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Sample records for shortest path problems

  1. An Improved Physarum polycephalum Algorithm for the Shortest Path Problem

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Adamatzky, Andrew; Chan, Felix T. S.; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2014-01-01

    Shortest path is among classical problems of computer science. The problems are solved by hundreds of algorithms, silicon computing architectures and novel substrate, unconventional, computing devices. Acellular slime mould P. polycephalum is originally famous as a computing biological substrate due to its alleged ability to approximate shortest path from its inoculation site to a source of nutrients. Several algorithms were designed based on properties of the slime mould. Many of the Physarum-inspired algorithms suffer from a low converge speed. To accelerate the search of a solution and reduce a number of iterations we combined an original model of Physarum-inspired path solver with a new a parameter, called energy. We undertook a series of computational experiments on approximating shortest paths in networks with different topologies, and number of nodes varying from 15 to 2000. We found that the improved Physarum algorithm matches well with existing Physarum-inspired approaches yet outperforms them in number of iterations executed and a total running time. We also compare our algorithm with other existing algorithms, including the ant colony optimization algorithm and Dijkstra algorithm. PMID:24982960

  2. A Successive Shortest Path Algorithm for the Assignment Problem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    a refinement of the Dinic-Kronrod algorithm [ 7 ]. We have used SSP to develop a computer code which is very efficient for solving large, sparse...x .. / - Node,i Predecessor,Pt Distance,D iI I lD, 3 none 0 2 3 6 2 3 1 1 4 3 3 (,2 4 5 1 3 6 2 10 7 1 1 6 Fig. 1. A shortest path tree. 4 In a...denote the number of elements in $I: j = Ail. The modified assignment problem relative to (C,A) is defined as follows: I 7 Minimize cij xij (i,j E

  3. Randomized shortest-path problems: two related models.

    PubMed

    Saerens, Marco; Achbany, Youssef; Fouss, François; Yen, Luh

    2009-08-01

    This letter addresses the problem of designing the transition probabilities of a finite Markov chain (the policy) in order to minimize the expected cost for reaching a destination node from a source node while maintaining a fixed level of entropy spread throughout the network (the exploration). It is motivated by the following scenario. Suppose you have to route agents through a network in some optimal way, for instance, by minimizing the total travel cost-nothing particular up to now-you could use a standard shortest-path algorithm. Suppose, however, that you want to avoid pure deterministic routing policies in order, for instance, to allow some continual exploration of the network, avoid congestion, or avoid complete predictability of your routing strategy. In other words, you want to introduce some randomness or unpredictability in the routing policy (i.e., the routing policy is randomized). This problem, which will be called the randomized shortest-path problem (RSP), is investigated in this work. The global level of randomness of the routing policy is quantified by the expected Shannon entropy spread throughout the network and is provided a priori by the designer. Then, necessary conditions to compute the optimal randomized policy-minimizing the expected routing cost-are derived. Iterating these necessary conditions, reminiscent of Bellman's value iteration equations, allows computing an optimal policy, that is, a set of transition probabilities in each node. Interestingly and surprisingly enough, this first model, while formulated in a totally different framework, is equivalent to Akamatsu's model ( 1996 ), appearing in transportation science, for a special choice of the entropy constraint. We therefore revisit Akamatsu's model by recasting it into a sum-over-paths statistical physics formalism allowing easy derivation of all the quantities of interest in an elegant, unified way. For instance, it is shown that the unique optimal policy can be obtained by

  4. An improved bio-inspired algorithm for the directed shortest path problem.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoge; Zhang, Yajuan; Deng, Yong

    2014-11-18

    Because most networks are intrinsically directed, the directed shortest path problem has been one of the fundamental issues in network optimization. In this paper, a novel algorithm for finding the shortest path in directed networks is proposed. It extends a bio-inspired path finding model of Physarum polycephalum, which is designed only for undirected networks, by adopting analog circuit analysis. Illustrative examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm in finding the directed shortest path.

  5. A time-delay neural network for solving time-dependent shortest path problem.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Yan, Chunwang; Wang, Jinsong; Wang, Wei

    2017-03-21

    This paper concerns the time-dependent shortest path problem, which is difficult to come up with global optimal solution by means of classical shortest path approaches such as Dijkstra, and pulse-coupled neural network (PCNN). In this study, we propose a time-delay neural network (TDNN) framework that comes with the globally optimal solution when solving the time-dependent shortest path problem. The underlying idea of TDNN comes from the following mechanism: the shortest path depends on the earliest auto-wave (from start node) that arrives at the destination node. In the design of TDNN, each node on a network is considered as a neuron, which comes in the form of two units: time-window unit and auto-wave unit. Time-window unit is used to generate auto-wave in each time window, while auto-wave unit is exploited here to update the state of auto-wave. Whether or not an auto-wave leaves a node (neuron) depends on the state of auto-wave. The evaluation of the performance of the proposed approach was carried out based on online public Cordeau instances and New York Road instances. The proposed TDNN was also compared with the quality of classical approaches such as Dijkstra and PCNN.

  6. A Bio-Inspired Method for the Constrained Shortest Path Problem

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongping; Lu, Xi; Wang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    The constrained shortest path (CSP) problem has been widely used in transportation optimization, crew scheduling, network routing and so on. It is an open issue since it is a NP-hard problem. In this paper, we propose an innovative method which is based on the internal mechanism of the adaptive amoeba algorithm. The proposed method is divided into two parts. In the first part, we employ the original amoeba algorithm to solve the shortest path problem in directed networks. In the second part, we combine the Physarum algorithm with a bio-inspired rule to deal with the CSP. Finally, by comparing the results with other method using an examples in DCLC problem, we demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method. PMID:24959603

  7. A bio-inspired method for the constrained shortest path problem.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongping; Lu, Xi; Zhang, Xiaoge; Wang, Qing; Deng, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The constrained shortest path (CSP) problem has been widely used in transportation optimization, crew scheduling, network routing and so on. It is an open issue since it is a NP-hard problem. In this paper, we propose an innovative method which is based on the internal mechanism of the adaptive amoeba algorithm. The proposed method is divided into two parts. In the first part, we employ the original amoeba algorithm to solve the shortest path problem in directed networks. In the second part, we combine the Physarum algorithm with a bio-inspired rule to deal with the CSP. Finally, by comparing the results with other method using an examples in DCLC problem, we demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method.

  8. The d-edge shortest-path problem for a Monge graph

    SciTech Connect

    Bein, W.W.; Larmore, L.L.; Park, J.K.

    1992-07-14

    A complete edge-weighted directed graph on vertices 1,2,...,n that assigns cost c(i,j) to the edge (i,j) is called Monge if its edge costs form a Monge array, i.e., for all i < k and j < l, c[i, j]+c[k,l]{le} < c[i,l]+c[k,j]. One reason Monge graphs are interesting is that shortest paths can be computed quite quickly in such graphs. In particular, Wilber showed that the shortest path from vertex 1 to vertex n of a Monge graph can be computed in O(n) time, and Aggarwal, Klawe, Moran, Shor, and Wilber showed that the shortest d-edge 1-to-n path (i.e., the shortest path among all 1-to-n paths with exactly d edges) can be computed in O(dn) time. This paper`s contribution is a new algorithm for the latter problem. Assuming 0 {le} c[i,j] {le} U and c[i,j + 1] + c[i + 1,j] {minus} c[i,j] {minus} c[i + 1, j + 1] {ge} L > 0 for all i and j, our algorithm runs in O(n(1 + 1g(U/L))) time. Thus, when d {much_gt} 1 + 1g(U/L), our algorithm represents a significant improvement over Aggarwal et al.`s O(dn)-time algorithm. We also present several applications of our algorithm; they include length-limited Huffman coding, finding the maximum-perimeter d-gon inscribed in a given convex n-gon, and a digital-signal-compression problem.

  9. Physarum can compute shortest paths.

    PubMed

    Bonifaci, Vincenzo; Mehlhorn, Kurt; Varma, Girish

    2012-09-21

    Physarum polycephalum is a slime mold that is apparently able to solve shortest path problems. A mathematical model has been proposed by Tero et al. (Journal of Theoretical Biology, 244, 2007, pp. 553-564) to describe the feedback mechanism used by the slime mold to adapt its tubular channels while foraging two food sources s(0) and s(1). We prove that, under this model, the mass of the mold will eventually converge to the shortest s(0)-s(1) path of the network that the mold lies on, independently of the structure of the network or of the initial mass distribution. This matches the experimental observations by Tero et al. and can be seen as an example of a "natural algorithm", that is, an algorithm developed by evolution over millions of years.

  10. Shortest path and Schramm-Loewner Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Posé, N.; Schrenk, K. J.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    We numerically show that the statistical properties of the shortest path on critical percolation clusters are consistent with the ones predicted for Schramm-Loewner evolution (SLE) curves for κ = 1.04 ± 0.02. The shortest path results from a global optimization process. To identify it, one needs to explore an entire area. Establishing a relation with SLE permits to generate curves statistically equivalent to the shortest path from a Brownian motion. We numerically analyze the winding angle, the left passage probability, and the driving function of the shortest path and compare them to the distributions predicted for SLE curves with the same fractal dimension. The consistency with SLE opens the possibility of using a solid theoretical framework to describe the shortest path and it raises relevant questions regarding conformal invariance and domain Markov properties, which we also discuss. PMID:24975019

  11. Distributional properties of stochastic shortest paths for smuggled nuclear material

    SciTech Connect

    Cuellar, Leticia; Pan, Feng; Roach, Fred; Saeger, Kevin J

    2011-01-05

    The shortest path problem on a network with fixed weights is a well studied problem with applications to many diverse areas such as transportation and telecommunications. We are particularly interested in the scenario where a nuclear material smuggler tries to succesfully reach herlhis target by identifying the most likely path to the target. The identification of the path relies on reliabilities (weights) associated with each link and node in a multi-modal transportation network. In order to account for the adversary's uncertainty and to perform sensitivity analysis we introduce random reliabilities. We perform some controlled experiments on the grid and present the distributional properties of the resulting stochastic shortest paths.

  12. An optimal antenna motion generation using shortest path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Moon-Jin; Kwon, Dong-Soo

    2017-03-01

    This paper considers an angular velocity minimization method for a satellite antenna. For high speed transmission of science data, a directional antenna with a two-axis gimbal is generally used. When a satellite passes over a ground station while pointing directly at it, the angular velocity of the satellite antenna can increase rapidly due to the gimbal kinematics. The high angular velocity could exceed the dynamic constraint of the antenna. Furthermore, micro vibration induced by high speed antenna rotation during an imaging operation might cause jitter, which can degrade the satellite image quality. To solve this problem, a minimum-velocity antenna motion generation method is proposed. Boundaries of the azimuth and elevation angles of the antenna within an effective beam width are derived using antenna geometry. A minimum-velocity azimuth profile and elevation profile within the boundaries are generated sequentially using a shortest path planning method. For fast and correct generation of the shortest path, a new algorithm called a string nailing algorithm is proposed. A numerical simulation shows that the antenna profile generated by the shortest path planning has a much lower angular velocity than the profiles generated by previous methods. The proposed string nailing algorithm also spends much less computation time than a search-based shortest path planning algorithm to generate almost the same antenna profiles.

  13. Multiple object tracking using the shortest path faster association algorithm.

    PubMed

    Xi, Zhenghao; Liu, Heping; Liu, Huaping; Yang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    To solve the persistently multiple object tracking in cluttered environments, this paper presents a novel tracking association approach based on the shortest path faster algorithm. First, the multiple object tracking is formulated as an integer programming problem of the flow network. Then we relax the integer programming to a standard linear programming problem. Therefore, the global optimum can be quickly obtained using the shortest path faster algorithm. The proposed method avoids the difficulties of integer programming, and it has a lower worst-case complexity than competing methods but better robustness and tracking accuracy in complex environments. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm takes less time than other state-of-the-art methods and can operate in real time.

  14. Solving the Secondary Structure Matching Problem in Cryo-EM De Novo Modeling Using a Constrained K-Shortest Path Graph Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Al Nasr, Kamal; Ranjan, Desh; Zubair, Mohammad; Chen, Lin; He, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy is becoming a major experimental technique in solving the structures of large molecular assemblies. More and more three-dimensional images have been obtained at the medium resolutions between 5 and 10 Å. At this resolution range, major α-helices can be detected as cylindrical sticks and β-sheets can be detected as plain-like regions. A critical question in de novo modeling from cryo-EM images is to determine the match between the detected secondary structures from the image and those on the protein sequence. We formulate this matching problem into a constrained graph problem and present an O(Δ(2)N(2)2(N)) algorithm to this NP-Hard problem. The algorithm incorporates the dynamic programming approach into a constrained K-shortest path algorithm. Our method, DP-TOSS, has been tested using α-proteins with maximum 33 helices and α-β proteins up to five helices and 12 β-strands. The correct match was ranked within the top 35 for 19 of the 20 α-proteins and all nine α-β proteins tested. The results demonstrate that DP-TOSS improves accuracy, time and memory space in deriving the topologies of the secondary structure elements for proteins with a large number of secondary structures and a complex skeleton.

  15. Effect of Congestion Costs on Shortest Paths Through Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashton, Douglas J.; Jarrett, Timothy C.; Johnson, Neil F.

    2005-02-01

    We analyze analytically the effect of congestion costs within a physically relevant, yet exactly solvable, network model featuring central hubs. These costs lead to a competition between centralized and decentralized transport pathways. In stark contrast to conventional no-cost networks, there now exists an optimal number of connections to the central hub in order to minimize the shortest path. Our results shed light on an open problem in biology, informatics, and sociology, concerning the extent to which decentralized versus centralized design benefits real-world complex networks.

  16. Effect of congestion costs on shortest paths through complex networks.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Douglas J; Jarrett, Timothy C; Johnson, Neil F

    2005-02-11

    We analyze analytically the effect of congestion costs within a physically relevant, yet exactly solvable, network model featuring central hubs. These costs lead to a competition between centralized and decentralized transport pathways. In stark contrast to conventional no-cost networks, there now exists an optimal number of connections to the central hub in order to minimize the shortest path. Our results shed light on an open problem in biology, informatics, and sociology, concerning the extent to which decentralized versus centralized design benefits real-world complex networks.

  17. ON THE ACCELERATION OF SHORTEST PATH CALCULATIONS IN TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    BAKER, ZACHARY K.; GOKHALE, MAYA B.

    2007-01-08

    Shortest path algorithms are a key element of many graph problems. They are used in such applications as online direction finding and navigation, as well as modeling of traffic for large scale simulations of major metropolitan areas. As the shortest path algorithms are an execution bottleneck, it is beneficial to move their execution to parallel hardware such as Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Hardware implementation is accomplished through the use of a small A core replicated on the order of 20 times on an FPGA device. The objective is to maximize the use of on-board random-access memory bandwidth through the use of multi-threaded latency tolerance. Each shortest path core is responsible for one shortest path calculation, and when it is finished it outputs its result and requests the next source from a queue. One of the innovations of this approach is the use of a small bubble sort core to produce the extract-min function. While bubble sort is not usually considered an appropriate algorithm for any non-trivial usage, it is appropriate in this case as it can produce a single minimum out of the list in O(n) cycles, whwere n is the number of elements in the vertext list. The cost of this min operation does not impact the running time of the architecture, because the queue depth for fetching the next set of edges from memory is roughly equivalent to the number of cores in the system. Additionally, this work provides a collection of simulation results that model the behavior of the node queue in hardware. The results show that a hardware queue, implementing a small bubble-type minimum function, need only be on the order of 16 elements to provide both correct and optimal paths. Because the graph database size is measured in the hundreds of megabytes, the Cray SRAM memory is insufficient. In addition to the A* cores, they have developed a memory management system allowing round-robin servicing of the nodes as well as virtual memory managed over the Hypertransport

  18. Dynamic Shortest Path Algorithms for Hypergraphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    hypergraphs, energy efficient routing in multichannel multiradio networks, and the Enron email data set. The experiment with the Enron email data set...efficient routing inmultichannel multiradio networks, and the Enron email data set. The experiment with the Enron email data set illustrates the application...FOR HYPERGRAPHS 3 of each actor. In Section VII, we apply the proposed shortest hy- perpath algorithms to the Enron e-mail data set. We propose a

  19. Competition for shortest paths on sparse graphs.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Chi Ho; Saad, David

    2012-05-18

    Optimal paths connecting randomly selected network nodes and fixed routers are studied analytically in the presence of a nonlinear overlap cost that penalizes congestion. Routing becomes more difficult as the number of selected nodes increases and exhibits ergodicity breaking in the case of multiple routers. The ground state of such systems reveals nonmonotonic complex behaviors in average path length and algorithmic convergence, depending on the network topology, and densities of communicating nodes and routers. A distributed linearly scalable routing algorithm is also devised.

  20. Two betweenness centrality measures based on Randomized Shortest Paths

    PubMed Central

    Kivimäki, Ilkka; Lebichot, Bertrand; Saramäki, Jari; Saerens, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces two new closely related betweenness centrality measures based on the Randomized Shortest Paths (RSP) framework, which fill a gap between traditional network centrality measures based on shortest paths and more recent methods considering random walks or current flows. The framework defines Boltzmann probability distributions over paths of the network which focus on the shortest paths, but also take into account longer paths depending on an inverse temperature parameter. RSP’s have previously proven to be useful in defining distance measures on networks. In this work we study their utility in quantifying the importance of the nodes of a network. The proposed RSP betweenness centralities combine, in an optimal way, the ideas of using the shortest and purely random paths for analysing the roles of network nodes, avoiding issues involving these two paradigms. We present the derivations of these measures and how they can be computed in an efficient way. In addition, we show with real world examples the potential of the RSP betweenness centralities in identifying interesting nodes of a network that more traditional methods might fail to notice. PMID:26838176

  1. Multiple Object Tracking Using K-Shortest Paths Optimization.

    PubMed

    Berclaz, Jérôme; Fleuret, François; Türetken, Engin; Fua, Pascal

    2011-09-01

    Multi-object tracking can be achieved by detecting objects in individual frames and then linking detections across frames. Such an approach can be made very robust to the occasional detection failure: If an object is not detected in a frame but is in previous and following ones, a correct trajectory will nevertheless be produced. By contrast, a false-positive detection in a few frames will be ignored. However, when dealing with a multiple target problem, the linking step results in a difficult optimization problem in the space of all possible families of trajectories. This is usually dealt with by sampling or greedy search based on variants of Dynamic Programming which can easily miss the global optimum. In this paper, we show that reformulating that step as a constrained flow optimization results in a convex problem. We take advantage of its particular structure to solve it using the k-shortest paths algorithm, which is very fast. This new approach is far simpler formally and algorithmically than existing techniques and lets us demonstrate excellent performance in two very different contexts.

  2. Traffic-engineering-aware shortest-path routing and its application in IP-over-WDM networks [Invited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngseok; Mukherjee, Biswanath

    2004-03-01

    Single shortest-path routing is known to perform poorly for Internet traffic engineering (TE) where the typical optimization objective is to minimize the maximum link load. Splitting traffic uniformly over equal-cost multiple shortest paths in open shortest path first and intermediate system-intermediate system protocols does not always minimize the maximum link load when multiple paths are not carefully selected for the global traffic demand matrix. However, a TE-aware shortest path among all the equal-cost multiple shortest paths between each ingress-egress pair can be selected such that the maximum link load is significantly reduced. IP routers can use the globally optimal TE-aware shortest path without any change to existing routing protocols and without any serious configuration overhead. While calculating TE-aware shortest paths, the destination-based forwarding constraint at a node should be satisfied, because an IP router will forward a packet to the next hop toward the destination by looking up the destination prefix. We present a mathematical problem formulation for finding a set of TE-aware shortest paths for the given network as an integer linear program, and we propose a simple heuristic for solving large instances of the problem. Then we explore the usage of our proposed algorithm for the integrated TE method in IP-over-WDM networks. The proposed algorithm is evaluated through simulations in IP networks as well as in IP-over-WDM networks.

  3. The Union of Shortest Path Trees of Functional Brain Networks.

    PubMed

    Meier, Jil; Tewarie, Prejaas; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2015-11-01

    Communication between brain regions is still insufficiently understood. Applying concepts from network science has shown to be successful in gaining insight in the functioning of the brain. Recent work has implicated that especially shortest paths in the structural brain network seem to play a major role in the communication within the brain. So far, for the functional brain network, only the average length of the shortest paths has been analyzed. In this article, we propose to construct the union of shortest path trees (USPT) as a new topology for the functional brain network. The minimum spanning tree, which has been successful in a lot of recent studies to comprise important features of the functional brain network, is always included in the USPT. After interpreting the link weights of the functional brain network as communication probabilities, the USPT of this network can be uniquely defined. Using data from magnetoencephalography, we applied the USPT as a method to find differences in the network topology of multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls. The new concept of the USPT of the functional brain network also allows interesting interpretations and may represent the highways of the brain.

  4. Shortest Path Planning for a Tethered Robot or an Anchored Cable

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, P.G.

    1999-02-22

    We consider the problem of planning shortest paths for a tethered robot with a finite length tether in a 2D environment with polygonal obstacles. We present an algorithm that runs in time O((k{sub 1} + 1){sup 2}n{sup 4}) and finds the shortest path or correctly determines that none exists that obeys the constraints; here n is the number obstacle vertices, and k{sub 1} is the number loops in the initial configuration of the tether. The robot may cross its tether but nothing can cross obstacles, which cause the tether to bend. The algorithm applies as well for planning a shortest path for the free end of an anchored cable.

  5. A Graph Search Heuristic for Shortest Distance Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, E

    2005-03-24

    This paper presents a heuristic for guiding A* search for finding the shortest distance path between two vertices in a connected, undirected, and explicitly stored graph. The heuristic requires a small amount of data to be stored at each vertex. The heuristic has application to quickly detecting relationships between two vertices in a large information or knowledge network. We compare the performance of this heuristic with breadth-first search on graphs with various topological properties. The results show that one or more orders of magnitude improvement in the number of vertices expanded is possible for large graphs, including Poisson random graphs.

  6. Membrane Boundary Extraction Using a Circular Shortest Path Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Changming; Vallotton, Pascal; Wang, Dadong; Lopez, Jamie; Ng, Yvonne; James, David

    2007-11-01

    Membrane proteins represent over 50% of known drug targets. Accordingly, several widely used assays in the High Content Analysis area rely on quantitative measures of the translocation of proteins between intracellular organelles and the cell surface. In order to increase the sensitivity of these assays, one needs to measure the signal specifically along the membrane, requiring a precise segmentation of this compartment. Doing this manually is a very time-consuming practice, limited to an academic setting. Manual tracing of the membrane compartment also confronts us with issues of objectivity and reproducibility. In this paper, we present an approach based on a circular shortest path technique that enables us to segment the membrane compartment accurately and rapidly. This feature is illustrated using cells expressing epitope-tagged membrane proteins.

  7. Dynamic behavior of shortest path routing algorithms for communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertsekas, D. P.

    1980-06-01

    Several proposed routing algorithms for store and forward communication networks, including one currently in operation in the ARPANET, route messages along shortest paths computed by using some set of link lengths. When these lengths depend on current traffic conditions as they must in an adaptive algorithm, dynamic behavior questions such as stability convergence, and speed of convergence are of interest. This paper is the first attempt to analyze systematically these issues. It is shown that minimum queuing delay path algorithms tend to exhibit violent oscillatory behavior in the absence of a damping mechanism. The oscillations can be damped by means of several types of schemes, two of which are analyzed in this paper. In the first scheme a constant bias is added to the queuing delay thereby providing a preference towards paths with a small number of links. In the second scheme the effects of several past routings are averaged as, for example, when the link lengths are computed and communicated asynchronously throughout the network.

  8. A new approach to shortest paths on networks based on the quantum bosonic mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xin; Wang, Hailong; Tang, Shaoting; Ma, Lili; Zhang, Zhanli; Zheng, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents quantum bosonic shortest path searching (QBSPS), a natural, practical and highly heuristic physical algorithm for reasoning about the recognition of network structure via quantum dynamics. QBSPS is based on an Anderson-like itinerant bosonic system in which a boson's Green function is used as a navigation pointer for one to accurately approach the terminals. QBSPS is demonstrated by rigorous mathematical and physical proofs and plenty of simulations, showing how it can be used as a greedy routing to seek the shortest path between different locations. In methodology, it is an interesting and new algorithm rooted in the quantum mechanism other than combinatorics. In practice, for the all-pairs shortest-path problem in a random scale-free network with N vertices, QBSPS runs in O(μ(N) ln ln N) time. In application, we suggest that the corresponding experimental realizations are feasible by considering path searching in quantum optical communication networks; in this situation, the method performs a pure local search on networks without requiring the global structure that is necessary for current graph algorithms.

  9. Coevolving solutions to the shortest common superstring problem.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, Assaf; Sipper, Moshe

    2004-01-01

    The shortest common superstring (SCS) problem, known to be NP-Complete, seeks the shortest string that contains all strings from a given set. In this paper we compare four approaches for finding solutions to the SCS problem: a standard genetic algorithm, a novel cooperative-coevolutionary algorithm, a benchmark greedy algorithm, and a parallel coevolutionary-greedy approach. We show the coevolutionary approach produces the best results, and discuss directions for future research.

  10. a Modified Genetic Algorithm for Finding Fuzzy Shortest Paths in Uncertain Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, A. A.; Delavar, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    In realistic network analysis, there are several uncertainties in the measurements and computation of the arcs and vertices. These uncertainties should also be considered in realizing the shortest path problem (SPP) due to the inherent fuzziness in the body of expert's knowledge. In this paper, we investigated the SPP under uncertainty to evaluate our modified genetic strategy. We improved the performance of genetic algorithm (GA) to investigate a class of shortest path problems on networks with vague arc weights. The solutions of the uncertain SPP with considering fuzzy path lengths are examined and compared in detail. As a robust metaheuristic, GA algorithm is modified and evaluated to tackle the fuzzy SPP (FSPP) with uncertain arcs. For this purpose, first, a dynamic operation is implemented to enrich the exploration/exploitation patterns of the conventional procedure and mitigate the premature convergence of GA technique. Then, the modified GA (MGA) strategy is used to resolve the FSPP. The attained results of the proposed strategy are compared to those of GA with regard to the cost, quality of paths and CPU times. Numerical instances are provided to demonstrate the success of the proposed MGA-FSPP strategy in comparison with GA. The simulations affirm that not only the proposed technique can outperform GA, but also the qualities of the paths are effectively improved. The results clarify that the competence of the proposed GA is preferred in view of quality quantities. The results also demonstrate that the proposed method can efficiently be utilized to handle FSPP in uncertain networks.

  11. Minimizing Communication in All-Pairs Shortest Paths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-13

    and C. Budak. Solving path problems on the GPU. Parallel Computing, 36(5-6):241 – 253, 2010. [12] L. E. Cannon. A cellular computer to implement the...and J. van Leeuwen, editors, Automata , Languages and Programming, volume 2076 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pages 178–189. Springer Berlin

  12. Algorithm for shortest path search in Geographic Information Systems by using reduced graphs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Puente, Rafael; Lazo-Cortés, Manuel S

    2013-01-01

    The use of Geographic Information Systems has increased considerably since the eighties and nineties. As one of their most demanding applications we can mention shortest paths search. Several studies about shortest path search show the feasibility of using graphs for this purpose. Dijkstra's algorithm is one of the classic shortest path search algorithms. This algorithm is not well suited for shortest path search in large graphs. This is the reason why various modifications to Dijkstra's algorithm have been proposed by several authors using heuristics to reduce the run time of shortest path search. One of the most used heuristic algorithms is the A* algorithm, the main goal is to reduce the run time by reducing the search space. This article proposes a modification of Dijkstra's shortest path search algorithm in reduced graphs. It shows that the cost of the path found in this work, is equal to the cost of the path found using Dijkstra's algorithm in the original graph. The results of finding the shortest path, applying the proposed algorithm, Dijkstra's algorithm and A* algorithm, are compared. This comparison shows that, by applying the approach proposed, it is possible to obtain the optimal path in a similar or even in less time than when using heuristic algorithms.

  13. Efficient shortest-path-tree computation in network routing based on pulse-coupled neural networks.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hong; Yi, Zhang; Yang, Simon X

    2013-06-01

    Shortest path tree (SPT) computation is a critical issue for routers using link-state routing protocols, such as the most commonly used open shortest path first and intermediate system to intermediate system. Each router needs to recompute a new SPT rooted from itself whenever a change happens in the link state. Most commercial routers do this computation by deleting the current SPT and building a new one using static algorithms such as the Dijkstra algorithm at the beginning. Such recomputation of an entire SPT is inefficient, which may consume a considerable amount of CPU time and result in a time delay in the network. Some dynamic updating methods using the information in the updated SPT have been proposed in recent years. However, there are still many limitations in those dynamic algorithms. In this paper, a new modified model of pulse-coupled neural networks (M-PCNNs) is proposed for the SPT computation. It is rigorously proved that the proposed model is capable of solving some optimization problems, such as the SPT. A static algorithm is proposed based on the M-PCNNs to compute the SPT efficiently for large-scale problems. In addition, a dynamic algorithm that makes use of the structure of the previously computed SPT is proposed, which significantly improves the efficiency of the algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate the effective and efficient performance of the proposed approach.

  14. A circuitous shortest path algorithm labeled by previous-arc vector group in navigation GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin; Zhou, Shunping; Wan, Bo; Pan, Xiaofang

    2008-10-01

    Path planning, as the core module of navigation GIS, its efficiency and accuracy has a crucial impact on the navigation system. General shortest-path algorithm is based on the classic node label-setting algorithm, which does not consider the situation of including circuitous road sections. Therefore, sometimes it will neglect the closer circuitous path at hand but find the farther path or even failed to find any path in the real road network with complicated traffic restrictions. For the sake of finding more accurate path, this paper presents a circuitous shortest path algorithm labeled by previous-arc vector group. Firstly, we generate incremental network topological relationships according to two random positions travelers are interested in. Secondly, we construct a vector group including previous arc, and seek the way by labeling the previous-arc vector group. Finally, the shortest path in the sense of mathematics which may contain circuitous road sections can be acquired. An experimental work has been done with this algorithm using the map of Beijing, which showed that the algorithm not only well improved the accuracy of the shortest path result between the two random positions in the road network, but also kept the efficiency of the classic node labeled algorithm.

  15. Formal language constrained path problems

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C.; Jacob, R.; Marathe, M.

    1997-07-08

    In many path finding problems arising in practice, certain patterns of edge/vertex labels in the labeled graph being traversed are allowed/preferred, while others are disallowed. Motivated by such applications as intermodal transportation planning, the authors investigate the complexity of finding feasible paths in a labeled network, where the mode choice for each traveler is specified by a formal language. The main contributions of this paper include the following: (1) the authors show that the problem of finding a shortest path between a source and destination for a traveler whose mode choice is specified as a context free language is solvable efficiently in polynomial time, when the mode choice is specified as a regular language they provide algorithms with improved space and time bounds; (2) in contrast, they show that the problem of finding simple paths between a source and a given destination is NP-hard, even when restricted to very simple regular expressions and/or very simple graphs; (3) for the class of treewidth bounded graphs, they show that (i) the problem of finding a regular language constrained simple path between source and a destination is solvable in polynomial time and (ii) the extension to finding context free language constrained simple paths is NP-complete. Several extensions of these results are presented in the context of finding shortest paths with additional constraints. These results significantly extend the results in [MW95]. As a corollary of the results, they obtain a polynomial time algorithm for the BEST k-SIMILAR PATH problem studied in [SJB97]. The previous best algorithm was given by [SJB97] and takes exponential time in the worst case.

  16. Shortest multiple disconnected path for the analysis of entanglements in two- and three-dimensional polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, Martin

    2005-06-01

    We present an algorithm which returns a shortest path and related number of entanglements for a given configuration of a polymeric system in 2 or 3 dimensions. Rubinstein and Helfand, and later Everaers et al. introduced a concept to extract primitive paths for dense polymeric melts made of linear chains (a multiple disconnected multibead 'path'), where each primitive path is defined as a path connecting the (space-fixed) ends of a polymer under the constraint of non-interpenetration (excluded volume) between primitive paths of different chains, such that the multiple disconnected path fulfills a minimization criterion. The present algorithm uses geometrical operations and provides a—model independent—efficient approximate solution to this challenging problem. Primitive paths are treated as 'infinitely' thin (we further allow for finite thickness to model excluded volume), and tensionless lines rather than multibead chains, excluded volume is taken into account without a force law. The present implementation allows to construct a shortest multiple disconnected path (SP) for 2D systems (polymeric chain within spherical obstacles) and an optimal SP for 3D systems (collection of polymeric chains). The number of entanglements is then simply obtained from the SP as either the number of interior kinks, or from the average length of a line segment. Further, information about structure and potentially also the dynamics of entanglements is immediately available from the SP. We apply the method to study the 'concentration' dependence of the degree of entanglement in phantom chain systems. Program summaryTitle of program:Z Catalogue number:ADVG Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVG Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Silicon Graphics (Irix), Sun (Solaris), PC (Linux) Operating systems or monitors under which the

  17. The approach for shortest paths in fire succor based on component GIS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Zhao, Yong; Dai, K. W.

    2007-06-01

    Fire safety is an important issue for the national economy and people's living. Efficiency and exactness of fire department succor directly relate to safety of peoples' lives and property. Many disadvantages of the traditional fire system have been emerged in practical applications. The preparation of pumpers is guided by wireless communication or wire communication, so its real-time and accurate performances are much poorer. The information about the reported fire, such as the position, disaster and map, et al., for alarm and command was processed by persons, which slows the reaction speed and delays the combat opportunity. In order to solve these disadvantages, it has an important role to construct a modern fire command center based on high technology. The construction of modern fire command center can realize the modernization and automation of fire command and management. It will play a great role in protecting safety of peoples' lives and property. The center can enhance battle ability and can reduce the direct and indirect loss of fire damage at most. With the development of science technology, Geographic Information System (GIS) has becoming a new information industry for hardware production, software development, data collection, space analysis and counseling. With the popularization of computers and the development of GIS, GIS has gained increasing broad applications for its strong functionality. Network analysis is one of the most important functions of GIS, and the most elementary and pivotal issue of network analysis is the calculation of shortest paths. The shortest paths are mostly applied to some emergent systems such as 119 fire alarms. These systems mainly require that the computation time of the optimal path should be 1-3 seconds. And during traveling, the next running path of the vehicles should be calculated in time. So the implement of the shortest paths must have a high efficiency. In this paper, the component GIS technology was applied to

  18. Spatial interpolation of fine particulate matter concentrations using the shortest wind-field path distance.

    PubMed

    Li, Longxiang; Gong, Jianhua; Zhou, Jieping

    2014-01-01

    Effective assessments of air-pollution exposure depend on the ability to accurately predict pollutant concentrations at unmonitored locations, which can be achieved through spatial interpolation. However, most interpolation approaches currently in use are based on the Euclidean distance, which cannot account for the complex nonlinear features displayed by air-pollution distributions in the wind-field. In this study, an interpolation method based on the shortest path distance is developed to characterize the impact of complex urban wind-field on the distribution of the particulate matter concentration. In this method, the wind-field is incorporated by first interpolating the observed wind-field from a meteorological-station network, then using this continuous wind-field to construct a cost surface based on Gaussian dispersion model and calculating the shortest wind-field path distances between locations, and finally replacing the Euclidean distances typically used in Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) with the shortest wind-field path distances. This proposed methodology is used to generate daily and hourly estimation surfaces for the particulate matter concentration in the urban area of Beijing in May 2013. This study demonstrates that wind-fields can be incorporated into an interpolation framework using the shortest wind-field path distance, which leads to a remarkable improvement in both the prediction accuracy and the visual reproduction of the wind-flow effect, both of which are of great importance for the assessment of the effects of pollutants on human health.

  19. K-Shortest-Path-Based Evacuation Routing with Police Resource Allocation in City Transportation Networks.

    PubMed

    He, Yunyue; Liu, Zhong; Shi, Jianmai; Wang, Yishan; Zhang, Jiaming; Liu, Jinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Emergency evacuation aims to transport people from dangerous places to safe shelters as quickly as possible. Police play an important role in the evacuation process, as they can handle traffic accidents immediately and help people move smoothly on roads. This paper investigates an evacuation routing problem that involves police resource allocation. We propose a novel k-th-shortest-path-based technique that uses explicit congestion control to optimize evacuation routing and police resource allocation. A nonlinear mixed-integer programming model is presented to formulate the problem. The model's objective is to minimize the overall evacuation clearance time. Two algorithms are given to solve the problem. The first one linearizes the original model and solves the linearized problem with CPLEX. The second one is a heuristic algorithm that uses a police resource utilization efficiency index to directly solve the original model. This police resource utilization efficiency index significantly aids in the evaluation of road links from an evacuation throughput perspective. The proposed algorithms are tested with a number of examples based on real data from cities of different sizes. The computational results show that the police resource utilization efficiency index is very helpful in finding near-optimal solutions. Additionally, comparing the performance of the heuristic algorithm and the linearization method by using randomly generated examples indicates that the efficiency of the heuristic algorithm is superior.

  20. K-Shortest-Path-Based Evacuation Routing with Police Resource Allocation in City Transportation Networks

    PubMed Central

    He, Yunyue; Liu, Zhong; Shi, Jianmai; Wang, Yishan; Zhang, Jiaming; Liu, Jinyuan

    2015-01-01

    Emergency evacuation aims to transport people from dangerous places to safe shelters as quickly as possible. Police play an important role in the evacuation process, as they can handle traffic accidents immediately and help people move smoothly on roads. This paper investigates an evacuation routing problem that involves police resource allocation. We propose a novel k-th-shortest-path-based technique that uses explicit congestion control to optimize evacuation routing and police resource allocation. A nonlinear mixed-integer programming model is presented to formulate the problem. The model’s objective is to minimize the overall evacuation clearance time. Two algorithms are given to solve the problem. The first one linearizes the original model and solves the linearized problem with CPLEX. The second one is a heuristic algorithm that uses a police resource utilization efficiency index to directly solve the original model. This police resource utilization efficiency index significantly aids in the evaluation of road links from an evacuation throughput perspective. The proposed algorithms are tested with a number of examples based on real data from cities of different sizes. The computational results show that the police resource utilization efficiency index is very helpful in finding near-optimal solutions. Additionally, comparing the performance of the heuristic algorithm and the linearization method by using randomly generated examples indicates that the efficiency of the heuristic algorithm is superior. PMID:26226109

  1. Do People Use the Shortest Path? An Empirical Test of Wardrop’s First Principle

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shanjiang; Levinson, David

    2015-01-01

    Most recent route choice models, following either the random utility maximization or rule-based paradigm, require explicit enumeration of feasible routes. The quality of model estimation and prediction is sensitive to the appropriateness of the consideration set. However, few empirical studies of revealed route characteristics have been reported in the literature. This study evaluates the widely applied shortest path assumption by evaluating routes followed by residents of the Minneapolis—St. Paul metropolitan area. Accurate Global Positioning System (GPS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) data were employed to reveal routes people used over an eight to thirteen week period. Most people did not choose the shortest path. Using three weeks of that data, we find that current route choice set generation algorithms do not reveal the majority of paths that individuals took. Findings from this study may guide future efforts in building better route choice models. PMID:26267756

  2. Chemical reaction optimization for solving shortest common supersequence problem.

    PubMed

    Khaled Saifullah, C M; Rafiqul Islam, Md

    2016-10-01

    Shortest common supersequence (SCS) is a classical NP-hard problem, where a string to be constructed that is the supersequence of a given string set. The SCS problem has an enormous application of data compression, query optimization in the database and different bioinformatics activities. Due to NP-hardness, the exact algorithms fail to compute SCS for larger instances. Many heuristics and meta-heuristics approaches were proposed to solve this problem. In this paper, we propose a meta-heuristics approach based on chemical reaction optimization, CRO_SCS that is designed inspired by the nature of the chemical reactions. For different optimization problems like 0-1 knapsack, quadratic assignment, global numeric optimization problems CRO algorithm shows very good performance. We have redesigned the reaction operators and a new reform function to solve the SCS problem. The outcomes of the proposed CRO_SCS algorithm are compared with those of the enhanced beam search (IBS_SCS), deposition and reduction (DR), ant colony optimization (ACO) and artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithms. The length of supersequence, execution time and standard deviation of all related algorithms show that CRO_SCS gives better results on the average than all other algorithms.

  3. Protein-fold recognition using an improved single-source K diverse shortest paths algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lhota, John; Xie, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Protein structure prediction, when construed as a fold recognition problem, is one of the most important applications of similarity search in bioinformatics. A new protein-fold recognition method is reported which combines a single-source K diverse shortest path (SSKDSP) algorithm with Enrichment of Network Topological Similarity (ENTS) algorithm to search a graphic feature space generated using sequence similarity and structural similarity metrics. A modified, more efficient SSKDSP algorithm is developed to improve the performance of graph searching. The new implementation of the SSKDSP algorithm empirically requires 82% less memory and 61% less time than the current implementation, allowing for the analysis of larger, denser graphs. Furthermore, the statistical significance of fold ranking generated from SSKDSP is assessed using ENTS. The reported ENTS-SSKDSP algorithm outperforms original ENTS that uses random walk with restart for the graph search as well as other state-of-the-art protein structure prediction algorithms HHSearch and Sparks-X, as evaluated by a benchmark of 600 query proteins. The reported methods may easily be extended to other similarity search problems in bioinformatics and chemoinformatics. The SSKDSP software is available at http://compsci.hunter.cuny.edu/~leixie/sskdsp.html.

