concentration increased in all tissues over time of salt exposure. The N nutrition-dependent effects of salt exposure were more intensive in roots than in leaves. Application of salt reduced root increment as well as stem height increase and, at the same time, increased the concentration of total amino compounds more intensively in roots of ammonium-fed plants. In leaves, salt treatment increased concentrations of total N more intensively in nitrate-fed plants and concentrations of amino compounds independently of N nutrition. The major changes in N metabolism of Grey poplar exposed to moderate salt concentrations were detected in the significant increase of amino acid concentrations. The present results indicate that N metabolism of Grey poplar exposed to salt performed better when the plants were fed with nitrate instead of ammonium as sole N source. Therefore, nitrate fertilization of poplar plantations grown on saline soil should be preferred.

  19. Short rotation Populus: a bibliography of North American literature, 1989-2011

    Treesearch

    Ronald S. Zalesny; David R. Coyle

    2013-01-01

    There have been three comprehensive poplar bibliographies dating back to 1854 and the most recent contained literature published through 1988. Given that these bibliographies are outdated, the number of forestry/bioenergy related journals has increased dramatically (along with subsequent publications), and there have been profound advances in science (particularly in...

  20. Efficient utilization of short rotation tree biomass for cooking in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, R.; Chauhan, S. K.

    2012-04-01

    The human as well as livestock population increase is phenomenal in developing world including India. The survival of this huge population certainly depends on the carrying capacity of the natural systems, which is essentially determined by the nature itself. Present state of the forests can satisfy the needs of certain population and the demand for wood has rapidly outstripped the sustainability of forests. The fuelwood requirements in the developing world is approximately 80 per cent of total wood requirements and is the major cause of forest degradation. Therefore, there is need to maximize the productivity on one hand and protection/extention of the area on another hand. Wood substitution is an option including shifting from fuelwood for cooking to fossil fuels but in the changing climatic situation, this option is short term alternative. There is need to produce more and use the same efficiently to reduce the demands. Millions of households across the country are using crude cooking stoves for their daily needs which are not only energy inefficient but detrimental to women health also. It has been the policy of Government to encourage trees outside forests to minimize the pressure from forests through meeting requirements outside forests, which is possible through intensively managed short rotation forestry and also some initiatives have been taken to increase the fuelwood efficiency through improved cooking stove, which are working successfully. Woodfuel remained the most important source of household energy in India but regular attempts have not been made to improve the efficiency in its use. This paper will focus on potential of short rotation forestry plantations for energy consumption and its efficient use at domestic scale. This has three fold interrelated economic, environmental and social impact. Key words: Short Rotation Forestry, trees outside forests, wood energy, cooking stove

  1. Rapidly rotating boson molecules with long- or short-range repulsion: An exact diagonalization study

    SciTech Connect

    Baksmaty, Leslie O.; Yannouleas, Constantine; Landman, Uzi

    2007-02-15

    The Hamiltonian for a small number N{<=}11 of bosons in a rapidly rotating harmonic trap, interacting via a short range (contact potential) or a long range (Coulomb) interaction, is studied via an exact diagonalization in the lowest Landau level. Our analysis shows that, for both low and high fractional fillings, the bosons localize and form rotating boson molecules (RBMs) consisting of concentric polygonal rings. Focusing on systems with the number of trapped atoms sufficiently large to form multiring bosonic molecules, we find that, as a function of the rotational frequency and regardless of the type of repulsive interaction, the ground-state angular momenta grow in specific steps that coincide with the number of localized bosons on each concentric ring. Comparison of the conditional probability distributions (CPDs) for both interactions suggests that the degree of crystalline correlations appears to depend more on the fractional filling {nu} than on the range of the interaction. The RBMs behave as nonrigid rotors, i.e., the concentric rings rotate independently of each other. At filling fractions {nu}<1/2, we observe well developed crystallinity in the CPDs (two-point correlation functions). For larger filling fractions {nu}>1/2, observation of similar molecular patterns requires consideration of even higher-order correlation functions.

  2. Yields of ten and eleven year-old hybrid poplars in the north central United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Netzer, D.; Tolsted, D.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this research is to determine commercially attainable biomass yields given the best site tending possible under the constraints of this extensive network. Biomass yields are reported from the best clones planted in one acre blocks on 8 sites over the four states. Biomass yields are presented of short rotation intensively cultured poplar plantations established in Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota during 1987--88. It was reported at that time that the mean annual increment had not peaked in the plantations. Growth measurements were continued through the 1997 growing season when the plantations had completed their 10th and 11th growing season.

  3. Short-Term Variations in the Equatorial Rotation Rate of Sunspot Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javaraiah, J.; Bertello, L.

    2016-12-01

    We have detected several periodicities in the solar equatorial rotation rate of sunspot groups in the catalog Greenwich Photoheliographic Results (GPR) during the period 1931 - 1976, the Solar Optical Observing Network (SOON) during the period 1977 - 2014, and the Debrecen Photoheliographic Data (DPD) during the period 1974 - 2014. We have compared the results from the fast Fourier transform (FFT), the maximum entropy method (MEM), and the Morlet wavelet power-spectra of the equatorial rotation rates determined from SOON and DPD sunspot-group data during the period 1986 - 2007 with those of the Mount Wilson Doppler-velocity data during the same period determined by Javaraiah et al. ( Solar Phys. 257, 61, 2009). We have also compared the power-spectra computed from the DPD and the combined GPR and SOON sunspot-group data during the period 1974 - 2014 to those from the GPR sunspot-group data during the period 1931 - 1973. Our results suggest a ˜ 250-day period in the equatorial rotation rate determined from both the Mt. Wilson Doppler-velocity data and the sunspot-group data during 1986 - 2007. However, a wavelet analysis reveals that this periodicity appears mostly around 1991 in the velocity data, while it is present in most of the solar cycles covered by the sunspot-group data, mainly near the minimum epochs of the solar cycles. We also found the signature of a period of ˜ 1.4 years in the velocity data during 1990 - 1995, and in the equatorial rotation rate of sunspot groups mostly around the year 1956. The equatorial rotation rate of sunspot groups reveals a strong ˜ 1.6-year periodicity around 1933 and 1955, a weaker one around 1976, and a strong ˜ 1.8-year periodicity around 1943. Our analysis also suggests periodicities of ˜ 5 years, ˜ 7 years, and ˜ 17 years, as well as some other short-term periodicities. However, short-term periodicities are mostly present at the time of solar minima. Hence, short-term periodicities cannot be confirmed because of

  4. How to predict hydrological effects of local land use change: how the vegetation parameterisation for short rotation coppices influences model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, F.; Döring, C.; Jansen, M.; Panferov, O.; Spank, U.; Bernhofer, C.

    2015-01-01

    Among the different bioenergy sources short rotation coppices (SRC) with poplar and willow trees are one of the mostly promising options in Europe. SRC not only provide woody biomass, but often additional ecosystem services. One known shortcoming is the possible negative effect on groundwater recharge, caused by potentially higher rates of evapotranspiration compared to annual crops. An assessment of land use change by means of hydrological models and taking into account the changing climate can help to minimize negative and maximize positive ecological effects at regional and local scales, e.g. to regional climate and/or to adjacent ecosystems. The present study implemented the hydrological model system WaSim for such assessment. The hydrological analysis requires the adequate description of the vegetation cover to simulate the processes like soil evaporation, interception evaporation and transpiration. The uncertainties in the vegetation parameterisations might result in implausible model results. The present study shows that leaf area index (LAI), stomatal resistance (Rsc) as well as the beginning and length of the growing season are the sensitive parameters when investigating the effects of an enhanced cultivation of SRC on water budget or on groundwater recharge. Mostly sensitive is the description of the beginning of the growing season. When this estimation is wrong, the accuracy of LAI and Rsc description plays a minor role. The analyses done here illustrate that the use of locally measured vegetation parameters like maximal LAI and meteorological variables like air temperature, to estimate the beginning of the growing season, produce better results than literature data or data from remote network stations. However the direct implementation of locally measured or literature data on e.g. stomatal resistance is not always advisable. The adjustment of locally vegetation parameterisation shows the best model evaluation. Additionally the adjusted course of LAI

  5. Short rotation woody crops: Using agroforestry technology for energy in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L L; Ranney, J W

    1991-01-01

    Agroforestry in the United States is being primarily defined as the process of using trees in agricultural systems for conservation purposes and multiple products. The type of agroforestry most commonly practiced in many parts of the world, that is the planting of tree crops in combination with food crops or pasture, is the type least commonly practiced in the United States. One type of agroforestry technique, which is beginning now and anticipated to expand to several million acres in the United States, is the planting of short-rotation woody crops (SRWCs) primarily to provide fiber and fuel. Research on SRWC's and environmental concerns are described.

  6. Increasing the productivity of short-rotation Populus plantations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeBell, D.S.; Harrington, C.A.; Clendenen, G.W.; Radwan, M.A.; Zasada, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    This final report represents the culmination of eight years of biological research devoted to increasing the productivity of short rotation plantations of Populus trichocarpa and Populus hybrids in the Pacific Northwest. Studies provide an understanding of tree growth, stand development and biomass yield at various spacings, and how patterns differ by Populus clone in monoclonal and polyclonal plantings. Also included is some information about factors related to wind damage in Populus plantings, use of leaf size as a predictor of growth potential, and approaches for estimating tree and stand biomass and biomass growth. Seven research papers are included which provide detailed methods, results, and interpretations on these topics.

  7. Evaluation of biomass quality in short-rotation bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) for bioenergy products.

    PubMed

    Wi, Seung Gon; Lee, Dae-Seok; Nguyen, Quynh Anh; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve the availability of biomass, the concept of growing high yield biomass with short rotations and intensive culture has been introduced. Bamboo has become a feedstock of potential interest for future energy production due to its high productivity and short rotation time. The growth age of biomass is an important factor affecting the efficiency of bioconversion and pretreatment for bioenergy production. In this regard, more information is required on the morphology and chemical composition of bamboo for short-rotation biomass production. In this study, we used a compositional assay to compare a bamboo of two different growth ages. Bamboo of two different ages showed characteristics patterns of morphology, chemical composition, and bioconversion. In young-age (2-month-old) bamboo, the pattern of tissue organization was similar to that of old-age (3-year-old) bamboo, indicating that the former had reached its full height. There were significant differences between young-age and old-age bamboo in terms of chemical composition. The glucose contents in old-age bamboo did not differ significantly among its internodes. For young-age bamboo, the lignin contents were 14.6-18.3%, whereas those of old-age bamboo were considerably higher, ranging from 25.4 to 27.1% with increasing syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio. The yield of total sugars following enzymatic hydrolysis of young-age bamboo was approximately eight times. However, following hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid pretreatment, the results of separate hydrolysis and fermentation and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation did not differ significantly between young- and old-age bamboo. However, ethanol production was higher in 2-month old than in 3-year old from initial raw biomass. Our data show that the production of total sugar from raw material was high in young bamboo with low lignin content. With respect to short-rotation biomass, bamboo culm harvested after termination of height growth is more

  8. All-reflective, highly accurate polarization rotator for high-power short-pulse laser systems.

    PubMed

    Keppler, S; Hornung, M; Bödefeld, R; Kahle, M; Hein, J; Kaluza, M C

    2012-08-27

    We present the setup of a polarization rotating device and its adaption for high-power short-pulse laser systems. Compared to conventional halfwave plates, the all-reflective principle using three zero-phase shift mirrors provides a higher accuracy and a higher damage threshold. Since plan-parallel plates, e.g. these halfwave plates, generate postpulses, which could lead to the generation of prepulses during the subsequent laser chain, the presented device avoids parasitic pulses and is therefore the preferable alternative for high-contrast applications. Moreover the device is easily scalable for large beam diameters and its spectral reflectivity can be adjusted by an appropriate mirror coating to be well suited for ultra-short laser pulses.

  9. Persistent stimulation of photosynthesis in short rotation coppice mulberry under elevated CO2 atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Madhana Sekhar, Kalva; Rachapudi, Venkata Sreeharsha; Mudalkar, Shalini; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2014-08-01

    Current study was undertaken to elucidate the responses of short rotation coppice (SRC) mulberry under elevated CO2 atmosphere (550μmolmol(-1)). Throughout the experimental period, elevated CO2 grown mulberry plants showed significant increase in light saturated photosynthetic rates (A') by increasing intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci) despite reduced stomatal conductance (gs). Reduced gs was linked to decrease in transpiration (E) resulting in improved water use efficiency (WUE). There was a significant increase in carboxylation efficiency (CE) of Rubisco, apparent quantum efficiency (AQE), light and CO2 saturated photosynthetic rates (AMAX), photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE), chlorophyll a fluorescence characteristics (FV/FM and PIABS), starch and other carbohydrates in high CO2 grown plants which clearly demonstrate no photosynthetic acclimation in turn resulted marked increase in above and below ground biomass. Our results strongly suggest that short rotation forestry (<1year) with mulberry plantations should be effective to mitigate raising CO2 levels as well as for the production of renewable bio-energy.

  10. Commercialization of short-rotation intensive culture tree production in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    An estimated 7500 ha of short-rotation intensive culture (SRIC) plantations are now in full-scale production or in scale-up research trials in the United States (4600 ha) and Canada (2900 ha). Over 7000 ha were established in 1978 after the initiation of both the US Department of Energy's Short Rotation Woody Crops Program and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources' Fast Growing Forest program. More than 80% of the increase in area can be attributed to the large SRIC plantations established in the Pacific Northwest by James River Corporation (formerly Crown Zellerbach) and in Ontario, Canada, by Domtar. Eighteen other locations in North America also have or are planning SRIC plantations of greater than 20 ha in size. A key to commercialization had been the establishment of an alliance between industry and research organizations (usually supported by government programs). Such alliances have naturally formed where research organizations have developed genetic improvement and silviculture programs simultaneously. The US Department of Energy has recognized the importance of fostering such alliances in its technology transfer efforts. Additional efforts should be made to transfer SRIC technology to individual landowners.

  11. Simulating evaporation from short-rotation forest: variations within and between seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Gunn; Lindroth, Anders

    1994-04-01

    A physically based soil water model was applied to a fertilized and irrigated short-rotation willow stand on a clay soil. The model is based on an extension of Richards' equation, and the water retention curve and saturated conductivity are determined by analyses of soil cores. The Penman-Monteith combination equation is used to calculate potential daily transpiration, soil evaporation and potential interception evaporation. Daily meteorological data are used as driving variables. Evaporation, estimated by the energy balance/Bowen ratio method, and soil-water tension measurements made over several years, were used to verify the model. Measured evaporation of water intercepted by the vegetation over 1 year was also compared with simulated monthly values. Good agreement was found between simulated evaporation and evaporation determined from Bowen ratio measurements. The cumulative seasonal evaporation exceeded the Penman open water evaporation by up to 31% in 3 years out of 4; it ranged between 416 and 584 mm for the period from May through October. On a mean seasonal basis, transpiration was 66%, soil evaporation 23% and interception evaporation 11% of total evaporation. The monthly interception evaporation comprised 5-23% of precipitation. The study period showed interannual variations attributable to variation in climate (including irrigation) as well as to stand age and development. This indicates that the model is quite general in many respects; it is tentatively suggested that it be used for accurate simulation of water balance components of short-rotation forest on a clay soil in this type of climate.

  12. Utilisation of short rotation forestry for on-site boiler fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, R.E.H.; Lowe, H.T.

    1995-11-01

    A New Zealand meat processing company has planted 100 ha of land adjacent to its plant in short rotation coppice eucalyptus trees for land treatment of the effluent stream (5000+ m{sup 3}/day). To be effective this necessitates removal of the accumulate biomass from the site at regular intervals (every 3-4 years). Using the biomass for fuelwood on site could offset the cost of effluent treatment if it could substitute for the existing energy supplies bought into the plant. A wide range of harvesting, drying, processing, storage and conversion options were identified with the objective of using the biomass produced on site to partly displace the coal currently fuelling a 4.2 MW boiler to provide process steam. A computer model was developed to identify the optimum biomass utilisation system from the variety of combinations of options possible including use of contractors. The objective was to match the work capacity of the various equipment components and to minimise the investment payback period for the company. Boiler options to convert or replace the current boiler or to purchase an additional wood-fired boiler were also included. The model was based around the specific requirements of this particular meat plant but it could be adapted to suit other similar short rotation forestry, biomass utilisation schemes.

  13. Short rotation willow coppice in Wales: High production under adverse environmental conditions?

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, F.M.; Hodson, R.W.; Randerson, P.F.

    1995-11-01

    The production of short rotation willow coppice in central Wales was once regarded as a vain hope rather than a distinct possibility. Research at the University of Wales, Cardiff, Field Station at Llysdinam in mid-Wales over the last four years has proven that it is possible to produce a commercially viable crop on very poor upland soils and at an altitude of almost 300m provided that lime and inorganic fertilizers are added. Because of the national need to find new routes for the disposal of sewage sludge, its addition to short rotation coppice serves the dual purpose of disposal and nutrient addition. Over the first two years of the sludging experiment, it was found that the addition of 300 m{sup 3}ha{sup -1} of digested sewage sludge significantly increased crop weight, at least in the first year. Unfortunately, the crop yields did not reach those obtained using inorganic fertilizers at the same site but it is suggested that a repeated application regime might improve overall crop yield.

  14. Soils organic C sequestration under poplar and willow agroforestry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Tariq, Azeem; Lamersdorf, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    Short rotation coppices (SRC) as monocultures or as agroforestry (AF) applications (e.g. alley cropping) are two techniques to implement forest into agricultural practices. Despite afforestation promotes soil carbon (C) accumulation, age and type of the tree stand can affect the C accumulation in different degrees. Here, we studied the impact of afforestation on C accumulation for: i) pure SCR of willow (Salix viminalis x Salix schwerinii) and poplar (Populus nigra x Populus maximowiczii) and ii) AF cropping system with willow. Forest systems have been established within the BEST agroforestry project in Germany. Adjacent agricultural field have been used as a control. Soil samples were collected in 2014, three years after plantation establishment, from three soil depths: 0-3, 3-20, and 20-30 cm. Total organic C, labile C (incubation of 20 g soil during 100 days with measuring of CO2) and aggregate structure were analysed. Additionally, density fractionation of the samples from 0-3 cm was applied to separate particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral fractions. Aggregates and density fractions were analyzed for C content. High input of plant litter as well as root exudates have led to increases of organic C in AF and SRC plots compare to cropland, mainly in the top 0-3 cm. The highest C content was found for willow SRC (18.2 g kg-1 soil), followed by willow-AF (15.6 g kg-1 soil), and poplar SRC (13.7 g kg-1 soil). Carbon content of cropland was 12.5 g kg-1 soil. Absence of ploughing caused increase portion of macroaggregates (>2000 μm) under SRC and AF in all soil layers as well as the highest percentage of C in that aggregate size class (70-80%). In contrast, C in cropland soil was mainly accumulated in small macroaggregates (250-2000 μm). Intensive mineralisation of fresh litter and old POM, taking place during first years of trees development, resulted to similar portions of free POM for willow AF, willow SRC and cropland (8%), and even lower ones for poplar

  15. Characterisation of the willow phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) gene family reveals expression differences compared with poplar.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Femke; Hanley, Steven J; Beale, Michael H; Karp, Angela

    2015-09-01

    Willow is an important biomass crop for the bioenergy industry, and therefore optimal growth with minimal effects of biotic and abiotic stress is essential. The phenylpropanoid pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of not only lignin but also of flavonoids, condensed tannins, benzenoids and phenolic glycosides which all have a role in protecting the plant against biotic and abiotic stress. All products of the phenylpropanoid pathway are important for the healthy growth of short rotation cropping species such as willow. However, the phenylpropanoid pathway in willow remains largely uncharacterised. In the current study we identified and characterised five willow phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) genes, which encode enzymes that catalyse the deamination of l-phenylalanine to form trans-cinnamic acid, the entry point into the phenylpropanoid pathway. Willow PAL1, PAL2, PAL3 and PAL4 genes were orthologous to the poplar genes. However no orthologue of PAL5 appears to be present in willow. Moreover, two tandemly repeated PAL2 orthologues were identified in a single contig. Willow PALs show similar sub-cellular localisation to the poplar genes. However, the enzyme kinetics and gene expression of the willow PAL genes differed slightly, with willow PAL2 being more widely expressed than its poplar orthologues implying a wider role for PALs in the production of flavonoids, condensed tannins, benzenoids, and phenolic glycosides, in willow.

  16. Characterisation of the willow phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) gene family reveals expression differences compared with poplar

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Femke; Hanley, Steven J.; Beale, Michael H.; Karp, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Willow is an important biomass crop for the bioenergy industry, and therefore optimal growth with minimal effects of biotic and abiotic stress is essential. The phenylpropanoid pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of not only lignin but also of flavonoids, condensed tannins, benzenoids and phenolic glycosides which all have a role in protecting the plant against biotic and abiotic stress. All products of the phenylpropanoid pathway are important for the healthy growth of short rotation cropping species such as willow. However, the phenylpropanoid pathway in willow remains largely uncharacterised. In the current study we identified and characterised five willow phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) genes, which encode enzymes that catalyse the deamination of l-phenylalanine to form trans-cinnamic acid, the entry point into the phenylpropanoid pathway. Willow PAL1, PAL2, PAL3 and PAL4 genes were orthologous to the poplar genes. However no orthologue of PAL5 appears to be present in willow. Moreover, two tandemly repeated PAL2 orthologues were identified in a single contig. Willow PALs show similar sub-cellular localisation to the poplar genes. However, the enzyme kinetics and gene expression of the willow PAL genes differed slightly, with willow PAL2 being more widely expressed than its poplar orthologues implying a wider role for PALs in the production of flavonoids, condensed tannins, benzenoids, and phenolic glycosides, in willow. PMID:26070140

  17. Yellow-poplar seedfall pattern

    Treesearch

    LaMont G. Engle

    1960-01-01

    Knowing the pattern of seedfall can be helpful when trying to regenerate yellow-poplar. This is especially true if the stand contains only scattered yellow-poplar seed trees. Information obtained from seed collections in Indiana shows that most of the seed falls north and northeast of seed trees.

  18. Short rotation coppice as alternative land use for Chernobyl-contaminated areas of Belarus.

    PubMed

    Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Goor, François; Timofeyev, Sergey; Grebenkov, Alexander; Thiry, Yves

    2004-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted in the Chernobyl-affected area to assess if short rotation coppice (SRC) for energy production is a feasible alternative for contaminated land. Four willow clones were planted on sandy and peaty soil and the radiocaesium (137Cs) and radiostrontium (90Sr) transfer factors (TF) and yield relevant parameters were recorded during four growing seasons. The 137Cs and 90Sr soil-to-willow wood TF on sandy soil (second growing season) were on average 1.40+/-1.06 x 10(-3) m2 kg(-1) and 130+/-74 x 10(-3) m2 kg(-1), respectively. The 137Cs TF recorded for the peaty soil (fourth growing season or end of the first rotation cycle) was on average 5.17+/-1.59 x 10(-3) m2 kg(-1). The 90Sr-TF was on average 2.61+/-0.44 x 10(-3) m2 kg(-1). No significant differences between clones for the 137Cs and 90Sr-TF were observed. Given the high TFs and the high deposition levels, Belarus exemption levels for fuel wood were highly exceeded. The annual average biomass production for one rotation cycle on the peaty soil ranged from 7.8 to 16.0 t ha(-1) y(-1) for one of the clones, comparable with average annual yield figures obtained for western Europe. On the sandy soils, first-year yields were 0.25 t ha(-1) y(-1). These soils are not suitable for SRC production and should better be dedicated to pine forests or drought-resistant grasses.

  19. Energy input-output analysis of herbaceous energy and short-rotation woody crop systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    Energy input-output analyses, expressed in terms of energy-profit ratios, were derived for the production of a biocrude fuel oil from switchgrass and silver maple. Each energy analysis was concerned with determining the amount of direct and embodied energy associated with crop production, transport, processing, and conversion. Direct energy inputs include energy derived from gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and/or LP-gas. Embodied energy inputs are the amount of energy allocated to the machinery, chemicals, and equipment needed to perform the various operations associated with producing, transporting, processing, and converting bioenergy crops to a useful energy source. Energy-profit ratios varied from 1.96 to 2.48 for switchgrass and were 1.46 to 1.97 when short-rotation woody crops were the feedstock.

  20. Array rotation aperture synthesis for short-range imaging at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucotte, B. M.; Grafulla-GonzáLez, B.; Harvey, A. R.

    2009-02-01

    Millimeter-wave interferometric synthetic aperture imagers are currently being developed for short-range applications such as concealed weapons detection. In contrast to the traditional snapshot imaging approach, we investigate the potential of mechanical scanning between the scene and the array in order to reduce the number of antennas and correlators. We assess the trade-off between this hardware reduction, the radiometric sensitivity and the imaging frame rate of the system. We show that rotational scanning achieves a more uniform coverage of the (u, v) plane than the more conventional linear scanning. We use a genetic algorithm to optimize two-dimensional arrays for maximum uniform (u, v) coverage after a rotational mechanical scan and demonstrates improvements in the array point spread function. Imaging performance is assessed with simulated millimeter-wave scenes. Results show an increased image quality is achieved with the optimized array compared with a conventional power law Y-shaped array. Finally we discuss the increased demands on system stability and calibration that the increased acquisition time of the proposed technique places.

  1. A generalized behavioral model for rotating short period comets with spectral orbital elements and axial orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.; Salvail, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A generalized model for short period comets is developed which integrates in a fairly rigorous manner the isolation history of regions on rotating comets with specified axial orientation and the complex feedback processes involving heat, gas and dust transport, dust mantle development and coma opacity. Attention is focused on development, reconfiguration and partial or complete launching of dust mantles and the reciprocal effects of these three processes on ice surface temperature and gas and dust production. The dust mantle controls the H2O flux not only by its effect on the temperature at the ice interface but (dominantly) by its dynamic stability which strongly influences vapor diffusivity. The model includes the effects of latitude, rotation and spin axis orientation are included and applied to an initially homogeneous sphere of H2O ice and silicate using the orbital parameters of comet Encke. Numerous variations of the model, using combinations of grain size distribution, dust-to-ice ratio, latitude and spin axis orientation, are presented and discussed. Resulted for a similar nonrotating, constant Sun orientation models are also included.

  2. Light and short arc rubs in rotating machines: Experimental tests and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennacchi, P.; Bachschmid, N.; Tanzi, E.

    2009-10-01

    Rotor-to-stator rub is a non-linear phenomenon which has been analyzed many times in rotordynamics literature, but very often these studies are devoted simply to highlight non-linearities, using very simple rotors, rather than to present reliable models. However, rotor-to-stator rub is actually one of the most common faults during the operation of rotating machinery. The frequency of its occurrence is increasing due to the trend of reducing the radial clearance between the seal and the rotor in modern turbine units, pumps and compressors in order to increase efficiency. Often the rub occurs between rotor and seals and the analysis of the phenomenon cannot set aside the consideration of the different relative stiffness. This paper presents some experimental results obtained by means of a test rig in which rub conditions of real machines are reproduced. In particular short arc rubs are considered and the shaft is stiffer than the obstacle. Then a model, suitable to be employed for real rotating machinery, is presented and the simulations obtained are compared with the experimental results. The model is able to reproduce the behaviour of the test rig.

  3. Interaction between isoprene and ozone fluxes at ecosystem level in a poplar plantation and its impact at European level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenone, T.; Hendriks, C.; Brilli, F.; Gioli, B.; Portillo Estrada, M.; Schaap, M.; Ceulemans, R.

    2015-12-01

    The emissions of Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from vegetation, mainly in form of isoprenoids, play an important role in the tropospheric ozone (O3) formation. The potential large expansion of isoprene emitter species (e.g. poplar) as biofuels feedstock might impact the ground level O3 formation. Here we report the simultaneous observations, using the eddy covariance (EC) technique, of isoprene, O3 and CO2 fluxes in a short rotation coppice (SRC) of poplar. The impact of current poplar plantations and associated isoprene emissions on ground level ozone concentrations for Europe was evaluated using a chemistry transport model (CTM) LOTOS-EUROS. The isoprene fluxes showed a well-defined seasonal and daily cycle that mirrored with the stomata O3 uptake. The isoprene emission and the stomata O3 uptake showed significant statistical relationship especially at elevated temperature. Isoprene was characterized by a remarkable peak of emissions (e.g. 38 nmol m-2s-1) occurring for few days as a consequence of the rapid variation of the air and surface temperature. During these days the photosynthetic apparatus (i.e. the CO2 fluxes) and transpiration rates did not show significant variation while we did observe a variation of the energy exchange and a reduction of the bowen ratio. The response of isoprene emissions to ambient O3 concentration follows the common form of the hormetic dose-response curve with a considerable reduction of the isoprene emissions at [O3] > 80 ppbv indicating a potential damping effect of the O3 levels on isoprene. Under the current condition the impact of SRC plantations on ozone concentrations / formation is very limited in Europe. Our findings indicate that, even with future scenarios with more SRC, or conventional poplar plantations, the impact on Ozone formation is negligible.

  4. Silvical Characteristics of Yellow-Poplar

    Treesearch

    David F. Olson

    1969-01-01

    Yellow-poplar (Liriorlentlron tulipifera L.) is also commonly known as tulip poplar, tulip tree, white-poplar, whitewood, and "poplar" (60). It gets its name from the tulip-like flowers which it bears in the late spring. Because of the excellent form and rapid growth of the tree, plus the fine working qualities of the wood, yellow-poplar is one of the most...

  5. Rotations

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Wayne D. Shepperd

    1985-01-01

    The rotation, in forestry, is the planned number of years between formation of a crop or stand and its final harvest at a specified stage of maturity (Ford-Robertson 1971). The rotation used for many species is the age of culmination of mean usable volume growth [net mean annual increment (MAI)]. At that age, usable volume divided by age reaches its highest level. That...

  6. The effect of long and short head biceps loading on glenohumeral joint rotational range of motion and humeral head position.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Michelle H; Nguyen, Michael L; Quigley, Ryan J; Hanypsiak, Bryan; Gupta, Ranjan; Lee, Thay Q

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of loading the long and short heads of the biceps on glenohumeral range of motion and humeral head position. Eight cadaveric shoulders were tested in 60° abduction in the scapula and coronal plane. Muscle loading was applied based on cross-sectional area ratios. The short and long head of the biceps were loaded individually followed by combined loading. Range of motion was measured with 2.2 Nm torque, and the humeral head apex position was measured using a MicroScribe. A paired t test with Bonferroni correction was used for statistics. Long head loading decreased internal rotation in both the scapular (17.9 %) and coronal planes (5.7 %) and external rotation in the scapular plane (2.6 %) (P < 0.04). With only short head loading, maximum internal rotation was significantly increased in the scapular and coronal plane. Long head and short head loading shifted the humeral head apex posteriorly in maximum internal rotation in both planes with the long head shift being significantly greater than the short head. Long head loading also shifted the humeral apex inferiorly in internal rotation and inferiorly posteriorly in neutral rotation in the scapular plane. With the long head unloaded, there was a significant superior shift with short head loading in both planes. Loading the long head of the biceps had a much greater effect on glenohumeral range of motion and humeral head shift than the short head of the biceps; however, in the absence of long head loading, with the short head loaded, maximum internal rotation increases and the humeral head shifts superiorly, which may contribute to impingement following tenodesis of the long head of the biceps. These small changes in rotational range of motion and humeral head position with biceps tenodesis may not lead to pathologic conditions in low-demand patients; however, in throwers, biceps tenodesis may lead to increased contact pressures in late-cocking and deceleration that will likely translate

  7. Differential rotation rates for short-lived regions of emerging magnetic flux. [in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, L.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    We have measured the synodic rotation rates of a sample of compact X-ray emission features lasting from 1 day to 7 days, thus bridging the transition between X-ray bright points and active regions. The rotation rate is found to be a function of the lifetime, or size, of the feature; shorter-lived smaller features rotate more slowly than long-lived ones. The rotation rate for features lasting 2 days or less is consistent with that of the photospheric gas. The longest-lived features rotate at a rate about 5% higher, consistent with the sunspot rotation rate.

  8. Measuring and partitioning soil respiration in sharkey shrink-swell clays under plantation grown short-rotation woody crops

    Treesearch

    Wilson G. Hood; Michael C. Tyree; Dylan N. Dillaway Dillaway; Theodor D. Leininger

    2015-01-01

    The Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV) offers an ecological niche for short-rotation woody crop (SRWC) production by mating marginal agricultural land with optimal growing conditions. Approximately 1.7 million ha within the LMAV consist of Sharkey shrink-swell clays. They are considered marginal in terms of traditional agricultural productivity due to their...

  9. Increasing the biomass production of short rotation coppice forestry. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbeck, K.

    1980-04-04

    The objective of this project is to determine means of increasing the biomass yield of short rotation hardwood forests through certain species admixtures, irrigation, fertilization and intensive cultural practices and the development of techniques for cloning in sterile culture of superior sycamore and other hardwood strains and the identification and propagation of individual hardwoods with superior growth and other characteristics.

  10. Using short-rotation, intensively managed hardwood plantations as ‘green’ inventory for southeastern U.S

    Treesearch

    Tom Gallagher; Bob Shaffer; Bob Rummer

    2008-01-01

    As a routine wood source for a pulp mill, recent studies have shown that intensively managed, short-rotation hardwood plantations are not cost effective. The objective of this study was to determine if these plantations may be cost effective as "green" inventory, replacing some portion of high cost remote woodyard inventory. Three southeastern U.S. pulp mills...

  11. Soil carbon, after 3 years, under short-rotation woody crops grown under varying nutrient and water availability

    Treesearch

    Felipe G. Sanchez; Mark Coleman; Charles T. Garten; Robert J. Luxmoore; John A. Stanturf; Carl Trettin; Stan D. Wullschleger

    2007-01-01

    Soil carbon contents were measured on a short-rotation woody crop study located on the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site outside Aiken, SC. This study included fertilization and irrigation treatments on five tree genotypes (sweetgum, loblolly pine, sycamore and two eastern cottonwood clones). Prior to study installation, the previous pine stand was...

  12. Biofuels, bioenergy, and bioproducts from sustainable agricultural and forest crops: proceedings of the short rotation crops international conference

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Rob Mitchell; Jim, eds. Richardson

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this conference was to initiate and provide opportunities for an international forum on the science and application of producing both agricultural and forest crops for biofuels, bioenergy, and bioproducts. There is a substantial global need for development of such systems and technologies that can economically and sustainably produce short rotation crops...

  13. Comparison of a Skidder and Front-End Loader for Primary Transport of Short-Rotation Trees

    Treesearch

    Raffaele Spinelli; Bruce R. Hartsough

    1999-01-01

    We time-studied a Cat 950F and a Cat 528 grapple skidder as extraction devices for moving bunched whole trees to a landing in a short rotation eucalyptus plantation. The front-end loader was 40 to 60% more productive than the grapple skidder, depending on extraction distance. Alternatively, the single loader could both extract trees and handle the landing duties such...

  14. A STELLA model to estimate water and nitrogen dynamics in a short-rotation woody crop plantation

    Treesearch

    Ying Ouyang; Jiaen Zhang; Theodor D. Leininger; Brent R. Frey

    2015-01-01

    Although short-rotation woody crop biomass production technology has demonstrated a promising potential to supply feedstocks for bioenergy production, the water and nutrient processes in the woody crop planation ecosystem are poorly understood. In this study, a computer model was developed to estimate the dynamics of water and nitrogen (N) species (e.g., NH4...

  15. Determining the effects of felling method and season of year on the regeneration of short rotation coppice

    Treesearch

    Daniel P.L. de Souza; Tom Gallagher; Dana Mitchell; Tim McDonald; Mathew Smidt

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in plantations with the objective of producing biomass for energy and fuel. These types of plantations are called Short Rotation Woody Crops (SRWC). Popular SRWC species are Eucalypt (Eucalyptus spp.), Cottonwood (Populus deltoides) and Willow (Salix spp.). These species have in...

  16. Short rotation woody crop trials for energy production in north central U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E.; Netzer, D.; Ostry, M.; Tolsted, D.; Ward, K

    1994-12-31

    Tree plantations at several sites have numerous clones with heights greater than 45 feet and diameters of 6+ inches in eight years. The fastest growth rates have been attained in a plantation on a wet site at Milaca, MN, a plantation at Granite Falls, WI, and a plantation at Mondovi, WI, where the largest trees are up to 8 inches DBH at age 8. Mean annual production ranges from 4 to 5+ dry tons per acre in the best clonal blocks, and up to 8.1 tons per acre for the best new hybrids. Reduced growth at some sites was related primarily to insufficient soil water during the growing season, and susceptibility to the disease Septoria musiva. Most tree mortality (36 percent) occurred during the establishment year with only an additional 2 percent mortality over the next 7 years. Leaf tissue nitrogen (N) levels decreased as trees aged and approached the hypothesized 3 percent critical level as trees reached 5- and 6-years old. Fertilization at 75 and 150 lbs/acre N resulted in significant increases in leaf tissue. However, no significant increase in tree growth has been detected. There are significant clonal differences in leaf tissue nitrogen. Hybrid poplar plantations planted on agricultural fields produce significant increases in soil carbon, although there may be carbon loss during the early years of plantation establishment. Septoria musiva is the major pathogen affecting survival and growth of hybrid poplar plantations. A collection of 859 Septoria musiva and Septoria populicola isolates has shown considerably variability in the microorganism. Tissue culture techniques are being used to increase resistance to Septoria in clone NE-308. Over 200 generation 2 plants are ready for field testing in 1995.

  17. Yellow-Poplar Rooting Habits

    Treesearch

    John K. Francis

    1979-01-01

    Although the configuration of pole-sized yellow-poplar root systems in Tennessee is quite variable, a branched taproot with several widely spreading laterals is typical. Rooting depth is particularly limited by clayey texture, wetness, and firmness of subsoils.

  18. Water Quality Changes in a Short-Rotation Woody Crop Riparian Buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, D.; Clausen, J.; Kuzovkina, J.

    2016-12-01

    Converting riparian buffers in agricultural areas from annual row crops to short rotation woody crops (SRWCs) grown for biofuel can provide both water quality benefits and a financial incentive for buffer adoption among agricultural producers. A randomized complete block design was used to determine water quality changes resulting from converting plots previously cultivated in corn to SRWC willow (Salix. spp) adjacent to a stream in Storrs, CT. Both overland flow and ground water samples were analyzed for total nitrogen (TN), nitrate + nitrite (NO2+NO3-N), and total phosphorus (TP). Overland flow was also analyzed for suspended solids concentration (SSC). Lower (p = 0.05) concentrations of TN (56%) and TP (61%) were observed in post-coppice surface runoff from willow plots than from corn plots. Shallow ground water concentrations at the edge of willow plots were lower in TN (56%) and NO3+NO2-N (64%), but 35% higher in TP, than at the edge of corn plots. SSC was also lower (72%) in overland flow associated with willow compared to corn. The treatment had no effect on discharge or mass export. These results suggest conversion from corn to a SRWC in a riparian area can provide water quality benefits similar to those observed in restored and established buffers.

  19. Environmental enhancement using short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses as alternative agricultural crops

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, V.R.; Schiller, A.

    1996-10-01

    Short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses are grown as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber. When replacing traditional row crops on similar lands, these alternative crops can provide multiple environmental benefits in addition to enhancing rural economies and providing valuable resources. The DOE is supporting research to address how these crops can provide environmental benefits to soil, water, and native wildlife species in addition to providing bioenergy feedstocks. Research is underway to address the potential for biomass crops to provide soils conservation and water quality improvements in crop settings. Replacement of traditional erosive row drops with biomass crops on marginal lands and establishment of biomass plantations as filter strips adjacent to streams and wetlands are being studied. The habitat value of different crops for wildlife species is also considered. Combining findings on wildlife use of individual plantations with information on the cumulative effects of multiple plantations on wildlife populations can provide guidance for establishing and managing biomass crops to enhance biodiversity while providing feedstocks. Data from site-specific environmental studies can provide input for evaluation of the effects of large-scale plantings at both landscape and regional levels of resolution.

  20. Environmental enhancement using short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses as alternative agricultural crops

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, V.R.; Schiller, A.

    1995-12-31

    Short-rotation woody crops and perennial grasses are grown as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber. When replacing traditional row crops on similar lands, these alternative crops can provide multiple environmental benefits in addition to enhancing rural economies and providing valuable feedstock resources. The Department of Energy is supporting research to address how these crops can provide environmental benefits to soil, water and native wildlife species in addition to providing bioenergy feedstocks. Research is underway to address the potential for biomass crops to provide soil conservation and water quality improvements in crop settings. Replacement of traditional erosive row crops with biomass crops on marginal lands and establishment of biomass plantations as filter strips adjacent to streams and wetlands are being studied. The habitat value of different biomass crops for selected wildlife species is also under study. To date, these studies have shown that in comparison with row crops biomass plantings of both grass and tree crops increased biodiversity of birds; however, the habitat value of tree plantations is not equivalent to natural forests. The effects on native wildlife of establishing multiple plantations across a landscape are being studied. Combining findings on wildlife use of individual plantations with information on the cumulative effects of multiple plantations on wildlife populations can provide guidance for establishing and managing biomass crops to enhance biodiversity while providing biomass feedstocks. Data from site-specific environmental studies can provide input for evaluation of the probable effects of large-scale plantings at both landscape and regional levels of resolution.

  1. Increasing the biomass production of short rotation coppice forests. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbeck, K.; Brown, C. L.

    1980-09-01

    The objective of the project is to increase biomass yields from coppice forests by admixing tree species (Alnus glutinosa, Robinia pseudoacacia and others) to plantations of Platanus occidentalis and Liquidambar styraciflua. Yield increases due to intensive cultivation, especially fertilization and irrigation, will be documented. A genetic improvement program of promising candidate species both through the identification of superior genotypes and mass cloning with tissue culture is also included. Three plantings have been established successfully to screen candidate species on various sites and to test the effects of weed control, fertilization and irrigation on short rotation forests. Two plantations in Georgia are in their 2nd and 3rd growing seasons while one in South Carolina is in its 1st growing season. A two acre plantation has been established to test development of geographic seed source material for sycamore. A nursery is in operation to develop seedling production methods for new species and to grow and maintain genetic material. Mass cloning of selected material by tissue culture techniques has produced material for testing in outplantings.

  2. Monitoring nutrients fate after digestate spreading in a short rotation buffer area.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Nicolò; Boz, Bruno; Gumiero, Bruna; Mastrocicco, Micòl

    2017-01-20

    One of the main sources of reactive nitrogen pollution is animal manure. The disposal of digestate (material remaining after the anaerobic digestion of a biodegradable feedstock) in agricultural soils could solve both the problems of soil fertilization and waste removal, but the fate of digestate in the environment must be assessed carefully before its massive utilization. To investigate whether digestate could be safely employed as a soil fertilizer, an agricultural field located in Monastier di Treviso (Northern Italy) and characterized by the presence of low hydraulic conductivity clay soils, was selected to be amended with bovine digestate. The experimental site was intensively monitored by a three-dimensional array of probes recording soil water content, temperature, and electrical conductivity, to solve the water and bulk mass fluxes in the unsaturated zone. High-resolution soil coring allowed the characterization of soil water composition over two hydrological years. Chloride, found in high concentrations in the digestate, was used as environmental tracer to track the fate of the percolating water. The study concluded that digestate could be confidently employed in short rotation buffer areas at an average rate of 195 ± 26 kg-N/ha/year in low hydraulic conductivity soils not affected by diffuse fracturing during dry periods.

  3. Environmental enchancement using short-rotation tree crops: research results and directions

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, V.R.; Schiller, A.

    1996-10-01

    Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) and perennial grasses used as biomass feedstocks for energy and fiber can provide multiple economic and environmental benefits. Site-specific environmental studies are providing information needed to help evaluate the economic and environmental impacts of biomass production at both local and regional scales. Erosion and chemical movement from an annual row crop, switchgrass, and tree crop with and without a groundcover are being compared in the Southeast. Studies of SRWC productivity on the South Carolina coastal plain are comparing surface and subsurface movement of chemicals applied under different fertilization and irrigation regimes, and addressing use of mill and agricultural residues to enhance crop production. Results are helping to assess the effects of biomass crops produced on different principal soil types and to match tree species with appropriate sites to maximize productivity and minimize environmental impacts. Studies are comparing wildlife use of biomass crops to row crops, grasslands, and natural forests. Results to date show that SRWCs support greater bird diversity than row crops, but less than natural forests; switchgrass plantings extend habitat for grasslands birds. Collaboration with an industrial partner on diverse SRWC plantings in the Southeast is addressing the relationship between plantings of different acreage, age, tree species, and landscape context and breeding bird use. Information from wildlife diversity, water, and soil quality studies can be used by the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP), researchers, producers, and industry to identify management strategies to maintain productivity While enhancing the environment.

  4. First results from the UK network to establish the greenhouse gas balance of land conversion to second generation bioenergy willow, Miscanthus and short rotation forestry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Zoe M.; Bottoms, Emily; Massey, Alice; McCalmont, Jon; Yamulki, Sirwan; Drewer, Julia; McNamara, Niall; Finch, Jon; Donnison, Ian; Perks, Mike; Smith, Pete; Taylor, Gail

    2013-04-01

    ELUM is UK consortium project with 7 partners, funded by a joint incentive of public and private investment from the Energies Technology Institute (ETI). The aim of this project is to assess the impact of land conversion to second generation non-food bioenergy crops on greenhouse gas balance for several land use transitions, including from arable and grassland. A network of 6 sites has been established across the UK to assess these processes underpinning GHG balance and to provide input data to a meta-model that will be used as a tool to assess the sustainability of our land use transitions. The planned outputs of this project include an assessment of our current understanding of land use change and bioenergy cropping systems, the addition of greenhouse gas (GHG) data to national inventories and development of novel technologies to monitor GHG. Here we focus on the results of the soil GHG flux data (CO2, N2O and CH4) which are being collected at 5 sites and transitions, gaining good spatial coverage of the UK including Scotland, Wales, northern and southern England. These sites cover the following transitions: grassland to short rotation forestry, grassland to Miscanthus, arable to short rotation coppice (SRC) willow, arable to Miscanthus and grassland to SRC willow. A year of data capturing has been collected at these sites revealing the seasonal variability with increased CO2 fluxes, representing total soil respiration, in the summer months, irrespective of site. The importance of non-CO2 GHGs is also being considered and monthly measurements of CH4 and N2O using static chambers, provide no evidence that these gases contribute significantly to the overall carbon footprint of the bioenergy crops, in contrast to recent reports on SRC poplar. There were, however, some occasional large unexplained fluxes in these gases suggesting they may play a lesser part in some bioenergy cropping systems and are more complicated to evaluate. As well as this experiment, data will

  5. Impacts of supplyshed-level differences in productivity and land Costs on the economics of hybrid poplar production in Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    William Lazarus; William L. Headlee; Ronald S. Zalesny

    2015-01-01

    The joint effects of poplar biomass productivity and land costs on poplar production economics were compared for 12 Minnesota counties and two genetic groups, using a process-based model (3-PG) to estimate productivity. The counties represent three levels of productivity and a range of land costs (annual rental rates) from $128/ha to $534/ha. An optimal rotation age...

  6. Influence of Robinia pseudoacacia short rotation coppice on soil physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Morvan; Isabelle, Bertrand; Gwenaelle, Gibaud

    2015-04-01

    Human activities can lead to the degradation of soil physical properties. For instance, machinery traffic across the land can induce the development of compacted areas at the wheel tracks. It leads to a decrease in porosity which results in a decrease of the hydraulic conductivity, and therefore, prevents water infiltration and promotes surface runoff. Land use, soil management and soil cover also have a significant influence on soil physical properties (Kodesova et al., 2011). In the arable land, surface runoff and soil erosion are enhanced by the absence of soil cover for part of the year and by the decrease of aggregate stability due to a decline of soil organic matter. In that context, few studies focused on the effects of a Robinia pseudoacacia short rotation coppice (SRC) on soil physical properties. Therefore, this study aims to determine the effect of the conversion of a grassland in a SRC on soil physical properties. These properties have also been compared to those of arable land and natural forest. For that, in several plots of the experimental farm of Grignon (30 km west of Paris, France), different measurements were performed: i) soil water retention on a pressure plate apparatus for 7 water potential between 0 and 1500 kPa, ii) bulk density using the method for gravelly and rocky soil recommended by the USDA, iii) aggregate stability using the method described in Le Bissonnais (1996), and iv) soil hydraulic conductivity using a Guelph permeameter. All these measurements were performed on the same soil type and on different land uses: arable land (AL), grassland (GL), natural forest (NF) and short rotation coppice (SRC) of Robinia pseudoacacia planted 5 years ago. Soil water retention measurements are still under progress and will be presented in congress. Bulk density measurements of the AL, GL and SRC are not significantly different. They ranged from 1.32 to 1.42. Only the NF measurements are significantly lower than the other (0.97). Aggregate

  7. Ecology and silviculture of poplar plantations

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf; Cees van Oosten; Daniel A. Netzer; Mark D. Coleman; C. Jeffrey Portwood

    2002-01-01

    Poplars are some of the fastest growing trees in North America and foresters have sought to capitalize on this potential since the 1940s. Interest in growing poplars has fluctuated, and objectives have shifted between producing sawlogs, pulp-wood, or more densely spaced "woodgrass" or biofuels. Currently, most poplar plantations are established for pulpwood...

  8. Insect enemies of yellow-poplar

    Treesearch

    Denver P. Burns; Denver P. Burns

    1970-01-01

    Yellow-poplar, like the other desirable hardwoods, is attacked by a variety of insects. However, only four species of insects are considered economically important: the tuliptree scale, the yellow-poplar weevil, the root-collar borer, and the Columbian timber beetle. These are native enemies of yellow-poplar (Liriodendvon tzllipifera L.) wherever the tree grows.

  9. Prospects for arable farm uptake of Short Rotation Coppice willow and miscanthus in England.

    PubMed

    Glithero, Neryssa J; Wilson, Paul; Ramsden, Stephen J

    2013-07-01

    Biomass will play a role in the UK meeting EU targets on renewable energy use. Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) and miscanthus are potential biomass feedstocks; however, supply will rely on farmer willingness to grow these crops. Despite attractive crop establishment grants for dedicated energy crops (DECs) in the UK, uptake remains low. Drawing on results from an on-farm survey with 244 English arable farmers, 81.6% (87.7%) of farmers would not consider growing miscanthus (SRC), while respectively, 17.2% (11.9%) would consider growing and 1.2% (0.4%) were currently growing these crops. Farmer age, location, land ownership, farm type, farm size and farmer education level were not significant factors in determining acceptance of DECs. The main reasons cited for not growing DECs were impacts on land quality, lack of appropriate machinery, commitment of land for a long period of time, time to financial return and profitability. Reasons cited for willingness to grow DECs included land quality, ease of crop management, commitment of land for a long period of time, and profitability. Farmers cited a range of 'moral' (e.g. should not be using land for energy crops when there is a shortage of food), land quality, knowledge, profit and current farming practice comments as reasons for not growing DECs, while those willing to grow DECs cited interest in renewable energy, willingness to consider new crops, and low labour needs as rationale for their interest. Farm business objectives indicated that maximising profit and quality of life were most frequently cited as very important objectives. Previous research in the UK indicates that farmers in arable areas are unlikely to convert large areas of land to DECs, even where these farmers have an interest and willingness to grow them. Assuming that those farmers interested in growing DECs converted 9.29% (average percentage of arable land set-aside between 1996 and 2005) of their utilised agricultural area to these crops, 50,700

  10. Dry Matter Losses and Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Outside Storage of Short Rotation Coppice Willow Chip.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Carly; Yates, Nicola E; Powers, Stephen J; Misselbrook, Tom; Shield, Ian

    This study examined the dry matter losses and the greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations within two short rotation coppice (SRC) willow wood chip storage heaps. One heap was built on a grassland area (East Midlands) and the other (Rothamsted) on a concrete hard standing. A series of 1- and 3-m probes were embedded in the heaps in order to retrieve gas samples for analysis, and pre-weighed net bags were positioned in the core of the heap to detect dry matter losses. The bagged samples showed dry matter losses of 18 and 19 % in the East Midlands and Rothamsted heaps after 210 and 97 days storage, respectively. The Rothamsted heap showed a whole-heap dry matter loss of 21 %. During this time, the wood chips dried from 54 to 39 % moisture content in the East Midlands heap and 50 to 43 % at Rothamsted. The results from analysing the whole Rothamsted heap indicated an overall loss of 1.5 GJ per tonne stored, although measurements from bagged samples in the core suggested that the chips dried sufficiently to have a minimal energy loss from storage. The process of mixing the heap, however, led to incorporation of wet outer layers and hence the average moisture content was higher in an average sample of chip. After establishment of the heaps, the temperature rose rapidly and this correlated with a peak in carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration within the heap. A peak in methane (CH4) concentration was also detected in both heaps, though more noticeably in the East Midlands heap after around 55 days. In both instances, the peak CH4 concentration occurred as CO2 concentrations dropped, suggesting that after an active period of aerobic decomposition in the first 2 months of storage, the conditions in the heap became anaerobic. The results from this study suggest that outside wood chip storage is not an efficient method of storing biomass, though this may be location-specific as there are some studies showing lower dry matter losses. It is necessary to explore other methods of

  11. Prospects for arable farm uptake of Short Rotation Coppice willow and miscanthus in England

    PubMed Central

    Glithero, Neryssa J.; Wilson, Paul; Ramsden, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Biomass will play a role in the UK meeting EU targets on renewable energy use. Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) and miscanthus are potential biomass feedstocks; however, supply will rely on farmer willingness to grow these crops. Despite attractive crop establishment grants for dedicated energy crops (DECs) in the UK, uptake remains low. Drawing on results from an on-farm survey with 244 English arable farmers, 81.6% (87.7%) of farmers would not consider growing miscanthus (SRC), while respectively, 17.2% (11.9%) would consider growing and 1.2% (0.4%) were currently growing these crops. Farmer age, location, land ownership, farm type, farm size and farmer education level were not significant factors in determining acceptance of DECs. The main reasons cited for not growing DECs were impacts on land quality, lack of appropriate machinery, commitment of land for a long period of time, time to financial return and profitability. Reasons cited for willingness to grow DECs included land quality, ease of crop management, commitment of land for a long period of time, and profitability. Farmers cited a range of ‘moral’ (e.g. should not be using land for energy crops when there is a shortage of food), land quality, knowledge, profit and current farming practice comments as reasons for not growing DECs, while those willing to grow DECs cited interest in renewable energy, willingness to consider new crops, and low labour needs as rationale for their interest. Farm business objectives indicated that maximising profit and quality of life were most frequently cited as very important objectives. Previous research in the UK indicates that farmers in arable areas are unlikely to convert large areas of land to DECs, even where these farmers have an interest and willingness to grow them. Assuming that those farmers interested in growing DECs converted 9.29% (average percentage of arable land set-aside between 1996 and 2005) of their utilised agricultural area to these crops, 50,700

  12. Meeting the demand for crop production: the challenge of yield decline in crops grown in short rotations.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Amanda J; Bending, Gary D; Chandler, David; Hilton, Sally; Mills, Peter

    2012-02-01

    There is a trend world-wide to grow crops in short rotation or in monoculture, particularly in conventional agriculture. This practice is becoming more prevalent due to a range of factors including economic market trends, technological advances, government incentives, and retailer and consumer demands. Land-use intensity will have to increase further in future in order to meet the demands of growing crops for both bioenergy and food production, and long rotations may not be considered viable or practical. However, evidence indicates that crops grown in short rotations or monoculture often suffer from yield decline compared to those grown in longer rotations or for the first time. Numerous factors have been hypothesised as contributing to yield decline, including biotic factors such as plant pathogens, deleterious rhizosphere microorganisms, mycorrhizas acting as pathogens, and allelopathy or autotoxicity of the crop, as well as abiotic factors such as land management practices and nutrient availability. In many cases, soil microorganisms have been implicated either directly or indirectly in yield decline. Although individual factors may be responsible for yield decline in some cases, it is more likely that combinations of factors interact to cause the problem. However, evidence confirming the precise role of these various factors is often lacking in field studies due to the complex nature of cropping systems and the numerous interactions that take place within them. Despite long-term knowledge of the yield-decline phenomenon, there are few tools to counteract it apart from reverting to longer crop rotations or break crops. Alternative cropping and management practices such as double-cropping or inter-cropping, tillage and organic amendments may prove valuable for combating some of the negative effects seen when crops are grown in short rotation. Plant breeding continues to be important, although this does require a specific breeding target to be identified. This

  13. Mercury uptake into poplar leaves.

    PubMed

    Assad, Mohamad; Parelle, Julien; Cazaux, David; Gimbert, Frédéric; Chalot, Michel; Tatin-Froux, Fabienne

    2016-03-01

    Tailings dumps require mercury stabilization to prevent air pollution by evaporated mercury, which can be achieved through plant covers. Plants are considered a net sink for atmospheric Hg via incorporation into leaf tissues. However, most studies related to Hg uptake by plants have considered plants exposed to only atmospheric Hg, whereas in the case of tailings dumps, plants are potentially exposed to both soil and atmospheric Hg. The goal of this work is to evaluate the relative contributions of root and atmospheric pathways by growing poplar (Populus trichocarpa X Populus maximowiczii/var Skado) cuttings on either control or polluted substrates and under either natural or controlled exposure conditions. We showed that foliar Hg concentrations significantly increased with age, reaching 120 ng g(-1) dry mass when poplars were exposed to Hg-contaminated substrate under natural exposure. Remarkably, we did not observe significantly different Hg concentrations in poplar leaves grown on either the control or polluted substrates when cultivated together in growth chambers. Our set of data prompted us to conclude that Hg entry into poplar leaves is exclusively through an atmospheric pathway. Our results are discussed in line with existing literature.

  14. Upgrading Yellow-Poplar Seeds

    Treesearch

    F. T. Bonner; G. L. Switzer

    1971-01-01

    Yellow-poplar seed lots can be upgraded considerably by dewinging in a debearder and then cleaning and separating the seeds into four specific-gravity fractions with a fractionating aspirator or a gravity separator. By this process, lots with an original soundness of 6 to 10 percent were upgraded to between 60 and 65 percent full seeds.

  15. Short-Term Photometric Variations in a Sample of Transneptunian Objects and Centaurs. Rotational Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, J. L.; Duffard, R.; Thirouin, A.; Santos Sanz, P.; Morales, N.; Aceituno, F.

    2008-09-01

    We present new time-resolved observations of 20 large Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) and Centaurs taken at the Sierra Nevada Observatory 1.5m telescope (Granada, Spain), at the Calar Alto Observatory 2.2m telescope (Almeria, Spain) and at the 2.5m INT telescope at La Palma (Canary Islands, Spain). This program is the continuation of a lightcurve survey of the transneptunian belt that we carry out since 2000, approximately. All the CCD images were reduced and analyzed with identical tools and methods, and older images of some of the targets were reanalyzed with exactly the same software. Rotation periods and axial ratios (or degree of heterogeneity) were derived for most of the targets while for others only some constraints were obtained. These results were merged with the rotational parameters of other TNOs and Centaurs already published in the literature in order to build a data base of nearly 70 bodies. This allows us to search for possible correlations of the rotational parameters with different orbital parameters in the different dynamical groups. Also, we can search for correlations of rotational properties with purely physical parameters to get hints on the collisional evolution and other physical processes that could have had an effect on the different groups. Some preliminary work in this regard was already presented by Santos-Sanz et al. (2006) but we show numerous improvements here.

  16. Short-rotation management of Eucalyptus: Guidelines for plantations in Hawaii. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Whitesell, C.D.; DeBell, D.S.; Schubert, T.H.; Strand, R.F.; Crabb, T.B.

    1992-11-01

    A 10-year research and development program was conducted on the island of Hawaii, where nearly 230,000 acres are suitable for growing biomass in short-rotation Eucalyptus plantations. Successful techniques are described for seedling production, plantation establishment (site preparation, weed control, planting), maintenance (weed control, fertilization), biomass yield estimation, and harvest. Basic biological relationships are described to aid decisions on site selection, initial spacing, fertilizer schedules, and rotation length. Environmental issues likely to be faced by growers of Eucalyptus plantations are discussed, including soil erosion, nutrient depletion, and monocultures. Continuing programs for tree improvement, monitoring, and silviculture research are recommeded. Production costs for biomass yields are estimated for three promising management regimes, representing pure Eucalyptus plantings at dense and wide spacings and a mixed species plantation where Albizia is used as a nurse crop to provide nitrogen needed for optimum Eucalyptus growth.

  17. [Dual insertion paths design characteristics and short-term clinical observation of rotational path removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Jiang, Ting; Li, Sai; Chen, Wei

    2013-02-18

    To investigate design methods of dual insertion paths and observe a short-term clinic overview of rotational path removable partial dentures (RPDs). In the study, 40 patients with partial edentulous arches were included and divided into two groups. The patients in group one were restored with rotational path RPDs (10 Kennedy class III and 10 Kennedy class IV respectively). The patients in group two (20 patients), whose edentulous area was matched with the patients' in group one, were restored with the linear path RPDs. After surveying and simulative preparation on diagnostic casts, the basic laws of designing rotational path RPDs were summarized. The oral preparation was accurately performed under the guidance of indices made on diagnostic casts after simulative preparation. The 40 dentures were recalled two weeks and one year after the insertion. The evaluations of the clinic outcome, including retention, stability, mastication function, esthetics and wearing convenience, were marked out as good, acceptable, and poor. The comparison of the evaluation results was performed between the two groups. In the rotational path design for Kennedy class III or IV RPDs, the angles (α) of dual insertion paths should be designed within a scope, approximate 10°-15°.When the angle (α) became larger, the denture retention turned to be better, but accordingly the posterior abutments needed more preparation. In the clinical application, the first insertions of the 40 dentures were all favorably accomplished. When the rotational path RPDs were compared to linear path RPDs, the time consuming on first insertion had no statistical difference[(32±8) min and (33±8) min respectively, P>0.05]. Recalled two weeks and one year after the insertion, in the esthetics evaluation, 20 rotational path RPDs were all evaluated as "A", but only 7(two weeks after) and 6 (one year after) linear path RPDs were evaluated as "A"(P<0.05). There was no significant difference in other evaluation results

  18. Standard and Short RoM Isokinetic Testing: Comparative Analysis in Identifying Submaximal Shoulder External Rotator Effort.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Eduard; Chaler, Joaquim; Sucarrats, Laura; López, Inés; Zeballos, Blanca; Garreta, Roser; Dvir, Zeevi

    2017-01-31

    An isokinetic-related parameter termed the difference between eccentric-concentric strength ratios at two distinct test velocities (DEC) based on 60° (standard) range of motion (RoM) has been proven to be highly efficient detecting feigned muscular efforts. This study aimed to verify whether a DEC derived from a much shorter test RoM (20°) was equally useful than a long RoM-derived one. Eighteen healthy men (32.4 ± 6.4 years old) took part in a study focusing on shoulder external rotation isokinetic strength. Participants performed a genuine shoulder external rotator maximal effort (eight pairs of concentric and eccentric contractions at high and low velocities at short and long RoM) and then instructed to feign maximal effort. Contraction velocities were adjusted accordingly by applying a 1:4 gradient and peak moments registered. Both condition DEC was then calculated by subtracting the eccentric and concentric strength ratios at low velocities from those at high velocities. DEC scores in the feigned effort were significantly higher than maximal effort ones in both conditions in men. It enabled the setting of specific cutoff levels for separating the efforts. Both approaches revealed a coincident sensitivity (78%) whereas short RoM showed an even higher specificity: 88% versus 78%. Thus, the short RoM protocol provides clinically acceptable detection power.

  19. Assessment of the Rotation Motion at the Papillary Muscle Short-Axis Plane with Normal Subjects by Two-Dimensional Speckle Tracking Imaging: A Basic Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xian-Da; Huang, Jun; Hu, Yuan-Ping; Xu, Rui; Yang, Wei-Yu; Zhou, Li-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to observe the rotation patterns at the papillary muscle plane in the Left Ventricle(LV) with normal subjects using two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging(2D-STI). Methods We acquired standard of the basal, the papillary muscle and the apical short-axis images of the LV in 64 subjects to estimate the LV rotation motion by 2D-STI. The rotational degrees at the papillary muscle short-axis plane were measured at 15 different time points in the analysis of two heart cycles. Results There were counterclockwise rotation, clockwise rotation, and counterclockwise to clockwise rotation at the papillary muscle plane in the LV with normal subjects, respectively. The ROC analysis of the rotational degrees was performed at the papillary muscle short-axis plane at the peak LV torsion for predicting whether the turnaround point of twist to untwist motion pattern was located at the papillary muscle level. Sensitivity and specificity were 97% and 67%, respectively, with a cut-off value of 0.34°, and an area under the ROC curve of 0.8. At the peak LV torsion, there was no correlation between the rotational degrees at the papillary muscle short-axis plane and the LVEF in the normal subjects(r = 0.000, p = 0.998). Conclusions In the study, we conclude that there were three rotation patterns at the papillary muscle short-axis levels, and the transition from basal clockwise rotation to apical counterclockwise rotation is located at the papillary muscle level. PMID:24376634

  20. A critical analysis of species selection and high vs. low-input silviculture on establishment success and early productivity of model short-rotation wood-energy cropping systems

    DOE PAGES

    Fischer, M.; Kelley, A. M.; Ward, E. J.; ...

    2017-02-03

    Most research on bioenergy short rotation woody crops (SRWC) has been dedicated to the genera Populus and Salix. These species generally require relatively high-input culture, including intensive weed competition control, which increases costs and environmental externalities. Widespread native early successional species, characterized by high productivity and good coppicing ability, may be better adapted to local environmental stresses and therefore could offer alternative low-input bioenergy production systems. In order to test this concept, we established a three-year experiment comparing a widely-used hybrid poplar (Populus nigra × P. maximowiczii, clone ‘NM6’) to two native species, American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.) and tuliptreemore » (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) grown under contrasting weed and pest control at a coastal plain site in eastern North Carolina, USA. Mean cumulative aboveground wood production was significantly greater in sycamore, with yields of 46.6 Mg ha-11 under high-inputs and 32.7 Mg ha-1 under low-input culture, which rivaled the high-input NM6 yield of 32.9 Mg ha-1. NM6 under low-input management provided noncompetitive yield of 6.2 Mg ha-1. We also found that sycamore showed superiority in survival, biomass increment, weed resistance, treatment convergence, and within-stand uniformity. All are important characteristics for a bioenergy feedstock crop species, leading to reliable establishment and efficient biomass production. Poor performance in all traits was found for tuliptree, with a maximum yield of 1.2 Mg ha-1, suggesting this native species is a poor choice for SRWC. We then conclude that careful species selection beyond the conventionally used genera may enhance reliability and decrease negative environmental impacts of the bioenergy biomass production sector.« less

  1. MAGNETICALLY DRIVEN WINDS FROM DIFFERENTIALLY ROTATING NEUTRON STARS AND X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Daniel M.; Ciolfi, Riccardo; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2014-04-10

    Besides being among the most promising sources of gravitational waves, merging neutron star binaries also represent a leading scenario to explain the phenomenology of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Recent observations have revealed a large subclass of SGRBs with roughly constant luminosity in their X-ray afterglows, lasting 10-10{sup 4} s. These features are generally taken as evidence of a long-lived central engine powered by the magnetic spin-down of a uniformly rotating, magnetized object. We propose a different scenario in which the central engine powering the X-ray emission is a differentially rotating hypermassive neutron star (HMNS) that launches a quasi-isotropic and baryon-loaded wind driven by the magnetic field, which is built-up through differential rotation. Our model is supported by long-term, three-dimensional, general-relativistic, and ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations, showing that this isotropic emission is a very robust feature. For a given HMNS, the presence of a collimated component depends sensitively on the initial magnetic field geometry, while the stationary electromagnetic luminosity depends only on the magnetic energy initially stored in the system. We show that our model is compatible with the observed timescales and luminosities and express the latter in terms of a simple scaling relation.

  2. Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of ARM spectral short-wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.

    1994-07-01

    Our ARM goal is to help improve both longwave and shortwave models used in GCM's by providing improved radiometric shortwave data. The inference of cloud cover and optical properties of clouds is another goal of this research effort. At the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) in Albany, New York, we are acquiring downwelling shortwave, including direct and diffuse irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling longwave, upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave, and aerosol optical depth that we combine with National Weather Service surface and upper air data as a model test data set for ARM researchers. The major objective of our program has been to develop two spectral versions of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR). The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) contains six filtered, narrow-passband detectors, and one unfiltered silicon detector that serves as a surrogate total shortwave sensor. The rotating shadowband spectroradiometer (RSS) contains a 256-channel diode array that spans the wavelengths 350-1050 nm with resolution varying between 0.6 nm and 8 nm. With some of the instrument development complete we are devoting more effort to analysis of the MFRSR data. Progress was made on several fronts this year, resulting in conference papers and submissions to refereed journals. Data from the ASRC roof has been used to develop corrections of the MFRSR shortwave sensor. SGP data has been used to develop and validate a retrieval technique for total column water vapor. Total column ozone has been estimated using MFRSR data, but validation at the SGP was not possible for lack of a suitable ozone column standard. Some progress has been made on cloud cover detection, but it is not yet implemented as a routine classification and reporting procedure.

  3. Hydromechanic effects of rotations on human blood vessels on a short-radius centrifuge.

    PubMed

    Akulov, V A

    2004-07-01

    An "imitation" task of evaluating the adequacy of model gravitation (SRC) and natural one with consideration of the distribution of liquid environment in human lower extremities (interval evaluation) has been formulated and solved. A reversed "imitation" task of calculating the SRC rotation frequency with consideration of a patient's individual height on the basis of zero difference on the criterion suggested. The methods developed were realized in a doctor's interface that provides a mode of a calculation experiment. Probation on real information showed great possibilities of using the interface as a technical means for a doctor to solve tasks of cosmic medicine, traumathology and orthopedics.

  4. Drier climate and productivity of operational poplar plantation - four years of throughfall exclusion experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsag, M.; Fischer, M.; Trnka, M.

    2016-12-01

    The production of woody biomass in short rotation woody coppice (SRWC) is considered as a suitable source of renewable energy for climate conditions prevailing in central European countries. The productivity of SRWC is largely dependent on the environmental conditions and the biomass yield can be severely compromised when water supply is limited. One of the climate change consequences predicted for Central Europe is the increasing frequency and duration of drought spells as a result of increased air temperature and temporally uneven distribution of precipitation. Therefore, a small-scale rain-throughfall exclusion experiment was established in 2011 in an operational SRWC plantation (hybrid poplar NM6) in the Bohemian-Moravian highlands (Czech Republic). Three times replicated experimental block comprised a treatment with 70 % rain-throughfall exclusion (R) and an adjacent control treatment (C) of the same size (25 m2). Above-ground biomass productivity (ABP) and soil moisture patterns were measured and evaluated during growing seasons 2011-2015. We observed high heterogeneity of soil moisture among blocks, resulting in high variability in ABP. The treatment effect was more pronounced with increasing seasonal precipitation. Generally, the R treatments showed lower ABP by 8.4 %, higher mortality by 6.7 % and strong competitive relationships among neighboring trees, which led to formation of few dominant trees, comprising 30 % of the total biomass at particular plot, accounting for 50 % of the annual ABP per 25 m2 plot. Our results suggests considerable resilience of hybrid poplar NM6 to decreased soil-water availability over long-term, while keeping minimal annual ABP of about 4.5 ton hectare (dry matter).

  5. Bioethanol from poplar: a commercially viable alternative to fossil fuel in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Jade; Guo, Miao; Boerjan, Wout; Murphy, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    The European Union has made it a strategic objective to develop its biofuels market in order to minimize greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, to help mitigate climate change and to address energy insecurity within the transport sector. Despite targets set at national and supranational levels, lignocellulosic bioethanol production has yet to be widely commercialized in the European Union. Here, we use techno-economic modeling to compare the price of bioethanol produced from short rotation coppice (SRC) poplar feedstocks under two leading processing technologies in five European countries. Our evaluation shows that the type of processing technology and varying national costs between countries results in a wide range of bioethanol production prices (€0.275 to 0.727/l). The lowest production prices for bioethanol were found in countries that had cheap feedstock costs and high prices for renewable electricity. Taxes and other costs had a significant influence on fuel prices at the petrol station, and therefore the presence and amount of government support for bioethanol was a major factor determining the competitiveness of bioethanol with conventional fuel. In a forward-looking scenario, genetically engineering poplar with a reduced lignin content showed potential to enhance the competitiveness of bioethanol with conventional fuel by reducing overall costs by approximately 41% in four out of the five countries modeled. However, the possible wider phenotypic traits of advanced poplars needs to be fully investigated to ensure that these do not unintentionally negate the cost savings indicated. Through these evaluations, we highlight the key bottlenecks within the bioethanol supply chain from the standpoint of various stakeholders. For producers, technologies that are best suited to the specific feedstock composition and national policies should be optimized. For policymakers, support schemes that benefit emerging bioethanol producers and allow renewable fuel to be

  6. Biomass production and carbon sequestration potential in poplar plantations with different management patterns.

    PubMed

    Fang, S; Xue, J; Tang, L

    2007-11-01

    Biomass production and carbon storage in short-rotation poplar plantations over 10 years were evaluated at the Hanyuan Forestry Farm, Baoying County, China. Experimental treatments applied in a split-plot design included four planting densities (1111, 833, 625 and 500 stems ha(-1)) and three poplar clones (NL-80351, I-69 and I-72). Based on the model of total biomass production developed, total plantation biomass production was significantly different in the plantations. The ranking of the plantation biomass production by planting density was 1111>833 more more than 625>500 stems ha(-1), and by components was stem>root>or=branch>leaf for all plantations. At 10 years, the highest total biomass in the plantation of 1111 stems ha(-1) reached about 146 t ha(-1), which was 5.3%, 11.6% and 24.2% higher than the plantations of 833, 625 and 500 stems ha(-1), respectively. The annual increment of biomass production over 10 years differed significantly among initial planting densities and stand ages (p<0.01), but no significant difference was observed from age 7 to 10. Mean carbon concentration among all biomass components ranged from 42-50%, with the highest carbon concentrations in stems and the lowest in leaves. Over the study period, the dynamic pattern of total plantation carbon storage by planting density was similar to that of total biomass production. At age 10, the highest total plantation carbon storage in the plantation of 1111 stems ha(-1) reached about 72.0 t ha(-1), which was 5.4%, 11.9% and 24.8% higher than in the plantations of 833, 625 and 500 stems ha(-1), respectively. The annual carbon storage increment over 10 years differed significantly among initial planting densities and stand ages (p<0.01), and it showed a pattern similar to the annual biomass production increment of the plantations. The results suggest that biomass production and carbon storage potential were highest for planting densities of 1111 and 833 stems ha(-1) grown over 5- and 6-year

  7. Properties and utilization of poplar wood

    Treesearch

    John J. Balatinecz; David E. Kretschmann

    2001-01-01

    Hybrid poplars are fast-growing, moisture-loving, full-sun-loving large trees that can be a rapid source of wood fiber. With the introduction of waferboard, oriented strandboard (OSB), and laminated strand lumber (LSL), aspen utilization has dramatically increased. Indigenous and hybrid poplars, however, present their own challenges, such as high discoloration...

  8. Yield of Unthinned Yellow-Poplar

    Treesearch

    Donald E. Beck; Lino Della-Bianca

    1970-01-01

    Cubic-foot and board-foot yields of unthinned yellow-poplar (Liriodendron Tulipiferi L.) stands are described in relation to stand age, site index, and number of trees per acre. The yield tables are based on analysis of diameter distributions and height-diameter relationships obtained from 141 natural, unthinned yellow-poplar stands in the...

  9. Environmental applications of poplars and willows

    Treesearch

    J.G. Isebrands; P. Aronsson; M. Carlson; R. Ceulemans; M. Coleman; N. Dickinson; J. Dimitriou; S. Doty; E. Gardiner; K. Heinsoo; J.D. Johnson; Y.B. Koo; J. Kort; J. Kuzovkina; L. Licht; A.R. McCracken; I. McIvor; P. Mertens; K. Perttu; D. Riddell-Black; B. Robins; G. Scarascia-Mugnozza; W.R. Schroeder; John Stanturf; T.A. Volk; M. Weih

    2014-01-01

    Poplars and willows have been planted for environmental purposes for millennia. There are reports that poplars were planted to improve the human environment 4000 years ago in the third dynasty of Ur, for streamside stabilization 2000 years ago in what is now the south-western USA by native North Americans and for urban amenities by the early Chinese dynasties (see...

  10. Dimension yields from yellow-poplar lumber

    Treesearch

    R. C. Gilmore; J. D. Danielson

    1984-01-01

    The available supply of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), its potential for new uses, and its continuing importance to the furniture industry have created a need to accumulate additional information about this species. As an aid to better utilization of this species, charts for determining cutting stock yields from yellow poplar lumber are presented for each...

  11. Yellow-Poplar Site Index Curves

    Treesearch

    Donald E. Beck

    1962-01-01

    Yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) occurs naturally throughout the eastern and central United States from southern New England west to Michigan and south to Florida and Louisiana. Because of its wide occurrence, yellow-poplar grows under a variety of climatic, edaphic, and biotic conditions. Combinations of these different environmental...

  12. Hybrid poplar planting in the Lake States

    Treesearch

    Paul O. Rudolf

    1948-01-01

    Poplars are among our fastest growing trees. Many of them are also relatively easy to grow from cuttings and to hybridize by means of cut flower-bearing twigs. Their wood is in demand for pulpwood, veneer for match and crate production, boxboards, and other uses. For these reasons there has been interest in many countries in selecting and breeding poplars. The tree...

  13. Observations on a hybrid poplar test planting in West Virginia

    Treesearch

    Arthur R. Eschner

    1960-01-01

    Hybrid poplars, crosses between European and American Aigeiros poplars, have been grown in Europe for about 200 years. The rapid growth and high productivity of some of these hybrids on sites to which they are adapted has stimulated interest in poplar growing in this country. And demand for these poplars is developing in many parts of the United States.

  14. Detection systems for short-time stroboscopic neutron imaging and measurements on a rotating engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillinger, B.; Abele, H.; Brunner, J.; Frei, G.; Gähler, R.; Gildemeister, A.; Hillenbach, A.; Lehmann, E.; Vontobel, P.

    2005-04-01

    Today's neutron sources do not deliver sufficient flux to examine singular short-time events in the millisecond range by neutron radiography. However, periodic processes can be examined if a triggered accumulating detector collects information of identical time-windows and positions over several cycles of the process. The same problem applies if the source signal itself carries information, like the energy-time dependence in the pulse of a spallation source. Several possible detection methods were considered; measurements were performed at the intense neutron beam H9 of ILL Grenoble, where an electrically driven BMW engine was examined at 1000 rpm with time resolution of 200 μs.

  15. Outcomes following arthroscopic transosseous equivalent suture bridge double row rotator cuff repair: a prospective study and short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Mohamed Abdelnabi; Abdelkafy, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background: The transosseous-equivalent cross bridge double row (TESBDR) rotator cuff (RC) repair technique has been developed to optimize healing biology at a repaired RC tendon insertion. It has been shown in the laboratory to improve pressurized contact area and mean foot print pressure when compared with a double row anchor technique. Pressure has been shown to influence healing between tendon and bone, and the tendon compression vector provided by the transosseous-equivalent suture bridges may enhance healing. The purpose was to prospectively evaluate the outcomes of arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair. Methods: Single center prospective case series study. Sixty-nine patients were selected to undergo arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair and were included in the current study. Primary outcome measures included the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS), the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score, the Constant-Murley (CM) Score and Range of motion (ROM). Secondary outcome measures included a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain, another VAS for patient satisfaction from the operative procedure, EuroQoL 5-Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D) for quality of life assessment. Results: At 24 months post-operative, average OSS score was 44, average UCLA score was 31, average CM score was 88, average forward flexion was 145°, average internal rotation was 35°, average external rotation was 79°, average abduction was 150°, average EQ-5D score was 0.73, average VAS for pain was 2.3, and average VAS for patient satisfaction was 9.2. Conclusion: Arthroscopic TESBDR RC repair is a procedure with good post-operative functional outcome and low re-tear rate based on a short term follow-up. PMID:27163096

  16. Effect of biomass pretreatment on the product distribution and composition resulting from the hydrothermal liquefaction of short rotation coppice willow.

    PubMed

    Grigoras, I F; Stroe, R E; Sintamarean, I M; Rosendahl, L A

    2017-05-01

    A major challenge for the implementation of hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) as a continuous process is the formulation of lignocellulosic feedstock, which is prone to phase separation into water and biomass parts when pressurized. One approach to remedy such phase separation is to reduce the dry matter content; however, as this approach is detrimental to process cost efficiency, designing an appropriate pretreatment step to ensure pumpability at high dry matter content is preferable. This paper evaluated the effect of various pretreatment methods on product distribution and composition resulting from the HTL of willow and proposes short rotation coppice as an alternative biomass feedstock for biofuels production. Alkaline-thermal pretreatment, besides making high dry matter pumpable feedstock slurries, also led to an increase in the production of the bio-crude product with an oxygen content lower than 8wt% and a higher concentration of aromatics and phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Short rotation coppice improve the phosphorus (P) supply of arable land through translocation of P from subsoil to topsoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, K.; Kaupenjohann, M.

    2011-12-01

    Even if the agricultural use of P will not increase during the next decades, the stock of phosphorous (P) in global mineral deposits is predicted to last for only less than 50 to 100 years. This will cause a much more severe problem than the shortage of fossil energy because P as an element essential to all life is not substitutable through any other material. Thus, efforts have to be made to close the P-cycle and it will in the near future be no more justifiable to disperse P or dump it at places where it cannot be recovered from. Additionally, new resources of P have to be explored to cover increasing P demand and to compensate for inevitable losses. Subsoil, which is hardly explored by arable crops may contain such P reserves. Deep rooting perennial plants like trees have access to these P resources and may be used to introduce subsoil P into the agricultural P cycle. Using literature data we followed the question to what extent the introduction of short rotation coppice of energy - Populus, Salix and Robinia into the agricultural crop rotation could support the P supply to annual food crops. Leaf litter of Populs, Salix and Robinia will transfer 3 to 13, 5 to 12 and 5 to 12 kg P and ha-1 a-1 to the soil surface, respectively. The large variation is mainly explained by site conditions (soil and climate). Assuming that 30 % of the nutrient requirement of the trees is assimilated from the subsoil, 1 to 5 kg of P ha-1 a-1 may be translocated to the topsoil. The knowledge about root content of P of the three tree species is very scarce. Based on information about other broadleaf trees, we consider that root litter may transfer amounts of P to the topsoil similar to leaf litter. Thus, in total the annual translocation of subsoil-P to the topsoil may range between 2 to 10 kg ha-1 in short rotation plantations. These amounts are far below the annual P removal from soils through food crops which may range from 20 to 40 kg P ha-1 a-1. Therefore subsoil P cannot replace P

  18. Symplastic phloem loading in poplar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cankui; Han, Lu; Slewinski, Thomas L; Sun, Jianlei; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Turgeon, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Sap is driven through phloem sieve tubes by an osmotically generated pressure gradient between source and sink tissues. In many plants, source pressure results from thermodynamically active loading in which energy is used to transfer sucrose (Suc) from mesophyll cells to the phloem of leaf minor veins against a concentration gradient. However, in some species, almost all trees, correlative evidence suggests that sugar migrates passively through plasmodesmata from mesophyll cells into the sieve elements. The possibility of alternate loading mechanisms has important ramifications for the regulation of phloem transport and source-sink interactions. Here, we provide experimental evidence that, in gray poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba), Suc enters the phloem through plasmodesmata. Transgenic plants were generated with yeast invertase in the cell walls to prevent Suc loading by this route. The constructs were driven either by the constitutive 35S promoter or the minor vein-specific galactinol synthase promoter. Transgenic plants grew at the same rate as the wild type without symptoms of loading inhibition, such as accumulation of carbohydrates or leaf chlorosis. Rates of photosynthesis were normal. In contrast, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) plants, which have limited numbers of plasmodesmata between mesophyll and phloem, displayed typical symptoms of loading inhibition when transformed with the same DNA constructs. The results are consistent with passive loading of Suc through plasmodesmata in poplar. We also noted defense-related symptoms in leaves of transgenic poplar when the plants were abruptly exposed to excessively high temperatures, adding to evidence that hexose is involved in triggering the hypersensitive response.

  19. Diseases of intensively cultured hybrid poplars: a summary of recent research in the north central region

    Treesearch

    M. E. Ostry; H. S. McNabb

    1983-01-01

    Several potentially damaging diseases of hybrid poplars hue been identified in the north-central United States. Among the most serious are leaf and stem diseases caused by Melampsora, Marssonina, and Septoria. Short-term chemical controls are of limited usefulness. The most practical control strategy appears to be the use of resistant clones obtained through local...

  20. Cooling the two-dimensional short spherocylinder liquid to the tetratic phase: Heterogeneous dynamics with one-way coupling between rotational and translational hopping.

    PubMed

    Su, Yen-Shuo; I, Lin

    2015-07-01

    We numerically demonstrate the transition from the isotropic liquid to the tetratic phase with quasilong-range tetratic alignment order (i.e., with nearly parallel or perpendicular aligned rods), for the cold two-dimensional (2D) short spherocylinder system before crystallization and investigate the thermal assisted heterogeneous rotational and translational micromotions. Comparing with the 2D liquid of isotropic particles, spherocylinders introduce extra rotational degrees of freedom and destroy packing isotropy and the equivalence between rotational and translational motions. It is found that cooling leads to the stronger dynamical heterogeneity with more cooperative hopping and the stronger retardations of rotational hopping than translational hopping. Under topological constraints from nearly parallel and perpendicular rods of the tetratic phase, longitudinal and transverse translational hopping can occur without rotational hopping, but not the reverse. The empty space trailing a neighboring translational hopping patch is needed for triggering the patch rotational hopping with its translational motion into the empty space. It is the origin for the observed increasing separation of hopping time scales and the one-way coupling between rotational and translational hopping. Strips of longitudinally or transversely aligned rods can be ruptured and reconnected with neighboring strips through buckling, kink formation, and patch rotation, under the unbalanced torques or forces from their neighboring rods and thermal kicks.

  1. Short-range optical air data measurements for aircraft control using rotational Raman backscatter.

    PubMed

    Fraczek, Michael; Behrendt, Andreas; Schmitt, Nikolaus

    2013-07-15

    A first laboratory prototype of a novel concept for a short-range optical air data system for aircraft control and safety was built. The measurement methodology was introduced in [Appl. Opt. 51, 148 (2012)] and is based on techniques known from lidar detecting elastic and Raman backscatter from air. A wide range of flight-critical parameters, such as air temperature, molecular number density and pressure can be measured as well as data on atmospheric particles and humidity can be collected. In this paper, the experimental measurement performance achieved with the first laboratory prototype using 532 nm laser radiation of a pulse energy of 118 mJ is presented. Systematic measurement errors and statistical measurement uncertainties are quantified separately. The typical systematic temperature, density and pressure measurement errors obtained from the mean of 1000 averaged signal pulses are small amounting to < 0.22 K, < 0.36% and < 0.31%, respectively, for measurements at air pressures varying from 200 hPa to 950 hPa but constant air temperature of 298.95 K. The systematic measurement errors at air temperatures varying from 238 K to 308 K but constant air pressure of 946 hPa are even smaller and < 0.05 K, < 0.07% and < 0.06%, respectively. A focus is put on the system performance at different virtual flight altitudes as a function of the laser pulse energy. The virtual flight altitudes are precisely generated with a custom-made atmospheric simulation chamber system. In this context, minimum laser pulse energies and pulse numbers are experimentally determined, which are required using the measurement system, in order to meet measurement error demands for temperature and pressure specified in aviation standards. The aviation error margins limit the allowable temperature errors to 1.5 K for all measurement altitudes and the pressure errors to 0.1% for 0 m and 0.5% for 13000 m. With regard to 100-pulse-averaged temperature measurements, the pulse energy using 532 nm

  2. Effects of Artificial Defoliation on Growth and Biomass Accumulation in Short-Rotation Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Jetton, Robert M.; Robison, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Sweetgum, Liquidambar styraciflua L. (Hamamelidales: Hamamelidaceae), is a species of interest for short-rotation plantation forestry in the southeastern United States. Despite its high levels of resistance to many native insects and pathogens, the species is susceptible to generalist defoliators during outbreak epidemics. The objective of this field study was to evaluate the potential impact of defoliation on sweetgum growth and productivity within the context of an operational plantation. Over three growing seasons, trees were subjected to artificial defoliation treatments of various intensity (control = 0% defoliation; low intensity = 33% defoliation; moderate intensity = 67% defoliation; high intensity = 99% defoliation) and frequency (not defoliated; defoliated once in April of the first growing season; defoliated twice, once in April of the first growing season and again in April of the second growing season). The responses of stem height, stem diameter, stem volume, crown volume, total biomass accumulation, and branch growth were measured in November of each growing season. At the end of the first growing season, when trees had received single defoliations, significant reductions in all growth traits followed the most severe (99%) defoliation treatment only. After the second and third growing seasons, when trees had received one or two defoliations of varying intensity, stem diameter and volume and total tree biomass were reduced significantly by 67 and 99% defoliation, while reductions in stem height and crown volume followed the 99% treatment only. All growth traits other than crown volume were reduced significantly by two defoliations but not one defoliation. Results indicate that sweetgum is highly resilient to single defoliations of low, moderate, and high intensity. However, during the three-year period of the study, repeated high-intensity defoliation caused significant reductions in growth and productivity that could have lasting impacts on yield

  3. Estimation of biological nitrogen fixation by black locust in short-rotation forests using natural 15N abundance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veste, M.; Böhm, C.; Quinckenstein, A.; Freese, D.

    2012-04-01

    The importance of short rotation forests and agroforestry systems for woody biomass production for bioenergy will increase in Central Europe within the next decades. In this context, black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) has a high growth potential especially at marginal, drought-susceptible sites such as occur in Brandenburg State (Eastern Germany). As a pioneer tree species black locust grows under a wide range of site conditions. The native range of black locust in Northern America is classified by a humid to sub-humid climate with a mean annual precipitation of 1020 to 1830 mm. In Central and Eastern Europe, this species is cultivated in a more continental climate with an annual precipitation often below 600 mm. Therefore, black locust is known to be relatively drought tolerant compared to other temperate, deciduous tree species. Because of its N2-fixation ability black locust plays generally an important role for the improvement of soil fertility. This effect is of particular interest at marginal sites in the post-mining landscapes. In order to estimate the N2-fixation potential of black locust at marginal sites leaf samples were taken from black locust trees in short rotation plantations planted between 1995 and 2007 in post-mining sites south of Cottbus (Brandenburg, NE Germany). The variation of the natural 15N abundance was measured to evaluate the biological nitrogen fixation. The nitrogen derived from the atmosphere can be calculated using a two-pool model from the quotient of the natural 15N abundances of the N2-fixing plant and the plant available soil N. Because representatively determining the plant available soil N is difficult, a non-N2-fixing reference plant growing at the same site with a similar root system and temporal N uptake pattern to the N2-fixing plant is often used. In our case we used red oak (Quercus rubra) as a reference. The average nitrogen content in the leaves of black locust ranged from 3.1% (C/N 14.8) in 15 years old trees to 3

  4. Water quality effects of short-rotation pine management for bioenergy feedstocks in the southeastern United States

    DOE PAGES

    Griffiths, Natalie A.; Jackson, C. Rhett; Bitew, Menberu M.; ...

    2017-06-12

    There is growing interest in renewable and domestically produced energy which motivates the evaluation of woody bioenergy feedstock production. In the southeastern U.S., woody feedstock plantations, primarily of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), would be intensively managed over short rotations (10–12 years) to achieve high yields. The primary differences in managing woody feedstocks for bioenergy production vs for pulp/sawtimber production include a higher frequency of pesticide and fertilizer applications, whole-tree removal, and greater ground disturbance (i.e., more bare ground during stand establishment and more frequent disturbance). And while the effects of pulp/sawtimber production on water quality are well-studied, the effects ofmore » growing short-rotation loblolly pine on water quality and the efficacy of current forestry Best Management Practices (BMPs) have not been evaluated for this emerging management system. We used a watershed-scale experiment in a before-after, control-impact design to evaluate the effects of growing loblolly pine for bioenergy on water quality in the Upper Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. Intensive management for bioenergy production and implementation of current forestry BMPs occurred on ~50% of two treatment watersheds, with one reference watershed in a minimally managed pine forest. Water quality metrics (nutrient and pesticide concentrations) were measured in stream water, groundwater, and interflow (i.e., shallow subsurface flow) for a two-year pre-treatment period, and for 3.5 years post-treatment. After 3.5 years, there was little change to stream water quality. Here, we report on observations where there were a few occurrences of saturated overland flow, but there were sediments and water dissipated within the streamside management zones in over 75% of these instances. Stream nutrient concentrations were low and temporal changes mainly reflected seasonal patterns in nitrogen cycling. Nitrate concentrations

  5. Proteome Analysis of Poplar Seed Vigor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Wei-Qing; Liu, Shu-Jun; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Seed vigor is a complex property that determines the seed’s potential for rapid uniform emergence and subsequent growth. However, the mechanism for change in seed vigor is poorly understood. The seeds of poplar (Populus × Canadensis Moench), which are short-lived, were stored at 30°C and 75±5% relative humidity for different periods of time (0–90 days) to obtain different vigor seeds (from 95 to 0% germination). With decreasing seed vigor, the temperature range of seed germination became narrower; the respiration rate of the seeds decreased markedly, while the relative electrolyte leakage increased markedly, both levelling off after 45 days. A total of 81 protein spots showed a significant change in abundance (≥ 1.5-fold, P < 0.05) when comparing the proteomes among seeds with different vigor. Of the identified 65 proteins, most belonged to the groups involved in metabolism (23%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (18%), cell defense and rescue (17%), and storage protein (15%). These proteins accounted for 95% of all the identified proteins. During seed aging, 53 and 6 identified proteins consistently increased and decreased in abundance, respectively, and they were associated with metabolism (22%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (19%), cell defense and rescue (19%), storage proteins (15%), and cell growth and structure (3%). These data show that the decrease in seed vigor (aging) is an energy-dependent process, which requires protein synthesis and degradation as well as cellular defense and rescue. PMID:26172265

  6. Proteome Analysis of Poplar Seed Vigor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Wei-Qing; Liu, Shu-Jun; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Seed vigor is a complex property that determines the seed's potential for rapid uniform emergence and subsequent growth. However, the mechanism for change in seed vigor is poorly understood. The seeds of poplar (Populus × Canadensis Moench), which are short-lived, were stored at 30 °C and 75 ± 5% relative humidity for different periods of time (0-90 days) to obtain different vigor seeds (from 95 to 0% germination). With decreasing seed vigor, the temperature range of seed germination became narrower; the respiration rate of the seeds decreased markedly, while the relative electrolyte leakage increased markedly, both levelling off after 45 days. A total of 81 protein spots showed a significant change in abundance (≥ 1.5-fold, P < 0.05) when comparing the proteomes among seeds with different vigor. Of the identified 65 proteins, most belonged to the groups involved in metabolism (23%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (18%), cell defense and rescue (17%), and storage protein (15%). These proteins accounted for 95% of all the identified proteins. During seed aging, 53 and 6 identified proteins consistently increased and decreased in abundance, respectively, and they were associated with metabolism (22%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (19%), cell defense and rescue (19%), storage proteins (15%), and cell growth and structure (3%). These data show that the decrease in seed vigor (aging) is an energy-dependent process, which requires protein synthesis and degradation as well as cellular defense and rescue.

  7. Finding Fingerprints of Selection in Poplar Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald

    2014-10-02

    Jerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the DOE JGI talks about poplar trees as models for selective adaptation to an environment. This video complements a study published ahead online August 24, 2014 in Nature Genetics.

  8. Continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Fieber, C.A.; Roberts, R.S.; Faass, G.S.; Muzzy, J.D.; Colcord, A.R.; Bery, M.K.

    1982-01-01

    The continuous hydrolysis of poplar chips by steam at 300-350 psi resulted in the separation of hemicellulose (I) cellulose and lignin components. The I fraction was readily depolymerised by steam to acetic acid, furfural, methanol, and xylose.

  9. Finding Fingerprints of Selection in Poplar Genomes

    ScienceCinema

    Tuskan, Gerald

    2017-05-12

    Jerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the DOE JGI talks about poplar trees as models for selective adaptation to an environment. This video complements a study published ahead online August 24, 2014 in Nature Genetics.

  10. Low temperatures counteract short-day induced nitrogen storage, but not accumulation of bark storage protein transcripts in bark of grey poplar (Populus × canescens) trees.

    PubMed

    Wildhagen, H; Bilela, S; Rennenberg, H

    2013-01-01

    According to climate change scenarios, the seasonal course of temperature will change in most regions of the world, raising the question of how this will influence seasonal nitrogen (N) storage in deciduous trees. The key to this question is a detailed understanding of the underlying regulatory mechanisms, which was addressed in this study by analysing (i) the effects of low temperatures (13-1 °C) on bark storage protein (BSP) transcription, BSP and total protein accumulation and amino acid metabolism; (ii) the effects of interactions between low temperatures and photoperiod on these processes; and (iii) the regulatory role of amino acids in the bark. For this purpose, we exposed grey poplar trees (Populus × canescens) to three different treatments of changing photoperiod at constant temperature, changing temperature at constant photoperiod, and both changing photoperiod and temperature. Under a shortened photoperiod, a substantial increase of BSP transcripts was observed that was correlated with the accumulation of bark proteins, indicating a metabolic shift to promote long-term N storage. Irrespective of the applied photoperiod, exposure to low temperatures (5 or 1 °C) caused a strong increase of BSP transcripts, which was not paralled by significant increases of BSP and total bark proteins. We conclude that the interaction between effects of photoperiod and temperature is dependent on the carbon status of the trees, and reflects a metabolic adjustment of reduced carbon consumption for BSP synthesis. These results demonstrate the differential temperature sensitivity of processes involved in seasonal N storage, implying vulnerability to changing environmental conditions.