  4. Modeling the average shortest-path length in growth of word-adjacency networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulig, Andrzej; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław; Kwapień, Jarosław; OświÈ©cimka, Paweł

    2015-03-01

    We investigate properties of evolving linguistic networks defined by the word-adjacency relation. Such networks belong to the category of networks with accelerated growth but their shortest-path length appears to reveal the network size dependence of different functional form than the ones known so far. We thus compare the networks created from literary texts with their artificial substitutes based on different variants of the Dorogovtsev-Mendes model and observe that none of them is able to properly simulate the novel asymptotics of the shortest-path length. Then, we identify the local chainlike linear growth induced by grammar and style as a missing element in this model and extend it by incorporating such effects. It is in this way that a satisfactory agreement with the empirical result is obtained.

  5. Finding splitting lines for touching cell nuclei with a shortest path algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiangzhi; Wang, Peng; Sun, Changming; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Fugen; Meng, Cai

    2015-08-01

    A shortest path-based algorithm is proposed in this paper to find splitting lines for touching cell nuclei. First, an initial splitting line is obtained through the distance transform of a marker image and the watershed algorithm. The initial splitting line is then separated into different line segments as necessary, and the endpoint positions of these line segments are adjusted to the concave points on the contour. Finally, a shortest path algorithm is used to find the accurate splitting line between the starting-point and the end-point, and the final split can be achieved by the contour of the touching cell nuclei and the splitting lines. Comparisons of experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is effective for segmentation of different types of touching cell nuclei.

  6. Spatially-global integration of closed, fragmented contours by finding the shortest-path in a log-polar representation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, TaeKyu; Agrawal, Kunal; Li, Yunfeng; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Finding the occluding contours of objects in real 2D retinal images of natural 3D scenes is done by determining, which contour fragments are relevant, and the order in which they should be connected. We developed a model that finds the closed contour represented in the image by solving a shortest path problem that uses a log-polar representation of the image; the kind of representation known to exist in area V1 of the primate cortex. The shortest path in a log-polar representation favors the smooth, convex and closed contours in the retinal image that have the smallest number of gaps. This approach is practical because finding a globally-optimal solution to a shortest path problem is computationally easy. Our model was tested in four psychophysical experiments. In the first two experiments, the subject was presented with a fragmented convex or concave polygon target among a large number of unrelated pieces of contour (distracters). The density of these pieces of contour was uniform all over the screen to minimize spatially-local cues. The orientation of each target contour fragment was randomly perturbed by varying the levels of jitter. Subjects drew a closed contour that represented the target’s contour on a screen. The subjects’ performance was nearly perfect when the jitter-level was low. Their performance deteriorated as jitter-levels were increased. The performance of our model was very similar to our subjects’. In two subsequent experiments, the subject was asked to discriminate a briefly-presented egg-shaped object while maintaining fixation at several different positions relative to the closed contour of the shape. The subject’s discrimination performance was affected by the fixation position in much the same way as the model’s. PMID:26241462

  7. The “Path” Not Taken: Exploring Structural Differences in Mapped- Versus Shortest-Network-Path School Travel Routes

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Kristian; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Stone, Michelle R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. School route measurement often involves estimating the shortest network path. We challenged the relatively uncritical adoption of this method in school travel research and tested the route discordance hypothesis that several types of difference exist between shortest network paths and reported school routes. Methods. We constructed the mapped and shortest path through network routes for a sample of 759 children aged 9 to 13 years in grades 5 and 6 (boys = 45%, girls = 54%, unreported gender = 1%), in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. We used Wilcoxon signed-rank tests to compare reported with shortest-path route measures including distance, route directness, intersection crossings, and route overlap. Measurement difference was explored by mode and location. Results. We found statistical evidence of route discordance for walkers and children who were driven and detected it more often for inner suburban cases. Evidence of route discordance varied by mode and school location. Conclusions. We found statistically significant differences for route structure and built environment variables measured along reported and geographic information systems–based shortest-path school routes. Uncertainty produced by the shortest-path approach challenges its conceptual and empirical validity in school travel research. PMID:23865648

  8. Structural properties of invasion percolation with and without trapping: Shortest path and distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzer, Stefan; Havlin, Shlomo; Bunde, Armin

    1999-03-01

    We study several structural properties including the shortest path l between two sites separated by a Euclidean distance r of invasion percolation with trapping (TIP) and without trapping (NIP). For the trapping case we find that the mass M scales with l as M~ldl with dl=1.510+/-0.005 and l scales with r as l~rdmin with dmin=1.213+/-0.005, whereas in the nontrapping case dl=1.671+/-0.006 and dmin=1.133+/-0.005. These values further support previous results that NIP and TIP are in distinct universality classes. We also study numerically using scaling approaches the distribution N(l,r) of the lengths of the shortest paths connecting two sites at distance r in NIP and TIP. We find that it obeys a scaling form N(l,r)~rdf-1-d minf(l/rdmin). The scaling function has a power-law tail for large x values, f(x)~x-h, with a universal value of h~2 for both models within our numerical accuracy.

  9. A Shortest Dependency Path Based Convolutional Neural Network for Protein-Protein Relation Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Chanqin

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-the-art methods for protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction are primarily based on kernel methods, and their performances strongly depend on the handcraft features. In this paper, we tackle PPI extraction by using convolutional neural networks (CNN) and propose a shortest dependency path based CNN (sdpCNN) model. The proposed method (1) only takes the sdp and word embedding as input and (2) could avoid bias from feature selection by using CNN. We performed experiments on standard Aimed and BioInfer datasets, and the experimental results demonstrated that our approach outperformed state-of-the-art kernel based methods. In particular, by tracking the sdpCNN model, we find that sdpCNN could extract key features automatically and it is verified that pretrained word embedding is crucial in PPI task. PMID:27493967

  10. Optimal symmetric networks in terms of minimizing average shortest path length and their sub-optimal growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Li, Yanjun; Wu, Tie-Jun

    2009-04-01

    Homogeneous entangled networks characterized by small world, large girths, and no community structure have attracted much attention due to some of their favorable performances. However, the optimization algorithm proposed by Donetti et al. is very time-consuming and will lose its efficiency when the size of the target network becomes large. In this paper, an alternative optimization algorithm is provided to get optimal symmetric networks by minimizing the average shortest path length. It is shown that the synchronizability of a symmetric network is enhanced when the average shortest path length of the network is shortened as the optimization proceeds, which suggests that the optimal symmetric networks in terms of minimizing average shortest path length will be very close to those entangled networks. In order to overcome the time-consuming obstacle of the optimization algorithms proposed by us and Donetti et al., a growth model is proposed to get large scale sub-optimal symmetric networks. Numerical simulations show that the symmetric networks derived by our growth model will have small-world property, and besides, these networks will have many other similar favorable performances as entangled networks, e.g., robustness against errors and attacks, very good load balancing ability, and strong synchronizability.

  11. The lawnmower problem and other geometric path covering problems

    SciTech Connect

    Fekete, S.; Arkin, E.; Mitchell, J.

    1994-12-31

    We discuss the Lawnmower Problem: Given a polygonal region, find the shortest closed path along which we have to move a given object (typically a square or a circle), such that any point of the region will be covered by the object for some position of it movement. In another version of the problem, known as the Milling Problem, the object has to stay within the region at all times. Practical motivations for considering the Lawnmower Problem come from manufacturing (spray painting, quality control), geography (aerial surveys), optimization (tour planning for a large number of clients with limited mobility), and gardening. The Milling Problem has gained attention by its importance for NC pocket machining. We show that both problems are NP-hard and discuss approximation methods for various versions of the problem.

  12. Finding the biased-shortest path with minimal congestion in networks via linear-prediction of queue length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Ren, Gang; Liu, Yang

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a biased-shortest path method with minimal congestion. In the method, we use linear-prediction to estimate the queue length of nodes, and propose a dynamic accepting probability function for nodes to decide whether accept or reject the incoming packets. The dynamic accepting probability function is based on the idea of homogeneous network flow and is developed to enable nodes to coordinate their queue length to avoid congestion. A path strategy incorporated with the linear-prediction of the queue length and the dynamic accepting probability function of nodes is designed to allow packets to be automatically delivered on un-congested paths with short traveling time. Our method has the advantage of low computation cost because the optimal paths are dynamically self-organized by nodes in the delivering process of packets with local traffic information. We compare our method with the existing methods such as the efficient path method (EPS) and the optimal path method (OPS) on the BA scale-free networks and a real example. The numerical computations show that our method performs best for low network load and has minimum run time due to its low computational cost and local routing scheme.

  13. A Multilevel Probabilistic Beam Search Algorithm for the Shortest Common Supersequence Problem

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, José E.

    2012-01-01

    The shortest common supersequence problem is a classical problem with many applications in different fields such as planning, Artificial Intelligence and especially in Bioinformatics. Due to its NP-hardness, we can not expect to efficiently solve this problem using conventional exact techniques. This paper presents a heuristic to tackle this problem based on the use at different levels of a probabilistic variant of a classical heuristic known as Beam Search. The proposed algorithm is empirically analysed and compared to current approaches in the literature. Experiments show that it provides better quality solutions in a reasonable time for medium and large instances of the problem. For very large instances, our heuristic also provides better solutions, but required execution times may increase considerably. PMID:23300667

  14. Identifying New Candidate Genes and Chemicals Related to Prostate Cancer Using a Hybrid Network and Shortest Path Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fei; Zhou, You; Wang, Meng; Yang, Jing; Wu, Kai; Lu, Changhong; Kong, Xiangyin; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the male prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. Because prostate cancer cells may spread to other parts of the body and can influence human reproduction, understanding the mechanisms underlying this disease is critical for designing effective treatments. The identification of as many genes and chemicals related to prostate cancer as possible will enhance our understanding of this disease. In this study, we proposed a computational method to identify new candidate genes and chemicals based on currently known genes and chemicals related to prostate cancer by applying a shortest path approach in a hybrid network. The hybrid network was constructed according to information concerning chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions. Many of the obtained genes and chemicals are associated with prostate cancer. PMID:26504486

  15. A Shortest-Path-Based Method for the Analysis and Prediction of Fruit-Related Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fangchu; Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Biologically, fruits are defined as seed-bearing reproductive structures in angiosperms that develop from the ovary. The fertilization, development and maturation of fruits are crucial for plant reproduction and are precisely regulated by intrinsic genetic regulatory factors. In this study, we used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model organism and attempted to identify novel genes related to fruit-associated biological processes. Specifically, using validated genes, we applied a shortest-path-based method to identify several novel genes in a large network constructed using the protein-protein interactions observed in Arabidopsis thaliana. The described analyses indicate that several of the discovered genes are associated with fruit fertilization, development and maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27434024

  16. Complexity Analysis of Real-Time Reinforcement Learning Applied to Finding Shortest Paths in Deterministic Domains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    i.e. tabula rasa ) reinforcement learning was exponential for such problems, or that it was tractable (i.e. of polynomial time-complexity) only if the...Figure 1: Navigating on a map studied by [2], [51, [23], [19], [24], and others. [35] showed that reaching a goal state with uninformed (i.e. tabula ... rasa ) reinforcement learning methods can require a number of action executions that is exponential in the size of the state space. [33] has shown that

  17. An Application of Multi-Criteria Shortest Path to a Customizable Hex-Map Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    model developed represents the next step in the evolution of the Metz model built by Frawley [12], which is fashioned after the WWII-inspired war game ...foundation of wargaming. The act of engaging in a war- game affects the user as opposed to the environment. In a real life engagement, affecting the...environment or circumstance is the focus, but in 1 a war- game , the focus is on the user: How will the user respond? How does the user problem-solve? How

  18. Predicting the continuum between corridors and barriers to animal movements using Step Selection Functions and Randomized Shortest Paths.

    PubMed

    Panzacchi, Manuela; Van Moorter, Bram; Strand, Olav; Saerens, Marco; Kivimäki, Ilkka; St Clair, Colleen C; Herfindal, Ivar; Boitani, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    The loss, fragmentation and degradation of habitat everywhere on Earth prompts increasing attention to identifying landscape features that support animal movement (corridors) or impedes it (barriers). Most algorithms used to predict corridors assume that animals move through preferred habitat either optimally (e.g. least cost path) or as random walkers (e.g. current models), but neither extreme is realistic. We propose that corridors and barriers are two sides of the same coin and that animals experience landscapes as spatiotemporally dynamic corridor-barrier continua connecting (separating) functional areas where individuals fulfil specific ecological processes. Based on this conceptual framework, we propose a novel methodological approach that uses high-resolution individual-based movement data to predict corridor-barrier continua with increased realism. Our approach consists of two innovations. First, we use step selection functions (SSF) to predict friction maps quantifying corridor-barrier continua for tactical steps between consecutive locations. Secondly, we introduce to movement ecology the randomized shortest path algorithm (RSP) which operates on friction maps to predict the corridor-barrier continuum for strategic movements between functional areas. By modulating the parameter Ѳ, which controls the trade-off between exploration and optimal exploitation of the environment, RSP bridges the gap between algorithms assuming optimal movements (when Ѳ approaches infinity, RSP is equivalent to LCP) or random walk (when Ѳ → 0, RSP → current models). Using this approach, we identify migration corridors for GPS-monitored wild reindeer (Rangifer t. tarandus) in Norway. We demonstrate that reindeer movement is best predicted by an intermediate value of Ѳ, indicative of a movement trade-off between optimization and exploration. Model calibration allows identification of a corridor-barrier continuum that closely fits empirical data and demonstrates that RSP

  19. Identification of Candidate Genes Related to Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance, Incremental Feature Selection, and the Shortest-Path Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hang; Kong, Xiang-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Identification of disease genes is a hot topic in biomedicine and genomics. However, it is a challenging problem because of the complexity of diseases. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an idiopathic disease caused by a dysregulated immune response to host intestinal microflora. It has been proven to be associated with the development of intestinal malignancies. Although the specific pathological characteristics and genetic background of IBD have been partially revealed, it is still an overdetermined disease and the blueprint of all genetic variants still needs to be improved. In this study, a novel computational method was built to identify genes related to IBD. Samples from two subtypes of IBD (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease) and normal samples were employed. By analyzing the gene expression profiles of these samples using minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, 21 genes were obtained that could effectively distinguish samples from the two subtypes of IBD and the normal samples. Then, the shortest-path approach was used to search for an additional 20 genes in a large network constructed using protein-protein interactions based on the above-mentioned 21 genes. Analyses of the 41 genes obtained indicate that they are closely associated with this disease. PMID:28293637

  20. The terminal area automated path generation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsin, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The automated terminal area path generation problem in the advanced Air Traffic Control System (ATC), has been studied. Definitions, input, output and the interrelationships with other ATC functions have been discussed. Alternatives in modeling the problem have been identified. Problem formulations and solution techniques are presented. In particular, the solution of a minimum effort path stretching problem (path generation on a given schedule) has been carried out using the Newton-Raphson trajectory optimization method. Discussions are presented on the effect of different delivery time, aircraft entry position, initial guess on the boundary conditions, etc. Recommendations are made on real-world implementations.

  1. A comparison of the cluster-span threshold and the union of shortest paths as objective thresholds of EEG functional connectivity networks from Beta activity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Keith; Abasolo, Daniel; Escudero, Javier; Smith, Keith; Abasolo, Daniel; Escudero, Javier; Escudero, Javier; Smith, Keith; Abasolo, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The Cluster-Span Threshold (CST) is a recently introduced unbiased threshold for functional connectivity networks. This binarisation technique offers a natural trade-off of sparsity and density of information by balancing the ratio of closed to open triples in the network topology. Here we present findings comparing it with the Union of Shortest Paths (USP), another recently proposed objective method. We analyse standard network metrics of binarised networks for sensitivity to clinical Alzheimer's disease in the Beta band of Electroencephalogram activity. We find that the CST outperforms the USP, as well as subjective thresholds based on fixing the network density, as a sensitive threshold for distinguishing differences in the functional connectivity between Alzheimer's disease patients and control. This study provides the first evidence of the usefulness of the CST for clinical research purposes.

  2. The Average Network Flow Problem: Shortest Path and Minimum Cost Flow Formulations, Algorithms, Heuristics, and Complexity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-13

    38 2.4 Computational Complexity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 2.5 Transportation Mode Selection...allowing the decision maker to tradeoff increases in the value obtained versus the number of arcs used. 9. Computational complexity proofs for the MASP... computational complexity , and transportation mode selection. Chapter 3 is a tutorial on Value Focused Thinking for Supply Chain Applications

  3. Identification of novel candidate drivers connecting different dysfunctional levels for lung adenocarcinoma using protein-protein interactions and a shortest path approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Jiang, Yang; Zheng, Mingyue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Tumors are formed by the abnormal proliferation of somatic cells with disordered growth regulation under the influence of tumorigenic factors. Recently, the theory of “cancer drivers” connects tumor initiation with several specific mutations in the so-called cancer driver genes. According to the differentiation of four basic levels between tumor and adjacent normal tissues, the cancer drivers can be divided into the following: (1) Methylation level, (2) microRNA level, (3) mutation level, and (4) mRNA level. In this study, a computational method is proposed to identify novel lung adenocarcinoma drivers based on dysfunctional genes on the methylation, microRNA, mutation and mRNA levels. First, a large network was constructed using protein-protein interactions. Next, we searched all of the shortest paths connecting dysfunctional genes on different levels and extracted new candidate genes lying on these paths. Finally, the obtained candidate genes were filtered by a permutation test and an additional strict selection procedure involving a betweenness ratio and an interaction score. Several candidate genes remained, which are deemed to be related to two different levels of cancer. The analyses confirmed our assertions that some have the potential to contribute to the tumorigenesis process on multiple levels. PMID:27412431

  4. Identification of novel candidate drivers connecting different dysfunctional levels for lung adenocarcinoma using protein-protein interactions and a shortest path approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Jiang, Yang; Zheng, Mingyue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Tumors are formed by the abnormal proliferation of somatic cells with disordered growth regulation under the influence of tumorigenic factors. Recently, the theory of “cancer drivers” connects tumor initiation with several specific mutations in the so-called cancer driver genes. According to the differentiation of four basic levels between tumor and adjacent normal tissues, the cancer drivers can be divided into the following: (1) Methylation level, (2) microRNA level, (3) mutation level, and (4) mRNA level. In this study, a computational method is proposed to identify novel lung adenocarcinoma drivers based on dysfunctional genes on the methylation, microRNA, mutation and mRNA levels. First, a large network was constructed using protein-protein interactions. Next, we searched all of the shortest paths connecting dysfunctional genes on different levels and extracted new candidate genes lying on these paths. Finally, the obtained candidate genes were filtered by a permutation test and an additional strict selection procedure involving a betweenness ratio and an interaction score. Several candidate genes remained, which are deemed to be related to two different levels of cancer. The analyses confirmed our assertions that some have the potential to contribute to the tumorigenesis process on multiple levels.

  5. Identification of Genes Associated with Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network with a Shortest Path Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yu-Dong; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao

    2017-02-03

    Tumor metastasis is defined as the spread of tumor cells from one organ or part to another that is not directly connected to it, which significantly contributes to the progression and aggravation of tumorigenesis. Because it always involves multiple organs, the metastatic process is difficult to study in its entirety. Complete identification of the genes related to this process is an alternative way to study metastasis. In this study, we developed a computational method to identify such genes. To test our method, we selected breast cancer bone metastasis. A large network was constructed using human protein-protein interactions. On the basis of the validated genes related to breast and bone cancer, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the network to search for novel genes that may mediate breast cancer metastasis to bone. In addition, further rules constructed using the permutation FDR, the betweenness ratio, and the max-min interaction score were also employed in the method to make the inferred genes more reliable. Eighteen putative genes were identified by the method and were extensively analyzed. The confirmation results indicate that these genes participate in metastasis.

  6. Spreading paths in partially observed social networks

    PubMed Central

    Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Christakis, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how and how far information, behaviors, or pathogens spread in social networks is an important problem, having implications for both predicting the size of epidemics, as well as for planning effective interventions. There are, however, two main challenges for inferring spreading paths in real-world networks. One is the practical difficulty of observing a dynamic process on a network, and the other is the typical constraint of only partially observing a network. Using a static, structurally realistic social network as a platform for simulations, we juxtapose three distinct paths: (1) the stochastic path taken by a simulated spreading process from source to target; (2) the topologically shortest path in the fully observed network, and hence the single most likely stochastic path, between the two nodes; and (3) the topologically shortest path in a partially observed network. In a sampled network, how closely does the partially observed shortest path (3) emulate the unobserved spreading path (1)? Although partial observation inflates the length of the shortest path, the stochastic nature of the spreading process also frequently derails the dynamic path from the shortest path. We find that the partially observed shortest path does not necessarily give an inflated estimate of the length of the process path; in fact, partial observation may, counterintuitively, make the path seem shorter than it actually is. PMID:22587148

  7. Neighboring extremals of dynamic optimization problems with path equality constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Neighboring extremals of dynamic optimization problems with path equality constraints and with an unknown parameter vector are considered in this paper. With some simplifications, the problem is reduced to solving a linear, time-varying two-point boundary-value problem with integral path equality constraints. A modified backward sweep method is used to solve this problem. Two example problems are solved to illustrate the validity and usefulness of the solution technique.

  8. Multiple Objectives and the Path Determination Problem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-03

    planners. Pipeline systems, water supply systems, communication systems, electronic systems design, aircraft routing, and the routing of shipments of...existing transportation routes and rates as expressed by commercial water , road, rail and air freight charts. Algorithmic approaches to the...path is dropped from further considera- ti on. 3) Path attribute A (or B) is better than the corresponding attribute level of at least one of the label 2

  9. Multi-Criteria Path Finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, E.; Hunter, A.

    2012-07-01

    Path finding solutions are becoming a major part of many GIS applications including location based services and web-based GIS services. Most traditional path finding solutions are based on shortest path algorithms that tend to minimize the cost of travel from one point to another. These algorithms make use of some cost criteria that is usually an attribute of the edges in the graph network. Providing one shortest path limits user's flexibility when choosing a possible route, especially when more than one parameter is utilized to calculate cost (e.g., when length, number of traffic lights, and number of turns are used to calculate network cost.) K shortest path solutions tend to overcome this problem by providing second, third, and Kth shortest paths. These algorithms are efficient as long as the graphs edge weight does not change dynamically and no other parameters affect edge weights. In this paper we try to go beyond finding shortest paths based on some cost value, and provide all possible paths disregarding any parameter that may affect total cost. After finding all possible paths, we can rank the results by any parameter or combination of parameters, without a substantial increase in time complexity.

  10. The traffic equilibrium problem with nonadditive path costs

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, S.A.; Bernstein, D.

    1995-08-21

    In this paper the authors present a version of the (static) traffic equilibrium problem in which the cost incurred on a path is not simply the sum of the costs on the arcs that constitute that path. The authors motivate this nonadditive version of the problem by describing several situations in which the classical additivity assumption fails. They also present an algorithm for solving nonadditive problems that is based on the recent NE/SQP algorithm, a fast and robust method for the nonlinear complementarity problem. Finally, they present a small example that illustrates both the importance of using nonadditive costs and the effectiveness of the NE/SQP method.

  11. Planning paths to multiple targets: memory involvement and planning heuristics in spatial problem solving.

    PubMed

    Wiener, J M; Ehbauer, N N; Mallot, H A

    2009-09-01

    For large numbers of targets, path planning is a complex and computationally expensive task. Humans, however, usually solve such tasks quickly and efficiently. We present experiments studying human path planning performance and the cognitive processes and heuristics involved. Twenty-five places were arranged on a regular grid in a large room. Participants were repeatedly asked to solve traveling salesman problems (TSP), i.e., to find the shortest closed loop connecting a start location with multiple target locations. In Experiment 1, we tested whether humans employed the nearest neighbor (NN) strategy when solving the TSP. Results showed that subjects outperform the NN-strategy, suggesting that it is not sufficient to explain human route planning behavior. As a second possible strategy we tested a hierarchical planning heuristic in Experiment 2, demonstrating that participants first plan a coarse route on the region level that is refined during navigation. To test for the relevance of spatial working memory (SWM) and spatial long-term memory (LTM) for planning performance and the planning heuristics applied, we varied the memory demands between conditions in Experiment 2. In one condition the target locations were directly marked, such that no memory was required; a second condition required participants to memorize the target locations during path planning (SWM); in a third condition, additionally, the locations of targets had to retrieved from LTM (SWM and LTM). Results showed that navigation performance decreased with increasing memory demands while the dependence on the hierarchical planning heuristic increased.

  12. An Application of Calculus: Optimum Parabolic Path Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atasever, Merve; Pakdemirli, Mehmet; Yurtsever, Hasan Ali

    2009-01-01

    A practical and technological application of calculus problem is posed to motivate freshman students or junior high school students. A variable coefficient of friction is used in modelling air friction. The case in which the coefficient of friction is a decreasing function of altitude is considered. The optimum parabolic path for a flying object…

  13. The Thinnest Path Problem for Secure Communications: A Directed Hypergraph Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    problem in hypergraphs remains a polynomial-time problem. The static shortest hyperpath problem was considered by Knuth [4] and Gallo et al. [5] in... Knuth , “A generalization of dijkstra’s algorithm,” Information Processing Letters, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 177–201, February 1977. [5] G. Gallo, G. Longo, S

  14. Dynamic Shortest Path Algorithms for Hypergraphs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    geometric hypergraphs and the Enron email data set. The latter illustrates the application of the proposed algorithms in social networks for identifying...analyze the time complexity of the proposed algorithms and perform simulation experiments for both random geometric hypergraphs and the Enron email data...geometric hypergraph model and a real data set of a social network ( Enron email data set), we study the average performance of these two algorithms in

  15. On path-following methods for structural failure problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanić, Andjelka; Brank, Boštjan; Korelc, Jože

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the consistently linearized path-following method that can be applied in the nonlinear finite element analysis of solids and structures in order to compute a solution path. Within this framework, two constraint equations are considered: a quadratic one (that includes as special cases popular spherical and cylindrical forms of constraint equation), and another one that constrains only one degree-of-freedom (DOF), the critical DOF. In both cases, the constrained DOFs may vary from one solution increment to another. The former constraint equation is successful in analysing geometrically nonlinear and/or standard inelastic problems with snap-throughs, snap-backs and bifurcation points. However, it cannot handle problems with the material softening that are computed e.g. by the embedded-discontinuity finite elements. This kind of problems can be solved by using the latter constraint equation. The plusses and minuses of the both presented constraint equations are discussed and illustrated on a set of numerical examples. Some of the examples also include direct computation of critical points and branch switching. The direct computation of the critical points is performed in the framework of the path-following method by using yet another constraint function, which is eigenvector-free and suited to detect critical points.

  16. Approaching the brachistochrone using inclined planes—striving for shortest or equal travelling times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theilmann, Florian

    2017-01-01

    The classical brachistochrone problem asks for the path on which a mobile point M just driven by its own gravity will travel in the shortest possible time between two given points A and B. The resulting curve, the cycloid, will also be the tautochrone curve, i.e. the travelling time of the mobile point will not depend on its starting position. We discuss three similar problems of increasing complexity that restrict the motion to inclined planes. Without using calculus we derive the respective optimal geometry and compare the theoretical values to measured travelling times. The observed discrepancies are quantitatively modelled by including angular motion and friction. We also investigate the correspondence between the original problem and our setups. The topic provides a conceptually simple yet non-trivial problem setting inviting for problem based learning and complex learning activities such as planing suitable experiments or modelling the relevant kinematics.

  17. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  18. Computational methods for long mean free path problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlieb, Andrew Jason

    This document describes work being done on particle transport in long mean free path environments. Two non statistical computational models are developed based on the method of propagators, which can have significant advantages in accuracy and efficiency over other methods. The first model has been developed primarily for charged particle transport and the second primarily for neutral particle transport. Both models are intended for application to transport in complex geometry using irregular meshes. The transport model for charged particles was inspired by the notion of obtaining a simulation that could handle complex geometry and resolve the bulk and sheath characteristics of a discharge, in a reasonable amount of computation time. The charged particle transport model has been applied in a self- consistent manner to the ion motion in a low density inductively coupled discharge. The electrons were assumed to have a Boltzmann density distribution for the computation of the electric field. This work assumes cylindrical geometry and focuses on charge exchange collisions as the primary ion collisional effect that takes place in the discharge. The results are compared to fluid simulations. The neutral transport model was constructed to solve the steady state Boltzmann equation on 3-D arbitrary irregular meshes. The neutral transport model was developed with the intent of investigating gas glow on the scale of micro-electrical-mechanical systems (MEMS), and is meant for tracking multiple species. The advantage of these methods is that the step size is determined by the mean free path of the particles rather than the mesh employed in the simulation.

  19. The Edge-Disjoint Path Problem on Random Graphs by Message-Passing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a message-passing algorithm to solve a series of edge-disjoint path problems on graphs based on the zero-temperature cavity equations. Edge-disjoint paths problems are important in the general context of routing, that can be defined by incorporating under a unique framework both traffic optimization and total path length minimization. The computation of the cavity equations can be performed efficiently by exploiting a mapping of a generalized edge-disjoint path problem on a star graph onto a weighted maximum matching problem. We perform extensive numerical simulations on random graphs of various types to test the performance both in terms of path length minimization and maximization of the number of accommodated paths. In addition, we test the performance on benchmark instances on various graphs by comparison with state-of-the-art algorithms and results found in the literature. Our message-passing algorithm always outperforms the others in terms of the number of accommodated paths when considering non trivial instances (otherwise it gives the same trivial results). Remarkably, the largest improvement in performance with respect to the other methods employed is found in the case of benchmarks with meshes, where the validity hypothesis behind message-passing is expected to worsen. In these cases, even though the exact message-passing equations do not converge, by introducing a reinforcement parameter to force convergence towards a sub optimal solution, we were able to always outperform the other algorithms with a peak of 27% performance improvement in terms of accommodated paths. On random graphs, we numerically observe two separated regimes: one in which all paths can be accommodated and one in which this is not possible. We also investigate the behavior of both the number of paths to be accommodated and their minimum total length. PMID:26710102

  20. Shortest recurrence periods of novae

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Mariko; Saio, Hideyuki; Hachisu, Izumi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2014-10-01

    Stimulated by the recent discovery of the 1 yr recurrence period nova M31N 2008-12a, we examined the shortest recurrence periods of hydrogen shell flashes on mass-accreting white dwarfs (WDs). We discuss the mechanism that yields a finite minimum recurrence period for a given WD mass. Calculating the unstable flashes for various WD masses and mass accretion rates, we identified a shortest recurrence period of about two months for a non-rotating 1.38 M {sub ☉} WD with a mass accretion rate of 3.6 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. A 1 yr recurrence period is realized for very massive (≳ 1.3 M {sub ☉}) WDs with very high accretion rates (≳ 1.5 × 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). We revised our stability limit of hydrogen shell burning, which will be useful for binary evolution calculations toward Type Ia supernovae.

  1. Multiple Manifold Clustering Using Curvature Constrained Path

    PubMed Central

    Babaeian, Amir; Bayestehtashk, Alireza; Bandarabadi, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    The problem of multiple surface clustering is a challenging task, particularly when the surfaces intersect. Available methods such as Isomap fail to capture the true shape of the surface near by the intersection and result in incorrect clustering. The Isomap algorithm uses shortest path between points. The main draw back of the shortest path algorithm is due to the lack of curvature constrained where causes to have a path between points on different surfaces. In this paper we tackle this problem by imposing a curvature constraint to the shortest path algorithm used in Isomap. The algorithm chooses several landmark nodes at random and then checks whether there is a curvature constrained path between each landmark node and every other node in the neighborhood graph. We build a binary feature vector for each point where each entry represents the connectivity of that point to a particular landmark. Then the binary feature vectors could be used as a input of conventional clustering algorithm such as hierarchical clustering. We apply our method to simulated and some real datasets and show, it performs comparably to the best methods such as K-manifold and spectral multi-manifold clustering. PMID:26375819

  2. Instability Paths in the Kirchhoff-Plateau Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusteri, Giulio G.; Franceschini, Paolo; Fried, Eliot

    2016-08-01

    The Kirchhoff-Plateau problem concerns the equilibrium shapes of a system in which a flexible filament in the form of a closed loop is spanned by a soap film, with the filament being modeled as a Kirchhoff rod and the action of the spanning surface being solely due to surface tension. Adopting a variational approach, we define an energy associated with shape deformations of the system and then derive general equilibrium and (linear) stability conditions by considering the first and second variations of the energy functional. We analyze in detail the transition to instability of flat circular configurations, which are ground states for the system in the absence of surface tension, when the latter is progressively increased. Such a theoretical study is particularly useful here, since the many different perturbations that can lead to instability make it challenging to perform an exhaustive experimental investigation. We generalize previous results, since we allow the filament to possess a curved intrinsic shape and also to display anisotropic flexural properties (as happens when the cross section of the filament is noncircular). This is accomplished by using a rod energy which is familiar from the modeling of DNA filaments. We find that the presence of intrinsic curvature is necessary to obtain a first buckling mode which is not purely tangent to the spanning surface. We also elucidate the role of twisting buckling modes, which become relevant in the presence of flexural anisotropy.

  3. Constrained Graph Optimization: Interdiction and Preservation Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, Aaron V

    2012-07-30

    The maximum flow, shortest path, and maximum matching problems are a set of basic graph problems that are critical in theoretical computer science and applications. Constrained graph optimization, a variation of these basic graph problems involving modification of the underlying graph, is equally important but sometimes significantly harder. In particular, one can explore these optimization problems with additional cost constraints. In the preservation case, the optimizer has a budget to preserve vertices or edges of a graph, preventing them from being deleted. The optimizer wants to find the best set of preserved edges/vertices in which the cost constraints are satisfied and the basic graph problems are optimized. For example, in shortest path preservation, the optimizer wants to find a set of edges/vertices within which the shortest path between two predetermined points is smallest. In interdiction problems, one deletes vertices or edges from the graph with a particular cost in order to impede the basic graph problems as much as possible (for example, delete edges/vertices to maximize the shortest path between two predetermined vertices). Applications of preservation problems include optimal road maintenance, power grid maintenance, and job scheduling, while interdiction problems are related to drug trafficking prevention, network stability assessment, and counterterrorism. Computational hardness results are presented, along with heuristic methods for approximating solutions to the matching interdiction problem. Also, efficient algorithms are presented for special cases of graphs, including on planar graphs. The graphs in many of the listed applications are planar, so these algorithms have important practical implications.

  4. Search Path Mapping: A Versatile Approach for Visualizing Problem-Solving Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Ronald H.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-based problem-solving examinations in immunology generate graphic representations of students' search paths, allowing evaluation of how organized and focused their knowledge is, how well their organization relates to critical concepts in immunology, where major misconceptions exist, and whether proper knowledge links exist between content…

  5. Development of the PEBLebl Traveling Salesman Problem Computerized Testbed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Shane T.; Perelman, Brandon S.; Tan, Yin Yin; Thanasuan, Kejkaew

    2015-01-01

    The traveling salesman problem (TSP) is a combinatorial optimization problem that requires finding the shortest path through a set of points ("cities") that returns to the starting point. Because humans provide heuristic near-optimal solutions to Euclidean versions of the problem, it has sometimes been used to investigate human visual…

  6. Path dependence of J in three numerical examples. [J integral in three crack propagation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karabin, M. E., Jr.; Swedlow, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Three cracked geometries are studied with the aid of a new finite element model. The procedure employs a variable singularity at the crack tip that tracks changes in the material response during the loading process. Two of the problems are tension-loaded center-crack panels and the other is a three-point bend specimen. Results usually agree with other numerical and analytical analyses, except the finding that J is path dependent as a substantial plastic zone develops. Credible J values are obtained near the crack tip and J shows a significant increase as the radius of J path increases over two orders of magnitude. Incremental and deformation theories are identical provided the stresses exhibit proportionality found in the far field stresses but not near the tip.

  7. Closed-time-path functional formalism in curved spacetime: Application to cosmological back-reaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzetta, E.; Hu, B. L.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss the generalization to curved spacetime of a path-integral formalism of quantum field theory based on the sum over paths first going forward in time in the presence of one external source from an in vacuum to a state defined on a hypersurface of constant time in the future, and then backwards in time in the presence of a different source to the same in vacuum. This closed-time-path formalism which generalizes the conventional method based on in-out vacuum persistence amplitudes yields real and causal effective actions, field equations, and expectation values. We apply this method to two problems in semiclassical cosmology. First we study the back reaction of particle production in a radiation-filled Bianchi type-I universe with a conformal scalar field. Unlike the in-out formalism which yields complex geometries the real and causal effective action here yields equations for real effective geometries, with more readily interpretable results. It also provides a clear identification of particle production as a dissipative process in semiclassical theories. In the second problem we calculate the vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor for a nonconformal massive λφ4 theory in a Robertson-Walker universe. This study serves to illustrate the use of Feynman diagrams and higher-loop calculations in this formalism. It also demonstrates the economy of this method in the calculation of expectation values over the mode-sum Bogolubov transformation methods ordinarily applied to matrix elements calculated in the conventional in-out approach. The capability of the closed-time-path formalism of dealing with Feynman, causal, and correlation functions on the same footing makes it a potentially powerful and versatile technique for treating nonequilibrium statistical properties of dynamical systems as in early-Universe quantum processes.

  8. Relevancy in Problem Solving: A Computational Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwisthout, Johan

    2012-01-01

    When computer scientists discuss the computational complexity of, for example, finding the shortest path from building A to building B in some town or city, their starting point typically is a formal description of the problem at hand, e.g., a graph with weights on every edge where buildings correspond to vertices, routes between buildings to…

  9. Algorithms for Heterogeneous, Multiple Depot, Multiple Unmanned Vehicle Path Planning Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Sundar, Kaarthik; Rathinam, Sivakumar

    2016-12-26

    Unmanned vehicles, both aerial and ground, are being used in several monitoring applications to collect data from a set of targets. This article addresses a problem where a group of heterogeneous aerial or ground vehicles with different motion constraints located at distinct depots visit a set of targets. The vehicles also may be equipped with different sensors, and therefore, a target may not be visited by any vehicle. The objective is to find an optimal path for each vehicle starting and ending at its respective depot such that each target is visited at least once by some vehicle, the vehicle–target constraints are satisfied, and the sum of the length of the paths for all the vehicles is minimized. Two variants of this problem are formulated (one for ground vehicles and another for aerial vehicles) as mixed-integer linear programs and a branchand- cut algorithm is developed to compute an optimal solution to each of the variants. Computational results show that optimal solutions for problems involving 100 targets and 5 vehicles can be obtained within 300 seconds on average, further corroborating the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  10. Algorithms for Heterogeneous, Multiple Depot, Multiple Unmanned Vehicle Path Planning Problems

    DOE PAGES

    Sundar, Kaarthik; Rathinam, Sivakumar

    2016-12-26

    Unmanned vehicles, both aerial and ground, are being used in several monitoring applications to collect data from a set of targets. This article addresses a problem where a group of heterogeneous aerial or ground vehicles with different motion constraints located at distinct depots visit a set of targets. The vehicles also may be equipped with different sensors, and therefore, a target may not be visited by any vehicle. The objective is to find an optimal path for each vehicle starting and ending at its respective depot such that each target is visited at least once by some vehicle, the vehicle–targetmore » constraints are satisfied, and the sum of the length of the paths for all the vehicles is minimized. Two variants of this problem are formulated (one for ground vehicles and another for aerial vehicles) as mixed-integer linear programs and a branchand- cut algorithm is developed to compute an optimal solution to each of the variants. Computational results show that optimal solutions for problems involving 100 targets and 5 vehicles can be obtained within 300 seconds on average, further corroborating the effectiveness of the proposed approach.« less

  11. Does executive function mediate the path from mothers' depressive symptoms to young children's problem behaviors?

    PubMed

    Roman, Gabriela D; Ensor, Rosie; Hughes, Claire

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the mediation role played by children's executive function in the relationship between exposure to mild maternal depressive symptoms and problem behaviors. At ages 2, 3, and 6years, 143 children completed executive function tasks and a verbal ability test. Mothers completed the Beck Depression Inventory at each time-point, and teachers completed the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire at child age 6. Longitudinal autoregressive mediation models showed a mediation effect that was significant and quite specific; executive function (and not verbal ability) at age 3 mediated the path between mothers' depressive symptoms (but not general social disadvantage) at the first time-point and children's externalizing and internalizing problems at age 6. Improving children's executive functioning might protect them against the adverse effects of exposure to maternal depressive symptoms.

  12. Double global optimum genetic algorithm-particle swarm optimization-based welding robot path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuewu; Shi, Yingpan; Ding, Dongyan; Gu, Xingsheng

    2016-02-01

    Spot-welding robots have a wide range of applications in manufacturing industries. There are usually many weld joints in a welding task, and a reasonable welding path to traverse these weld joints has a significant impact on welding efficiency. Traditional manual path planning techniques can handle a few weld joints effectively, but when the number of weld joints is large, it is difficult to obtain the optimal path. The traditional manual path planning method is also time consuming and inefficient, and cannot guarantee optimality. Double global optimum genetic algorithm-particle swarm optimization (GA-PSO) based on the GA and PSO algorithms is proposed to solve the welding robot path planning problem, where the shortest collision-free paths are used as the criteria to optimize the welding path. Besides algorithm effectiveness analysis and verification, the simulation results indicate that the algorithm has strong searching ability and practicality, and is suitable for welding robot path planning.