  11. Growth, yield, and disease resistance of 7- to 12-year-old poplar clones in the north central United States.

    Treesearch

    D.A. Netzer; D.N. Tolsted; M. E. Ostry; J. G. Isebrands; D.E. Riemenschneider; K.T. Ward

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes growth, yield, and disease resistance of 95 poplar clones at or near rotation age (culmination of mean annual increment). Plantations were established from 1986 to 1992 in Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota. Clones DN164, DN177, DN154, NM2, NE264, DN170, and DN21 are recommended for further testing.

  12. Transpiration by two poplar varieties grown as coppice for biomass production.

    PubMed

    Allen, Simon J.; Hall, Robin L.; Rosier, Paul T. W.

    1999-07-01

    Fast-growing tree clones selected for biomass plantations are highly productive and therefore likely to use more water than the agricultural crops they replace. We report field measurements of transpiration through the summer of 1994 from two poplar clones, Beaupré (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & A. Gray x P. deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) and Dorschkamp (P. deltoides x P. nigra L.), grown as unirrigated short-rotation coppice in southern England. Stand transpiration was quantified by scaling up from sap flow measurements made with the heat balance method in a sample of stems. Leaf conductances, leaf area development, meteorological variables and soil water deficit were also measured to investigate the response of the trees to the environment. High rates of transpiration were found for Beaupré. In June, when soil water was plentiful, the mean (+/- SD) transpiration rate over an 18-day period was 5.0 +/- 1.8 mm day(-1), reaching a maximum of 7.9 mm day(-1). Transpiration rates from Dorschkamp were lower, as a result of its lower leaf area index. High total leaf conductances were measured for both Beaupré (0.34 +/- 0.17 mol m(-2) s(-1)) and Dorschkamp (0.39 +/- 0.16 mol m(-2) s(-1)). Leaf conductance declined slightly with increasing atmospheric vapor pressure deficit in both clones, but only in Beaupré did leaf conductance decrease as soil water deficit increased.

  13. Management with willow short rotation coppice increase the functional gene diversity and functional activity of a heavy metal polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Xue, K; van Nostrand, J D; Vangronsveld, J; Witters, N; Janssen, J O; Kumpiene, J; Siebielec, G; Galazka, R; Giagnoni, L; Arenella, M; Zhou, J-Z; Renella, G

    2015-11-01

    We studied the microbial functional diversity, biochemical activity, heavy metals (HM) availability and soil toxicity of Cd, Pb and Zn contaminated soils, kept under grassland or short rotation coppice (SRC) to attenuate the risks associated with HM contamination and restore the soil ecological functions. Soil microbial functional diversity was analyzed by the GeoChip, a functional gene microarray containing probes for genes involved in nutrient cycling, metal resistance and stress response. Soil under SRC showed a higher abundance of microbial genes involved in C, N, P and S cycles and resistance to various HM, higher microbial biomass, respiration and enzyme activity rates, and lower HM availability than the grassland soil. The linkages between functional genes of soil microbial communities and soil chemical properties, HM availability and biochemical activity were also investigated. Soil toxicity and N, P and Pb availability were important factors in shaping the microbial functional diversity, as determined by CCA. We concluded that in HM contaminated soils the microbial functional diversity was positively influenced by SRC management through the reduction of HM availability and soil toxicity increase of nutrient cycling. The presented results can be important in predicting the long term environmental sustainability of plant-based soil remediation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimating relationships among water use, nitrogen uptake and biomass production in a short-rotation woody crop plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Short-rotation woody crop has been identified as one of the best feedstocks for bioenergy production due to their fast-growth rates. However, the biomass production, nutrient uptake, and water use efficiency under adverse environmental condition are still poorly understood. In this study, a computer model was developed to undertake these issues using STELLA (Structural Thinking and Experiential Learning Laboratory with Animation) software. Two simulation scenarios were employed: one was to quantify the mechanisms of water use, nitrogen uptake and biomass production in a eucalypt plantation under the normal soil conditions, the other was to estimate the same mechanisms under the wet and dry soil conditions. In general, the rates of evaporation, transpiration, evapotranspiration (ET), and root water uptake were in the following order: ET > root uptake > leaf transpiration > soil evaporation. A profound discrepancy in water use was observed between the wet and dry soil conditions. Leaching of nitrate-N and soluble organic N depended not only on soil N content but also on rainfall rate and duration. The yield of biomass from the eucalypt was primarily regulated by water availability in a fertilized plantation.

  15. Soil carbon after three years under short rotation woody crops grown under varying nutrient and water availability

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Felipe G.; Coleman, Mark; Garten Jr, Charles T; Luxmoore, Robert J; Stanturf, J. A.; Trettin, Carl; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2007-01-01

    Soil carbon contents were measured on a short-rotation woody crop study located on the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site outside Aiken, SC. This study included fertilization and irrigation treatments on five tree genotypes (sweetgum, loblolly pine, sycamore and two eastern cottonwood clones). Prior to study installation, the previous pine stand was harvested and the remaining slash and stumps were pulverized and incorporated 30 cm into the soil. One year after harvest soil carbon levels were consistent with pre-harvest levels but dropped in the third year below pre-harvest levels. Tillage increased soil carbon contents, after three years, as compared with adjacent plots that were not part of the study but where harvested, but not tilled, at the same time. When the soil response to the individual treatments for each genotype was examined, one cottonwood clone (ST66), when irrigated and fertilized, had higher total soil carbon and mineral associated carbon in the upper 30 cm compared with the other tree genotypes. This suggests that root development in ST66 may have been stimulated by the irrigation plus fertilization treatment.

  16. Constitutive expression of the Poplar FD-like basic leucine zipper transcription factor alters growth and bud development.

    PubMed

    Parmentier-Line, Cécile M; Coleman, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    In poplar, the CO/FT regulatory module mediates seasonal growth cessation. Although FT interacts with the basic leucine zipper transcription factor FD, surprisingly little is known about the possible role of FD in bud development and growth cessation in trees. In this study, we examined the expression and localization of the poplar FD homolog, PtFD1, during short-day (SD)-induced bud development, and the consequences of overexpressing PtFD1 on bud development and shoot growth. PtFD1 was primarily expressed in apical and axillary buds and exhibited a transient increase in expression during the initial stages of SD-induced bud development. This transient increase declined with continued SD treatment. When PtFD1 was overexpressed in poplar, SD-induced growth cessation and bud formation were abolished. PTFD1 overexpression also resulted in precocious flowering of juvenile plants in long-day (LD) photoperiods. Because the phenotypes associated with overexpression of PtFD1 are similar to those observe when poplar FT1 is overexpressed (Science, 312, 2006, 1040), the expression and diurnal patterns of expression of both poplar FT1 and FT2 were characterized in PtFD1 overexpression poplars and found to be altered. DNA microarray analysis revealed few differences in gene expression between PtFD1 overexpressing poplars in LD conditions while extensive levels of differential gene expression occur in SD-treated plants. These results enforce the connection between the regulation of flowering and the regulation of growth cessation and bud development in poplar. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Bioethanol from poplar clone Imola: an environmentally viable alternative to fossil fuel?

    PubMed

    Guo, Miao; Li, Changsheng; Facciotto, Gianni; Bergante, Sara; Bhatia, Rakesh; Comolli, Roberto; Ferré, Chiara; Murphy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Environmental issues, e.g. climate change, fossil resource depletion have triggered ambitious national/regional policies to develop biofuel and bioenergy roles within the overall energy portfolio to achieve decarbonising the global economy and increase energy security. With the 10 % binding target for the transport sector, the Renewable Energy Directive confirms the EU's commitment to renewable transport fuels especially advanced biofuels. Imola is an elite poplar clone crossed from Populus deltoides Bartr. and Populus nigra L. by Research Units for Intensive Wood Production, Agriculture Research Council in Italy. This study examines its suitability for plantation cultivation under short or very short rotation coppice regimes as a potential lignocellulosic feedstock for the production of ethanol as a transport biofuel. A life cycle assessment (LCA) approach was used to model the cradle-to-gate environmental profile of Imola-derived biofuel benchmarked against conventional fossil gasoline. Specific attention was given to analysing the agroecosystem fluxes of carbon and nitrogen occurring in the cultivation of the Imola biomass in the biofuel life cycle using a process-oriented biogeochemistry model (DeNitrification-DeComposition) specifically modified for application to 2G perennial bioenergy crops and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Our results demonstrate that carbon and nitrogen cycling in perennial crop-soil ecosystems such as this example can be expected to have significant effects on the overall environmental profiles of 2G biofuels. In particular, soil carbon accumulation in perennial biomass plantations is likely to be a significant component in the overall greenhouse gas balance of future biofuel and other biorefinery products and warrants ongoing research and data collection for LCA models. We conclude that bioethanol produced from Imola represents a promising alternative transport fuel offering some savings ranging from 35 to 100 % over petrol in global

  18. Probing Pulsar Emission on Short Timescales: Rotating Radio Transients, Cyclic Spectroscopy, and Single-Pulse Studies of Millisecond Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palliyaguru, Nipuni Tharaka

    Rotating radio transients (RRATs) are neutron stars are that characterized by the emission of strong sporadic bursts. We have analysed the long- and short-term time dependence of the pulse arrival times and the pulse detection rates for eight RRAT sources from the Parkes Multi-beam Pulsar Survey (PMPS). We find significant periodicities in the individual pulse arrival times from six RRATs. These periodicities range from ˜30 minutes to 2100 days and from one to 16 independent (i.e. non-harmonically related) periodicities are detected for each RRAT. In addition, we find that pulse emission is a random process on short (hour-long) time scales but that most of the objects exhibit longer term (months-years) non-random behaviour. We find that PSRs J1819--1458 and J1317--5759 emit more doublets (two consecutive pulses) and triplets (three consecutive pulses) than is expected in random pulse distributions. No evidence for such an excess is found for the other RRATs. There are several different models for RRAT emission depending on both extrinsic and intrinsic factors which are consistent with these properties. Light travel time changes due to gravitational waves may be detected within the next decade through precision timing of an array of millisecond pulsars. Removal of frequency-dependent interstellar medium (ISM) delays due to dispersion and scattering is a key issue in the detection process. Current timing algorithms routinely correct pulse times of arrival (TOAs) for time-variable delays due to cold plasma dispersion. However, none of the major pulsar timing groups routinely correct for delays due to scattering from multi-path propagation in the ISM. Scattering introduces a phase change in the signal that results in pulse broadening and arrival time delays. As a step toward a more comprehensive ISM propagation delay correction, we demonstrate through a simulation that we can accurately recover pulse broadening functions (PBFs), such as those that would be introduced

  19. Water quality response after two years of short-rotation pine management for bioenergy in the southeastern U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, N.; Jackson, C. R.; McDonnell, J.; Bitew, M. M.; Du, E.; Klaus, J.

    2014-12-01

    We are using a watershed-scale experiment to examine the water quality effects of growing woody crops for bioenergy in the southeastern United States. Three adjacent watersheds in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina were instrumented and baseline conditions were established for two years (2010-2012). In spring 2012, approximately 40% of the 2 treatment watersheds were harvested while the third watershed served as an unmanipulated control. Loblolly pine seedlings were planted in spring 2013, and silvicultural activities (herbicide and fertilizer applications) were implemented following a short-rotation (8-12 year) schedule. The chemistry (nitrogen, phosphorus, dissolved organic carbon, herbicides) of stream water, soil water (interflow), groundwater, and precipitation was measured weekly, monthly, or on an event basis. Baseline chemistry and hydrological measurements together showed that groundwater is the dominant flowpath in these watersheds, and thus we predicted that any effects of pine management on stream water quality may be lagged by several years. After two years of post-treatment water quality monitoring, there have been no changes in stream water quality in the two treatment watersheds. Ammonium concentrations varied temporally in all 3 watersheds, and this pattern may be driven by seasonal variation in nitrification rates. Stream nitrate concentrations were generally low (<500 μg N/L), and concentrations peaked in all 3 watersheds after stream flow resumed following a dry year. Ammonium and nitrate concentrations in deep groundwater increased for several months after harvest; however, concentrations were low (primarily <200 μg N/L for ammonium and <1,500 μg N/L for nitrate). Longer-term measurements are needed to determine if this pattern of increased nutrients in groundwater persists.

  20. A STELLA Model to Estimate Water and Nitrogen Dynamics in a Short-Rotation Woody Crop Plantation.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ying; Zhang, Jiaen; Leininger, Theodor D; Frey, Brent R

    2015-01-01

    Although short-rotation woody crop biomass production technology has demonstrated a promising potential to supply feedstocks for bioenergy production, the water and nutrient processes in the woody crop planation ecosystem are poorly understood. In this study, a computer model was developed to estimate the dynamics of water and nitrogen (N) species (e.g., NH-N, NO-N, particulate organic N, and soluble organic N [SON]) in a woody crop plantation using STELLA (tructural hinking and xperiential earning aboratory with nimation) software. A scenario was performed to estimate diurnal and monthly water and N variations of a 1-ha mature cottonwood plantation over a 1-yr simulation period. A typical monthly variation pattern was found for soil water evaporation, leaf water transpiration, and root water uptake, with an increase from winter to summer and a decrease from summer to the following winter. Simulations further revealed that the rate of soil water evaporation was one order of magnitude lower than that of leaf water transpiration. In most cases, the relative monthly water loss rates could be expressed as evapotranspiration > root uptake > percolation > runoff. Leaching of NO-N and SON depended not only on soil N content but also on rainfall rate and duration. Leaching of NO-N from the cottonwood plantation was about two times higher than that of SON. The relative monthly rate of N leaching was NO-N > SON > NH-N. This study suggests that the STELLA model developed is a useful tool for estimating water and N dynamics from a woody crop plantation.

  1. Progress in developing disease control strategies for hybrid poplars

    Treesearch

    Michael E. Ostry

    2000-01-01

    Hybrid poplars are being grown throughout many regions of the world for purposes including the production of fiber and energy, ornamental landscape plantings, and soil stabilization. Disease has often been responsible for planting failures resulting in poplars being labeled the universal host to many damaging pathogens. However, many of the poplar species and their...

  2. Growth Reductions in Short-Rotation Loblolly and Slash Pines in Central Louisiana -- 10th Year Results

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; Allan E. Tiarks

    1995-01-01

    A 22-year-old loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) and slash pine (P. elliottii Engeim. var. elliotti)research plantation was clearciut and replanted with the same species to compare tree growth between the two rotations. Both pine species were more productive in the first than the second rotation through 10 growing seasons...

  3. A high-speed target-rotation system (taro) for the study of short-lived nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyatake, H.; Hama, H.; Kamiya, T.; Yoshii, M.; Shinozuka, T.; Fujioka, M.

    1986-05-01

    We describe the design and performance of a high-speed target-rotation system for the study of nuclei far from stability, by which targets can be transported to the detector position in 60 ms after irradiation (90° rotation). The rotor movement and the cyclotron beam pulsing, as well as the data acquisition, are controlled by a microcomputer. Using this device 54Co (T {1}/{2} = 193 ms) and 58Cu (T {1}/{2} = 3.2 s) were observed in a test experiment with a transport efficiency of 71 and 98%, respectively (180° rotation).

  4. Assessing Regional-Scale Impacts of Short Rotation Coppices on Ecosystem Services by Modeling Land-Use Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Jule; Frank, Karin; Priess, Joerg A.; Meyer, Markus A.

    2016-01-01

    Meeting the world’s growing energy demand through bioenergy production involves extensive land-use change which could have severe environmental and social impacts. Second generation bioenergy feedstocks offer a possible solution to this problem. They have the potential to reduce land-use conflicts between food and bioenergy production as they can be grown on low quality land not suitable for food production. However, a comprehensive impact assessment that considers multiple ecosystem services (ESS) and biodiversity is needed to identify the environmentally best feedstock option, as trade-offs are inherent. In this study, we simulate the spatial distribution of short rotation coppices (SRCs) in the landscape of the Mulde watershed in Central Germany by modeling profit-maximizing farmers under different economic and policy-driven scenarios using a spatially explicit economic simulation model. This allows to derive general insights and a mechanistic understanding of regional-scale impacts on multiple ESS in the absence of large-scale implementation. The modeled distribution of SRCs, required to meet the regional demand of combined heat and power (CHP) plants for solid biomass, had little or no effect on the provided ESS. In the policy-driven scenario, placing SRCs on low or high quality soils to provide ecological focus areas, as required within the Common Agricultural Policy in the EU, had little effect on ESS. Only a substantial increase in the SRC production area, beyond the regional demand of CHP plants, had a relevant effect, namely a negative impact on food production as well as a positive impact on biodiversity and regulating ESS. Beneficial impacts occurred for single ESS. However, the number of sites with balanced ESS supply hardly increased due to larger shares of SRCs in the landscape. Regression analyses showed that the occurrence of sites with balanced ESS supply was more strongly driven by biophysical factors than by the SRC share in the landscape

  5. Exploring the Role of Plant Genetics to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration in Hybrid Poplar Plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wullschleger, S. D.; Garten, C. T.; Classen, A. T.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased in recent decades and are projected to increase even further during the coming century. These projections have prompted scientists and policy-makers to consider how plants and soils can be used to stabilize CO2 concentrations. Although storing carbon in terrestrial ecosystems represents an attractive near-term option for mitigating rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations, enhancing the sequestration potential of managed systems will require advancements in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that control rates of carbon transfer and turnover in plants and soils. To address this challenge, a mathematical model was constructed to evaluate how changes in particular plant traits and management practices could affect soil carbon storage beneath hybrid poplar (Populus) plantations. The model was built from four sub-models that describe aboveground biomass, root biomass, soil carbon dynamics, and soil nitrogen transformations for trees growing throughout a user-defined rotation. Simulations could be run over one or multiple rotations. A sensitivity analysis of the model indicated changes in soil carbon storage were affected by variables that could be linked to hybrid poplar traits like rates of aboveground production, partitioning of carbon to coarse and fine roots, and rates of root decomposition. A higher ratio of belowground to aboveground production was especially important and correlated directly with increased soil carbon storage. Faster decomposition rates for coarse and fine dead roots resulted in a greater loss of carbon to the atmosphere as CO2 and less residual organic carbon for transfer to the fast soil carbon pool. Hence, changes in root chemistry that prolonged dead root decomposition rates, a trait that is under potential genetic control, were predicted to increase soil carbon storage via higher soil carbon inputs. Nitrogen limitation of both aboveground biomass production and soil carbon sequestration was

  6. Effects of chronic and acute exposure to sulphur dioxide on the growth of hybrid poplar cuttings

    Treesearch

    Leon S. Dochinger; Keith F. Jensen

    1975-01-01

    Hybrid poplar clones were fumigated in controlled-environment chambers with either 5 ppm sulphur dioxide for 1½, 3, and 6 h or with 0.25 ppm sulphur dioxide for six weeks. Multivariate analyses were made from shoot-growth data before and after treatment and on the foliar injury induced by S02. Both short- and long-term fumigation produced similar...

  7. Bud-grafting yellow-poplar

    Treesearch

    David T. Funk

    1963-01-01

    Several years ago we began work on the vegetative propagation of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) with the aim of eventually establishing a clonal seed orchard. We tried field grafting, field budding, and air layering. We then attempted rooting cuttings in the greenhouse and in an indoor propagation bench. The best we could do with any of these methods was 4...

  8. Hybrid Poplar Plantations Outgrow Deer Browsing Effects

    Treesearch

    Daniel A. Netzer

    1984-01-01

    Good plantation establishment techniques along with fast growing clones result in minimal deer damage to hybrid poplar plantations. Although deer prefer certain clones, as food becomes scarce they eventually browse all clones. With proper establishment trees grow to or beyond the reach of browsing deer in the first year and well beyond in the second. Poorly...

  9. Yellow-Poplar: Characteristics and Management

    Treesearch

    Donald E. Beck; Lino Della-Bianca

    1981-01-01

    This reference tool and field guide for foresters and other landmanagers includes a synthesis of information on the characteristics of yellow-poplar with guidelines for managing the species. It is based on research conducted by many individuals in State and Federal forestry organizations and in universities throughout the Eastern United States. This handbook...

  10. Surface sterilization of hybrid poplar cuttings

    Treesearch

    Alma M. Waterman

    1954-01-01

    Fungus diseases of hybrid poplars may be spread by spores that lodge in the resinous coating of buds of dormant cuttings, and in the lenticels. Surface sterilization by dipping the cuttings in fungicides was tested to determine whether such treatment would prevent the germination of spores of the canker-producing fungi Septoria musiva and Dothichiza populea and the...

  11. Rating poplars for Melampsora leaf rust infection

    Treesearch

    Ernst J. Schreiner

    1959-01-01

    Melampsora leaf rust occurs in all countries where poplars are native or where they have been introduced for ornamental use or timber culture. The rust is easily recognized by the bright orange-yellow spore masses on the undersides of the leaves during most of the growing season.

  12. Diversity of arthropod community in transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D J; Lu, Z Y; Liu, J X; Li, C L; Yang, M S

    2015-12-02

    Poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems are the main agricultural planting modes of plain cotton fields in China. Here, we performed a systematic survey of the diversity and population of arthropod communities in four different combination of poplar-cotton eco-systems, including I) non-transgenic poplar and non-transgenic cotton fields; II) non-transgenic poplar and transgenic cotton fields [Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton]; III) Bt transgenic poplar (high insect resistant strain Pb29) and non-transgenic cotton; and IV) transgenic poplar and transgenic cotton fields, over a period of 3 years. Based on the statistical methods used to investigate community ecology, the effects of transgenic ecosystems on the whole structure of the arthropod community, on the structure of arthropods in the nutritive layer, and on the similarity of arthropod communities were evaluated. The main results were as follows: the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem has a stronger inhibitory effect on insect pests and has no impact on the structure of the arthropod community, and therefore, maintains the diversity of the arthropod community. The character index of the community indicated that the structure of the arthropod community of the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem was better than that of the poplar-cotton ecosystem, and that system IV had the best structure. As for the abundance of nutritional classes, the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem was also better than that of the non-transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem. The cluster analysis and similarity of arthropod communities between the four different transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems illustrated that the structure of the arthropod community excelled in the small sample of the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems.

  13. Yields in high density, short rotation intensive culture (SRIC)—plantations of Eucalyptus and Other Hardwood Species

    Treesearch

    R.M. Sachs; C.B. Low

    1983-01-01

    Initial high density (17,200 trees ha-1, 6961 trees a-1) plantations of Eucalyptus grandis yielded up to 22 oven dry tons (ODT) ha-l yr-I (10 ta-1 yr-1) on an approximate 6 month rotation. Border effects could not be eliminated from the small sized plots used...

  14. High intensity, short duration rotational grazing on reclaimed cool season fescue/legume pastures: I. System development

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, W.R.; Carlson, K.E.

    1995-09-01

    The Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co.`s ({open_quotes}P&M{close_quotes}) Midway Mine lies 50 miles south of Kansas City, Kansas, straddling the border of Kansas and Missouri. P&M actively mined the area until 1989, when the mine was closed and reclaimed. Approximately 3,750 acres of surface mined land were topsoiled and revegetated to cool season fescue/legume pasture. Various pasture management methods are being utilized to meet reclamation success standards and achieve final bond release. The effectiveness and costs of various cool season fescue/legume pasture management methods are evaluated and contrasted. These methods include sharecropping, bush hogging, burning and livestock grazing. It presents guidelines used to develop a site specific rotational livestock grazing programs with land owners or contractors, and local, state and federal agencies. Rotational grazing uses both cow/calf or feeder livestock operations. Key managerial elements used to control grazing activities, either by the landowner or a contractor, are reviewed. Methods used to determine stocking levels for successful rotational grazing on this type of pasture are presented. Rotational grazing of livestock has proven to be the most effective method for managing established cool season fescue/legume pastures at this site. Initial stocking rates of 1 A.U.M. per 5 acres have been modified to a current stocking rate of 1 A.U.M. per 2.5 acres. Supporting physical and chemical data are presented and discussed.

  15. Triggering collapse of the presolar dense cloud core and injecting short-lived radioisotopes with a shock wave. III. Rotating three-dimensional cloud cores

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2014-06-10

    A key test of the supernova triggering and injection hypothesis for the origin of the solar system's short-lived radioisotopes is to reproduce the inferred initial abundances of these isotopes. We present here the most detailed models to date of the shock wave triggering and injection process, where shock waves with varied properties strike fully three-dimensional, rotating, dense cloud cores. The models are calculated with the FLASH adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code. Three different outcomes can result: triggered collapse leading to fragmentation into a multiple protostar system; triggered collapse leading to a single protostar embedded in a protostellar disk; or failure to undergo dynamic collapse. Shock wave material is injected into the collapsing clouds through Rayleigh-Taylor fingers, resulting in initially inhomogeneous distributions in the protostars and protostellar disks. Cloud rotation about an axis aligned with the shock propagation direction does not increase the injection efficiency appreciably, as the shock parameters were chosen to be optimal for injection even in the absence of rotation. For a shock wave from a core-collapse supernova, the dilution factors for supernova material are in the range of ∼10{sup –4} to ∼3 × 10{sup –4}, in agreement with recent laboratory estimates of the required amount of dilution for {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al. We conclude that a type II supernova remains as a promising candidate for synthesizing the solar system's short-lived radioisotopes shortly before their injection into the presolar cloud core by the supernova's remnant shock wave.

  16. Clonal variation in heavy metal accumulation and biomass production in a poplar coppice culture. II. Vertical distribution and phytoextraction potential.

    PubMed

    Laureysens, I; De Temmerman, L; Hastir, T; Van Gysel, M; Ceulemans, R

    2005-02-01

    Short rotation coppice cultures (SRC) are intensively managed, high-density plantations of multi-shoot trees. In April 1996, an SRC field trial with 17 different poplar clones was established in Boom (Belgium) on a former waste disposal site. In December 1996 and January 2001, all shoots were cut back to a height of 5 cm to create a coppice culture. For six clones, wood and bark were sampled at the bottom, middle and top of a shoot in August and November 2002. No significant height effect of metal concentration was found, but for wood, metal concentrations generally increased toward the top of the shoot in August, and decreased toward the top of the shoot in November. Phytoextraction potential of a clone was primarily determined by metal concentration and by biomass production. Shoot size and number of shoots per stool were less important, as a high biomass production could be achieved by producing a few large shoots or many smaller shoots. Clone Fritzi Pauley accumulated 1.4 kg ha(-1) of Al over two years; Wolterson and Balsam Spire showed a relatively high accumulation of Cd and Zn, i.e. averaging, respectively 47 and 57 g ha(-1) for Cd and 2.4 and 2.0 kg ha(-1) for Zn over two years.

  17. Green revolution trees: semidwarfism transgenes modify gibberellins, promote root growth, enhance morphological diversity, and reduce competitiveness in hybrid poplar.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ani A; Busov, Victor B; Kosola, Kevin R; Ma, Cathleen; Etherington, Elizabeth; Shevchenko, Olga; Gandhi, Harish; Pearce, David W; Rood, Stewart B; Strauss, Steven H

    2012-10-01

    Semidwarfism has been used extensively in row crops and horticulture to promote yield, reduce lodging, and improve harvest index, and it might have similar benefits for trees for short-rotation forestry or energy plantations, reclamation, phytoremediation, or other applications. We studied the effects of the dominant semidwarfism transgenes GA Insensitive (GAI) and Repressor of GAI-Like, which affect gibberellin (GA) action, and the GA catabolic gene, GA 2-oxidase, in nursery beds and in 2-year-old high-density stands of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba). Twenty-nine traits were analyzed, including measures of growth, morphology, and physiology. Endogenous GA levels were modified in most transgenic events; GA(20) and GA(8), in particular, had strong inverse associations with tree height. Nearly all measured traits varied significantly among genotypes, and several traits interacted with planting density, including aboveground biomass, root-shoot ratio, root fraction, branch angle, and crown depth. Semidwarfism promoted biomass allocation to roots over shoots and substantially increased rooting efficiency with most genes tested. The increased root proportion and increased leaf chlorophyll levels were associated with changes in leaf carbon isotope discrimination, indicating altered water use efficiency. Semidwarf trees had dramatically reduced growth when in direct competition with wild-type trees, supporting the hypothesis that semidwarfism genes could be effective tools to mitigate the spread of exotic, hybrid, and transgenic plants in wild and feral populations.

  18. Improved saccharification and ethanol yield from field-grown transgenic poplar deficient in cinnamoyl-CoA reductase

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Rebecca; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Aerts, Dirk; Storme, Véronique; Goeminne, Geert; Ivens, Bart; Légée, Frédéric; Lapierre, Catherine; Piens, Kathleen; Van Montagu, Marc C. E.; Santoro, Nicholas; Foster, Clifton E.; Ralph, John; Soetaert, Wim; Pilate, Gilles; Boerjan, Wout

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is one of the main factors determining recalcitrance to enzymatic processing of lignocellulosic biomass. Poplars (Populus tremula x Populus alba) down-regulated for cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR), the enzyme catalyzing the first step in the monolignol-specific branch of the lignin biosynthetic pathway, were grown in field trials in Belgium and France under short-rotation coppice culture. Wood samples were classified according to the intensity of the red xylem coloration typically associated with CCR down-regulation. Saccharification assays under different pretreatment conditions (none, two alkaline, and one acid pretreatment) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation assays showed that wood from the most affected transgenic trees had up to 161% increased ethanol yield. Fermentations of combined material from the complete set of 20-mo-old CCR–down-regulated trees, including bark and less efficiently down-regulated trees, still yielded ∼20% more ethanol on a weight basis. However, strong down-regulation of CCR also affected biomass yield. We conclude that CCR down-regulation may become a successful strategy to improve biomass processing if the variability in down-regulation and the yield penalty can be overcome. PMID:24379366

  19. [Silviculture of poplar plantation in China: a review].

    PubMed

    Fang, Sheng-Zuo

    2008-10-01

    There are more than 7.0 million hm2 of poplar plantation in China, ranking top one in the world. To meet the needs of a growing world for social-economic development, environmental improvement, and sustainable development through poplar plantation establishment is a main research interest in the globe. This paper introduced the regionalizing cultivation, key planting clones, and productivities of poplar plantations in China, and summarized the recent 10 years research progress in China in the site quality evaluation, seedling propagation techniques, management patterns, mixed plantation establishment, agroforestry management system, water and nutrient management techniques, site productivity maintenance, and ecological functions of poplar plantation. The potential productivity, general allocation, oriented silviculture, and environmental function study of poplar plantation were also discussed and prospected. The contents of this paper would provide some references for the silviculture and sustainable management of poplar plantation in China.

  20. Goldstone radar evidence for short-axis mode non-principal axis rotation of near-Earth asteroid (214869) 2007 PA8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozovic, M.; Benner, L.; Magri, C.; Busch, M.; Scheeres, D. J.; Giorgini, J. D.; Reddy, V.; Hicks, M. D.; Jao, J. S.; Lee, C. G.; Snedeker, L. G.; Silva, M. A.; Slade, M. A.; Lawrence, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    We report Goldstone radar (8560 MHz, 3.5 cm) observations and shape and spin state modeling of near-Earth asteroid (214869) 2007 PA8. We observed 2007 PA8 on 16 days between Oct 16-Nov 13, 2012 when the asteroid was within 0.14 AU of Earth. Closest approach was on Nov 5 at a distance of 0.043 AU (17 lunar distances). Images obtained with Goldstone's new chirp system achieved range resolution as fine as 3.75 m, placing thousands of pixels on the asteroid's surface and revealing that 2007 PA8 is an elongated, asymmetric object. Surface features include angularities, multiple facets, and a concavity approximately several hundred meters in diameter. We used the Shape software [1, 2] to estimate the asteroid's 3D shape and spin state. The initial shape of the asteroid was parameterized as an ovoid with dimensions of 1.85 kmx1.25 kmx1.20 km in principal axis (PA) rotation with rotational rates of 80-100 deg/day to match the progression of features visible in the images. This yielded two candidate spin states: one near the south ecliptic pole and another near ecliptic longitude and latitude of (270, +17) deg. However, PA spin state models predict that images from Oct 31 and Nov 11 should be very similar, but the images on those two days appear dramatically different. As a result, we expanded the spin state search to include non-principal axis (NPA) rotation. The best fit was obtained with NPA rotation in short-axis mode with an average period of precession by the long axis around the angular momentum vector of 4.25 days and an oscillatory period around the long axis of 20.16 days. The amplitude of rolling around the long axis is 42 deg. The angular momentum vector points within 10 deg of ecliptic longitude and latitude of (273, +16) deg. 2007 PA8 is only the second confirmed short-axis mode NPA rotator found in the near-Earth asteroid population, after (99942) Apophis [3]. References: [1] Hudson, S., 1993. Remote Sens. Rev. 8, 195-203. [2] Magri, C. et al., 2007. Icarus

  1. Amelioration of drought-induced negative responses by elevated CO2 in field grown short rotation coppice mulberry (Morus spp.), a potential bio-energy tree crop.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Kalva Madhana; Reddy, Kanubothula Sitarami; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2017-05-01

    Present study describes the responses of short rotation coppice (SRC) mulberry, a potential bio-energy tree, grown under interactive environment of elevated CO2 (E) and water stress (WS). Growth in E stimulated photosynthetic performance in well-watered (WW) as well as during WS with significant increases in light-saturated photosynthetic rates (A Sat), water use efficiency (WUEi), intercellular [CO2], and photosystem-II efficiency (F V/F M and ∆F/F M') with concomitant reduction in stomatal conductance (g s) and transpiration (E) compared to ambient CO2 (A) grown plants. Reduced levels of proline, H2O2, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and higher contents of antioxidants including ascorbic acid and total phenolics in WW and WS in E plants clearly demonstrated lesser oxidative damage. Further, A plants showed higher transcript abundance and antioxidant enzyme activities under WW as well as during initial stages of WS (15 days). However, with increasing drought imposition (30 days), A plants showed down regulation of antioxidant systems compared to their respective E plants. These results clearly demonstrated that future increased atmospheric CO2 enhances the photosynthetic potential and also mitigate the drought-induced oxidative stress in SRC mulberry. In conclusion, mulberry is a potential bio-energy tree crop which is best suitable for short rotation coppice forestry-based mitigation of increased [CO2] levels even under intermittent drought conditions, projected to prevail in the fast-changing global climate.

  2. How are arbuscular mycorrhizal associations related to maize growth performance during short-term cover crop rotation?

    PubMed

    Higo, Masao; Takahashi, Yuichi; Gunji, Kento; Isobe, Katsunori

    2017-07-31

    Better cover crop management options aiming to maximize the benefits of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to subsequent crops are largely unknown. We investigated the impact of cover crop management methods on maize growth performance and assemblages of AMF colonizing maize roots in a field trial. The cover crop treatments comprised Italian ryegrass, wheat, brown mustard and fallow in rotation with maize. The diversity of AMF communities among cover crops used for maize management was significantly influenced by the cover crop and time course. Cover crops did not affect grain yield and aboveground biomass of subsequent maize but affected early growth. A structural equation model indicated that the root colonization, AMF diversity and maize phosphorus uptake had direct strong positive effects on yield performance. AMF variables and maize performance were related directly or indirectly to maize grain yield, whereas root colonization had a positive effect on maize performance. AMF may be an essential factor that determines the success of cover crop rotational systems. Encouraging AMF associations can potentially benefit cover cropping systems. Therefore, it is imperative to consider AMF associations and crop phenology when making management decisions. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Estimating yellow-poplar growth and yield

    Treesearch

    Donald E. Beck

    1989-01-01

    Yellow-poplar grows in essentially pure, even-aged stands, so you can make growth and yield estimates from relatively few stand characteristics. The tables and models described here require only measures of stand age, stand basal area in trees 4.5 inches and larger, and site index. They were developed by remeasuring (at 5-year intervals over a 20-year period) many...

  4. Low temperatures are required to induce the development of fertile flowers in transgenic male and female early flowering poplar (Populus tremula L.).

    PubMed

    Hoenicka, Hans; Lehnhardt, Denise; Briones, Valentina; Nilsson, Ove; Fladung, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Until now, artificial early flowering poplar systems have mostly led to the development of sterile flowers. In this study, several strategies aimed at inducting fertile flowers in pHSP::AtFT transgenic poplar were evaluated, in particular the influence of temperature and photoperiod. Our results provide evidence that temperature, and not photoperiod, is the key factor required for the development of fertile flowers in early flowering poplar. Fertile flowers were only obtained when a cold treatment phase of several weeks was used after the heat treatment phase. Heat treatments induced AtFT gene activity through activation of the heat-shock promoter (pHSP). Photoperiod did not show a similar influence on flower fertility as pollen grains were obtained under both long- and short-day conditions. Fertility was confirmed in flowers of both male and female plants. For the first time, crosses were successfully performed with transgenic female early flowering poplar. All mature flowers obtained after 8 weeks of inductive treatments were fertile. Gene expression studies also confirmed that cold temperatures influenced expression of poplar genes homologous to 'pollen development genes' from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Homology and expression patterns suggested a role for PtTDF1, PtBAM1, PtSERK1/2 and PtMS1 on anther and pollen development in poplar flowers. The system developed in this study allows a fast and very reliable induction of fertile poplar flowers in a very short period of time. The non-reproductive phase, usually 7-10 years, can now be shortened to 6-10 months, and fertile flowers can be obtained independently of the season. This system is a reliable tool for breeding purposes (high-speed breeding technology), genomics and biosafety research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Short-term and Imminent Precursors of Haiti M7.0 Earthquake: Earth Degassing and Thermal Vortex Rotated Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Z.; Qiang, J.; Zeng, Z.; Wang, J.; Xie, H.

    2010-12-01

    The introduction of fracture theory in geology into seismology is hindering the development of seismology and impeding the progress of earthquake forecast. The study of thermal infrared images of the same time but on different days, 30 days prior to the earthquake, one at 17:45:14,Dec.10 UTC,2009 and the other at 17:45:14,Dec.14 UTC,2009, shows that the brightness temperature increases from 296-297°C into 302-303°C in the Cuba Ils., Haiti Isl. Of Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea and adjacent area. The area of temperature increase takes the shape of an elliptic circle 4000Km long in the NW direction and 1000Km wide in the NE direction with an area of about 4,000,000Km2 . P axis is stretch in NNE21° direction. The strike of the fracture is NW 3300. The elliptic circle structure had left handed rotation. 12 to 10days before the quake the cloud belt had extended from Port-au-Prince into Atlantic ocean(25°N,-31.5W)with its width of 50-100Km and lasted more than 50 hours. Earthquake can be predicted using the satellite thermal infrared brightness temperature anomalous method and combining the method of array of infrasonic instruments. The autors thank Dr. Helen Wood, former Chairman of CEOS (Committee of Earth Observation Satellite) and Dr. Axel Graumann of NOAA for providing the satellite images used in this study. Thermal Vortex Rotated Movement and Structure Prior to Haiti Earthquake Earth degassing from the epicenter of Haiti Earthquake, Clould belt extends 4,000 km for 50 hours.

  6. Adaptive traits to fluvial systems of native tree European black Poplar (Populus nigra L.) population in Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulino, Luigi; Pasquino, Vittorio; Todaro, Luigi; Rita, Angelo; Villani, Paolo; Battista Chirico, Giovanni; Saracino, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    This work focuses on the morphological and biomechanical traits developed by the European black poplar (Populus nigra) to cope with the hydraulic force and prolonged submersion periods during floods. Two riverine environments of the Cilento sub-region (Southern Italy) have been selected for this experimental study. The two sites have the same climatic and hydrological regimes. The first site is located along the Ripiti stream, characterized by a braided channel with longitudinal and transverse bars and eroding banks. The second site is located along the Badolato stream, an entrenched meandering riffle/pool channel, with low gradients and high width/depth. P. nigra mixed with Salix alba and along the Badolato stream also Platanus orientalis, is the dominant wooden riparian vegetation in both sites. Cuttings from adult P. nigra trees originated by seeds were collected and planted in the 'Azienda Sperimentale Regionale Improsta' (Eboli-Salerno, Campania region). The experimental plantation was managed according to a multi-stem short rotation coppice with low external energy input and high disturbance regime generated by a 3 years rotation coppicing. The two sample stool sets exhibit statistically similar morphological traits, but different values of Young elasticity module of the shoots. A functional evaluation of the biomechanical differences was performed by measuring the bending of the individual stems under the hypothesis of complete submergence within a flow of different mean velocities, using a numerical model that predicts the bending of woody vegetation beams allowing for large deflections. The results suggest that plants with the same gene pool but coming from morphologically different riverine environments, may reflect different dominant biomechanical properties, which might be relevant for designing local sustainable management and restoration plans of rivers and riparian systems.

  7. 7. GENERAL VIEW EAST FROM ROOFTOP OF POPLAR FOREST TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. GENERAL VIEW EAST FROM ROOFTOP OF POPLAR FOREST TOWARDS SUMMER KITCHEN (FOREGROUND) AND DAIRY; CHIMNEY OF SOUTH TENANT HOUSE BARELY VISIBLE THROUGH TREES; EAST PRIVY RARELY VISIBLE OVER EAST MOUND (1987) - Poplar Forest, Summer Kitchen, State Route 661, Forest, Bedford County, VA

  8. Use of Sulfometuron in Hybrid Poplar Energy Plantations

    Treesearch

    Daniel A. Netzer

    1995-01-01

    Reports that low rates of sulfometuron, 70 grams per hactare (1 ounce product or 0.75 ounces active ingredient per acre), applied when hybrid poplars are completely dormant, can provide season-long weed control and increase hybrid poplar growth. If plantation access is not possible before growth activity begins in the spring, late fall application of this herbicide...

  9. Morphological and molecular characterization of two Aphelenchoides from poplar leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During a long-term, large network study of the ecology of plant endophytes in native habitats, various nematodes were found. Two poplar species, Populus angustifolia (narrowleaf cottonwood) and P. trichocarpa (black poplar) represent important ecological and genomic models now used in ongoing plant...

  10. Soil greenhouse gas fluxes from a poplar bioenergy plantation: How long does former land use type matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    The cultivation of fast-growing tree species for the production of bioenergy -- known as short rotation woody crops (SRWC) -- is considered to be carbon-neutral because biomass combustion releases only carbon which has previously been extracted from the atmosphere via photosynthesis. The true greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential of SRWC, however, remains largely unknown due to limited knowledge on the amount of GHG released from the soil during cultivation, and the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration rate over time. Especially measurements of the complete GHG balance of SRWC plantations which have already been managed for several years are lacking. The aim of this study was to quantify the spatial and temporal variability of soil GHG fluxes in a SRWC plantation with poplar located in Lochristi, Belgium (POPFULL, http://uahost.uantwerpen.be/popfull/). The plantation has been established in April 2010 partly on former cropland and partly on former pasture, enabling us to study the dependency of soil GHG fluxes on former land use type under identical climate and management conditions. Furthermore, spatial differences in the SOC content created by alternating row spacings between poplars were studied. The plantation was harvested in February 2012, and in February 2014. Soil CO_2, CH_4, N_2O and CO fluxes were simultaneously monitored with automated closed dynamic chamber systems from May 2013 until August 2014, embracing a pre- and post-harvest period. The chamber measurements were accompanied by fortnightly measurements of soil gas concentrations in the top- and subsoil (2013: CO2 and O_2, 2014: CO_2, CH_4, and N_2O). Preliminary results show that former pasture and cropland areas were still distinguishable within the plantation based on properties such as weed composition, dry bulk density and SOC content. During a drought period in August 2013, soil CO2 fluxes seemed to be slightly higher from the former cropland area, but no apparent effect of former land

  11. Effects of increased nitrogen supply on the lignification of poplar wood.

    PubMed

    Pitre, Frederic E; Pollet, Brigitte; Lafarguette, Florian; Cooke, Janice E K; MacKay, John J; Lapierre, Catherine

    2007-12-12

    The short-term influence of adequate and high nitrogen fertilization on poplar lignification was investigated. The high nitrogen supply decreased lignin staining in the newly formed secondary xylem, indicating that lignin deposition was affected. Acetyl bromide determinations gave a 9-10% decrease in lignin content; however, Klason lignin content was unchanged. Thioacidolysis showed that elevated N supply affected lignin structure such that there was a reduced frequency of lignin units involved in beta-O-4 bonds, a reduced syringyl/guaiacyl ratio, an increased frequency of p-hydroxyphenyl lignin units, more guaiacyl units with free phenolic groups, and more p-hydroxybenzoic acid ester-linked to poplar lignins. These features suggest that lignins from poplars grown under high N bear structural similarities to lignins formed during early stages of wood development. The findings also indicate that a gravitational stimulus inducing the formation of tension wood and high N availability lead to similar and additive effects on lignin content and structure.

  12. Overexpression of DEMETER, a DNA demethylase, promotes early apical bud maturation in poplar.

    PubMed

    Conde, Daniel; Moreno-Cortés, Alicia; Dervinis, Christopher; Ramos-Sánchez, José M; Kirst, Matias; Perales, Mariano; González-Melendi, Pablo; Allona, Isabel

    2017-08-15

    The transition from active growth to dormancy is critical for the survival of perennial plants. We identified a DEMETER-like (CsDML) cDNA from a winter-enriched cDNA subtractive library in chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.), an economically and ecologically important species. Next, we characterized this DNA demethylase and its putative orthologue in the more experimentally tractable hybrid poplar (Populus tremula x alba), under the signals that trigger bud dormancy in trees. We performed phylogenetic and protein sequence analysis, gene expression profiling and 5mC immunodetection studies to evaluate the role of CsDML and its homologue in poplar, PtaDML6. Transgenic hybrid poplars overexpressing CsDML were produced and analyzed. Short days (SD) and cold temperatures induced CsDML and PtaDML6. Overexpression of CsDML accelerated SD-induced bud formation, specifically from stage 1 to 0. Bud acquired a red-brown coloration earlier than wild type (WT) plants, alongside with the up regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis enzymes and accumulation of flavonoids in the SAM and bud scales. Our data shows that the CsDML gene induces bud formation needed for the survival of the apical meristem under the harsh conditions of winter. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Obesity Has Minimal Impact on Short-Term Functional Scores After Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Rotator Cuff Tear Arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Morris, Brent J; Haigler, Richard E; Cochran, John M; Laughlin, Mitzi S; Elkousy, Hussein A; Gartsman, Gary M; Edwards, T Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The potential adverse effect of body mass index (BMI) on shoulder function scores after reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) has not been investigated. We conducted a study to examine outcomes of RSA performed for rotator cuff tear arthropathy (RCTA) across BMI categories (normal weight, overweight, obese). We hypothesized that, compared with normal-weight patients, obese patients would have worse shoulder function scores, worse mobility, and more complications. Using a prospective shoulder arthroplasty registry, we identified 77 primary RSAs performed for RCTA with minimum 2-year follow-up. Thirty-four patients had normal weight (BMI <25 kg/m2), 21 were overweight (BMI 25-30 kg/m2), and 22 were obese (BMI >30 kg/m2). Shoulder function scores, mobility, and satisfaction were evaluated before surgery and at final follow-up. The 3 BMI groups were not significantly different on demographic factors, preoperative shoulder function scores, or preoperative mobility (P > .05). For each group, shoulder function scores and mobility significantly improved between the preoperative and final follow-up assessments (P < .001). Patient satisfaction was similar between groups (P = .967). Improved shoulder function scores, mobility, and patient satisfaction can be expected after RSA for RCTA in patients regardless of BMI.

  14. Current status and future directions for the U.S. Department of Energy`s short-rotation woody crop research

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, G.A.; Downing, M.E.; Wright, L.L.

    1994-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Biofuels Feedstock Development Program (BFDP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1978. The program`s goal is to provide leadership in the development, demonstration and implementation of environmentally acceptable and commercially viable biomass supply systems. Three model short-rotation woody crop (SRWC) species, i.e. Populus spp., Acer saccharinum and Salix spp., have been selected for further development based on their productivity, adaptability, and suitability as biomass feedstocks. Of these three, Populus is the primary candidate for SRWC in the United States. For Populus the prescribed management system involves the use of intensive site preparation of agricultural quality lands, improved clonal plant materials at ca. 1,000 trees/ac, mechanical and chemical weed control for the first 2 years, and rotation length of 6--8 years, followed by replanting. Currently, due to the wider spacings and larger tree sizes, traditional, start-stop, one-piece harvesting techniques are being applied to SRWC; this includes the use of feller-bunchers, skidding to a common landing, and on-site chipping. Under the above silvicultural system, harvesting and transportation expenditures account for 50 to 60% of the total production costs. The productivity goals for SRWC are 8--12 t/ac/yr, with the current average across all sites and clones at ca. 4 t/ac/yr. Productivity rates on large-scale plantings have been documented at 11 t/ac/yr. To increase the average productivity rates, silvicultural enrichments [e.g., spacing variances, fertilization once per rotation (ca. 70 lbs/ac N), and irrigation], genetic improvement, and molecular genetics techniques are being applied to all model species. This research is being managed under the concept of regional, integrated Crop Development Centers. There are presently 3 Populus crop development centers.