  13. Path planning strategies for autonomous ground vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Kevin Kent

    Several key issues involved with the planning and executing of optimally generated paths for autonomous vehicles are addressed. Two new path planning algorithms are developed, and examined, which effectively minimize replanning as unmapped hazards are encountered. The individual algorithms are compared via extensive simulation. The search strategy results are implemented and tested using the University of Colorado's autonomous vehicle test-bed, RoboCar, and results show the advantages of solving the single-destination all-paths problem for autonomous vehicle path planning. Both path planners implement a graph search methodology incorporating dynamic programming that solves the single-destination shortest-paths problem. Algorithm 1, termed DP for dynamic programming, searches a state space where each state represents a potential vehicle location in a breadth-first fashion expanding from the goal to all potential start locations in the state space. Algorithm 2, termed DP*, couples the heuristic search power of the well-known A* search procedure (Nilsson-80) with the dynamic programming principle applied to graph searching to efficiently make use of overlapping subproblems. DP* is the primary research contribution of the work contained within this thesis. The advantage of solving the single-destination shortest-paths problem is that the entire terrain map is solved in terms of reaching a specified goal. Therefore, if the robot is diverted from the pre-planned path, an alternative path is already computed. The search algorithms are extended to include a probabilistic approach using empirical loss functions to incorporate terrain map uncertainties into the path considering terrain planning process. The results show the importance of considering terrain uncertainty. If the map representation ignores uncertainty by marking any area with less than perfect confidence as unpassable or assigns it the worst case rating, then the paths are longer than intuitively necessary. A

  14. Using State Merging and State Pruning to Address the Path Explosion Problem Faced by Symbolic Execution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-19

    the number of possible paths within a program grows exponentially with respect to loops and conditionals. New techniques are needed to address the path...increasing the code coverage. Each algorithm is tested over 66 of the GNU COREUTILS utilities. State merging combined with state pruning outperforms...30 3.6.1 GNU COREUTILS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 3.7 Performance Metrics

  15. Path optimization with limited sensing ability

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sung Ha Kim, Seong Jun Zhou, Haomin

    2015-10-15

    We propose a computational strategy to find the optimal path for a mobile sensor with limited coverage to traverse a cluttered region. The goal is to find one of the shortest feasible paths to achieve the complete scan of the environment. We pose the problem in the level set framework, and first consider a related question of placing multiple stationary sensors to obtain the full surveillance of the environment. By connecting the stationary locations using the nearest neighbor strategy, we form the initial guess for the path planning problem of the mobile sensor. Then the path is optimized by reducing its length, via solving a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), while maintaining the complete scan of the environment. Furthermore, we use intermittent diffusion, which converts the ODEs into stochastic differential equations (SDEs), to find an optimal path whose length is globally minimal. To improve the computation efficiency, we introduce two techniques, one to remove redundant connecting points to reduce the dimension of the system, and the other to deal with the entangled path so the solution can escape the local traps. Numerical examples are shown to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. A Comparison of Heuristic and Human Performance on Open Versions of the Traveling Salesperson Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, James N.; Chronicle, Edward P.; Ormerod, Thomas C.

    2006-01-01

    We compared the performance of three heuristics with that of subjects on variants of a well-known combinatorial optimization task, the Traveling Salesperson Problem (TSP). The present task consisted of finding the shortest path through an array of points from one side of the array to the other. Like the standard TSP, the task is computationally…

  17. On Dirac-Coulomb problem in (2+1) dimensional space-time and path integral quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Haouat, S.; Chetouani, L.

    2012-06-15

    The problem of Dirac particle interacting with Coulomb potential in (2+1) dimensions is formulated in the framework of super-symmetric path integrals where the spin degrees of freedom are described by odd Grassmannian variables. The relative propagator is expressed through Cartesian coordinates in a Hamiltonian form by the use of an adequate transformation. The passage to the polar coordinates permitted us to calculate the fixed energy Green's function and to extract bound states and associating wave functions.

  18. Investigation and Implementation of an Algorithm for Computing Optimal Search Paths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    of a convex objective function subject to the flow constraints of an acyclic N x T network . Lower bounds are obtained via the Frank-Wolfe method of...solution specialized for acyclic networks . This technique relies on linearization of the objective function to yield a shortest path problem ,0 D S’Q...function subject to the flow constraints of an acyclic N x T network . Lower bounds are obtained via the Frank-Wolf/e method of solution specialized

  19. Effective descriptions of complex quantum systems: path integrals and operator ordering problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckern, U.; Gruber, M. J.; Schwab, P.

    2005-09-01

    [Dedicated to Bernhard Mühlschlegel on the occasion ofhis 80th birthday]We study certain aspects of the effective, occasionally called collective, description of complex quantum systems within the framework of the path integral formalism, in which the environment is integrated out. Generalising the standard Feynman-Vernon Caldeira-Leggett model to include a non-linear coupling between particle and environment, and considering a particular spectral density of the coupling, a coordinate-dependent mass (or velocity-dependent potential) is obtained. The related effective quantum theory, which depends on the proper discretisation of the path integral, is derived and discussed. As a result, we find that in general a simple effective low-energy Hamiltonian, in which only the coordinate-dependent mass enters, cannot be formulated. The quantum theory of weakly coupled superconductors and the quantum dynamics of vortices in Josephson junction arrays are physical examples where these considerations, in principle, are of relevance.

  20. An Application of Self-Organizing Map for Multirobot Multigoal Path Planning with Minmax Objective

    PubMed Central

    Faigl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Self-Organizing Map (SOM) for the Multiple Traveling Salesman Problem (MTSP) with minmax objective is applied to the robotic problem of multigoal path planning in the polygonal domain. The main difficulty of such SOM deployment is determination of collision-free paths among obstacles that is required to evaluate the neuron-city distances in the winner selection phase of unsupervised learning. Moreover, a collision-free path is also needed in the adaptation phase, where neurons are adapted towards the presented input signal (city) to the network. Simple approximations of the shortest path are utilized to address this issue and solve the robotic MTSP by SOM. Suitability of the proposed approximations is verified in the context of cooperative inspection, where cities represent sensing locations that guarantee to “see” the whole robots' workspace. The inspection task formulated as the MTSP-Minmax is solved by the proposed SOM approach and compared with the combinatorial heuristic GENIUS. The results indicate that the proposed approach provides competitive results to GENIUS and support applicability of SOM for robotic multigoal path planning with a group of cooperating mobile robots. The proposed combination of approximate shortest paths with unsupervised learning opens further applications of SOM in the field of robotic planning. PMID:27340395

  1. Spatial interpolation of river channel topography using the shortest temporal distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanjun; Xian, Cuiling; Chen, Huajin; Grieneisen, Michael L.; Liu, Jiaming; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-11-01

    It is difficult to interpolate river channel topography due to complex anisotropy. As the anisotropy is often caused by river flow, especially the hydrodynamic and transport mechanisms, it is reasonable to incorporate flow velocity into topography interpolator for decreasing the effect of anisotropy. In this study, two new distance metrics defined as the time taken by water flow to travel between two locations are developed, and replace the spatial distance metric or Euclidean distance that is currently used to interpolate topography. One is a shortest temporal distance (STD) metric. The temporal distance (TD) of a path between two nodes is calculated by spatial distance divided by the tangent component of flow velocity along the path, and the STD is searched using the Dijkstra algorithm in all possible paths between two nodes. The other is a modified shortest temporal distance (MSTD) metric in which both the tangent and normal components of flow velocity were combined. They are used to construct the methods for the interpolation of river channel topography. The proposed methods are used to generate the topography of Wuhan Section of Changjiang River and compared with Universal Kriging (UK) and Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW). The results clearly showed that the STD and MSTD based on flow velocity were reliable spatial interpolators. The MSTD, followed by the STD, presents improvement in prediction accuracy relative to both UK and IDW.

  2. Inferring propagation paths for sparsely observed perturbations on complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Massucci, Francesco Alessandro; Wheeler, Jonathan; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Joven, Jorge; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Guimerà, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In a complex system, perturbations propagate by following paths on the network of interactions among the system’s units. In contrast to what happens with the spreading of epidemics, observations of general perturbations are often very sparse in time (there is a single observation of the perturbed system) and in “space” (only a few perturbed and unperturbed units are observed). A major challenge in many areas, from biology to the social sciences, is to infer the propagation paths from observations of the effects of perturbation under these sparsity conditions. We address this problem and show that it is possible to go beyond the usual approach of using the shortest paths connecting the known perturbed nodes. Specifically, we show that a simple and general probabilistic model, which we solved using belief propagation, provides fast and accurate estimates of the probabilities of nodes being perturbed. PMID:27819038

  3. Status Problem and Expectations of Competence: A Challenging Path for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pescarmona, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Complex Instruction (CI) is a cooperative learning approach, which aims at improving the equal status interaction among students working in groups who may be at different academic and social levels. Based on an ethnographic research, the article examines how a group of Italian primary school teachers understand the status problem and how the…

  4. On Numerical Methods of Solving Some Optimal Path Problems on the Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, V. N.; Matviychuk, A. R.; Malev, A. G.

    Three numerical methods of solution of some time optimal control problems for a system under phase constraints are described in the paper. Two suggested methods are based on transition to the discrete time model, constructing attainability sets and application of the guide construction. The third method is based on the Deikstra algorithm.

  5. Path Model of the Processes Influencing Drinking-Related Problems among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenzel, L. Mickey; Patel, Shreya

    This study tested a causal model of the prediction of the rate of occurrence of social and academic problems that results from college students' drinking. The model posited two pathways, one examining self-worth perceptions and symptoms of depression as mediators and one examining binge-drinking frequency as a mediator. Predictors included:…

  6. Computing the Length of the Shortest Telomere in the Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao Duc, K.; Holcman, D.

    2013-11-01

    The telomere length can either be shortened or elongated by an enzyme called telomerase after each cell division. Interestingly, the shortest telomere is involved in controlling the ability of a cell to divide. Yet, its dynamics remains elusive. We present here a stochastic approach where we model this dynamics using a Markov jump process. We solve the forward Fokker-Planck equation to obtain the steady state distribution and the statistical moments of telomere lengths. We focus specifically on the shortest one and we estimate its length difference with the second shortest telomere. After extracting key parameters such as elongation and shortening dynamics from experimental data, we compute the length of telomeres in yeast and obtain as a possible prediction the minimum concentration of telomerase required to ensure a proper cell division.

  7. Progression paths in children's problem solving: The influence of dynamic testing, initial variability, and working memory.

    PubMed

    Resing, Wilma C M; Bakker, Merel; Pronk, Christine M E; Elliott, Julian G

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated developmental trajectories of analogical reasoning performance of 104 7- and 8-year-old children. We employed a microgenetic research method and multilevel analysis to examine the influence of several background variables and experimental treatment on the children's developmental trajectories. Our participants were divided into two treatment groups: repeated practice alone and repeated practice with training. Each child received an initial working memory assessment and was subsequently asked to solve figural analogies on each of several sessions. We examined children's analogical problem-solving behavior and their subsequent verbal accounts of their employed solving processes. We also investigated the influence of verbal and visual-spatial working memory capacity and initial variability in strategy use on analogical reasoning development. Results indicated that children in both treatment groups improved but that gains were greater for those who had received training. Training also reduced the influence of children's initial variability in the use of analogical strategies with the degree of improvement in reasoning largely unrelated to working memory capacity. Findings from this study demonstrate the value of a microgenetic research method and the use of multilevel analysis to examine inter- and intra-individual change in problem-solving processes.

  8. The Role of Youth Problem Behaviors in the Path From Child Abuse and Neglect to Prostitution: A Prospective Examination

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Helen W.; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2009-01-01

    Behaviors beginning in childhood or adolescence may mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and involvement in prostitution. This paper examines five potential mediators: early sexual initiation, running away, juvenile crime, school problems, and early drug use. Using a prospective cohort design, abused and neglected children (ages 0–11) with cases processed during 1967–1971 were matched with non-abused, non-neglected children and followed into young adulthood. Data are from in-person interviews at approximate age 29 and arrest records through 1994. Structural Equation Modeling tested path models. Results indicated that victims of child abuse and neglect were at increased risk for all problem behaviors, except drug use. In the full model, only early sexual initiation remained significant as a mediator in the pathway from child abuse and neglect to prostitution. Findings were generally consistent for physical and sexual abuse and neglect. These findings suggest that interventions to reduce problem behaviors among maltreated children may also reduce their risk for prostitution later in life. PMID:20186260

  9. The Role of Youth Problem Behaviors in the Path From Child Abuse and Neglect to Prostitution: A Prospective Examination.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Helen W; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2010-01-01

    Behaviors beginning in childhood or adolescence may mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and involvement in prostitution. This paper examines five potential mediators: early sexual initiation, running away, juvenile crime, school problems, and early drug use. Using a prospective cohort design, abused and neglected children (ages 0-11) with cases processed during 1967-1971 were matched with non-abused, non-neglected children and followed into young adulthood. Data are from in-person interviews at approximate age 29 and arrest records through 1994. Structural Equation Modeling tested path models. Results indicated that victims of child abuse and neglect were at increased risk for all problem behaviors, except drug use. In the full model, only early sexual initiation remained significant as a mediator in the pathway from child abuse and neglect to prostitution. Findings were generally consistent for physical and sexual abuse and neglect. These findings suggest that interventions to reduce problem behaviors among maltreated children may also reduce their risk for prostitution later in life.

  10. From Parent to Child to Parent…: Paths In and Out of Problem Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert H.; Corwyn, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This study used data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development to examine relations between parenting, self-control and externalizing behavior from early childhood to mid-adolescence (N=956; 49.9% male). Results indicated that maternal sensitivity, parental harshness and productive activity are related to externalizing problems but that patterns of relations change from early childhood to middle childhood to adolescence, with evidence suggesting that externalizing behavior influences parenting more than the reverse from middle childhood onward. Self-control measured during early adolescence partially mediated relations between maternal sensitivity and adolescent-reported externalizing behavior. Parental monitoring during adolescence was also related to externalizing behavior at age 15. Monitoring partially mediated the relation between externalizing behavior in early adolescence and externalizing at age 15. PMID:23135289

  11. Solving the Bi-Objective Maximum-Flow Network-Interdiction Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    starts.” We use a variant of the shortest- augmenting-path algorithm of Edmonds and Karp (1972) to solve maximum-flow problems, and an inherent feature...support. Both authors thank Gerald Brown for provid- ing road data for computational examples and Matthew Carlyle, Javier Salmeron, and Keith Olson for...Monterey, CA. Edmonds, J., R. M. Karp . 1972. Theoretical improvements in algo- rithm efficiency for network flow problems. J. ACM 19 248–264. Ford, L

  12. Parallel path planning in unknown terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prassler, Erwin A.; Milios, Evangelos E.

    1991-03-01

    We present a parallel processing approach to path planning in unknown terrains which combines map-based and sensor-based techniques into a real-time capable navigation system. The method is based on massively parallel computations in a grid of simple processing elements denoted as cells. In the course of a relaxation process a potential distribution is created in the grid which exhibits a monotonous slope from a start cell to the cell corresponding to the robot''s goal position. A shortest path is determined by means of a gradient descent criterion which settles on the steepest descent in the potential distribution. Like high-level path planning algorithms our approach is capable of planning shortest paths through an arbitrarily cluttered large-scale terrain on the basis of its current internal map. Sequentially implemented its complexity is in the order of efficient classical path planning algorithms. Unlike these algorithms however the method is also highly responsive to new obstacles encountered in the terrain. By continuing the planning process during the robot''s locomotion information about previously unknown obstacles immediately affects further path planning without a need to interrupt the ongoing planning process. New obstacles cause distortions of the potential distribution which let the robot find proper detours. By ensuring a monotonous slope in the overall distribution we avoid local minimum effects which may trap a robot in the proximity of an obstacle configuration before it has reached its goal. 1 Until the recent past research on path planning in the presence of obstacles can be assigned to two major categories: map-based high-level planning approaches and sensor-based low-level conLrol approaches. In work such as 12 path planning is treated as a high-level planning task. Assuming that an (accnrae) precompiled map of the terrain is available high-level path planners provide paths which guarantee a collision-free locomotion through an arbitrary

  13. The Thinnest Path Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Problems”, available online at http://arxiv.org/pdf/1212.6176v1.pdf [7] G. Ausiello, G. Italiano , and U. Nanni, “Optimal traversal of directed...algorithm,” Infor- mation Processing Letters, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 177–201, February 1977. [9] G. Ausiello, U. Nanni, and G.F. Italiano , “Dynamic

  14. The Thinnest Path Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-22

    cause unnecessary energy consumption. C. Related Work There is a large body of literature on security issues in wire - less ad hoc networks (see, for...crossing is inevitable when we draw on a 2-D plane. The implementationof hyperedges that cross eachother needs special care to...Let and denote the distance between and the two lines and , respectively. Next, we draw a circle with radius centered at . Let denote the

  15. Path similarity skeleton graph matching.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiang; Latecki, Longin Jan

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a novel framework to for shape recognition based on object silhouettes. The main idea is to match skeleton graphs by comparing the shortest paths between skeleton endpoints. In contrast to typical tree or graph matching methods, we completely ignore the topological graph structure. Our approach is motivated by the fact that visually similar skeleton graphs may have completely different topological structures. The proposed comparison of shortest paths between endpoints of skeleton graphs yields correct matching results in such cases. The skeletons are pruned by contour partitioning with Discrete Curve Evolution, which implies that the endpoints of skeleton branches correspond to visual parts of the objects. The experimental results demonstrate that our method is able to produce correct results in the presence of articulations, stretching, and occlusion.

  16. Path ensembles and a tradeoff between communication efficiency and resilience in the human connectome.

    PubMed

    Avena-Koenigsberger, Andrea; Mišić, Bratislav; Hawkins, Robert X D; Griffa, Alessandra; Hagmann, Patric; Goñi, Joaquín; Sporns, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Computational analysis of communication efficiency of brain networks often relies on graph-theoretic measures based on the shortest paths between network nodes. Here, we explore a communication scheme that relaxes the assumption that information travels exclusively through optimally short paths. The scheme assumes that communication between a pair of brain regions may take place through a path ensemble comprising the k-shortest paths between those regions. To explore this approach, we map path ensembles in a set of anatomical brain networks derived from diffusion imaging and tractography. We show that while considering optimally short paths excludes a significant fraction of network connections from participating in communication, considering k-shortest path ensembles allows all connections in the network to contribute. Path ensembles enable us to assess the resilience of communication pathways between brain regions, by measuring the number of alternative, disjoint paths within the ensemble, and to compare generalized measures of path length and betweenness centrality to those that result when considering only the single shortest path between node pairs. Furthermore, we find a significant correlation, indicative of a trade-off, between communication efficiency and resilience of communication pathways in structural brain networks. Finally, we use k-shortest path ensembles to demonstrate hemispherical lateralization of efficiency and resilience.

  17. A Dynamic Programming Approach to Identifying the Shortest Path in Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazlollahtabar, Hamed

    2008-01-01

    E-learning has been widely adopted as a promising solution by many organizations to offer learning-on-demand opportunities to individual employees (learners) in order to reduce training time and cost. While successful information systems models have received much attention among researchers, little research has been conducted to assess the success…

  18. A new graph model and algorithms for consistent superstring problems.

    PubMed

    Na, Joong Chae; Cho, Sukhyeun; Choi, Siwon; Kim, Jin Wook; Park, Kunsoo; Sim, Jeong Seop

    2014-05-28

    Problems related to string inclusion and non-inclusion have been vigorously studied in diverse fields such as data compression, molecular biology and computer security. Given a finite set of positive strings P and a finite set of negative strings N, a string α is a consistent superstring if every positive string is a substring of α and no negative string is a substring of α. The shortest (resp. longest) consistent superstring problem is to find a string α that is the shortest (resp. longest) among all the consistent superstrings for the given sets of strings. In this paper, we first propose a new graph model for consistent superstrings for given P and N. In our graph model, the set of strings represented by paths satisfying some conditions is the same as the set of consistent superstrings for P and N. We also present algorithms for the shortest and the longest consistent superstring problems. Our algorithms solve the consistent superstring problems for all cases, including cases that are not considered in previous work. Moreover, our algorithms solve in polynomial time the consistent superstring problems for more cases than the previous algorithms. For the polynomially solvable cases, our algorithms are more efficient than the previous ones.

  19. Fast marching methods for the continuous traveling salesman problem

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, June; Sethian, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    We consider a problem in which we are given a domain, a cost function which depends on position at each point in the domain, and a subset of points (“cities”) in the domain. The goal is to determine the cheapest closed path that visits each city in the domain once. This can be thought of as a version of the traveling salesman problem, in which an underlying known metric determines the cost of moving through each point of the domain, but in which the actual shortest path between cities is unknown at the outset. We describe algorithms for both a heuristic and an optimal solution to this problem. The complexity of the heuristic algorithm is at worst case M·N log N, where M is the number of cities, and N the size of the computational mesh used to approximate the solutions to the shortest paths problems. The average runtime of the heuristic algorithm is linear in the number of cities and O(N log N) in the size N of the mesh. PMID:17220271

  20. Fast marching methods for the continuous traveling salesman problem

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.; Sethian, J.A.

    2008-12-01

    We consider a problem in which we are given a domain, a cost function which depends on position at each point in the domain, and a subset of points ('cities') in the domain. The goal is to determine the cheapest closed path that visits each city in the domain once. This can be thought of as a version of the Traveling Salesman Problem, in which an underlying known metric determines the cost of moving through each point of the domain, but in which the actual shortest path between cities is unknown at the outset. We describe algorithms for both a heuristic and an optimal solution to this problem. The order of the heuristic algorithm is at worst case M * N logN, where M is the number of cities, and N the size of the computational mesh used to approximate the solutions to the shortest paths problems. The average runtime of the heuristic algorithm is linear in the number of cities and O(N log N) in the size N of the mesh.

  1. Incremental Multi-Scale Search Algorithm for Dynamic Path Planning With Low Worst-Case Complexity.

    PubMed

    Yibiao Lu; Xiaoming Huo; Arslan, O; Tsiotras, P

    2011-12-01

    Path-planning (equivalently, path-finding) problems are fundamental in many applications, such as transportation, VLSI design, robot navigation, and many more. In this paper, we consider dynamic shortest path-planning problems on a graph with a single endpoint pair and with potentially changing edge weights over time. Several algorithms exist in the literature that solve this problem, notably among them the Lifelong Planning algorithm. The algorithm is an incremental search algorithm that replans the path when there are changes in the environment. In numerical experiments, however, it was observed that the performance of is sensitive in the number of vertex expansions required to update the graph when an edge weight value changes or when a vertex is added or deleted. Although, in most cases, the classical requires a relatively small number of updates, in some other cases the amount of work required by the to find the optimal path can be overwhelming. To address this issue, in this paper, we propose an extension of the baseline algorithm, by making efficient use of a multiscale representation of the environment. This multiscale representation allows one to quickly localize the changed edges, and subsequently update the priority queue efficiently. This incremental multiscale ( for short) algorithm leads to an improvement both in terms of robustness and computational complexity-in the worst case-when compared to the classical . Numerical experiments validate the aforementioned claims.

  2. The shortest period detached binary white dwarf system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Mukremin; Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, S. J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Andrews, J.; Kleinman, S. J.; Winget, K. I.; Winget, D. E.; Hermes, J. J.

    2011-05-01

    We identify SDSS J010657.39-100003.3 (hereafter J0106-1000) as the shortest period detached binary white dwarf (WD) system currently known. We targeted J0106-1000 as part of our radial velocity programme to search for companions around known extremely low-mass (ELM; ˜0.2 M⊙) WDs using the 6.5-m Multiple Mirror Telescope. We detect peak-to-peak radial velocity variations of 740 km s-1 with an orbital period of 39.1 min. The mass function and optical photometry rule out a main-sequence star companion. Follow-up high-speed photometric observations obtained at the McDonald 2.1-m telescope reveal ellipsoidal variations from the distorted primary but no eclipses. This is the first example of a tidally distorted WD. Modelling the light curve, we constrain the inclination angle of the system to be 67°± 13°. J0106-1000 contains a pair of WDs (0.17 M⊙ primary + 0.43 M⊙ invisible secondary) at a separation of 0.32 R⊙. The two WDs will merge in 37 Myr and most likely form a core He-burning single subdwarf star. J0106-1000 is the shortest time-scale merger system currently known. The gravitational wave strain from J0106-1000 is at the detection limit of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). However, accurate ephemeris and orbital period measurements may enable LISA to detect J0106-1000 above the Galactic background noise. Based on observations obtained at the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  3. A new efficient optimal path planner for mobile robot based on Invasive Weed Optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Prases K.; Parhi, Dayal R.

    2014-12-01

    Planning of the shortest/optimal route is essential for efficient operation of autonomous mobile robot or vehicle. In this paper Invasive Weed Optimization (IWO), a new meta-heuristic algorithm, has been implemented for solving the path planning problem of mobile robot in partially or totally unknown environments. This meta-heuristic optimization is based on the colonizing property of weeds. First we have framed an objective function that satisfied the conditions of obstacle avoidance and target seeking behavior of robot in partially or completely unknown environments. Depending upon the value of objective function of each weed in colony, the robot avoids obstacles and proceeds towards destination. The optimal trajectory is generated with this navigational algorithm when robot reaches its destination. The effectiveness, feasibility, and robustness of the proposed algorithm has been demonstrated through series of simulation and experimental results. Finally, it has been found that the developed path planning algorithm can be effectively applied to any kinds of complex situation.

  4. Path Finder

    SciTech Connect

    Rigdon, J. Brian; Smith, Marcus Daniel; Mulder, Samuel A

    2014-01-07

    PathFinder is a graph search program, traversing a directed cyclic graph to find pathways between labeled nodes. Searches for paths through ordered sequences of labels are termed signatures. Determining the presence of signatures within one or more graphs is the primary function of Path Finder. Path Finder can work in either batch mode or interactively with an analyst. Results are limited to Path Finder whether or not a given signature is present in the graph(s).

  5. Path-based network unfolding: A solution for the problem of mixed trophic and non-trophic processes in trophic dynamic analysis

    PubMed

    Whipple

    1998-02-07

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a quantitative method of trophic dynamic analysis derived from a systems ecology theoretical foundation. This method was devised to provide a solution for the problem of how to deal with mixed trophic and non-trophic processes in cyclic ecosystem networks, a problem that has vexed trophic ecology since Lindeman first presented a formal concept of trophic dynamics in 1942. The author's initial attempt to solve this problem was presented in Whipple & Patten (1993, J. theor. Biol. 163, 393-411). The path-based network unfolding method described in this paper provides a quantitative method for conducting trophic dynamic analysis of cyclic ecosystems containing non-living storages and non-trophic flows to produce a true energy-transformation trophic macrochain. This method solves the "trophic-level inflation" problem described in Whipple & Patten (193, J. theor. Biol. 163, 393-411). The results of the analysis of an oyster reef ecosystem model demonstrate that the dual trophic macrochain produced by path-based network unfolding may be used to compare the relative contribution of grazing and detrital sub-webs to the trophic dynamics of ecosystems. It was found that the standing stock and flow contribution of the detrital sub-web was quantitatively dominant in the oyster reef ecosystem model. This method might be used to compare the contribution of grazing and detrital sub-webs for models of different ecosystem types. Because a true energy transformation trophic chain is produced, the progressive efficiency concept of the Lindeman-Hutchinson paradigm may be applied in comparative trophic analyses of ecosystems. In comparing the oyster reef model results of three quantitative trophic analysis methods, the path-based network unfolding method was found to produce a trophic macrochain with progressive efficiencies intermediate between those produced by the original Higashi et al. method and the Burns et al. unfolding analysis of a

  6. The Role of Youth Problem Behaviors in the Path from Child Abuse and Neglect to Prostitution: A Prospective Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Helen W.; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2010-01-01

    Behaviors beginning in childhood or adolescence may mediate the relationship between childhood maltreatment and involvement in prostitution. This paper examines 5 potential mediators: early sexual initiation, running away, juvenile crime, school problems, and early drug use. Using a prospective cohort design, abused and neglected children (ages…

  7. Engineering the path to higher-order thinking in elementary education: A problem-based learning approach for STEM integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehmat, Abeera Parvaiz

    As we progress into the 21st century, higher-order thinking skills and achievement in science and math are essential to meet the educational requirement of STEM careers. Educators need to think of innovative ways to engage and prepare students for current and future challenges while cultivating an interest among students in STEM disciplines. An instructional pedagogy that can capture students' attention, support interdisciplinary STEM practices, and foster higher-order thinking skills is problem-based learning. Problem-based learning embedded in the social constructivist view of teaching and learning (Savery & Duffy, 1995) promotes self-regulated learning that is enhanced through exploration, cooperative social activity, and discourse (Fosnot, 1996). This quasi-experimental mixed methods study was conducted with 98 fourth grade students. The study utilized STEM content assessments, a standardized critical thinking test, STEM attitude survey, PBL questionnaire, and field notes from classroom observations to investigate the impact of problem-based learning on students' content knowledge, critical thinking, and their attitude towards STEM. Subsequently, it explored students' experiences of STEM integration in a PBL environment. The quantitative results revealed a significant difference between groups in regards to their content knowledge, critical thinking skills, and STEM attitude. From the qualitative results, three themes emerged: learning approaches, increased interaction, and design and engineering implementation. From the overall data set, students described the PBL environment to be highly interactive that prompted them to employ multiple approaches, including design and engineering to solve the problem.

  8. Minimal Paths in the City Block: Human Performance on Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Traveling Salesperson Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walwyn, Amy L.; Navarro, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment is reported comparing human performance on two kinds of visually presented traveling salesperson problems (TSPs), those reliant on Euclidean geometry and those reliant on city block geometry. Across multiple array sizes, human performance was near-optimal in both geometries, but was slightly better in the Euclidean format. Even so,…

  9. Quartz fabric-based deformation thermometry: examples of its application, relationships to petrology-based PT paths, and potential problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Richard; Waters, Dave; Morgan, Sven; Stahr, Don; Francsis, Matthew; Ashley, Kyle; Kronenberg, Andreas; Thomas, Jay; Mazza, Sarah; Heaverlo, Nicholas

    2013-04-01

    The quartz c-axis fabric opening-angle thermometer proposed by Kruhl (1998) offers a potential analytical technique for estimating deformation temperatures in rocks deformed by crystal plastic flow. However, in addition to deformation temperature, opening-angle is also sensitive to other variables such as strain rate, degree of hydrolytic weakening, and 3D strain type. Unless the influence of these individual variables can be quantified, use of fabric opening-angle as a deformation thermometer remains problematic and controversial. Over the last decade close correlations between: a) deformation temperatures indicated by fabric opening-angles and, b) temperatures of metamorphism indicated by trace element and mineral phase equilibria analyses, have been reported from a range of different tectonic settings, thereby arguably giving support to the use of opening-angles as a deformation thermometer. However, it needs to be demonstrated that the similar temperatures estimated by the different methods are related to the same geologic event, and therefore occupy at least a similar position on the PTt path - something that is in practice difficult to achieve for an individual rock sample. In cases where temperatures indicated by opening angles and mineral assemblages are markedly different, these differences could, for example, be explained by penetrative deformation and mineral growth/diffusion occurring at different times. Alternatively, when apparent deformation temperatures based on quartz fabrics are significantly greater than temperatures indicated by synchronous metamorphic mineral assemblages, this might be due to extreme hydrolytic weakening of quartz. We illustrate this talk on the pros and cons of using fabric opening-angles as a deformation thermometer with examples from: a) Aureoles of forcibly emplaced plutons in the White-Inyo Range of eastern California where crystal-plastic deformation and recrystallization was short-lived and synchronous with contact

  10. Real-time robot path planning based on a modified pulse-coupled neural network model.

    PubMed

    Qu, Hong; Yang, Simon X; Willms, Allan R; Yi, Zhang

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a modified pulse-coupled neural network (MPCNN) model for real-time collision-free path planning of mobile robots in nonstationary environments. The proposed neural network for robots is topologically organized with only local lateral connections among neurons. It works in dynamic environments and requires no prior knowledge of target or barrier movements. The target neuron fires first, and then the firing event spreads out, through the lateral connections among the neurons, like the propagation of a wave. Obstacles have no connections to their neighbors. Each neuron records its parent, that is, the neighbor that caused it to fire. The real-time optimal path is then the sequence of parents from the robot to the target. In a static case where the barriers and targets are stationary, this paper proves that the generated wave in the network spreads outward with travel times proportional to the linking strength among neurons. Thus, the generated path is always the global shortest path from the robot to the target. In addition, each neuron in the proposed model can propagate a firing event to its neighboring neuron without any comparing computations. The proposed model is applied to generate collision-free paths for a mobile robot to solve a maze-type problem, to circumvent concave U-shaped obstacles, and to track a moving target in an environment with varying obstacles. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach is demonstrated through simulation and comparison studies.

  11. Open path measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapor under foggy conditions - technical problems, approaches and effects on flux measurements and budget calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Madany, T.; Griessbaum, F.; Maneke, F.; Chu, H.-S.; Wu, C.-C.; Chang, S. C.; Hsia, Y.-J.; Juang, J.-Y.; Klemm, O.

    2010-07-01

    To estimate carbon dioxide or water vapor fluxes with the Eddy Covariance method high quality data sets are necessary. Under foggy conditions this is challenging, because open path measurements are influenced by the water droplets that cross the measurement path as well as deposit on the windows of the optical path. For the LI-7500 the deposition of droplets on the window results in an intensity reduction of the infrared beam. To keep the strength of the infrared beam under these conditions, the energy is increased. A measure for the increased energy is given by the AGC value (Automatic Gain Control). Up to a AGC threshold value of 70 % the data from the LI-7500 is assumed to be of good quality (personal communication with LICOR). Due to fog deposition on the windows, the AGC value rises above 70 % and stays there until the fog disappears and the water on the windows evaporates. To gain better data quality during foggy conditions, a blower system was developed that blows the deposited water droplets off the window. The system is triggered if the AGC value rises above 70 %. Then a pneumatic jack will lift the blower system towards the LI-7500 and the water-droplets get blown off with compressed air. After the AGC value drops below 70 %, the pneumatic jack will move back to the idle position. Using this technique showed that not only the fog droplets on the window causing significant problems to the measurement, but also the fog droplets inside the measurement path. Under conditions of very dense fog the measured values of carbon dioxide can get unrealistically high, and for water vapor, negative values can be observed even if the AGC value is below 70 %. The negative values can be explained by the scatter of the infrared beam on the fog droplets. It is assumed, that different types of fog droplet spectra are causing the various error patterns observed. For high quality flux measurements, not only the AGC threshold value of 70 % is important, but also the fluctuation

  12. An Innovative Multi-Agent Search-and-Rescue Path Planning Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-09

    path planning may be found in the robotics literature in the area of robot motion planning [8] and, namely, terrain acquisition [9], [10] and coverage...path planning [11],[12], [13]. Robot motion planning explored search path planning, primarily providing constrained shortest path type solutions...involving unknown sparsely distributed static targets and obstacles. Separate work on robot search algorithms is also referenced on the pursuit

  13. Mobile transporter path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baffes, Paul; Wang, Lui

    1990-01-01

    The use of a genetic algorithm (GA) for solving the mobile transporter path planning problem is investigated. The mobile transporter is a traveling robotic vehicle proposed for the space station which must be able to reach any point of the structure autonomously. Elements of the genetic algorithm are explored in both a theoretical and experimental sense. Specifically, double crossover, greedy crossover, and tournament selection techniques are examined. Additionally, the use of local optimization techniques working in concert with the GA are also explored. Recent developments in genetic algorithm theory are shown to be particularly effective in a path planning problem domain, though problem areas can be cited which require more research.

  14. Path Pascal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. H.; Kolstad, R. B.; Holle, D. F.; Miller, T. J.; Krause, P.; Horton, K.; Macke, T.

    1983-01-01

    Path Pascal is high-level experimental programming language based on PASCAL, which incorporates extensions for systems and real-time programming. Pascal is extended to treat real-time concurrent systems.

  15. Tracing path-guided apparent motion in human primary visual cortex V1

    PubMed Central

    Akselrod, Michel; Herzog, Michael H.; Öğmen, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Vision is a constructive process. For example, a square, flashed at two distinct locations one after the other, appears to move smoothly between the two locations rather than as two separate flashes (apparent motion). Apparent motion is usually perceived along the shortest path between locations. Previous studies have shown that retinotopic activity in V1 correlates well with the subjective filling-in in apparent motion. If V1 activity truly reflects illusory motion, it should flexibly reflect filling-in of any path, subjectively perceived. Here, we used a path-guided apparent motion paradigm in which a faint cue, presented in addition to the squares, leads to a curved illusory motion path. We found retinotopic activity in V1 to reflect the illusory filling-in of the curved path, similarly to filling-in with linear, shortest paths. Moreover, our results show that activity along the linear path was less selective to stimulus conditions than the activity along the curved path. This finding may be interpreted as V1 activity representing a small subset of infinitely many possible solutions to ambiguous stimuli, whilst giving more weight to the shortest path/energy solution. PMID:25317907

  16. Path planning under spatial uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Jan M; Lafon, Matthieu; Berthoz, Alain

    2008-04-01

    In this article, we present experiments studying path planning under spatial uncertainties. In the main experiment, the participants' task was to navigate the shortest possible path to find an object hidden in one of four places and to bring it to the final destination. The probability of finding the object (probability matrix) was different for each of the four places and varied between conditions. Givensuch uncertainties about the object's location, planning a single path is not sufficient. Participants had to generate multiple consecutive plans (metaplans)--for example: If the object is found in A, proceed to the destination; if the object is not found, proceed to B; and so on. The optimal solution depends on the specific probability matrix. In each condition, participants learned a different probability matrix and were then asked to report the optimal metaplan. Results demonstrate effective integration of the probabilistic information about the object's location during planning. We present a hierarchical planning scheme that could account for participants' behavior, as well as for systematic errors and differences between conditions.

  17. Challenging of path planning algorithms for autonomous robot in known environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, R. N.; Irwan, N.; Zuraida, Raja Lailatul; Shaharum, Umairah; Hanafi@Omar, Hafiz Mohd

    2014-06-01

    Most of the mobile robot path planning is estimated to reach its predetermined aim through the shortest path and avoiding the obstacles. This paper is a survey on path planning algorithms of various current research and existing system of Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV) where their challenging issues to be intelligent autonomous robot. The focuses are some short reviews on individual papers for UGV in the known environment. Methods and algorithms in path planning for the autonomous robot had been discussed. From the reviews, we obtained that the algorithms proposed are appropriate for some cases such as single or multiple obstacles, static or movement obstacle and optimal shortest path. This paper also describes some pros and cons for every reviewed paper toward algorithms improvement for further work.

  18. Deterministic Agent-Based Path Optimization by Mimicking the Spreading of Ripples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Ming; Leeson, Mark S; Di Paolo, Ezequiel A; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Inspirations from nature have contributed fundamentally to the development of evolutionary computation. Learning from the natural ripple-spreading phenomenon, this article proposes a novel ripple-spreading algorithm (RSA) for the path optimization problem (POP). In nature, a ripple spreads at a constant speed in all directions, and the node closest to the source is the first to be reached. This very simple principle forms the foundation of the proposed RSA. In contrast to most deterministic top-down centralized path optimization methods, such as Dijkstra's algorithm, the RSA is a bottom-up decentralized agent-based simulation model. Moreover, it is distinguished from other agent-based algorithms, such as genetic algorithms and ant colony optimization, by being a deterministic method that can always guarantee the global optimal solution with very good scalability. Here, the RSA is specifically applied to four different POPs. The comparative simulation results illustrate the advantages of the RSA in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. Thanks to the agent-based and deterministic features, the RSA opens new opportunities to attack some problems, such as calculating the exact complete Pareto front in multiobjective optimization and determining the kth shortest project time in project management, which are very difficult, if not impossible, for existing methods to resolve. The ripple-spreading optimization principle and the new distinguishing features and capacities of the RSA enrich the theoretical foundations of evolutionary computation.

  19. Applications to determine the shortest tower BTS distance using Dijkstra algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardana, Herwin; Maharani, Septya; Hatta, Heliza Rahmania

    2017-02-01

    Telecommunications Tower or so-called BTS (Base Transceiver System) Toweris one of the main components in the network infrastructure that has experienced an increase in the number of construction. Telecommunications tower function as a place to put the antenna signal transmitter (access network) to provide communication services to customers around the tower. In addition, other use of telecommunications tower also to place the transmission signal antenna (transport network using microwave technology) for connecting customers with a central area. Therefore, in needed of a decision support system that can provide recommendations planting route of fiber optic cable with the shortest distance in purpose the use of fiber optic cable becoming more efficient. The results of the research were the shortest rule information, showing the distance to be travelled and the map view to enabling users to look at these.

  20. Trajectory Generation and Path Planning for Autonomous Aerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Shivanjli; Kulczycki, Eric A.; Elfes, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents global path planning algorithms for the Titan aerobot based on user defined waypoints in 2D and 3D space. The algorithms were implemented using information obtained through a planner user interface. The trajectory planning algorithms were designed to accurately represent the aerobot's characteristics, such as minimum turning radius. Additionally, trajectory planning techniques were implemented to allow for surveying of a planar area based solely on camera fields of view, airship altitude, and the location of the planar area's perimeter. The developed paths allow for planar navigation and three-dimensional path planning. These calculated trajectories are optimized to produce the shortest possible path while still remaining within realistic bounds of airship dynamics.

  1. Time optimal paths for high speed maneuvering

    SciTech Connect

    Reister, D.B.; Lenhart, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical results have completely solved the problem of determining the minimum length path for a vehicle with a minimum turning radius moving from an initial configuration to a final configuration. Time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle are a subset of the minimum length paths. This paper uses the Pontryagin maximum principle to find time optimal paths for a constant speed vehicle. The time optimal paths consist of sequences of axes of circles and straight lines. The maximum principle introduces concepts (dual variables, bang-bang solutions, singular solutions, and transversality conditions) that provide important insight into the nature of the time optimal paths. We explore the properties of the optimal paths and present some experimental results for a mobile robot following an optimal path.

  2. PATHS groundwater hydrologic model

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.; Schur, J.A.

    1980-04-01

    A preliminary evaluation capability for two-dimensional groundwater pollution problems was developed as part of the Transport Modeling Task for the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP). Our approach was to use the data limitations as a guide in setting the level of modeling detail. PATHS Groundwater Hydrologic Model is the first level (simplest) idealized hybrid analytical/numerical model for two-dimensional, saturated groundwater flow and single component transport; homogeneous geology. This document consists of the description of the PATHS groundwater hydrologic model. The preliminary evaluation capability prepared for WISAP, including the enhancements that were made because of the authors' experience using the earlier capability is described. Appendixes A through D supplement the report as follows: complete derivations of the background equations are provided in Appendix A. Appendix B is a comprehensive set of instructions for users of PATHS. It is written for users who have little or no experience with computers. Appendix C is for the programmer. It contains information on how input parameters are passed between programs in the system. It also contains program listings and test case listing. Appendix D is a definition of terms.

  3. Representing anisotropic subduction zones with isotropic velocity models: A characterization of the problem and some steps on a possible path forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezada, M. J.; Faccenda, M.; Toomey, D. R.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the widely known fact that mantle flow in and around subduction zones produces the development of considerable seismic anisotropy, most P-wave tomography efforts still rely on the assumption of isotropy. In this study, we explore the potential effects of erroneous assumption on tomographic images and explore an alternative approach. We conduct a series of synthetic tomography tests based on a geodynamic simulation of subduction and rollback. The simulation results provide a self-consistent distribution of isotropic (thermal) anomalies and seismic anisotropy which we use to calculate synthetic delay times for a number of realistic and hypothetical event distributions. We find that anisotropy-induced artifacts are abundant and significant for teleseismic, local and mixed event distributions. The occurrence of artifacts is not reduced, and indeed can be exacerbated, by increasing richness in ray-path azimuths and incidence angles. The artifacts that we observe are, in all cases, important enough to significantly impact the interpretation of the images. We test an approach based on prescribing the anisotropy field as an a priori constraint and find that even coarse approximations to the true anisotropy field produce useful results. Using approximate anisotropy, fields can result in reduced RMS misfit to the travel time delays and reduced abundance and severity of imaging artifacts. We propose that the use of anisotropy fields derived from geodynamic modeling and constrained by seismic observables may constitute a viable alternative to isotropic tomography that does not require the inversion for anisotropy parameters in each node of the model.

  4. Paths from mother-child and father-child relationships to externalizing behavior problems in children differing in electrodermal reactivity: a longitudinal study from infancy to age 10.

    PubMed

    Kochanska, Grazyna; Brock, Rebecca L; Chen, Kuan-Hua; Aksan, Nazan; Anderson, Steven W

    2015-05-01

    Electrodermal hyporeactivity (or low skin conductance level, SCL) has been long established as a correlate of and diathesis for antisocial behavior, aggression, disregard for rules of conduct and feelings of others, and generally, externalizing behavior problems in children and adults. Much less is known, however, about how individual differences in children's SCL and qualities of their early experiences in relationships with parents interact to produce antisocial outcomes. In a community sample of 102 families (51 girls), we examined children's SCL, assessed in standard laboratory tasks at age 8 (N = 81), as a moderator of the links between parent-child socialization history and children's externalizing behavior problems at ages 8 and 10, reported by mothers and fathers in well-established instruments and by children in clinical interviews. Mother- and father-child socialization history was assessed in frequent, intensive observations. Parent-child mutually responsive orientation (MRO) was observed from infancy to age 10, parental power assertion was observed from 15 months to age 6 ½, and children reported their attachment security in interviews at age 8 and 10. For children with lower SCL, variations in mothers' power assertion and father-child MRO were associated with parent-rated externalizing problems. The former interaction was consistent with diathesis-stress, and the latter with differential susceptibility. For children with higher SCL, there were no links between socialization history and externalizing problems.

  5. Paths from Mother-Child and Father-Child Relationships to Externalizing Behavior Problems in Children Differing in Electrodermal Reactivity: a Longitudinal Study from Infancy to Age 10

    PubMed Central

    Kochanska, Grazyna; Brock, Rebecca L.; Chen, Kuan-Hua; Aksan, Nazan; Anderson, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Electrodermal hyporeactivity (or low skin conductance level, SCL) has been long established as a correlate of and diathesis for antisocial behavior, aggression, disregard for rules of conduct and feelings of others, and generally, externalizing behavior problems in children and adults. Much less is known, however, about how individual differences in children’s SCL and qualities of their early experiences in relationships with parents interact to produce antisocial outcomes. In a community sample of 102 families (51 girls), we examined children’s SCL, assessed in standard laboratory tasks at age 8 (N=81), as a moderator of the links between parent–child socialization history and children’s externalizing behavior problems at ages 8 and 10, reported by mothers and fathers in well-established instruments and by children in clinical interviews. Mother- and father-child socialization history was assessed in frequent, intensive observations. Parent–child mutually responsive orientation (MRO) was observed from infancy to age 10, parental power assertion was observed from 15 months to age 6 ½, and children reported their attachment security in interviews at age 8 and 10. For children with lower SCL, variations in mothers’ power assertion and father-child MRO were associated with parent-rated externalizing problems. The former interaction was consistent with diathesis-stress, and the latter with differential susceptibility. For children with higher SCL, there were no links between socialization history and externalizing problems. PMID:25218772

  6. The mixture problem in computer mapping of terrain: Improved techniques for establishing spectral signature, atmospheric path radiance, and transmittance. [in Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedes, H. W.; Hulstrom, R. L.; Ranson, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    The results of LANDSAT and Skylab research programs on the effects of the atmosphere on computer mapping of terrain include: (1) the concept of a ground truth map needs to be drastically revised; (2) the concept of training areas and test areas is not as simple as generally thought because of the problem of pixels that represent a mixture of terrain classes; (3) this mixture problem needs to be more widely recognized and dealt with by techniques of calculating spectral signatures of mixed classes, or by other methods; (4) atmospheric effects should be considered in computer mapping of terrain and in monitoring changes; and (5) terrain features may be used as calibration panels on the ground, from which atmospheric conditions can be determined and monitored. Results are presented of a test area in mountainous terrain of south-central Colorado for which an initial classification was made using simulated mixture-class spectral signatures and actual LANDSAT-1-MSS data.

  7. 4 x 4 optical cross-point packet switch matrix with minimized path-dependent optical gain.

    PubMed

    Varrazza, Riccardo; Djordjevic, Ivan B; Hill, Matthew; Yu, Siyuan

    2003-11-15

    Packet-switching characteristics are optimized across an integrated 4 x 4 optical cross-point switch matrix based on active vertical coupler switch cells. Optical gain is demonstrated across the entire matrix with a <3-dB difference between the shortest and longest switching paths.

  8. Representing the Nominal Path for an Interior Libration Point Orbit in the Sun-Earth+Moon Elliptic Restricted Three-Body Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-07

    the Sun -Earth+Moon Elliptic Restricted Three-Body Problem. Numerical integration is used to generate the periodic or quasi-periodic reference trajectories in this effort. The output of the routine will be numerical values for each of the six states (three position and three velocity) at each of the integration time steps. Linearization of both the equations of motion and of the equations representing the tracking solution assumes access to a continuous representation of the spacecraft’s orbit. Follow-on research that investigates tracking errors or station-keeping

  9. Pathfinder: Visual Analysis of Paths in Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Partl, C.; Gratzl, S.; Streit, M.; Wassermann, A. M.; Pfister, H.; Schmalstieg, D.; Lex, A.

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of paths in graphs is highly relevant in many domains. Typically, path-related tasks are performed in node-link layouts. Unfortunately, graph layouts often do not scale to the size of many real world networks. Also, many networks are multivariate, i.e., contain rich attribute sets associated with the nodes and edges. These attributes are often critical in judging paths, but directly visualizing attributes in a graph layout exacerbates the scalability problem. In this paper, we present visual analysis solutions dedicated to path-related tasks in large and highly multivariate graphs. We show that by focusing on paths, we can address the scalability problem of multivariate graph visualization, equipping analysts with a powerful tool to explore large graphs. We introduce Pathfinder (Figure 1), a technique that provides visual methods to query paths, while considering various constraints. The resulting set of paths is visualized in both a ranked list and as a node-link diagram. For the paths in the list, we display rich attribute data associated with nodes and edges, and the node-link diagram provides topological context. The paths can be ranked based on topological properties, such as path length or average node degree, and scores derived from attribute data. Pathfinder is designed to scale to graphs with tens of thousands of nodes and edges by employing strategies such as incremental query results. We demonstrate Pathfinder's fitness for use in scenarios with data from a coauthor network and biological pathways. PMID:27942090

  10. Gas-path seal technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    Improved gas-path seals are needed for better fuel economy, longer performance retention, and lower maintenance, particularly in advanced, high-performance gas turbine engines. Problems encountered in gas-path sealing are described, as well as new blade-tip sealing approaches for high-pressure compressors and turbines. These include a lubricant coating for conventional, porous-metal, rub-strip materials used in compressors. An improved hot-press metal alloy shows promise to increase the operating surface temperatures of high-pressure-turbine, blade-tip seals to 1450 K (2150 F). Three ceramic seal materials are also described that have the potential to allow much higher gas-path surface operating temperatures than are possible with metal systems.

  11. The absolute path command

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, A.

    2012-05-11

    The ap command traveres all symlinks in a given file, directory, or executable name to identify the final absolute path. It can print just the final path, each intermediate link along with the symlink chan, and the permissions and ownership of each directory component in the final path. It has functionality similar to "which", except that it shows the final path instead of the first path. It is also similar to "pwd", but it can provide the absolute path to a relative directory from the current working directory.

  12. Mass measurements of the shortest-lived nuclides à la MISTRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunney, D.; Vieira, N.; Audi, G.; Gaulard, C.; de Saint Simon, M.; Thibault, C.

    2006-04-01

    At Princeton in the 1960's, L.G. Smith invented an instrument of astonishing accuracy and rapid measurement time, derived from his so-called mass synchrometer. Using the same principle, a radiofrequency spectrometer was constructed in Orsay to measure masses of the shortest-lived nuclides at Cern's Isolde facility. Smith's spectrometer is now a museum piece, making the Orsay version (since baptized, MISTRAL) the sole example of such an instrument and the only one ever to be used on-line. Here we report on a measurement of the 65[thin space]ms half-life, NDZ nuclide performed with MISTRAL. The measured mass excess of [thin space]keV is compared with that obtained by ISOLTRAP, since independent measurements using different techniques assure a healthy gene pool for the recommended masses of the atomic mass evaluation. The nuclide is the heaviest for which a precise mass is of importance for the so-called Wigner energy. A discussion is presented concerning this Wigner energy, perhaps the last component of nuclear mass formulas resisting microscopic treatment.

  13. Why were Sardinians the shortest Europeans? A journey through genes, infections, nutrition, and sex.

    PubMed

    Pes, Giovanni Mario; Tognotti, Eugenia; Poulain, Michel; Chambre, Dany; Dore, Maria Pina

    2017-01-31

    Since ancient times the Mediterranean island of Sardinia has been known for harboring a population with an average body height shorter than almost every other ethnic group in Europe. After over a century of investigations, the cause(s) at the origin of this uniqueness are not yet clear. The shorter stature of Sardinians appears to have been documented since prehistoric times, as revealed by the analysis of skeletal remains discovered in archaeological sites on the island. Recently, a number of genetic, hormonal, environmental, infective and nutritional factors have been put forward to explain this unique anthropometric feature, which persisted for a long time, even when environmental and living conditions improved around 1960. Although some of the putative factors are supported by sound empirical evidence, weaker support is available for others. The recent advent of whole genome analysis techniques shed new light on specific variants at the origin of this short stature. However, the marked geographical variability of stature across time and space within the island, and the well-known presence of pockets of short height in the population of the southern districts, are still puzzling findings that have attracted the interest of anthropologists and geneticists. The purpose of this review is to focus on the state-of-the-art research on stature, as well as the factors that made Sardinians the shortest among Europeans.

  14. Using seafaring simulations and shortest-hop trajectories to model the prehistoric colonization of Remote Oceania.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Álvaro; Callaghan, Richard T; Fitzpatrick, Scott M

    2016-10-24

    The prehistoric colonization of islands in Remote Oceania that began ∼3400 B.P. represents what was arguably the most expansive and ambitious maritime dispersal of humans across any of the world's seas or oceans. Though archaeological evidence has provided a relatively clear picture of when many of the major island groups were colonized, there is still considerable debate as to where these settlers originated from and their strategies/trajectories used to reach habitable land that other datasets (genetic, linguistic) are also still trying to resolve. To address these issues, we have harnessed the power of high-resolution climatic and oceanographic datasets in multiple seafaring simulation platforms to examine major pulses of colonization in the region. Our analysis, which takes into consideration currents, land distribution, wind periodicity, the influence of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events, and "shortest-hop" trajectories, demonstrate that (i) seasonal and semiannual climatic changes were highly influential in structuring ancient Pacific voyaging; (ii) western Micronesia was likely settled from somewhere around the Maluku (Molucca) Islands; (iii) Samoa was the most probable staging area for the colonization of East Polynesia; and (iv) although there are major differences in success rates depending on time of year and the occurrence of ENSO events, settlement of Hawai'i and New Zealand is possible from the Marquesas or Society Islands, the same being the case for settlement of Easter Island from Mangareva or the Marquesas.

  15. Molecular definition of the shortest region of deletion overlap in the Langer-Giedion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Johnson, Carey; Wagner, Michael J.; Wells, Dan E.; Turleau, Catherine; Tommerup, Niels; Latos-Bielenska, Anna; Sandig, Klaus-Rainer; Meinecke, Peter; Zabel, Bernhard; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    1991-01-01

    The Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS), which is characterized by craniofacial dysmorphism and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by a genetic defect in 8q24.1. We have used 13 anonymous DNA markers from an 8q24.1-specific microdissection library, as well as c-myc and thyroglobulin gene probes, to map the deletion breakpoints in 16 patients with LGS. Twelve patients had a cytogenetically visible deletion, two patients had an apparently balanced translocation, and two patients had an apparently normal karyotype. In all cases except one translocation patient, loss of genetic material was detected. The DNA markers fall into 10 deletion intervals. Clone L48 (D8S51) defines the shortest region of deletion overlap (SRO), which is estimated to be less than 2 Mbp. Three clones–pl7-2.3EE (D8S43), L24 (D8S45), and L40 (D8S49)–which flank the SRO recognize evolutionarily conserved sequences. ImagesFigure 1Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:1836105

  16. Brief Announcement: A Stabilizing Algorithm for Finding Two Disjoint Paths in Arbitrary Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaata, Mehmet Hakan; Hadid, Rachid

    The problem of finding disjoint paths in a network is a fundamental problem with numerous applications. Two paths in a network are said to be (node) disjoint if they do not share any nodes except for the endpoints. The two node disjoint paths problem is to find two node-disjoint paths in G = (V,E) from source s ∈ V to the target t ∈ V . The two-node-disjoint paths problem is a fundamental problem with several applications in diverse areas including VLSI layout, reliable network routing, secure message transmission, and network survivability. The two node disjoint path problem is fundamental, extensively studied in graph theory.

  17. Laboratory considerations in rotational path removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Ivanhoe, J R

    2000-10-01

    Clinical indications and contraindications have been well covered in the literature for rotational path removable partial dentures (RPDs). However, only minimal coverage has been devoted to problems encountered that may prevent the proper fabrication of these restorations by dental technicians. The purpose of this article is to illustrate 2 problems that dental technicians occasionally encounter that make the fabrication of rotational path RPDs difficult or impossible. Design modifications by the clinician can eliminate 2 problems faced by technicians fabricating rotational path RPDs.

  18. A-star algorithm based path planning for the glasses-free three-dimensional display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Sang, Xinzhu; Xing, Shujun; Cui, Huilong; Yan, Binbin; Yu, Chongxiu; Dou, Wenhua; Xiao, Liquan

    2016-10-01

    A-Star (A*) algorithm is a heuristic directed search algorithm to evaluate the cost of moving along a particular path in the search space, which can get the shortest path. Here, path planning between any two points on the map is carried out. The STAGE tool is used to manually add way points on the map and determine their spatial location. The adjacent waypoint with a waypoint ID is connected by the line segment to form the navigation graph. A* algorithm can search the navigation graph to find the shortest path from a starting point to the destination. The A* algorithm can restart searching for path from a certain point, and the complex path can be divided in a plurality of frames. Since the navigation graph consists of the movable space, it is considered the obstacle formed by static objects in the scene, and collision detection between the character and static objects is not considered. A-star algorithm based path planning is experimentally demonstrated on a glasses-free three-dimensional display equipment, so that 3D effect of path finding can be perceived.

  19. AH Cam: A metal-rich RR Lyrae star with the shortest known Blazhko period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Horace A.; Matthews, Jaymie M.; Lee, Kevin M.; Williams, Jeffrey; Silbermann, N. A.; Bolte, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of 746 new V-band observations of the RR Lyrae star AH Cam obtained during 1989 - 1992 clearly show that its light curve cannot be described by a single period. In fact, at first glance, the Fourier spectrum of the photometry resembles that of a double-mode pulsator, with peaks at a fundamental period of 0.3686 d and an apparent secondary period of 0.2628 d. Nevertheless, the dual-mode solution is a poor fit to the data. Rather, we believe that AH Cam is a single-mode RR Lyrae star undergoing the Blazhko effect: periodic modulation of the amplitude and shape of its light curve. What was originally taken to be the period of the second mode is instead the 1-cycle/d alias of a modulation sidelobe in the Fourier spectrum. The data are well described by a modulation period of just under 11 d, which is the shortest Blazhko period reported to date in the literature and confirms the earlier suggestion by Goranskii. A low-resolution spectrum of AH Cam indicates that it is relatively metal rich, with delta-S less than or = 2. Its high metallicity and short modulation period may provide a critical test of at least one theory for the Blazhko effect. Moskalik's internal resonance model makes specific predictions of the growth rate of the fundamental model vs fundamental period. AH Cam falls outside the regime of other known Blazhko variables and resonance model predictions, but these are appropriate for metal-poor RR Lyrae stars. If the theory matches the behavior of AH Cam for a metal-rich stellar model, this would bolster the resonance hypothesis.

  20. Partial charge transfer in the shortest possible metallofullerene peapod, La@C82 ⊂[11]cycloparaphenylene.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takahiro; Slanina, Zdenek; Mizorogi, Naomi; Guo, Jingdong; Akasaka, Takeshi; Nagase, Shigeru; Takaya, Hikaru; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Kato, Tatsuhisa; Yamago, Shigeru

    2014-10-27

    [11]Cycloparaphenylene ([11]CPP) selectively encapsulates La@C82 to form the shortest possible metallofullerene-carbon nanotube (CNT) peapod, La@C82 ⊂[11]CPP, in solution and in the solid state. Complexation in solution was affected by the polarity of the solvent and was 16 times stronger in the polar solvent nitrobenzene than in the nonpolar solvent 1,2-dichlorobenzene. Electrochemical analysis revealed that the redox potentials of La@C82 were negatively shifted upon complexation from free La@C82 . Furthermore, the shifts in the redox potentials increased with polarity of the solvent. These results are consistent with formation of a polar complex, (La@C82 )(δ-) ⊂[11]CPP(δ+) , by partial electron transfer from [11]CPP to La@C82 . This is the first observation of such an electronic interaction between a fullerene pea and CPP pod. Theoretical calculations also supported partial charge transfer (0.07) from [11]CPP to La@C82 . The structure of the complex was unambiguously determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis, which showed the La atom inside the C82 near the periphery of the [11]CPP. The dipole moment of La@C82 was projected toward the CPP pea, nearly perpendicular to the CPP axis. The position of the La atom and the direction of the dipole moment in La@C82 ⊂[11]CPP were significantly different from those observed in La@C82 ⊂CNT, thus indicating a difference in orientation of the fullerene peas between fullerene-CPP and fullerene-CNT peapods. These results highlight the importance of pea-pea interactions in determining the orientation of the metallofullerene in metallofullerene-CNT peapods.

  1. A global path planning approach for redundant manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seereeram, Sanjeev; Wen, J.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach for global path planning of redundant manipulators is proposed. It poses the path planning problem as a finite time nonlinear control problem. The solution is found by a Newton-Raphson type algorithm. This technique is capable of handling various goal task descriptions as well as incorporating both joint and task space constraints. The algorithm has shown promising preliminary results in planning joint path sequences for 3R and 4R planar robots to meet Cartesian tip tracking and goal endpoint planning. It is robust with respect to local path planning problems such as singularity considerations and local minimum problems. Repetitive joint path solutions for cyclic end-effector tasks are also generated. Eventual goals of this work include implementation on full spatial robots, as well as provision of an interface for supervisory input to aid in path planning for more complex problems.

  2. Topological Path Planning in GPS Trajectory Data

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Padraig

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel solution to the problem of computing a set of topologically inequivalent paths between two points in a space given a set of samples drawn from that space. Specifically, these paths are homotopy inequivalent where homotopy is a topological equivalence relation. This is achieved by computing a basis for the group of homology inequivalent loops in the space. An additional distinct element is then computed where this element corresponds to a loop which passes through the points in question. The set of paths is subsequently obtained by taking the orbit of this element acted on by the group of homology inequivalent loops. Using a number of spaces, including a street network where the samples are GPS trajectories, the proposed method is demonstrated to accurately compute a set of homotopy inequivalent paths. The applications of this method include path and coverage planning. PMID:28009817

  3. A novel multi-segment path analysis based on a heterogeneous velocity model for the localization of acoustic emission sources in complex propagation media.

    PubMed

    Gollob, Stephan; Kocur, Georg Karl; Schumacher, Thomas; Mhamdi, Lassaad; Vogel, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    In acoustic emission analysis, common source location algorithms assume, independently of the nature of the propagation medium, a straight (shortest) wave path between the source and the sensors. For heterogeneous media such as concrete, the wave travels in complex paths due to the interaction with the dissimilar material contents and with the possible geometrical and material irregularities present in these media. For instance, cracks and large air voids present in concrete influence significantly the way the wave travels, by causing wave path deviations. Neglecting these deviations by assuming straight paths can introduce significant errors to the source location results. In this paper, a novel source localization method called FastWay is proposed. It accounts, contrary to most available shortest path-based methods, for the different effects of material discontinuities (cracks and voids). FastWay, based on a heterogeneous velocity model, uses the fastest rather than the shortest travel paths between the source and each sensor. The method was evaluated both numerically and experimentally and the results from both evaluation tests show that, in general, FastWay was able to locate sources of acoustic emissions more accurately and reliably than the traditional source localization methods.

  4. The universal path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Seth; Dreyer, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Path integrals calculate probabilities by summing over classical configurations of variables such as fields, assigning each configuration a phase equal to the action of that configuration. This paper defines a universal path integral, which sums over all computable structures. This path integral contains as sub-integrals all possible computable path integrals, including those of field theory, the standard model of elementary particles, discrete models of quantum gravity, string theory, etc. The universal path integral possesses a well-defined measure that guarantees its finiteness. The probabilities for events corresponding to sub-integrals can be calculated using the method of decoherent histories. The universal path integral supports a quantum theory of the universe in which the world that we see around us arises out of the interference between all computable structures.

  5. Pulled Motzkin paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse van Rensburg, E. J.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper the models of pulled Dyck paths in Janse van Rensburg (2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 215001) are generalized to pulled Motzkin path models. The generating functions of pulled Motzkin paths are determined in terms of series over trinomial coefficients and the elastic response of a Motzkin path pulled at its endpoint (see Orlandini and Whittington (2004 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 37 5305-14)) is shown to be R(f) = 0 for forces pushing the endpoint toward the adsorbing line and R(f) = f(1 + 2cosh f))/(2sinh f) → f as f → ∞, for forces pulling the path away from the X-axis. In addition, the elastic response of a Motzkin path pulled at its midpoint is shown to be R(f) = 0 for forces pushing the midpoint toward the adsorbing line and R(f) = f(1 + 2cosh (f/2))/sinh (f/2) → 2f as f → ∞, for forces pulling the path away from the X-axis. Formal combinatorial identities arising from pulled Motzkin path models are also presented. These identities are the generalization of combinatorial identities obtained in directed paths models to their natural trinomial counterparts.

  6. Path Integrals and Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2014-03-01

    1. Synopsis; Part I. Fundamental Principles: 2. The mathematical structure of quantum mechanics; 3. Operators; 4. The Feynman path integral; 5. Hamiltonian mechanics; 6. Path integral quantization; Part II. Stochastic Processes: 7. Stochastic systems; Part III. Discrete Degrees of Freedom: 8. Ising model; 9. Ising model: magnetic field; 10. Fermions; Part IV. Quadratic Path Integrals: 11. Simple harmonic oscillators; 12. Gaussian path integrals; Part V. Action with Acceleration: 13. Acceleration Lagrangian; 14. Pseudo-Hermitian Euclidean Hamiltonian; 15. Non-Hermitian Hamiltonian: Jordan blocks; 16. The quartic potential: instantons; 17. Compact degrees of freedom; Index.

  7. At-Least Version of the Generalized Minimum Spanning Tree Problem: Optimization Through Ant Colony System and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janich, Karl W.

    2005-01-01

    The At-Least version of the Generalized Minimum Spanning Tree Problem (L-GMST) is a problem in which the optimal solution connects all defined clusters of nodes in a given network at a minimum cost. The L-GMST is NPHard; therefore, metaheuristic algorithms have been used to find reasonable solutions to the problem as opposed to computationally feasible exact algorithms, which many believe do not exist for such a problem. One such metaheuristic uses a swarm-intelligent Ant Colony System (ACS) algorithm, in which agents converge on a solution through the weighing of local heuristics, such as the shortest available path and the number of agents that recently used a given path. However, in a network using a solution derived from the ACS algorithm, some nodes may move around to different clusters and cause small changes in the network makeup. Rerunning the algorithm from the start would be somewhat inefficient due to the significance of the changes, so a genetic algorithm based on the top few solutions found in the ACS algorithm is proposed to quickly and efficiently adapt the network to these small changes.

  8. Generic Equations for Constructing Smooth Paths Along Circles and Tangent Lines With Application to Airport Ground Paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. Keith

    1998-01-01

    The primary purpose of this publication is to develop a mathematical model to describe smooth paths along any combination of circles and tangent lines. Two consecutive circles in a path are either tangent (externally or internally) or they appear on the same (lateral) or opposite (transverse) sides of a connecting tangent line. A path may start or end on either a segment or circle. The approach is to use mathematics common to robotics to design the path as a multilink manipulator. This approach allows a hierarchical view of the problem and keeps the notation manageable. A user simply specifies a few parameters to configure a path. Necessary and sufficient conditions automatically ensure the consistency of the inputs for a smooth path. Two example runway exit paths are given, and an angle to go assists in knowing when to switch from one path element to the next.

  9. Practical path planning among movable obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang C.; Hwang, Yong K.

    1990-09-05

    Path planning among movable obstacles is a practical problem that is in need of a solution. In this paper an efficient heuristic algorithm that uses a generate-and-test paradigm: a good'' candidate path is hypothesized by a global planner and subsequently verified by a local planner. In the process of formalizing the problem, we also present a technique for modeling object interactions through contact. Our algorithm has been tested on a variety of examples, and was able to generate solutions within 10 seconds. 5 figs., 27 refs.

  10. Distributed multiple path routing in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang; Wang, San-Xiu; Wu, Ling-Wei; Mei, Pan; Yang, Xu-Hua; Wen, Guang-Hui

    2016-12-01

    Routing in complex transmission networks is an important problem that has garnered extensive research interest in the recent years. In this paper, we propose a novel routing strategy called the distributed multiple path (DMP) routing strategy. For each of the O-D node pairs in a given network, the DMP routing strategy computes and stores multiple short-length paths that overlap less with each other in advance. And during the transmission stage, it rapidly selects an actual routing path which provides low transmission cost from the pre-computed paths for each transmission task, according to the real-time network transmission status information. Computer simulation results obtained for the lattice, ER random, and scale-free networks indicate that the strategy can significantly improve the anti-congestion ability of transmission networks, as well as provide favorable routing robustness against partial network failures.

  11. A Path to Discovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegemoller, William; Stegemoller, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    The path taken and the turns made as a turtle traces a polygon are examined to discover an important theorem in geometry. A unique tool, the Angle Adder, is implemented in the investigation. (Contains 9 figures.)

  12. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Wheeler, David R.; Simonson, Robert J.

    2010-09-21

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  13. The path integral for dendritic trees.

    PubMed

    Abbott, L F; Farhi, E; Gutmann, S

    1991-01-01

    We construct the path integral for determining the potential on any dendritic tree described by a linear cable equation. This is done by generalizing Brownian motion from a line to a tree. We also construct the path integral for dendritic structures with spatially-varying and/or time-dependent membrane conductivities due, for example, to synaptic inputs. The path integral allows novel computational techniques to be applied to cable problems. Our analysis leads ultimately to an exact expression for the Green's function on a dendritic tree of arbitrary geometry expressed in terms of a set of simple diagrammatic rules. These rules providing a fast and efficient method for solving complex cable problems.

  14. Multi-Objective Ant Colony Optimization Based on the Physarum-Inspired Mathematical Model for Bi-Objective Traveling Salesman Problems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zili; Gao, Chao; Lu, Yuxiao; Liu, Yuxin; Liang, Mingxin

    2016-01-01

    Bi-objective Traveling Salesman Problem (bTSP) is an important field in the operations research, its solutions can be widely applied in the real world. Many researches of Multi-objective Ant Colony Optimization (MOACOs) have been proposed to solve bTSPs. However, most of MOACOs suffer premature convergence. This paper proposes an optimization strategy for MOACOs by optimizing the initialization of pheromone matrix with the prior knowledge of Physarum-inspired Mathematical Model (PMM). PMM can find the shortest route between two nodes based on the positive feedback mechanism. The optimized algorithms, named as iPM-MOACOs, can enhance the pheromone in the short paths and promote the search ability of ants. A series of experiments are conducted and experimental results show that the proposed strategy can achieve a better compromise solution than the original MOACOs for solving bTSPs. PMID:26751562

  15. Multi-Objective Ant Colony Optimization Based on the Physarum-Inspired Mathematical Model for Bi-Objective Traveling Salesman Problems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zili; Gao, Chao; Lu, Yuxiao; Liu, Yuxin; Liang, Mingxin

    2016-01-01

    Bi-objective Traveling Salesman Problem (bTSP) is an important field in the operations research, its solutions can be widely applied in the real world. Many researches of Multi-objective Ant Colony Optimization (MOACOs) have been proposed to solve bTSPs. However, most of MOACOs suffer premature convergence. This paper proposes an optimization strategy for MOACOs by optimizing the initialization of pheromone matrix with the prior knowledge of Physarum-inspired Mathematical Model (PMM). PMM can find the shortest route between two nodes based on the positive feedback mechanism. The optimized algorithms, named as iPM-MOACOs, can enhance the pheromone in the short paths and promote the search ability of ants. A series of experiments are conducted and experimental results show that the proposed strategy can achieve a better compromise solution than the original MOACOs for solving bTSPs.

  16. A modified reconfigurable data path processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesh, G.; Whitaker, S.; Maki, G.

    1991-01-01

    High throughput is an overriding factor dictating system performance. A configurable data processor is presented which can be modified to optimize performance for a wide class of problems. The new processor is specifically designed for arbitrary data path operations and can be dynamically reconfigured.

  17. Transition Path Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    vanden-Eijnden, E.

    The dynamical behavior of many systems arising in physics, chemistry, biology, etc. is dominated by rare but important transition events between long lived states. For over 70 years, transition state theory (TST) has provided the main theoretical framework for the description of these events [17,33,34]. Yet, while TST and evolutions thereof based on the reactive flux formalism [1, 5] (see also [30,31]) give an accurate estimate of the transition rate of a reaction, at least in principle, the theory tells very little in terms of the mechanism of this reaction. Recent advances, such as transition path sampling (TPS) of Bolhuis, Chandler, Dellago, and Geissler [3, 7] or the action method of Elber [15, 16], may seem to go beyond TST in that respect: these techniques allow indeed to sample the ensemble of reactive trajectories, i.e. the trajectories by which the reaction occurs. And yet, the reactive trajectories may again be rather uninformative about the mechanism of the reaction. This may sound paradoxical at first: what more than actual reactive trajectories could one need to understand a reaction? The problem, however, is that the reactive trajectories by themselves give only a very indirect information about the statistical properties of these trajectories. This is similar to why statistical mechanics is not simply a footnote in books about classical mechanics. What is the probability density that a trajectory be at a given location in state-space conditional on it being reactive? What is the probability current of these reactive trajectories? What is their rate of appearance? These are the questions of interest and they are not easy to answer directly from the ensemble of reactive trajectories. The right framework to tackle these questions also goes beyond standard equilibrium statistical mechanics because of the nontrivial bias that the very definition of the reactive trajectories imply - they must be involved in a reaction. The aim of this chapter is to

  18. Flux Control in Networks of Diffusion Paths

    SciTech Connect

    A. I. Zhmoginov and N. J. Fisch

    2009-07-08

    A class of optimization problems in networks of intersecting diffusion domains of a special form of thin paths has been considered. The system of equations describing stationary solutions is equivalent to an electrical circuit built of intersecting conductors. The solution of an optimization problem has been obtained and extended to the analogous electrical circuit. The interest in this network arises from, among other applications, an application to wave-particle diffusion through resonant interactions in plasma.

  19. Integrated assignment and path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphey, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    A surge of interest in unmanned systems has exposed many new and challenging research problems across many fields of engineering and mathematics. These systems have the potential of transforming our society by replacing dangerous and dirty jobs with networks of moving machines. This vision is fundamentally separate from the modern view of robotics in that sophisticated behavior is realizable not by increasing individual vehicle complexity, but instead through collaborative teaming that relies on collective perception, abstraction, decision making, and manipulation. Obvious examples where collective robotics will make an impact include planetary exploration, space structure assembly, remote and undersea mining, hazardous material handling and clean-up, and search and rescue. Nonetheless, the phenomenon driving this technology trend is the increasing reliance of the US military on unmanned vehicles, specifically, aircraft. Only a few years ago, following years of resistance to the use of unmanned systems, the military and civilian leadership in the United States reversed itself and have recently demonstrated surprisingly broad acceptance of increasingly pervasive use of unmanned platforms in defense surveillance, and even attack. However, as rapidly as unmanned systems have gained acceptance, the defense research community has discovered the technical pitfalls that lie ahead, especially for operating collective groups of unmanned platforms. A great deal of talent and energy has been devoted to solving these technical problems, which tend to fall into two categories: resource allocation of vehicles to objectives, and path planning of vehicle trajectories. An extensive amount of research has been conducted in each direction, yet, surprisingly, very little work has considered the integrated problem of assignment and path planning. This dissertation presents a framework for studying integrated assignment and path planning and then moves on to suggest an exact

  20. Detection of Deregulated Modules Using Deregulatory Linked Path

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yuxuan; Gao, Lin; Shi, Kai; Chiu, David K. Y.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of deregulated modules (such as induced by oncogenes) is a crucial step for exploring the pathogenic process of complex diseases. Most of the existing methods focus on deregulation of genes rather than the links of the path among them. In this study, we emphasize on the detection of deregulated links, and develop a novel and effective regulatory path-based approach in finding deregulated modules. Observing that a regulatory pathway between two genes might involve in multiple rather than a single path, we identify condition-specific core regulatory path (CCRP) to detect the significant deregulation of regulatory links. Using time-series gene expression, we define the regulatory strength within each gene pair based on statistical dependence analysis. The CCRPs in regulatory networks can then be identified using the shortest path algorithm. Finally, we derive the deregulated modules by integrating the differential edges (as deregulated links) of the CCRPs between the case and the control group. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, we apply the method to expression data associated with different states of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2). The experimental results show that the genes as well as the links in the deregulated modules are significantly enriched in multiple KEGG pathways and GO biological processes, most of which can be validated to suffer from impact of this oncogene based on previous studies. Additionally, we find the regulatory mechanism associated with the crucial gene SNAI1 significantly deregulated resulting from the activation of HER2. Hence, our method provides not only a strategy for detecting the deregulated links in regulatory networks, but also a way to identify concerning deregulated modules, thus contributing to the target selection of edgetic drugs. PMID:23894653

  1. Minimal entropy probability paths between genome families.

    PubMed

    Ahlbrandt, Calvin; Benson, Gary; Casey, William

    2004-05-01

    We develop a metric for probability distributions with applications to biological sequence analysis. Our distance metric is obtained by minimizing a functional defined on the class of paths over probability measures on N categories. The underlying mathematical theory is connected to a constrained problem in the calculus of variations. The solution presented is a numerical solution, which approximates the true solution in a set of cases called rich paths where none of the components of the path is zero. The functional to be minimized is motivated by entropy considerations, reflecting the idea that nature might efficiently carry out mutations of genome sequences in such a way that the increase in entropy involved in transformation is as small as possible. We characterize sequences by frequency profiles or probability vectors, in the case of DNA where N is 4 and the components of the probability vector are the frequency of occurrence of each of the bases A, C, G and T. Given two probability vectors a and b, we define a distance function based as the infimum of path integrals of the entropy function H( p) over all admissible paths p(t), 0 < or = t< or =1, with p(t) a probability vector such that p(0)=a and p(1)=b. If the probability paths p(t) are parameterized as y(s) in terms of arc length s and the optimal path is smooth with arc length L, then smooth and "rich" optimal probability paths may be numerically estimated by a hybrid method of iterating Newton's method on solutions of a two point boundary value problem, with unknown distance L between the abscissas, for the Euler-Lagrange equations resulting from a multiplier rule for the constrained optimization problem together with linear regression to improve the arc length estimate L. Matlab code for these numerical methods is provided which works only for "rich" optimal probability vectors. These methods motivate a definition of an elementary distance function which is easier and faster to calculate, works on non

  2. Path planning for everday robotics with SANDROS

    SciTech Connect

    Watterberg, P.; Xavier, P.; Hwang, Y.

    1997-02-01

    We discuss the integration of the SANDROS path planner into a general robot simulation and control package with the inclusion of a fast geometry engine for distance calculations. This creates a single system that allows the path to be computed, simulated, and then executed on the physical robot. The architecture and usage procedures are presented. Also, we present examples of its usage in typical environments found in our organization. The resulting system is as easy to use as the general simulation system (which is in common use here) and is fast enough (example problems are solved in seconds) to be used interactively on an everyday basis.

  3. Stochastic Evolutionary Algorithms for Planning Robot Paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang; Aghazarian, Hrand; Huntsberger, Terrance; Terrile, Richard

    2006-01-01

    A computer program implements stochastic evolutionary algorithms for planning and optimizing collision-free paths for robots and their jointed limbs. Stochastic evolutionary algorithms can be made to produce acceptably close approximations to exact, optimal solutions for path-planning problems while often demanding much less computation than do exhaustive-search and deterministic inverse-kinematics algorithms that have been used previously for this purpose. Hence, the present software is better suited for application aboard robots having limited computing capabilities (see figure). The stochastic aspect lies in the use of simulated annealing to (1) prevent trapping of an optimization algorithm in local minima of an energy-like error measure by which the fitness of a trial solution is evaluated while (2) ensuring that the entire multidimensional configuration and parameter space of the path-planning problem is sampled efficiently with respect to both robot joint angles and computation time. Simulated annealing is an established technique for avoiding local minima in multidimensional optimization problems, but has not, until now, been applied to planning collision-free robot paths by use of low-power computers.

  4. An Unplanned Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, Lynn M.; Sterenberg, Gladys Y.; Long, Julie S.

    2013-01-01

    The authors elucidate what they saw as three important challenges to overcome along the path to becoming elementary school mathematics teacher leaders: marginal interest in math, low self-confidence, and teaching in isolation. To illustrate how these challenges were mitigated, they focus on the stories of two elementary school teachers--Laura and…

  5. Gas path seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.; Johnson, R. D. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A gas path seal suitable for use with a turbine engine or compressor is described. A shroud wearable or abradable by the abrasion of the rotor blades of the turbine or compressor shrouds the rotor bades. A compliant backing surrounds the shroud. The backing is a yieldingly deformable porous material covered with a thin ductile layer. A mounting fixture surrounds the backing.

  6. Progress in Horizontal and Slant-Path Imaging Speckle Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, C J

    2003-01-30

    The difficulty in terrestrial imaging over long horizontal or slant paths is that atmospheric aberrations and distortions reduce the resolution and contrast in images recorded at high resolution. This paper will describe the problem of horizontal-path imaging, briefly cover various methods for imaging over horizontal paths and then describe the speckle imaging method actively being pursued at LLNL. We will review some closer range (1-3 km range) imagery of people we have already published, as well as show new results of vehicles we have obtained over longer slant-range paths greater than 20 km.

  7. Path-consistency: When space misses time

    SciTech Connect

    Chmeiss, A.; Jegou, P.