  15. Survey of twenty-six hybrid poplar lines for poplar borer

    Treesearch

    W. Doug Stone; T. Keith Beatty; T. Evan Nebeker

    2006-01-01

    An insect survey was completed on 26 lines of hybrid poplar (Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii) that had the Roundup® Ready and Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) genes. The survey was conducted in Kentucky in cooperation with MeadWestvaco. A total of 260 trees were evaluated. Survival rate averaged...

  16. The clonal root system of balsam poplar in upland sites of Quebec and Alberta.

    PubMed

    Adonsou, Kokouvi E; DesRochers, Annie; Tremblay, Francine; Thomas, Barb R; Isabel, Nathalie

    2016-10-01

    Balsam poplar seeds are short-lived and require moist seedbeds soon after they are released to germinate. In addition to sexual reproduction, balsam poplar stands can regenerate clonally by root suckering. The origin of stands will in turn affect their genetic structure and root system architecture, which are poorly understood for upland forest stands. Three stands were hydraulically excavated in Quebec (moist) and Alberta (dry) to determine the origin of trees and to characterize root systems with respect to presence of parental roots and root grafts connections. Clones were identified using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs), and all stems, roots and root grafts were aged using dendrochronology techniques. All 82 excavated trees were of sucker origin, and four of the six stands contained a single clone. Parental root connections were found between 22% and 25% of excavated trees, and 53% and 48% of trees were linked with a root graft between the same or different clones, in Alberta and Quebec, respectively. Mean distance between trees connected by parental root was significantly lower than the distance between unconnected trees (0.47 ± 0.25 m vs. 3.14 ± 0.15 m and 1.55 ± 0.27 m vs. 4.25 ± 0.13 m) in Alberta and in Quebec, respectively. The excavations also revealed many dead stumps with live roots, maintained through root connections with live trees. This research highlights that balsam poplar growing in upland stands is a clonal species that can maintain relatively high genotypic diversity, with frequent root connections between trees at maturity. Maintaining an extensive root system through root connections increases the chances of a clone surviving when the above ground tree is dead and may also enhance the resilience of balsam poplar stands after disturbance.

  17. High intensity, short duration rotational grazing on reclaimed cool season tall fescue/legume pastures: II. Forage production, soil and plant tissue comparisons between grazed and ungrazed pastures

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.E.; Erickson, W.R.; Bonine, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    The Midway Mine is located 50 miles south of Kansas City, Kansas straddling the border of Kansas and Missouri. The Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co. mined the area until 1989, when the mine was closed and reclaimed. Approximately 3,750 acres were topsoiled and revegetated with a cool season tall fescue/legume pasture. High intensity, short duration rotational grazing has become the preferred management practice on these pastures. This study evaluated soil and vegetation data collected on 1,250 acres of pasture which was grazed by about 550 cow/calf units. Ongoing monitoring programs are evaluating the effects of rotational grazing. Soil testing includes macro-nutrients, micro-nutrients and microbial activity. Plant tissue analyses monitor levels of principal macro-nutrients and micro-nutrients. Vegetation monitoring consists of measuring forage production. Results were contrasted between pregrazing and postgrazing, and grazed and ungrazed pasture. Agronomic data from the grazed versus ungrazed treatments documented the following results: (1) higher levels of plant tissue nitrate, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and sulfur; (2) higher microbial activity; (3) similar levels of soil nitrate, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and sulfur; and (4) increased biomass production.

  18. Ultrasound imaging-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis: success in short-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Bazzocchi, Alberto; Pelotti, Patrizia; Serraino, Salvatore; Battaglia, Milva; Bettelli, Graziano; Fusaro, Isabella; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Rotini, Roberto; Albisinni, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinitis (RCCT) is a common cause of shoulder pain in adults and typically presents as activity-related shoulder pain. Between non-surgical and surgical treatment options, today a few minimal invasive techniques are available to remove the calcific deposit, and they represent a cornerstone in the management of this painful clinical condition. The aim of the work was a retrospective evaluation of double-needle ultrasound-guided percutaneous fragmentation and lavage (DNL), focused on understanding the factors which are of major importance in determining a quick and good response at 1 month. A series of 147 patients affected by RCCT and suitable for DNL were evaluated. A systematic review of anamnestic, clinical and imaging data was performed in 144 shoulders treated in a single-centre setting. Clinical reports and imaging examinations were revisited. The inclusion criteria were submission to DNL, therefore fitness for the percutaneous procedure, and following 1-month follow-up. There was no exclusion owing to risk of bias. The treatment was defined as successful for constant shoulder modified score (CSS) improvement of >50% at 1 month. In 70% of shoulders, the treatment resulted in a quick and significant reduction of symptoms (successful). On the whole, CSS increase at 1 month was estimated at 91.5 ± 69.1%. CSS variations were significantly related to age of patients (better results between 30 and 40 years old), calcification size (more relevant improvement for middle-sized calcifications, 12-17 mm), sonographic and radiographic features of calcific deposits (softer calcifications) and thickening of subacromial/subdeltoid bursa walls. In the final model of stepwise regression for CSS variation, ultrasound score pre-treatment and post-treatment, the distance between bursa and calcification before treatment and the size of post-treatment calcification area were shown to be independently correlated to success. Numeric rating scale score

  19. Ultrasound imaging-guided percutaneous treatment of rotator cuff calcific tendinitis: success in short-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Pelotti, Patrizia; Serraino, Salvatore; Battaglia, Milva; Bettelli, Graziano; Fusaro, Isabella; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Rotini, Roberto; Albisinni, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Rotator cuff calcific tendinitis (RCCT) is a common cause of shoulder pain in adults and typically presents as activity-related shoulder pain. Between non-surgical and surgical treatment options, today a few minimal invasive techniques are available to remove the calcific deposit, and they represent a cornerstone in the management of this painful clinical condition. The aim of the work was a retrospective evaluation of double-needle ultrasound-guided percutaneous fragmentation and lavage (DNL), focused on understanding the factors which are of major importance in determining a quick and good response at 1 month. Methods: A series of 147 patients affected by RCCT and suitable for DNL were evaluated. A systematic review of anamnestic, clinical and imaging data was performed in 144 shoulders treated in a single-centre setting. Clinical reports and imaging examinations were revisited. The inclusion criteria were submission to DNL, therefore fitness for the percutaneous procedure, and following 1-month follow-up. There was no exclusion owing to risk of bias. The treatment was defined as successful for constant shoulder modified score (CSS) improvement of >50% at 1 month. Results: In 70% of shoulders, the treatment resulted in a quick and significant reduction of symptoms (successful). On the whole, CSS increase at 1 month was estimated at 91.5 ± 69.1%. CSS variations were significantly related to age of patients (better results between 30 and 40 years old), calcification size (more relevant improvement for middle-sized calcifications, 12–17 mm), sonographic and radiographic features of calcific deposits (softer calcifications) and thickening of subacromial/subdeltoid bursa walls. In the final model of stepwise regression for CSS variation, ultrasound score pre-treatment and post-treatment, the distance between bursa and calcification before treatment and the size of post-treatment calcification area were shown to be independently correlated to

  20. Comparison of short-range-order in liquid- and rotator-phase states of a simple molecular liquid: A reverse Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics analysis of neutron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, Luis Carlos; Tamarit, Josep Lluis; Veglio, Nestor; Bermejo, Francisco Javier; Cuello, Gabriel Julio

    2007-10-01

    The short-range order (SRO) correlations in liquid- and rotator-phase states of carbon tetrachloride are revisited here. The correlation of some angular magnitudes is used to evaluate the positional and orientational correlations in the liquid as well as in the rotator phase. The results show significant similitudes in the relative position of the molecules surrounding a central one but striking differences in their relative orientations, which could explain the changes in SRO between the two phases and the puzzling behavior of the local density in the liquid and rotator phases.

  1. Exercise following a short immobilization period is detrimental to tendon properties and joint mechanics in a rat rotator cuff injury model.

    PubMed

    Peltz, Cathryn D; Sarver, Joseph J; Dourte, Leann M; Würgler-Hauri, Carola C; Williams, Gerald R; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2010-07-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common clinical problem that can result in pain and disability. Previous studies in a rat model showed enhanced tendon to bone healing with postoperative immobilization. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of postimmobilization activity level on insertion site properties and joint mechanics in a rat model. Our hypothesis was that exercise following a short period of immobilization will cause detrimental changes in insertion site properties compared to cage activity following the same period of immobilization, but that passive shoulder mechanics will not be affected. We detached and repaired the supraspinatus tendon of 22 Sprague-Dawley rats, and the injured shoulder was immobilized postoperatively for 2 weeks. Following immobilization, rats were prescribed cage activity or exercise for 12 weeks. Passive shoulder mechanics were determined, and following euthanasia, tendon cross-sectional area and mechanical properties were measured. Exercise following immobilization resulted in significant decreases compared to cage activity in range of motion, tendon stiffness, modulus, percent relaxation, and several parameters from both a structurally based elastic model and a quasi-linear viscoelastic model. Therefore, we conclude that after a short period of immobilization, increased activity is detrimental to both tendon mechanical properties and shoulder joint mechanics, presumably due to increased scar production.

  2. Exercise following a short immobilization period is detrimental to tendon properties and joint mechanics in a rat rotator cuff injury model

    PubMed Central

    Peltz, Cathryn D.; Sarver, Joseph J.; Dourte, LeAnn M.; Wüergler-Hauri, Carola C.; Williams, Gerald R.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common clinical problem that can result in pain and disability. Previous studies in a rat model have shown enhanced tendon to bone healing with post-operative immobilization. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of post-immobilization activity level on insertion site properties and joint mechanics in a rat model. Our hypothesis was that exercise following a short period of immobilization will cause detrimental changes in insertion site properties compared to cage activity following the same period of immobilization but passive shoulder mechanics will not be affected. We detached and repaired the supraspinatus tendon of twenty-two Sprague-Dawley rats and the injured shoulder was immobilized post-operatively for 2 weeks. Following the immobilization period, rats were prescribed cage activity or exercise for 12 weeks. Passive shoulder mechanics were determined and following sacrifice, tendon cross-sectional area and mechanical properties were measured. Exercise following immobilization resulted in significant decreases compared to cage activity in range of motion, tendon stiffness, modulus, percent relaxation and several parameters from both a structurally based elastic model and a quasi-linear viscoelastic model. Therefore, we conclude that after a short period of immobilization, increased activity is detrimental to both tendon mechanical properties and shoulder joint mechanics, presumably due to increased scar production. PMID:20058271

  3. Practical salinity management for leachate irrigation to poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Smesrud, Jason K; Duvendack, George D; Obereiner, James M; Jordahl, James L; Madison, Mark F

    2012-01-01

    Landfill leachate can be beneficially reused for irrigation of fiber crops with appropriate attention to nutrient and salinity management. The Riverbend Landfill in Western Oregon has been effectively practicing irrigation of landfill leachate to poplar trees since 1993. Over that time, the site has been adaptively managed to control salinity impacts to the tree crop while beneficially utilizing the applied water and nutrients during each growing season. Representative leachate irrigation water has ranged in concentration of total dissolved solids from 777 to 6,940 mg/L, chloride from 180 to 1,760 mg/L and boron from 3.2 to 7.3 mg/L. Annual leachate irrigation applications have also ranged between 102 and 812 mm/yr. Important conclusions from this site have included: 1) Appropriate tree clone selection and tree stand spacing, thinning, and harvest rotations are critical to maintaining a productive tree stand that is resilient and resistant to salt stress. The most effective combinations have included clones DN-34, OP-367, 184-411, 49-177, and 15-29 planted at spacing of 3.7-m x 1.8-m to 3.7-m x 3.7-m; 2) Leaf tissue boron levels are closely correlated to soil boron levels and can be managed with leaching. When leaf tissue boron levels exceed 200 to 250 mg/kg, signs of salt stress may emerge and should be monitored closely; 3) Salinity from leachate irrigation can be managed to sustain a healthy tree crop by controlling mass loading rates and providing appropriate irrigation blending if necessary. Providing freshwater irrigation following each leachate irrigation and targeting freshwater irrigation as 30 percent of total irrigation water applied has successfully controlled salt impacts to vegetation; and 4) Drip irrigation generally requires more careful attention to long-term soil salinity management than spray irrigation. Moving drip irrigation tubes periodically to prevent the formation of highly saline zones within the soil profile is important. In this paper, a

  4. The possibility to measure the magnetic moments of short-lived particles (charm and beauty baryons) at LHC and FCC energies using the phenomenon of spin rotation in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The use of spin rotation effect in bent crystals for measuring the magnetic moment of short-lived particles in the range of LHC and FCC energies is considered. It is shown that the estimated number of produced baryons that are captured into a bent crystal grows as ∼γ 3 / 2 with increasing particle energy. Hence it may be concluded that the experimental measurement of magnetic moments of short-lived particles using the spin rotation effect is feasible at LHC and higher energies (for LHC energies, e.g., the running time required for measuring the magnetic moment of Λc+ is 2 ÷ 16 hours).

  5. Numerical Analysis of the Bending Properties of Cathay Poplar Glulam

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying; Wu, Yuxuan; Zhu, Xudong; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Zhiming; Wu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the formulae and finite element analysis models for predicting the Modulus of Elastic (MOE) and Modulus of Rupture (MOR) of Cathay poplar finger-jointed glulam. The formula of the MOE predicts the MOE of Cathay poplar glulam glued with one-component polyurethane precisely. Three formulae are used to predict the MOR, and Equation (12) predicts the MOR of Cathay poplar glulam precisely. The finite element analysis simulation results of both the MOE and MOR are similar to the experimental results. The predicted results of the finite element analysis are shown to be more accurate than those of the formulae, because the finite element analysis considers the glue layers, but the formulae do not. Three types of typical failure modes due to bending were summarized. The bending properties of Cathay poplar glulam were compared to those of Douglas fir glulam. The results show that Cathay poplar glulam has a lower stiffness, but a marginally higher strength. One-component polyurethane adhesive is shown to be more effective than resorcinol formaldehyde resin adhesive for Cathay poplar glulam. This study shows that Cathay poplar has the potential to be a glulam material in China. PMID:28793619

  6. Cytokinin signaling regulates cambial development in poplar.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Immanen, Juha; Laxell, Marjukka; Kauppinen, Leila; Tarkowski, Petr; Dolezal, Karel; Tähtiharju, Sari; Elo, Annakaisa; Decourteix, Mélanie; Ljung, Karin; Bhalerao, Rishikesh; Keinonen, Kaija; Albert, Victor A; Helariutta, Ykä

    2008-12-16

    Although a substantial proportion of plant biomass originates from the activity of vascular cambium, the molecular basis of radial plant growth is still largely unknown. To address whether cytokinins are required for cambial activity, we studied cytokinin signaling across the cambial zones of 2 tree species, poplar (Populus trichocarpa) and birch (Betula pendula). We observed an expression peak for genes encoding cytokinin receptors in the dividing cambial cells. We reduced cytokinin levels endogenously by engineering transgenic poplar trees (P. tremula x tremuloides) to express a cytokinin catabolic gene, Arabidopsis CYTOKININ OXIDASE 2, under the promoter of a birch CYTOKININ RECEPTOR 1 gene. Transgenic trees showed reduced concentration of a biologically active cytokinin, correlating with impaired cytokinin responsiveness. In these trees, both apical and radial growth was compromised. However, radial growth was more affected, as illustrated by a thinner stem diameter than in WT at same height. To dissect radial from apical growth inhibition, we performed a reciprocal grafting experiment. WT scion outgrew the diameter of transgenic stock, implicating cytokinin activity as a direct determinant of radial growth. The reduced radial growth correlated with a reduced number of cambial cell layers. Moreover, expression of a cytokinin primary response gene was dramatically reduced in the thin-stemmed transgenic trees. Thus, a reduced level of cytokinin signaling is the primary basis for the impaired cambial growth observed. Together, our results show that cytokinins are major hormonal regulators required for cambial development.

  7. Leaf ontogeny dominates the seasonal exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in a SRC-poplar plantation during an entire growing season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilli, Federico; Gioli, Beniamino; Fares, Silvano; Zenone, Terenzio; Zona, Donatella; Gielen, Bert; Loreto, Francesco; Janssens, Ivan; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    The declining cost of many renewable energy technologies and changes in the prices of fossil fuels have recently encouraged governments policies to subsidize the use of biomass as a sustainable source of energy. Deciduous poplars (Populus spp.) trees are often selected for biomass production in short rotation coppiced (SRC) for their high CO2 photosynthetic assimilation rates and their capacity to develop dense canopies with high values of leaf area index (LAI). So far, observations and projections of seasonal variations of many VOC fluxes has been limited to strong isoprenoids emitting evergreen ecosystems such tropical and Mediterranean forests as well as Citrus and oil palm plantation, all having constant values of LAI. We run a long-term field campaign where the exchange of VOC, together with CO2 and water vapor was monitored during an entire growing season (June - November, 2012) above a SRC-based poplar plantation. Our results confirmed that isoprene and methanol were the most abundant fluxes emitted, accounting for more than 90% of the total carbon released in form of VOC. However, Northern climates characterized by fresh summertime temperatures and recurring precipitations favored poplar growth while inhibiting the development of isoprene emission that resulted in only 0.7% of the net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE). Besides, measurements of a multitude of VOC fluxes by PTR-TOF-MS showed bi-directional exchange of oxygenated-VOC (OVOC) such as: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene oxidation products (iox, namely MVK, MAC and MEK) as well as ethanol and formic acid. The application of Self Organizing Maps to visualize the relationship between the full time-series of many VOC fluxes and the observed seasonal variations of environmental, physiological and structural parameters proved the most abundant isoprene ad methanol fluxes to occur mainly on the hottest days under mid-high light intensities when also NEE and evapotraspiration reached the highest

  8. Goldstone radar evidence for short-axis mode non-principal-axis rotation of near-Earth asteroid (214869) 2007 PA8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brozović, Marina; Benner, Lance A. M.; Magri, Christopher; Scheeres, Daniel J.; Busch, Michael W.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Nolan, Michael C.; Jao, Joseph S.; Lee, Clement G.; Snedeker, Lawrence G.; Silva, Marc A.; Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Slade, Martin A.; Hicks, Michael D.; Howell, Ellen S.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Sanchez, Juan A.; Reddy, Vishnu; Dykhuis, Melissa; Le Corre, Lucille

    2017-04-01

    We report radar and optical photometric observations of near-Earth asteroid (214869) 2007 PA8 obtained during October 2-November 13, 2012. We observed 2007 PA8 on sixteen days with Goldstone (8560 MHz, 3.5 cm) and on five days with the 0.6 m telescope at Table Mountain Observatory. Closest approach was on November 5 at a distance of 0.043 au. Images obtained with Goldstone's new chirp system achieved range resolutions as fine as 3.75 m, placing thousands of pixels on the asteroid's surface, and revealing that 2007 PA8 is an elongated, asymmetric object. Surface features include angularities, facets, and a concavity approximately 400 m in diameter. We used the Shape software to estimate the asteroid's 3D shape and spin state. 2007 PA8 has a broad, rounded end and a tapered, angular end with sharp-crested ridges. The asteroid's effective diameter is 1.35 ± 0.07 km, which in combination with the absolute magnitude of 16.30 ± 0.52 gives an optical albedo of pV = 0.29 ± 0.14. The shape modeling of the radar data revealed that 2007 PA8 is a non-principal axis (NPA) rotator in the short-axis mode with an average period of precession by the long axis around the angular momentum vector of 4.26 ± 0.02 days and an oscillatory period around the long axis of 20.55 ± 3.75 days. The amplitude of rolling around the long axis is 42 ± 7° . The angular momentum vector points toward ecliptic longitude and latitude of 273.6 ± 10°, +16.9 ± 5°. 2007 PA8 is only the second confirmed short-axis mode NPA rotator known in the near-Earth asteroid population after (99942) Apophis (Pravec et al., 2014). 2007 PA8 has a geopotential high at the equator, where the equator is defined as the plane that contains the long and intermediate axis. This geopotential extreme could be interpreted as a large, hidden surface depression, or as evidence that 2007 PA8 is a multi-component body.

  9. Methods of establishing plantations of hybrid-poplar cuttings

    Treesearch

    Frank E. Cunningham

    1954-01-01

    Fast-growing hybrid poplars are now being tested in plantations scattered from Maine to West Virginia to find out how the different hybrids respond to a wide range of environmental conditions throughout the Northeast.

  10. Establishing intensively cultured hybrid poplar plantations for fuel and fiber.

    Treesearch

    Edward Hansen; Lincoln Moore; Daniel Netzer; Michael Ostry; Howard Phipps; Jaroslav Zavitkovski

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a step-by-step procedure for establishing commercial size intensively cultured plantations of hybrid poplar and summarizes the state-of-knowledge as developed during 10 years of field research at Rhinelander, Wisconsin.

  11. 8. EXTERIOR VIEW OF THE BARNES BUILDING FROM POPLAR STREET, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EXTERIOR VIEW OF THE BARNES BUILDING FROM POPLAR STREET, FACING NORTHEAST. CITY AUDITORIUM (BACKGROUND RIGHT) AND THE SHRINE TEMPLE (BACKGROUND LEFT). - Barnes Building, 477 Cotton Avenue, Macon, Bibb County, GA

  12. Assessment of mercury content in poplar leaves of Novokuznetsk agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapina, E. E.; Yusupov, D. V.; Tursunalieva, E. M.; Osipova, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the content of mercury in poplar leaves in the Novokuznetsk industrial agglomeration and along the automobile route Novokuznetsk-Mezhdurechensk is assessed. The geoecological indicators are also calculated.

  13. Virulence of Three Cylindrocladium Species to Yellow-Poplar Seedlings

    Treesearch

    T. H. Filer

    1970-01-01

    Cylindrocladium crotalariae and C. scoparium caused severe root rot on potted yellow-poplar seedlings. They appeared to be equally virulent. C. floridanum caused necrosis only on feeder roots of the seedlings.

  14. Green Revolution Trees: Semidwarfism Transgenes Modify Gibberellins, Promote Root Growth, Enhance Morphological Diversity, and Reduce Competitiveness in Hybrid Poplar1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Ani A.; Busov, Victor B.; Kosola, Kevin R.; Ma, Cathleen; Etherington, Elizabeth; Shevchenko, Olga; Gandhi, Harish; Pearce, David W.; Rood, Stewart B.; Strauss, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Semidwarfism has been used extensively in row crops and horticulture to promote yield, reduce lodging, and improve harvest index, and it might have similar benefits for trees for short-rotation forestry or energy plantations, reclamation, phytoremediation, or other applications. We studied the effects of the dominant semidwarfism transgenes GA Insensitive (GAI) and Repressor of GAI-Like, which affect gibberellin (GA) action, and the GA catabolic gene, GA 2-oxidase, in nursery beds and in 2-year-old high-density stands of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba). Twenty-nine traits were analyzed, including measures of growth, morphology, and physiology. Endogenous GA levels were modified in most transgenic events; GA20 and GA8, in particular, had strong inverse associations with tree height. Nearly all measured traits varied significantly among genotypes, and several traits interacted with planting density, including aboveground biomass, root-shoot ratio, root fraction, branch angle, and crown depth. Semidwarfism promoted biomass allocation to roots over shoots and substantially increased rooting efficiency with most genes tested. The increased root proportion and increased leaf chlorophyll levels were associated with changes in leaf carbon isotope discrimination, indicating altered water use efficiency. Semidwarf trees had dramatically reduced growth when in direct competition with wild-type trees, supporting the hypothesis that semidwarfism genes could be effective tools to mitigate the spread of exotic, hybrid, and transgenic plants in wild and feral populations. PMID:22904164

  15. Bedding Improves Yellow-Poplar Growth on Fragipan Soils

    Treesearch

    John K. Francis

    1979-01-01

    Yellow-poplar can be grown on soils that have a shallow fragipan--but unless such sites are bedded, growth is likely to be extremely poor. In a Tennessee study, bedding increased height of planted yellow-poplar over 5 years, but fertilizer did not. Because of the cost of bedding and the availability of nonfragipan sites, it would ordinarily be better not to plant...

  16. Spatial assessment of the economic feasibility of short rotation coppice on radioactively contaminated land in Belarus, Ukraine, and Russia. I. Model description and scenario analysis.

    PubMed

    Perk Mv, Marcel van der; Burema, Jiske; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Goor, François; Timofeyev, Sergei

    2004-09-01

    The economic feasibility of short rotation coppice (SRC) production and energy conversion in areas contaminated by Chernobyl-derived (137)Cs was evaluated taking the spatial variability of environmental conditions into account. Two sequential GIS-embedded submodels were developed for a spatial assessment, which allow for spatial variation in soil contamination, soil type, and land use. These models were applied for four SRC production and four energy conversion scenarios for the entire contaminated area of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia and for a part of the Bragin district, Belarus. It was concluded that in general medium-scale SRC production using local machines is most profitable. The areas near Chernobyl are not suitable for SRC production since the contamination levels in SRC wood exceed the intervention limit. Large scale SRC production is not profitable in areas where dry and sandy soils predominate. If the soil contamination does not exceed the intervention limit and sufficient SRC wood is available, all energy conversion scenarios are profitable.

  17. Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses

    SciTech Connect

    D.R. Coyle; J. Blake; K. Britton; M. Buford; R.G. Campbell; J. Cox; B. Cregg; D. Daniels; M. Jacobson; K. Johnsen; T. McDonald; K. McLeod; E. Nelson; D. Robison; R. Rummer; F. Sanchez; J. Stanturf; B. Stokes; C. Trettin; J. Tuskan; L. Wright; S. Wullschleger

    2003-12-31

    Coleman, M.D., et. al. 2003. Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses. Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 26 pp. Abstract: Many researchers have studied the productivity potential of intensively managed forest plantations. However, we need to learn more about the effects of fundamental growth processes on forest productivity; especially the influence of aboveground and belowground resource acquisition and allocation. This report presents installation, establishment, and first-year results of four tree species (two cottonwood clones, sycamore, sweetgum, and loblolly pine) grown with fertilizer and irrigation treatments. At this early stage of development, irrigation and fertilization were additive only in cottonwood clone ST66 and sweetgum. Leaf area development was directly related to stem growth, but root production was not always consistent with shoot responses, suggesting that allocation of resources varies among treatments. We will evaluate the consequences of these early responses on resource availability in subsequent growing seasons. This information will be used to: (1) optimize fiber and bioenergy production; (2) understand carbon sequestration; and (3) develop innovative applications such as phytoremediation; municipal, industrial, and agricultural wastes management; and protection of soil, air, and water resources.

  18. Mechanical resistance evaluation of a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced post in artificial endodontically treated premolar under rotational/lateral fracture fatigue testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lin, Chun-Li

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a novel anatomical short glass fiber reinforced (anatomical SGFR) post and evaluates the mechanical performance in artificial endodontically treated premolars. An anatomical SGFR fiber post with an oval shape and slot/notch designs was manufactured using an injection-molding machine. The three-point bending test and crown/core restorations using the anatomical SGFR and commercial cylindrical fiber posts under fatigue test were executed to understand the mechanical resistances. The results showed that static and dynamic rotational resistance were found significantly higher in the anatomical SGFR fiber post than in the commercial post. The endurance limitations at 1.2×10(6) cycles were 66.81 and 64.77 N for the anatomical SGFR and commercial fiber posts, respectively. The anatomical SGFR fiber post presented acceptable value of flexural strength and modulus, better fit adaption in the root canal resist torque more efficiency but was not a key issue in the lateral fracture resistance in an endodontically treated premolar.

  19. Poplar and its bacterial endophytes: coexistence and harmony

    SciTech Connect

    van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; Monchy, S.; Schwender, J.; Miller, L.; Ferrieri, R.; Rogers, A.; Zhu, W.; Weyens, N.; Vangronsveld, J.; Newman, L.

    2009-09-01

    Associations between plants and microorganisms are very complex and are the subject of an increasing number of studies. Here, we specifically address the relationship between poplar and its endophytic bacteria. The role and importance of endophytic bacteria in growth and development of their host plants is still underestimated. However, since many endophytes have a beneficial effect on their host, an improved understanding of the interaction between poplar and its endophytic bacteria has the potential to provide major breakthroughs that will improve the productivity of poplar. Endophytic bacteria can improve plant growth and development in a direct or indirect way. Direct plant growth promoting mechanisms may involve nitrogen fixation, production of plant growth regulators such as auxins, cytokinins and gibberellins, and suppression of stress ethylene synthesis by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity. Endophytic bacteria can indirectly benefit the plant by preventing the growth or activity of plant pathogens through competition for space and nutrients, antibiosis, production of hydrolytic enzymes, inhibition of pathogen-produced enzymes or toxins, and through systemic induction of plant defense mechanisms. Examples of applications for custom endophyte-host partnerships include improved productivity and establishment of poplar trees on marginal soils and the phytoremediation of contaminated soils and groundwater. A systems biology approach to understand the synergistic interactions between poplar and its beneficial endophytic bacteria represents an important field of research, which is facilitated by the recent sequencing of the genomes of poplar and several of its endophytic bacteria.

  20. Saline-water contamination in Quaternary deposits and the Poplar River, East Poplar Oil Field, northeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thamke, J.N.; Craigg, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    The extent of saline-water contamination in Quaternary deposits in and near the East Poplar oil field may be as much as 12.4 square miles and appears to be present throughout the entire saturated zone. The saline-water contamination affects 9-60 billion gallons of ground water. Saline- contaminated water moves westward through Quaternary glacial deposits and merges with southward-flowing water in Quaternary alluvium in the Poplar River valley. Saline ground water discharges into the Poplar River, and increases the dissolved-solids and chloride concentrations of the river. The probable source of saline-water contamination in the Quaternary deposits is brine that is a byproduct of the production of crude oil in the East Poplar oil field study area.

  1. Continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Fieber, C.; Colcord, A.R.; Faass, S.; Muzzy, J.D.; Roberts, R.S.

    1982-08-01

    To produce ethanol from hardwood it is desirable to fractionate the hardwood in order to produce a relatively pure cellulosic pulp for dilute acid hydrolysis. An experimental investigation of continuous steam hydrolysis of tulip poplar wood chips indicates that over 90% of the lignin present can be extracted by 0.1N sodium hydroxide, resulting in a cellulose pulp containing over 90% hexosan. The study was performed using a Stake Technology, Ltd., continuous digester rated at one oven dry ton per hour of wood chips. The yields of hexosans, hexoses, xylan, xylose, lignin, furfural, acetic acid and methanol were determined as a function of residence time and steam pressure in the digester. The information provides a basis for establishing a material and energy balance for a hardwood to ethanol plant.

  2. Effects of free atmospheric CO2 enrichment (FACE), N fertilization and poplar genotype on the physical protection of carbon in the mineral soil of a polar plantation after five years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoosbeek, M. R.; Vos, J. M.; Bakker, E. J.; Scarascia-Mugnozza, G. E.

    2006-11-01

    Free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments in aggrading forests and plantations have demonstrated significant increases in net primary production (NPP) and C storage in forest vegetation. The extra C uptake may also be stored in forest floor litter and in forest soil. After five years of FACE treatment at the EuroFACE short rotation poplar plantation, the increase of total soil C% was larger under elevated than under ambient CO2. However, the fate of this additional C allocated belowground remains unclear. The stability of soil organic matter is controlled by the chemical structure of the organic matter and the formation of micro-aggregates (within macro-aggregates) in which organic matter is stabilized and protected. FACE and N-fertilization treatment did not affect the micro- and macro-aggregate weight, C or N fractions obtained by wet sieving. However, Populus euramericana increased the small macro-aggregate and free micro-aggregate weight and C fractions. The obtained macro-aggregates were broken up in order to isolate recently formed micro-aggregates within macro-aggregates (iM-micro-aggregates). FACE increased the iM-micro-aggregate weight and C fractions, although not significantly. This study reveals that FACE did not affect the formation of aggregates. We did, however, observe a trend of increased stabilization and protection of soil C in micro-aggregates formed within macro-aggregates under FACE. Moreover, the largest effect on aggregate formation was due to differences in species, i.e. poplar genotype. P. euramericana increased the formation of free micro-aggregates which means that more newly incorporated soil C was stabilized and protected. The choice of species in a plantation, or the effect of global change on species diversity, may therefore affect the stabilization and protection of C in soils.

  3. Distribution of P, K, Ca, Mg, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn in wood and bark age classes of willows and poplars used for phytoextraction on soils contaminated by risk elements.

    PubMed

    Zárubová, Pavla; Hejcman, Michal; Vondráčková, Stanislava; Mrnka, Libor; Száková, Jiřina; Tlustoš, Pavel

    2015-12-01

    Fast-growing clones of Salix and Populus have been studied for remediation of soils contaminated by risk elements (RE) using short-rotation coppice plantations. Our aim was to assess biomass yield and distributions of elements in wood and bark of highly productive willow (S1--[Salix schwerinii × Salix viminalis] × S. viminalis, S2--Salix × smithiana clone S-218) and poplar (P1--Populus maximowiczii × Populus nigra, P2--P. nigra) clones with respect to aging. The field experiment was established in April 2008 on moderately Cd-, Pb- and Zn- contaminated soil. Shoots were harvested after four seasons (February 2012) and separated into annual classes of wood and bark. All tested clones grew on contaminated soils, with highest biomass production and lowest mortality exhibited by P1 and S2. Concentrations of elements, with exception of Ca and Pb, decreased with age and were higher in bark than in wood. The Salix clones were characterised by higher removal of Cd, Mn and Zn compared to the Populus clones. Despite generally higher RE content in young shoots, partly due to lower wood/bark ratios and higher RE concentrations in bark, the overall removal of RE was higher in older wood classes due to higher biomass yield. Thus, longer rotations seem to be more effective when phytoextraction strategy is considered. Of the four selected clones, S1 exhibited the best removal of Cd and Zn and is a good candidate for phytoextraction.

  4. The impacts of land-use change from grassland to bioenergy Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) Willow on the crop and ecosystem greenhouse gas balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Zoe M.; Alberti, Giorgio; Dondini, Marta; Smith, Pete; Taylor, Gail

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this research is to better understand the greenhouse gas balance of land-use transition to bioenergy cropping systems in a UK context. Given limited land availability, addressing the food-energy-water nexus remains a challenge, and it is imperative that bioenergy crops are sited appropriately and that competition with food crops is minimized. Here we present the results of a years' worth of soil and GHG data for a conversion from ex-set aside grassland to short rotation coppice (SRC) willow for bioenergy on a commercial scale. Initial results indicate that willow was a net sink for CO2 in comparison to grassland which was a net source of CO2. This provides evidence that the GHG balance of transitions to SRC bioenergy crops will potentially result in increased soil carbon. The empirical findings from this study have been combined with modelled estimates for the site to both test and validate the ECOSSE model. Initial comparisons show that the model is able to accurately predict the respiration occurring at the field site, suggesting that it is a valuable approach for up-scaling from point sites such as this to wider geographical areas and for considering future climate scenarios. The modelling output will also provide a user-friendly tool for land owners which will determine the GHG and soil carbon effects of changing land to bioenergy for UK. This work is based on the Ecosystem Land Use Modelling & Soil Carbon GHG Flux Trial (ELUM) project, which was commissioned and funded by the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI). This work was also jointly funded by the Carbo Biocrop Project.

  5. The impacts of land-use change from grassland to bioenergy Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) willow on the crop and ecosystem greenhouse gas balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Z. M.; Taylor, G.; Alberti, G.; Dondini, M.; Smith, P.

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research is to better understand the greenhouse gas balance of land-use transition to bioenergy cropping systems in a UK context. Given limited land availability, addressing the food-energy-water nexus remains a challenge, and it is imperative that bioenergy crops are sited appropriately and that competition with food crops is minimised. Initial analyses included an extensive literature review and meta-analysis with a focus on the effects of land-use change to bioenergy on soil carbon and GHGs. This data mining exercise allowed us to understand the current state of the literature and identify key areas of research which needed to be addressed. Significant knowledge gaps were identified, with particular uncertainty around transitions from grasslands and transitions to short rotation forestry. A paired site experiment was established on a commercial SRC willow plantation and grassland to measure soil and ecosystem respiration. Initial results indicate that willow was a net sink for CO2 in comparison to grassland which was a net source of CO2. This provides evidence that the GHG balance of transition to SRC bioenergy willow will potentially result in increased soil carbon, in the long-term. The empirical findings from this study have been combined with modelled estimates for the site to both test and validate the ECOSSE model. Initial comparisons show that the model is able to accurately predict the respiration occurring at the field site, suggesting that it is a valuable approach for up-scaling from point sites such as this to wider geographical areas, and for considering future climate scenarios. The spatial modelling outputs will be used to build a modelling tool for non-specialist users which will determine the GHG and soil carbon effects of changing land to bioenergy for UK. This work is based on the Ecosystem Land Use Modelling & Soil Carbon GHG Flux Trial (ELUM) project, which was commissioned and funded by the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI).

  6. Correspondence of ectomycorrhizal diversity and colonisation of willows (Salix spp.) grown in short rotation coppice on arable sites and adjacent natural stands.

    PubMed

    Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna; Toljander, Ylva K; Baum, Christel; Fransson, Petra M A; Taylor, Andy F S; Weih, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) are mycorrhizal tree species sometimes cultivated as short rotation coppice (SRC) on arable sites for energy purposes; they are also among the earliest plants colonising primary successional sites in natural stands. The objective of this study was to analyse the degree of colonisation and diversity of ectomycorrhizal (EM) communities on willows grown as SRC in arable soils and their adjacent natural or naturalized stands. Arable sites usually lack ectomycorrhizal host plants before the establishment of SRC, and adjacent natural or naturalized willow stands were hypothesized to be a leading source of ectomycorrhizal inoculum for the SRC. Three test sites including SRC stands (Salix viminalis, Salix dasyclados, and Salix schwerinii) and adjacent natural or naturalized (Salix caprea, Salix fragilis, and Salix × mollissima) stands in central Sweden were investigated on EM colonisation and morphotypes, and the fungal partners of 36 of the total 49 EM fungi morphotypes were identified using molecular tools. The frequency of mycorrhizas in the natural/naturalized stands was higher (two sites) or lower (one site) than in the corresponding cultivated stands. Correspondence analysis revealed that some EM taxa (e.g. Agaricales) were mostly associated with cultivated willows, while others (e.g. Thelephorales) were mostly found in natural/naturalized stands. In conclusion, we found strong effects of sites and willow genotype on EM fungi formation, but poor correspondence between the EM fungi abundance and diversity in SRC and their adjacent natural/naturalized stands. The underlying mechanism might be selective promotion of some EM fungi species by more effective spore dispersal.

  7. Long-term response of yellow-poplar to thinning in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    Treesearch

    Tara L. Keyser; Peter M. Brown

    2015-01-01

    Yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) is the most abundant individual tree species (in terms of volume) in the southern Appalachian Mountains, with Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) reports documenting a continuous increase in yellow-poplar over the recent years (Brown 2003, Schweitzer 1999, Thompson 1998). Current management efforts in evenaged yellow-poplar...

  8. Poplar maintains zinc homeostasis with heavy metal genes HMA4 and PCS1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This project has identified two large gene families, HMA and ZIP, in poplar that have been greatly expanded by the latest Salicoid genome duplication in poplar. In other species, these two families have been shown to be central in both hyperaccumulators and non-hyperaccumulators In poplar, many of t...

  9. Investigating the Role of Extensin Proteins in Poplar Biomass Recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Margaret Brigham; Decker, Stephen R.; Bedinger, Patricia A.

    2016-02-03

    The biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to biofuel is hindered by cell wall recalcitrance, which can limit the ability of cellulases to access and break down cellulose. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hydroxyproline-rich cell wall proteins (extensins) are present in poplar stem biomass, and whether these proteins may contribute to recalcitrance. Three classical extensin genes were identified in Populus trichocarpa through bioinformatic analysis of poplar genome sequences, with the following proposed names: PtEXTENSIN1 (Potri.001G019700); PtEXTENSIN2 (Potri.001G020100); PtEXTENSIN3 (Potri.018G050100). Tissue print immunoblots localized the extensin proteins in poplar stems to regions near the vascular cambium. Different thermochemical pretreatments reduced but did not eliminate hydroxyproline (Hyp, a proxy for extensins) from the biomass. Protease treatment of liquid hot water-pretreated poplar biomass reduced Hyp content by a further 16% and increased subsequent glucose yield by 20%. These data suggest that extensins may contribute to recalcitrance in pretreated poplar biomass, and that incorporating protease treatment into pretreatment protocols could result in a small but significant increase in the yield of fermentable glucose.

  10. Investigating the Role of Extensin Proteins in Poplar Biomass Recalcitrance

    DOE PAGES

    Fleming, Margaret Brigham; Decker, Stephen R.; Bedinger, Patricia A.

    2016-02-03

    The biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to biofuel is hindered by cell wall recalcitrance, which can limit the ability of cellulases to access and break down cellulose. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hydroxyproline-rich cell wall proteins (extensins) are present in poplar stem biomass, and whether these proteins may contribute to recalcitrance. Three classical extensin genes were identified in Populus trichocarpa through bioinformatic analysis of poplar genome sequences, with the following proposed names: PtEXTENSIN1 (Potri.001G019700); PtEXTENSIN2 (Potri.001G020100); PtEXTENSIN3 (Potri.018G050100). Tissue print immunoblots localized the extensin proteins in poplar stems to regions near the vascular cambium. Different thermochemicalmore » pretreatments reduced but did not eliminate hydroxyproline (Hyp, a proxy for extensins) from the biomass. Protease treatment of liquid hot water-pretreated poplar biomass reduced Hyp content by a further 16% and increased subsequent glucose yield by 20%. These data suggest that extensins may contribute to recalcitrance in pretreated poplar biomass, and that incorporating protease treatment into pretreatment protocols could result in a small but significant increase in the yield of fermentable glucose.« less

  11. Investigating the Role of Extensin Proteins in Poplar Biomass Recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Margaret Brigham; Decker, Stephen R.; Bedinger, Patricia A.

    2016-04-13

    The biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to biofuel is hindered by cell wall recalcitrance, which can limit the ability of cellulases to access and break down cellulose. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hydroxyproline-rich cell wall proteins (extensins) are present in poplar stem biomass, and whether these proteins may contribute to recalcitrance. Three classical extensin genes were identified in Populus trichocarpa through bioinformatic analysis of poplar genome sequences, with the following proposed names: PtEXTENSIN1 (Potri.001G019700); PtEXTENSIN2 (Potri.001G020100); PtEXTENSIN3 (Potri.018G050100). Tissue print immunoblots localized the extensin proteins in poplar stems to regions near the vascular cambium. Different thermochemical pretreatments reduced but did not eliminate hydroxyproline (Hyp, a proxy for extensins) from the biomass. Protease treatment of liquid hot water-pretreated poplar biomass reduced Hyp content by a further 16% and increased subsequent glucose yield by 20%. These data suggest that extensins may contribute to recalcitrance in pretreated poplar biomass, and that incorporating protease treatment into pretreatment protocols could result in a small but significant increase in the yield of fermentable glucose.

  12. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at LHC and FCC energies. The possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles and quadrupole moment of Ω -hyperon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshevsky, V. G.

    2017-07-01

    The phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of charged and neutral charm and beauty hyperons and quadrupole moment of Ω -hyperon. Crystals with polarized nuclei give opportunities for measuring spin-dependent interactions of short lived particles with nuclei and measurement of a particle polarization.

  13. Proteomics of nitrogen remobilization in poplar bark.

    PubMed

    Islam, Nazrul; Li, Gen; Garrett, Wesley M; Lin, Rongshuang; Sriram, Ganesh; Cooper, Bret; Coleman, Gary D

    2015-02-06

    Seasonal nitrogen (N) cycling in temperate deciduous trees involves the accumulation of bark storage proteins (BSPs) in phloem parenchyma and xylem ray cells. BSPs are anabolized using recycled N during autumn leaf senescence and later become a source of N during spring shoot growth as they are catabolized. Little is known about the catabolic processes involved in remobilization and reutilization of N from BSPs in trees. In this study, we used multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) and spectral counting to identify protein changes that occur in the bark during BSP catabolism. A total of 4,178 proteins were identified from bark prior to and during BSP catabolism. The majority (62%) of the proteins were found during BSP catabolism, indicating extensive remodeling of the proteome during renewed shoot growth and N remobilization. Among these proteins were 30 proteases, the relative abundances of which increased during BSP catabolism. These proteases spanned a range of families including members of the papain-like cysteine proteases, serine carboxypeptidases, and aspartyl proteases. These data identify, for the first time, candidate proteases that could potentially provide hydrolase activity required for N remobilization from BSPs and provide the foundation for research to advance our knowledge of poplar N cycling.

  14. Genomic insights into salt adaptation in a desert poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Tao; Wang, Junyi; Zhou, Gongke; Yue, Zhen; Hu, Quanjun; Chen, Yan; Liu, Bingbing; Qiu, Qiang; Wang, Zhuo; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Kun; Jiang, Dechun; Gou, Caiyun; Yu, Lili; Zhan, Dongliang; Zhou, Ran; Luo, Wenchun; Ma, Hui; Yang, Yongzhi; Pan, Shengkai; Fang, Dongming; Luo, Yadan; Wang, Xia; Wang, Gaini; Wang, Juan; Wang, Qian; Lu, Xu; Chen, Zhe; Liu, Jinchao; Lu, Yao; Yin, Ye; Yang, Huanming; Abbott, Richard J.; Wu, Yuxia; Wan, Dongshi; Li, Jia; Yin, Tongming; Lascoux, Martin; DiFazio, Stephen P.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Wang, Jun; Jianquan, Liu

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high economic and ecological importance of forests, our knowledge of the genomic evolution of trees under salt stress remains very limited. Here we report the genome sequence of the desert poplar, Populus euphratica, which exhibits high tolerance to sa lt stress. Its genome is very similar and collinear to that of the closely related mesophytic congener, P trichocarpa. However, we find that several gene families likely to be involved in tolerance to salt stress contain significantly more gene copies within the P euphratica lineage. Furthermore, genes showing evidence of positive selection are significantly enriched in functional categories related to salt stress. Some of these genes, and others within the same categories, are significantly upregulated under salt stress relative to their expression in another salt-sensitive poplar. Our results provide an important background for understanding tree adaptation to salt stress and facilitating the genetic improvement of cultivated poplars for saline soils.

  15. Does laterally rotated flap design influence the short-term periodontal status of second molars and postoperative discomfort after partially impacted third molar surgery?

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Yavuz Tolga; Mollaoglu, Nur; Ozmeriç, Nurdan

    2015-06-01

    To assess the influence of the surgical removal of partially impacted third molars (3Ms) and compare the effects of a 3-cornered laterally rotated flap (LRF) with primary closure (flap 1) and an envelope flap with secondary closure (flap 2) on the short-term periodontal status of the adjacent second molars (2Ms). We also assessed the postoperative complications after removal of the partially impacted 3M. A split mouth, randomized clinical study was designed. The study sample included patients with bilateral partially impacted 3Ms. The primary predictor variable was the type of flap design (flaps 1 and 2). The primary outcome variable was periodontal status (gingival recession [GR], probing depth [PD], plaque index [PI], and gingival index) of the 2Ms measured preoperatively and 90 days postoperatively. The secondary outcome variables were postoperative complications, including pain, facial swelling, alveolitis, and local wound infection. The other variables included gender, position of the 3Ms, and surgical difficulty. We performed descriptive, comparative, correlation, and multivariate analyses. The sample included 28 patients aged 18 to 28 years. The GR, PD, and PI values with the flap 2 design were greater than those with the flap 1 design (P < .05). Facial swelling with the flap 1 design was significantly greater than with the flap 2 design on the second postoperative day (P < .05). The pain levels with the flap 1 design were significantly greater than those with the flap 2 design on the first and second postoperative days (P < .05). According to the multivariate regression analyses, flap design was closely related to the periodontal status of the 2Ms and postoperative discomfort. The results of the present clinical study have shown that the flap design in partially impacted 3M surgery considerably influences the early periodontal health of the 2Ms and postoperative discomfort. However, although the 3-cornered LRF design might cause more pain and swelling, it

  16. Impacts of Short-Rotation Early-Growing Season Prescribed Fire on a Ground Nesting Bird in the Central Hardwoods Region of North America

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Landscape-scale short-rotation early-growing season prescribed fire, hereafter prescribed fire, in upland hardwood forests represents a recent shift in management strategies across eastern upland forests. Not only does this strategy depart from dormant season to growing season prescriptions, but the strategy also moves from stand-scale to landscape-scale implementation (>1,000 ha). This being so, agencies are making considerable commitments in terms of time and resources to this management strategy, but the effects on wildlife in upland forests, especially those dominated by hardwood canopy species, are relatively unknown. We initiated our study to assess whether this management strategy affects eastern wild turkey reproductive ecology on the Ozark-St. Francis National Forest. We marked 67 wild turkey hens with Global Positioning System (GPS) Platform Transmitting Terminals in 2012 and 2013 to document exposure to prescribed fire, and estimate daily nest survival, nest success, and nest-site selection. We estimated these reproductive parameters in forest units managed with prescribed fire (treated) and units absent of prescribed fire (untreated). Of 60 initial nest attempts monitored, none were destroyed or exposed to prescribed fire because a majority of fires occurred early than a majority of the nesting activity. We found nest success was greater in untreated units than treated units (36.4% versus 14.6%). We did not find any habitat characteristic differences between successful and unsuccessful nest-sites. We found that nest-site selection criteria differed between treated and untreated units. Visual concealment and woody ground cover were common selection criteria in both treated and untreated units. However, in treated units wild turkey selected nest-sites with fewer small shrubs (<5 cm ground diameter) and large trees (>20 cm DBH) but not in untreated units. In untreated units wild turkey selected nest-sites with more large shrubs (≥5cm ground diameter) but

  17. Impacts of Short-Rotation Early-Growing Season Prescribed Fire on a Ground Nesting Bird in the Central Hardwoods Region of North America.