    1996-12-31

    Within the framework of constraint programming, particulary concerning the Constraint Satisfaction Problems (CSPs), the techniques of preprocessing based on filtering algorithms were shown to be very important for the search phase. In particular, two filtering methods have been studied, these methods exploit two properties of local consistency: arc- and path-consistency. Concerning the arc-consistency methods, there is a linear time algorithm (in the size of the problem) which is efficient in practice. But the limitations of the arc-consistency algorithms requires often filtering methods with higher order like path-consistency filterings. The best path-consistency algorithm proposed is PC-6, a natural generalization of AC-6 to path-consistency. Its time complexity is O(n{sup 3}d{sup 4}) and its space complexity is O(n{sup 3}d{sup 4}), where n is the number of variables and d is the size of domains. We have remarked that PC-6, though it is widely better than PC-4, was not very efficient in practice, specially for those classes of problems that require an important space to be run. Therefore, we propose here a new path-consistency algorithm called PC-7, its space complexity is O(n{sup 3}d{sup 4}) but its time complexity is O(n{sup 3}d{sup 4}) i.e. worse than that of PC-6. However, the simplicity of PC-7 as well as the data structures used for its implementation offer really a higher performance than PC-6. Furthermore, it turns out that when the size of domains is a constant of the problems, the time complexity of PC-7 becomes. like PC-6, optimal i.e. O(n{sup 3}).

  8. Entanglement by Path Identity.

    PubMed

    Krenn, Mario; Hochrainer, Armin; Lahiri, Mayukh; Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-02-24

    Quantum entanglement is one of the most prominent features of quantum mechanics and forms the basis of quantum information technologies. Here we present a novel method for the creation of quantum entanglement in multipartite and high-dimensional systems. The two ingredients are (i) superposition of photon pairs with different origins and (ii) aligning photons such that their paths are identical. We explain the experimentally feasible creation of various classes of multiphoton entanglement encoded in polarization as well as in high-dimensional Hilbert spaces-starting only from nonentangled photon pairs. For two photons, arbitrary high-dimensional entanglement can be created. The idea of generating entanglement by path identity could also apply to quantum entities other than photons. We discovered the technique by analyzing the output of a computer algorithm. This shows that computer designed quantum experiments can be inspirations for new techniques.

  9. Entanglement by Path Identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenn, Mario; Hochrainer, Armin; Lahiri, Mayukh; Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-02-01

    Quantum entanglement is one of the most prominent features of quantum mechanics and forms the basis of quantum information technologies. Here we present a novel method for the creation of quantum entanglement in multipartite and high-dimensional systems. The two ingredients are (i) superposition of photon pairs with different origins and (ii) aligning photons such that their paths are identical. We explain the experimentally feasible creation of various classes of multiphoton entanglement encoded in polarization as well as in high-dimensional Hilbert spaces—starting only from nonentangled photon pairs. For two photons, arbitrary high-dimensional entanglement can be created. The idea of generating entanglement by path identity could also apply to quantum entities other than photons. We discovered the technique by analyzing the output of a computer algorithm. This shows that computer designed quantum experiments can be inspirations for new techniques.

  10. Nonadiabatic transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, M. C.; Corcelli, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) is combined with transition path sampling (TPS) to produce a new method called nonadiabatic path sampling (NAPS). The NAPS method is validated on a model electron transfer system coupled to a Langevin bath. Numerically exact rate constants are computed using the reactive flux (RF) method over a broad range of solvent frictions that span from the energy diffusion (low friction) regime to the spatial diffusion (high friction) regime. The NAPS method is shown to quantitatively reproduce the RF benchmark rate constants over the full range of solvent friction. Integrating FSSH within the TPS framework expands the applicability of both approaches and creates a new method that will be helpful in determining detailed mechanisms for nonadiabatic reactions in the condensed-phase.

  11. PathMaster

    PubMed Central

    Mattie, Mark E.; Staib, Lawrence; Stratmann, Eric; Tagare, Hemant D.; Duncan, James; Miller, Perry L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Currently, when cytopathology images are archived, they are typically stored with a limited text-based description of their content. Such a description inherently fails to quantify the properties of an image and refers to an extremely small fraction of its information content. This paper describes a method for automatically indexing images of individual cells and their associated diagnoses by computationally derived cell descriptors. This methodology may serve to better index data contained in digital image databases, thereby enabling cytologists and pathologists to cross-reference cells of unknown etiology or nature. Design: The indexing method, implemented in a program called PathMaster, uses a series of computer-based feature extraction routines. Descriptors of individual cell characteristics generated by these routines are employed as indexes of cell morphology, texture, color, and spatial orientation. Measurements: The indexing fidelity of the program was tested after populating its database with images of 152 lymphocytes/lymphoma cells captured from lymph node touch preparations stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Images of “unknown” lymphoid cells, previously unprocessed, were then submitted for feature extraction and diagnostic cross-referencing analysis. Results: PathMaster listed the correct diagnosis as its first differential in 94 percent of recognition trials. In the remaining 6 percent of trials, PathMaster listed the correct diagnosis within the first three “differentials.” Conclusion: PathMaster is a pilot cell image indexing program/search engine that creates an indexed reference of images. Use of such a reference may provide assistance in the diagnostic/prognostic process by furnishing a prioritized list of possible identifications for a cell of uncertain etiology. PMID:10887168

  12. Chemotaxis can take plant-parasitic nematodes to the source of a chemo-attractant via the shortest possible routes

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Andy M.; Dutta, Tushar K.; Curtis, Rosane H. C.; Powers, Stephen J.; Gaur, Hari S.; Kerry, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that chemotaxis is the primary means by which nematodes locate host plants. Nonetheless, chemotaxis has received scant attention. We show that chemotaxis is predicted to take nematodes to a source of a chemo-attractant via the shortest possible routes through the labyrinth of air-filled or water-filled channels within a soil through which the attractant diffuses. There are just two provisos: (i) all of the channels through which the attractant diffuses are accessible to the nematodes and (ii) nematodes can resolve all chemical gradients no matter how small. Previously, this remarkable consequence of chemotaxis had gone unnoticed. The predictions are supported by experimental studies of the movement patterns of the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne incognita and Meloidogyne graminicola in modified Y-chamber olfactometers filled with Pluronic gel. By providing two routes to a source of the attractant, one long and one short, our experiments, the first to demonstrate the routes taken by nematodes to plant roots, serve to test our predictions. Our data show that nematodes take the most direct route to their preferred hosts (as predicted) but often take the longest route towards poor hosts. We hypothesize that a complex of repellent and attractant chemicals influences the interaction between nematodes and their hosts. PMID:20880854

  13. Chemotaxis can take plant-parasitic nematodes to the source of a chemo-attractant via the shortest possible routes.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Andy M; Dutta, Tushar K; Curtis, Rosane H C; Powers, Stephen J; Gaur, Hari S; Kerry, Brian R

    2011-04-06

    It has long been recognized that chemotaxis is the primary means by which nematodes locate host plants. Nonetheless, chemotaxis has received scant attention. We show that chemotaxis is predicted to take nematodes to a source of a chemo-attractant via the shortest possible routes through the labyrinth of air-filled or water-filled channels within a soil through which the attractant diffuses. There are just two provisos: (i) all of the channels through which the attractant diffuses are accessible to the nematodes and (ii) nematodes can resolve all chemical gradients no matter how small. Previously, this remarkable consequence of chemotaxis had gone unnoticed. The predictions are supported by experimental studies of the movement patterns of the root-knot nematodes Meloidogyne incognita and Meloidogyne graminicola in modified Y-chamber olfactometers filled with Pluronic gel. By providing two routes to a source of the attractant, one long and one short, our experiments, the first to demonstrate the routes taken by nematodes to plant roots, serve to test our predictions. Our data show that nematodes take the most direct route to their preferred hosts (as predicted) but often take the longest route towards poor hosts. We hypothesize that a complex of repellent and attractant chemicals influences the interaction between nematodes and their hosts.

  14. Tracking hurricane paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakaran, Nagarajan; Rishe, Naphtali; Athauda, Rukshan

    1997-01-01

    The South East coastal region experiences hurricane threat for almost six months in every year. To improve the accuracy of hurricane forecasts, meteorologists would need the storm paths of both the present and the past. A hurricane path can be established if we could identify the correct position of the storm at different times right from its birth to the end. We propose a method based on both spatial and temporal image correlations to locate the position of a storm from satellite images. During the hurricane season, the satellite images of the Atlantic ocean near the equator are examined for the hurricane presence. This is accomplished in two steps. In the first step, only segments with more than a particular value of cloud cover are selected for analysis. Next, we apply image processing algorithms to test the presence of a hurricane eye in the segment. If the eye is found, the coordinate of the eye is recorded along with the time stamp of the segment. If the eye is not found, we examine adjacent segments for the existence of hurricane eye. It is probable that more than one hurricane eye could be found from different segments of the same period. Hence, the above process is repeated till the entire potential area for hurricane birth is exhausted. The subsequent/previous position of each hurricane eye will be searched in the appropriate adjacent segments of the next/previous period to mark the hurricane path. The temporal coherence and spatial coherence of the images are taken into account by our scheme in determining the segments and the associated periods required for analysis.

  15. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decisionmaker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its content

  16. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decision maker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its

  17. Benefit of adaptive FEC in shared backup path protected elastic optical network.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Dai, Hua; Wang, Chao; Li, Yongcheng; Bose, Sanjay K; Shen, Gangxiang

    2015-07-27

    We apply an adaptive forward error correction (FEC) allocation strategy to an Elastic Optical Network (EON) operated with shared backup path protection (SBPP). To maximize the protected network capacity that can be carried, an Integer Linear Programing (ILP) model and a spectrum window plane (SWP)-based heuristic algorithm are developed. Simulation results show that the FEC coding overhead required by the adaptive FEC scheme is significantly lower than that needed by a fixed FEC allocation strategy resulting in higher network capacity for the adaptive strategy. The adaptive FEC allocation strategy can also significantly outperform the fixed FEC allocation strategy both in terms of the spare capacity redundancy and the average FEC coding overhead needed per optical channel. The proposed heuristic algorithm is efficient and not only performs closer to the ILP model but also does much better than the shortest-path algorithm.

  18. JAVA PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehhtz, Peter

    2005-01-01

    JPF is an explicit state software model checker for Java bytecode. Today, JPF is a swiss army knife for all sort of runtime based verification purposes. This basically means JPF is a Java virtual machine that executes your program not just once (like a normal VM), but theoretically in all possible ways, checking for property violations like deadlocks or unhandled exceptions along all potential execution paths. If it finds an error, JPF reports the whole execution that leads to it. Unlike a normal debugger, JPF keeps track of every step how it got to the defect.

  19. Portage and Path Dependence*

    PubMed Central

    Bleakley, Hoyt; Lin, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    We examine portage sites in the U.S. South, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwest, including those on the fall line, a geomorphological feature in the southeastern U.S. marking the final rapids on rivers before the ocean. Historically, waterborne transport of goods required portage around the falls at these points, while some falls provided water power during early industrialization. These factors attracted commerce and manufacturing. Although these original advantages have long since been made obsolete, we document the continuing importance of these portage sites over time. We interpret these results as path dependence and contrast explanations based on sunk costs interacting with decreasing versus increasing returns to scale. PMID:23935217

  20. Cornered Quadtrees/Octrees and Multiple Gateways Between Each Two Nodes; A Structure for Path Planning in 2D and 3D Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namdari, Mohammad Hasan; Hejazi, Seyed Reza; Palhang, Maziar

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, modified versions of quadtree/octree, as structures used in path planning, are proposed which we call them cornered quadtree/octree. Also a new method of creating paths in quadtrees/octrees, once quadrants/octants to be passed are determined, is proposed both to improve traveled distance and path smoothness. In proposed modified versions of quadtree/octree, four corner cells of quadrants and eight corner voxels of octants are also considered as nodes of the graph to be searched for finding the shortest path. This causes better quadrant/octant selection during graph search relative to simple quadtrees and octrees. On the other hand, after that all quadrants/octants are determined, multiple gateways are nominated between each two selected nodes and path is constructed by passing through the gateway which its selection leads in shorter and smoother path. Proposed structures in this paper alongside the utilized path construction approach, creates better paths in terms of path length than those created if simple trees are used, somehow equal to the quality of the achieved paths by framed trees, meanwhile interestingly, consumed time and memory in our proposed method are closer to the used time and memory if simple trees are used.

  1. Path Flow Estimation Using Time Varying Coefficient State Space Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, Yow-Jen; Lan, Chien-Lun

    2009-08-01

    The dynamic path flow information is very crucial in the field of transportation operation and management, i.e., dynamic traffic assignment, scheduling plan, and signal timing. Time-dependent path information, which is important in many aspects, is nearly impossible to be obtained. Consequently, researchers have been seeking estimation methods for deriving valuable path flow information from less expensive traffic data, primarily link traffic counts of surveillance systems. This investigation considers a path flow estimation problem involving the time varying coefficient state space model, Gibbs sampler, and Kalman filter. Numerical examples with part of a real network of the Taipei Mass Rapid Transit with real O-D matrices is demonstrated to address the accuracy of proposed model. Results of this study show that this time-varying coefficient state space model is very effective in the estimation of path flow compared to time-invariant model.

  2. Algorithms and Sensors for Small Robot Path Following

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogg, Robert W.; Rankin, Arturo L.; Roumeliotis, Stergios I.; McHenry, Michael C.; Helmick, Daniel M.; Bergh, Charles F.; Matthies, Larry

    2002-01-01

    Tracked mobile robots in the 20 kg size class are under development for applications in urban reconnaissance. For efficient deployment, it is desirable for teams of robots to be able to automatically execute path following behaviors, with one or more followers tracking the path taken by a leader. The key challenges to enabling such a capability are (l) to develop sensor packages for such small robots that can accurately determine the path of the leader and (2) to develop path following algorithms for the subsequent robots. To date, we have integrated gyros, accelerometers, compass/inclinometers, odometry, and differential GPS into an effective sensing package. This paper describes the sensor package, sensor processing algorithm, and path tracking algorithm we have developed for the leader/follower problem in small robots and shows the result of performance characterization of the system. We also document pragmatic lessons learned about design, construction, and electromagnetic interference issues particular to the performance of state sensors on small robots.

  3. Star-Paths, Stones and Horizon Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Bernadette

    2015-05-01

    Archaeoastronomers tend to approach ancient monuments focusing on the landscape and the horizon calendar events of sun and moon and, due to problems with precession, generally ignore the movement of the stars. However, locating the position of solar calendar points on the horizon can have other uses apart from calendar and/or cosmological purposes. This paper firstly suggests that the stars do not need to be ignored. By considering the evidence of the Phaenomena, a sky poem by Aratus of Soli, a third century BC Greek poet, and his use of second millennium BC star lore fragments, this paper argues that the stars were a part of the knowledge of horizon astronomy. Aratus' poem implied that the horizon astronomy of the late Neolithic and Bronze Age periods included knowledge of star-paths or 'linear constellations' that were defined by particular horizon calendar events and other azimuths. Knowledge of such star-paths would have enabled navigation and orientation, and by using permanent markers, constructed or natural, to define these paths, they were immune to precession as the stones could redefine a star-path for a future generation. Finally the paper presents other possible intentions behind the diverse orientation of passage tombs and some megalithic sites.

  4. Quad-rotor flight path energy optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Edward

    Quad-Rotor unmanned areal vehicles (UAVs) have been a popular area of research and development in the last decade, especially with the advent of affordable microcontrollers like the MSP 430 and the Raspberry Pi. Path-Energy Optimization is an area that is well developed for linear systems. In this thesis, this idea of path-energy optimization is extended to the nonlinear model of the Quad-rotor UAV. The classical optimization technique is adapted to the nonlinear model that is derived for the problem at hand, coming up with a set of partial differential equations and boundary value conditions to solve these equations. Then, different techniques to implement energy optimization algorithms are tested using simulations in Python. First, a purely nonlinear approach is used. This method is shown to be computationally intensive, with no practical solution available in a reasonable amount of time. Second, heuristic techniques to minimize the energy of the flight path are tested, using Ziegler-Nichols' proportional integral derivative (PID) controller tuning technique. Finally, a brute force look-up table based PID controller is used. Simulation results of the heuristic method show that both reliable control of the system and path-energy optimization are achieved in a reasonable amount of time.

  5. Damage detection using frequency shift path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longqi; Lie, Seng Tjhen; Zhang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel concept called FREquency Shift (FRESH) path to describe the dynamic behavior of structures with auxiliary mass. FRESH path combines the effects of frequency shifting and amplitude changing into one space curve, providing a tool for analyzing structure health status and properties. A damage index called FRESH curvature is then proposed to detect local stiffness reduction. FRESH curvature can be easily adapted for a particular problem since the sensitivity of the index can be adjusted by changing auxiliary mass or excitation power. An algorithm is proposed to adjust automatically the contribution from frequency and amplitude in the method. Because the extraction of FRESH path requires highly accurate frequency and amplitude estimators; therefore, a procedure based on discrete time Fourier transform is introduced to extract accurate frequency and amplitude with the time complexity of O (n log n), which is verified by simulation signals. Moreover, numerical examples with different damage sizes, severities and damping are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed damage index. In addition, applications of FRESH path on two steel beams with different damages are presented and the results show that the proposed method is valid and computational efficient.

  6. Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Sergei D.; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2003-06-01

    Molecular dynamics formulation of Bead-Fourier path integral method for simulation of quantum systems at finite temperatures is presented. Within this scheme, both the bead coordinates and Fourier coefficients, defining the path representing the quantum particle, are treated as generalized coordinates with corresponding generalized momenta and masses. Introduction of the Fourier harmonics together with the center-of-mass thermostating scheme is shown to remove the ergodicity problem, known to pose serious difficulties in standard path integral molecular dynamics simulations. The method is tested for quantum harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom (Coulombic potential). The simulation results are compared with the exact analytical solutions available for both these systems. Convergence of the results with respect to the number of beads and Fourier harmonics is analyzed. It was shown that addition of a few Fourier harmonics already improves the simulation results substantially, even for a relatively small number of beads. The proposed Bead-Fourier path integral molecular dynamics is a reliable and efficient alternative to simulations of quantum systems.

  7. Path Following in the Exact Penalty Method of Convex Programming

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Classical penalty methods solve a sequence of unconstrained problems that put greater and greater stress on meeting the constraints. In the limit as the penalty constant tends to ∞, one recovers the constrained solution. In the exact penalty method, squared penalties are replaced by absolute value penalties, and the solution is recovered for a finite value of the penalty constant. In practice, the kinks in the penalty and the unknown magnitude of the penalty constant prevent wide application of the exact penalty method in nonlinear programming. In this article, we examine a strategy of path following consistent with the exact penalty method. Instead of performing optimization at a single penalty constant, we trace the solution as a continuous function of the penalty constant. Thus, path following starts at the unconstrained solution and follows the solution path as the penalty constant increases. In the process, the solution path hits, slides along, and exits from the various constraints. For quadratic programming, the solution path is piecewise linear and takes large jumps from constraint to constraint. For a general convex program, the solution path is piecewise smooth, and path following operates by numerically solving an ordinary differential equation segment by segment. Our diverse applications to a) projection onto a convex set, b) nonnegative least squares, c) quadratically constrained quadratic programming, d) geometric programming, and e) semidefinite programming illustrate the mechanics and potential of path following. The final detour to image denoising demonstrates the relevance of path following to regularized estimation in inverse problems. In regularized estimation, one follows the solution path as the penalty constant decreases from a large value. PMID:26366044

  8. Path Following in the Exact Penalty Method of Convex Programming.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Classical penalty methods solve a sequence of unconstrained problems that put greater and greater stress on meeting the constraints. In the limit as the penalty constant tends to ∞, one recovers the constrained solution. In the exact penalty method, squared penalties are replaced by absolute value penalties, and the solution is recovered for a finite value of the penalty constant. In practice, the kinks in the penalty and the unknown magnitude of the penalty constant prevent wide application of the exact penalty method in nonlinear programming. In this article, we examine a strategy of path following consistent with the exact penalty method. Instead of performing optimization at a single penalty constant, we trace the solution as a continuous function of the penalty constant. Thus, path following starts at the unconstrained solution and follows the solution path as the penalty constant increases. In the process, the solution path hits, slides along, and exits from the various constraints. For quadratic programming, the solution path is piecewise linear and takes large jumps from constraint to constraint. For a general convex program, the solution path is piecewise smooth, and path following operates by numerically solving an ordinary differential equation segment by segment. Our diverse applications to a) projection onto a convex set, b) nonnegative least squares, c) quadratically constrained quadratic programming, d) geometric programming, and e) semidefinite programming illustrate the mechanics and potential of path following. The final detour to image denoising demonstrates the relevance of path following to regularized estimation in inverse problems. In regularized estimation, one follows the solution path as the penalty constant decreases from a large value.

  9. 757 Path Loss Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Kent; Huffman, Mitch; Eppic, Brian; White, Harrison

    2005-01-01

    Path Loss Measurements were obtained on three (3) GPS equipped 757 aircraft. Systems measured were Marker Beacon, LOC, VOR, VHF (3), Glide Slope, ATC (2), DME (2), TCAS, and GPS. This data will provide the basis for assessing the EMI (Electromagnetic Interference) safety margins of comm/nav (communication and navigation) systems to portable electronic device emissions. These Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) include all devices operated in or around the aircraft by crews, passengers, servicing personnel, as well as the general public in the airport terminals. EMI assessment capability is an important step in determining if one system-wide PED EMI policy is appropriate. This data may also be used comparatively with theoretical analysis and computer modeling data sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center and others.

  10. Interactive cutting path analysis programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, J. M.; Williams, D. S.; Colley, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The operation of numerically controlled machine tools is interactively simulated. Four programs were developed to graphically display the cutting paths for a Monarch lathe, Cintimatic mill, Strippit sheet metal punch, and the wiring path for a Standard wire wrap machine. These programs are run on a IMLAC PDS-ID graphic display system under the DOS-3 disk operating system. The cutting path analysis programs accept input via both paper tape and disk file.

  11. Path Planning For A Class Of Cutting Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavora, Jose

    1989-03-01

    Optimizing processing time in some contour-cutting operations requires solving the so-called no-load path problem. This problem is formulated and an approximate resolution method (based on heuristic search techniques) is described. Results for real-life instances (clothing layouts in the apparel industry) are presented and evaluated.

  12. MinePath: Mining for Phenotype Differential Sub-paths in Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Koumakis, Lefteris; Kartsaki, Evgenia; Chatzimina, Maria; Zervakis, Michalis; Vassou, Despoina; Marias, Kostas; Moustakis, Vassilis; Potamias, George

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis methodologies couple traditional gene expression analysis with knowledge encoded in established molecular pathway networks, offering a promising approach towards the biological interpretation of phenotype differentiating genes. Early pathway analysis methodologies, named as gene set analysis (GSA), view pathways just as plain lists of genes without taking into account either the underlying pathway network topology or the involved gene regulatory relations. These approaches, even if they achieve computational efficiency and simplicity, consider pathways that involve the same genes as equivalent in terms of their gene enrichment characteristics. Most recent pathway analysis approaches take into account the underlying gene regulatory relations by examining their consistency with gene expression profiles and computing a score for each profile. Even with this approach, assessing and scoring single-relations limits the ability to reveal key gene regulation mechanisms hidden in longer pathway sub-paths. We introduce MinePath, a pathway analysis methodology that addresses and overcomes the aforementioned problems. MinePath facilitates the decomposition of pathways into their constituent sub-paths. Decomposition leads to the transformation of single-relations to complex regulation sub-paths. Regulation sub-paths are then matched with gene expression sample profiles in order to evaluate their functional status and to assess phenotype differential power. Assessment of differential power supports the identification of the most discriminant profiles. In addition, MinePath assess the significance of the pathways as a whole, ranking them by their p-values. Comparison results with state-of-the-art pathway analysis systems are indicative for the soundness and reliability of the MinePath approach. In contrast with many pathway analysis tools, MinePath is a web-based system (www.minepath.org) offering dynamic and rich pathway visualization functionality, with the

  13. Reaction Path Optimization with Holonomic Constraints and Kinetic Energy Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Brokaw, Jason B.; Haas, Kevin R.; Chu, Jhih-wei

    2009-08-11

    Two methods are developed to enhance the stability, efficiency, and robustness of reaction path optimization using a chain of replicas. First, distances between replicas are kept equal during path optimization via holonomic constraints. Finding a reaction path is, thus, transformed into a constrained optimization problem. This approach avoids force projections for finding minimum energy paths (MEPs), and fast-converging schemes such as quasi-Newton methods can be readily applied. Second, we define a new objective function - the total Hamiltonian - for reaction path optimization, by combining the kinetic energy potential of each replica with its potential energy function. Minimizing the total Hamiltonian of a chain determines a minimum Hamiltonian path (MHP). If the distances between replicas are kept equal and a consistent force constant is used, then the kinetic energy potentials of all replicas have the same value. The MHP in this case is the most probable isokinetic path. Our results indicate that low-temperature kinetic energy potentials (<5 K) can be used to prevent the development of kinks during path optimization and can significantly reduce the required steps of minimization by 2-3 times without causing noticeable differences between a MHP and MEP. These methods are applied to three test cases, the C₇eq-to-Cax isomerization of an alanine dipeptide, the ⁴C₁- to-¹C₄ transition of an α-D-glucopyranose, and the helix-to-sheet transition of a GNNQQNY heptapeptide. By applying the methods developed in this work, convergence of reaction path optimization can be achieved for these complex transitions, involving full atomic details and a large number of replicas (>100). For the case of helix-to-sheet transition, we identify pathways whose energy barriers are consistent with experimental measurements. Further, we develop a method based on the work energy theorem to quantify the accuracy of reaction paths and to determine whether the atoms used to define a

  14. Reaction Path Optimization with Holonomic Constraints and Kinetic Energy Potentials.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, Jason B; Haas, Kevin R; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2009-08-11

    Two methods are developed to enhance the stability, efficiency, and robustness of reaction path optimization using a chain of replicas. First, distances between replicas are kept equal during path optimization via holonomic constraints. Finding a reaction path is, thus, transformed into a constrained optimization problem. This approach avoids force projections for finding minimum energy paths (MEPs), and fast-converging schemes such as quasi-Newton methods can be readily applied. Second, we define a new objective function - the total Hamiltonian - for reaction path optimization, by combining the kinetic energy potential of each replica with its potential energy function. Minimizing the total Hamiltonian of a chain determines a minimum Hamiltonian path (MHP). If the distances between replicas are kept equal and a consistent force constant is used, then the kinetic energy potentials of all replicas have the same value. The MHP in this case is the most probable isokinetic path. Our results indicate that low-temperature kinetic energy potentials (<5 K) can be used to prevent the development of kinks during path optimization and can significantly reduce the required steps of minimization by 2-3 times without causing noticeable differences between a MHP and MEP. These methods are applied to three test cases, the C7eq-to-Cax isomerization of an alanine dipeptide, the (4)C1-to-(1)C4 transition of an α-d-glucopyranose, and the helix-to-sheet transition of a GNNQQNY heptapeptide. By applying the methods developed in this work, convergence of reaction path optimization can be achieved for these complex transitions, involving full atomic details and a large number of replicas (>100). For the case of helix-to-sheet transition, we identify pathways whose energy barriers are consistent with experimental measurements. Further, we develop a method based on the work energy theorem to quantify the accuracy of reaction paths and to determine whether the atoms used to define a path

  15. An introduction to critical paths.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Richard J; Richards, Janet S; Remmert, Carl S; LeRoy, Sarah S; Schoville, Rhonda R; Baldwin, Phyllis J

    2005-01-01

    A critical path defines the optimal sequencing and timing of interventions by physicians, nurses, and other staff for a particular diagnosis or procedure. Critical paths are developed through collaborative efforts of physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and others to improve the quality and value of patient care. They are designed to minimize delays and resource utilization and to maximize quality of care. Critical paths have been shown to reduce variation in the care provided, facilitate expected outcomes, reduce delays, reduce length of stay, and improve cost-effectiveness. The approach and goals of critical paths are consistent with those of total quality management (TQM) and can be an important part of an organization's TQM process.

  16. Adaptive Path Selection for Link Loss Inference in Network Tomography Applications

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yan; Jiao, Jun; Rao, Yuan; Ma, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we address the problem of selecting the optimal end-to-end paths for link loss inference in order to improve the performance of network tomography applications, which infer the link loss rates from the path loss rates. Measuring the path loss rates using end-to-end probing packets may incur additional traffic overheads for networks, so it is important to select the minimum path set carefully while maximizing their performance. The usual approach is to select the maximum independent paths from the candidates simultaneously, while the other paths can be replaced by linear combinations of them. However, this approach ignores the fact that many paths always exist that do not lose any packets, and thus it is easy to determine that all of the links of these paths also have 0 loss rates. Not considering these good paths will inevitably lead to inefficiency and high probing costs. Thus, we propose an adaptive path selection method that selects paths sequentially based on the loss rates of previously selected paths. We also propose a theorem as well as a graph construction and decomposition approach to efficiently find the most valuable path during each round of selection. Our new method significantly outperforms the classical path selection method based on simulations in terms of the probing cost, number of accurate links determined, and the running speed. PMID:27701447

  17. Decision paths in complex tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, Eugene

    1991-01-01

    Complex real world action and its prediction and control has escaped analysis by the classical methods of psychological research. The reason is that psychologists have no procedures to parse complex tasks into their constituents. Where such a division can be made, based say on expert judgment, there is no natural scale to measure the positive or negative values of the components. Even if we could assign numbers to task parts, we lack rules i.e., a theory, to combine them into a total task representation. We compare here two plausible theories for the amalgamation of the value of task components. Both of these theories require a numerical representation of motivation, for motivation is the primary variable that guides choice and action in well-learned tasks. We address this problem of motivational quantification and performance prediction by developing psychophysical scales of the desireability or aversiveness of task components based on utility scaling methods (Galanter 1990). We modify methods used originally to scale sensory magnitudes (Stevens and Galanter 1957), and that have been applied recently to the measure of task 'workload' by Gopher and Braune (1984). Our modification uses utility comparison scaling techniques which avoid the unnecessary assumptions made by Gopher and Braune. Formula for the utility of complex tasks based on the theoretical models are used to predict decision and choice of alternate paths to the same goal.

  18. Path-integral approach to lattice polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilovitch, P. E.

    2007-06-01

    The basic principles behind a path integral approach to the lattice polaron are reviewed. Analytical integration of phonons reduces the problem to one self-interacting imaginary-time path, which is then simulated by Metropolis Monte Carlo. Projection operators separate states of different symmetry, which provides access to various excited states. Shifted boundary conditions in imaginary time enable calculation of the polaron mass, spectrum and density of states. Other polaron characteristics accessible by the method include the polaron energy, number of excited phonons and isotope exponent on mass. Monte Carlo updates are formulated in continuous imaginary time on infinite lattices and as such provide statistically unbiased results without finite-size and finite time-step errors. Numerical data are presented for models with short-range and long-range electron-phonon interactions.

  19. Two arm robot path planning in a static environment using polytopes and string stretching. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schima, Francis J., III

    1990-01-01

    The two arm robot path planning problem has been analyzed and reduced into components to be simplified. This thesis examines one component in which two Puma-560 robot arms are simultaneously holding a single object. The problem is to find a path between two points around obstacles which is relatively fast and minimizes the distance. The thesis involves creating a structure on which to form an advanced path planning algorithm which could ideally find the optimum path. An actual path planning method is implemented which is simple though effective in most common situations. Given the limits of computer technology, a 'good' path is currently found. Objects in the workspace are modeled with polytopes. These are used because they can be used for rapid collision detection and still provide a representation which is adequate for path planning.

  20. Path Analysis: A Brief Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carducci, Bernardo J.

    Path analysis is presented as a technique that can be used to test on a priori model based on a theoretical conceptualization involving a network of selected variables. This being an introductory source, no previous knowledge of path analysis is assumed, although some understanding of the fundamentals of multiple regression analysis might be…

  1. Reconfigurable data path processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohoe, Gregory (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A reconfigurable data path processor comprises a plurality of independent processing elements. Each of the processing elements advantageously comprising an identical architecture. Each processing element comprises a plurality of data processing means for generating a potential output. Each processor is also capable of through-putting an input as a potential output with little or no processing. Each processing element comprises a conditional multiplexer having a first conditional multiplexer input, a second conditional multiplexer input and a conditional multiplexer output. A first potential output value is transmitted to the first conditional multiplexer input, and a second potential output value is transmitted to the second conditional multiplexer output. The conditional multiplexer couples either the first conditional multiplexer input or the second conditional multiplexer input to the conditional multiplexer output, according to an output control command. The output control command is generated by processing a set of arithmetic status-bits through a logical mask. The conditional multiplexer output is coupled to a first processing element output. A first set of arithmetic bits are generated according to the processing of the first processable value. A second set of arithmetic bits may be generated from a second processing operation. The selection of the arithmetic status-bits is performed by an arithmetic-status bit multiplexer selects the desired set of arithmetic status bits from among the first and second set of arithmetic status bits. The conditional multiplexer evaluates the select arithmetic status bits according to logical mask defining an algorithm for evaluating the arithmetic status bits.

  2. Modelling of radiative transfer by the Monte Carlo method and solving the inverse problem based on a genetic algorithm according to experimental results of aerosol sensing on short paths using a femtosecond laser source

    SciTech Connect

    Matvienko, G G; Oshlakov, V K; Sukhanov, A Ya; Stepanov, A N

    2015-02-28

    We consider the algorithms that implement a broadband ('multiwave') radiative transfer with allowance for multiple (aerosol) scattering and absorption by main atmospheric gases. In the spectral range of 0.6 – 1 μm, a closed numerical simulation of modifications of the supercontinuum component of a probing femtosecond pulse is performed. In the framework of the algorithms for solving the inverse atmospheric-optics problems with the help of a genetic algorithm, we give an interpretation of the experimental backscattered spectrum of the supercontinuum. An adequate reconstruction of the distribution mode for the particles of artificial aerosol with the narrow-modal distributions in a size range of 0.5 – 2 mm and a step of 0.5 mm is obtained. (light scattering)

  3. Collabortive Authoring of Walden's Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanling; Bogen II, Paul Logasa; Pogue, Daniel; Furuta, Richard Keith; Shipman, Frank Major

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a prototype of an authoring tool to allow users to collaboratively build, annotate, manage, share and reuse collections of distributed resources from the World Wide Web. This extends on the Walden’s Path project’s work to help educators bring resources found on the World Wide Web into a linear contextualized structure. The introduction of collaborative authoring feature fosters collaborative learning activities through social interaction among participants, where participants can coauthor paths in groups. Besides, the prototype supports path sharing, branching and reusing; specifically, individual participant can contribute to the group with private collections of knowledge resources; paths completed by group can be shared among group members, such that participants can tailor, extend, reorder and/or replace nodes to have sub versions of shared paths for different information needs.

  4. Perturbative Methods in Path Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-Freyd, Theodore Paul

    This dissertation addresses a number of related questions concerning perturbative "path" integrals. Perturbative methods are one of the few successful ways physicists have worked with (or even defined) these infinite-dimensional integrals, and it is important as mathematicians to check that they are correct. Chapter 0 provides a detailed introduction. We take a classical approach to path integrals in Chapter 1. Following standard arguments, we posit a Feynman-diagrammatic description of the asymptotics of the time-evolution operator for the quantum mechanics of a charged particle moving nonrelativistically through a curved manifold under the influence of an external electromagnetic field. We check that our sum of Feynman diagrams has all desired properties: it is coordinate-independent and well-defined without ultraviolet divergences, it satisfies the correct composition law, and it satisfies Schrodinger's equation thought of as a boundary-value problem in PDE. Path integrals in quantum mechanics and elsewhere in quantum field theory are almost always of the shape ∫ f es for some functions f (the "observable") and s (the "action"). In Chapter 2 we step back to analyze integrals of this type more generally. Integration by parts provides algebraic relations between the values of ∫ (-) es for different inputs, which can be packaged into a Batalin--Vilkovisky-type chain complex. Using some simple homological perturbation theory, we study the version of this complex that arises when f and s are taken to be polynomial functions, and power series are banished. We find that in such cases, the entire scheme-theoretic critical locus (complex points included) of s plays an important role, and that one can uniformly (but noncanonically) integrate out in a purely algebraic way the contributions to the integral from all "higher modes," reducing ∫ f es to an integral over the critical locus. This may help explain the presence of analytic continuation in questions like the

  5. Integrated flight path planning system and flight control system for unmanned helicopters.

    PubMed

    Jan, Shau Shiun; Lin, Yu Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the design of an integrated navigation and guidance system for unmanned helicopters. The integrated navigation system comprises two systems: the Flight Path Planning System (FPPS) and the Flight Control System (FCS). The FPPS finds the shortest flight path by the A-Star (A*) algorithm in an adaptive manner for different flight conditions, and the FPPS can add a forbidden zone to stop the unmanned helicopter from crossing over into dangerous areas. In this paper, the FPPS computation time is reduced by the multi-resolution scheme, and the flight path quality is improved by the path smoothing methods. Meanwhile, the FCS includes the fuzzy inference systems (FISs) based on the fuzzy logic. By using expert knowledge and experience to train the FIS, the controller can operate the unmanned helicopter without dynamic models. The integrated system of the FPPS and the FCS is aimed at providing navigation and guidance to the mission destination and it is implemented by coupling the flight simulation software, X-Plane, and the computing software, MATLAB. Simulations are performed and shown in real time three-dimensional animations. Finally, the integrated system is demonstrated to work successfully in controlling the unmanned helicopter to operate in various terrains of a digital elevation model (DEM).

  6. A Flight Examination of Operating Problems of V/STOL Aircraft in STOL-Type Landing and Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Innis, Robert C.; Quigley, Hervey C.

    1961-01-01

    A flight investigation has been conducted using a large twin-engine cargo aircraft to isolate the problems associated with operating propeller-driven aircraft in the STOL speed range where appreciable engine power is used to augment aerodynamic lift. The problems considered would also be representative of those of a large overloaded VTOL aircraft operating in an STOL manner with comparable thrust-to-weight ratios. The study showed that operation at low approach speeds was compromised by the necessity of maintaining high thrust to generate high lift and yet achieving the low lift-drag ratios needed for steep descents. The useable range of airspeed and flight path angle was limited by the pilot's demand for a positive climb margin at the approach speed, a suitable stall margin, and a control and/or performance margin for one engine inoperative. The optimum approach angle over an obstacle was found to be a compromise between obtaining the shortest air distance and the lowest touchdown velocity. In order to realize the greatest low-speed potential from STOL designs, the stability and control characteristics must be satisfactory.

  7. One-dimensional Gromov minimal filling problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexandr O.; Tuzhilin, Alexey A.

    2012-05-01

    The paper is devoted to a new branch in the theory of one-dimensional variational problems with branching extremals, the investigation of one-dimensional minimal fillings introduced by the authors. On the one hand, this problem is a one-dimensional version of a generalization of Gromov's minimal fillings problem to the case of stratified manifolds. On the other hand, this problem is interesting in itself and also can be considered as a generalization of another classical problem, the Steiner problem on the construction of a shortest network connecting a given set of terminals. Besides the statement of the problem, we discuss several properties of the minimal fillings and state several conjectures. Bibliography: 38 titles.

  8. Privacy-Preserving Relationship Path Discovery in Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzour, Ghita; Perrig, Adrian; Gligor, Virgil; Papadimitratos, Panos

    As social networks sites continue to proliferate and are being used for an increasing variety of purposes, the privacy risks raised by the full access of social networking sites over user data become uncomfortable. A decentralized social network would help alleviate this problem, but offering the functionalities of social networking sites is a distributed manner is a challenging problem. In this paper, we provide techniques to instantiate one of the core functionalities of social networks: discovery of paths between individuals. Our algorithm preserves the privacy of relationship information, and can operate offline during the path discovery phase. We simulate our algorithm on real social network topologies.

  9. An expert path through a thermo maze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustusch, Mary Bridget; Roundy, David; Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    Several studies in recent years have demonstrated that upper-division students struggle with partial derivatives and the complicated chain rules ubiquitous in thermodynamics. We asked several experts (primarily faculty who teach thermodynamics) to solve a challenging and novel thermodynamics problem in order to understand how they navigate through this maze. What we found was a tremendous variety in solution strategies and sense-making tools, both within and between individuals. This case study focuses on one particular expert: his solution paths, use of sense-making tools, and comparison of different approaches.

  10. Predicting link directions using local directed path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Xue; Zhao, Chengli; Xie, Zheng; Zhang, Shengjun; Yi, Dongyun

    2015-02-01

    Link prediction in directed network is attracting growing interest among many network scientists. Compared with predicting the existence of a link, determining its direction is more complicated. In this paper, we propose an efficient solution named Local Directed Path to predict link direction. By adding an extra ground node to the network, we solve the information loss problem in sparse network, which makes our method effective and robust. As a quasi-local method, our method can deal with large-scale networks in a reasonable time. Empirical analysis on real networks shows that our method can correctly predict link directions, which outperforms some local and global methods.

  11. Path integration in desert ants, Cataglyphis fortis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Martin; Wehner, Rüdiger

    1988-01-01

    Foraging desert ants, Cataglyphis fortis, continually keep track of their own posotions relative to home— i.e., integrate their tortuous outbound routes and return home along straight (inbound) routes. By experimentally manipulating the ants' outbound trajectories we show that the ants solve this path integration problem not by performing a true vector summation (as a human navigator does) but by employing a computationally simple approximation. This approximation is characterized by small, but systematic, navigational errors that helped us elucidate the ant's way of computing its mean home vector. PMID:16593958

  12. The Traveling Salesman and Related Stochastic Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percus, A. G.

    1998-03-01

    In the traveling salesman problem, one must find the length of the shortest closed tour visiting given ``cities''. We study the stochastic version of the problem, taking the locations of cities and the distances separating them to be random variables drawn from an ensemble. We consider first the ensemble where cities are placed in Euclidean space. We investigate how the optimum tour length scales with number of cities and with number of spatial dimensions. We then examine the analytical theory behind the random link ensemble, where distances between cities are independent random variables. Finally, we look at the related geometric issue of nearest neighbor distances, and find some remarkable universalities.