    PubMed

    Pittman, H Tyler; Krementz, David G

    2016-01-01

    Landscape-scale short-rotation early-growing season prescribed fire, hereafter prescribed fire, in upland hardwood forests represents a recent shift in management strategies across eastern upland forests. Not only does this strategy depart from dormant season to growing season prescriptions, but the strategy also moves from stand-scale to landscape-scale implementation (>1,000 ha). This being so, agencies are making considerable commitments in terms of time and resources to this management strategy, but the effects on wildlife in upland forests, especially those dominated by hardwood canopy species, are relatively unknown. We initiated our study to assess whether this management strategy affects eastern wild turkey reproductive ecology on the Ozark-St. Francis National Forest. We marked 67 wild turkey hens with Global Positioning System (GPS) Platform Transmitting Terminals in 2012 and 2013 to document exposure to prescribed fire, and estimate daily nest survival, nest success, and nest-site selection. We estimated these reproductive parameters in forest units managed with prescribed fire (treated) and units absent of prescribed fire (untreated). Of 60 initial nest attempts monitored, none were destroyed or exposed to prescribed fire because a majority of fires occurred early than a majority of the nesting activity. We found nest success was greater in untreated units than treated units (36.4% versus 14.6%). We did not find any habitat characteristic differences between successful and unsuccessful nest-sites. We found that nest-site selection criteria differed between treated and untreated units. Visual concealment and woody ground cover were common selection criteria in both treated and untreated units. However, in treated units wild turkey selected nest-sites with fewer small shrubs (<5 cm ground diameter) and large trees (>20 cm DBH) but not in untreated units. In untreated units wild turkey selected nest-sites with more large shrubs (≥5 cm ground diameter

  18. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Plastidic Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Poplar Leaves Emitting and Nonemitting Isoprene1[W

    PubMed Central

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Wright, Louwrance Peter; Bi, Zhen; Rosenkranz, Maaria; Pulido, Pablo; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Niinemets, Ülo; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The plastidic 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is one of the most important pathways in plants and produces a large variety of essential isoprenoids. Its regulation, however, is still not well understood. Using the stable isotope 13C-labeling technique, we analyzed the carbon fluxes through the MEP pathway and into the major plastidic isoprenoid products in isoprene-emitting and transgenic isoprene-nonemitting (NE) gray poplar (Populus × canescens). We assessed the dependence on temperature, light intensity, and atmospheric [CO2]. Isoprene biosynthesis was by far (99%) the main carbon sink of MEP pathway intermediates in mature gray poplar leaves, and its production required severalfold higher carbon fluxes compared with NE leaves with almost zero isoprene emission. To compensate for the much lower demand for carbon, NE leaves drastically reduced the overall carbon flux within the MEP pathway. Feedback inhibition of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase activity by accumulated plastidic dimethylallyl diphosphate almost completely explained this reduction in carbon flux. Our data demonstrate that short-term biochemical feedback regulation of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase activity by plastidic dimethylallyl diphosphate is an important regulatory mechanism of the MEP pathway. Despite being relieved from the large carbon demand of isoprene biosynthesis, NE plants redirected only approximately 0.5% of this saved carbon toward essential nonvolatile isoprenoids, i.e. β-carotene and lutein, most probably to compensate for the absence of isoprene and its antioxidant properties. PMID:24590857

  19. Canopy profiles of photosynthetic parameters under elevated CO2 and N fertilization in a poplar plantation.

    PubMed

    Calfapietra, Carlo; Tulva, Ingmar; Eensalu, Eve; Perez, Marta; De Angelis, Paolo; Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe; Kull, Olevi

    2005-10-01

    A poplar plantation has been exposed to an elevated CO2 concentration for 5 years using the free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technique. Even after such a long period of exposure, leaves of Populus x euramericana have not shown clear signs of photosynthetic acclimation. Only at the end of the growing season for shade leaves was a decrease of maximum velocity of carboxylation (Vcmax) observed. Maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) was increased by FACE treatment in July. Assimilation rates at CO2 partial pressure of 400 (A400) and 600 (A600) micromol mol(-1) were not significantly different under FACE treatment. Most notably FACE significantly decreased stomatal conductance (g(s)) both on upper and lower canopy leaves. N fertilization increased N content in the leaves on mass basis (Nm) and specific leaf area (SLA) in both CO2 treatments but did not influence the photosynthetic parameters. These data show that in poplar plantations the long-term effects of elevated CO2 on photosynthesis do not differ considerably from the short-term ones even with N deposition.

  20. Effects of young poplar plantations on understory plant diversity in the Dongting Lake wetlands, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Youzhi; Chen, Xinsheng; Xie, Yonghong; Li, Xu; Li, Feng; Hou, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of young poplar plantations on understory plant diversity in the Dongting Lake wetlands, China. Poplar plantations resulted in a higher species number and Shannon's diversity. Species compositions were different between areas with poplar and reed populations: a lower ratio of hygrophytes but a higher ratio of mesophytes, and a higher ratio of heliophytes but a lower ratio of neutrophilous or shade plants in poplar areas compared to reed areas. Poplar plantations supported a higher ratio of ligneous plants in the entire Dongting Lake area, but there was no difference in the monitored plots. Unlike reedy areas, poplar plantations had higher light availability but lower soil water content during the growing seasons. These data suggest that young poplar plantations generally increased species richness and plant diversity, but significantly changed species composition due to the reduced soil water and increased light availability. PMID:25208975

  1. Shifted detector super short scan reconstruction for the rotate-plus-shift trajectories and its application to C-arm CT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, Jan; Knaup, Michael; Fleischmann, Christof; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Mobile and compact C-arm systems are routinely used in interventional procedures for fluoroscopic CT imaging. The mechanical requirements guarantee for a maximum of flexibility and mobility but restrict the mechanical rotation range (e.g. 165°) and the lateral size of the field of measurement (FOM), typically about 160 mm. Recently, the rotate-plus-shift trajectory for the acquisition of complete datasets from 180° minus fan-angle has been published.1, 2 Here, we combine the rotate-plus-shift trajectory with a shifted detector approach for a fully motorized C-arm system. As the isocenter in non-centric C-arms can be freely chosen, the shifted detector can be equally well absorbed with an offset of the C parallel to the transaxial detector direction. The typical rotation range of 360° used in shifted detector trajectories is replaced by a double rotate-plus-shift scan requiring a rotation range of at least 180° minus fan-angle. The trajectory increasing the diameter of the FOM by up to a factor of two is presented and the practical application of variations with an asymmetric FOM is shown. For image reconstruction we use our modified FDK algorithm that is equipped with a generalized redundancy weight. The presented trajectory can increase the applicability and flexibility of C-arm systems and has the potential to perform intra-operative large volume control or overview scans and thus reduce the patient's risk.

  2. Molecular dissection of xylan biosynthesis during wood formation in poplar.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chanhui; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2011-07-01

    Xylan, being the second most abundant polysaccharide in dicot wood, is considered to be one of the factors contributing to wood biomass recalcitrance for biofuel production. To better utilize wood as biofuel feedstock, it is crucial to functionally characterize all the genes involved in xylan biosynthesis during wood formation. In this report, we investigated roles of poplar families GT43 and GT8 glycosyltransferases in xylan biosynthesis during wood formation. There exist seven GT43 genes in the genome of poplar (Populus trichocarpa), five of which, namely PtrGT43A, PtrGT43B, PtrGT43C, PtrGT43D, and PtrGT43E, were shown to be highly expressed in the developing wood and their encoded proteins were localized in the Golgi. Comprehensive genetic complementation coupled with chemical analyses demonstrated that overexpression of PtrGT43A/B/E but not PtrGT43C/D was able to rescue the xylan defects conferred by the Arabidopsis irx9 mutant, whereas overexpression of PtrGT43C/D but not PtrGT43A/B/E led to a complementation of the xylan defects in the Arabidopsis irx14 mutant. The essential roles of poplar GT43 members in xylan biosynthesis was further substantiated by RNAi down-regulation of GT43B in the hybrid poplar (Populus alba x tremula) leading to reductions in wall thickness and xylan content in wood, and an elevation in the abundance of the xylan reducing end sequence. Wood digestibility analysis revealed that cellulase digestion released more glucose from the wood of poplar GT43B RNAi lines than the control wood, indicating a decrease in wood biomass recalcitrance. Furthermore, RNAi down-regulation of another poplar wood-associated glycosyltransferase, PoGT8D, was shown to cause decreases in wall thickness and xylan content as well as in the abundance of the xylan reducing end sequence. Together, these findings demonstrate that the poplar GT43 members form two functionally non-redundant groups, namely PtrGT43A/B/E as functional orthologs of Arabidopsis IRX9 and Ptr

  3. Effect of different biochars on Nitrogen uptake in poplar trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Elizabeth; Tonon, Giustino; Scandellari, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Influence of biochar on soil nitrogen transformation and plant uptake has been reported. This paper presents preliminary results of plant N uptake in poplars by using 15N isotope tracer approach Two types of biochar were applied to two sets of pots containing only sand and each pot received a pre-rooted poplar cutting. Half of the pots were inoculated with commercial mycorrhizal gel and the other half were left without. It is intended to provide information on how biochar, mycorrhiza and root interaction mediate nitrogen uptake and organ allocation.

  4. Dimension yields from short logs of low-quality hardwood trees.

    Treesearch

    Howard N. Rosen; Harold A. Stewart; David J. Polak

    1980-01-01

    Charts are presented for determining yields of 4/4 dimension cuttings from short hardwood logs of aspen, soft maple, black cherry, yellow-poplar, and black walnut for several cutting grades and bolt sizes. Cost comparisons of short log and standard grade mixes show sizes. Cost comparisons of short log and standard grade mixes show the estimated least expensive...

  5. Greenhouse gas emissions from intercropping switchgrass and hybrid poplar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Highly productive, commercial hybrid poplar plantations are being managed in the Pacific Northwest for high-value timber production at relatively low stocking densities under irrigation. The open understory was used to produce switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) prior to canopy closure. The objectives ...

  6. A system for dosage-based functional genomics in poplar

    Treesearch

    Isabelle M. Henry; Matthew S. Zinkgraf; Andrew T. Groover; Luca Comai

    2015-01-01

    Altering gene dosage through variation in gene copy number is a powerful approach to addressing questions regarding gene regulation, quantitative trait loci, and heterosis, but one that is not easily applied to sexually transmitted species. Elite poplar (Populus spp) varieties are created through interspecific hybridization, followed by...

  7. Diameter Distributions in Natural Yellow-Poplar Stands

    Treesearch

    Charles E. McGee; Lino Della-Bianca

    1967-01-01

    Diameter distributions obtained from 141 pure, natural unthinned yellow-poplar stands in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, North Carolina, and Georgia are presented in tables. The distributions are described in relation to stand age, site index, and total number of trees per acre, and are useful for stand management planning.

  8. Growth and Yield of Thinned Yellow-Poplar

    Treesearch

    Donald E. Beck; Lino Della-Bianca

    1972-01-01

    Diameter distributions and yields for various combinations of site index, age, and density for unthinned and largely undisturbed stands of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L. ) have been presented by McGee and Della-Bianca (1967) and Beck and Della-Bianca (1970). Their results were based on the initial measurements of a network of permanent sample plots...

  9. Wood reinforcement of poplar by rice NAC transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Takata, Naoki; Oshima, Yoshimi; Yoshida, Kouki; Taniguchi, Toru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2016-01-27

    Lignocellulose, composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, in the secondary cell wall constitutes wood and is the most abundant form of biomass on Earth. Enhancement of wood accumulation may be an effective strategy to increase biomass as well as wood strength, but currently only limited research has been undertaken. Here, we demonstrated that OsSWN1, the orthologue of the rice NAC Secondary-wall Thickening factor (NST) transcription factor, effectively enhanced secondary cell wall formation in the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem and poplar (Populus tremula×Populus tremuloides) stem when expressed by the Arabidopsis NST3 promoter. Interestingly, in transgenic Arabidopsis and poplar, ectopic secondary cell wall deposition in the pith area was observed in addition to densification of the secondary cell wall in fiber cells. The cell wall content or density of the stem increased on average by up to 38% and 39% in Arabidopsis and poplar, respectively, without causing growth inhibition. As a result, physical strength of the stem increased by up to 57% in poplar. Collectively, these data suggest that the reinforcement of wood by NST3pro:OsSWN1 is a promising strategy to enhance wood-biomass production in dicotyledonous plant species.

  10. Growth, photosynthesis, and herbicide tolerance of genetically modified hybrid poplar

    Treesearch

    Raymond A. Donahue; Tim D. Davis; Charles H. Michler; Don E. Riemenschneider; Doug R. Carter; Paula E. Marquardt; Daksha Sankhla; Narendra Sankhla; Bruce E. Haissig; J. G. Isebrands

    1994-01-01

    Poplar hybrids have high light-saturated photosynthetic rates and potential utility as a renewable biofuel, but they lack tolerance to commercially important herbicides that may be needed for successful plantation management. Tolerance to glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) has been conferred to many plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transfor-...

  11. Feeding Preference of Penned Whitetailed Deer for Hybrid Poplar Clones

    Treesearch

    Richard L. Verch

    1979-01-01

    Five hybrid poplar clones were presented to 16 penned white-tailed deer on a feeding board over a 3-day period in September, 1978. A definite order of preference was observed over a 3-hour period fore each of 3 trials. Over a longer period (8-24 hours), all 5 clones were completely consumed.

  12. Overrun in Second-Growth Yellow-Poplar

    Treesearch

    Robert A. Campbell

    1959-01-01

    Second-growth yellow-poplar is reaching merchantable size in the Southern Appalachians in increasing quantities each year. Although the timber is young and logs are small, it produces lumber of sufficiently high quality to supply the needs of Carolina wood-using industries.

  13. Locust sprouts reduce growth of yellow-poplar seedlings

    Treesearch

    Donald E. Beck; Charles E. McGee

    1974-01-01

    Dense thickets of black locust which often appear after clearcutting in the Southern Appalachians and Piedmont, can severely reduce growth of other desirable hardwoods. Released yellow-poplar seedlings were 51 percent taller and 79 percent larger in diameter than unreleased ones 6 years after treatment.

  14. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera).

    PubMed

    Olson, Matthew S; Robertson, Amanda L; Takebayashi, Naoki; Silim, Salim; Schroeder, William R; Tiffin, Peter

    2010-04-01

    *Current perceptions that poplars have high levels of nucleotide variation, large effective population sizes, and rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium are based primarily on studies from one poplar species, Populus tremula. *We analysed 590 gene fragments (average length 565 bp) from each of 15 individuals from different populations from throughout the range of Populus balsamifera. *Nucleotide diversity (theta(total) = 0.0028, pi = 0.0027) was low compared with other trees and model agricultural systems. Patterns of nucleotide diversity and site frequency spectra were consistent with purifying selection on replacement and intron sites. When averaged across all loci we found no evidence for decay of linkage disequilibrium across 750 bp, consistent with the low estimates of the scaled recombination parameter, rho = 0.0092. *Compared with P. tremula, a well studied congener with a similar distribution, P. balsamifera has low diversity and low effective recombination, both of which indicate a lower effective population size in P. balsamifera. Patterns of diversity and linkage indicate that there is considerable variation in population genomic patterns among poplar species and unlike P. tremula, association mapping techniques in balsam poplar should consider sampling single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at well-spaced intervals.

  15. Summer is the best time to thin hybrid poplar plantations

    Treesearch

    Harold F. Ford; Albert G., Jr. Snow

    1954-01-01

    Hybrid poplar plantations are established by planting dormant cuttings in close spacing, usually 4 x 4 feet. They are cultivated during the first growing season to eliminate competition from grasses and weeds. After the first year, the more vigorous trees effectively shade out lower vegetation. But rapid tree growth often makes thinning necessary after 2 or 3 growing...

  16. Hydroponic screening of poplar for trace element tolerance and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Migeon, Aude; Richaud, Pierre; Guinet, Frédéric; Blaudez, Damien; Chalot, Michel

    2012-04-01

    Using the nutrient film technique, we screened 21 clones of poplar for growth in the presence of a mix of trace elements (TE) and for TE accumulation capacities. Poplar cuttings were exposed for four weeks to a multipollution solution consisting in 10 microM Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb, and 200 microM Zn. Plant biomass and TE accumulation patterns in leaves varied greatly between clones. The highest Cd and Zn concentrations in leaves were detected in P. trichocarpa and P. trichocarpa hybrids, with the clone Skado (P. trichocarpa x P. maximowiczii) accumulating up to 108 mg Cd kg(-1) DW and 1510 mg Zn kg(-1) DW when exposed to a multipollution context. Our data also confirm the importance of pH and multipollution, as these factors greatly affect TE accumulation in above ground biomass. The NFT technique applied here to a large range of poplar clones also revealed the potential of the Rochester, AFO662 and AFO678 poplar clones for use in phytostabilization programs and bioenergy production, where production of less contaminated above ground biomass is suitable.

  17. Transgenic manipulation of the metabolism of polyamines in poplar cells

    Treesearch

    Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Bernadette M. Glasheen; Suneet K. Bains; Stephanie L. Long; Rakesh Minocha; Christian Walter; Subhash C. Minocha

    2001-01-01

    The metabolism of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) has become the target of genetic manipulation because of their significance in plant development and possibly stress tolerance. We studied the polyamine metabolism in non-transgenic (NT) and transgenic cells of poplar (Populus nigra 3 maximowiczii) expressing a...

  18. Seasonal variation in hybrid poplar tolerance to glyphosate.

    Treesearch

    Daniel Netzer; Edward Hansen

    1992-01-01

    Reports that glyphosate applied during April or May in hybrid poplar plantations usually results in tree growth increases and that later summer applications often result in tree damage, growth loss, or mortality. Introduces the concept of "physiological" and "morphological" herbicide tolerance.

  19. Comparative growth of hybrid poplars and native northern black cottonwoods.

    Treesearch

    Roy R. Silen

    1947-01-01

    Beginning in the early 1920's, some fast-growing hybrid poplars were developed by the Oxford Paper Company in New England. In 1938 cuttings of the 25 best hybrids developed were sent to the Northwest for trial. These were planted on Lady Island near Camas, Washington, on lands of the Crown Zellerbach Corporation. During 1946 the eighth-year measurement was made of...

  20. Planting Depth of Hybrid Poplar Cuttings Influences Number of Shoots

    Treesearch

    Edward Hansen; David Tolsted; Matthew Tower

    1991-01-01

    Reports that planting unrooted hybrid poplar cuttings flush with the soil surface resulted in significantly fewer multiple-stem shoots compared to letting the cutting protrude 2.5 or 5.0 cm above the soil surface. There were no significant effects on shoot height growth or cutting mortality.

  1. Planting Yellow-Poplar--Where We Stand Today

    Treesearch

    T.E. Russell

    1977-01-01

    Yellow-poplar can be established on a wide variety of sites with bare-rooted seedlings and standard planting techniques. Many past plantings have performed poorly because substandard seedlings have been planted on unsuitable sites and competing vegetation has not been adequately controlled. Research over the past two decades, however, provides workable guides for site...

  2. Weed Control for Establishing Intensively Cultured Hybrid Poplar Plantations

    Treesearch

    Edward Hansen; Daniel Netzer; W.J. Rietveld

    1984-01-01

    Compares effeects of various wee-control methods, including hericides, cultivation, and legume cover crop, on tree survival and height growth of 2-year-old hybrid poplars. Cultivation and herbicides singly or in combination gave consistently better results than the other treatment tested.

  3. Symptoms of Nutrient Deficiency in Yellow-Poplar Seedlings

    Treesearch

    Albert F. Ike

    1968-01-01

    Visual symptoms are described for leaves of yellow-poplar seedlings supplied N, P. and K in varying concentrations ranging from minimal to excessive. Probability of growth responses to added N is high when tissue levels are below 2 percent; no response is likely when they exceed 3 percent.

  4. Wood reinforcement of poplar by rice NAC transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Takata, Naoki; Oshima, Yoshimi; Yoshida, Kouki; Taniguchi, Toru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulose, composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, in the secondary cell wall constitutes wood and is the most abundant form of biomass on Earth. Enhancement of wood accumulation may be an effective strategy to increase biomass as well as wood strength, but currently only limited research has been undertaken. Here, we demonstrated that OsSWN1, the orthologue of the rice NAC Secondary-wall Thickening factor (NST) transcription factor, effectively enhanced secondary cell wall formation in the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem and poplar (Populus tremula×Populus tremuloides) stem when expressed by the Arabidopsis NST3 promoter. Interestingly, in transgenic Arabidopsis and poplar, ectopic secondary cell wall deposition in the pith area was observed in addition to densification of the secondary cell wall in fiber cells. The cell wall content or density of the stem increased on average by up to 38% and 39% in Arabidopsis and poplar, respectively, without causing growth inhibition. As a result, physical strength of the stem increased by up to 57% in poplar. Collectively, these data suggest that the reinforcement of wood by NST3pro:OsSWN1 is a promising strategy to enhance wood-biomass production in dicotyledonous plant species. PMID:26812961

  5. Beetle feeding induces a different volatile emission pattern from black poplar foliage than caterpillar herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Unsicker, Sybille B.; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Köllner, Tobias G.

    2015-01-01

    Herbivore-induced plant volatile emission is often considered to be attacker species-specific, but most experimental evidence comes from short lived herbaceous species. In a recent study we showed that black poplar (Populus nigra) trees emit a complex blend of volatiles from damaged leaves when they are attacked by generalist gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars. Minor nitrogenous volatiles were especially characteristic of this blend. Here we show that attack on P. nigra by a beetle species, Phratora vulgatissima (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae), led to the emission of the same compounds as already observed after caterpillar herbivory, but with striking quantitative changes in the blend. The consequences for attraction of herbivore enemies are discussed. PMID:25831045

  6. Assimilate movement dictates remote sites of wound-induced gene expression in poplar leaves.

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Gordon, M P; Smit, B A

    1991-03-15

    When a single leaf on a young poplar tree is mechanically wounded, wound-induced (win) mRNAs are detected in the unwounded portion of that leaf and in specific leaves that are remote from the wounded leaf. Shortly after wounding (6-8 hr), the remote leaves in which win genes are expressed can be predicted by a knowledge of photoassimilate movement patterns in vivo. When assimilate movement from a wounded leaf is blocked or the direction of assimilate movement is altered by shading, win gene expression in remote leaves is similarly blocked or altered. These data illustrate how the long-distance transduction of wound-induced signals can be manipulated in plants by altering carbon allocation.

  7. Mercury Remediation Technology Development for Lower East Fork Poplar Creek - FY 2015 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Mark J.; Brooks, Scott C.; Mathews, Teresa J.; Mayes, Melanie; Johs, Alexander; Watson, David B.; Poteat, Monica D.; Smith, John; Mehlhorn, Tonia; Lester, Brian; Morris, Jesse; Lowe, Kenneth; Dickson, Johnbull O.; Eller, Virginia; DeRolph, Christopher R.

    2016-04-01

    Mercury remediation is a high priority for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (OREM) because of large historical losses of mercury within buildings and to soils and surface waters at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Because of the extent of mercury losses and the complexities of mercury transport and fate in the downstream environment, the success of conventional options for mercury remediation in lower East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) is uncertain. A phased, adaptive management approach to remediation of surface water includes mercury treatment actions at Y-12 in the short-term and research and technology development (TD) to evaluate longer-term solutions in the downstream environment (US Department of Energy 2014b).

  8. Isoprene biosynthesis in hybrid poplar impacts ozone tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, K.; Kleist, E.; Uerlings, R.; Wildt, J.; Rennenberg, H.; Schnitzler, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant volatile compound emitted by vegetation. It influences air chemistry and is thought to take part in plant defense reactions against abiotic stress such as high temperature or ozone. However, whether or not isoprene emission interacts with ozone tolerance of plants is still in discussion. We exploited transgenic non-isoprene emitting Grey poplar (Populus x canescens) in a biochemical and physiological model study to investigate the effect of acute ozone stress on the elicitation of defense-related emissions of plant volatiles, photosynthesis and the antioxidative system. We recorded that non-isoprene emitting poplars are more resistant to ozone as indicated by less damaged leaf area and higher assimilation rates compared to ozone-exposed wild type plants. The integral of green leaf volatile (GLV) emissions was different between the two poplar phenotypes and a reliable early marker for subsequent leaf damage. For other stress-induced volatiles like mono-, homo-, and sesquiterpenes, and methyl salicylate similar time profiles, pattern and emission intensities were observed in both transgenic and wild type plants. However, un-stressed non-isoprene emitting poplars are characterized by elevated levels of ascorbate and α-tocopherol as well as a more effective de-epoxidation ratio of xanthophylls than in wild type plants. Since ozone quenching properties of ascorbate are much higher than those of isoprene and furthermore α-tocopherol also is an essential antioxidant, non-isoprene emitting poplars might benefit from changes within the antioxidative system by providing them with enhanced ozone tolerance.

  9. Land-use history and management intensity as drivers of spatial variability in soil greenhouse gas fluxes in a poplar bioenergy plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2014-05-01

    Bioenergy crops are considered to be carbon-neutral because biomass combustion releases only carbon which has previously been extracted from the atmosphere by the plants. However, during crop growth, a significant amount of the greenhouse gases (GHG) CO2, CH4 and N2O can be produced by soil microorganisms and released to the atmosphere. Depending on crop type and management intensity, soil GHG fluxes might be so substantial that bioenergy crops could overall emit more GHG than the same amount of fossil fuels. The present knowledge about soil GHG fluxes from bioenergy crops is not sufficient to accurately quantify them. This is especially true for short rotation woody crops (SRWC) which might become more important in the future because they have a relatively high GHG mitigation potential. However, before pursuing the use of SRWC plantations for carbon sequestration and fossil fuel replacement, it is necessary to accurately assess their uptake and release of all major GHG to prevent the unconscious widespread deployment of unsustainable cultivation practices. The aim of this project is to identify drivers of spatial variability in soil GHG fluxes in a poplar SRWC plantation with special emphasis on the legacy effect of former land-use. The plantation has been established partly on former pasture and partly on former cropland, offering the unique opportunity to study soil GHG flux dynamics with respect to their dependency on former land-use type under identical climate and management conditions. The plantation is currently in its fifth vegetation season and in the first year of its third rotation. Simultaneous monitoring of soil CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes will take place with a custom-made automated chamber system throughout the entire third rotation (three years) accompanied by soil gas concentration profile measurements. In parallel, community composition of functional groups of soil microorganisms (denitrifiers, ammonia oxidizers, methanogens) and total soil microbial

  10. Isoprene emission-free poplars--a chance to reduce the impact from poplar plantations on the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Katja; Grote, Rüdiger; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Zimmer, Ina; Zhou, Guanwu; Elobeid, Mudawi; Janz, Dennis; Polle, Andrea; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2012-04-01

    • Depending on the atmospheric composition, isoprene emissions from plants can have a severe impact on air quality and regional climate. For the plant itself, isoprene can enhance stress tolerance and also interfere with the attraction of herbivores and parasitoids. • Here, we tested the growth performance and fitness of Populus × canescens in which isoprene emission had been knocked down by RNA interference technology (PcISPS-RNAi plants) for two growing seasons under outdoor conditions. • Neither the growth nor biomass yield of the PcISPS-RNAi poplars was impaired, and they were even temporarily enhanced compared with control poplars. Modelling of the annual carbon balances revealed a reduced carbon loss of 2.2% of the total gross primary production by the absence of isoprene emission, and a 6.9% enhanced net growth of PcISPS-RNAi poplars. However, the knock down in isoprene emission resulted in reduced susceptibility to fungal infection, whereas the attractiveness for herbivores was enhanced. • The present study promises potential for the use of non- or low-isoprene-emitting poplars for more sustainable and environmentally friendly biomass production, as reducing isoprene emission will presumably have positive effects on regional climate and air quality.

  11. Fifth International Poplar Symposium: 'Poplars and willows: from research models to multipurpose trees for a bio-based society'.

    PubMed

    Tognetti, Roberto; Massacci, Angelo; Mugnozza, Giuseppe Scarascia

    2011-12-01

    Carefully managed tree plantations offer an opportunity for sustainable biomass production. In recent years, the responses of the Salicaceae to environmental constraints have increasingly been investigated at different levels of biological integration, giving rise to a physiological approach to the function of trees in environmental restoration and monitoring. Significant progress has been achieved by the poplar and willow community in understanding targeted characteristics of complex tree stress responses. The Fifth International Poplar Symposium brought together experts in this area, with the main objective being to improve, coordinate and communicate existing national research on the biological and environmental dimension of multifunctional poplar and willow plantations. The secondary objective was to develop a network of research scientists and extension workers to provide scientific support for subjects interested in using fast-growing poplar and willow species for tree-related environmental projects. The ultimate goal was to build up services for the multipurpose tree plantation network on local-level management in order to obtain maximized benefits from tree crops. The purpose was also to maximize the synergy between local knowledge and global-level processes that require information on multipurpose tree crop production.

  12. Petiole length and biomass investment in support modify light interception efficiency in dense poplar plantations.

    PubMed

    Niinemets, Ulo; Al Afas, Najwa; Cescatti, Alessandro; Pellis, An; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2004-02-01

    Leaf architecture, stand leaf area index and canopy light interception were studied in 13 poplar clones growing in a second rotation of a coppice plantation, to determine the role of leaf architectural attributes on canopy light-harvesting efficiency and to assess biomass investment in leaf support tissue. Stand leaf area index (L) varied from 2.89 to 6.99, but L was only weakly associated with canopy transmittance (TC). The weak relationship between TC and L was a result of a higher degree of foliage aggregation at larger values of L, leading to lower light-interception efficiency in stands with greater total leaf area. We observed a strong increase in leaf aggregation and a decrease in light-harvesting efficiency with decreasing mean leaf petiole length (PL) but not with leaf size, possibly because, in cordate or deltoid poplar leaves, most of the leaf area is located close to the petiole attachment to the lamina. Although PL was the key leaf characteristic of light-harvesting efficiency, clones with longer petioles had larger biomass investments in petioles, and there was a negative relationship between PL and L, demonstrating that enhanced light harvesting may lead to an overall decline in photosynthesizing leaf surface. Upper-canopy leaves were generally larger and had greater dry mass (MA) and nitrogen per unit area (NA) than lower-canopy leaves. Canopy plasticity in MA and NA was higher in clones with higher foliar biomass investment in midrib, and lower in clones with relatively longer petioles. These relationships suggest that there is a trade-off between photosynthetic plasticity and biomass investment in support, and also that high light-harvesting efficiency may be associated with lower photosynthetic plasticity. Our results demonstrate important clonal differences in leaf aggregation that are linked to leaf structure and biomass allocation patterns within the leaf.

  13. Cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peng; Zhu, Guang; Liu, Ying; Chen, Jun; Jing, Qingshen; Yang, Weiqing; Ma, Jusheng; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-07-23

    We demonstrate a cylindrical rotating triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on sliding electrification for harvesting mechanical energy from rotational motion. The rotating TENG is based on a core-shell structure that is made of distinctly different triboelectric materials with alternative strip structures on the surface. The charge transfer is strengthened with the formation of polymer nanoparticles on surfaces. During coaxial rotation, a contact-induced electrification and the relative sliding between the contact surfaces of the core and the shell result in an "in-plane" lateral polarization, which drives the flow of electrons in the external load. A power density of 36.9 W/m(2) (short-circuit current of 90 μA and open-circuit voltage of 410 V) has been achieved by a rotating TENG with 8 strip units at a linear rotational velocity of 1.33 m/s (a rotation rate of 1000 r/min). The output can be further enhanced by integrating more strip units and/or applying larger linear rotational velocity. This rotating TENG can be used as a direct power source to drive small electronics, such as LED bulbs. This study proves the possibility to harvest mechanical energy by TENGs from rotational motion, demonstrating its potential for harvesting the flow energy of air or water for applications such as self-powered environmental sensors and wildlife tracking devices.

  14. Increased physical protection of soil carbon in the mineral soil of a poplar plantation after five years of free atmospheric CO2 enrichment (FACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoosbeek, M. R.; Vos, J. M.; Scarascia-Mugnozza, G. E.

    2006-07-01

    Free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments in aggrading forests and plantations have demonstrated significant increases in net primary production (NPP) and C storage in forest vegetation. The extra C uptake may also be stored in forest floor litter and in forest soil. After five years of FACE treatment at the EuroFACE short rotation poplar plantation, the increase of total soil C% was larger under elevated than under ambient CO2. However, the fate of this additional C allocated belowground remains unclear. The stability of soil organic matter is controlled by the chemical structure of the organic matter and the existence of protection offered by the soil matrix and minerals. Fresh litter entering the soil enhances microbial activity which induces the binding of organic matter and soil particles into macro-aggregates. As the enclosed organic matter is decomposed, microbial and decomposition products become associated with mineral particles. This association results in the formation of micro-aggregates (within macro-aggregates) in which organic matter is stabilized and protected. FACE and N-fertilization treatment did not affect the micro- and macro-aggregate weight, C or N fractions obtained by wet sieving. However, Populus euramericana increased the micro- and small macro-aggregates weight and C fractions. The obtained macro-aggregates were broken up in order to isolate recently formed micro-aggregates within macro-aggregates (iM-micro-aggregates). FACE increased the iM-micro-aggregate weight and C fractions. This study reveals that: 1) Species has an effect on the formation of macro-aggregates. The choice of species in a plantation or the effect of global change on species diversity, may therefore affect the stabilization and protection of soil C in aggregates. And 2) Increased atmospheric CO2 concentration increases the stabilization and protection of soil C in micro-aggregates formed within macro-aggregates. This mechanism increases the C sink of forest soils

  15. Design of experiments on 135 cloned poplar trees to map environmental influence in greenhouse.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rui Climaco; Stenlund, Hans; Hertzberg, Magnus; Lundstedt, Torbjörn; Johansson, Erik; Trygg, Johan

    2011-01-31

    To find and ascertain phenotypic differences, minimal variation between biological replicates is always desired. Variation between the replicates can originate from genetic transformation but also from environmental effects in the greenhouse. Design of experiments (DoE) has been used in field trials for many years and proven its value but is underused within functional genomics including greenhouse experiments. We propose a strategy to estimate the effect of environmental factors with the ultimate goal of minimizing variation between biological replicates, based on DoE. DoE can be analyzed in many ways. We present a graphical solution together with solutions based on classical statistics as well as the newly developed OPLS methodology. In this study, we used DoE to evaluate the influence of plant specific factors (plant size, shoot type, plant quality, and amount of fertilizer) and rotation of plant positions on height and section area of 135 cloned wild type poplar trees grown in the greenhouse. Statistical analysis revealed that plant position was the main contributor to variability among biological replicates and applying a plant rotation scheme could reduce this variation.

  16. Genome Enabled Discovery of Carbon Sequestration Genes in Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Filichkin, Sergei; Etherington, Elizabeth; Ma, Caiping; Strauss, Steve

    2007-02-22

    The goals of the S.H. Strauss laboratory portion of 'Genome-enabled discovery of carbon sequestration genes in poplar' are (1) to explore the functions of candidate genes using Populus transformation by inserting genes provided by Oakridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Florida (UF) into poplar; (2) to expand the poplar transformation toolkit by developing transformation methods for important genotypes; and (3) to allow induced expression, and efficient gene suppression, in roots and other tissues. As part of the transformation improvement effort, OSU developed transformation protocols for Populus trichocarpa 'Nisqually-1' clone and an early flowering P. alba clone, 6K10. Complete descriptions of the transformation systems were published (Ma et. al. 2004, Meilan et. al 2004). Twenty-one 'Nisqually-1' and 622 6K10 transgenic plants were generated. To identify root predominant promoters, a set of three promoters were tested for their tissue-specific expression patterns in poplar and in Arabidopsis as a model system. A novel gene, ET304, was identified by analyzing a collection of poplar enhancer trap lines generated at OSU (Filichkin et. al 2006a, 2006b). Other promoters include the pGgMT1 root-predominant promoter from Casuarina glauca and the pAtPIN2 promoter from Arabidopsis root specific PIN2 gene. OSU tested two induction systems, alcohol- and estrogen-inducible, in multiple poplar transgenics. Ethanol proved to be the more efficient when tested in tissue culture and greenhouse conditions. Two estrogen-inducible systems were evaluated in transgenic Populus, neither of which functioned reliably in tissue culture conditions. GATEWAY-compatible plant binary vectors were designed to compare the silencing efficiency of homologous (direct) RNAi vs. heterologous (transitive) RNAi inverted repeats. A set of genes was targeted for post transcriptional silencing in the model Arabidopsis system; these include the floral meristem identity gene (APETALA1 or

  17. Effect of Continuous Cropping Generations on Each Component Biomass of Poplar Seedlings during Different Growth Periods

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhang, Shuyong; Li, Tian; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Ronghua; Zhang, Guangcan

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the change rules and response characteristics of growth status on each component of poplar seedling followed by continuous cropping generations and growth period, we clear the biomass distribution pattern of poplar seedling, adapt continuous cropping, and provide theoretical foundation and technical reference on cultivation management of poplar seedling, the first generation, second generation, and third generation continuous cropping poplar seedlings were taken as study objects, and the whole poplar seedling was harvested to measure and analyze the change of each component biomass on different growth period poplar leaves, newly emerging branches, trunks and root system, and so forth. The results showed that the whole biomass of poplar seedling decreased significantly with the leaf area and its ratio increased, and the growth was inhibited obviously. The biomass aboveground was more than that underground. The ratios of leaf biomass and newly emerging branches biomass of first continuous cropping poplar seedling were relatively high. With the continuous cropping generations and growth cycle increasing, poplar seedling had a growth strategy to improve the ratio of root-shoot and root-leaf to adapt the limited soil nutrient of continuous cropping. PMID:25401150

  18. Effect of continuous cropping generations on each component biomass of poplar seedlings during different growth periods.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhang, Shuyong; Li, Tian; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Ronghua; Zhang, Guangcan

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the change rules and response characteristics of growth status on each component of poplar seedling followed by continuous cropping generations and growth period, we clear the biomass distribution pattern of poplar seedling, adapt continuous cropping, and provide theoretical foundation and technical reference on cultivation management of poplar seedling, the first generation, second generation, and third generation continuous cropping poplar seedlings were taken as study objects, and the whole poplar seedling was harvested to measure and analyze the change of each component biomass on different growth period poplar leaves, newly emerging branches, trunks and root system, and so forth. The results showed that the whole biomass of poplar seedling decreased significantly with the leaf area and its ratio increased, and the growth was inhibited obviously. The biomass aboveground was more than that underground. The ratios of leaf biomass and newly emerging branches biomass of first continuous cropping poplar seedling were relatively high. With the continuous cropping generations and growth cycle increasing, poplar seedling had a growth strategy to improve the ratio of root-shoot and root-leaf to adapt the limited soil nutrient of continuous cropping.

  19. An Empirical Assessment of Transgene Flow from a Bt Transgenic Poplar Plantation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xingling; Lv, Jinhui; Jia, Huixia; Zhao, Shutang; Lu, Mengzhu

    2017-01-01

    To assess the possible impact of transgenic poplar plantations on the ecosystem, we analyzed the frequency and distance of gene flow from a mature male transgenic Populus nigra plantation carrying the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin gene (Bt poplar) and the survival of Bt poplar seeds. The resultant Bt poplar seeds occurred at a frequency of ~0.15% at 0 m to ~0.02% at 500 m from the Bt poplar plantation. The germination of Bt poplar seeds diminished within three weeks in the field (germination rate from 68% to 0%) compared to 48% after three weeks of storage at 4°C. The survival rate of seedlings in the field was 0% without any treatment but increased to 1.7% under the addition of four treatments (cleaning and trimming, watering, weeding, and covering with plastic film to maintain moisture) after being seeded in the field for eight weeks. The results of this study indicate that gene flow originating from the Bt poplar plantation occurred at an extremely low level through pollen or seeds under natural conditions. This study provides first-hand field data on the extent of transgene flow in poplar plantations and offers guidance for the risk assessment of transgenic poplar plantations.

  20. Poplar maintains zinc homeostasis with heavy metal genes HMA4 and PCS1

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Joshua P.; Adeli, Ardeshir; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Harkess, Richard L.; Page, Grier P.; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Schultz, Emily B.; Yuceer, Cetin

    2011-01-01

    Perennial woody species, such as poplar (Populus spp.) must acquire necessary heavy metals like zinc (Zn) while avoiding potential toxicity. Poplar contains genes with sequence homology to genes HMA4 and PCS1 from other species which are involved in heavy metal regulation. While basic genomic conservation exists, poplar does not have a hyperaccumulating phenotype. Poplar has a common indicator phenotype in which heavy metal accumulation is proportional to environmental concentrations but excesses are prevented. Phenotype is partly affected by regulation of HMA4 and PCS1 transcriptional abundance. Wild-type poplar down-regulates several transcripts in its Zn-interacting pathway at high Zn levels. Also, overexpressed PtHMA4 and PtPCS1 genes result in varying Zn phenotypes in poplar; specifically, there is a doubling of Zn accumulation in leaf tissues in an overexpressed PtPCS1 line. The genomic complement and regulation of poplar highlighted in this study supports a role of HMA4 and PCS1 in Zn regulation dictating its phenotype. These genes can be altered in poplar to change its interaction with Zn. However, other poplar genes in the surrounding pathway may maintain the phenotype by inhibiting drastic changes in heavy metal accumulation with a single gene transformation. PMID:21504875

  1. An Empirical Assessment of Transgene Flow from a Bt Transgenic Poplar Plantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingling; Lv, Jinhui; Jia, Huixia; Zhao, Shutang; Lu, Mengzhu

    2017-01-01

    To assess the possible impact of transgenic poplar plantations on the ecosystem, we analyzed the frequency and distance of gene flow from a mature male transgenic Populus nigra plantation carrying the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin gene (Bt poplar) and the survival of Bt poplar seeds. The resultant Bt poplar seeds occurred at a frequency of ~0.15% at 0 m to ~0.02% at 500 m from the Bt poplar plantation. The germination of Bt poplar seeds diminished within three weeks in the field (germination rate from 68% to 0%) compared to 48% after three weeks of storage at 4°C. The survival rate of seedlings in the field was 0% without any treatment but increased to 1.7% under the addition of four treatments (cleaning and trimming, watering, weeding, and covering with plastic film to maintain moisture) after being seeded in the field for eight weeks. The results of this study indicate that gene flow originating from the Bt poplar plantation occurred at an extremely low level through pollen or seeds under natural conditions. This study provides first-hand field data on the extent of transgene flow in poplar plantations and offers guidance for the risk assessment of transgenic poplar plantations. PMID:28085955

  2. 21st Session of the International Poplar Commission (IPC-2000): poplar and willow culture: meeting the needs of society and the environment; 200 September 24-28; Vancouver, WA.

    Treesearch

    J.G. Isebrands; J. Richardson

    2000-01-01

    Research results and ongoing research activities on poplar and willow breeding, diseases, insects, production, and utilization are described in 220 abstracts from the International Poplar Commission meeting in Vancouver, Washington, September 24-28, 2000.

  3. Development of a sink–source interaction model for the growth of short-rotation coppice willow and in silico exploration of genotype×environment effects

    PubMed Central

    Cerasuolo, M.; Richter, G. M.; Richard, B.; Cunniff, J.; Girbau, S.; Shield, I.; Purdy, S; Karp, A.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying key performance traits is essential for elucidating crop growth processes and breeding. In Salix spp., genotypic diversity is being exploited to tailor new varieties to overcome environmental yield constraints. Process-based models can assist these efforts by identifying key parameters of yield formation for different genotype×environment (G×E) combinations. Here, four commercial willow varieties grown in contrasting environments (west and south-east UK) were intensively sampled for growth traits over two 2-year rotations. A sink–source interaction model was developed to parameterize the balance of source (carbon capture/mobilization) and sink formation (morphogenesis, carbon allocation) during growth. Global sensitivity analysis consistently identified day length for the onset of stem elongation as most important factor for yield formation, followed by various ‘sink>source’ controlling parameters. In coastal climates, the chilling control of budburst ranked higher compared with the more eastern climate. Sensitivity to drought, including canopy size and rooting depth, was potentially growth limiting in the south-east and west of the UK. Potential yields increased from the first to the second rotation, but less so for broad- than for narrow-leaved varieties (20 and 47%, respectively), which had established less well initially (–19%). The establishment was confounded by drought during the first rotation, affecting broad- more than narrow-leaved canopy phenotypes (–29%). The analysis emphasized quantum efficiency at low light intensity as key to assimilation; however, on average, sink parameters were more important than source parameters. The G×E pairings described with this new process model will help to identify parameters of sink–source control for future willow breeding. PMID:26663471

  4. Development of a sink-source interaction model for the growth of short-rotation coppice willow and in silico exploration of genotype×environment effects.

    PubMed

    Cerasuolo, M; Richter, G M; Richard, B; Cunniff, J; Girbau, S; Shield, I; Purdy, S; Karp, A

    2016-02-01

    Identifying key performance traits is essential for elucidating crop growth processes and breeding. In Salix spp., genotypic diversity is being exploited to tailor new varieties to overcome environmental yield constraints. Process-based models can assist these efforts by identifying key parameters of yield formation for different genotype×environment (G×E) combinations. Here, four commercial willow varieties grown in contrasting environments (west and south-east UK) were intensively sampled for growth traits over two 2-year rotations. A sink-source interaction model was developed to parameterize the balance of source (carbon capture/mobilization) and sink formation (morphogenesis, carbon allocation) during growth. Global sensitivity analysis consistently identified day length for the onset of stem elongation as most important factor for yield formation, followed by various 'sink>source' controlling parameters. In coastal climates, the chilling control of budburst ranked higher compared with the more eastern climate. Sensitivity to drought, including canopy size and rooting depth, was potentially growth limiting in the south-east and west of the UK. Potential yields increased from the first to the second rotation, but less so for broad- than for narrow-leaved varieties (20 and 47%, respectively), which had established less well initially (-19%). The establishment was confounded by drought during the first rotation, affecting broad- more than narrow-leaved canopy phenotypes (-29%). The analysis emphasized quantum efficiency at low light intensity as key to assimilation; however, on average, sink parameters were more important than source parameters. The G×E pairings described with this new process model will help to identify parameters of sink-source control for future willow breeding.

  5. Arthroscopic treatment of rotator cuff tear in the over-60s: repair is preferable to isolated acromioplasty-tenotomy in the short term.

    PubMed

    Dezaly, C; Sirveaux, F; Philippe, R; Wein-Remy, F; Sedaghatian, J; Roche, O; Molé, D

    2011-10-01

    The principal study objective was to compare clinical results for arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear and acromioplasty-tenotomy in patients aged over 60 years. Repair provides better clinical results than isolated acromioplasty-tenotomy. Shoulder function is improved when healing is obtained. One hundred and forty-two patients aged over 60 years (mean age, 67 years) presenting with reparable supraspinatus tear, extending to a greater or lesser degree to the infraspinatus, agreed to take part in a randomized prospective study. Fifteen were excluded from statistical analysis. All underwent acromioplasty and biceps tenotomy. They were randomly assigned to arthroscopic rotator-cuff repair (CR group) or not (AT group). The principal evaluation criterion was mean weighted Constant score at one year's follow-up. Healing in the CR group was assessed on ultrasound at one year. The complications rate was 7.9%. Mean weighted Constant score was significantly better in group CR: 75.8%, versus 68.8% in AT. In the CR group, the 1-year healing rate was 67.6%. Healing significantly impacted mean weighted Constant score: 80% with healing, versus 66.9% in iterative tearing. Whatever the size of the tear, mean weighted Constant score was significantly better in patients with than without (no repair or iterative tear) tendon healing. The study demonstrated the interest of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in patients aged over 60 years. The benefit of repair compared to isolated acromioplasty-tenotomy depended on tendon healing. Randomized prospective study, level II. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of ARM spectral short-wave data. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.

    1994-07-18

    Our ARM goal is to help improve both longwave and shortwave models used in GCMs by providing improved radiometric shortwave data. The inference of cloud cover and optical properties of clouds is another goal of this research effort. At the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) in Albany, New York, we are acquiring downwelling shortwave, including direct and diffuse irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling longwave, upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave, and aerosol optical depth that we combine with National Weather Service surface and upper air data as a model test data set for ARM researchers. The major objective of our program has been to develop two spectral versions of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR). The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) contains six filtered, narrow-passband detectors, and one unfiltered silicon detector that serves as a surrogate total shortwave sensor. The rotating shadowband spectroradiometer (RSS) contains a 256-channel diode array that spans the wavelengths 350-1050 nm with resolution varying between 0.6 nm and 8 nm. With some of the instrument development complete we are devoting more effort to analysis of the MFRSR data. Progress was made on several fronts this year, resulting in conference papers and submissions to refereed journals. Data from the ASRC roof has been used to develop corrections of the MFRSR shortwave sensor. SGP data has been used to develop and validate a retrieval technique for total column water vapor. Total column ozone has been estimated using MFRSR data, but validation at the SGP was not possible for lack of a suitable ozone column standard. Some progress has been made on cloud cover detection, but it is not yet implemented as a routine classification and reporting procedure.

  7. Nutrient Distribution Indicated Whole-Tree Harvesting as a Possible Factor Restricting the Sustainable Productivity of a Poplar Plantation System in China

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xiaomin; Tian, Ye; Tang, Luozhong

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the biomass and contents of five major macronutrients (N, P, K, Ca and Mg) in 10-year-old poplar trees (Populus deltoids Bartr. cv. “Lux”), and determined their nutrient use efficiencies (NUEs) at Zhoushan Forestry Farm (32°20′ N, 119°40′ E), Jiangsu province, in eastern China. The above- and below-ground biomass of poplar trees was 161.7 t ha-1, of which 53.3% was stemwood. The nutrient contents in the aboveground part were as follows: 415.1 kg N ha-1, 29.7 kg P ha-1, 352.0 kg K ha-1, 1083.0 kg Ca ha-1, and 89.8 kg Mg ha-1. The highest nutrient contents were in stembark, followed by branches, roots, stemwood, and foliage. The NUEs of the aboveground parts of poplar for N, P, K, Ca and Mg were 0.313, 4.377, 0.369, 0.120, 1.448 t dry biomass kg-1 nutrient, respectively, while those of stemwood were 1.294, 33.154, 1.253, 0.667, and 3.328 t dry biomass kg-1, respectively. The cycling coefficients, defined as the percentage of annual nutrient return in annual nutrient uptake, of N, P, K, Ca and Mg for the aboveground part were 87, 95, 69, 92, and 84%, respectively. Based on the NUE and nutrient cycling characteristics, shifting from whole-tree harvesting to stemwood-only harvesting and appropriately extending the harvest rotation could prevent site deterioration and support sustainable productivity of poplar plantation systems. PMID:25992549

  8. Nutrient distribution indicated whole-tree harvesting as a possible factor restricting the sustainable productivity of a poplar plantation system in China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaomin; Tian, Ye; Tang, Luozhong

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the biomass and contents of five major macronutrients (N, P, K, Ca and Mg) in 10-year-old poplar trees (Populus deltoids Bartr. cv. "Lux"), and determined their nutrient use efficiencies (NUEs) at Zhoushan Forestry Farm (32°20' N, 119°40' E), Jiangsu province, in eastern China. The above- and below-ground biomass of poplar trees was 161.7 t ha(-1), of which 53.3% was stemwood. The nutrient contents in the aboveground part were as follows: 415.1 kg N ha(-1), 29.7 kg P ha(-1), 352.0 kg K ha(-1), 1083.0 kg Ca ha(-1), and 89.8 kg Mg ha(-1). The highest nutrient contents were in stembark, followed by branches, roots, stemwood, and foliage. The NUEs of the aboveground parts of poplar for N, P, K, Ca and Mg were 0.313, 4.377, 0.369, 0.120, 1.448 t dry biomass kg(-1) nutrient, respectively, while those of stemwood were 1.294, 33.154, 1.253, 0.667, and 3.328 t dry biomass kg(-1), respectively. The cycling coefficients, defined as the percentage of annual nutrient return in annual nutrient uptake, of N, P, K, Ca and Mg for the aboveground part were 87, 95, 69, 92, and 84%, respectively. Based on the NUE and nutrient cycling characteristics, shifting from whole-tree harvesting to stemwood-only harvesting and appropriately extending the harvest rotation could prevent site deterioration and support sustainable productivity of poplar plantation systems.

  9. [Phosphorus transfer between mixed poplar and black locust seedlings].

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Jia, Liming; Hao, Baogang; Wen, Xuejun; Zhai, Mingpu

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, the 32P radio-tracer technique was applied to study the ways of phosphorus transfer between poplar (Populus euramericana cv. 'I-214') and black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia). A five compartment root box (18 cm x 18 cm x 26 cm) was used for testing the existence of the hyphal links between the roots of two tree species when inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae). Populus I-214 (donor) and Robinia pseudoacacia (receiver) were grown in two terminal compartments, separated by a 2 cm root-free soil layer. The root compartments were lined with bags of nylon mesh (38 microns) that allowed the passage of hyphae but not roots. The top soil of a mixed stand of poplar and black locust, autoclaved at 121 degrees C for one hour, was used for growing seedlings for testing. In 5 compartment root box, mycorrhizal root colonization of poplar was 34%, in which VA mycorrhizal fungus was inoculated, whereas 26% mycorrhizal root colonization was observed in black locust, the other terminal compartment, 20 weeks after planting. No root colonization was observed in non-inoculated plant pairs. This indicated that the mycorrhizal root colonization of black locust was caused by hyphal spreading from the poplar. Test of tracer isotope of 32P showed that the radioactivity of the treatment significantly higher than that of the control (P < 0.05), 14 days from the tracer applied, to 27 days after, when VA mycorrhizal fungus was inoculated in poplar root. Furthermore, mycorrhizal interconnections between the roots of poplar and black locust seedlings was observed in situ by binocular in root box. All these experiments showed that the hyphal links was formed between the roots of two species of trees inoculated by VA mycorrhizal fungus. Four treatments were designed according to if there were two nets (mesh 38 microns), 2 cm apart, between the poplar and black locust, and if the soil in root box was pasteurized. Most significant differences of

  10. Nitrogen ion utilization by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L. ) seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, L.K.

    1982-01-01

    Growth responses of one-year-old tulip poplar seedlings were determined for different nitrogen sources (HN/sub 4/NO/sub 3/, NH+/sub 4/, NO-/sub 3/, no nitrogen) at 336 ppm N in nutrient culture. At the end of three months, there were no significant differences in growth observed among treatments in terms of stem elongation, leaf area, and leaf size. After four months, however, seedlings of the NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ treatment exhibited significantly (P<0.05) greater growth (final weight gain and stem elongation) than all other nitrogen sorces. Growth was slightly less for the NO-/sub 3/ treatment plants, but compared with NH+/sub 4/ and no nitrogen treatment, both NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ and NO-/sub 3/ treatments exhibited significantly greater growth responses. NO-/sub 3/ is recommended as the sole nitrogen source, especially for small seedlings of tulip poplar.

  11. Growth of hybrid poplars in Pennsylvania and Maryland clonal tests

    Treesearch

    Maurice E., Jr. Demeritt

    1981-01-01

    Average 4-year-height of 199 hybrid poplar clones ranged from 5.1 to 26.0 feet in Pennsylvania and 5.6 to 22.7 feet in Maryland. Several rapid-growing clones grew well at both locations, but height growth was affected by interactions of clones and location. The clones that grew best on both sites averaged 4 to 6 feet of height growth per year.

  12. West Virginia yellow-poplar lumber defect database

    Treesearch

    Lawrence E. Osborn; Charles J. Gatchell; Curt C. Hassler; Curt C. Hassler

    1992-01-01

    Describes the data collection methods and the format of the new West Virginia yellow-poplar lumber defect database that was developed for use with computer simulation programs. The database contains descriptions of 627 boards, totaling approximately 3,800 board. feet, collected in West Virginia in grades FAS, FASlF, No. 1 Common, No. 2A Common, and No. 2B Common. The...

  13. Sulfur content of hybrid poplar cuttings fumigated with sulfur dioxide

    Treesearch

    Keith F. Jensen

    1975-01-01

    Hybrid poplar cuttings were fumigated with sulfur dioxide ranging in concentration from 0.1 to 5 ppm for periods of 5 to 80 hours. At the end of the fumigation periods, the cuttings were harvested and the sulfur and chlorophyll contents of the leaves were measured. At 0.1 ppm and 0.25 ppm the sulfur content initially increased, but decreased as fumigation continued. At...

  14. Hydrologic Evaluation of a Humid Climate Poplar Phytoremediation Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swensen, K.; Rabideau, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    The emplacement of hybrid poplar trees to function as phytoremediation barriers is an appealing and sustainable groundwater management strategy because of low maintenance costs and the potential to extract large amounts of groundwater without pumping. While the effectiveness of poplar barriers has been assessed by groundwater quality monitoring, less attention has been given to physical hydrologic evaluations needed to improve barrier designs. In this research, a five year hydrologic evaluation was conducted at a poplar phytoremediation site in western NY, with the goal of quantifying ETg (evapotranspiration from groundwater) as a measure of the barrier's effectiveness in a humid climate. To consider transpiration from both vadose zone and groundwater, the hydrologic evaluation included four components: physical ET measurements, theoretical ET calculations, analysis of diurnal groundwater table fluctuations, and vadose zone modeling. The direct measurements of ETT (total) were obtained using sap flow meters installed on multiple trees within the barrier. These data were interpreted using a regression model that included theoretical ET calculations and site-specific measurements of weather parameters and poplar trunk area. Application of this model was challenged by the spatial variation in rooting depth as determined by tree excavations. To further quantify the removal of groundwater by the phytobarrier (ETg), the White Method was applied to interpret diurnal groundwater fluctuations from monitoring wells located within the barrier, in conjunction with a variably saturated-saturated flow model configured to confirm water extraction from ETg. Taken together, the results of this five year hydrologic evaluation highlight the complexity in quantifying humid climate groundwater extraction, as a large number of variables were found to influence these rates. Improved understanding of these controls will contribute to improved barrier designs that maximize ETg.

  15. Heat transfer mechanisms in poplar wood undergoing torrefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sule, Idris O.; Mahmud, Shohel; Dutta, Animesh; Tasnim, Syeda Humaira

    2016-03-01

    Torrefaction, a thermal treatment process of biomass, has been proved to improve biomass combustible properties. Torrefaction is defined as a thermochemical process in reduced oxygen condition and at temperature range from 200 to 300 °C for shorter residence time whereby energy yield is maximized, can be a bridging technology that can lead the conventional system (e.g. coal-fired plants) towards a sustainable energy system. In efforts to develop a commercial operable torrefaction reactor, the present study examines the minimum input condition at which biomass is torrefied and explores the heat transfer mechanisms during torrefaction in poplar wood samples. The heat transfer through the wood sample is numerically modeled and analyzed. Each poplar wood is torrefied at temperature of 250, 270, and 300 °C. The experimental study shows that the 270 °C-treatment can be deduced as the optimal input condition for torrefaction of poplar wood. A good understanding of heat transfer mechanisms can facilitate the upscaling and downscaling of torrefaction process equipment to fit the feedstock input criteria and can help to develop treatment input specifications that can maximize process efficiency.

  16. Modeling sustainable reuse of nitrogen-laden wastewater by poplar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yusong; Licht, Louis; Just, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Numerical modeling was used to simulate the leaching of nitrogen (N) to groundwater as a consequence of irrigating food processing wastewater onto grass and poplar under various management scenarios. Under current management practices for a large food processor, a simulated annual N loading of 540 kg ha(-1) yielded 93 kg ha(-1) of N leaching for grass and no N leaching for poplar during the growing season. Increasing the annual growing season N loading to approximately 1,550 kg ha(-1) for poplar only, using "weekly", "daily" and "calculated" irrigation scenarios, yielded N leaching of 17 kg ha(-1), 6 kg ha(-1), and 4 kg ha(-1), respectively. Constraining the simulated irrigation schedule by the current onsite wastewater storage capacity of approximately 757 megaliters (Ml) yielded N leaching of 146 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) while storage capacity scenarios of 3,024 and 4,536 Ml yielded N leaching of 65 and 13 kg ha(-1) yr(-1), respectively, for a loading of 1,550 kg ha(-1) yr(-1). Further constraining the model by the current wastewater storage volume and the available land area (approximately 1,000 hectares) required a "diverse" irrigation schedule that was predicted to leach a weighted average of 13 kg-N ha(-1) yr(-1) when dosed with 1,063 kg-N ha(-1) yr(-1).

  17. Poplar for the phytomanagement of boron contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Robinson, B H; Green, S R; Chancerel, B; Mills, T M; Clothier, B E

    2007-11-01

    Boron (B) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is mobile relative to other trace elements. We investigated the potential of hybrid poplar (Populus sp.) for B phytomanagement using a lysimeter experiment and a field trial on B-contaminated wood-waste. In both studies, poplars enhanced evapotranspiration from the wood-waste, reduced B leaching, and accumulated B in the aerial portions of the tree. When grown in a substrate containing 30 mg/kg B, poplar leaves had an average B concentration of 845 mg/kg, while the stems contained 21 mg/kg B. Leaf B concentrations increased linearly with leaf age. A decomposition experiment revealed that abscised leaves released 14% of their B during the winter months. Fertiliser application enhanced tree growth without decreasing the leaf B concentrations. Harvesting alternate rows of trees on a contaminated site would reduce leaching from the site while removing B. Harvested plant material may provide bioenergy, stock fodder, or an amendment for B-deficient soils.

  18. Carbon balance in leaves of young poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, S; Heizmann, U; Magel, E; Eiblmeier, M; Müller, A; Rennenberg, H; Hampp, R; Schnitzler, J-P; Kreuzwieser, J

    2004-11-01

    In the present study, important components of carbon metabolism of mature leaves of young poplar trees (Populus x canescens) were determined. Carbohydrate concentrations in leaves and xylem sap were quantified at five different times during the day and compared with photosynthetic gas exchange measurements (net assimilation, transpiration and rates of isoprene emission). Continuously measured xylem sap flow rates, with a time resolution of 15 min, were used to calculate diurnal balances of carbon metabolism of whole mature poplar leaves on different days. Loss of photosynthetically fixed carbon by isoprene emission and dark respiration amounted to 1% and 20%. The most abundant soluble carbohydrates in leaves and xylem sap were glucose, fructose and sucrose, with amounts of approx. 2 to 12 mmol m(-2) leaf area in leaves and about 0.2 to 15 mM in xylem sap. Clear diurnal patterns of carbohydrate concentration in xylem sap and leaves, however, were not observed. Calculations of the carbon transport rates in the xylem to the leaves were based on carbohydrate concentrations in xylem sap and xylem sap flow rates. This carbon delivery amounted to about 3 micromol C m(-2) s(-1) during the day and approx. 1 micromol C m(-2) s(-1) at night. The data demonstrated that between 9 and 28 % of total carbon delivered to poplar leaves during 24 h resulted from xylem transport and, hence, provide a strong indication for a significant rate of carbon cycling within young trees.

  19. Spatial variability of soil carbon and nitrogen in two hybrid poplar-hay crop systems in southern Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winans, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    Canadian agricultural operations contribute approximately 8% of national GHG emissions each year, mainly from fertilizers, enteric fermentation, and manure management (Environment Canada, 2010). With improved management of cropland and forests, it is possible to mitigate GHG emissions through carbon (C) sequestration while enhancing soil and crop productivity. Tree-based intercropped (TBI) systems, consisting of a fast-growing woody species such as poplar (Populus spp.) planted in widely-spaced rows with crops cultivated between tree rows, were one of the technologies prioritized for investigation by the Agreement for the Agricultural Greenhouse Gases Program (AAGGP), because fast growing trees can be a sink for atmospheric carbon-dioxide (CO2) as well as a long-term source of farm income (Montagnini and Nair, 2004). However, there are relatively few estimates of the C sequestration in the trees or due to tree inputs (e.g., fine root turnover, litterfall that gets incorporated into SOC), and hybrid poplars grow exponentially in the first 8-10 years after planting. With the current study, our objectives were (1) to evaluate spatial variation in soil C and nitrogen (N) storage, CO2 and nitrogen oxide (N20), and tree and crop productivity for two hybrid poplar-hay intercrop systems at year 9, comparing TBI vs. non-TBI systems, and (2) to evaluate TBI systems in the current context of C trading markets, which value C sequestration in trees, unharvested crop components, and soils of TBI systems. The study results will provide meaningful measures that indicate changes due to TBI systems in the short-term and in the long-term, in terms of GHG mitigation, enhanced soil and crop productivity, as well as the expected economic returns in TBI systems.

  20. Correction of Tibial Torsion in Children With Cerebral Palsy by Isolated Distal Tibia Rotation Osteotomy: A Short-term, In Vivo Anatomic Study.

    PubMed

    Andrisevic, Emily; Westberry, David E; Pugh, Linda I; Bagley, Anita M; Tanner, Stephanie; Davids, Jon R

    2016-01-01

    Excessive internal or external tibial torsion is frequently present in children with cerebral palsy. Several surgical techniques have been described to correct excessive tibial torsion, including isolated distal tibial rotation osteotomy (TRO). The anatomic changes surrounding this technique are poorly understood. The goal of the study was to examine the anatomic relationship between the tibia and fibula following isolated distal TRO in children with cerebral palsy. Twenty patients with 29 limbs were prospectively entered for study. CT scans of the proximal and distal tibiofibular (TF) articulations were obtained preoperatively, at 6 weeks, and 1 year postoperatively. Measurements of tibia and fibula torsion were performed at each interval. Qualitative assessments of proximal and distal TF joint congruency were also performed. The subjects with internal tibia torsion (ITT, 19 limbs) showed significant torsional changes for the tibia between preoperative, postoperative, and 1 year time points (mean torsion 13.21, 31.05, 34.84 degrees, respectively). Measurement of fibular torsion in the ITT treatment group also showed significant differences between time points (mean -36.77, -26.77, -18.54 degrees, respectively). Proximal and distal TF joints remained congruent at all time points in the study.Subjects with external tibia torsion (ETT, 10 limbs) showed significant differences between preoperative and postoperative tibial torsion, but not between postoperative and 1 year (mean torsion 54, 19.3, 23.3 degrees, respectively). Measurement of fibular torsion in the ETT treatment group did not change significantly between preoperative and postoperative, but did change significantly between postoperative and 1 year (mean torsion -9.8,-16.9, -30.7 degrees, respectively). Nine of 10 proximal TF joints were found to be subluxated at 6 weeks postoperatively. At 1 year, all 9 of these joints had reduced. Correction of ITT by isolated distal tibial external rotation osteotomy

  1. Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of ARM spectral short-wave data. Technical progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.

    1995-04-26

    The authors goal in the ARM program is the improvement of radiation models used in GCMs, especially in the shortwave, (1) by providing improved shortwave radiometric measurements for the testing of models and (2) by developing methods for retrieving climatologically sensitive parameters that serve as input to shortwave and longwave models. They are acquiring downwelling direct and diffuse spectral irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling broadband longwave, and upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave irradiances that they combined with surface and upper air data from the Albany airport as a test data set for ARM modelers. They have also developed algorithms to improve shortwave measurements made at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM site by standard thermopile instruments and by the multifolter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR). However, the major objective of the program has been the development of two spectral versions of the rotating shadowband radiometer. The MFRSR, has become a workhose at the CART site in Oklahoma and Kansas, and it is widely deployed in other climate programs. They have spent most of their effort this year developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, they have had success in calculating shortwave surface albedo and aerosol optical depth from the ratio of direct to diffuse spectral irradiance. Using the surface albedo and the global irradiance, they have calculated cloud optical depths. From cloud optical depth and liquid water measured with the microwave radiometer, they have calculated effective liquid cloud particle radii. In each case the authors have attempted to validate the approach using independent measurements or retrievals of the parameters under investigation. With the exception of the ozone intercomparison, the corroborative measurements have been made at the SGP CART site. This report highlights these results.

  2. Effective alkaline metal-catalyzed oxidative delignification of hybrid poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Bhalla, Aditya; Bansal, Namita; Stoklosa, Ryan J.; Fountain, Mackenzie; Ralph, John; Hodge, David B.; Hegg, Eric L.

    2016-02-09

    Background: Strategies to improve copper-catalyzed alkaline hydrogen peroxide (Cu-AHP) pretreatment of hybrid poplar were investigated. These improvements included a combination of increasing hydrolysis yields, while simultaneously decreasing process inputs through (i) more efficient utilization of H2O2 and (ii) the addition of an alkaline extraction step prior to the metal-catalyzed AHP pretreatment. We hypothesized that utilizing this improved process could substantially lower the chemical inputs needed during pretreatment. Results: Hybrid poplar was pretreated utilizing a modified process in which an alkaline extraction step was incorporated prior to the Cu-AHP treatment step and H2O2 was added batch-wise over the course of 10 h. Our results revealed that the alkaline pre-extraction step improved both lignin and xylan solubilization, which ultimately led to improved glucose (86 %) and xylose (95 %) yields following enzymatic hydrolysis. An increase in the lignin solubilization was also observed with fed-batch H2O2 addition relative to batch-only addition, which again resulted in increased glucose and xylose yields (77 and 93 % versus 63 and 74 %, respectively). Importantly, combining these strategies led to significantly improved sugar yields (96 % glucose and 94 % xylose) following enzymatic hydrolysis. In addition, we found that we could substantially lower the chemical inputs (enzyme, H2O2, and catalyst), while still maintaining high product yields utilizing the improved Cu-AHP process. This pretreatment also provided a relatively pure lignin stream consisting of ≥90 % Klason lignin and only 3 % xylan and 2 % ash following precipitation. Two-dimensional heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (2D HSQC) NMR and size-exclusion chromatography demonstrated that the solubilized lignin was high molecular weight (Mw ≈ 22,000 Da) and only slightly oxidized relative to lignin

  3. Effective alkaline metal-catalyzed oxidative delignification of hybrid poplar

    DOE PAGES

    Bhalla, Aditya; Bansal, Namita; Stoklosa, Ryan J.; ...

    2016-02-09

    Background: Strategies to improve copper-catalyzed alkaline hydrogen peroxide (Cu-AHP) pretreatment of hybrid poplar were investigated. These improvements included a combination of increasing hydrolysis yields, while simultaneously decreasing process inputs through (i) more efficient utilization of H2O2 and (ii) the addition of an alkaline extraction step prior to the metal-catalyzed AHP pretreatment. We hypothesized that utilizing this improved process could substantially lower the chemical inputs needed during pretreatment. Results: Hybrid poplar was pretreated utilizing a modified process in which an alkaline extraction step was incorporated prior to the Cu-AHP treatment step and H2O2 was added batch-wise over the course of 10more » h. Our results revealed that the alkaline pre-extraction step improved both lignin and xylan solubilization, which ultimately led to improved glucose (86 %) and xylose (95 %) yields following enzymatic hydrolysis. An increase in the lignin solubilization was also observed with fed-batch H2O2 addition relative to batch-only addition, which again resulted in increased glucose and xylose yields (77 and 93 % versus 63 and 74 %, respectively). Importantly, combining these strategies led to significantly improved sugar yields (96 % glucose and 94 % xylose) following enzymatic hydrolysis. In addition, we found that we could substantially lower the chemical inputs (enzyme, H2O2, and catalyst), while still maintaining high product yields utilizing the improved Cu-AHP process. This pretreatment also provided a relatively pure lignin stream consisting of ≥90 % Klason lignin and only 3 % xylan and 2 % ash following precipitation. Two-dimensional heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (2D HSQC) NMR and size-exclusion chromatography demonstrated that the solubilized lignin was high molecular weight (Mw ≈ 22,000 Da) and only slightly oxidized relative to lignin from untreated poplar. In conclusion: This study demonstrated that the fed

  4. Fitness dynamics within a poplar hybrid zone: I. Prezygotic and postzygotic barriers impacting a native poplar hybrid stand

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Amanda D; MacQuarrie, Chris J K; Gros-Louis, Marie-Claude; Simpson, J Dale; Lamarche, Josyanne; Beardmore, Tannis; Thompson, Stacey L; Tanguay, Philippe; Isabel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization and introgression are pervasive evolutionary phenomena that provide insight into the selective forces that maintain species boundaries, permit gene flow, and control the direction of evolutionary change. Poplar trees (Populus L.) are well known for their ability to form viable hybrids and maintain their distinct species boundaries despite this interspecific gene flow. We sought to quantify the hybridization dynamics and postzygotic fitness within a hybrid stand of balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera L.), eastern cottonwood (P. deltoides Marsh.), and their natural hybrids to gain insight into the barriers maintaining this stable hybrid zone. We observed asymmetrical hybrid formation with P. deltoides acting as the seed parent, but with subsequent introgression biased toward P. balsamifera. Native hybrids expressed fitness traits intermediate to the parental species and were not universally unfit. That said, native hybrid seedlings were absent from the seedling population, which may indicate additional selective pressures controlling their recruitment. It is imperative that we understand the selective forces maintaining this native hybrid zone in order to quantify the impact of exotic poplar hybrids on this native system. PMID:24967081

  5. Rotational moulding.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Kearns, M P

    2003-10-01

    Rotational moulding promises designers attractive economics and a low-pressure process. The benefits of rotational moulding are compared here with other manufacturing methods such as injection and blow moulding.

  6. Rotating Vesta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Astronomers combined 146 exposures taken by NASA's Hubble SpaceTelescope to make this 73-frame movie of the asteroid Vesta's rotation.Vesta completes a rotation every 5.34 hours.› Asteroid and...

  7. Effect of sterilizing treatments on survival and growth of hybrid poplar cuttings

    Treesearch

    Harold F. Ford

    1954-01-01

    Fungus diseases of poplars might be spread to new locations if hybrid poplar cuttings (now being test-planted in various parts of the northeast) were not sterilized before shipment. Among these diseases are the canker-producing fungi Septoria musiva and Dothichiza populea and the leafblotch fungus Septotinia populiperda.

  8. Sequencing the genome of Marssonina brunnea reveals fungus-poplar co-evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The fungus Marssonina brunnea is a causal pathogen of Marssonina leaf spot that devastates poplar plantations by defoliating susceptible trees before normal fall leaf drop. Results We sequence the genome of M. brunnea with a size of 52 Mb assembled into 89 scaffolds, representing the first sequenced Dermateaceae genome. By inoculating this fungus onto a poplar hybrid clone, we investigate how M. brunnea interacts and co-evolves with its host to colonize poplar leaves. While a handful of virulence genes in M. brunnea, mostly from the LysM family, are detected to up-regulate during infection, the poplar down-regulates its resistance genes, such as nucleotide binding site domains and leucine rich repeats, in response to infection. From 10,027 predicted proteins of M. brunnea in a comparison with those from poplar, we identify four poplar transferases that stimulate the host to resist M. brunnea. These transferas-encoding genes may have driven the co-evolution of M. brunnea and Populus during the process of infection and anti-infection. Conclusions Our results from the draft sequence of the M. brunnea genome provide evidence for genome-genome interactions that play an important role in poplar-pathogen co-evolution. This knowledge could help to design effective strategies for controlling Marssonina leaf spot in poplar. PMID:22876864

  9. Hybrid poplars: fast-growing, disease-resistant species has multiple uses

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny

    2004-01-01

    The production of alternative fuels as a source of energy is a focus of concern in the United States. Intensively cultured hybrid poplar plantations have been used to supplement industrial fiber supplies in several areas of the United States, and have therefore gained attention in the North Central region. Attention is focused on poplars because they are fast growing...

  10. Methods of rapid, early selection of poplar clones for maximum yield potential: a manual of procedures.

    Treesearch

    USDA FS

    1982-01-01

    Instructions, illustrated with examples and experimental results, are given for the controlled-environment propagation and selection of poplar clones. Greenhouse and growth-room culture of poplar stock plants and scions are described, and statistical techniques for discriminating among clones on the basis of growth variables are emphasized.

  11. Board-Foot and Diameter Growth of Yellow-Poplar After Thinning

    Treesearch

    Donald E. Beck; Lino Della-Bianca

    1975-01-01

    Board-foot growth and yield of thinned yellow-poplar stands (Liriodendron tulipifera L.)is related to age, site index, residual basal area, and residual quadratic mean stand diameter after thinning. Diameter growth of individual trees is increased considerably by thinning. Equations describing growth and yield are based on data from 141 natura1 yellow-poplar stands in...

  12. Gene and enhancer trap tagging of vascular-expressed genes in poplar trees

    Treesearch

    Andrew Groover; Joseph R. Fontana; Gayle Dupper; Caiping Ma; Robert Martienssen; Steven Strauss; Richard Meilan

    2004-01-01

    We report a gene discovery system for poplar trees based on gene and enhancer traps. Gene and enhancer trap vectors carrying the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were inserted into the poplar genome via Agrobacterium tumefaciens transformation, where they reveal the expression pattern of genes at or near the insertion sites. Because GUS...

  13. WUS and STM-based reporter genes for studying meristem development in poplar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We describe the development of a reporter system for monitoring meristem initiation in poplar using promoters of poplar homologs to the meristem-active regulatory genes WUSCHEL (WUS) and SHOOTMERISTEMLESS (STM). When ~3 kb of the 5’ flanking regions of close homologs were used to drive expression o...

  14. Hybrid poplar pulpwood and lumber from a reclaimed strip-mine

    Treesearch

    Walter H. Davidson

    1979-01-01

    A 2-acre hybrid poplar planting on a reclaimed strip-mine was harvested at age 16. The commercial clearcut yielded 90 tons of pulpwood and 9,400 board feet of lumber. This is equal to a growth rate of approximately 2 cords per acre per year. Selected physical properties of the hybrid poplars were compared with those of other commercial eastern species.

  15. Early root development of poplars ( Populus spp.) in relation to moist and saturated soil conditions

    Treesearch

    Rebecka Mc Carthy; Magnus Löf; Emile S. Gardiner

    2017-01-01

    Poplars (Populus spp.) are among the fastest growing trees raised in temperate regions of the world. Testing of newly developed cultivars informs assessment of potential planting stock for local environments. Initial rooting by nine poplar clones was tested in moist and saturated soil conditions during an 18-day greenhouse experiment. Clones responded differently to...

  16. Biological Control of Septoria Leaf Spot Disease of Hybrid Poplar in the Field

    Treesearch

    Laszlo Gyenis; Neil A. Anderson; Michael E. Ostry

    2003-01-01

    Biological control of Septoria leaf spot of hrhrid poplars was investigated using disease-suppressive Streptomyces strains. Field experiments were conducted in 1998 and 1999 on potted trees placed in a hybrid poplar plantation near Rosemount, MN, and on field-planted trees in 1998 at St. Paul. At both locations, one resistant and three susceptible...

  17. Contribution factor of wood properties of three poplar clones to strength of laminated veneer lumber

    Treesearch

    Fucheng Bao; Feng Fu; Elvin Choong; Chung-Yun Hse

    2001-01-01

    The term "Contribution Factor" (c.) was introduced in this paper to indicate the contribution ratio of solid wood properties to laminated veneer lumber (LVL) strength. Three poplar (Populus sp.) clones were studied, and the results showed that poplar with good solid wood properties has high Contribution Factor. The average Contribution...

  18. Fertilizer and Mulch Improves Yellow-Poplar Growth on Exposed harsells Subsoils

    Treesearch

    John K. Francis

    1977-01-01

    Fertilizing and mulching of eroded Hartsells soil increased height and diameter of yellow-poplars. To see if chemical infertility of exposed Hartsells subsoils limits yellow-poplar growth and to test fertilizer and mulch as remedial agents, seedlings were planted on undisturbed soil, soil with the topsoil removed, and soil with the topsoil removed but mulched with leaf...

  19. Potential Utilization of Sweetgum and Yellow-Poplar for Structural Lumber

    Treesearch

    Timothy D. Faust; Robert H. McAlister; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Christopher B. Stephens

    1991-01-01

    The forest resource base in the Southeast is rapidly changing. Dwindling reserves of high quality pine sawlogs will provide incentive to utilize low-density hardwoods such as yellow-poplar and sweetgum for structural lumber. Inventories of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua, L.) and yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera, L.) are currently high and growth is exceeding...

  20. Survival and growth of yellow-poplar seedlings depend on date of germination

    Treesearch

    George R., Jr. Trimble; E. H. Tryon

    1969-01-01

    A study of yellow-poplar seedlings showed that early survival and growth were best among stems that originated in May and early June. Few, if any, seedlings that emerged after 1 July were in favorable competitive condition 3 years later. This indicates that clearcuttings made for maximum natural regeneration of yellow-poplar should be carried out in fall and winter to...

  1. Potential of the TCE-degrading endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to improve plant growth and reduce TCE phytotoxicity and evapotranspiration in poplar cuttings

    SciTech Connect

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Truyens, S.; Dupae, J.; Newman, L.; Taghavi, S.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2010-09-01

    The TCE-degrading poplar endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE was inoculated in poplar cuttings, exposed to 0, 200 and 400 mg l{sup -1} TCE, that were grown in two different experimental setups. During a short-term experiment, plants were grown hydroponically in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution and exposed to TCE for 3 days. Inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE promoted plant growth, reduced TCE phytotoxicity and reduced the amount of TCE present in the leaves. During a mid-term experiment, plants were grown in potting soil and exposed to TCE for 3 weeks. Here, inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE had a less pronounced positive effect on plant growth and TCE phytotoxicity, but resulted in strongly reduced amounts of TCE in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 400 mg l{sup -1} TCE, accompanied by a lowered evapotranspiration of TCE. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), which are known intermediates of TCE degradation, were not detected. The endophyte P. putida W619-TCE degrades TCE during its transport through the xylem, leading to reduced TCE concentrations in poplar, and decreased TCE evapotranspiration.

  2. HAT-P-57b: A Short-period Giant Planet Transiting a Bright Rapidly Rotating A8V Star Confirmed Via Doppler Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. Á.; Buchhave, L. A.; Torres, G.; Latham, D. W.; Kovács, G.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; de Val-Borro, M.; Penev, K.; Huang, C. X.; Béky, B.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S. N.; Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W.; Johnson, J. A.; Isaacson, H.; Fischer, D. A.; Noyes, R. W.; Falco, E.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Knox, R. P.; Hinz, P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-12-01

    We present the discovery of HAT-P-57b, a P = 2.4653 day transiting planet around a V=10.465+/- 0.029 mag, {T}{{eff}}=7500+/- 250 K main sequence A8V star with a projected rotation velocity of v{sin}i=102.1+/- 1.3 {km} {{{s}}}-1. We measure the radius of the planet to be R=1.413+/- 0.054 {R}{{J}} and, based on RV observations, place a 95% confidence upper limit on its mass of M\\lt 1.85 {M}{{J}}. Based on theoretical stellar evolution models, the host star has a mass and radius of 1.47+/- 0.12 {M}⊙ and 1.500+/- 0.050 {R}⊙ , respectively. Spectroscopic observations made with Keck-I/HIRES during a partial transit event show the Doppler shadow of HAT-P-57b moving across the average spectral line profile of HAT-P-57, confirming the object as a planetary system. We use these observations, together with analytic formulae that we derive for the line profile distortions, to determine the projected angle between the spin axis of HAT-P-57 and the orbital axis of HAT-P-57b. The data permit two possible solutions, with -16\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 7\\lt λ \\lt 3\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 3 or 27\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 6\\lt λ \\lt 57\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 4 at 95% confidence, and with relative probabilities for the two modes of 26% and 74%, respectively. Adaptive optics imaging with MMT/Clio2 reveals an object located 2\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 7 from HAT-P-57 consisting of two point sources separated in turn from each other by 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 22. The H- and {L}\\prime -band magnitudes of the companion stars are consistent with their being physically associated with HAT-P-57, in which case they are stars of mass 0.61+/- 0.10 {M}⊙ and 0.53+/- 0.08 {M}⊙ . HAT-P-57 is the most rapidly rotating star, and only the fourth main sequence A star, known to host a transiting planet. Based on observations obtained with the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network. Based in part on observations made with the Keck-I telescope at Mauna

  3. Short-Term Outcome After Arthroscopic Bursectomy Debridement of Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendonopathy With and Without Subacromial Decompression: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Clement, Nicholas D; Watts, Adam C; Phillips, Christine; McBirnie, Julie M

    2015-09-01

    To conduct a prospective randomized controlled trial to assess whether arthroscopic bursectomy and debridement of the calcific deposit, with or without subacromial decompression, influences the functional outcome of patients with calcific tendonitis. During a 4-year period, 80 patients were recruited who presented to the study center with refractory calcific tendonitis of the shoulder. Forty patients were randomized to have a subacromial decompression, and 40 were randomized not to have a subacromial decompression in combination with bursectomy and arthroscopic removal of the calcific deposit. All surgery was performed by one surgeon who was blinded to the functional assessment of the patients. Patient demographics, body mass index (BMI), and length of symptoms were recorded at the time of randomization. Patients were asked to complete a pain visual analog score (VAS), short form (SF-12), disability arm shoulder and hand (DASH), and Constant score (CS) preoperatively and at 1 year postoperatively. There were 21 male and 59 female patients with a mean age of 49 (range, 32 to 75) years. The mean time of follow-up was 13 (range, 12 to 15) months. There were no significant differences in gender, age, BMI, length of symptoms, or preoperative outcome measures assessed between the groups. Overall, for both groups there was a significant improvement in the pain VAS (P < .001), DASH (P < .001), and CS (P < .001) at 1 year compared with preoperative scores. There were no significant differences demonstrated between the groups for improvement in the pain VAS (P = .57), DASH (P = .93), SF-12 physical component score (P = .58), or CS (P = .27) at 1 year. This study has demonstrated that the short-term functional outcome of patients with calcific tendonitis after arthroscopic bursectomy and debridement of the calcific deposit is not influenced if performed in combination with or without a subacromial decompression. Level I therapeutic study, randomized controlled trial

  4. Rotational testing.

    PubMed

    Furman, J M

    2016-01-01

    The natural stimulus for the semicircular canals is rotation of the head, which also might stimulate the otolith organs. Vestibular stimulation usually induces eye movements via the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). The orientation of the subject with respect to the axis of rotation and the orientation of the axis of rotation with respect to gravity together determine which labyrinthine receptors are stimulated for particular motion trajectories. Rotational testing usually includes the measurement of eye movements via a video system but might use a subject's perception of motion. The most common types of rotational testing are whole-body computer-controlled sinusoidal or trapezoidal stimuli during earth-vertical axis rotation (EVAR), which stimulates primarily the horizontal semicircular canals bilaterally. Recently, manual impulsive rotations, known as head impulse testing (HIT), have been developed to assess individual horizontal semicircular canals. Most types of rotational stimuli are not used routinely in the clinical setting but may be used in selected research environments. This chapter will discuss clinically relevant rotational stimuli and several types of rotational testing that are used primarily in research settings.

  5. Symplastic Phloem Loading in Poplar1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cankui; Han, Lu; Slewinski, Thomas L.; Sun, Jianlei; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Turgeon, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sap is driven through phloem sieve tubes by an osmotically generated pressure gradient between source and sink tissues. In many plants, source pressure results from thermodynamically active loading in which energy is used to transfer sucrose (Suc) from mesophyll cells to the phloem of leaf minor veins against a concentration gradient. However, in some species, almost all trees, correlative evidence suggests that sugar migrates passively through plasmodesmata from mesophyll cells into the sieve elements. The possibility of alternate loading mechanisms has important ramifications for the regulation of phloem transport and source-sink interactions. Here, we provide experimental evidence that, in gray poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba), Suc enters the phloem through plasmodesmata. Transgenic plants were generated with yeast invertase in the cell walls to prevent Suc loading by this route. The constructs were driven either by the constitutive 35S promoter or the minor vein-specific galactinol synthase promoter. Transgenic plants grew at the same rate as the wild type without symptoms of loading inhibition, such as accumulation of carbohydrates or leaf chlorosis. Rates of photosynthesis were normal. In contrast, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) plants, which have limited numbers of plasmodesmata between mesophyll and phloem, displayed typical symptoms of loading inhibition when transformed with the same DNA constructs. The results are consistent with passive loading of Suc through plasmodesmata in poplar. We also noted defense-related symptoms in leaves of transgenic poplar when the plants were abruptly exposed to excessively high temperatures, adding to evidence that hexose is involved in triggering the hypersensitive response. PMID:25056922

  6. Metagenome of an Anaerobic Microbial Community Decomposing Poplar Wood Chips

    SciTech Connect

    van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; McCorkle, S. M.; Li, L. L.; Malfatti, S. A.; Monteleone, D.; Donohoe, B. S.; Ding, S. Y.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Tringe, S. G.

    2012-05-01

    This study describes the composition and metabolic potential of a lignocellulosic biomass degrading community that decays poplar wood chips under anaerobic conditions. We examined the community that developed on poplar biomass in a non-aerated bioreactor over the course of a year, with no microbial inoculation other than the naturally occurring organisms on the woody material. The composition of this community contrasts in important ways with biomass-degrading communities associated with higher organisms, which have evolved over millions of years into a symbiotic relationship. Both mammalian and insect hosts provide partial size reduction, chemical treatments (low or high pH environments), and complex enzymatic 'secretomes' that improve microbial access to cell wall polymers. We hypothesized that in order to efficiently degrade coarse untreated biomass, a spontaneously assembled free-living community must both employ alternative strategies, such as enzymatic lignin depolymerization, for accessing hemicellulose and cellulose and have a much broader metabolic potential than host-associated communities. This would suggest that such a community would make a valuable resource for finding new catalytic functions involved in biomass decomposition and gaining new insight into the poorly understood process of anaerobic lignin depolymerization. Therefore, in addition to determining the major players in this community, our work specifically aimed at identifying functions potentially involved in the depolymerization of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and to assign specific roles to the prevalent community members in the collaborative process of biomass decomposition. A bacterium similar to Magnetospirillum was identified among the dominant community members, which could play a key role in the anaerobic breakdown of aromatic compounds. We suggest that these compounds are released from the lignin fraction in poplar hardwood during the decay process, which would point to

  7. Some physicochemical peculiarities of poplar plastocyanins a and b.

    PubMed

    Christova, Petya K; Donchev, Anthony A; Shosheva, Alexandra C; Getov, Vladimir I; Dimitrov, Mitko I

    2009-01-01

    The redox potentials of poplar plastocyanins a and b (PCa, PCb) were determined by spectrophotometric titrations of their reduced forms with [Fe(CN)6]3-. It was found that the two isoforms have the following millimolar extinction coefficients epsilon597 equilibrium constants Keq of one-electron exchange with [Fe(CN)6]4-/[Fe(CN)6]3-, and standard electron potentials E0: PCa: epsilon597 = (4.72 +/- 0.08) mM(-1) cm(-1), Keq = 0.133 +/- 0.009, E0' = (354 +/- 11) mV; PCb: epsilon597 = (5.23 +/- 0.16) mM(-1) cm(-1), Keq = 0.175 +/- 0.010, E0' = (363 +/- 12) mV. The pH dependence of the redox potential of PCb was studied too. It was found, that the value of E0' for PCb is constant in the pH range 6.5-9.5, but decreases in the range 4.8-6.5. On the whole, the dependence resembles that of PC from some well-known plant species, including poplar PCa. The changes of E0' in the pH-dependent region for poplar PCb, however, are smaller and are 13 mV per pH unit, whereas in the other well-known plant species the changes are about 50-60 mV per pH unit. It has been assumed that the weaker pH dependence of EO' of PCb accounts for some structural differences between PCa and PCb.

  8. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of desert poplar (Populus euphratica).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun-jie; Gao, Li-zhi

    2016-01-01

    The complete chloroplast sequence of the desert poplar (Populus euphratica), a plant well-adapted to salt stress, was determined in this study. The genome consists of 156,766 bp containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 16,591 bp separated by a large single-copy region and a small single-copy region of 84,888 bp and 27,646 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome contains 130 known genes, including 89 protein-coding genes, 8 ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 tRNA genes; 18 of these are located in the inverted repeat region.

  9. Nitrogen fertilizer and sewage sludge effects on hybrid poplars. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Riha, S.R.; Senesac, G.P.; Naylor, L.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments conducted in the greenhouse compared the growth and nutrient and heavy metal uptake in two clones of hybrid poplar grown in soil amended with nitrogen fertilizer or sewage sludge. In addition, poplar responses to weed competition and to rooting prior to planting were investigated. Both fertilizer and sludge application increased poplar stem biomass. Weeds reduced poplar biomass. The large difference in root biomass of the two poplar clones may account for different effects weed and sludge application had on nutrient and heavy metal uptake in each clone. The relatively small root biomass of I-45/51 increased with increasing sludge application, as did the uptake of nutrients and heavy metals. The relatively large root biomass of clone NE-510 was reduced when weeds were present, as was nutrient and heavy metal uptake. Other results suggest that poplars with low root-to-stem ratios may be most affected by weed competition, especially after their first year, and that nitrogen fertilization may alleviate effects of weeds on their growth. Poplars grown in sludge-amended soil did not accumulate more of any nutrient or heavy metal studied compared to those grown in nitrogen-fertilized soil. 17 refs., 5 figs., 57 tabs.

  10. Enhancement of Biogas Yield of Poplar Leaf by High-Solid Codigestion with Swine Manure.

    PubMed

    Wangliang, Li; Zhikai, Zhang; Guangwen, Xu

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to examine the improvement of anaerobic biodegradability of organic fractions of poplar leaf from codigestion with swine manure (SM), thus biogas yield and energy recovery. When poplar leaf was used as a sole substrate, the cumulative biogas yield was low, about 163 mL (g volatile solid (VS))(-1) after 45 days of digestion with a substrate/inoculum ratio of 2.5 and a total solid (TS) of 22 %. Under the same condition, the cumulative biogas yield of poplar leaf reached 321 mL (g VS)(-1) when SM/poplar leaf ratio was 2:5 (based on VS). The SM/poplar leaf ratio can determine C/N ratio of the cosubstrate and thus has significant influence on biogas yield. When the SM/poplar leaf ratio was 2:5, C/N ratio was calculated to be 27.02, and the biogas yield in 45 days of digestion was the highest. The semi-continuous digestion of poplar leaf was carried out with the organic loading rate of 1.25 and 1.88 g VS day(-1). The average daily biogas yield was 230.2 mL (g VS)(-1) and 208.4 mL (g VS)(-1). The composition analysis revealed that cellulose and hemicellulose contributed to the biogas production.

  11. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral "Salicoid" Genome Duplication.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-06-27

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the "salicoid" duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants.

  12. Characterization of top phase oil obtained from co-pyrolysis of sewage sludge and poplar sawdust.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wu; Jin, Baosheng; Huang, Yaji; Sun, Yu

    2014-01-01

    To research the impact of adding sawdust on top phase oil, a sewage sludge and poplar sawdust co-pyrolysis experiment was performed in a fixed bed. Gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS) was used to analyze the component distribution of top phase oil. Higher heating value, viscosity, water content, and pH of the top phase oil product were determined. The highest top phase oil yield (5.13 wt%) was obtained from the mixture containing 15% poplar sawdust, while the highest oil yield (16.51 wt%) was obtained from 20% poplar sawdust. Top phase oil collected from the 15% mixture also has the largest amount of aliphatics and the highest higher heating value (28.6 MJ/kg). Possible reaction pathways were proposed to explain the increase in the types of phenols present in the top phase oil as the proportion of poplar sawdust used in the mixture increased. It can be concluded that synergetic reactions occurred during co-pyrolysis of sewage sludge and poplar sawdust. The results indicate that the high ash content of the sewage sludge may be responsible for the characteristic change in the top phase oil obtained from the mixtures containing different proportions of sewage sludge and poplar sawdust. Consequently, co-pyrolysis of the mixture containing 15 % poplar sawdust can increase the yield and the higher heating value of top phase oil.

  13. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral “Salicoid” Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the “salicoid” duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants. PMID:27352946

  14. [Carbon storage of poplar-crop ecosystem in Eastern Henan Plain].

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Yun; Fan, Wei; Yu, Xin-Xiao; Wan, Meng

    2010-03-01

    Aimed to understand the carbon storage of poplar-crop ecosystem in Eastern Henan Plain, the poplar-crop ecosystems with different ages (5, 9, 11, and 13 years old) of poplar were selected, and each of them was further divided into four subsystems, i. e. , forest, crop, litterfall, and soil. In the poplar-crop ecosystems with 5, 9, 11, and 13 years old poplar, the carbon storage of the subsystems forest and litterfall was summed as 7.86, 42.07, 44.31, and 60.71 t x hm(-2), respectively. Subsystem crop averagely sequestrated 6. 8 t x hm(-2) of CO2 per year, and the carbon storage of subsystem soil achieved 45.55, 51.06, 55.94, and 60.49 t x hm(-2), respectively. The total carbon storage of these four poplar-crop ecosystems reached 60.81, 100.09, 106.76, and 127.34 t x hm(-2), respectively, much higher than that in mono-cultured farmland (49.36 t x hm(-2)). For the test poplar-crop ecosystems, the carbon storage of subsystems forest and soil occupied a large proportion, accounting for 87.1%-93.1% of the total carbon storage, while that of subsystems crop and litterfall occupied a relatively small proportion, being 6.9%-12.9% of the total, illustrating that agroforestry ecosystem had a high potential in carbon absorption and sequestration.