  13. Deriving multiple near-optimal solutions to deterministic reservoir operation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pan; Cai, Ximing; Guo, Shenglian

    2011-08-01

    Even deterministic reservoir operation problems with a single objective function may have multiple near-optimal solutions (MNOS) whose objective values are equal or sufficiently close to the optimum. MNOS is valuable for practical reservoir operation decisions because having a set of alternatives from which to choose allows reservoir operators to explore multiple options whereas the traditional algorithm that produces a single optimum does not offer them this flexibility. This paper presents three methods: the near-shortest paths (NSP) method, the genetic algorithm (GA) method, and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, to explore the MNOS. These methods, all of which require a long computation time, find MNOS using different approaches. To reduce the computation time, a narrower subspace, namely a near-optimal space (NOSP, described by the maximum and minimum bounds of MNOS) is derived. By confining the MNOS search within the NOSP, the computation time of the three methods is reduced. The proposed methods are validated with a test function before they are examined with case studies of both a single reservoir (the Three Gorges Reservoir in China) and a multireservoir system (the Qing River Cascade Reservoirs in China). It is found that MNOS exists for the deterministic reservoir operation problems. When comparing the three methods, the NSP method is unsuitable for large-scale problems but provides a benchmark to which solutions of small- and medium-scale problems can be compared. The GA method can produce some MNOS but is not very efficient in terms of the computation time. Finally, the MCMC method performs best in terms of goodness-of-fit to the benchmark and computation time, since it yields a wide variety of MNOS based on all retained intermediate results as potential MNOS. Two case studies demonstrate that the MNOS identified in this study are useful for real-world reservoir operation, such as the identification of important operation time periods and

  14. PCB Drill Path Optimization by Combinatorial Cuckoo Search Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Wei Chen Esmonde; Kanagaraj, G.; Ponnambalam, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of drill path can lead to significant reduction in machining time which directly improves productivity of manufacturing systems. In a batch production of a large number of items to be drilled such as printed circuit boards (PCB), the travel time of the drilling device is a significant portion of the overall manufacturing process. To increase PCB manufacturing productivity and to reduce production costs, a good option is to minimize the drill path route using an optimization algorithm. This paper reports a combinatorial cuckoo search algorithm for solving drill path optimization problem. The performance of the proposed algorithm is tested and verified with three case studies from the literature. The computational experience conducted in this research indicates that the proposed algorithm is capable of efficiently finding the optimal path for PCB holes drilling process. PMID:24707198

  15. PCB drill path optimization by combinatorial cuckoo search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wei Chen Esmonde; Kanagaraj, G; Ponnambalam, S G

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of drill path can lead to significant reduction in machining time which directly improves productivity of manufacturing systems. In a batch production of a large number of items to be drilled such as printed circuit boards (PCB), the travel time of the drilling device is a significant portion of the overall manufacturing process. To increase PCB manufacturing productivity and to reduce production costs, a good option is to minimize the drill path route using an optimization algorithm. This paper reports a combinatorial cuckoo search algorithm for solving drill path optimization problem. The performance of the proposed algorithm is tested and verified with three case studies from the literature. The computational experience conducted in this research indicates that the proposed algorithm is capable of efficiently finding the optimal path for PCB holes drilling process.

  16. Practical and conceptual path sampling issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolhuis, P. G.; Dellago, C.

    2015-09-01

    In the past 15 years transition path sampling (TPS) has evolved from its basic algorithm to an entire collection of methods and a framework for investigating rare events in complex systems. The methodology is applicable to a wide variety of systems and processes, ranging from transitions in small clusters or molecules to chemical reactions, phase transitions, and conformational changes in biomolecules. The basic idea of TPS is to harvest dynamical unbiased trajectories that connect a reactant with a product, by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure called shooting. This simple importance sampling yields the rate constants, the free energy surface, insight in the mechanism of the rare event of interest, and by using the concept of the committor, also access to the reaction coordinate. In the last decade extensions to TPS have been developed, notably the transition interface sampling (TIS) methods, and its generalization multiple state TIS. Combination with advanced sampling methods such as replica exchange and the Wang-Landau algorithm, among others, improves sampling efficiency. Notwithstanding the success of TPS, there are issues left to discuss, and, despite the method's apparent simplicity, many pitfalls to avoid. This paper discusses several of these issues and pitfalls: the choice of stable states and interface order parameters, the problem of positioning the TPS windows and TIS interfaces, the matter of convergence of the path ensemble, the matter of kinetic traps, and the question whether TPS is able to investigate and sample Markov state models. We also review the reweighting technique used to join path ensembles. Finally we discuss the use of the sampled path ensemble to obtain reaction coordinates.

  17. Measurements of isocenter path characteristics of the gantry rotation axis with a smartphone application

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefer, H. Peters, S.; Plasswilm, L.; Ingulfsen, N.; Kluckert, J.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: For stereotactic radiosurgery, the AAPM Report No. 54 [AAPM Task Group 42 (AAPM, 1995)] requires the overall stability of the isocenter (couch, gantry, and collimator) to be within a 1 mm radius. In reality, a rotating system has no rigid axis and thus no isocenter point which is fixed in space. As a consequence, the isocenter concept is reviewed here. It is the aim to develop a measurement method following the revised definitions. Methods: The mechanical isocenter is defined here by the point which rotates on the shortest path in the room coordinate system. The path is labeled as “isocenter path.” Its center of gravity is assumed to be the mechanical isocenter. Following this definition, an image-based and radiation-free measurement method was developed. Multiple marker pairs in a plane perpendicular to the assumed gantry rotation axis of a linear accelerator are imaged with a smartphone application from several rotation angles. Each marker pair represents an independent measuring system. The room coordinates of the isocenter path and the mechanical isocenter are calculated based on the marker coordinates. The presented measurement method is by this means strictly focused on the mechanical isocenter. Results: The measurement result is available virtually immediately following completion of measurement. When 12 independent measurement systems are evaluated, the standard deviations of the isocenter path points and mechanical isocenter coordinates are 0.02 and 0.002 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The measurement is highly accurate, time efficient, and simple to adapt. It is therefore suitable for regular checks of the mechanical isocenter characteristics of the gantry and collimator rotation axis. When the isocenter path is reproducible and its extent is in the range of the needed geometrical accuracy, it should be taken into account in the planning process. This is especially true for stereotactic treatments and radiosurgery.

  18. An Introduction to Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Lee M.

    1977-01-01

    The analytical procedure of path analysis is described in terms of its use in nonexperimental settings in the social sciences. The description assumes a moderate statistical background on the part of the reader. (JKS)

  19. Scattering theory with path integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfelder, R.

    2014-03-15

    Starting from well-known expressions for the T-matrix and its derivative in standard nonrelativistic potential scattering, I rederive recent path-integral formulations due to Efimov and Barbashov et al. Some new relations follow immediately.

  20. A Bat Algorithm with Mutation for UCAV Path Planning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gaige; Guo, Lihong; Duan, Hong; Liu, Luo; Wang, Heqi

    2012-01-01

    Path planning for uninhabited combat air vehicle (UCAV) is a complicated high dimension optimization problem, which mainly centralizes on optimizing the flight route considering the different kinds of constrains under complicated battle field environments. Original bat algorithm (BA) is used to solve the UCAV path planning problem. Furthermore, a new bat algorithm with mutation (BAM) is proposed to solve the UCAV path planning problem, and a modification is applied to mutate between bats during the process of the new solutions updating. Then, the UCAV can find the safe path by connecting the chosen nodes of the coordinates while avoiding the threat areas and costing minimum fuel. This new approach can accelerate the global convergence speed while preserving the strong robustness of the basic BA. The realization procedure for original BA and this improved metaheuristic approach BAM is also presented. To prove the performance of this proposed metaheuristic method, BAM is compared with BA and other population-based optimization methods, such as ACO, BBO, DE, ES, GA, PBIL, PSO, and SGA. The experiment shows that the proposed approach is more effective and feasible in UCAV path planning than the other models. PMID:23365518

  1. Heuristic optimization of the scanning path of particle therapy beams.

    PubMed

    Pardo, J; Donetti, M; Bourhaleb, F; Ansarinejad, A; Attili, A; Cirio, R; Garella, M A; Giordanengo, S; Givehchi, N; La Rosa, A; Marchetto, F; Monaco, V; Pecka, A; Peroni, C; Russo, G; Sacchi, R

    2009-06-01

    Quasidiscrete scanning is a delivery strategy for proton and ion beam therapy in which the beam is turned off when a slice is finished and a new energy must be set but not during the scanning between consecutive spots. Different scanning paths lead to different dose distributions due to the contribution of the unintended transit dose between spots. In this work an algorithm to optimize the scanning path for quasidiscrete scanned beams is presented. The classical simulated annealing algorithm is used. It is a heuristic algorithm frequently used in combinatorial optimization problems, which allows us to obtain nearly optimal solutions in acceptable running times. A study focused on the best choice of operational parameters on which the algorithm performance depends is presented. The convergence properties of the algorithm have been further improved by using the next-neighbor algorithm to generate the starting paths. Scanning paths for two clinical treatments have been optimized. The optimized paths are found to be shorter than the back-and-forth, top-to-bottom (zigzag) paths generally provided by the treatment planning systems. The gamma method has been applied to quantify the improvement achieved on the dose distribution. Results show a reduction of the transit dose when the optimized paths are used. The benefit is clear especially when the fluence per spot is low, as in the case of repainting. The minimization of the transit dose can potentially allow the use of higher beam intensities, thus decreasing the treatment time. The algorithm implemented for this work can optimize efficiently the scanning path of quasidiscrete scanned particle beams. Optimized scanning paths decrease the transit dose and lead to better dose distributions.

  2. Seismic refraction analysis: the path forward

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Zelt, Colin; Doll, William

    2012-01-01

    Seismic Refraction Methods: Unleashing the Potential and Understanding the Limitations; Tucson, Arizona, 29 March 2012 A workshop focused on seismic refraction methods took place on 29 May 2012, associated with the 2012 Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems. This workshop was convened to assess the current state of the science and discuss paths forward, with a primary focus on near-surface problems but with an eye on all applications. The agenda included talks on these topics from a number of experts interspersed with discussion and a dedicated discussion period to finish the day. Discussion proved lively at times, and workshop participants delved into many topics central to seismic refraction work.

  3. Adaptive path planning: Algorithm and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pang C.

    1993-03-01

    Path planning has to be fast to support real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To alleviate this problem, we present a learning algorithm that uses past experience to enhance future performance. The algorithm relies on an existing path planner to provide solutions to difficult tasks. From these solutions, an evolving sparse network of useful subgoals is learned to support faster planning. The algorithm is suitable for both stationary and incrementally-changing environments. To analyze our algorithm, we use a previously developed stochastic model that quantifies experience utility. Using this model, we characterize the situations in which the adaptive planner is useful, and provide quantitative bounds to predict its behavior. The results are demonstrated with problems in manipulator planning. Our algorithm and analysis are sufficiently general that they may also be applied to task planning or other planning domains in which experience is useful.

  4. Efficient algorithms for finding disjoint paths in grids

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wun-Tat; Chin, F.Y.L.

    1997-06-01

    The reconfiguration problem on VLSI/WSI processor arrays in the presence of faulty processors can be stated as the following integral multi-source routing problem: Given a set of N nodes (faulty processors or sources) in am m x n rectangular grid where m, n {le} N, the problem to be solved is to connect the N nodes to distinct nodes at the grid boundary using a set of {open_quotes}disjoint{close_quotes} paths. This problem can be referred to as an escape problem which can be solved trivially in O(mnN) time. By exploiting all the properties of the network, planarity and regularity of a grid, integral flow, and unit capacity source/sink/flow, we can optimally compress the size of the grid from O(mn) to O({radical}mnN) and solve the problem in O(d{radical}mnN), where d is the maximum number of disjoint paths found, for both the edge-disjoint and vertex-disjoint cases. In the worst case, d, m, n are O(N) and the result is O(N{sup 2.5}). Note that this routing problem can also be solved with the same time complexity even if the disjoint paths have to be ended at another set of N nodes (sinks) in the grid instead of the grid boundary.

  5. Quantum path analysis of high-order above-threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopold, R.; Becker, W.; Kleber, M.

    2000-05-01

    High-order above-threshold ionization spectra are calculated via an improved Keldysh approximation that takes rescattering into account. An approximate method of evaluating the crucial multidimensional integral proceeds via the saddle point method. The saddle points define complex orbits in position space that depart from the ion and return to it to rescatter. The real parts of these orbits are very closely related to the trajectories of the simple-man model. The spectra are analyzed in terms of these quantum orbits whose constructive and destructive interferences generate the spectrum's intricate structures. In most spectral regions, the six trajectories having the shortest travel times between start and return already provide an excellent approximation to the exact calculation. In exceptional cases, more orbits are required. The quantum orbits provide an illuminating illustration of the quantum mechanical path integral.

  6. Best Mitigation Paths To Effectively Reduce Earth's Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegman, Bruce M.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some ways to reduce the problem posed by debris in orbit around the Earth. It reviews the orbital debris environment, the near-term needs to minimize the Kessler syndrome, also known as collisional cascading, a survey of active orbital debris mitigation strategies, the best paths to actively remove orbital debris, and technologies that are required for active debris mitigation.

  7. Construction of Optimal-Path Maps for Homogeneous-Cost-Region Path-Planning Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    209 ’,cond ((null (aref *cell* YtiYn II I IC Kew -cell not explored (setf (acef *ccll* i:z Yr. 1) ;,-’et, and Is not an obstacle, Center-ceXl...School Monterey, CA 93943 2 Dr. Donald R. Barr Valuation Technology, Inc. 6800 Garden Road Monterey, CA 93940 2 Dr. Robert B. McGhee, Code 52Mz

  8. Optimizing and "Pessimizing": Human Performance with Instructional Variants of the Traveling Salesperson Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle, Edward; MacGregor, James; Ormerod, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The two-dimensional Traveling Salesperson Problem (TSP) requires finding the shortest tour through n locations. Untrained adults are adept at the task and reliably outperform simple construction algorithms for n= 60. Performance may stem from a specific inherent ability. Alternatively, it may reflect general spatial intelligence, whether inherent…

  9. Manifest variable path analysis: potentially serious and misleading consequences due to uncorrected measurement error.

    PubMed

    Cole, David A; Preacher, Kristopher J

    2014-06-01

    Despite clear evidence that manifest variable path analysis requires highly reliable measures, path analyses with fallible measures are commonplace even in premier journals. Using fallible measures in path analysis can cause several serious problems: (a) As measurement error pervades a given data set, many path coefficients may be either over- or underestimated. (b) Extensive measurement error diminishes power and can prevent invalid models from being rejected. (c) Even a little measurement error can cause valid models to appear invalid. (d) Differential measurement error in various parts of a model can change the substantive conclusions that derive from path analysis. (e) All of these problems become increasingly serious and intractable as models become more complex. Methods to prevent and correct these problems are reviewed. The conclusion is that researchers should use more reliable measures (or correct for measurement error in the measures they do use), obtain multiple measures for use in latent variable modeling, and test simpler models containing fewer variables.

  10. Innovative development path of ethnomedicines: the interpretation of the path.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaoyun; Fu, Dehuan; Gui, Yali; Cui, Tao; Wang, Jingkun; Wang, Ting; Yang, Zhizhong; Niu, Yanfei; She, Zhennan; Wang, Li

    2017-03-01

    One of the primary purposes of the innovative development of ethnomedicines is to use their excellent safety and significant efficacy to serve a broader population. To achieve this purpose, modern scientific and technological means should be referenced, and relevant national laws and regulations as well as technical guides should be strictly followed to develop standards and to perform systemic research in producing ethnomedicines. Finally, ethnomedicines, which are applied to a limited extent in ethnic areas, can be transformed into safe, effective, and quality-controllable medical products to relieve the pain of more patients. The innovative development path of ethnomedicines includes the following three primary stages: resource study, standardized development research, and industrialization of the achievements and efforts for internationalization. The implementation of this path is always guaranteed by the research and development platform and the talent team. This article is based on the accumulation of long-term practice and is combined with the relevant disciplines, laws and regulations, and technical guidance from the research and development of ethnomedicines. The intention is to perform an in-depth analysis and explanation of the major research thinking, methods, contents, and technical paths involved in all stages of the innovative development path of ethnomedicines to provide useful references for the development of proper ethnomedicine use.

  11. Speckle Imaging Over Horizontal Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, C J

    2002-05-21

    Atmospheric aberrations reduce the resolution and contrast in surveillance images recorded over horizontal or slant paths. This paper describes our recent horizontal and slant path imaging experiments of extended scenes as well as the results obtained using speckle imaging. The experiments were performed with an 8-inch diameter telescope placed on either a rooftop or hillside and cover ranges of interest from 0.5 km up to 10 km. The scenery includes resolution targets, people, vehicles, and other structures. The improvement in image quality using speckle imaging is dramatic in many cases, and depends significantly upon the atmospheric conditions. We quantify resolution improvement through modulation transfer function measurement comparisons.

  12. Multiple paths in complex tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galanter, Eugene; Wiegand, Thomas; Mark, Gloria

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between utility judgments of subtask paths and the utility of the task as a whole was examined. The convergent validation procedure is based on the assumption that measurements of the same quantity done with different methods should covary. The utility measures of the subtasks were obtained during the performance of an aircraft flight controller navigation task. Analyses helped decide among various models of subtask utility combination, whether the utility ratings of subtask paths predict the whole tasks utility rating, and indirectly, whether judgmental models need to include the equivalent of cognitive noise.

  13. UAV path planning using artificial potential field method updated by optimal control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong-bo; Luo, Guan-chen; Mei, Yue-song; Yu, Jian-qiao; Su, Xiao-long

    2016-04-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) path planning problem is an important assignment in the UAV mission planning. Based on the artificial potential field (APF) UAV path planning method, it is reconstructed into the constrained optimisation problem by introducing an additional control force. The constrained optimisation problem is translated into the unconstrained optimisation problem with the help of slack variables in this paper. The functional optimisation method is applied to reform this problem into an optimal control problem. The whole transformation process is deduced in detail, based on a discrete UAV dynamic model. Then, the path planning problem is solved with the help of the optimal control method. The path following process based on the six degrees of freedom simulation model of the quadrotor helicopters is introduced to verify the practicability of this method. Finally, the simulation results show that the improved method is more effective in planning path. In the planning space, the length of the calculated path is shorter and smoother than that using traditional APF method. In addition, the improved method can solve the dead point problem effectively.

  14. Light transport on path-space manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Wenzel Alban

    -stepping limitations of the theory, they often suffer from unusably slow convergence; improvements to this situation have been hampered by the lack of a thorough theoretical understanding. We address these problems by developing a new theory of path-space light transport which, for the first time, cleanly incorporates specular scattering into the standard framework. Most of the results obtained in the analysis of the ideally smooth case can also be generalized to rendering of glossy materials and volumetric scattering so that this dissertation also provides a powerful new set of tools for dealing with them. The basis of our approach is that each specular material interaction locally collapses the dimension of the space of light paths so that all relevant paths lie on a submanifold of path space. We analyze the high-dimensional differential geometry of this submanifold and use the resulting information to construct an algorithm that is able to "walk" around on it using a simple and efficient equation-solving iteration. This manifold walking algorithm then constitutes the key operation of a new type of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) rendering method that computes lighting through very general families of paths that can involve arbitrary combinations of specular, near-specular, glossy, and diffuse surface interactions as well as isotropic or highly anisotropic volume scattering. We demonstrate our implementation on a range of challenging scenes and evaluate it against previous methods.

  15. Free energies from integral equation theories: enforcing path independence.

    PubMed

    Kast, Stefan M

    2003-04-01

    A variational formalism is constructed for deriving the chemical potential and the Helmholtz free energy in various statistical-mechanical integral equation theories of fluids. Nonzero bridge functions extending the scope of the theories beyond the hypernetted chain approximation can be classified as to whether or not they imply path dependence of the free energy. Classes of bridge functions free of the path dependence problem are derived, based on which a route is devised toward direct computation of free energies from the simulation of a single state.

  16. Relationship between total quality management, critical paths, and outcomes management.

    PubMed

    Lynn, P A

    1996-09-01

    Total quality management (TQM), clinical paths, and outcomes management are high-profile strategies in today's health care environment. Each strategy is distinct, yet there are interrelationships among them. TQM supports a customer-focused organizational culture, providing tools and techniques to identify and solve problems. Clinical paths are tools for enhancing patient care coordination and for identifying system-wide and patient population specific issues. Outcomes management is an integrated system for measuring the results in patient populations over time. There is a recent shift in outcomes measurement towards expanding both the nature of the outcomes examined and the timeframes in which they are studied.

  17. A general NMPC framework for a diesel engine air path

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murilo, André; Alamir, Mazen; Alberer, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the formulation of a parameterised nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) scheme to be applied on a diesel engine air path. The most important feature of the proposed controller is that it uses no structural properties of the system model. Therefore, the proposed NMPC scheme can be applied to any nonlinear system, leading to a general framework for a diesel engine air path. Moreover, the computational burden is substantially reduced due to an optimisation problem of low dimension obtained by means of the parameterised approach. Simulation results and an experimental validation are presented in order to emphasise the controller's efficiency and the real-time implementability.

  18. Career Paths in Environmental Sciences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Career paths, current and future, in the environmental sciences will be discussed, based on experiences and observations during the author's 40 + years in the field. An emphasis will be placed on the need for integrated, transdisciplinary systems thinking approaches toward achie...

  19. SSME propellant path leak detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Roger; Shohadaee, Ahmad Ali

    1989-01-01

    The complicated high-pressure cycle of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) propellant path provides many opportunities for external propellant path leaks while the engine is running. This mode of engine failure may be detected and analyzed with sufficient speed to save critical engine test hardware from destruction. The leaks indicate hardware failures which will damage or destroy an engine if undetected; therefore, detection of both cryogenic and hot gas leaks is the objective of this investigation. The primary objective of this phase of the investigation is the experimental validation of techniques for detecting and analyzing propellant path external leaks which have a high probability of occurring on the SSME. The selection of candidate detection methods requires a good analytic model for leak plumes which would develop from external leaks and an understanding of radiation transfer through the leak plume. One advanced propellant path leak detection technique is obtained by using state-of-the-art technology infrared (IR) thermal imaging systems combined with computer, digital image processing, and expert systems for the engine protection. The feasibility of IR leak plume detection is evaluated on subscale simulated laboratory plumes to determine sensitivity, signal to noise, and general suitability for the application.

  20. Career Path of School Superintendents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertz, Norma T.; McNeely, Sonja R.

    This study of the career paths of 147 Tennessee school superintendents sought to determine to what extent coaching and principalships are routes to that office. The majority of respondents were white males; only one was black, and 10 were female. The data were analyzed by group, race, sex, years in office, and method of selection (elected or…

  1. Employer Resource Manual. Project Path.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Karen R.; Del George, Eve

    Project Path at Illinois' College of DuPage was established to provide pre-employment training and career counseling for disabled students. To encourage the integration of qualified individuals with disabilities into the workplace, the project compiled this resource manual for area businesses, providing tips for interacting with disabled people…

  2. Perceived Shrinkage of Motion Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinico, Michele; Parovel, Giulia; Casco, Clara; Anstis, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    We show that human observers strongly underestimate a linear or circular trajectory that a luminous spot follows in the dark. At slow speeds, observers are relatively accurate, but, as the speed increases, the size of the path is progressively underestimated, by up to 35%. The underestimation imposes little memory load and does not require…

  3. Solving the Curriculum Sequencing Problem with DNA Computing Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debbah, Amina; Ben Ali, Yamina Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In the e-learning systems, a learning path is known as a sequence of learning materials linked to each others to help learners achieving their learning goals. As it is impossible to have the same learning path that suits different learners, the Curriculum Sequencing problem (CS) consists of the generation of a personalized learning path for each…

  4. Path Integral Monte Carlo Methods for Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ethan, Ethan; Dubois, Jonathan; Ceperley, David

    2014-03-01

    In general, Quantum Monte Carlo methods suffer from a sign problem when simulating fermionic systems. This causes the efficiency of a simulation to decrease exponentially with the number of particles and inverse temperature. To circumvent this issue, a nodal constraint is often implemented, restricting the Monte Carlo procedure from sampling paths that cause the many-body density matrix to change sign. Unfortunately, this high-dimensional nodal surface is not a priori known unless the system is exactly solvable, resulting in uncontrolled errors. We will discuss two possible routes to extend the applicability of finite-temperatue path integral Monte Carlo. First we extend the regime where signful simulations are possible through a novel permutation sampling scheme. Afterwards, we discuss a method to variationally improve the nodal surface by minimizing a free energy during simulation. Applications of these methods will include both free and interacting electron gases, concluding with discussion concerning extension to inhomogeneous systems. Support from DOE DE-FG52-09NA29456, DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL LDRD 10- ERD-058, and the Lawrence Scholar program.

  5. Aircraft Engine Gas Path Diagnostic Methods: Public Benchmarking Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Borguet, Sebastien; Leonard, Olivier; Zhang, Xiaodong (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of aircraft engine health management (EHM) technologies. To help address this issue, a gas path diagnostic benchmark problem has been created and made publicly available. This software tool, referred to as the Propulsion Diagnostic Method Evaluation Strategy (ProDiMES), has been constructed based on feedback provided by the aircraft EHM community. It provides a standard benchmark problem enabling users to develop, evaluate and compare diagnostic methods. This paper will present an overview of ProDiMES along with a description of four gas path diagnostic methods developed and applied to the problem. These methods, which include analytical and empirical diagnostic techniques, will be described and associated blind-test-case metric results will be presented and compared. Lessons learned along with recommendations for improving the public benchmarking processes will also be presented and discussed.

  6. Benchmarking Gas Path Diagnostic Methods: A Public Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Donald L.; Bird, Jeff; Davison, Craig; Volponi, Al; Iverson, R. Eugene

    2008-01-01

    Recent technology reviews have identified the need for objective assessments of engine health management (EHM) technology. The need is two-fold: technology developers require relevant data and problems to design and validate new algorithms and techniques while engine system integrators and operators need practical tools to direct development and then evaluate the effectiveness of proposed solutions. This paper presents a publicly available gas path diagnostic benchmark problem that has been developed by the Propulsion and Power Systems Panel of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) to help address these needs. The problem is coded in MATLAB (The MathWorks, Inc.) and coupled with a non-linear turbofan engine simulation to produce "snap-shot" measurements, with relevant noise levels, as if collected from a fleet of engines over their lifetime of use. Each engine within the fleet will experience unique operating and deterioration profiles, and may encounter randomly occurring relevant gas path faults including sensor, actuator and component faults. The challenge to the EHM community is to develop gas path diagnostic algorithms to reliably perform fault detection and isolation. An example solution to the benchmark problem is provided along with associated evaluation metrics. A plan is presented to disseminate this benchmark problem to the engine health management technical community and invite technology solutions.

  7. Enzymatic reaction paths as determined by transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Jean Emily

    Enzymes are biological catalysts capable of enhancing the rates of chemical reactions by many orders of magnitude as compared to solution chemistry. Since the catalytic power of enzymes routinely exceeds that of the best artificial catalysts available, there is much interest in understanding the complete nature of chemical barrier crossing in enzymatic reactions. Two specific questions pertaining to the source of enzymatic rate enhancements are investigated in this work. The first is the issue of how fast protein motions of an enzyme contribute to chemical barrier crossing. Our group has previously identified sub-picosecond protein motions, termed promoting vibrations (PVs), that dynamically modulate chemical transformation in several enzymes. In the case of human heart lactate dehydrogenase (hhLDH), prior studies have shown that a specific axis of residues undergoes a compressional fluctuation towards the active site, decreasing a hydride and a proton donor--acceptor distance on a sub-picosecond timescale to promote particle transfer. To more thoroughly understand the contribution of this dynamic motion to the enzymatic reaction coordinate of hhLDH, we conducted transition path sampling (TPS) using four versions of the enzymatic system: a wild type enzyme with natural isotopic abundance; a heavy enzyme where all the carbons, nitrogens, and non-exchangeable hydrogens were replaced with heavy isotopes; and two versions of the enzyme with mutations in the axis of PV residues. We generated four separate ensembles of reaction paths and analyzed each in terms of the reaction mechanism, time of barrier crossing, dynamics of the PV, and residues involved in the enzymatic reaction coordinate. We found that heavy isotopic substitution of hhLDH altered the sub-picosecond dynamics of the PV, changed the favored reaction mechanism, dramatically increased the time of barrier crossing, but did not have an effect on the specific residues involved in the PV. In the mutant systems

  8. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    absorption measurements some specific problems of those detectors have to be solved experimentally (i.e. fixed pattern noise, dark signal noise, nonuniform efficiency of individual elements, spatial sensitivity variations). In order to improve the low spatial resolution we performed laboratory studies using a multiple reflection cell to convert the long path technique to a real in situ point measurement. Under the conditions of field experiments in Julich residual absorbance signals at present are about 1.5x10(exp -4) corresponding to an OH detection sensitivity of 2x10(exp 6) OH/cm(exp 3) using a light path of 5.8 km. Total integration times for one measurement point vary between a few minutes and an hour.

  9. Transport path optimization algorithm based on fuzzy integrated weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yuan-Da; Xu, Xiao-Hao

    2014-11-01

    Natural disasters cause significant damage to roads, making route selection a complicated logistical problem. To overcome this complexity, we present a method of using a trapezoidal fuzzy number to select the optimal transport path. Using the given trapezoidal fuzzy edge coefficients, we calculate a fuzzy integrated matrix, and incorporate the fuzzy multi-weights into fuzzy integrated weights. The optimal path is determined by taking two sets of vertices and transforming undiscovered vertices into discoverable ones. Our experimental results show that the model is highly accurate, and requires only a few measurement data to confirm the optimal path. The model provides an effective, feasible, and convenient method to obtain weights for different road sections, and can be applied to road planning in intelligent transportation systems.

  10. Conditions for transmission path analysis in energy distribution models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragonès, Àngels; Guasch, Oriol

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we explore under which conditions transmission path analysis (TPA) developed for statistical energy analysis (SEA) can be applied to the less restrictive energy distribution (ED) models. It is shown that TPA can be extended without problems to proper-SEA systems whereas the situation is not so clear for quasi-SEA systems. In the general case, it has been found that a TPA can always be performed on an ED model if its inverse influence energy coefficient (EIC) matrix turns to have negative off-diagonal entries. If this condition is satisfied, it can be shown that the inverse EIC matrix automatically becomes an M-matrix. An ED graph can then be defined for it and use can be made of graph theory ranking path algorithms, previously developed for SEA systems, to classify dominant paths in ED models. A small mechanical system consisting of connected plates has been used to illustrate some of the exposed theoretical results.

  11. Algorithm of Finding Hypo-Critical Path in Network Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jianxun; Zhao, Xiuhua

    Network planning technology could be used to represent project plan management, such Critical Path Method (CPM for short) and Performance Evaluation Review Technique (PERT for short) etc. Aiming at problem that how to find hypo-critical path in network planning, firstly, properties of total float. free float and safety float are analyzed, and total float theorem is deduced on the basis of above analysis; and secondly, simple algorithm of finding the hypo-critical path is designed by using these properties of float and total theorem, and correctness of the algorithm is analyzed. Proof shows that the algorithm could realize effect of whole optimization could be realized by part optimization. Finally, one illustration is given to expatiate the algorithm.

  12. Structure of the optimal path to a fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizón-Escamilla, N.; Hurtado, P. I.; Garrido, P. L.

    2017-03-01

    Macroscopic fluctuations have become an essential tool to understand physics far from equilibrium due to the link between their statistics and nonequilibrium ensembles. The optimal path leading to a fluctuation encodes key information on this problem, shedding light on, e.g., the physics behind the enhanced probability of rare events out of equilibrium, the possibility of dynamic phase transitions, and new symmetries. This makes the understanding of the properties of these optimal paths a central issue. Here we derive a fundamental relation which strongly constrains the architecture of these optimal paths for general d -dimensional nonequilibrium diffusive systems, and implies a nontrivial structure for the dominant current vector fields. Interestingly, this general relation (which encompasses and explains previous results) makes manifest the spatiotemporal nonlocality of the current statistics and the associated optimal trajectories.

  13. Aircraft flight path angle display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A display system for use in an aircraft control wheel steering system provides the pilot with a single, quickened flight path angle display to overcome poor handling qualities due to intrinsic flight path angle response lags, while avoiding multiple information display symbology. The control law for the flight path angle control system is designed such that the aircraft's actual flight path angle response lags the pilot's commanded flight path angle by a constant time lag .tau., independent of flight conditions. The synthesized display signal is produced as a predetermined function of the aircraft's actual flight path angle, the time lag .tau. and command inputs from the pilot's column.

  14. Anisotropic path searching for automatic neuron reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Zhao, Ting; Lee, Tzumin; Myers, Eugene; Peng, Hanchuan

    2011-10-01

    Full reconstruction of neuron morphology is of fundamental interest for the analysis and understanding of their functioning. We have developed a novel method capable of automatically tracing neurons in three-dimensional microscopy data. In contrast to template-based methods, the proposed approach makes no assumptions about the shape or appearance of neurite structure. Instead, an efficient seeding approach is applied to capture complex neuronal structures and the tracing problem is solved by computing the optimal reconstruction with a weighted graph. The optimality is determined by the cost function designed for the path between each pair of seeds and by topological constraints defining the component interrelations and completeness. In addition, an automated neuron comparison method is introduced for performance evaluation and structure analysis. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and has been validated using different types of microscopy data sets including Drosophila's projection neurons and fly neurons with presynaptic sites. In all cases, the approach yielded promising results.

  15. Integrating two-dimensional paths: do desert ants process distance information in the absence of celestial compass cues?

    PubMed

    Ronacher, B; Westwig, E; Wehner, R

    2006-09-01

    When performing foraging trips desert ants of the genus Cataglyphis continuously process and update a ;home vector' that enables them to return to their nest on the shortest route. This capacity of path integration requires two types of information: (i) information about the travelling directions, and (ii) odometric information about the distances travelled in a particular direction. We have investigated how these two necessary pieces of information interact within the path integration processor. The specific question is: how do the ants process distance information if there is no simultaneous input from the sky compass available. Ants were trained to forage in a ;Z'-shaped channel system, the three segments of which joined at right angles. Individual animals were transferred from the feeder to a test field where their homing paths could be observed. In the crucial tests the middle segment of the maze was covered by orange Perspex that did not transmit the UV part of the spectrum, and thus precluded the perception of polarization patterns. Changes of the ant's processing of odometric information within this channel segment directly translate into a change in homing direction on the test field. The results indicate that the odometric information about travelling distance is largely ignored for path integration if there is no simultaneous input from the sky-view-based compass. They further show that idiothetic information cannot adequately substitute for the polarization compass to infer travelling directions.

  16. Hierarchical path planning and control of a small fixed-wing UAV: Theory and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Dongwon

    2007-12-01

    Recently there has been a tremendous growth of research emphasizing control of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) either in isolation or in teams. As a matter of fact, UAVs increasingly find their way into military and law enforcement applications (e.g., reconnaissance, remote delivery of urgent equipment/material, resource assessment, environmental monitoring, battlefield monitoring, ordnance delivery, etc.). This trend will continue in the future, as UAVs are poised to replace the human-in-the-loop during dangerous missions. Civilian applications of UAVs are also envisioned such as crop dusting, geological surveying, search and rescue operations, etc. In this thesis we propose a new online multiresolution path planning algorithm for a small UAV with limited on-board computational resources. The proposed approach assumes that the UAV has detailed information of the environment and the obstacles only in its vicinity. Information about far-away obstacles is also available, albeit less accurately. The proposed algorithm uses the fast lifting wavelet transform (FLWT) to get a multiresolution cell decomposition of the environment, whose dimension is commensurate to the on-board computational resources. A topological graph representation of the multiresolution cell decomposition is constructed efficiently, directly from the approximation and detail wavelet coefficients. Dynamic path planning is sequentially executed for an optimal path using the A* algorithm over the resulting graph. The proposed path planning algorithm is implemented on-line on a small autopilot. Comparisons with the standard D*-lite algorithm are also presented. We also investigate the problem of generating a smooth, planar reference path from a discrete optimal path. Upon the optimal path being represented as a sequence of cells in square geometry, we derive a smooth B-spline path that is constrained inside a channel that is induced by the geometry of the cells. To this end, a constrained optimization

  17. A morphological adaptation approach to path planning inspired by slime mould

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jeff

    2015-04-01

    Path planning is a classic problem in computer science and robotics which has recently been implemented in unconventional computing substrates such as chemical reaction-diffusion computers. These novel computing schemes utilise the parallel spatial propagation of information and often use a two-stage method involving diffusive propagation to discover all paths and a second stage to highlight or visualise the path between two particular points in the arena. The true slime mould Physarum polycephalum is known to construct efficient transport networks between nutrients in its environment. These networks are continuously remodelled as the organism adapts its body plan to changing spatial stimuli. It can be guided towards attractant stimuli (nutrients, warm regions) and it avoids locations containing hazardous stimuli (light irradiation, repellents, or regions occupied by predatory threats). Using a particle model of slime mould we demonstrate scoping experiments which explore how path planning may be performed by morphological adaptation. We initially demonstrate simple path planning by a shrinking blob of virtual plasmodium between two attractant sources within a polygonal arena. We examine the case where multiple paths are required and the subsequent selection of a single path from multiple options. Collision-free paths are implemented via repulsion from the borders of the arena. Finally, obstacle avoidance is implemented by repulsion from obstacles as they are uncovered by the shrinking blob. These examples show proof-of-concept results of path planning by morphological adaptation which complement existing research on path planning in novel computing substrates.

  18. Working on interesting problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Arfon M.

    2015-01-01

    BSc Chemistry, The University of Sheffield 2001... PhD Astrochemistry, The University of Nottingham 2006... Scientist at GitHub Inc. 2013.From the outside, the path an individual has taken from academia to industry is not an obvious one. In this session I'll (try and) explain how an interest in software, engineering and chasing interesting problems makes internet startup in San Francisco a great home.

  19. Squeezed states and path integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daubechies, Ingrid; Klauder, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The continuous-time regularization scheme for defining phase-space path integrals is briefly reviewed as a method to define a quantization procedure that is completely covariant under all smooth canonical coordinate transformations. As an illustration of this method, a limited set of transformations is discussed that have an image in the set of the usual squeezed states. It is noteworthy that even this limited set of transformations offers new possibilities for stationary phase approximations to quantum mechanical propagators.

  20. Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.

    1998-06-30

    This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE`s national strategy, the Richland Operations Office`s Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established.

  1. Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 71 NIST Electron Inelastic-Mean-Free-Path Database (PC database, no charge)   This database provides values of electron inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) for use in quantitative surface analyses by AES and XPS.

  2. Robust Path Planning and Feedback Design Under Stochastic Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles require optimal path planning algorithms to achieve mission goals while avoiding obstacles and being robust to uncertainties. The uncertainties arise from exogenous disturbances, modeling errors, and sensor noise, which can be characterized via stochastic models. Previous work defined a notion of robustness in a stochastic setting by using the concept of chance constraints. This requires that mission constraint violation can occur with a probability less than a prescribed value.In this paper we describe a novel method for optimal chance constrained path planning with feedback design. The approach optimizes both the reference trajectory to be followed and the feedback controller used to reject uncertainty. Our method extends recent results in constrained control synthesis based on convex optimization to solve control problems with nonconvex constraints. This extension is essential for path planning problems, which inherently have nonconvex obstacle avoidance constraints. Unlike previous approaches to chance constrained path planning, the new approach optimizes the feedback gain as wellas the reference trajectory.The key idea is to couple a fast, nonconvex solver that does not take into account uncertainty, with existing robust approaches that apply only to convex feasible regions. By alternating between robust and nonrobust solutions, the new algorithm guarantees convergence to a global optimum. We apply the new method to an unmanned aircraft and show simulation results that demonstrate the efficacy of the approach.

  3. SDN-based path hopping communication against eavesdropping attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanhao; Bu, Youjun; Zhao, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    Network eavesdropping is one of the most popular means used by cyber attackers, which has been a severe threat to network communication security. Adversaries could capture and analyze network communication data from network nodes or links, monitor network status and steal sensitive data such as username and password etc. Traditional network usually uses static network configuration, and existing defense methods, including firewall, IDS, IPS etc., cannot prevent eavesdropping, which has no distinguishing characteristic. Network eavesdropping become silent during most of the time of the attacking process, which is why it is difficult to discover and to defend. But A successful eavesdropping attack also has its' precondition, which is the target path should be relatively stable and has enough time of duration. So, In order to resolve this problem, it has to work on the network architecture. In this paper, a path hopping communication(PHC) mechanism based on Software Define Network (SDN) was proposed to solve this problem. In PHC, Ends in communication packets as well as the routing paths were changed dynamically. Therefore, the traffic would be distributed to multiple flows and transmitted along different paths. so that Network eavesdropping attack could be prevented effectively. It was concluded that PHC was able to increase the overhead of Network eavesdropping, as well as the difficulty of communication data recovery.