  15. Lignification in poplar tension wood lignified cell wall layers.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Arata; Kusumoto, Hiroshi; Laurans, Françoise; Pilate, Gilles; Takabe, Keiji

    2012-09-01

    The lignification process in poplar tension wood lignified cell wall layers, specifically the S(1) and S(2) layers and the compound middle lamella (CML), was analysed using ultraviolet (UV) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Variations in the thickness of the gelatinous layer (G-layer) were also measured to clarify whether the lignified cell wall layers had completed their lignification before the deposition of G-layers, or, on the contrary, if lignification of these layers was still active during G-layer formation. Observations using UV microscopy and TEM indicated that both UV absorbance and the degree of potassium permanganate staining increased in the CML and S(1) and S(2) layers during G-layer formation, suggesting that the lignification of these lignified layers is still in progress during G-layer formation. In the context of the cell-autonomous monolignol synthesis hypothesis, our observations suggest that monolignols must go through the developing G-layer during the lignification of CML and the S(1) and S(2) layers. The alternative hypothesis of external synthesis (in the rays) does not require that monolignols go through the G-layer before being deposited in the CML, or the S(1) and S(2) layers. Interestingly, the previous observation of lignin in the poplar G-layer was not confirmed with the microscopy techniques used in the present study.

  16. Phytoextraction of risk elements by willow and poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Kacálková, Lada; Tlustoš, Pavel; Száková, Jiřina

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the phytoextraction efficiency of two clones of willow trees (Salix x smithiana Willd., Salix rubens) and two clones of poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii, Populus nigra Wolterson) were planted in contaminated soil (0.4-2.0 mg Cd.kg(-1), 78-313 mg Zn.kg(-1), 21.3-118 mg Cu.kg(-1)). Field experiment was carried out in Czech Republic. The study investigated their ability to accumulate heavy metals (Cd, Zn, and Cu) in harvestable plant parts. The poplars produced higher amount of biomass than willows. Both Salix clones accumulated higher amount of Cd, Zn and Cu in their biomass (maximum 6.8 mg Cd.kg(-1), 909 mg Zn.kg(-1), and 17.7 mg Cu.kg(-1)) compared to Populus clones (maximum 2.06 mg Cd.kg(-1), 463 mg Zn.kg(-1), and 11.8 mg Cu.kg(-1)). There were no significant differences between clones of individual species. BCs for Cd and Zn were greater than 1 (the highest in willow leaves). BCs values of Cu were very low. These results indicate that Salix is more suitable plant for phytoextraction of Cd and Zn than Populus. The Cu phytoextraction potential of Salix and Populus trees was not confirmed in this experiment due to low soil availability of this element.

  17. CsRAV1 induces sylleptic branching in hybrid poplar.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cortés, Alicia; Hernández-Verdeja, Tamara; Sánchez-Jiménez, Paloma; González-Melendi, Pablo; Aragoncillo, Cipriano; Allona, Isabel

    2012-04-01

    • Sylleptic branching in trees may increase significantly branch number, leaf area and the general growth of the tree, particularly in its early years. Although this is a very important trait, so far little is known about the genes that control this process. • This article characterizes the Castanea sativa RAV1 gene, homologous to Arabidopsis TEM genes, by analyzing its circadian behavior and examining its winter expression in chestnut stems and buds. Transgenic hybrid poplars over-expressing CsRAV1 or showing RNA interference down-regulated PtaRAV1 and PtaRAV2 expression were produced and analyzed. • Over-expression of the CsRAV1 gene induces the early formation of sylleptic branches in hybrid poplar plantlets during the same growing season in which the lateral buds form. Only minor growth differences and no changes in wood anatomy are produced. • The possibility of generating trees with a greater biomass by manipulating the CsRAV1 gene makes CsRAV1 transgenic plants promising candidates for bioenergy production. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Aquaporins and leaf hydraulics: poplar sheds new light.

    PubMed

    Lopez, David; Venisse, Jean-Stéphane; Fumanal, Boris; Chaumont, François; Guillot, Esther; Daniels, Mark J; Cochard, Hervé; Julien, Jean-Louis; Gousset-Dupont, Aurélie

    2013-12-01

    To help understand leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) modulation under high irradiance, well-watered poplars (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray ex Hook and Populus nigra L.) were studied diurnally at molecular and ecophysiological scales. Transcriptional and translational modulations of plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) aquaporins were evaluated in leaf samples during diurnal time courses. Among the 15 poplar PIP genes, a subset of two PIP1s and seven PIP2s are precociously induced within the first hour of the photoperiod concomitantly with a Kleaf increase. Since expression patterns were cyclic and reproducible over several days, we hypothesized that endogenous signals could be involved in PIP transcriptional regulation. To address this question, plants were submitted to forced darkness during their subjective photoperiod and compared with their control counterparts, which showed that some PIP1s and PIP2s have circadian regulation while others did not. Promoter analysis revealed that a large number of hormone, light, stress response and circadian elements are present. Finally, involvement of aquaporins is supported by the reduction of Kleaf by HgCl2 treatment.

  19. Aquaporins in poplar: what a difference a symbiont makes!

    PubMed

    Marjanović, Zaklina; Uehlein, Norbert; Kaldenhoff, Ralf; Zwiazek, Janusz J; Weiss, Michael; Hampp, Rüdiger; Nehls, Uwe

    2005-10-01

    The formation of ectomycorrhizas, a tight association between fine roots of trees and certain soil fungi, improves plant nutrition in a nutrient-limited environment and may increase plant survival under water stress conditions. To investigate the impact of mycorrhiza formation on plant water uptake, seven genes coding for putative water channel proteins (aquaporins) were isolated from a poplar ectomycorrhizal cDNA library. Four out of the seven genes were preferentially expressed in roots. Mycorrhiza formation resulted in an increased transcript level for three of these genes, two of which are the most prominently expressed aquaporins in roots. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, the corresponding proteins of both genes were able to transport water. Together, these data indicate, that the water transport capacity of the plasma membrane of root cells is strongly increased in mycorrhized plants. Measurements of the hydraulic conductance of intact root systems revealed an increased water transport capacity of mycorrhized poplar roots. These data, however, also indicate that changes in the properties of the plasma membrane as well as those of the apoplast are responsible for the increased root hydraulic conductance in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis.

  20. Circadian Rhythms of Isoprene Biosynthesis in Grey Poplar Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Loivamäki, Maaria; Louis, Sandrine; Cinege, Gyöngyi; Zimmer, Ina; Fischbach, Robert J.; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2007-01-01

    Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) emission varies diurnally in different species. In poplar (Populus spp.), it has recently been shown that the gene encoding the synthesizing enzyme for isoprene, isoprene synthase (ISPS), displays diurnal variation in expression. Working on shoot cultures of Grey poplar (Populus × canescens) placed under a different light regime in phytochambers, we showed that these variations in PcISPS gene expression, measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, are not only due to day-night changes, but also are linked to an internal circadian clock. Measurement of additional selected isoprenoid genes revealed that phytoene synthase (carotenoid pathway) displays similar fluctuations, whereas 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase, possibly the first committed enzyme of the 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate pathway, only shows light regulation. On the protein level, it appeared that PcISPS activity and protein content became reduced under constant darkness, whereas under constant light, activity and protein content of this enzyme were kept high. In contrast, isoprene emission rates under continuous irradiation displayed circadian changes as is the case for gene expression of PcISPS. Furthermore, binding assays with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) late elongated hypocotyl, a transcription factor of Arabidopsis involved in circadian regulation, clearly revealed the presence of circadian-determining regulatory elements in the promoter region of PcISPS. PMID:17122071

  1. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  2. Rotating Wavepackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  3. Rotational elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  4. Comparisons of Ethanol Extracts of Chinese Propolis (Poplar Type) and Poplar Gums Based on the Antioxidant Activities and Molecular Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianglin; Cao, Xueping; Ping, Shun; Wang, Kai; Shi, Jinhu; Zhang, Cuiping; Zheng, Huoqing; Hu, Fuliang

    2015-01-01

    The biological activities of propolis are varied from plant sources and the prominent antioxidant effects of Chinese propolis (poplar type) have been extensively reported. Oxidative stress is associated with inflammation and induces many diseases. In the study, to evaluate antioxidant capacities and clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms of ethanol extracts of Chinese propolis (EECP) and ethanol extracts of poplar gums (EEPG), we analyzed their compositions by HPLC, evaluating their free radical scavenging activities and reducing power by chemical analysis methods. Moreover, we studied the roles of EECP and EEPG on the elimination of ROS and expressions of antioxidant genes (HO-1, TrxR1, GCLM, and GCLC) in RAW264.7 cells. We further investigated the effects of MAPKs on the antioxidant genes expression by specific inhibitors. The nucleus translocation effects of Nrf2 were also measured by confocal microscopy analysis. The results indicated that EECP had higher TPC and FDC values but regarding TFC values were not significant. EECP also possessed more contents of 11 compounds than EEPG. Both phytochemical analysis and cell experiment reflected that EECP exerted stronger antioxidant activities than EEPG. EECP and EEPG enhanced endogenous antioxidant defenses by eliminating reactive oxygen species directly and activating Erk-Nrf2-HO1, GCLM, and TrxR1 signal pathways. PMID:25802536

  5. GENOME ENABLED MODIFICATION OF POPLAR ROOT DEVELOPMENT FOR INCREASED CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Busov, Victor

    2013-03-05

    recapitulation was observed in 10 of 12 retransformed genes tested, indicating true tagging and a functional relationship between the genes and observed phenotypes for most activation lines. Our studies indicate that in addition to associating mapping and QTL approaches, activation tagging can be used successfully as an effective forward gene discovery tool in Populus. This study describes functional characterization of two putative poplar PHOTOPERIOD RESPONSE 1 (PHOR1) orthologues. The expression and sequence analyses indicate that the two poplar genes diverged, at least partially, in function. PtPHOR1_1 is most highly expressed in roots and induced by short days, while PtPHOR1_2 is more uniformly expressed throughout plant tissues and is not responsive to short days. The two PHOR1 genes also had distinct effects on shoot and root growth when their expression was up- and downregulated transgenically. PtPHOR1_1 effects were restricted to roots while PtPHOR1_2 had similar effects on aerial and below-ground development. Nevertheless, both genes seemed to be upregulated in transgenic poplars that are gibberellin-deficient and gibberellin-insensitive, suggesting interplay with gibberellin signalling. PHOR1 suppression led to increased starch accumulation in both roots and stems. The effect of PHOR1 suppression on starch accumulation was coupled with growth-inhibiting effects in both roots and shoots, suggesting that PHOR1 is part of a mechanism that regulates the allocation of carbohydrate to growth or storage in poplar. PHOR1 downregulation led to significant reduction of xylem formation caused by smaller fibres and vessels suggesting that PHOR1 likely plays a role in the growth of xylem cells. Species within the genus Populus are among the fastest growing trees in regions with a temperate climate. Not only are they an integral component of ecosystems, but they are also grown commercially for fuel, fiber, and forest products in rural areas of the world. In the late 1970s, they were

  6. Feeding Experience Affects the Behavioral Response of Polyphagous Gypsy Moth Caterpillars to Herbivore-induced Poplar Volatiles.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Andrea C; Reinecke, Andreas; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Unsicker, Sybille B

    2016-05-01

    Plant volatiles influence host selection of herbivorous insects. Since volatiles often vary in space and time, herbivores (especially polyphagous ones) may be able to use these compounds as cues to track variation in host plant quality based on their innate abilities and previous experience. We investigated the behavioral response of naïve (fed on artificial diet) and experienced (fed on poplar) gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars, a polyphagous species, towards constitutive and herbivore-induced black poplar (Populus nigra) volatiles at different stages of herbivore attack. In Y-tube olfactometer assays, both naïve and experienced caterpillars were attracted to constitutive volatiles and volatiles released after short-term herbivory (up to 6 hr). Naïve caterpillars also were attracted to volatiles released after longer-term herbivory (24-30 hr), but experienced caterpillars preferred the odor of undamaged foliage. A multivariate statistical analysis comparing the volatile emission of undamaged plants vs. plants after short and longer-term herbivory, suggested various compounds as being responsible for distinguishing between the odors of these plants. Ten compounds were selected for individual testing of caterpillar behavioral responses in a four-arm olfactometer. Naïve caterpillars spent more time in arms containing (Z)-3-hexenol and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate than in solvent permeated arms, while avoiding benzyl cyanide and salicyl aldehyde. Experienced caterpillars avoided benzyl cyanide and preferred (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate and the homoterpene (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT) over solvent. Only responses to DMNT were significantly different when comparing experienced and naïve caterpillars. The results show that gypsy moth caterpillars display an innate behavioral response towards constitutive and herbivore-induced plant volatiles, but also that larval behavior is plastic and can be modulated by previous feeding experience.

  7. Development of the Poplar-Laccaria bicolor Ectomycorrhiza Modifies Root Auxin Metabolism, Signaling, and Response.

    PubMed

    Vayssières, Alice; Pěnčík, Ales; Felten, Judith; Kohler, Annegret; Ljung, Karin; Martin, Francis; Legué, Valérie

    2015-09-01

    Root systems of host trees are known to establish ectomycorrhizae (ECM) interactions with rhizospheric fungi. This mutualistic association leads to dramatic developmental modifications in root architecture, with the formation of numerous short and swollen lateral roots ensheathed by a fungal mantle. Knowing that auxin plays a crucial role in root development, we investigated how auxin metabolism, signaling, and response are affected in poplar (Populus spp.)-Laccaria bicolor ECM roots. The plant-fungus interaction leads to the arrest of lateral root growth with simultaneous attenuation of the synthetic auxin response element DR5. Measurement of auxin-related metabolites in the free-living partners revealed that the mycelium of L. bicolor produces high concentrations of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Metabolic profiling showed an accumulation of IAA and changes in the indol-3-pyruvic acid-dependent IAA biosynthesis and IAA conjugation and degradation pathways during ECM formation. The global analysis of auxin response gene expression and the regulation of AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX PROTEIN5, AUXIN/IAA, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR expression in ECM roots suggested that symbiosis-dependent auxin signaling is activated during the colonization by L. bicolor. Taking all this evidence into account, we propose a model in which auxin signaling plays a crucial role in the modification of root growth during ECM formation.

  8. Uptake of trichloroethylene by hybrid poplar trees grown hydroponically in flow-through plant growth chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Orchard, B.J.; Doucette, W.J.; Chard, J.K.; Bugbee, B.

    2000-04-01

    Phytoremediation in being promoted as a cost-effective treatment option for shallow groundwater and soils contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE). However, its effectiveness is difficult to assess due to contradictory reports regarding the magnitude of plant uptake and phytovolatilization. Experimental artifacts and plants stress, resulting from the use of static or low-flow plants growth laboratory systems, may account for part of the discrepancy. High exposure concentrations and short durations may also cause artifacts in laboratory studies. A dual-chamber plant growth system designed to minimize experimental artifacts was used to determine the uptake of [{sup 14}C] TCE by hydroponically grown hybrid poplar as a function of plant stress, exposure concentration, and exposure duration. The [{sup 14}]TCE recoveries ranged from 92 to 101% in 11 dosed chambers. Trichloroethylene mass equivalent concentrations in the shoot tissue were dependent on the amount of water transpired and the exposure concentration. Root-zone oxygen status die not significantly impact TCE uptake. Transpiration stream concentration factors (TSCFs) determined in these studies were independent of exposure duration and are much lower than those previously reported and predicted. The role of TSCF and other factors in estimating the significance of plant uptake in the phytoremediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater is discussed.

  9. Development of the Poplar-Laccaria bicolor Ectomycorrhiza Modifies Root Auxin Metabolism, Signaling, and Response1

    PubMed Central

    Vayssières, Alice; Pěnčík, Ales; Felten, Judith; Kohler, Annegret; Ljung, Karin; Martin, Francis; Legué, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Root systems of host trees are known to establish ectomycorrhizae (ECM) interactions with rhizospheric fungi. This mutualistic association leads to dramatic developmental modifications in root architecture, with the formation of numerous short and swollen lateral roots ensheathed by a fungal mantle. Knowing that auxin plays a crucial role in root development, we investigated how auxin metabolism, signaling, and response are affected in poplar (Populus spp.)-Laccaria bicolor ECM roots. The plant-fungus interaction leads to the arrest of lateral root growth with simultaneous attenuation of the synthetic auxin response element DR5. Measurement of auxin-related metabolites in the free-living partners revealed that the mycelium of L. bicolor produces high concentrations of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Metabolic profiling showed an accumulation of IAA and changes in the indol-3-pyruvic acid-dependent IAA biosynthesis and IAA conjugation and degradation pathways during ECM formation. The global analysis of auxin response gene expression and the regulation of AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX PROTEIN5, AUXIN/IAA, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR expression in ECM roots suggested that symbiosis-dependent auxin signaling is activated during the colonization by L. bicolor. Taking all this evidence into account, we propose a model in which auxin signaling plays a crucial role in the modification of root growth during ECM formation. PMID:26084921

  10. Supergranulation rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schou, Jesper; Beck, John G.

    2001-01-01

    Simple convection models estimate the depth of supergranulation at approximately 15,000 km which suggests that supergranules should rotate at the rate of the plasma in the outer 2% of the Sun by radius. Previous measurements (Snodgrass & Ulrich, 1990; Beck & Schou, 2000) found that supergranules rotate significantly faster than this, with a size-dependent rotation rate. We expand on previous work and show that the torsional oscillation signal seen in the supergranules tracks that obtained for normal modes. We also find that the amplitudes and lifetimes of the supergranulation are size dependent.

  11. Effects of Large Scale Poplar Plantations on the Hydrology of Semiarid Areas in Inner Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilske, B.; Lu, N.; Chen, S.; Liu, C.; Xu, W.; Noormets, A.; Wei, L.; Lin, G.; Miao, H.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Chen, J.; Zha, T.; Ni, J.; Sun, G.; Guo, K.; McNulty, S.; John, R.; Chen, J.

    2007-12-01

    Tree plantation is widely practiced to counteract desertification. It often involves planting forests in semiarid and arid areas, which are naturally dominated by grass- or shrub steppe. Severe land degradation has been observed in the vast grasslands of Inner Mongolia, China. Under drying climates vegetation may naturally change from grass- to open shrub land. Current programs aim at a large number of poplar plantations to compose a super-scale shelterbelt to curb soil erosion, dust storms, and further loss of vegetation cover. However, the water consumption of poplar plantations can be expected to exceed the water use of grass- or shrub steppe. Hence, large-scale poplar plantation may significantly alter the water budget in the semiarid region. We compared Eddy- Covariance-derived evapotranspiration (ET) of a young poplar plantation and an adjacent shrub land south of the Yellow River in Inner Mongolia. In addition, ET from the semiarid site was compared with ET from an older poplar plantation growing under semi-humid conditions south of Beijing. In spite of 33% lower precipitation, ET was 6% higher from the young poplar plantation (236.52 mm) than from the natural shrub land (223.02 mm) based on the five-month period May- September 2006. The difference was mainly because of higher ET from the poplar plantation during the drier periods of the growing season. Further comparison with the older plantation outlined future potential of the poplars to exceed ET of the shrub land by 100-200%. To highlight potential hydrological consequences of large scale poplar plantations, ET values were set in relation to the total size of plantations projected for the area and the stream flow of the nearby Yellow River. Additional groundwater discharge by mature poplar plantations may equal 6.5-15% of the Yellow River mean stream flow. Thus, the water expenditure of poplar plantations renders them a questionable tool in sustainable arid-land management, particularly as climate

  12. Effect of calcium cyanamide on growth and nutrition of plan fed yellow-poplar seedlings

    Treesearch

    L.R. Auchmoody; G.W. Wendel; G.W. Wendel

    1973-01-01

    Calcium cyanamide, a nitrogenous fertilizer that also acts as an herbicide, was evaluated over a 3-year period for use in establishing planted yellow-poplar on an old-field site. Results of this study show that first and second year growth of yellow-poplar can be increased by nbroadcasting CaCN2 around the seedlings. When applied at rates of 400 to 500 pounds of...

  13. Ethanol production from poplar wood through enzymatic saccharification and fermentation by dilute acid and SPORL pretreatments

    Treesearch

    Z.J. Wang; J.Y. Zhu; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny; K.F. Chen

    2012-05-01

    Dilute acid (DA) and Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL) pretreatments were directly applied to wood chips of four poplar wood samples of different genotypes (hereafter referred to as poplars; Populus tremuloides Michx. ‘native aspen collection’; Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh x Populus nigra L. ‘NE222’ and ‘DN5’; P. nigra x...

  14. Delimbing hybrid poplar prior to processing with a flail/chipper

    Treesearch

    Bruce Hartsough; Raffaele Spinelli; Steve Pottle

    2000-01-01

    We compared the performance of a flail/chipper for processing a) whole poplar trees and b) poplar trees that had been roughly delimbed with a pull-through delimber. Production rate was about 10% higher for the delimbed trees. The reduced cost of flail/chipping would not cover the additional cost of delimbing with the machine mix tested, but changes to equipment might...

  15. Response of ecosystem carbon fluxes to drought events in a poplar plantation in Northern China

    Treesearch

    Jie Zhou; Zhiqiang Zhang; Ge Sun; Xianrui Fang; Tonggang Zha; Steve McNulty; Jiquan Chen; Ying Jin; Asko Noormets

    2013-01-01

    Poplar plantations are widely used for timber production and ecological restoration in northern China,a region that experiences frequent droughts and water scarcity. An open-path eddy-covariance (EC)system was used to continuously measure the carbon,water,and energy fluxes in a poplar plantation during the growing season (i.e., April–October)over the period 2006–2008...

  16. Hydroxylated Metabolites of 4-Monochlorobiphenyl and Its Metabolic Pathway in Whole Poplar Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Guangshu; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2010-01-01

    4-Monochlorobiphenyl (CB3), mainly an airborne pollutant, undergoes rapid biotransformation to produce hydroxylated metabolites (OH-CB3s). However, up to now, hydroxylation of CB3 has not been studied in living organisms. In order to explore the formation of hydroxylated metabolites of CB3 in whole plants, poplars (Populus deltoides × nigra, DN34) were exposed to CB3 for 10 days. Poplars are a model plant with complete genomic sequence, and they are widely used in phytoremediation. Results showed poplar plants can metabolize CB3 into OH-CB3s. Three monohydroxy metabolites, including 2′-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (2′OH-CB3), 3′-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (3′OH-CB3) and 4′-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (4′OH-CB3), were identified in hydroponic solution and in different parts of poplar plant. The metabolite 4′OH-CB3 was the major product. In addition, there were two other unknown monohydroxy metabolites of CB3 found in whole poplar plants. Based on their physical and chemical properties, they are likely to be 2-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (2OH-CB3) and 3-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (3OH-CB3). Compared to the roots and leaves, the middle portion of the plant (the middle wood and bark) had higher concentrations of 2′OH-CB3, 3′OH-CB3 and 4′OH-CB3, which suggests that these hydroxylated metabolites of CB3 are easily translocated in poplars from roots to shoots. The total masses of 2′OH-CB3, 3′OH-CB3 and 4′OH-CB3 in whole poplar plants were much higher than those in solution, strongly suggesting that it is mainly the poplar plant itself which metabolizes CB3 to OH-CB3s. Finally, the data suggest that the metabolic pathway be via epoxide intermediates. PMID:20402517

  17. Changes in tree density do not influence epicormic branching of yellow-poplar

    Treesearch

    H. Clay Smith

    1977-01-01

    Epicormic branching was studied in a West Virginia yellow-poplar stand thinned to various tree density levels. Study trees in the 55- to 60-year-old second-growth stand were primarily codominant in crown class with 32 to 48 feet of log height. Eight-year study results indicated that yellow-poplar trees in this age class and locale could be thinned without serious loss...

  18. Rotational Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates several objects rolling down a slope to explain the energy transition among potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy. Contains a problem from Galileo's rolling ball experiment. (YP)

  19. Rotational Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates several objects rolling down a slope to explain the energy transition among potential energy, translational kinetic energy, and rotational kinetic energy. Contains a problem from Galileo's rolling ball experiment. (YP)

  20. Solar rotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziembowski, W.

    Sunspot observations made by Johannes Hevelius in 1642 - 1644 are the first ones providing significant information about the solar differential rotation. In modern astronomy the determination of the rotation rate is done in a routine way by measuring positions of various structures on the solar surface as well as by studying the Doppler shifts of spectral lines. In recent years a progress in helioseismology enabled determination of the rotation rate in the layers inaccessible for direct observations. There are still uncertainties concerning, especially, the temporal variations of the rotation rate and its behaviour in the radiative interior. We are far from understanding the observations. Theoretical works have not yet resulted in a satisfactory model for the angular momentum transport in the convective zone.

  1. Study on adsorption and remediation of heavy metals by poplar and larch in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Jia, Youngfeng

    2010-08-01

    Field experiments at the Shenyang Experimental Station of Ecology were conducted to study the adsorption, accumulation, and remediation of heavy metals by poplar and larch grown in artificially contaminated soil. The soil was spiked with a combination of Cd, Cu, and Zn at concentrations of 1.5, 100, and 200 mg.kg(-1), respectively. The results showed that the biomass of poplar (Populus canadensis Moench) was lower by 26.0% in the soil spiked with a mixture of Cd, Cu, and Zn, compared with the control. Concentrations of Cd in poplar leaf and Cu in poplar roots in the treated soil were 4.11 and 14.55 mg kg(-1), respectively, which are much greater than in corresponding controls. The migration of heavy metals in woody plant body was in the order Cd > Zn > Cu. Poplar had higher metal concentrations in aboveground tissues and a higher biomass compared with larch of the same age and therefore is potentially more suitable for remediation. In the heavy metal-polluted soil of this study, phytoremediation by poplar may take 56 and 245 years for Cd and Cu, respectively, for meeting the soil standards of heavy metals, and the corresponding phytoremediation times by larch would take 211 and 438 years. The research findings could be used as a basis to develop ecological engineering technologies for environmental control and remediation of pollution caused by heavy metals in soils.

  2. Case history development of a hybrid poplar nursery at Reynolds Metals Company, Massena, New York. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, R.L.

    1981-11-01

    Intensive cultivation of fast-growing hardwoods, such as hybrid poplars, is a promising method of assuring adequate supplies of biomass for energy purposes. This report details the establishment of a hybrid poplar nursery on formerly unused land at the Reynolds Metals Company's reduction plant in Massena, NY and presents the results obtained during the first growing season. Cuttings from the nursery replanted during the Spring of 1982 are the first phase of a 600-acre hybrid poplar plantation at the Reynolds site.

  3. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 – Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Seol Ah Choi, Young-Im Cho, Jin-Seong Lee, Hyoshin

    2015-06-19

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems. - Highlights: • We identify the BEE3-like gene form hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). • We examine effects of overexpression of PagBEE3L on growth in poplar. • We found that 35S:BEE3L transgenic plants showed more rapid growth than wild-type plants. • BEE3L protein plays an important role in the development of plant stem.

  4. Dechlorination of PCBs in the rhizosphere of Switchgrass and Poplar

    PubMed Central

    Meggo, Richard E.; Schnoor, Jerald L.; Hu, Dingfei

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (PCB 52, 77, and 153) singly and in mixture were spiked and aged in soil microcosms and subsequently planted with switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) or poplar (Populus deltoids x nigra DN34). The planted reactors showed significantly greater reductions in PCB parent compounds when compared to unplanted systems after 32 weeks. There was evidence of reductive dechlorination in both planted and unplanted systems, but the planted microcosms with fully developed roots and rhizospheres showed greater biotransformation than the unplanted reactors. These dechlorination products accounted for approximately all of the molar mass of parent compound lost. Based on the transformation products, reductive dechlorination pathways are proposed for rhizospheric biotransformation of PCB 52, 77, and 153. This is the first report of rhizosphere biotransformation pathways for reductive dechlorination in marginally aerobic, intermittently flooded soil as evidenced by a mass balance on transformation products. PMID:23603468

  5. Analysis of 4,664 high-quality sequence-finished poplar full-length

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, S.; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A; Douglas, Carl; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Bohlmann, J.

    2008-01-01

    The genus Populus includes poplars, aspens and cottonwoods, which will be collectively referred to as poplars hereafter unless otherwise specified. Poplars are the dominant tree species in many forest ecosystems in the Northern Hemisphere and are of substantial economic value in plantation forestry. Poplar has been established as a model system for genomics studies of growth, development, and adaptation of woody perennial plants including secondary xylem formation, dormancy, adaptation to local environments, and biotic interactions. As part of the poplar genome sequencing project and the development of genomic resources for poplar, we have generated a full-length (FL)-cDNA collection using the biotinylated CAP trapper method. We constructed four FLcDNA libraries using RNA from xylem, phloem and cambium, and green shoot tips and leaves from the P. trichocarpa Nisqually-1 genotype, as well as insect-attacked leaves of the P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides hybrid. Following careful selection of candidate cDNA clones, we used a combined strategy of paired end reads and primer walking to generate a set of 4,664 high-accuracy, sequence-verified FLcDNAs, which clustered into 3,990 putative unique genes. Mapping FLcDNAs to the poplar genome sequence combined with BLAST comparisons to previously predicted protein coding sequences in the poplar genome identified 39 FLcDNAs that likely localize to gaps in the current genome sequence assembly. Another 173 FLcDNAs mapped to the genome sequence but were not included among the previously predicted genes in the poplar genome. Comparative sequence analysis against Arabidopsis thaliana and other species in the non-redundant database of GenBank revealed that 11.5% of the poplar FLcDNAs display no significant sequence similarity to other plant proteins. By mapping the poplar FLcDNAs against transcriptome data previously obtained with a 15.5 K cDNA microarray, we identified 153 FLcDNA clones for genes that were differentially expressed in

  6. Isolation and characterization of galactinol synthases from hybrid poplar

    PubMed Central

    Unda, Faride; Canam, Thomas; Preston, Lindsay; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2012-01-01

    The raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs) serve as transport carbohydrates in the phloem, storage compounds in sink tissues, and putative biological agents to combat both abiotic and biotic stress in several plant species. To investigate further the functional roles of this class of compounds in trees, two cDNAs encoding galactinol synthase (GolS, EC 2.4.1.123), which catalyses the first step in the biosynthesis of RFOs, were identified and cloned from hybrid poplar (Populus alba×grandidentata). Phylogenetic analyses of the Populus GolS isoforms with other known GolS proteins suggested a putative role for these enzymes during biotic or abiotic stress in hybrid poplar. The predicted protein sequences of both isoforms (Pa×gGolSI and Pa×gGolSII) showed characteristics of GolS proteins from other species, including a serine phosphorylation site and the ASAAP pentapeptide hydrophobic domain. Kinetic analyses of recombinant Pa×gGolSI and Pa×gGolSII resulted in Km values for UPD-galactose of 0.80 and 0.65 mM and Vmax values of 657.5 and 1245 nM min−1, respectively. Pa×gGolSI inherently possessed a broader pH and temperature range when compared with Pa×gGolSII. Interestingly, spatial and temporal expression analyses revealed that Pa×gGolSII transcript levels varied seasonally, while Pa×gGolSI did not, implying temperature-regulated transcriptional control of this gene in addition to the observed thermosensitivity of the respective enzyme. This evidence suggested that Pa×gGolSI may be involved in basic metabolic activities such as storage, while Pa×gGolSII is probably involved in seasonal mobilization of carbohydrates. PMID:22197892

  7. Earth Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1995-01-01

    The study of the Earth's rotation in space (encompassing Universal Time (UT1), length of day, polar motion, and the phenomena of precession and nutation) addresses the complex nature of Earth orientation changes, the mechanisms of excitation of these changes and their geophysical implications in a broad variety of areas. In the absence of internal sources of energy or interactions with astronomical objects, the Earth would move as a rigid body with its various parts (the crust, mantle, inner and outer cores, atmosphere and oceans) rotating together at a constant fixed rate. In reality, the world is considerably more complicated, as is schematically illustrated. The rotation rate of the Earth's crust is not constant, but exhibits complicated fluctuations in speed amounting to several parts in 10(exp 8) [corresponding to a variation of several milliseconds (ms) in the Length Of the Day (LOD) and about one part in 10(exp 6) in the orientation of the rotation axis relative to the solid Earth's axis of figure (polar motion). These changes occur over a broad spectrum of time scales, ranging from hours to centuries and longer, reflecting the fact that they are produced by a wide variety of geophysical and astronomical processes. Geodetic observations of Earth rotation changes thus provide insights into the geophysical processes illustrated, which are often difficult to obtain by other means. In addition, these measurements are required for engineering purposes. Theoretical studies of Earth rotation variations are based on the application of Euler's dynamical equations to the problem of finding the response of slightly deformable solid Earth to variety of surface and internal stresses.

  8. Gypsy moth caterpillar feeding has only a marginal impact on phenolic compounds in old-growth black poplar.

    PubMed

    Boeckler, G Andreas; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Unsicker, Sybille B

    2013-10-01

    Species of the Salicaceae produce phenolic compounds that may function as anti-herbivore defenses. Levels of these compounds have been reported to increase upon herbivory, but only rarely have these changes in phenolics been studied under natural conditions. We profiled the phenolics of old-growth black poplar (Populus nigra L.) and studied the response to gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) herbivory in two separate field experiments. In a first experiment, foliar phenolics of 20 trees were monitored over 4 weeks after caterpillar infestation, and in a second experiment the bark and foliar phenolics of a single tree were measured over a week. Of the major groups of phenolics, salicinoids (phenolic glycosides) showed no short term response to caterpillar feeding, but after 4 weeks they declined up to 40 % in herbivore damaged and adjacent undamaged leaves on the same branch when compared to leaves of control branches. Flavonol glycosides, low molecular weight flavan-3-ols, and condensed tannins were not affected by herbivory in the first experiment. However, in the single-tree experiment, foliar condensed tannins increased by 10-20 % after herbivory, and low molecular weight flavan-3-ols decreased by 10 % in the leaves but increased by 10 % in the bark. Despite 15 % experimental leaf area loss followed by a 5-fold increase in foliar jasmonate defense hormones, we found no evidence for substantial induction of phenolic defense compounds in old growth black poplar trees growing in a native stand. Thus, if phenolics in these trees function as defenses against herbivory, our results suggest that they act mainly as constitutive defenses.

  9. Physiological and transcriptional regulation in poplar roots and leaves during acclimation to high temperature and drought.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingbo; Li, Shaojun; Cao, Xu; Li, Hong; Shi, Wenguang; Polle, Andrea; Liu, Tong-Xian; Peng, Changhui; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the physiological and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that underlie the responses of poplars to high temperature (HT) and/or drought in woody plants, we exposed Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa saplings to ambient temperature (AT) or HT under 80 or 40% field capacities (FC), or no watering. HT increased the foliar total carbon (C) concentrations, and foliar δ(13) C and δ(18) O. HT triggered heat stress signaling via increasing levels of abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in poplar roots and leaves. After perception of HT, poplars initiated osmotic adjustment by increasing foliar sucrose and root galactose levels. In agreement with the HT-induced heat stress and the changes in the levels of ABA and carbohydrates, we detected increased transcript levels of HSP18 and HSP21, as well as NCED3 in the roots and leaves, and the sugar transporter gene STP14 in the roots. Compared with AT, drought induced greater enhancement of foliar δ(13) C and δ(18) O in poplars at HT. Similarly, drought caused greater stimulation of the ABA and foliar glucose levels in poplars at HT than at AT. Correspondingly, desiccation led to greater increases in the mRNA levels of HSP18, HSP21, NCED3, STP14 and INT1 in poplar roots at HT than at AT. These results suggest that HT has detrimental effects on physiological processes and it induces the transcriptional regulation of key genes involved in heat stress responses, ABA biosynthesis and sugar transport and HT can cause greater changes in drought-induced physiological and transcriptional responses in poplar roots and leaves.

  10. Deep sequencing and microarray hybridization identify conserved and species-specific microRNAs during somatic embryogenesis in hybrid yellow poplar.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Chen, Jinhui; Qiu, Shuai; Zhang, Yanjuan; Wang, Pengkai; Yang, Liwei; Lu, Ye; Shi, Jisen

    2012-01-01

    To date, several studies have indicated a major role for microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating plant development, but miRNA-mediated regulation of the developing somatic embryo is poorly understood, especially during early stages of somatic embryogenesis in hardwood plants. In this study, Solexa sequencing and miRNA microfluidic chips were used to discover conserved and species-specific miRNAs during somatic embryogenesis of hybrid yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera×L. chinense). A total of 17,214,153 reads representing 7,421,623 distinct sequences were obtained from a short RNA library generated from small RNAs extracted from all stages of somatic embryos. Through a combination of deep sequencing and bioinformatic analyses, we discovered 83 sequences with perfect matches to known miRNAs from 33 conserved miRNA families and 273 species-specific candidate miRNAs. MicroRNA microarray results demonstrated that many conserved and species-specific miRNAs were expressed in hybrid yellow poplar embryos. In addition, the microarray also detected another 149 potential miRNAs, belonging to 29 conserved families, which were not discovered by deep sequencing analysis. The biological processes and molecular functions of the targets of these miRNAs were predicted by carrying out BLAST search against Arabidopsis thaliana GenBank sequences and then analyzing the results with Gene Ontology. Solexa sequencing and microarray hybridization were used to discover 232 candidate conserved miRNAs from 61 miRNA families and 273 candidate species-specific miRNAs in hybrid yellow poplar. In these predicted miRNAs, 64 conserved miRNAs and 177 species-specific miRNAs were detected by both sequencing and microarray hybridization. Our results suggest that miRNAs have wide-ranging characteristics and important roles during all stages of somatic embryogenesis in this economically important species.

  11. Carbon budget and its response to environmental factors in young and mature poplar plantations along the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River, China

    Treesearch

    Jinxing Zhou; Yuan Wei; Jun Yang; Xiaohui Yang; Zeping Jiang; Jiquan Chen; Asko Noormets; Xiaosong Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Although poplar forest is the dominant plantation type in China, there is uncertainty about the carbon budget of these forests across the country. The observations, performed in 2006, of two eddy covariance flux towers on a young poplar plantation (Yueyang, Hunan province) and a mature poplar plantation (Huaining, Anhui province) provide an opportunity to understand...

  12. Chloroplast parameters differ in wild type and transgenic poplars overexpressing gsh1 in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, L A; Ronzhina, D A; Ivanov, L A; Stroukova, L V; Peuke, A D; Rennenberg, H

    2009-07-01

    Poplar mutants overexpressing the bacterial genes gsh1 or gsh2 encoding the enzymes of glutathione biosynthesis are among the best-characterised transgenic plants. However, this characterisation originates exclusively from laboratory studies, and the performance of these mutants under field conditions is largely unknown. Here, we report a field experiment in which the wild-type poplar hybrid Populus tremula x P. alba and a transgenic line overexpressing the bacterial gene gsh1 encoding gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase in the cytosol were grown for 3 years at a relatively clean (control) field site and a field site contaminated with heavy metals. Aboveground biomass accumulation was slightly smaller in transgenic compared to wild-type plants; soil contamination significantly decreased biomass accumulation in both wild-type and transgenic plants by more than 40%. Chloroplasts parameters, i.e., maximal diameter, projection area and perimeter, surface area and volume, surface/volume ratio and a two-dimensional form coefficient, were found to depend on plant type, leaf tissue and soil contamination. The greatest differences between wild and transgenic poplars were observed at the control site. Under these conditions, chloroplast sizes in palisade tissue of transgenic poplar significantly exceeded those of the wild type. In contrast to the wild type, palisade chloroplast volume exceeded that of spongy chloroplasts in transgenic poplars at both field sites. Chlorophyll content per chloroplast was the same in wild and transgenic poplars. Apparently, the increase in chloroplast volume was not connected to changes in the photosynthetic centres. Chloroplasts of transgenic poplar at the control site were more elongated in palisade cells and close to spherical in spongy mesophyll chloroplasts. At the contaminated site, palisade and spongy cell chloroplasts of leaves from transgenic trees and the wild type were the same shape. Transgenic poplars also had a smaller chloroplast

  13. Enantioselective Transport and Biotransformation of Chiral Hydroxylated Metabolites of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Whole Poplar Plants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxylated metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) have been found to be ubiquitous in the environment due to the oxidative metabolism of their parent PCBs. With more polarity, OH-PCBs may be more toxic and mobile than their parent compounds. However, the behavior and fate of OH-PCBs have been neglected in the environment because they are not the original contaminants. Some of these hydroxylated metabolites are chiral, and chiral compounds can be used to probe biological metabolic processes. Therefore, chiral OH-PCBs were selected to study their uptake, translocation, transformation, and enantioselectivity in plants in this work. Poplars (Populus deltoides × nigra, DN34), a model plant with complete genomic sequence, were hydroponically exposed to 5-hydroxy-2,2′,3,4′,6-pentachlorobiphenyl (5-OH-PCB91) and 5-hydroxy-2,2′,3,5′,6-pentachlorobiphenyl (5-OH-PCB95) for 10 days. Chiral 5-OH-PCB91 and 5-OH-PCB95 were clearly shown to be sorbed, taken up, and translocated in whole poplars, and they were detected in various tissues of whole poplars. However, the enantioselectivity of poplar for 5-OH-PCB91 and 5-OH-PCB95 proved to be quite different. The second-eluting enantiomer of OH-PCB95, separated on a chiral column (Phenomenex Lux Cellulose-1), was enantioselectively removed in whole poplar. Enantiomeric fractions in the middle xylem, top bark, top xylem, and stem, reached 0.803 ± 0.022, 0.643 ± 0.110, 0.835 ± 0.087, and 0.830 ± 0.029, respectively. Therefore, 5-OH-PCB95 was significantly enantioselectively biotransformed inside poplar tissues, in contrast to nearly racemic mixtures of 5-OH-PCB95 remaining in hydroponic solutions. Unlike 5-OH-PCB95, 5-OH-PCB91 remained nearly racemic in most tissues of whole poplars during 10 day exposure, suggesting the enantiomers of 5-OH-PCB91 were equally transported and metabolized in whole poplars. This is the first evidence of enantioselectivity of chiral OH-PCBs and suggests that poplars can

  14. Sapflow of hybrid poplar (Populus nigra L. x P. maximowiczii A. Henry 'NM6') during phytoremediation of landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese; Edmund O. Bauer; Don E. Riemenschneider

    2006-01-01

    Poplars are ideal for phytoremediation because of their high water usage, fast growth, and deep root systems. We measured in 2002 and 2003 the sapflow of hybrid poplars (Populus nigra L. x P. maximowiczii A. Henry 'NM6') planted in 1999 for phytoremediation of a landfill in Rhinelander, WI, USA (45.6?N, 89.4?W).

  15. Impacts of transgenic poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems upon target pests and non-target insects under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D J; Liu, J X; Lu, Z Y; Li, C L; Comada, E; Yang, M S

    2015-07-27

    Poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems are the main agricultural planting modes of cotton fields in China. With increasing acres devoted to transgenic insect-resistant poplar and transgenic insect-resistant cotton, studies examining the effects of transgenic plants on target and non-target insects become increasingly important. We systematically surveyed populations of both target pests and non-target insects for 4 different combinations of poplar-cotton eco-systems over 3 years. Transgenic Bt cotton strongly resisted the target insects Fall webworm moth [Hyphantria cunea (Drury)], Sylepta derogata Fabrieius, and American bollworm (Heliothis armigera), but no clear impact on non-target insect cotton aphids (Aphis gossypii). Importantly, intercrops containing transgenic Pb29 poplar significantly increased the inhibitory effects of Bt cotton on Fall webworm moth in ecosystem IV. Highly resistant Pb29 poplar reduced populations of the target pests Grnsonoma minutara Hubner and non-target insect poplar leaf aphid (Chaitophorus po-pulialbae), while Fall webworm moth populations were unaffected. We determined the effects of Bt toxin from transgenic poplar and cotton on target and non-target pests in different ecosystems of cotton-poplar intercrops and identified the synergistic effects of such combinations toward both target and non-target insects.

  16. Poplar MYB115 and MYB134 Transcription Factors Regulate Proanthocyanidin Synthesis and Structure1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dawei; Mellway, Robin; Yoshida, Kazuko; Tran, Lan; Stewart, Don; Reichelt, Michael; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Séguin, Armand

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of proanthocyanidins is regulated by a complex of transcription factors composed of R2R3 MYB, basic helix-loop-helix, and WD40 proteins that activate the promoters of biosynthetic genes. In poplar (genus Populus), MYB134 is known to regulate proanthocyanidin biosynthesis by activating key flavonoid genes. Here, we characterize a second MYB regulator of proanthocyanidins, MYB115. Transgenic poplar overexpressing MYB115 showed a high-proanthocyanidin phenotype and reduced salicinoid accumulation, similar to the effects of MYB134 overexpression. Transcriptomic analysis of MYB115- and MYB134-overexpressing poplar plants identified a set of common up-regulated genes encoding proanthocyanidin biosynthetic enzymes and several novel uncharacterized MYB transcriptional repressors. Transient expression experiments demonstrated the capacity of both MYB134 and MYB115 to activate flavonoid promoters, but only in the presence of a basic helix-loop-helix cofactor. Yeast two-hybrid experiments confirmed the direct interaction of these transcription factors. The unexpected identification of dihydromyricetin in leaf extracts of both MYB115- and MYB134-overexpressing poplar led to the discovery of enhanced flavonoid B-ring hydroxylation and an increased proportion of prodelphinidins in proanthocyanidin of the transgenics. The dramatic hydroxylation phenotype of MYB115 overexpressors is likely due to the up-regulation of both flavonoid 3′,5′-hydroxylases and cytochrome b5. Overall, this work provides new insight into the complexity of the gene regulatory network for proanthocyanidin synthesis in poplar. PMID:28348066

  17. Poplar MYB115 and MYB134 Transcription Factors Regulate Proanthocyanidin Synthesis and Structure.

    PubMed

    James, Amy Midori; Ma, Dawei; Mellway, Robin; Gesell, Andreas; Yoshida, Kazuko; Walker, Vincent; Tran, Lan; Stewart, Don; Reichelt, Michael; Suvanto, Jussi; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Séguin, Armand; Constabel, C Peter

    2017-05-01

    The accumulation of proanthocyanidins is regulated by a complex of transcription factors composed of R2R3 MYB, basic helix-loop-helix, and WD40 proteins that activate the promoters of biosynthetic genes. In poplar (genus Populus), MYB134 is known to regulate proanthocyanidin biosynthesis by activating key flavonoid genes. Here, we characterize a second MYB regulator of proanthocyanidins, MYB115. Transgenic poplar overexpressing MYB115 showed a high-proanthocyanidin phenotype and reduced salicinoid accumulation, similar to the effects of MYB134 overexpression. Transcriptomic analysis of MYB115- and MYB134-overexpressing poplar plants identified a set of common up-regulated genes encoding proanthocyanidin biosynthetic enzymes and several novel uncharacterized MYB transcriptional repressors. Transient expression experiments demonstrated the capacity of both MYB134 and MYB115 to activate flavonoid promoters, but only in the presence of a basic helix-loop-helix cofactor. Yeast two-hybrid experiments confirmed the direct interaction of these transcription factors. The unexpected identification of dihydromyricetin in leaf extracts of both MYB115- and MYB134-overexpressing poplar led to the discovery of enhanced flavonoid B-ring hydroxylation and an increased proportion of prodelphinidins in proanthocyanidin of the transgenics. The dramatic hydroxylation phenotype of MYB115 overexpressors is likely due to the up-regulation of both flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylases and cytochrome b5 Overall, this work provides new insight into the complexity of the gene regulatory network for proanthocyanidin synthesis in poplar. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Genetic variation of hydraulic and wood anatomical traits in hybrid poplar and trembling aspen.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Stefan G; Hacke, Uwe G; Hamann, Andreas; Thomas, Barb R

    2011-04-01

    Intensive forestry systems and breeding programs often include either native aspen or hybrid poplar clones, and performance and trait evaluations are mostly made within these two groups. Here, we assessed how traits with potential adaptive value varied within and across these two plant groups. Variation in nine hydraulic and wood anatomical traits as well as growth were measured in selected aspen and hybrid poplar genotypes grown at a boreal planting site in Alberta, Canada. Variability in these traits was statistically evaluated based on a blocked experimental design. We found that genotypes of trembling aspen were more resistant to cavitation, exhibited more negative water potentials, and were more water-use-efficient than hybrid poplars. Under the boreal field test conditions, which included major regional droughts, height growth was negatively correlated with branch vessel diameter (Dv ) in both aspen and hybrid poplars and differences in Dv were highly conserved in aspen trees from different provenances. Differences between the hybrid poplars and aspen provenances suggest that these two groups employ different water-use strategies. The data also suggest that vessel diameter may be a key trait in evaluating growth performance in a boreal environment.