  4. Multiple Paths to Encephalization and Technical Civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzman, David; Middendorf, George

    2011-12-01

    We propose consideration of at least two possible evolutionary paths for the emergence of intelligent life with the potential for technical civilization. The first is the path via encephalization of homeothermic animals; the second is the path to swarm intelligence of so-called superorganisms, in particular the social insects. The path to each appears to be facilitated by environmental change: homeothermic animals by decreased climatic temperature and for swarm intelligence by increased oxygen levels.

  5. Path-Based Supports for Hypergraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, Ulrik; Cornelsen, Sabine; Pampel, Barbara; Sallaberry, Arnaud

    A path-based support of a hypergraph H is a graph with the same vertex set as H in which each hyperedge induces a Hamiltonian subgraph. While it is NP-complete to compute a path-based support with the minimum number of edges or to decide whether there is a planar path-based support, we show that a path-based tree support can be computed in polynomial time if it exists.

  6. Performance Analysis of Path Planning Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhirui; Li, Shuanghong; Zhang, Ying; Du, Qiaoling

    Ant colony system (ACS) algorithm was applied to the path planning for the robot. In the same working environment, path planning based on MAKLINK graph theory and Voronoi diagram were simulated and compared. MAKLINK graph theory is appropriate to apply to precise searching in small-scale district, and Voronoi diagram is suitable for fast path planning in a large area.

  7. Evaluation of the Learning Path Specification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Jose; Berlanga, Adriana J.; Koper, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Flexible lifelong learning requires that learners can compare and select learning paths that best meet individual needs, not just in terms of learning goals, but also in terms of planning, costs etc. To this end a learning path specification was developed, which describes both the contents and the structure of any learning path, be it formal,…

  8. Path Relaxation: Path Planning for a Mobile Robot.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    15213 April 1984 JUN 5 1984 Copyright © 1984 Mobile Robot Laboratory, Carnegie-Mellon University The CMU Rover has been supported at the Carnegie-Mellon...particular robot or mission. Path Relaxation is part of Fido, the vision and navigation system of the CM L Rover mol)ile robot. [29, 411 The Rover , under...their 31) positions relative to the Rover . The Rover will then move about half a meter, take a new pair of pictires, find the 40 tracked points in each of

  9. Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsella, John J.

    1970-01-01

    Discussed are the nature of a mathematical problem, problem solving in the traditional and modern mathematics programs, problem solving and psychology, research related to problem solving, and teaching problem solving in algebra and geometry. (CT)

  10. Sequential quadratic programming-based fast path planning algorithm subject to no-fly zone constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Shunjian; Sun, Mingwei; Yi, Haidong; Wang, Zenghui; Chen, Zengqiang

    2016-08-01

    Path planning plays an important role in aircraft guided systems. Multiple no-fly zones in the flight area make path planning a constrained nonlinear optimization problem. It is necessary to obtain a feasible optimal solution in real time. In this article, the flight path is specified to be composed of alternate line segments and circular arcs, in order to reformulate the problem into a static optimization one in terms of the waypoints. For the commonly used circular and polygonal no-fly zones, geometric conditions are established to determine whether or not the path intersects with them, and these can be readily programmed. Then, the original problem is transformed into a form that can be solved by the sequential quadratic programming method. The solution can be obtained quickly using the Sparse Nonlinear OPTimizer (SNOPT) package. Mathematical simulations are used to verify the effectiveness and rapidity of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Constructing Overlay Networks with Short Paths and Low Communication Cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makikawa, Fuminori; Tsuchiya, Tatsuhiro; Kikuno, Tohru

    A Peer-To-Peer (P2P) application uses an overlay network which is a virtual network constructed over the physical network. Traditional overlay construction methods do not take physical location of nodes into consideration, resulting in a large amount of redundant traffic. Some proximity-aware construction methods have been proposed to address this problem. These methods typically connect nearby nodes in the physical network. However, as the number of nodes increases, the path length of a route between two distant nodes rapidly increases. To alleviate this problem, we propose a technique which can be incorporated in existing overlay construction methods. The idea behind this technique is to employ long links to directly connect distant nodes. Through simulation experiments, we show that using our proposed technique, networks can achieve small path length and low communication cost while maintaining high resiliency to failures.

  12. Extracting contours of oval-shaped objects by Hough transform and minimal path algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tleis, Mohamed; Verbeek, Fons J.

    2014-04-01

    Circular and oval-like objects are very common in cell and micro biology. These objects need to be analyzed, and to that end, digitized images from the microscope are used so as to come to an automated analysis pipeline. It is essential to detect all the objects in an image as well as to extract the exact contour of each individual object. In this manner it becomes possible to perform measurements on these objects, i.e. shape and texture features. Our measurement objective is achieved by probing contour detection through dynamic programming. In this paper we describe a method that uses Hough transform and two minimal path algorithms to detect contours of (ovoid-like) objects. These algorithms are based on an existing grey-weighted distance transform and a new algorithm to extract the circular shortest path in an image. The methods are tested on an artificial dataset of a 1000 images, with an F1-score of 0.972. In a case study with yeast cells, contours from our methods were compared with another solution using Pratt's figure of merit. Results indicate that our methods were more precise based on a comparison with a ground-truth dataset. As far as yeast cells are concerned, the segmentation and measurement results enable, in future work, to retrieve information from different developmental stages of the cell using complex features.

  13. Optical path control in the MAM testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regehr, M. W.; Hines, B.; Holmes, B.

    2003-01-01

    Future space-based optical interferometers will require control of the optical path delay to accomplish some or all of the three objectives: balancing the optical path in the two arms to within a tolerance corresponding to the coherence length of the star light being observed, modulating the optical path in order to observe the phase of the star light interference fringe, and modulating the path length in order to reduce the effect of cyclic errors in the laser metrology system used to measure the optical path length in the two arms of the interferometer.

  14. Characterizing the Evolutionary Path(s) to Early Homo

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Lauren; Roseman, Charles C.; Cheverud, James M.; Ackermann, Rebecca R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that the transition from Australopithecus to Homo was characterized by evolutionary innovation, resulting in the emergence and coexistence of a diversity of forms. However, the evolutionary processes necessary to drive such a transition have not been examined. Here, we apply statistical tests developed from quantitative evolutionary theory to assess whether morphological differences among late australopith and early Homo species in Africa have been shaped by natural selection. Where selection is demonstrated, we identify aspects of morphology that were most likely under selective pressure, and determine the nature (type, rate) of that selection. Results demonstrate that selection must be invoked to explain an Au. africanus—Au. sediba—Homo transition, while transitions from late australopiths to various early Homo species that exclude Au. sediba can be achieved through drift alone. Rate tests indicate that selection is largely directional, acting to rapidly differentiate these taxa. Reconstructions of patterns of directional selection needed to drive the Au. africanus—Au. sediba—Homo transition suggest that selection would have affected all regions of the skull. These results may indicate that an evolutionary path to Homo without Au. sediba is the simpler path and/or provide evidence that this pathway involved more reliance on cultural adaptations to cope with environmental change. PMID:25470780

  15. A path to integration in an academic health science center.

    PubMed

    Panko, W B; Wilson, W

    1992-01-01

    This article describes a networking and integration strategy in use at the University of Michigan Medical Center. This strategy builds upon the existing technology base and is designed to provide a roadmap that will direct short-term development along a productive, long-term path. It offers a way to permit the short-term development of incremental solutions to current problems while at the same time maximizing the likelihood that these incremental efforts can be recycled into a more comprehensive approach.

  16. Attention trees and semantic paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Christian; Pieroni, Goffredo G.; Pieroni, Laura

    2007-02-01

    In the last few decades several techniques for image content extraction, often based on segmentation, have been proposed. It has been suggested that under the assumption of very general image content, segmentation becomes unstable and classification becomes unreliable. According to recent psychological theories, certain image regions attract the attention of human observers more than others and, generally, the image main meaning appears concentrated in those regions. Initially, regions attracting our attention are perceived as a whole and hypotheses on their content are formulated; successively the components of those regions are carefully analyzed and a more precise interpretation is reached. It is interesting to observe that an image decomposition process performed according to these psychological visual attention theories might present advantages with respect to a traditional segmentation approach. In this paper we propose an automatic procedure generating image decomposition based on the detection of visual attention regions. A new clustering algorithm taking advantage of the Delaunay- Voronoi diagrams for achieving the decomposition target is proposed. By applying that algorithm recursively, starting from the whole image, a transformation of the image into a tree of related meaningful regions is obtained (Attention Tree). Successively, a semantic interpretation of the leaf nodes is carried out by using a structure of Neural Networks (Neural Tree) assisted by a knowledge base (Ontology Net). Starting from leaf nodes, paths toward the root node across the Attention Tree are attempted. The task of the path consists in relating the semantics of each child-parent node pair and, consequently, in merging the corresponding image regions. The relationship detected in this way between two tree nodes generates, as a result, the extension of the interpreted image area through each step of the path. The construction of several Attention Trees has been performed and partial

  17. Simple biodosimetry method for cases of high-dose radiation exposure using the ratio of the longest/shortest length of Giemsa-stained drug-induced prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC).

    PubMed

    Gotoh, E; Tanno, Y

    2005-05-01

    The aim was to develop a simple biodosimetry method for as rapid as possible estimation of absorbed radiation doses in victims of radiation accidents, in particular after high-dose exposure. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were gamma-irradiated in vitro with several doses up to 40 Gy stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) for 2 days and their chromosomes condensed prematurely using 50 nm calyculin A. Chromosome lengths of Giemsa-stained G2 prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCC) were measured using image analysing software and the ratio of the longest/shortest chromosome length was calculated. The length ratio (LR) of the longest/shortest Giemsa-stained chromosome s increased with a good correlation to the square root of the radiation dose (D) up to 40 Gy, i.e. LR = (4.90 x D0.5) + 2.14. The LR of the longest/shortest chromosome might be used as an index for estimating the radiation dose. The blood samples should not be cooled until the start of separation/stimulation of the lymphocytes. A rapid and easy estimation of large doses after whole-body exposure was identified by measuring the ratio of the longest/shortest length of Giemsa-stained G2-PCC induced by calyculin A. This simple protocol will be particularly useful for making therapy decisions for victims of ionizing radiation exposure and has potential for use as a biodosimeter for partial-body exposure accidents.

  18. Adaptive neural control for cooperative path following of marine surface vehicles: state and output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Wang, D.; Peng, Z. H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the cooperative path-following problem of multiple marine surface vehicles subject to dynamical uncertainties and ocean disturbances induced by unknown wind, wave and ocean current. The control design falls neatly into two parts. One is to steer individual marine surface vehicle to track a predefined path and the other is to synchronise the along-path speed and path variables under the constraints of an underlying communication network. Within these two formulations, a robust adaptive path-following controller is first designed for individual vehicles based on backstepping and neural network techniques. Then, a decentralised synchronisation control law is derived by means of consensus on along-path speed and path variables based on graph theory. The distinct feature of this design lies in that synchronised path following can be reached for any undirected connected communication graphs without accurate knowledge of the model. This result is further extended to the output feedback case, where an observer-based cooperative path-following controller is developed without measuring the velocity of each vehicle. For both designs, rigorous theoretical analysis demonstrate that all signals in the closed-loop system are semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results validate the performance and robustness improvement of the proposed strategy.

  19. Path perception during rotation: influence of instructions, depth range, and dot density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Li; Warren, William H Jr

    2004-01-01

    How do observers perceive their direction of self-motion when traveling on a straight path while their eyes are rotating? Our previous findings suggest that information from retinal flow and extra-retinal information about eye movements are each sufficient to solve this problem for both perception and active control of self-motion [Vision Res. 40 (2000) 3873; Psych. Sci. 13 (2002) 485]. In this paper, using displays depicting translation with simulated eye rotation, we investigated how task variables such as instructions, depth range, and dot density influenced the visual system's reliance on retinal vs. extra-retinal information for path perception during rotation. We found that path errors were small when observers expected to travel on a straight path or with neutral instructions, but errors increased markedly when observers expected to travel on a curved path. Increasing depth range or dot density did not improve path judgments. We conclude that the expectation of the shape of an upcoming path can influence the interpretation of the ambiguous retinal flow. A large depth range and dense motion parallax are not essential for accurate path perception during rotation, but reference objects and a large field of view appear to improve path judgments.

  20. Multiple order common path spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbury, Amy B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dispersive spectrometer. The spectrometer allows detection of multiple orders of light on a single focal plane array by splitting the orders spatially using a dichroic assembly. A conventional dispersion mechanism such as a defraction grating disperses the light spectrally. As a result, multiple wavelength orders can be imaged on a single focal plane array of limited spectral extent, doubling (or more) the number of spectral channels as compared to a conventional spectrometer. In addition, this is achieved in a common path device.

  1. Communication path for extreme environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C. (Inventor); Betts, Bradley J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and systems for using one or more radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs), or other suitable signal transmitters and/or receivers, to provide a sensor information communication path, to provide location and/or spatial orientation information for an emergency service worker (ESW), to provide an ESW escape route, to indicate a direction from an ESW to an ES appliance, to provide updated information on a region or structure that presents an extreme environment (fire, hazardous fluid leak, underwater, nuclear, etc.) in which an ESW works, and to provide accumulated thermal load or thermal breakdown information on one or more locations in the region.

  2. Paths to adolescent parenthood: implications for prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Flick, L H

    1986-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy and parenthood are increasingly common today and pose many problems for both the individual persons involved and society as a whole. For programs to address these issues successfully, factors associated with unintended pregnancy and resulting parenthood must first be identified and understood. This paper is a review of current research on the factors associated with the four steps leading to an adolescent becoming a parent. Being an adolescent parent requires taking a particular path at four crossroads: becoming sexually active, not using or incorrectly using contraceptives, carrying rather than aborting a pregnancy, and parenting rather than placing a child for adoption. Much research in the last 15 years has explored adolescent childbearing, but many studies only compared adolescent parents to nonparents to reach conclusions about differences in these groups. This review focuses on recent studies that explore the four processes, or crossroads, separately and it excludes studies that generalize and overlap these processes. Factors that influence adolescent behavior at multiple points on the path to parenthood indicate areas particularly relevant for preventive intervention. For instance, boyfriends exert influence at all four crossroads. Sexual activity and contraceptive use increase with longevity of relationships, yet closer relationships are less often associated with raising a child. Better general communication skills, and particularly an increased ability to discuss sexuality, increases use of contraceptives, and low educational and occupational aspirations appear to influence each successive turn toward parenthood. This summary of current research serves to highlight those individual, family, dyadic, and social factors that exert great impact on adolescent parenthood by influencing young people at each of the four crossroads. These factors suggest potentially effective points for intervention to reduce the incidence of adolescent

  3. Optimal path-finding through mental exploration based on neural energy field gradients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihong; Wang, Rubin; Zhu, Yating

    2017-02-01

    Rodent animal can accomplish self-locating and path-finding task by forming a cognitive map in the hippocampus representing the environment. In the classical model of the cognitive map, the system (artificial animal) needs large amounts of physical exploration to study spatial environment to solve path-finding problems, which costs too much time and energy. Although Hopfield's mental exploration model makes up for the deficiency mentioned above, the path is still not efficient enough. Moreover, his model mainly focused on the artificial neural network, and clear physiological meanings has not been addressed. In this work, based on the concept of mental exploration, neural energy coding theory has been applied to the novel calculation model to solve the path-finding problem. Energy field is constructed on the basis of the firing power of place cell clusters, and the energy field gradient can be used in mental exploration to solve path-finding problems. The study shows that the new mental exploration model can efficiently find the optimal path, and present the learning process with biophysical meaning as well. We also analyzed the parameters of the model which affect the path efficiency. This new idea verifies the importance of place cell and synapse in spatial memory and proves that energy coding is effective to study cognitive activities. This may provide the theoretical basis for the neural dynamics mechanism of spatial memory.

  4. Least expected time paths in stochastic, time-varying transportation networks

    SciTech Connect

    Miller-Hooks, E.D.; Mahmassani, H.S.

    1999-06-01

    The authors consider stochastic, time-varying transportation networks, where the arc weights (arc travel times) are random variables with probability distribution functions that vary with time. Efficient procedures are widely available for determining least time paths in deterministic networks. In stochastic but time-invariant networks, least expected time paths can be determined by setting each random arc weight to its expected value and solving an equivalent deterministic problem. This paper addresses the problem of determining least expected time paths in stochastic, time-varying networks. Two procedures are presented. The first procedure determines the a priori least expected time paths from all origins to a single destination for each departure time in the peak period. The second procedure determines lower bounds on the expected times of these a priori least expected time paths. This procedure determines an exact solution for the problem where the driver is permitted to react to revealed travel times on traveled links en route, i.e. in a time-adaptive route choice framework. Modifications to each of these procedures for determining least expected cost (where cost is not necessarily travel time) paths and lower bounds on the expected costs of these paths are given. Extensive numerical tests are conducted to illustrate the algorithms` computational performance as well as the properties of the solution.

  5. Path integration: effect of curved path complexity and sensory system on blindfolded walking.

    PubMed

    Koutakis, Panagiotis; Mukherjee, Mukul; Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Blanke, Daniel J; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2013-02-01

    Path integration refers to the ability to integrate continuous information of the direction and distance traveled by the system relative to the origin. Previous studies have investigated path integration through blindfolded walking along simple paths such as straight line and triangles. However, limited knowledge exists regarding the role of path complexity in path integration. Moreover, little is known about how information from different sensory input systems (like vision and proprioception) contributes to accurate path integration. The purpose of the current study was to investigate how sensory information and curved path complexity affect path integration. Forty blindfolded participants had to accurately reproduce a curved path and return to the origin. They were divided into four groups that differed in the curved path, circle (simple) or figure-eight (complex), and received either visual (previously seen) or proprioceptive (previously guided) information about the path before they reproduced it. The dependent variables used were average trajectory error, walking speed, and distance traveled. The results indicated that (a) both groups that walked on a circular path and both groups that received visual information produced greater accuracy in reproducing the path. Moreover, the performance of the group that received proprioceptive information and later walked on a figure-eight path was less accurate than their corresponding circular group. The groups that had the visual information also walked faster compared to the group that had proprioceptive information. Results of the current study highlight the roles of different sensory inputs while performing blindfolded walking for path integration.

  6. Characterization of the nuclear matrix targeting sequence (NMTS) of the BPV1 E8/E2 protein--the shortest known NMTS.

    PubMed

    Sankovski, Eve; Karro, Kristiina; Sepp, Mari; Kurg, Reet; Ustav, Mart; Abroi, Aare

    2015-01-01

    Technological advantages in sequencing and proteomics have revealed the remarkable diversity of alternative protein isoforms. Typically, the localization and functions of these isoforms are unknown and cannot be predicted. Also the localization signals leading to particular subnuclear compartments have not been identified and thus, predicting alternative functions due to alternative subnuclear localization is limited only to very few subnuclear compartments. Knowledge of the localization and function of alternative protein isoforms allows for a greater understanding of cellular complexity. In this article, we characterize a short and well-defined signal targeting the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E8/E2 protein to the nuclear matrix. The targeting signal comprises the peptide coded by E8 ORF, which is spliced together with part of the E2 ORF to generate the E8/E2 mRNA. Localization to the nuclear matrix correlates well with the transcription repression activities of E8/E2; a single point mutation directs the E8/E2 protein into the nucleoplasm, and transcription repression activity is lost. Our data prove that adding as few as ˜10 amino acids by alternative transcription/alternative splicing drastically alters the function and subnuclear localization of proteins. To our knowledge, E8 is the shortest known nuclear matrix targeting signal.

  7. An Algorithm for Linearly Constrained Nonlinear Programming Programming Problems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    ALGORITHM FOR LINEARLY CONSTRAINED NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING PROBLEMS Mokhtar S. Bazaraa and Jamie J. Goode In this paper an algorithm for solving a linearly...distance pro- gramr.ing, as in the works of Bazaraa and Goode 12], and Wolfe [16 can be used for solving this problem. Special methods that take advantage of...34 Pacific Journal of Mathematics, Volume 16, pp. 1-3, 1966. 2. M. S. Bazaraa and J. j. Goode, "An Algorithm for Finding the Shortest Element of a

  8. Cumulative slant path rain attenuation associated with COMSTAR beacon at 28.56 GHz for Wallops Island, Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, J.

    1978-01-01

    Yearly, monthly, and time of day fade statistics are presented and characterized. A 19.04 GHz yearly fade distribution, corresponding to a second COMSTAR beacon frequency, is predicted using the concept of effective path length, disdrometer, and rain rate results. The yearly attenuation and rain rate distributions follow with good approximation log normal variations for most fade and rain rate levels. Attenuations were exceeded for the longest and shortest periods of times for all fades in August and February, respectively. The eight hour time period showing the maximum and minimum number of minutes over the year for which fades exceeded 12 db were approximately between 1600 to 2400, and 0400 to 1200 hours, respectively. In employing the predictive method for obtaining the 19.04 GHz fade distribution, it is demonstrated theoretically that the ratio of attenuations at two frequencies is minimally dependent of raindrop size distribution providing these frequencies are not widely separated.

  9. Obstacle Bypassing in Optimal Ship Routing Using Simulated Annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Kosmas, O. T.; Vlachos, D. S.; Simos, T. E.

    2008-11-06

    In this paper we are going to discuss a variation on the problem of finding the shortest path between two points in optimal ship routing problems consisting of obstacles that are not allowed to be crossed by the path. Our main goal are going to be the construction of an appropriate algorithm, based in an earlier work by computing the shortest path between two points in the plane that avoids a set of polygonal obstacles.

  10. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... often, it could be a sign of a balance problem. Balance problems can make you feel unsteady or as ... fall-related injuries, such as hip fracture. Some balance problems are due to problems in the inner ...

  11. Path-Following Control of Wheeled Planetary Exploration Robots Moving on Deformable Rough Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liang; Gao, Hai-bo; Deng, Zong-quan; Li, Zhijun; Xia, Ke-rui; Duan, Guang-ren

    2014-01-01

    The control of planetary rovers, which are high performance mobile robots that move on deformable rough terrain, is a challenging problem. Taking lateral skid into account, this paper presents a rough terrain model and nonholonomic kinematics model for planetary rovers. An approach is proposed in which the reference path is generated according to the planned path by combining look-ahead distance and path updating distance on the basis of the carrot following method. A path-following strategy for wheeled planetary exploration robots incorporating slip compensation is designed. Simulation results of a four-wheeled robot on deformable rough terrain verify that it can be controlled to follow a planned path with good precision, despite the fact that the wheels will obviously skid and slip. PMID:24790582

  12. Round-the-clock homing behavior of a subsocial shield bug, Parastrachia japonensis (Heteroptera: Parastrachiidae), using path integration.

    PubMed

    Hironaka, Mantaro; Tojo, Sumio; Nomakuchi, Shintaro; Filippi, Lisa; Hariyama, Takahiko

    2007-06-01

    Females of the subsocial shield bug, Parastrachia japonensis (Parastrachiidae), are central-place foragers, collecting drupes for their young from nearby host trees by walking along the forest floor both during the day and at night. Because burrows are often some distance from the drupe-shedding tree, the bugs must repeatedly leave their burrows, search for drupes, and return to the burrows. After a bug leaves its burrow, it searches arduously until it encounters a drupe. When a drupe is obtained, the bug always takes the shortest route back to its burrow. It has been clarified that this bug utilizes path integration during diurnal provisioning excursions. In this paper, we examined nocturnal behavior and some parameters of the path integration utilized by P. japonensis. There were no observable differences between day and night in the patterns of foraging and direct-homing behavior. When the bug was displaced to another position during the day or night, it always walked straight toward the fictive burrow, the site where the burrow should be if it had been displaced along with the bug, and then displayed searching behavior in the vicinity of the fictive burrow. The distance of the straight run corresponded accurately with a straight line between the burrow and the place where the bug obtained the drupe. These results indicate that P. japonensis orients toward the burrow using path integration both during diurnal and nocturnal provisioning behavior.

  13. Extracting Critical Path Graphs from MPI Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M

    2005-07-27

    The critical path is one of the fundamental runtime characteristics of a parallel program. It identifies the longest execution sequence without wait delays. In other words, the critical path is the global execution path that inflicts wait operations on other nodes without itself being stalled. Hence, it dictates the overall runtime and knowing it is important to understand an application's runtime and message behavior and to target optimizations. We have developed a toolset that identifies the critical path of MPI applications, extracts it, and then produces a graphical representation of the corresponding program execution graph to visualize it. To implement this, we intercept all MPI library calls, use the information to build the relevant subset of the execution graph, and then extract the critical path from there. We have applied our technique to several scientific benchmarks and successfully produced critical path diagrams for applications running on up to 128 processors.

  14. Sequential Path Entanglement for Quantum Metrology

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xian-Min; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Deng, Youjin; Barbieri, Marco; Nunn, Joshua; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Path entanglement is a key resource for quantum metrology. Using path-entangled states, the standard quantum limit can be beaten, and the Heisenberg limit can be achieved. However, the preparation and detection of such states scales unfavourably with the number of photons. Here we introduce sequential path entanglement, in which photons are distributed across distinct time bins with arbitrary separation, as a resource for quantum metrology. We demonstrate a scheme for converting polarization Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entanglement into sequential path entanglement. We observe the same enhanced phase resolution expected for conventional path entanglement, independent of the delay between consecutive photons. Sequential path entanglement can be prepared comparably easily from polarization entanglement, can be detected without using photon-number-resolving detectors, and enables novel applications.

  15. Counting paths with Schur transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Pablo; Kemp, Garreth; Véliz-Osorio, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    In this work we explore the structure of the branching graph of the unitary group using Schur transitions. We find that these transitions suggest a new combinatorial expression for counting paths in the branching graph. This formula, which is valid for any rank of the unitary group, reproduces known asymptotic results. We proceed to establish the general validity of this expression by a formal proof. The form of this equation strongly hints towards a quantum generalization. Thus, we introduce a notion of quantum relative dimension and subject it to the appropriate consistency tests. This new quantity finds its natural environment in the context of RCFTs and fractional statistics; where the already established notion of quantum dimension has proven to be of great physical importance.

  16. Flexible-Path Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, B.; Adler, M.; Alkalai, L.; Burdick, G.; Coulter, D.; Jordan, F.; Naderi, F.; Graham, L.; Landis, R.; Drake, B.; Hoffman, S.; Grunsfeld, J.; Seery, B. D.

    2010-01-01

    In the fourth quarter of 2009 an in-house, multi-center NASA study team briefly examined "Flexible Path" concepts to begin understanding characteristics, content, and roles of potential missions consistent with the strategy proposed by the Augustine Committee. We present an overview of the study findings. Three illustrative human/robotic mission concepts not requiring planet surface operations are described: assembly of very large in-space telescopes in cis-lunar space; exploration of near Earth objects (NEOs); exploration of Mars' moon Phobos. For each, a representative mission is described, technology and science objectives are outlined, and a basic mission operations concept is quantified. A fourth type of mission, using the lunar surface as preparation for Mars, is also described. Each mission's "capability legacy" is summarized. All four illustrative missions could achieve NASA's stated human space exploration objectives and advance human space flight toward Mars surface exploration. Telescope assembly missions would require the fewest new system developments. NEO missions would offer a wide range of deep-space trip times between several months and two years. Phobos exploration would retire several Marsclass risks, leaving another large remainder set (associated with entry, descent, surface operations, and ascent) for retirement by subsequent missions. And extended lunar surface operations would build confidence for Mars surface missions by addressing a complementary set of risks. Six enabling developments (robotic precursors, ISS exploration testbed, heavy-lift launch, deep-space-capable crew capsule, deep-space habitat, and reusable in-space propulsion stage) would apply across multiple program sequence options, and thus could be started even without committing to a specific mission sequence now. Flexible Path appears to be a viable strategy, with meaningful and worthy mission content.

  17. Robust Flight Path Determination for Mars Precision Landing Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Kohen, Hamid

    1997-01-01

    This paper documents the application of genetic algorithms (GAs) to the problem of robust flight path determination for Mars precision landing. The robust flight path problem is defined here as the determination of the flight path which delivers a low-lift open-loop controlled vehicle to its desired final landing location while minimizing the effect of perturbations due to uncertainty in the atmospheric model and entry conditions. The genetic algorithm was capable of finding solutions which reduced the landing error from 111 km RMS radial (open-loop optimal) to 43 km RMS radial (optimized with respect to perturbations) using 200 hours of computation on an Ultra-SPARC workstation. Further reduction in the landing error is possible by going to closed-loop control which can utilize the GA optimized paths as nominal trajectories for linearization.

  18. The Path-of-Probability Algorithm for Steering and Feedback Control of Flexible Needles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wooram; Wang, Yunfeng; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we develop a new framework for path planning of flexible needles with bevel tips. Based on a stochastic model of needle steering, the probability density function for the needle tip pose is approximated as a Gaussian. The means and covariances are estimated using an error propagation algorithm which has second order accuracy. Then we adapt the path-of-probability (POP) algorithm to path planning of flexible needles with bevel tips. We demonstrate how our planning algorithm can be used for feedback control of flexible needles. We also derive a closed-form solution for the port placement problem for finding good insertion locations for flexible needles in the case when there are no obstacles. Furthermore, we propose a new method using reference splines with the POP algorithm to solve the path planning problem for flexible needles in more general cases that include obstacles. PMID:21151708

  19. Diffusion approximation and short-path statistics at low to intermediate Knudsen numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrée, Guillaume; Blanco, Stéphane; El Hafi, Mouna; Fournier, Richard; Rolland, Julien Yves

    2015-04-01

    In the field of first-return statistics in bounded domains, short paths may be defined as those paths for which the diffusion approximation is inappropriate. However, general integral constraints have been identified that make it possible to address such short-path statistics indirectly by application of the diffusion approximation to long paths in a simple associated first-passage problem. This approach is exact in the zero Knudsen limit (Blanco S. and Fournier R., Phys. Rev. Lett., 97 (2006) 230604). Its generalization to the low to intermediate Knudsen range is addressed here theoretically and the corresponding predictions are compared to both one-dimension analytical solutions and three-dimension numerical experiments. Direct quantitative relations to the solution of the Schwarzschild-Milne problem are identified.

  20. Comparing Unlabeled Pedigree Graphs via Covering with Bipartite and Path.

    PubMed

    Amar, Lamiaa A; Belal, Nahla A; Rashwan, Shaheera

    2016-11-01

    Family trees, also called pedigrees, have important information about an individual's past and future life. It can be used as a diagnostic tool and help guide decisions about genetic testing for the patient and at-risk family members. There are 2% to 10% of parent-child relationships missing, and this can cause large differences in the pedigree graphs created. Hence, the evaluation of pedigrees is an essential task. In this article, we focus on the problem of isomorphism of unlabeled subpedigrees with a large number of individuals and hundreds of families, given that the two pedigrees being evaluated are generational and mating is between external parents. We address two restricted versions of the unlabeled subpedigree graph problem, Cover Unlabeled subPedigree with a Bipartite graph (CUPB), and Cover Unlabeled subPedigree with a Path (CUPP) problems. Fixed parameter algorithms are presented to solve the two problems, CUPB and CUPP.

  1. A Hybrid Metaheuristic DE/CS Algorithm for UCAV Three-Dimension Path Planning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gaige; Guo, Lihong; Duan, Hong; Wang, Heqi; Liu, Luo; Shao, Mingzhen

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimension path planning for uninhabited combat air vehicle (UCAV) is a complicated high-dimension optimization problem, which primarily centralizes on optimizing the flight route considering the different kinds of constrains under complicated battle field environments. A new hybrid metaheuristic differential evolution (DE) and cuckoo search (CS) algorithm is proposed to solve the UCAV three-dimension path planning problem. DE is applied to optimize the process of selecting cuckoos of the improved CS model during the process of cuckoo updating in nest. The cuckoos can act as an agent in searching the optimal UCAV path. And then, the UCAV can find the safe path by connecting the chosen nodes of the coordinates while avoiding the threat areas and costing minimum fuel. This new approach can accelerate the global convergence speed while preserving the strong robustness of the basic CS. The realization procedure for this hybrid metaheuristic approach DE/CS is also presented. In order to make the optimized UCAV path more feasible, the B-Spline curve is adopted for smoothing the path. To prove the performance of this proposed hybrid metaheuristic method, it is compared with basic CS algorithm. The experiment shows that the proposed approach is more effective and feasible in UCAV three-dimension path planning than the basic CS model. PMID:23193383

  2. Ensuring critical event sequences in high consequence computer based systems as inspired by path expressions

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, M.E.C.

    1997-02-01

    The goal of our work is to provide a high level of confidence that critical software driven event sequences are maintained in the face of hardware failures, malevolent attacks and harsh or unstable operating environments. This will be accomplished by providing dynamic fault management measures directly to the software developer and to their varied development environments. The methodology employed here is inspired by previous work in path expressions. This paper discusses the perceived problems, a brief overview of path expressions, the proposed methods, and a discussion of the differences between the proposed methods and traditional path expression usage and implementation.

  3. Square-root actions, metric signature, and the path integral of quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlini, A.; Greensite, J.

    1995-12-01

    We consider quantization of the Baierlein-Sharp-Wheeler form of the gravitational action, in which the lapse function is determined from the Hamiltonian constraint. This action has a square root form, analogous to the actions of the relativistic particle and Nambu string. We argue that path-integral quantization of the gravitational action should be based on a path integrand exp[ √i S] rather than the familiar Feynman expression exp[iS], and that unitarity requires integration over manifolds of both Euclidean and Lorentzian signature. We discuss the relation of this path integral to our previous considerations regarding the problem of time, and extend our approach to include fermions.

  4. A path-independent integral for fracture of solids under combined electrochemical and mechanical loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haftbaradaran, Hamed; Qu, Jianmin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we first demonstrate that the J-integral in classical linear elasticity becomes path-dependent when the solid is subjected to combined electrical, chemical and mechanical loadings. We then construct an electro-chemo-mechanical J-integral that is path-independent under such combined multiple driving forces. Further, we show that this electro-chemo-mechanical J-integral represents the rate at which the grand potential releases per unit crack growth. As an example, the path-independent nature of the electro-chemo-mechanical J-integral is demonstrated by solving the problem of a thin elastic film delaminated from a thick elastic substrate.

  5. Deadlock-free Path Following Control with Collision Avoidance for Multiple Robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurama, Kazunori; Nakano, Kazushi

    This paper deals with a path following problem with collision avoidance for multiple robots. The path following aims to move the robots along reference paths with assigned velocities. When there are geometric errors between the robots' positions and the reference paths, or when the differences between their velocities and assigned velocities are not zero, we expect to reduce these errors. Unfortunately, if the multiple robots try to realize the exact path following, they may collide with one another in areas where the reference paths intersect. In this case, the robots have to avoid collision at the expense of the original paths. This paper introduces a value function including geometric and velocity errors, and proposes a new online collision avoidance method which constrains the value function. The proposed method minimizes the time derivative of the value function in each instance. Moreover, this method prevents deadlocks of the robots with the following strategy: design a time-varying function which moves slowly along the reference path for each robot, and append a penalty function to the value function which increases when the position of the robot becomes less than the time-varying function.

  6. A Dynamic Bioinspired Neural Network Based Real-Time Path Planning Method for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Real-time path planning for autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is a very difficult and challenging task. Bioinspired neural network (BINN) has been used to deal with this problem for its many distinct advantages: that is, no learning process is needed and realization is also easy. However, there are some shortcomings when BINN is applied to AUV path planning in a three-dimensional (3D) unknown environment, including complex computing problem when the environment is very large and repeated path problem when the size of obstacles is bigger than the detection range of sensors. To deal with these problems, an improved dynamic BINN is proposed in this paper. In this proposed method, the AUV is regarded as the core of the BINN and the size of the BINN is based on the detection range of sensors. Then the BINN will move with the AUV and the computing could be reduced. A virtual target is proposed in the path planning method to ensure that the AUV can move to the real target effectively and avoid big-size obstacles automatically. Furthermore, a target attractor concept is introduced to improve the computing efficiency of neural activities. Finally, some experiments are conducted under various 3D underwater environments. The experimental results show that the proposed BINN based method can deal with the real-time path planning problem for AUV efficiently. PMID:28255297

  7. A Dynamic Bioinspired Neural Network Based Real-Time Path Planning Method for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianjun; Wu, Liuying; Shi, Pengfei; Yang, Simon X

    2017-01-01

    Real-time path planning for autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is a very difficult and challenging task. Bioinspired neural network (BINN) has been used to deal with this problem for its many distinct advantages: that is, no learning process is needed and realization is also easy. However, there are some shortcomings when BINN is applied to AUV path planning in a three-dimensional (3D) unknown environment, including complex computing problem when the environment is very large and repeated path problem when the size of obstacles is bigger than the detection range of sensors. To deal with these problems, an improved dynamic BINN is proposed in this paper. In this proposed method, the AUV is regarded as the core of the BINN and the size of the BINN is based on the detection range of sensors. Then the BINN will move with the AUV and the computing could be reduced. A virtual target is proposed in the path planning method to ensure that the AUV can move to the real target effectively and avoid big-size obstacles automatically. Furthermore, a target attractor concept is introduced to improve the computing efficiency of neural activities. Finally, some experiments are conducted under various 3D underwater environments. The experimental results show that the proposed BINN based method can deal with the real-time path planning problem for AUV efficiently.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamics Using Path or Stream Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naor, Yossi; Keshet, Uri

    2015-09-01

    Magnetization in highly conductive plasmas is ubiquitous to astronomical systems. Flows in such media can be described by three path functions {{{Λ }}}α , or, for a steady flow, by two stream functions {λ }κ and an additional field such as mass density ρ, velocity v, or travel time {{Δ }}t. While typical analyses of a frozen magnetic field {\\boldsymbol{B}} are problem-specific and involve nonlocal gradients of the fluid element position {\\boldsymbol{x}}(t), we derive the general, local (in Λ or λ space) solution {\\boldsymbol{B}}={(\\partial {\\boldsymbol{x}}/\\partial {{{Λ }}}α )}t{\\tilde{B}}α ρ /\\tilde{ρ }, where Lagrangian constants denoted by a tilde are directly fixed at a boundary hypersurface \\tilde{H} on which {\\boldsymbol{B}} is known. For a steady flow, \\tilde{ρ }{\\boldsymbol{B}}/ρ ={(\\partial {\\boldsymbol{x}}/\\partial {λ }κ )}{{Δ }t}{\\tilde{B}}κ +{\\boldsymbol{v}}{\\tilde{B}}3/\\tilde{v}; here the electric field {\\boldsymbol{E}}∼ ({\\tilde{B}}2{\\boldsymbol{\

  9. Path planning for robotic truss assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, Arthur C.

    1993-01-01

    A new Potential Fields approach to the robotic path planning problem is proposed and implemented. Our approach, which is based on one originally proposed by Munger, computes an incremental joint vector based upon attraction to a goal and repulsion from obstacles. By repetitively adding and computing these 'steps', it is hoped (but not guaranteed) that the robot will reach its goal. An attractive force exerted by the goal is found by solving for the the minimum norm solution to the linear Jacobian equation. A repulsive force between obstacles and the robot's links is used to avoid collisions. Its magnitude is inversely proportional to the distance. Together, these forces make the goal the global minimum potential point, but local minima can stop the robot from ever reaching that point. Our approach improves on a basic, potential field paradigm developed by Munger by using an active, adaptive field - what we will call a 'flexible' potential field. Active fields are stronger when objects move towards one another and weaker when they move apart. An adaptive field's strength is individually tailored to be just strong enough to avoid any collision. In addition to the local planner, a global planning algorithm helps the planner to avoid local field minima by providing subgoals. These subgoals are based on the obstacles which caused the local planner to fail. A best-first search algorithm A* is used for graph search.

  10. Path-Integral Derivation of Lifshitz Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa-Yakanit, V.

    2008-11-01

    The behavior of the electron density of states (DOS) for the Lifshitz tail states is studied in the limit of low energy using the Feynman path-integral method. This method was used to study the heavily doped semiconductors for the case of a Gaussian random potential. The main results obtained are that the tail states behave as DOS exp (-B(E)), with B(E) = En, n = {1 / 2} for short-range interaction and n = 2 for long-range interaction. In this study it is shown that without the Gaussian approximation, the behavior of the Lifshitz tails for the Poisson distribution is obtained as DOS exp (-B(E)) with B(E) = En, n = {3 / 2} . As in the case of heavily doped semiconductor, the method can be easily generalized to long-range interactions. A comparison with the method developed by Friedberg and Luttinger based on the reformulation of the problem in terms of Brownian motion is given.

  11. A path-oriented matrix-based knowledge representation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feyock, Stefan; Karamouzis, Stamos T.

    1993-01-01

    Experience has shown that designing a good representation is often the key to turning hard problems into simple ones. Most AI (Artificial Intelligence) search/representation techniques are oriented toward an infinite domain of objects and arbitrary relations among them. In reality much of what needs to be represented in AI can be expressed using a finite domain and unary or binary predicates. Well-known vector- and matrix-based representations can efficiently represent finite domains and unary/binary predicates, and allow effective extraction of path information by generalized transitive closure/path matrix computations. In order to avoid space limitations a set of abstract sparse matrix data types was developed along with a set of operations on them. This representation forms the basis of an intelligent information system for representing and manipulating relational data.

  12. Horizontal and Slant-Path Surveillance with Speckle Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, C J; Brase, J M

    2002-08-19

    A fundamental problem in providing high-quality surveillance images recorded over long horizontal or slant paths is the blurring caused by atmospheric turbulence, which reduces both the resolution and contrast. The objective of the work reported here is to develop a capability for long-range imaging through the atmosphere that is not limited by the atmosphere but only by the fundamental diffraction limit of the optics. This paper describes our recent horizontal and slant-path imaging experiments of point targets and extended scenes as well as simulations of point targets in comparison to experiment. We show the near-diffraction limited resolution results obtained using bispectral speckle-imaging techniques. The experiments were performed with an 8-inch diameter telescope placed either in a field, on a rooftop, or on a hillside and cover ranges of interest from 100 meters up to 10 km. The scenery includes resolution targets, people, vehicles, and other structures.