  19. Identification and analysis of phosphorylation status of proteins in dormant terminal buds of poplar.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Cai; Liu, Chang-Fu; Wang, Hong-Xia; Shen, Zhi-Ying; Yang, Chuan-Ping; Wei, Zhi-Gang

    2011-11-11

    Although there has been considerable progress made towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of bud dormancy, the roles of protein phosphorylation in the process of dormancy regulation in woody plants remain unclear. We used mass spectrometry combined with TiO₂ phosphopeptide-enrichment strategies to investigate the phosphoproteome of dormant terminal buds (DTBs) in poplar (Populus simonii × P. nigra). There were 161 unique phosphorylated sites in 161 phosphopeptides from 151 proteins; 141 proteins have orthologs in Arabidopsis, and 10 proteins are unique to poplar. Only 34 sites in proteins in poplar did not match well with the equivalent phosphorylation sites of their orthologs in Arabidopsis, indicating that regulatory mechanisms are well conserved between poplar and Arabidopsis. Further functional classifications showed that most of these phosphoproteins were involved in binding and catalytic activity. Extraction of the phosphorylation motif using Motif-X indicated that proline-directed kinases are a major kinase group involved in protein phosphorylation in dormant poplar tissues. This study provides evidence about the significance of protein phosphorylation during dormancy, and will be useful for similar studies on other woody plants.

  20. Two Highly Similar Poplar Paleo-subgenomes Suggest an Autotetraploid Ancestor of Salicaceae Plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinzhe; Wang, Jinpeng; Ge, Weina; Wang, Zhenyi; Li, Yuxian; Yang, Nanshan; Sun, Sangrong; Zhang, Liwei; Wang, Xiyin

    2017-01-01

    As a model plant to study perennial trees in the Salicaceae family, the poplar (Populus trichocarpa) genome was sequenced, revealing recurrent paleo-polyploidizations during its evolution. A comparative and hierarchical alignment of its genome to a well-selected reference genome would help us better understand poplar's genome structure and gene family evolution. Here, by adopting the relatively simpler grape (Vitis vinifera) genome as reference, and by inferring both intra- and inter-genomic gene collinearity, we produced a united alignment of these two genomes and hierarchically distinguished the layers of paralogous and orthologous genes, as related to recursive polyploidizations and speciation. We uncovered homologous blocks in the grape and poplar genomes and also between them. Moreover, we characterized the genes missing and found that poplar had two considerably similar subgenomes (≤0.05 difference in gene deletion) produced by the Salicaceae-common tetraploidization, suggesting its autotetraploid nature. Taken together, this work provides a timely and valuable dataset of orthologous and paralogous genes for further study of the genome structure and functional evolution of poplar and other Salicaceae plants.

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Poplar during Leaf Spot Infection with Sphaerulina spp.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Adam J.; Pelletier, Gervais; Tanguay, Philippe; Séguin, Armand

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of poplar caused by the native fungal pathogen Sphaerulina musiva and related species are of growing concern, particularly with the increasing interest in intensive poplar plantations to meet growing energy demands. Sphaerulina musiva is able to cause infection on leaves, resulting in defoliation and canker formation on stems. To gain a greater understanding of the different responses of poplar species to infection caused by the naturally co-evolved Sphaerulina species, RNA-seq was conducted on leaves of Populus deltoides, P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides infected with S. musiva, S. populicola and a new undescribed species, Ston1, respectively. The experiment was designed to contain the pathogen in a laboratory environment, while replicating disease development in commercial plantations. Following inoculation, trees were monitored for disease symptoms, pathogen growth and host responses. Genes involved in phenylpropanoid, terpenoid and flavonoid biosynthesis were generally upregulated in P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides, while cell wall modification appears to play an important role in the defense of P. deltoides. Poplar defensive genes were expressed early in P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides, but their expression was delayed in P. deltoides, which correlated with the rate of disease symptoms development. Also, severe infection in P. balsamifera led to leaf abscission. This data gives an insight into the large differences in timing and expression of genes between poplar species being attacked by their associated Sphaerulina pathogen. PMID:26378446

  2. Ecological risk assessment of the fish community of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek system

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, G.; Barnthouse, L.; Efroymson, R.; Jaeger, H.; Beauchamp, J.

    1995-12-31

    The CERCLA remedial investigation for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek included the fish community as an endpoint. The assessment endpoint was defined as a 20% reduction in the species richness or abundance of the fish community in the Poplar Creek embayment or in any of three reaches of the Clinch River. Screening of chemicals in water against benchmarks determined that Ag, Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Zn, PCBs, and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate were contaminants of potential ecological concern (COPECs). Comparison of the distributions of COPEC concentrations with the distributions of literature toxicity values indicated that none of the COPECs was routinely toxic but episodic concentrations (< 10% of the distribution) of some COPECs were in the toxic range. Aqueous toxicity tests gave unclear results except for regularly high lethality to fish embryos in Poplar Creek. Bioindicators analysis found elevated histopathologies and disrupted reproductive indicators in Centrarchids from Poplar Creek, but their implications for the community are unclear. Body burdens of PCBs in some channel catfish exceeded levels associated with sublethal effects on that species in the laboratory. Electrofishing and gill netting found that the fish community of Poplar Creek had low species number and abundance, but habitat quality was also low. These mixed results present a challenge to ecological risk characterization based on weight-of-evidence. The process of weighing the evidence will be presented.

  3. In silico identification and characterization of N-Terminal acetyltransferase genes of poplar (Populus trichocarpa).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hang-Yong; Li, Chun-Ming; Wang, Li-Feng; Bai, Hui; Li, Yan-Ping; Yu, Wen-Xi; Xia, De-An; Liu, Chang-Cai

    2014-01-27

    N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nats) complex is responsible for protein N-terminal acetylation (Nα-acetylation), which is one of the most common covalent modifications of eukaryotic proteins. Although genome-wide investigation and characterization of Nat catalytic subunits (CS) and auxiliary subunits (AS) have been conducted in yeast and humans they remain unexplored in plants. Here we report on the identification of eleven genes encoding eleven putative Nat CS polypeptides, and five genes encoding five putative Nat AS polypeptides in Populus. We document that the expansion of Nat CS genes occurs as duplicated blocks distributed across 10 of the 19 poplar chromosomes, likely only as a result of segmental duplication events. Based on phylogenetic analysis, poplar Nat CS were assigned to six subgroups, which corresponded well to the Nat CS types (CS of Nat A-F), being consistent with previous reports in humans and yeast. In silico analysis of microarray data showed that in the process of normal development of the poplar, their Nat CS and AS genes are commonly expressed at one relatively low level but share distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. This exhaustive survey of Nat genes in poplar provides important information to assist future studies on their functional role in poplar.

  4. Transcriptome Analysis of Poplar during Leaf Spot Infection with Sphaerulina spp.

    PubMed

    Foster, Adam J; Pelletier, Gervais; Tanguay, Philippe; Séguin, Armand

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of poplar caused by the native fungal pathogen Sphaerulina musiva and related species are of growing concern, particularly with the increasing interest in intensive poplar plantations to meet growing energy demands. Sphaerulina musiva is able to cause infection on leaves, resulting in defoliation and canker formation on stems. To gain a greater understanding of the different responses of poplar species to infection caused by the naturally co-evolved Sphaerulina species, RNA-seq was conducted on leaves of Populus deltoides, P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides infected with S. musiva, S. populicola and a new undescribed species, Ston1, respectively. The experiment was designed to contain the pathogen in a laboratory environment, while replicating disease development in commercial plantations. Following inoculation, trees were monitored for disease symptoms, pathogen growth and host responses. Genes involved in phenylpropanoid, terpenoid and flavonoid biosynthesis were generally upregulated in P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides, while cell wall modification appears to play an important role in the defense of P. deltoides. Poplar defensive genes were expressed early in P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides, but their expression was delayed in P. deltoides, which correlated with the rate of disease symptoms development. Also, severe infection in P. balsamifera led to leaf abscission. This data gives an insight into the large differences in timing and expression of genes between poplar species being attacked by their associated Sphaerulina pathogen.

  5. Rhizosphere Competitiveness of Trichloroethylene-Degrading, Poplar-Colonizing Recombinant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hojae; Chauhan, Sadhana; Ryoo, Doohyun; Bowers, Kally; Thomas, Stuart M.; Canada, Keith A.; Burken, Joel G.; Wood, Thomas K.

    2000-01-01

    Indigenous bacteria from poplar tree (Populus canadensis var. eugenei ‘Imperial Carolina’) and southern California shrub rhizospheres, as well as two tree-colonizing Rhizobium strains (ATCC 10320 and ATCC 35645), were engineered to express constitutively and stably toluene o-monooxygenase (TOM) from Burkholderia cepacia G4 by integrating the tom locus into the chromosome. The poplar and Rhizobium recombinant bacteria degraded trichloroethylene at a rate of 0.8 to 2.1 nmol/min/mg of protein and were competitive against the unengineered hosts in wheat and barley rhizospheres for 1 month (colonization occurred at a level of 1.0 × 105 to 23 × 105 CFU/cm of root). In addition, six of these recombinants colonized poplar roots stably and competitively with populations as large as 79% ± 12% of all rhizosphere bacteria after 28 days (0.2 × 105 to 31 × 105 CFU/cm of root). Furthermore, five of the most competitive poplar recombinants (e.g., Pb3-1 and Pb5-1, which were identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain PsK recombinants) retained the ability to express TOM for 29 days as 100% ± 0% of the recombinants detected in the poplar rhizosphere expressed TOM constitutively. PMID:11055909

  6. Antibiofilm and Antioxidant Activity of Propolis and Bud Poplar Resins versus Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    De Marco, Stefania; Piccioni, Miranda; Pagiotti, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common biofilm-forming bacterial pathogen implicated in lung, skin, and systemic infections. Biofilms are majorly associated with chronic lung infection, which is the most severe complication in cystic fibrosis patients characterized by drug-resistant biofilms in the bronchial mucus with zones, where reactive oxygen species concentration is increased mainly due to neutrophil activity. Aim of this work is to verify the anti-Pseudomonas property of propolis or bud poplar resins extracts. The antimicrobial activity of propolis and bud poplar resins extracts was determined by MIC and biofilm quantification. Moreover, we tested the antioxidant activity by DPPH and neutrophil oxidative burst assays. In the end, both propolis and bud poplar resins extracts were able to inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and to influence both swimming and swarming motility. Moreover, the extracts could inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production by human PBMC and showed both direct and indirect antioxidant activity. This work is the first to demonstrate that propolis and bud poplar resins extracts can influence biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa contrasting the inflammation and the oxidation state typical of chronic infection suggesting that propolis or bud poplar resins can be used along with antibiotic as adjuvant in the therapy against P. aeruginosa infections related to biofilm. PMID:28127379

  7. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  8. Bioavailability of mercury in East Fork Poplar Creek soils

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, M.O.; Turner, R.R.

    1995-05-01

    The initial risk assessment for the East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) floodplain in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a superfund site heavily contaminated with mercury, was based upon a reference dose for mercuric chloride, a soluble mercury compound not expected to be present in the floodplain, which is frequently saturated with water. Previous investigations had suggested mercury in the EFPC floodplain was less soluble and therefore less bioavailable than mercuric chloride, possibly making the results of the risk assessment unduly conservative. A bioavailability study, designed to measure the amount of mercury available for absorption in a child`s digestive tract, the most critical risk endpoint and pathway, was performed on twenty soils from the EFPC floodplain. The average percentage of mercury released during the study for the twenty soils was 5.3%, compared to 100% of the compound mercuric chloride subjected to the same conditions. Alteration of the procedure to test additional conditions possible during soil digestion did not appreciably alter the results. Therefore, use of a reference dose for mercuric chloride in the EFPC risk assessment without inclusion of a corresponding bioavailability factor may be unduly conservative.

  9. Metal accumulation in poplar plant grown with industrial wastes.

    PubMed

    Giachetti, Giorgio; Sebastiani, Luca

    2006-06-01

    In this study the effects of different levels of industrial wastes on growth traits and metal accumulation in aerial portions were determined for Populusxeuramericana clone I-214. The experiment started in April 2003. Scions of Populusxeuramericana clone I-214, were grown outdoor near Pisa (Italy), in lisimeters filled with soil naturally present in the land around the experimental site, were daily drip irrigated, hand weeded, monthly fertilized, pruned for a unique shoot and cultivated with four increasing treatments: soil non-amended, soil amended with 4.8 kgm(-2), with 9.6 kgm(-2) and with 19.2 kgm(-2) of fresh tannery waste. The climatic parameters were daily recorded throughout the whole experiment. Growth relieves were performed during the growing season. After six months since the plantation of the scions, aerial portions of every plant were harvested for biomass and metal content analyses. Data demonstrated that the waste exerted beneficial effects on poplars mainly through a general increase of growth traits and that the nutrients relocation is the mechanisms involved in modulating growth rate. The concentration and the amount of the mineral elements analysed (N, P, K, Na, Ca, Mg, S, B, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cr) changed determinately among treatments, organs and position. We concluded that phytoremediation strategies of tannery wastes might be possible and sustainable for polar plantations in soil amended with non-hazardous levels of industrial waste, which maintain total heavy metals concentration close to background values.

  10. Genomics Mechanisms of Carbon Allocation and Partitioning in Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Kirst, Matias; Peter, Gary; Martin, Timothy

    2009-07-30

    The genetic control of carbon allocation and partitioning in woody perennial plants is poorly understood despite its importance for carbon sequestration. It is also unclear how environmental cues such as nitrogen availability impact the genes that regulate growth, and biomass allocation and wood composition in trees. To address these questions we phenotyped 396 clonally replicated genotypes of an interspecific pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus for wood composition and biomass traits in above and below ground organs. The loci that regulate growth, carbon allocation and partitioning under two nitrogen conditions were identified, defining the contribution of environmental cues to their genetic control. Fifty-seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for twenty traits analyzed. The majority of QTL are specific to one of the two nitrogen treatments, demonstrating significant nitrogen-dependent genetic control. A highly significant genetic correlation was observed between plant growth and lignin/cellulose composition, and QTL co-localization identified the genomic position of potential pleiotropic regulators. Gene expression analysis of all poplar genes was also characterized in differentiating xylem, whole-roots and developing leaves of 192 of the segregating population. By integrating the QTL and gene expression information we identified genes that regulate carbon partitioning and several biomass growth related properties. The work developed in this project resulted in the publication of three book chapters, four scientific articles (three others currently in preparation), 17 presentations in international conferences and two provisional patent applications.

  11. Removal of emerging organic contaminants in a poplar vegetation filter.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Hernández, V; Leal, M; Meffe, R; de Miguel, A; Alonso-Alonso, C; de Bustamante, I; Lillo, J; Martín, I; Salas, J J

    2017-08-24

    Vegetation filters (VFs), a type of land application system, are a robust technology based on natural treatment mechanisms for the removal of wastewater contaminants. Their capacity to attenuate emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) has not yet been evaluated. The present study reports the results of a 2-year EOC monitoring carried out using a poplar VF receiving wastewater primarily treated by an Imhoff tank. The compounds selected included analgesics, a β-adrenergic blocker, stimulants, an anticonvulsant, an anti-depressant, an anti-inflammatory, an antibiotic and analgesic and stimulant metabolites. EOCs were analysed in the Imhoff tank effluent, in the infiltrated water at a depth of 90cm and in the groundwater at a depth of 10m. The results demonstrated that EOC attenuation was more significant in the first 90cm than in the rest of the soil profile. The removal efficiency for all of the selected EOCs was higher than 90% with the exception of ketoprofen, which may pose a higher threat of groundwater contamination. The observed attenuation correlated with the hydrophobicity and charge state of the EOCs. The higher persistence of the metabolites 4-AAA and 4-FAA shows that progression in the degradation pathway does not always imply a mitigation of contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS, S.M.; ASHWOOD, T.L.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.

    1997-10-24

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y- 12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  13. Biological monitoring program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Beaty, T.W.; Brandt, C.C.; Christensen, S.W.; Cicerone, D.S.; Greeley, M.S. Jr.; Hill, W.R.; Kszos, L.S.

    1997-04-18

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  14. BIOLOGICAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR EAST FORK POPLAR CREEK

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS, S.M.; BEATY, T.W.; BRANDT, C.C.; CHRISTENSEN, S.W.; CICERONE, D.S.

    1998-09-09

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek; EFPC), in particular, the growth and propagation of aquatic life (Lear et al. 1989). A second objective of the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from the implementation of a water pollution control program designed to eliminate direct discharges of wastewaters to EFPC and to minimize the inadvertent release of pollutants to the environment. Because of the complex nature of the discharges to EFPC and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the discharges, a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed. A new permit was issued to the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995 and became effective on July 1, 1995. Biological monitoring continues to be required under the new permit. The BMAP consists of four major tasks that reflect different but complementary approaches to evaluating the effects of the Y-12 Plant discharges on the aquatic integrity of EFPC. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) biological indicator studies, (3) bioaccumulation studies, and (4) ecological surveys of the periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish communities.

  15. Dual targeted poplar ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase interacts with hemoglobin 1.

    PubMed

    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Kastaniotis, Alexander J; Parkash, Vimal; Sundström, Robin; Leiva-Eriksson, Nélida; Nymalm, Yvonne; Blokhina, Olga; Kukkola, Eija; Fagerstedt, Kurt V; Salminen, Tiina A; Läärä, Esa; Bülow, Leif; Ohlmeier, Steffen; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Kallio, Pauli T; Häggman, Hely

    2016-06-01

    Previous reports have connected non-symbiotic and truncated hemoglobins (Hbs) to metabolism of nitric oxide (NO), an important signalling molecule involved in wood formation. We have studied the capability of poplar (Populus tremula × tremuloides) Hbs PttHb1 and PttTrHb proteins alone or with a flavin-protein reductase to relieve NO cytotoxicity in living cells. Complementation tests in a Hb-deficient, NO-sensitive yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Δyhb1 mutant showed that neither PttHb1 nor PttTrHb alone protected cells against NO. To study the ability of Hbs to interact with a reductase, ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase PtthFNR was characterized by sequencing and proteomics. To date, by far the greatest number of the known dual-targeted plant proteins are directed to chloroplasts and mitochondria. We discovered a novel variant of hFNR that lacks the plastid presequence and resides in cytosol. The coexpression of PttHb1 and PtthFNR partially restored NO resistance of the yeast Δyhb1 mutant, whereas PttTrHb coexpressed with PtthFNR failed to rescue growth. YFP fusion proteins confirmed the interaction between PttHb1 and PtthFNR in plant cells. The structural modelling results indicate that PttHb1 and PtthFNR are able to interact as NO dioxygenase. This is the first report on dual targeting of central plant enzyme FNR to plastids and cytosol.

  16. Lignin content versus syringyl to guaiacyl ratio amongst poplars.

    PubMed

    Bose, Samar K; Francis, Raymond C; Govender, Mark; Bush, Tamara; Spark, Andrew

    2009-02-01

    Two oxidation techniques that afford high yields of monomers and dimers were used to more accurately estimate the syringyl to guaiacyl (S:G) ratio of hardwood lignins. Permanganate oxidation of the woodmeal after a CuO pre-hydrolysis step gave poor results and this was attributed to preferential oxidation and degradation of syringyl nuclei by CuO. However, this procedure did provide a good estimate of the percentages of both S and G phenylpropane (C(9)) units that were uncondensed. When the total S and G products from nitrobenzene oxidation (NBO) of the uncondensed fractions were corrected, credible S:G ratios were obtained. These ratios were in good agreement with results from KMnO4 oxidation of dissolved kraft lignin without CuO pre-hydrolysis. The corrected NBO method was used to determine the S:G ratio of 13 poplars, and the values ranged from 1.01 to 1.68. Unlike results from other investigations, an excellent linear correlation (R(2) =0.846) was obtained for a decreasing lignin content (28% to 16.5%) with an increase in the S:G ratio.

  17. Cadmium interferes with auxin physiology and lignification in poplar

    PubMed Central

    Elobeid, Mudawi; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Polle, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a phytotoxic heavy metal that causes rapid growth reduction. To investigate if Cd interferes with the metabolism of auxin, a major growth hormone in plants, poplars (Populus×canescens) expressing a heterologous GH3::GUS reporter gene were exposed to 50 μM Cd in hydroponic solutions. Growth, photosynthetic performance, lignification, peroxidase activity, auxin concentration, and GUS staining were determined in order to record the activities of GH3 enzymes in the stem apex, the elongation zone, wood in the zone of radial growth, and in roots. Cd-induced growth reductions were tissue-specific decreasing in the order: roots>wood>shoot elongation and leaf initiation, whereas Cd concentrations increased in the order: leaves

  18. Polyphenol oxidase from hybrid poplar. Cloning and expression in response to wounding and herbivory.

    PubMed

    Constabel, C P; Yip, L; Patton, J J; Christopher, M E

    2000-09-01

    The inducible expression of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), a presumed antiherbivore enzyme, was examined in hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x Populus deltoides). Following mechanical wounding simulating insect damage, PPO activity increased dramatically in wounded and unwounded leaves on wounded plants beginning at 24 and 48 h, respectively. A hybrid poplar PPO cDNA was isolated and its nucleotide sequence determined. On northern blots, PPO transcripts were detected within 8 h of wounding, and reached peak levels at 16 and 24 h in wounded and unwounded leaves, respectively. Methyl jasmonate spray and feeding by forest tent caterpillar also induced PPO expression. The induction of PPO was strongest in the youngest four leaves, which were generally avoided by caterpillars in free feeding experiments. This wound- and herbivore-induced expression of PPO in hybrid poplar supports the defensive role of this protein against insect pests.

  19. Daytime and nighttime wind differentially affects hydraulic properties and thigmomorphogenic response of poplar saplings.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Wan, Xianchong; Lieffers, Victor J

    2016-05-01

    This study tested how wind in daytime and nighttime affects hydraulic properties and thigmomorphogenic response of poplar saplings. It shows that wind in daytime interrupted water balance of poplar plants by aggravating cavitation in the stem xylem under high xylem tension in the daytime, reducing water potential in midday and hence reducing gas exchange, including stomatal conductance and CO2 assimilation. The wind blowing in daytime significantly reduced plant growth, including height, diameter, leaf size, leaf area, root and whole biomass, whereas wind blowing in nighttime only caused a reduction in radial and height growth at the early stage compared with the control but decreased height:diameter ratios. In summary, the interaction between wind loading and xylem tension exerted a negative impact on water balance, gas exchanges and growth of poplar plants, and wind in nighttime caused only a small thigmomorphogenic response. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  20. Preparation of Modified Beeswax and Its Influence on the Surface Properties of Compressed Poplar Wood

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lili; Cai, Yingchun; Ren, Limin; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Beeswax was modified through the direct blending of nano-TiO2, chitosan, acid dyes, and neutral dyes. With the varied modified beeswax, hot waxing was conducted on compressed poplar wood. Treated wood surfaces were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. Results show that the C, O, N, Au, S, and Ti elements in modified beeswax successfully penetrated into pits of compressed poplar wood, imparting rich colors to the wood surface. The blending of 10% (mass fraction) beeswax, 0.2% chitosan, and 0.05% neutral red was the best treatment for mulation for improving the in-surface staining uniformity, durability, surface gloss, contact angle, and texture conspicuity of compressed poplar. PMID:28773357

  1. Polyphenol Oxidase from Hybrid Poplar. Cloning and Expression in Response to Wounding and Herbivory1

    PubMed Central

    Constabel, C. Peter; Yip, Lynn; Patton, Joseph J.; Christopher, Mary E.

    2000-01-01

    The inducible expression of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), a presumed antiherbivore enzyme, was examined in hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × Populus deltoides). Following mechanical wounding simulating insect damage, PPO activity increased dramatically in wounded and unwounded leaves on wounded plants beginning at 24 and 48 h, respectively. A hybrid poplar PPO cDNA was isolated and its nucleotide sequence determined. On northern blots, PPO transcripts were detected within 8 h of wounding, and reached peak levels at 16 and 24 h in wounded and unwounded leaves, respectively. Methyl jasmonate spray and feeding by forest tent caterpillar also induced PPO expression. The induction of PPO was strongest in the youngest four leaves, which were generally avoided by caterpillars in free feeding experiments. This wound- and herbivore-induced expression of PPO in hybrid poplar supports the defensive role of this protein against insect pests. PMID:10982443

  2. Transgenic Hybrid Poplar for Sustainable and Scalable Production of the Commodity/Specialty Chemical, 2-Phenylethanol

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Michael A.; Marques, Joaquim V.; Dalisay, Doralyn S.; Herman, Barrington; Bedgar, Diana L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2013-01-01

    Fast growing hybrid poplar offers the means for sustainable production of specialty and commodity chemicals, in addition to rapid biomass production for lignocellulosic deconstruction. Herein we describe transformation of fast-growing transgenic hybrid poplar lines to produce 2-phenylethanol, this being an important fragrance, flavor, aroma, and commodity chemical. It is also readily converted into styrene or ethyl benzene, the latter being an important commodity aviation fuel component. Introducing this biochemical pathway into hybrid poplars marks the beginnings of developing a platform for a sustainable chemical delivery system to afford this and other valuable specialty/commodity chemicals at the scale and cost needed. These modified plant lines mainly sequester 2-phenylethanol via carbohydrate and other covalently linked derivatives, thereby providing an additional advantage of effective storage until needed. The future potential of this technology is discussed. MALDI metabolite tissue imaging also established localization of these metabolites in the leaf vasculature. PMID:24386157

  3. Effect of lignocellulosic composition and structure on the bioethanol production from different poplar lines.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaojian; Zhang, Changbo; Ju, Xuehai; Li, Qiongcui; Chen, Shouyi; Wang, Jingan; Liu, Zhongqi

    2013-07-01

    Branches from three transgenic poplar lines and their wild type line 107 were used to study the effect of lignocellulosic composition and structure on the production of glucose and ethanol. Experimental results showed that the transgenic line 18-1 had the high cellulose content and amorphous fibril structure. After poplar meals were pretreated with 10% NaOH and a mixture of hydrogen peroxide and acetic acid, their lateral order index decreased significantly. The highest glucose yield in enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol yield from the substrate of 18-1 was much higher than that from feedstock of 107 by 192.7% and 108.7%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy images confirmed that lignocellulose from the 18-1 could be destroyed by chemicals more easily than those from other lines. These results demonstrated that changing lignocellulose structure could be more effective on improving the digestibility and enzymatic hydrolysis of poplar biomass than increasing the cellulose content in biomass.

  4. Effect of autohydrolysis on the wettability, absorbility and further alkali impregnation of poplar wood chips.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ningpan; Liu, Wei; Hou, Qingxi; Wang, Peiyun; Yao, Zhirong

    2016-09-01

    Autohydrolysis with different severity factors was performed on poplar wood chips prior to pulping, and the wettability, absorbility and the following impregnation of NaOH solution for the poplar wood chips were then investigated. The results showed that after autohydrolysis pretreatment the porosity, shrinkage and fiber saturation point (FSP) of the poplar wood chips were increased, while the surface contact angle decreased as the severity factor was increased. The autohydrolyzed chips absorbed more NaOH in impregnation that resulted in a low NaOH concentration in the bulk impregnation liquor (i.e., the impregnation liquor outside wood chips), while the concentration in the entrapped liquor (i.e., the impregnation liquor inside wood chips) was increased. Autohydrolysis substantially improved the effectiveness of alkali impregnation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential of the TCE-degrading endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to improve plant growth and reduce TCE phytotoxicity and evapotranspiration in poplar cuttings.

    PubMed

    Weyens, Nele; Truyens, Sascha; Dupae, Joke; Newman, Lee; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2010-09-01

    The TCE-degrading poplar endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE was inoculated in poplar cuttings, exposed to 0, 200 and 400 mg l(-1) TCE, that were grown in two different experimental setups. During a short-term experiment, plants were grown hydroponically in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution and exposed to TCE for 3 days. Inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE promoted plant growth, reduced TCE phytotoxicity and reduced the amount of TCE present in the leaves. During a mid-term experiment, plants were grown in potting soil and exposed to TCE for 3 weeks. Here, inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE had a less pronounced positive effect on plant growth and TCE phytotoxicity, but resulted in strongly reduced amounts of TCE in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 400 mg l(-1) TCE, accompanied by a lowered evapotranspiration of TCE. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), which are known intermediates of TCE degradation, were not detected.

  6. Poplar plantation has the potential to alter the water balance in semiarid Inner Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Wilske, Burkhard; Lu, Nan; Wei, Long; Chen, Shiping; Zha, Tonggang; Liu, Chenfeng; Xu, Wenting; Noormets, Asko; Huang, Jianhui; Wei, Yafen; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Ni, Jian; Sun, Ge; Guo, Kirk; McNulty, Steve; John, Ranjeet; Han, Xingguo; Lin, Guanghui; Chen, Jiquan

    2009-06-01

    Poplar plantation is the most dominant broadleaf forest type in northern China. Since the mid-1990s plantation was intensified to combat desertification along China's northwestern border, i.e., within Inner Mongolia (IM). This evoked much concern regarding the ecological and environmental effects on areas that naturally grow grass or shrub vegetation. To highlight potential consequences of large-scale poplar plantations on the water budget within semiarid IM, we compared the growing season water balance (evapotranspiration (ET) and precipitation (PPT)) of a 3-yr old poplar plantation (Kp(3)) and a natural shrubland (Ks) in the Kubuqi Desert in western IM, and a 6-yr old poplar plantation (Bp(6)) growing under sub-humid climate near Beijing. The results showed that, despite 33% lower PPT at Kp(3), ET was 2% higher at Kp(3) (228 mm) as compared with Ks (223 mm) in May-September 2006. The difference derived mainly from higher ET at the plantation during drier periods of the growing season, which also indicated that the poplars must have partly transpired groundwater. Estimated growing season ET at Bp(6) was about 550 mm and more than 100% higher than at Kp(3). It is estimated that increases in leaf area index and net radiation at Kp(3) provide future potential for the poplars in Kubuqi to exceed the present ET and ET of the natural shrubland by 100-200%. These increases in ET are only possible through the permanent use of groundwater either directly by the trees or through increased irrigation. This may significantly change the water balance in the area (e.g., high ET at the cost of a reduction in the water table), which renders large-scale plantations a questionable tool in sustainable arid-land management.

  7. Stomatal factors and vulnerability of stem xylem to cavitation in poplars.

    PubMed

    Arango-Velez, Adriana; Zwiazek, Janusz J; Thomas, Barb R; Tyree, Melvin T

    2011-10-01

    The relationships between the vulnerability of stem xylem to cavitation, stomatal conductance, stomatal density, and leaf and stem water potential were examined in six hybrid poplar (P38P38, Walker, Okanese, Northwest, Assiniboine and Berlin) and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) clones. Stem xylem cavitation resistance was examined with the Cavitron technique in well-watered plants grown in the greenhouse. To investigate stomatal responses to drought, plants were subjected to drought stress by withholding watering for 5 (mild drought) and 7 (severe drought) days and to stress recovery by rewatering severely stressed plants for 30 min and 2 days. The clones varied in stomatal sensitivity to drought and vulnerability to stem xylem cavitation. P38P38 reduced stomatal conductance in response to mild stress while the balsam poplar clone maintained high leaf stomatal conductance under more severe drought stress conditions. Differences between the severely stressed clones were also observed in leaf water potentials with no or relatively small decreases in Assiniboine, P38P38, Okanese and Walker. Vulnerability to drought-induced stem xylem embolism revealed that balsam poplar and Northwest clones reached loss of conductivity at lower stem water potentials compared with the remaining clones. There was a strong link between stem xylem resistance to cavitation and stomatal responsiveness to drought stress in balsam poplar and P38P38. However, the differences in stomatal responsiveness to mild drought suggest that other drought-resistant strategies may also play a key role in some clones of poplars exposed to drought stress. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  8. Physical and chemical characterizations of corn stover and poplar solids resulting from leading pretreatment technologies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Mago, Gaurav; Balan, Venkatesh; Wyman, Charles E

    2009-09-01

    In order to investigate changes in substrate chemical and physical features after pretreatment, several characterizations were performed on untreated (UT) corn stover and poplar and their solids resulting pretreatments by ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), ammonia recycled percolation (ARP), controlled pH, dilute acid, flowthrough, lime, and SO(2) technologies. In addition to measuring the chemical compositions including acetyl content, physical attributes determined were biomass crystallinity, cellulose degree of polymerization, cellulase adsorption capacity of pretreated solids and enzymatically extracted lignin, copper number, FT-IR responses, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) visualizations, and surface atomic composition by electron spectroscopy of chemical analysis (ESCA). Lime pretreatment removed the most acetyl groups from both corn stover and poplar, while AFEX removed the least. Low pH pretreatments depolymerized cellulose and enhanced biomass crystallinity much more than higher pH approaches. Lime pretreated corn stover solids and flowthrough pretreated poplar solids had the highest cellulase adsorption capacity, while dilute acid pretreated corn stover solids and controlled pH pretreated poplar solids had the least. Furthermore, enzymatically extracted AFEX lignin preparations for both corn stover and poplar had the lowest cellulase adsorption capacity. ESCA results showed that SO(2) pretreated solids had the highest surface O/C ratio for poplar, but for corn stover, the highest value was observed for dilute acid pretreatment with a Parr reactor. Although dependent on pretreatment and substrate, FT-IR data showed that along with changes in cross linking and chemical changes, pretreatments may also decrystallize cellulose and change the ratio of crystalline cellulose polymorphs (Ialpha/Ibeta).

  9. Uptake of ferrocyanide in willow and poplar trees in a long term greenhouse experiment.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Tsvetelina; Repmann, Frank; Raab, Thomas; Freese, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Phytoremediation of sites contaminated with iron cyanides can be performed using poplar and willow trees. Poplar and willow trees were grown in potting substrate spiked with ferrocyanide concentrations of up to 2,000 mg kg(-1) for 4 and 8 weeks respectively. Soil solution and leaf tissue of different age were sampled for total cyanide analysis every week. Chlorophyll content in the leaves was determined to quantify cyanide toxicity. Results showed that cyanide in the soil solution of spiked soils differed between treatments and on weekly basis and ranged from 0.5 to 1,200 mg l(-1). The maximum cyanide content in willow and poplar leaves was 518 mg kg(-1) fresh weight (FW) and 148 mg kg(-1) FW respectively. Cyanide accumulated in the leaves increased linearly with increasing cyanide concentration in the soil solution. On the long term, significantly more cyanide was accumulated in old leaf tissue than in young tissue. Chlorophyll content in poplar decreased linearly with increasing cyanide in the soil solution and in leaf tissue, and over time. The inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for poplars after 4 weeks of exposure was 173 mg l(-1) and for willow after 8 weeks of exposure-768 mg l(-1). Results show that willows tolerate much more cyanide and over a longer period than poplars, making them very appropriate for remediating sites highly contaminated with iron cyanides.

  10. Apoplast proteome reveals that extracellular matrix contributes to multistress response in poplar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Riverine ecosystems, highly sensitive to climate change and human activities, are characterized by rapid environmental change to fluctuating water levels and siltation, causing stress on their biological components. We have little understanding of mechanisms by which riverine plant species have developed adaptive strategies to cope with stress in dynamic environments while maintaining growth and development. Results We report that poplar (Populus spp.) has evolved a systems level "stress proteome" in the leaf-stem-root apoplast continuum to counter biotic and abiotic factors. To obtain apoplast proteins from P. deltoides, we developed pressure-chamber and water-displacement methods for leaves and stems, respectively. Analyses of 303 proteins and corresponding transcripts coupled with controlled experiments and bioinformatics demonstrate that poplar depends on constitutive and inducible factors to deal with water, pathogen, and oxidative stress. However, each apoplast possessed a unique set of proteins, indicating that response to stress is partly compartmentalized. Apoplast proteins that are involved in glycolysis, fermentation, and catabolism of sucrose and starch appear to enable poplar to grow normally under water stress. Pathogenesis-related proteins mediating water and pathogen stress in apoplast were particularly abundant and effective in suppressing growth of the most prevalent poplar pathogen Melampsora. Unexpectedly, we found diverse peroxidases that appear to be involved in stress-induced cell wall modification in apoplast, particularly during the growing season. Poplar developed a robust antioxidative system to buffer oxidation in stem apoplast. Conclusion These findings suggest that multistress response in the apoplast constitutes an important adaptive trait for poplar to inhabit dynamic environments and is also a potential mechanism in other riverine plant species. PMID:21114852

  11. Effect of sprayer settings on spray drift during pesticide application in poplar plantations (Populus spp.).

    PubMed

    Grella, Marco; Marucco, Paolo; Manzone, Marco; Gallart, Montserrat; Balsari, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed spray drift generated by sprayer settings commonly used for pesticide application in poplar plantations (Populus spp.). Tests were conducted per the ISO 22866 methodology using a mounted air-assisted sprayer (Tifone VRP600) equipped with a swivel-cannon air conveyor (model Cannone 50S). Trials evaluated sprayer settings, combinations of nozzle types, airflow rates, and air direction in both adult and young poplar plantations. Overall, spray drift amounts registered downwind of poplar plantations were less than those obtained to derive reference drift curves during the EU Plant Protection Product registration process that used late-growth-stage fruit crops. In the adult poplar plantation, Venturi nozzles (TVI 8004 red) yielded the highest drift reductions compared to reference sprayer setting, especially at distances farthest from the sprayed area (86% between 40 and 47m). Highest total drift reductions were achieved when conventional nozzles (1.81mm ceramic disc-core) were combined with their spray direction modified for an inclined cannon spray unit. Alternatively, the young poplar plantation showed no drift reduction for distances farthest from the sprayed area, regardless of sprayer settings, which likely resulted from lower foliage density and widely-spaced rows. Yet, both Venturi nozzles combined with high fan flow rates and conventional nozzles combined with reduced fan flow rate showed total spray drift reductions of over 70% within the downwind sampling area. These experimental results represent the first set of data on spray drift amounts in poplar plantations, which is key for defining the reference curves and best practices to reduce spray drift in tall tree plantations.

  12. Methylation of microRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development in andromonoecious poplar.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Ci, Dong; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies showed sex-specific DNA methylation and expression of candidate genes in bisexual flowers of andromonoecious poplar, but the regulatory relationship between methylation and microRNAs (miRNAs) remains unclear. To investigate whether the methylation of miRNA genes regulates gene expression in bisexual flower development, the methylome, microRNA, and transcriptome were examined in female and male flowers of andromonoecious poplar. 27 636 methylated coding genes and 113 methylated miRNA genes were identified. In the coding genes, 64.5% of the methylated reads mapped to the gene body region; by contrast, 60.7% of methylated reads in miRNA genes mainly mapped in the 5' and 3' flanking regions. CHH methylation showed the highest methylation levels and CHG showed the lowest methylation levels. Correlation analysis showed a significant, negative, strand-specific correlation of methylation and miRNA gene expression (r=0.79, P <0.05). The methylated miRNA genes included eight long miRNAs (lmiRNAs) of 24 nucleotides and 11 miRNAs related to flower development. miRNA172b might play an important role in the regulation of bisexual flower development-related gene expression in andromonoecious poplar, via modification of methylation. Gynomonoecious, female, and male poplars were used to validate the methylation patterns of the miRNA172b gene, implying that hyper-methylation in andromonoecious and gynomonoecious poplar might function as an important regulator in bisexual flower development. Our data provide a useful resource for the study of flower development in poplar and improve our understanding of the effect of epigenetic regulation on genes other than protein-coding genes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Apoplast proteome reveals that extracellular matrix contributes to multi-stress response in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Pechanova, Olga; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Joshua P.; Pechan, Tibor; Vandervelde, Lindsay; Drnevich, Jenny; Jawdy, Sara; Adeli, Ardeshir; Suttle, Jeffrey; Lawrence, Amanda; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Seguin, Armand; Yuceer, Cetin

    2010-01-01

    Riverine ecosystems, highly sensitive to climate change and human activities, are characterized by rapid environmental change to fluctuating water levels and siltation, causing stress on their biological components. We have little understanding of mechanisms by which riverine plant species have developed adaptive strategies to cope with stress in dynamic environments while maintaining growth and development. We report that poplar (Populus spp.) has evolved a systems level 'stress proteome' in the leaf-stem-root apoplast continuum to counter biotic and abiotic factors. To obtain apoplast proteins from P. deltoides, we developed pressure-chamber and water-displacement methods for leaves and stems, respectively. Analyses of 303 proteins and corresponding transcripts coupled with controlled experiments and bioinformatics demonstrate that poplar depends on constitutive and inducible factors to deal with water, pathogen, and oxidative stress. However, each apoplast possessed a unique set of proteins, indicating that response to stress is partly compartmentalized. Apoplast proteins that are involved in glycolysis, fermentation, and catabolism of sucrose and starch appear to enable poplar to grow normally under water stress. Pathogenesis-related proteins mediating water and pathogen stress in apoplast were particularly abundant and effective in suppressing growth of the most prevalent poplar pathogen Melampsora. Unexpectedly, we found diverse peroxidases that appear to be involved in stress-induced cell wall modification in apoplast, particularly during the growing season. Poplar developed a robust antioxidative system to buffer oxidation in stem apoplast. These findings suggest that multistress response in the apoplast constitutes an important adaptive trait for poplar to inhabit dynamic environments and is also a potential mechanism in other riverine plant species.

  14. Energy partitioning and surface resistance of a poplar plantation in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Zhang, Z.; Noormets, A.; Fang, X.; Zha, T.; Zhou, J.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S. G.; Chen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Poplar (Populus sp.) plantations have been, on the one hand, broadly used in northern China for urban greening, combating desertification, as well as for paper and wood production. On the other hand, such plantations have been questioned occasionally for their possible negative impacts on water availability due to the higher water-use nature of poplar trees compared with other tree species in water-limited dryland regions. To further understand the acclimation of poplar species to semiarid environments and to evaluate the potential impacts of these plantations on the broader context of the region's water supply, we examine the variability of bulk resistance parameters and energy partitioning in a poplar (Populus euramericana cv. "74/76") plantation located in northern China over a 4-year period, encompassing both dry and wet conditions. The partitioning of available energy to latent heat flux (LE) decreased from 0.62 to 0.53 under mediated meteorological drought by irrigation applications. A concomitant increase in sensible heat flux (H) resulted in the increase of a Bowen ratio from 0.83 to 1.57. Partial correlation analysis indicated that surface resistance (Rs) normalized by leaf area index (LAI; Rs:LAI) increased by 50 % under drought conditions and was the dominant factor controlling the Bowen ratio. Furthermore, Rs was the main factor controlling LE during the growing season, even in wet years, as indicated by the decoupling coefficient (Ω = 0.45 and 0.39 in wet and dry years, respectively). Rs was also a major regulator of the LE / LEeq ratio, which decreased from 0.81 in wet years to 0.68 in dry years. All physiological and bioclimatological metrics indicated that the water demands of the poplar plantation were greater than the amount available through precipitation, highlighting the poor match of a water-intensive species like poplar for this water-limited region.

  15. Effect of hybrid poplar trees on microbial populations important to hazardous waste bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jordahl, J.L.; Foster, L.; Schnoor, J.L.; Alvarez, P.J.J.

    1997-06-01

    Microbial concentrations of denitrifiers, pseudomonads, and monoaromatic petroleum hydrocarbon (BTX) degraders were significantly higher (p < 0.1) in soil samples from the rhizosphere of poplar trees than in adjacent agricultural soils, and atrazine degraders were found only in one rhizosphere sample. The relative abundance of these phenotypes (as a fraction of total heterotrophs) was not significantly different between rhizosphere and surrounding soils. Therefore, the poplar rhizosphere enhanced the growth of microbial populations that participate in natural bioremediation without exerting selective pressure for them.

  16. Some important physical properties of laminated veneer lumber (Lvl) made from oriental beech and Lombardy poplar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıç, Murat

    2012-09-01

    This study examined some physical characteristics of laminated veneer lumber (LVL) obtained in different compositions from cut veneers of Oriental beech (Fagus Orientalis Lipsky) and Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra) with thicknesses of 4 mm and 5 mm. Five each beech and poplar trees were felled with this objective. The PVAc (Kleiberit 303) and PU (Bizon Timber PU-Max Express) types of adhesive were used in lamination. The air-dry and oven dry densities, cell wall density and porosity, the value of volume density, shrinkage in a tangential and radial direction and volume swelling amounts were determined by preparing the specimens in accordance with the standards.

  17. Phytostimulation of poplars and Arabidopsis exposed to silver nanoparticles and Ag⁺ at sublethal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Koo, Yeonjong; Alexander, Anne; Yang, Yu; Westerhof, Samantha; Zhang, Qingbo; Schnoor, Jerald L; Colvin, Vicki L; Braam, Janet; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2013-05-21

    The increasing likelihood of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) releases to the environment highlights the importance of understanding AgNP interactions with plants, which are cornerstones of most ecosystems. In this study, poplars (Populus deltoides × nigra) and Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed hydroponically to nanoparticles of different sizes (PEG-coated 5 and 10 nm AgNPs, and carbon-coated 25 nm AgNPs) or silver ions (Ag(+), added as AgNO₃) at a wide range of concentrations (0.01 to 100 mg/L). Whereas all forms of silver were phytotoxic above a specific concentration, a stimulatory effect was observed on root elongation, fresh weight, and evapotranspiration of both plants at a narrow range of sublethal concentrations (e.g., 1 mg/L of 25 nm AgNPs for poplar). Plants were most susceptible to the toxic effects of Ag(+) (1 mg/L for poplar, 0.05 mg/L for Arabidopsis), but AgNPs also showed some toxicity at higher concentrations (e.g., 100 mg/L of 25 nm AgNPs for poplar, 1 mg/L of 5 nm AgNPs for Arabidopsis) and this susceptibility increased with decreasing AgNP size. Both poplars and Arabidopsis accumulated silver, but silver distribution in shoot organs varied between plant species. Arabidopsis accumulated silver primarily in leaves (at 10-fold higher concentrations than in the stem or flower tissues), whereas poplars accumulated silver at similar concentrations in leaves and stems. Within the particle subinhibitory concentration range, silver accumulation in poplar tissues increased with exposure concentration and with smaller AgNP size. However, compared to larger AgNPs, the faster silver uptake associated with smaller AgNPs was offset by their toxic effect on evapotranspiration, which was exerted at lower concentrations (e.g., 1 mg/L of 5 nm AgNPs for poplar). Overall, the observed phytostimulatory effects preclude generalizations about the phytotoxicity of AgNPs and encourage further mechanistic research.

  18. Case history development of a hybrid poplar nursery at Reynolds Metals Company, Massena, NY. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, R.L.

    1983-03-01

    The methods used to establish the hybrid poplar nursery and the results obtained in the first year's operation are discussed. It also documents the history of the project. Hybrid poplar clones were established in the nursery in 1980 and their growth performance was evaluated after one growing season. The results were most promising. The mean survivability rate ranged from 84.92% to 90.58% per clone, while the clone height growth ranged from 58.16 inches to 76.47 inches over the first growing season. Approximately 71,000 cuttings were estimated to be available for outplanting during the Spring of 1982.

  19. Inhibition of Cytochromes P450 and the Hydroxylation of 4-Monochlorobiphenyl in Whole Poplar

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Guangshu; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are potential enzymes responsible for hydroxylation of many xenobiotics and endogenous chemicals in living organisms. It has been found that 4-monochlorobiphenyl (PCB3), mainly an airborne pollutant, can be metabolized to hydroxylated transformation products (OH-PCB3s) in whole poplars. However, the enzymes involved in the hydroxylation of PCB3 in whole poplars have not been identified. Therefore, two CYP suicide inhibitors, 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT) and 17-octadecynoic acid (ODYA), were selected to probe the hydroxylation reaction of PCB3 in whole poplars in this work. Poplars (Populus deltoides × nigra, DN34) were exposed to PCB3 with or without inhibitor for 11 days. Results showed both ABT and ODYA can decrease the concentrations and yields of five OH-PCB3s in different poplar parts via the inhibition of CYPs. Furthermore, both ABT and ODYA demonstrated a dose-dependent relationship to the formation of OH-PCB3s in whole poplars. The higher the inhibitor concentrations, the lower the total yields of OH-PCB3s. For ABT spiked-additions, the total mass yield of five OH-PCB3s was inhibited by a factor of 1.6 times at an ABT concentration of 2.5 mg L−1, 4.0 times at 12.5 mg L−1, and 7.0 times at 25 mg L−1. For the inhibitor ODYA, the total mass of five OH-PCB3s was reduced by 2.1 times compared to the control at an ODYA concentration of 2.5 mg L−1. All results pointed to the conclusion that CYP enzymes were the agents which metabolized PCB3 to OH-PCB3s in whole poplars because suicide CYP inhibitors ABT and ODYA both led to sharp decreases of OH-PCB3s formation in whole poplars. A dose-response curve for each of the suicide inhibitors was developed. PMID:23320482

  20. Rotational ratchets with dipolar interactions.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Sebastian; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2012-12-01

    We report results from a computer simulation study on the rotational ratchet effect in systems of magnetic particles interacting via dipolar interactions. The ratchet effect consists of directed rotations of the particles in an oscillating magnetic field, which lacks a net rotating component. Our investigations are based on Brownian dynamics simulations of such many-particle systems. We investigate the influence of both the random and deterministic contributions to the equations of motion on the ratchet effect. As a main result, we show that dipolar interactions can have an enhancing as well as a dampening effect on the ratchet behavior depending on the dipolar coupling strength of the system under consideration. The enhancement is shown to be caused by an increase in the effective field on a particle generated by neighboring magnetic particles, while the dampening is due to restricted rotational motion in the effective field. Moreover, we find a nontrivial influence of the short-range, repulsive interaction between the particles.