  13. Inadequacy of single-impulse transfers for path constrained rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. A.; Soileau, K. M.

    1987-01-01

    The use of single-impulse techniques to maneuver from point to point about a large space structure (LSS) with an arbitrary geometrical configuration and spin is examined. Particular consideration is given to transfers with both endpoints on the forbidden zone surface. Clohessy-Wiltshire equations of relative motion are employed to solve path constrained rendezvous problems. External and internal transfers between arbitrary points are analyzed in terms of tangential departure and arrival conditions. It is observed that single-impulse techniques are inadequate for transferring about the exterior of any LSS; however, single-impulse transfers are applicable for transfers in the interior of LSSs. It is concluded that single-impulse transducers are not applicable for path constrained rendezvous guidance.

  14. Path integral Liouville dynamics for thermal equilibrium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jian

    2014-06-14

    We show a new imaginary time path integral based method—path integral Liouville dynamics (PILD), which can be derived from the equilibrium Liouville dynamics [J. Liu and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 104101 (2011)] in the Wigner phase space. Numerical tests of PILD with the simple (white noise) Langevin thermostat have been made for two strongly anharmonic model problems. Since implementation of PILD does not request any specific form of the potential energy surface, the results suggest that PILD offers a potentially useful approach for general condensed phase molecular systems to have the two important properties: conserves the quantum canonical distribution and recovers exact thermal correlation functions (of even nonlinear operators, i.e., nonlinear functions of position or momentum operators) in the classical, high temperature, and harmonic limits.

  15. Balance Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Balance Problems About Balance Problems Have you ever felt dizzy, lightheaded, or ... dizziness problem during the past year. Why Good Balance is Important Having good balance means being able ...

  16. White Noise Path Integrals in Stochastic Neurodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpio-Bernido, M. Victoria; Bernido, Christopher C.

    2008-06-01

    The white noise path integral approach is used in stochastic modeling of neural activity, where the primary dynamical variables are the relative membrane potentials, while information on transmembrane ionic currents is contained in the drift coefficient. The white noise path integral allows a natural framework and can be evaluated explicitly to yield a closed form for the conditional probability density.

  17. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VI.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, M.

    1949-06-30

    This paper is a compilation of the essential results of our experimental work in the determination of the path of carbon in photosynthesis. There are discussions of the dark fixation of photosynthesis and methods of separation and identification including paper chromatography and radioautography. The definition of the path of carbon in photosynthesis by the distribution of radioactivity within the compounds is described.

  18. The path dependence of deformation texture development

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, T.; Kocks, U.F.; Wenk, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated for the case of three different strain paths, all of which end up with the same, elongated specimen shape, that the texture developed during straining is path dependent. This is true both for experiments on aluminum polycrystals and for simulations using the LApp code.

  19. Career Path Guide for Adult Career Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Clydia

    Intended for adults who are considering career choices or changes, this booklet provides opportunities for self-study and reflection in six career paths. The booklet begins with tips for long-term career survival and myths and realities of career planning. After a brief career survey, readers are introduced to six career paths: arts and…

  20. A Random Walk on a Circular Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, W.-K.; Lee, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    This short note introduces an interesting random walk on a circular path with cards of numbers. By using high school probability theory, it is proved that under some assumptions on the number of cards, the probability that a walker will return to a fixed position will tend to one as the length of the circular path tends to infinity.

  1. Cooperative organic mine avoidance path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, Christopher B.; Piatko, Christine D.; Peterson, Adam V.; Donnald, Creighton R.; Cohen, David

    2005-06-01

    The JHU/APL Path Planning team has developed path planning techniques to look for paths that balance the utility and risk associated with different routes through a minefield. Extending on previous years' efforts, we investigated real-world Naval mine avoidance requirements and developed a tactical decision aid (TDA) that satisfies those requirements. APL has developed new mine path planning techniques using graph based and genetic algorithms which quickly produce near-minimum risk paths for complicated fitness functions incorporating risk, path length, ship kinematics, and naval doctrine. The TDA user interface, a Java Swing application that obtains data via Corba interfaces to path planning databases, allows the operator to explore a fusion of historic and in situ mine field data, control the path planner, and display the planning results. To provide a context for the minefield data, the user interface also renders data from the Digital Nautical Chart database, a database created by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency containing charts of the world's ports and coastal regions. This TDA has been developed in conjunction with the COMID (Cooperative Organic Mine Defense) system. This paper presents a description of the algorithms, architecture, and application produced.

  2. Adaptively Ubiquitous Learning in Campus Math Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Shu-Chuan; Kuo, Bor-Chen; Liu, Yu-Lung

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to develop and evaluate the instructional model and learning system which integrate ubiquitous learning, computerized adaptive diagnostic testing system and campus math path learning. The researcher first creates a ubiquitous learning environment which is called "adaptive U-learning math path system". This…

  3. Connections on decorated path space bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Saikat; Lahiri, Amitabha; Sengupta, Ambar N.

    2017-02-01

    For a principal bundle P → M equipped with a connection A ¯ , we study an infinite dimensional bundle PA¯ dec P over the space of paths on M, with the points of PA¯ dec P being horizontal paths on P decorated with elements of a second structure group. We construct parallel transport processes on such bundles and study holonomy bundles in this setting.

  4. Evaluation of Calcine Disposition - Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Birrer

    2003-02-01

    This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

  5. Gerbertian paths for the Jubilee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2015-04-01

    Gerbert before becoming Pope Sylvester II came several times in Rome, as reported in his Letters and in the biography of Richerus. Eight places in Rome can be connected with Gerbertian memories. 1. The Cathedral of St. John in the Lateran where the gravestone of his tumb is still preserved near the Holy Door; 2. the “Basilica Hierusalem” (Santa Croce) where Gerbert had the stroke on May 3rd 1003 which lead him to death on May 12th; 3. the Aventine hill, with the church of the Knights of Malta in the place where the palace of the Ottonian Emperors was located; 4. the church of St. Bartholomew in the Tiber Island built in 997 under Otto III; 5. the Obelisk of Augustus in Montecitorio to remember the relationship between Gerbert, Astronomy and numbers which led the birth of the legends on Gerbert magician; 6. St. Mary Major end of the procession of August 15, 1000; 7. St. Paul outside the walls with the iconography of the Popes and 8. St. Peter's tumb end of all Romaei pilgrimages. This Gerbertian path in Rome suggests one way to accomplish the pilgrimage suggested by Pope Francis in the Bulla Misericordiae Vultus (14) of indiction of the new Jubilee.

  6. Bergman Kernel from Path Integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Michael R.; Klevtsov, Semyon

    2010-01-01

    We rederive the expansion of the Bergman kernel on Kähler manifolds developed by Tian, Yau, Zelditch, Lu and Catlin, using path integral and perturbation theory, and generalize it to supersymmetric quantum mechanics. One physics interpretation of this result is as an expansion of the projector of wave functions on the lowest Landau level, in the special case that the magnetic field is proportional to the Kähler form. This is relevant for the quantum Hall effect in curved space, and for its higher dimensional generalizations. Other applications include the theory of coherent states, the study of balanced metrics, noncommutative field theory, and a conjecture on metrics in black hole backgrounds discussed in [24]. We give a short overview of these various topics. From a conceptual point of view, this expansion is noteworthy as it is a geometric expansion, somewhat similar to the DeWitt-Seeley-Gilkey et al short time expansion for the heat kernel, but in this case describing the long time limit, without depending on supersymmetry.

  7. Precision Cleaning - Path to Premier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackler, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    ITT Space Systems Division s new Precision Cleaning facility provides critical cleaning and packaging of aerospace flight hardware and optical payloads to meet customer performance requirements. The Precision Cleaning Path to Premier Project was a 2007 capital project and is a key element in the approved Premier Resource Management - Integrated Supply Chain Footprint Optimization Project. Formerly precision cleaning was located offsite in a leased building. A new facility equipped with modern precision cleaning equipment including advanced process analytical technology and improved capabilities was designed and built after outsourcing solutions were investigated and found lacking in ability to meet quality specifications and schedule needs. SSD cleans parts that can range in size from a single threaded fastener all the way up to large composite structures. Materials that can be processed include optics, composites, metals and various high performance coatings. We are required to provide verification to our customers that we have met their particulate and molecular cleanliness requirements and we have that analytical capability in this new facility. The new facility footprint is approximately half the size of the former leased operation and provides double the amount of throughput. Process improvements and new cleaning equipment are projected to increase 1st pass yield from 78% to 98% avoiding $300K+/yr in rework costs. Cost avoidance of $350K/yr will result from elimination of rent, IT services, transportation, and decreased utility costs. Savings due to reduced staff expected to net $4-500K/yr.

  8. A clinical path for adult diabetes.

    PubMed

    Courtney, L; Gordon, M; Romer, L

    1997-01-01

    The use of clinical paths for patient care management was explored by this development team as a mechanism to provide consistent, high-quality care to hospitalized patients in high-volume, high-risk diagnostic categories. Reviewing the historical aspects and importance of clinical paths helped expand the team's perspective to incorporate pre- and posthospitalization phases of patient care into the clinical path being developed. A multidisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, health educators, and dietitians from both inpatient and outpatient departments of Kaiser-Santa Teresa Medical Center in San Jose, California, devised and implemented an Adult Diabetes Mellitus care path. Staff education preceded the implementation of the care paths. Measurements of quality indicators showed improvements in patient satisfaction, patient education, patient knowledge, and nutrition assessments.

  9. Interactive multi-objective path planning through a palette-based user interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Meher T.; Goodrich, Michael A.; Yi, Daqing; Hoehne, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    n a problem where a human uses supervisory control to manage robot path-planning, there are times when human does the path planning, and if satisfied commits those paths to be executed by the robot, and the robot executes that plan. In planning a path, the robot often uses an optimization algorithm that maximizes or minimizes an objective. When a human is assigned the task of path planning for robot, the human may care about multiple objectives. This work proposes a graphical user interface (GUI) designed for interactive robot path-planning when an operator may prefer one objective over others or care about how multiple objectives are traded off. The GUI represents multiple objectives using the metaphor of an artist's palette. A distinct color is used to represent each objective, and tradeoffs among objectives are balanced in a manner that an artist mixes colors to get the desired shade of color. Thus, human intent is analogous to the artist's shade of color. We call the GUI an "Adverb Palette" where the word "Adverb" represents a specific type of objective for the path, such as the adverbs "quickly" and "safely" in the commands: "travel the path quickly", "make the journey safely". The novel interactive interface provides the user an opportunity to evaluate various alternatives (that tradeoff between different objectives) by allowing her to visualize the instantaneous outcomes that result from her actions on the interface. In addition to assisting analysis of various solutions given by an optimization algorithm, the palette has additional feature of allowing the user to define and visualize her own paths, by means of waypoints (guiding locations) thereby spanning variety for planning. The goal of the Adverb Palette is thus to provide a way for the user and robot to find an acceptable solution even though they use very different representations of the problem. Subjective evaluations suggest that even non-experts in robotics can carry out the planning tasks with a

  10. A Generalized Orienteering Problem for Optimal Search and Interdiction Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    exploit this resource trade-o through a specialized branch -and- bound algorithm that relies on partial path relaxation problems , which often yield tight...computing inexpensive upper bounds based on a binary knapsack problem . This is possible because the arc lengths and rewards are xed values...algorithm that relies on partial path relaxation problems , which often yield tight bounds and lead to substantial pruning in the enumeration tree. We

  11. A global approach to kinematic path planning to robots with holonomic and nonholonomic constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divelbiss, Adam; Seereeram, Sanjeev; Wen, John T.

    1993-01-01

    Robots in applications may be subject to holonomic or nonholonomic constraints. Examples of holonomic constraints include a manipulator constrained through the contact with the environment, e.g., inserting a part, turning a crank, etc., and multiple manipulators constrained through a common payload. Examples of nonholonomic constraints include no-slip constraints on mobile robot wheels, local normal rotation constraints for soft finger and rolling contacts in grasping, and conservation of angular momentum of in-orbit space robots. The above examples all involve equality constraints; in applications, there are usually additional inequality constraints such as robot joint limits, self collision and environment collision avoidance constraints, steering angle constraints in mobile robots, etc. The problem of finding a kinematically feasible path that satisfies a given set of holonomic and nonholonomic constraints, of both equality and inequality types is addressed. The path planning problem is first posed as a finite time nonlinear control problem. This problem is subsequently transformed to a static root finding problem in an augmented space which can then be iteratively solved. The algorithm has shown promising results in planning feasible paths for redundant arms satisfying Cartesian path following and goal endpoint specifications, and mobile vehicles with multiple trailers. In contrast to local approaches, this algorithm is less prone to problems such as singularities and local minima.

  12. Smell Detection Agent Based Optimization Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinod Chandra, S. S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a novel nature-inspired optimization algorithm has been employed and the trained behaviour of dogs in detecting smell trails is adapted into computational agents for problem solving. The algorithm involves creation of a surface with smell trails and subsequent iteration of the agents in resolving a path. This algorithm can be applied in different computational constraints that incorporate path-based problems. Implementation of the algorithm can be treated as a shortest path problem for a variety of datasets. The simulated agents have been used to evolve the shortest path between two nodes in a graph. This algorithm is useful to solve NP-hard problems that are related to path discovery. This algorithm is also useful to solve many practical optimization problems. The extensive derivation of the algorithm can be enabled to solve shortest path problems.

  13. Nonholonomic catheter path reconstruction using electromagnetic tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Akl, Selim G.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Catheter path reconstruction is a necessary step in many clinical procedures, such as cardiovascular interventions and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. To overcome limitations of standard imaging modalities, electromagnetic tracking has been employed to reconstruct catheter paths. However, tracking errors pose a challenge in accurate path reconstructions. We address this challenge by means of a filtering technique incorporating the electromagnetic measurements with the nonholonomic motion constraints of the sensor inside a catheter. The nonholonomic motion model of the sensor within the catheter and the electromagnetic measurement data were integrated using an extended Kalman filter. The performance of our proposed approach was experimentally evaluated using the Ascension's 3D Guidance trakStar electromagnetic tracker. Sensor measurements were recorded during insertions of an electromagnetic sensor (model 55) along ten predefined ground truth paths. Our method was implemented in MATLAB and applied to the measurement data. Our reconstruction results were compared to raw measurements as well as filtered measurements provided by the manufacturer. The mean of the root-mean-square (RMS) errors along the ten paths was 3.7 mm for the raw measurements, and 3.3 mm with manufacturer's filters. Our approach effectively reduced the mean RMS error to 2.7 mm. Compared to other filtering methods, our approach successfully improved the path reconstruction accuracy by exploiting the sensor's nonholonomic motion constraints in its formulation. Our approach seems promising for a variety of clinical procedures involving reconstruction of a catheter path.

  14. Robot path planning using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, Timothy F.; Baffes, Paul T.; Wang, Liu

    1988-01-01

    Robot path planning can refer either to a mobile vehicle such as a Mars Rover, or to an end effector on an arm moving through a cluttered workspace. In both instances there may exist many solutions, some of which are better than others, either in terms of distance traversed, energy expended, or joint angle or reach capabilities. A path planning program has been developed based upon a genetic algorithm. This program assumes global knowledge of the terrain or workspace, and provides a family of good paths between the initial and final points. Initially, a set of valid random paths are constructed. Successive generations of valid paths are obtained using one of several possible reproduction strategies similar to those found in biological communities. A fitness function is defined to describe the goodness of the path, in this case including length, slope, and obstacle avoidance considerations. It was found that with some reproduction strategies, the average value of the fitness function improved for successive generations, and that by saving the best paths of each generation, one could quite rapidly obtain a collection of good candidate solutions.

  15. A note on the path integral representation for Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    Majorana fermions are currently of huge interest in the context of nanoscience and condensed matter physics. Different to usual fermions, Majorana fermions have the property that the particle is its own anti-particle thus, they must be described by real fields. Mathematically, this property makes nontrivial the quantization of the problem due, for instance, to the absence of a Wick-like theorem. In view of the present interest on the subject, it is important to develop different theoretical approaches in order to study problems where Majorana fermions are involved. In this note we show that Majorana fermions can be studied in the context of field theories for constrained systems. Using the Faddeev-Jackiw formalism for quantum field theories with constraints, we derived the path integral representation for Majorana fermions. In order to show the validity of the path integral we apply it to an exactly solvable problem. This application also shows that it is rather simple to perform systematic calculations on the basis of the present framework.

  16. Graphs and matroids weighted in a bounded incline algebra.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling-Xia; Zhang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Firstly, for a graph weighted in a bounded incline algebra (or called a dioid), a longest path problem (LPP, for short) is presented, which can be considered the uniform approach to the famous shortest path problem, the widest path problem, and the most reliable path problem. The solutions for LPP and related algorithms are given. Secondly, for a matroid weighted in a linear matroid, the maximum independent set problem is studied.

  17. Path integral measure, constraints and ghosts for massive gravitons with a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Metaxas, Dimitrios

    2009-12-15

    For massive gravity in a de Sitter background one encounters problems of stability when the curvature is larger than the graviton mass. I analyze this situation from the path integral point of view and show that it is related to the conformal factor problem of Euclidean quantum (massless) gravity. When a constraint for massive gravity is incorporated and the proper treatment of the path integral measure is taken into account one finds that, for particular choices of the DeWitt metric on the space of metrics (in fact, the same choices as in the massless case), one obtains the opposite bound on the graviton mass.

  18. A Comparison of Risk Sensitive Path Planning Methods for Aircraft Emergency Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuleau, Nicolas; Plaunt, Christian; Smith, David E.; Smith, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    Determining the best site to land a damaged aircraft presents some interesting challenges for standard path planning techniques. There are multiple possible locations to consider, the space is 3-dimensional with dynamics, the criteria for a good path is determined by overall risk rather than distance or time, and optimization really matters, since an improved path corresponds to greater expected survival rate. We have investigated a number of different path planning methods for solving this problem, including cell decomposition, visibility graphs, probabilistic road maps (PRMs), and local search techniques. In their pure form, none of these techniques have proven to be entirely satisfactory - some are too slow or unpredictable, some produce highly non-optimal paths or do not find certain types of paths, and some do not cope well with the dynamic constraints when controllability is limited. In the end, we are converging towards a hybrid technique that involves seeding a roadmap with a layered visibility graph, using PRM to extend that roadmap, and using local search to further optimize the resulting paths. We describe the techniques we have investigated, report on our experiments with these techniques, and discuss when and why various techniques were unsatisfactory.

  19. A path to integration in an academic health science center.

    PubMed Central

    Panko, W. B.; Wilson, W.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes a networking and integration strategy in use at the University of Michigan Medical Center. This strategy builds upon the existing technology base and is designed to provide a roadmap that will direct short-term development along a productive, long-term path. It offers a way to permit the short-term development of incremental solutions to current problems while at the same time maximizing the likelihood that these incremental efforts can be recycled into a more comprehensive approach. PMID:1336413

  20. Smart random walkers: the cost of knowing the path.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Juan I; Billoni, Orlando V

    2012-07-01

    In this work we study the problem of targeting signals in networks using entropy information measurements to quantify the cost of targeting. We introduce a penalization rule that imposes a restriction on the long paths and therefore focuses the signal to the target. By this scheme we go continuously from fully random walkers to walkers biased to the target. We found that the optimal degree of penalization is mainly determined by the topology of the network. By analyzing several examples, we have found that a small amount of penalization reduces considerably the typical walk length, and from this we conclude that a network can be efficiently navigated with restricted information.

  1. Path planning in uncertain flow fields using ensemble method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Le Maître, Olivier P.; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Knio, Omar M.

    2016-10-01

    An ensemble-based approach is developed to conduct optimal path planning in unsteady ocean currents under uncertainty. We focus our attention on two-dimensional steady and unsteady uncertain flows, and adopt a sampling methodology that is well suited to operational forecasts, where an ensemble of deterministic predictions is used to model and quantify uncertainty. In an operational setting, much about dynamics, topography, and forcing of the ocean environment is uncertain. To address this uncertainty, the flow field is parametrized using a finite number of independent canonical random variables with known densities, and the ensemble is generated by sampling these variables. For each of the resulting realizations of the uncertain current field, we predict the path that minimizes the travel time by solving a boundary value problem (BVP), based on the Pontryagin maximum principle. A family of backward-in-time trajectories starting at the end position is used to generate suitable initial values for the BVP solver. This allows us to examine and analyze the performance of the sampling strategy and to develop insight into extensions dealing with general circulation ocean models. In particular, the ensemble method enables us to perform a statistical analysis of travel times and consequently develop a path planning approach that accounts for these statistics. The proposed methodology is tested for a number of scenarios. We first validate our algorithms by reproducing simple canonical solutions, and then demonstrate our approach in more complex flow fields, including idealized, steady and unsteady double-gyre flows.

  2. Planning Paths Through Singularities in the Center of Mass Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.; Messner, William C.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The center of mass space is a convenient space for planning motions that minimize reaction forces at the robot's base or optimize the stability of a mechanism. A unique problem associated with path planning in the center of mass space is the potential existence of multiple center of mass images for a single Cartesian obstacle, since a single center of mass location can correspond to multiple robot joint configurations. The existence of multiple images results in a need to either maintain multiple center of mass obstacle maps or to update obstacle locations when the robot passes through a singularity, such as when it moves from an elbow-up to an elbow-down configuration. To illustrate the concepts presented in this paper, a path is planned for an example task requiring motion through multiple center of mass space maps. The object of the path planning algorithm is to locate the bang- bang acceleration profile that minimizes the robot's base reactions in the presence of a single Cartesian obstacle. To simplify the presentation, only non-redundant robots are considered and joint non-linearities are neglected.

  3. Explore Stochastic Instabilities of Periodic Points by Transition Path Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yu; Lin, Ling; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    We consider the noise-induced transitions from a linearly stable periodic orbit consisting of T periodic points in randomly perturbed discrete logistic map. Traditional large deviation theory and asymptotic analysis at small noise limit cannot distinguish the quantitative difference in noise-induced stochastic instabilities among the T periodic points. To attack this problem, we generalize the transition path theory to the discrete-time continuous-space stochastic process. In our first criterion to quantify the relative instability among T periodic points, we use the distribution of the last passage location related to the transitions from the whole periodic orbit to a prescribed disjoint set. This distribution is related to individual contributions to the transition rate from each periodic points. The second criterion is based on the competency of the transition paths associated with each periodic point. Both criteria utilize the reactive probability current in the transition path theory. Our numerical results for the logistic map reveal the transition mechanism of escaping from the stable periodic orbit and identify which periodic point is more prone to lose stability so as to make successful transitions under random perturbations.

  4. Two Paths Diverged: Exploring Trajectories, Protocols, and Dynamic Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingrich, Todd Robert

    Using tools of statistical mechanics, it is routine to average over the distribution of microscopic configurations to obtain equilibrium free energies. These free energies teach us about the most likely molecular arrangements and the probability of observing deviations from the norm. Frequently, it is necessary to interrogate the probability not just of static arrangements, but of dynamical events, in which case analogous statistical mechanical tools may be applied to study the distribution of molecular trajectories. Numerical study of these trajectory spaces requires algorithms which efficiently sample the possible trajectories. We study in detail one such Monte Carlo algorithm, transition path sampling, and use a non- equilibrium statistical mechanical perspective to illuminate why the algorithm cannot easily be adapted to study some problems involving long-timescale dynamics. Algorithmically generating highly-correlated trajectories, a necessity for transition path sampling, grows exponentially more challenging for longer trajectories unless the dynamics is strongly-guided by the "noise history", the sequence of random numbers representing the noise terms in the stochastic dynamics. Langevin dynamics of Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) particles in two dimensions lacks this strong noise guidance, so it is challenging to use transition path sampling to study rare dynamical events in long trajectories of WCA particles. The spin flip dynamics of a two-dimensional Ising model, on the other hand, can be guided by the noise history to achieve efficient path sampling. For systems that can be efficiently sampled with path sampling, we show that it is possible to simultaneously sample both the paths and the (potentially vast) space of non-equilibrium protocols to efficiently learn how rate constants vary with protocols and to identify low-dissipation protocols. When high-dimensional molecular dynamics can be coarse-grained and represented by a simplified dynamics on a low

  5. Development Paths in Archaeological Surveying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbagh, A.

    2005-05-01

    Geophysical surveys of archaeological sites began in 1938, when an electrical survey was performed at the historical site of Williamsburg (Virginia, USA). Its full development, however, has been achieved by several European teams, which have continuously worked on it since the fifties. Geophysical survey is one step of archaeological site reconnaissance, which comprises many other non-invasive techniques such as document studies, field walking, air photo interpretation...Nevertheless solely geophysical techniques allow a direct exploration of the underground itself over a significant depth of investigation. Several physical properties can be measured to detect and map archaeological features and/or remains but electrical resistivity and magnetisation has been commonly used for fifty years and dielectric permittivity more recently. The major path of the technical evolution was to increase both the speed of the survey and the size of the area by using short measurement duration (less than 0.1 s) and to incorporate mechanical systems that allow the continuous pulling of the sensors on the field. Magnetic measurements are thus achieved either by fluxgate or optically pumped sensors, while electrical measurements are achieved by mobile multi-pole systems simultaneously over two or three different depths. In such surveys the mesh grid is 1 x 1 m or 0.5 x 0.5 m. Another aim is to limit the size of the surveyed area but to increase the geometrical resolution by using ground penetrating radars (GPR) with a very fine mesh (0.2 x 0.2 m) and by processing the data by `time slices' which allow to follow precisely the extension in depth of the different features. In addition for magnetic features, the simultaneous inversion of magnetic field and susceptibility (and soon viscosity) measurements using linear filtering allows the differentiation among the types of magnetization and allows for an improved determination of the depths of magnetic property contrasts. By considering the

  6. BOOK REVIEW: Path Integrals in Field Theory: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, Lewis

    2004-06-01

    In the 1960s Feynman was known to particle physicists as one of the people who solved the major problems of quantum electrodynamics, his contribution famously introducing what are now called Feynman diagrams. To other physicists he gained a reputation as the author of the Feynman Lectures on Physics; in addition some people were aware of his work on the path integral formulation of quantum theory, and a very few knew about his work on gravitation and Yang--Mills theories, which made use of path integral methods. Forty years later the scene is rather different. Many of the problems of high energy physics are solved; and the standard model incorporates Feynman's path integral method as a way of proving the renormalisability of the gauge (Yang--Mills) theories involved. Gravitation is proving a much harder nut to crack, but here also questions of renormalisability are couched in path-integral language. What is more, theoretical studies of condensed matter physics now also appeal to this technique for quantisation, so the path integral method is becoming part of the standard apparatus of theoretical physics. Chapters on it appear in a number of recent books, and a few books have appeared devoted to this topic alone; the book under review is a very recent one. Path integral techniques have the advantage of enormous conceptual appeal and the great disadvantage of mathematical complexity, this being partly the result of messy integrals but more fundamentally due to the notions of functional differentiation and integration which are involved in the method. All in all this subject is not such an easy ride. Mosel's book, described as an introduction, is aimed at graduate students and research workers in particle physics. It assumes a background knowledge of quantum mechanics, both non-relativistic and relativistic. After three chapters on the path integral formulation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics there are eight chapters on scalar and spinor field theory, followed

  7. Bioinspired Coordinated Path Following for Vessels with Speed Saturation Based on Virtual Leader

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mingyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the coordinated path following of multiple marine vessels with speed saturation. Based on virtual leader strategy, the authors show how the neural dynamic model and passivity-based techniques are brought together to yield a distributed control strategy. The desired path following is achieved by means of a virtual dynamic leader, whose controller is designed based on the biological neural shunting model. Utilizing the characteristic of bounded and smooth output of neural dynamic model, the tracking error jump is avoided and speed saturation problem is solved in straight path. Meanwhile, the coordinated path following of multiple vessels with a desired spatial formation is achieved through defining the formation reference point. The consensus of formation reference point is realized by using the synchronization controller based on passivity. Finally, simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed coordinated algorithm. PMID:27034652

  8. Thermodynamic Metrics and Optimal Paths

    SciTech Connect

    Sivak, David; Crooks, Gavin

    2012-05-08

    A fundamental problem in modern thermodynamics is how a molecular-scale machine performs useful work, while operating away from thermal equilibrium without excessive dissipation. To this end, we derive a friction tensor that induces a Riemannian manifold on the space of thermodynamic states. Within the linear-response regime, this metric structure controls the dissipation of finite-time transformations, and bestows optimal protocols with many useful properties. We discuss the connection to the existing thermodynamic length formalism, and demonstrate the utility of this metric by solving for optimal control parameter protocols in a simple nonequilibrium model.

  9. Handbook for the estimation of microwave propagation effects: Link calculations for earth-space paths (path loss and noise estimation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, R. K.; Blood, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    A single model for a standard of comparison for other models when dealing with rain attenuation problems in system design and experimentation is proposed. Refinements to the Global Rain Production Model are incorporated. Path loss and noise estimation procedures as the basic input to systems design for earth-to-space microwave links operating at frequencies from 1 to 300 GHz are provided. Topics covered include gaseous absorption, attenuation by rain, ionospheric and tropospheric scintillation, low elevation angle effects, radome attenuation, diversity schemes, link calculation, and receiver noise emission by atmospheric gases, rain, and antenna contributions.

  10. Animation: Path of 2010 Solar Eclipse

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Sunday, 2010 July 11, a total eclipse of the Sun is visible from within a narrow corridor that traverses Earth's southern hemisphere. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow crosses the South Pacif...

  11. IRIS Optical Instrument and Light Paths

    NASA Video Gallery

    The optical portion of the instrument and the light paths from the primary and secondary mirror of the telescope assembly into the spectrograph. The spectrograph then breaks the light into 2 Near U...

  12. Riemann Curvature Tensor and Closed Geodesic Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morganstern, Ralph E.

    1977-01-01

    Demonstrates erroneous results obtained if change in a vector under parallel transport about a closed path in Riemannian spacetime is made in a complete circuit rather than just half a circuit. (Author/SL)

  13. Orbital Path of the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts Don Pettit, Andre Kuipers and Dan Burbank explain the orbital path of the International Space Station. Earth video credit: Image Science and Analysis Laboratory, NASA's Johnson Space Cen...

  14. Path Integral Approach to Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Allison

    2016-09-01

    The Path Integral technique is an alternative formulation of quantum mechanics that is based on a Lagrangian approach. In its exact form, it is completely equivalent to the Hamiltonian-based Schrödinger equation approach. Developed by Feynman in the 1940's, following inspiration from Dirac, the path integral approach has been widely used in high energy physics, quantum field theory, and statistical mechanics. However, only in limited cases has the path integral approach been applied to quantum mechanical few-body scattering. We present a theoretical and computational development of the path integral method for use in the study of atomic collisions. Preliminary results are presented for some simple systems. Ultimately, this approach will be applied to few-body ion-atom collisions. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1505217.

  15. Local-time representation of path integrals.

    PubMed

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x-dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x(t) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x. Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed.

  16. A chemist building paths to cell biology.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-11-01

    Galileo is reported to have stated, "Measure what is measurable and make measurable what is not so." My group's trajectory in cell biology has closely followed this philosophy, although it took some searching to find this path.

  17. Identifying decohering paths in closed quantum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas

    1990-01-01

    A specific proposal is discussed for how to identify decohering paths in a wavefunction of the universe. The emphasis is on determining the correlations among subsystems and then considering how these correlations evolve. The proposal is similar to earlier ideas of Schroedinger and of Zeh, but in other ways it is closer to the decoherence functional of Griffiths, Omnes, and Gell-Mann and Hartle. There are interesting differences with each of these which are discussed. Once a given coarse-graining is chosen, the candidate paths are fixed in this scheme, and a single well defined number measures the degree of decoherence for each path. The normal probability sum rules are exactly obeyed (instantaneously) by these paths regardless of the level of decoherence. Also briefly discussed is how one might quantify some other aspects of classicality. The important role that concrete calculations play in testing this and other proposals is stressed.

  18. QoS routing via multiple paths using bandwidth reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, N.S.V.; Batsell, S.G.

    1998-01-01

    The authors address the problem of computing a multipath, consisting of possibly overlapping paths, to transmit data from the source node s to the destination node d over a computer network while ensuring deterministic bounds on end-to-end delay or delivery rate.They consider two generic routing problems within the framework wherein bandwidth can be reserved, and guaranteed, once reserved, on various links of the communication network. The first problem requires that a message of finite length be transmitted from s to d within {tau} units of time. The second problem requires that a sequential message of r units be transmitted at a rate of {eta} such that maximum time difference between two units that are received out of order is no more than q. They propose a polynomial-time algorithm to the first problem based on an adaptation of the classical Ford-Fulkerson`s method. They present simulation results to illustrate the applicability of the proposed algorithm. They show the second problem to be NP-complete, and propose a polynomial-time approximately solution.

  19. QoS routing via multiple paths using bandwidth reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, N.S.V.; Batsell, S.G.

    1997-11-01

    The authors address the problem of computing a multipath, consisting of possibly overlapping paths, to transmit data from the source node s to the destination node d over a computer network while ensuring deterministic bounds on end-to-end delay or delivery rate. They consider two generic routing problems within the framework wherein bandwidth can be reserved, and guaranteed, once reserved, on various links of the communication network. The first problem requires that a message of finite length be transmitted from s to d within {tau} units of time. The second problem requires that a sequential message of r units be transmitted at a rate of {eta} such that maximum time difference between two units that are received out of order is no more than q. They propose a polynomial-time algorithm to the first problem based on an adaptation of the classical Ford-Fulkerson`s method. They present simulation results to illustrate the applicability of the proposed algorithm. They show the second problem to be NP-complete and propose a polynomial-time approximate solution.

  20. Path Tracking Using Simple Planar curves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    identify by block number) FIELD IGROUP SUB-GROUP Path Planning, Obstacle Avoidance, Autonomous Vehicle Motion 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if...algorithm, the method shall be incorporated into a robot’s software system. This path tracking method will lay the groundwork for a dynamic obstacle ...dynamic obstacle avoidance system for a mobile robot. Accesion For NTIS CRA& L U,.a i.O,,-.ed l ju.-Affcation o........................ By D:;t ibutioa i

  1. The prediction of radio-path characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitina, G. M.; Kalinin, Iu. K.

    The paper examines algorithms for the long-term prediction of radio-path characteristics in the ionosphere, the main characteristic being the MUF at a given distance. The proposed approach is based on long-term memories called DATA BANKS. Attention is given to the characteritics of the various banks, including the BANK OF CITIES, the BANK OF RADIO PATHS, the REFERENCE DATA BANK, and the OUTPUT DATA BANK.

  2. Path Selection in a Poisson field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Yossi; Rothman, Daniel H.

    2016-11-01

    A criterion for path selection for channels growing in a Poisson field is presented. We invoke a generalization of the principle of local symmetry. We then use this criterion to grow channels in a confined geometry. The channel trajectories reveal a self-similar shape as they reach steady state. Analyzing their paths, we identify a cause for branching that may result in a ramified structure in which the golden ratio appears.

  3. A Scheduling Algorithm for Cloud Computing System Based on the Driver of Dynamic Essential Path.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhiqiang; Shao, Xia; Xin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    To solve the problem of task scheduling in the cloud computing system, this paper proposes a scheduling algorithm for cloud computing based on the driver of dynamic essential path (DDEP). This algorithm applies a predecessor-task layer priority strategy to solve the problem of constraint relations among task nodes. The strategy assigns different priority values to every task node based on the scheduling order of task node as affected by the constraint relations among task nodes, and the task node list is generated by the different priority value. To address the scheduling order problem in which task nodes have the same priority value, the dynamic essential long path strategy is proposed. This strategy computes the dynamic essential path of the pre-scheduling task nodes based on the actual computation cost and communication cost of task node in the scheduling process. The task node that has the longest dynamic essential path is scheduled first as the completion time of task graph is indirectly influenced by the finishing time of task nodes in the longest dynamic essential path. Finally, we demonstrate the proposed algorithm via simulation experiments using Matlab tools. The experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm can effectively reduce the task Makespan in most cases and meet a high quality performance objective.

  4. A Scheduling Algorithm for Cloud Computing System Based on the Driver of Dynamic Essential Path

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhiqiang; Shao, Xia; Xin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    To solve the problem of task scheduling in the cloud computing system, this paper proposes a scheduling algorithm for cloud computing based on the driver of dynamic essential path (DDEP). This algorithm applies a predecessor-task layer priority strategy to solve the problem of constraint relations among task nodes. The strategy assigns different priority values to every task node based on the scheduling order of task node as affected by the constraint relations among task nodes, and the task node list is generated by the different priority value. To address the scheduling order problem in which task nodes have the same priority value, the dynamic essential long path strategy is proposed. This strategy computes the dynamic essential path of the pre-scheduling task nodes based on the actual computation cost and communication cost of task node in the scheduling process. The task node that has the longest dynamic essential path is scheduled first as the completion time of task graph is indirectly influenced by the finishing time of task nodes in the longest dynamic essential path. Finally, we demonstrate the proposed algorithm via simulation experiments using Matlab tools. The experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm can effectively reduce the task Makespan in most cases and meet a high quality performance objective. PMID:27490901

  5. Walking Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parkinson's disease Diseases such as arthritis or multiple sclerosis Vision or balance problems Treatment of walking problems depends on the cause. Physical therapy, surgery, or mobility aids may help.

  6. Quantum cosmology based on discrete Feynman paths

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, Geoffrey F.

    2002-10-10

    Although the rules for interpreting local quantum theory imply discretization of process, Lorentz covariance is usually regarded as precluding time quantization. Nevertheless a time-discretized quantum representation of redshifting spatially-homogeneous universe may be based on discrete-step Feynman paths carrying causal Lorentz-invariant action--paths that not only propagate the wave function but provide a phenomenologically-promising elementary-particle Hilbert-space basis. In a model under development, local path steps are at Planck scale while, at a much larger ''wave-function scale'', global steps separate successive wave-functions. Wave-function spacetime is but a tiny fraction of path spacetime. Electromagnetic and gravitational actions are ''at a distance'' in Wheeler-Feynman sense while strong (color) and weak (isospin) actions, as well as action of particle motion, are ''local'' in a sense paralleling the action of local field theory. ''Nonmaterial'' path segments and ''trivial events'' collaborate to define energy and gravity. Photons coupled to conserved electric charge enjoy privileged model status among elementary fermions and vector bosons. Although real path parameters provide no immediate meaning for ''measurement'', the phase of the complex wave function allows significance for ''information'' accumulated through ''gentle'' electromagnetic events involving charged matter and ''soft'' photons. Through its soft-photon content the wave function is an ''information reservoir''.

  7. Three-Dimensional Path Planning Software-Assisted Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: A Technical Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsauo, Jiaywei Luo, Xuefeng; Ye, Linchao; Li, Xiao

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to report our results with a modified technique of three-dimensional (3D) path planning software assisted transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS).Methods3D path planning software was recently developed to facilitate TIPS creation by using two carbon dioxide portograms acquired at least 20° apart to generate a 3D path for overlay needle guidance. However, one shortcoming is that puncturing along the overlay would be technically impossible if the angle of the liver access set and the angle of the 3D path are not the same. To solve this problem, a prototype 3D path planning software was fitted with a utility to calculate the angle of the 3D path. Using this, we modified the angle of the liver access set accordingly during the procedure in ten patients.ResultsFailure for technical reasons occurred in three patients (unsuccessful wedged hepatic venography in two cases, software technical failure in one case). The procedure was successful in the remaining seven patients, and only one needle pass was required to obtain portal vein access in each case. The course of puncture was comparable to the 3D path in all patients. No procedure-related complication occurred following the procedures.ConclusionsAdjusting the angle of the liver access set to match the angle of the 3D path determined by the software appears to be a favorable modification to the technique of 3D path planning software assisted TIPS.

  8. Calibration of neural networks using genetic algorithms, with application to optimal path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Terence R.; Pitney, Gilbert A.; Greenwood, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    Genetic algorithms (GA) are used to search the synaptic weight space of artificial neural systems (ANS) for weight vectors that optimize some network performance function. GAs do not suffer from some of the architectural constraints involved with other techniques and it is straightforward to incorporate terms into the performance function concerning the metastructure of the ANS. Hence GAs offer a remarkably general approach to calibrating ANS. GAs are applied to the problem of calibrating an ANS that finds optimal paths over a given surface. This problem involves training an ANS on a relatively small set of paths and then examining whether the calibrated ANS is able to find good paths between arbitrary start and end points on the surface.

  9. The Study of Intelligent Vehicle Navigation Path Based on Behavior Coordination of Particle Swarm

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gaining; Fu, Weiping; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    In the behavior dynamics model, behavior competition leads to the shock problem of the intelligent vehicle navigation path, because of the simultaneous occurrence of the time-variant target behavior and obstacle avoidance behavior. Considering the safety and real-time of intelligent vehicle, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is proposed to solve these problems for the optimization of weight coefficients of the heading angle and the path velocity. Firstly, according to the behavior dynamics model, the fitness function is defined concerning the intelligent vehicle driving characteristics, the distance between intelligent vehicle and obstacle, and distance of intelligent vehicle and target. Secondly, behavior coordination parameters that minimize the fitness function are obtained by particle swarm optimization algorithms. Finally, the simulation results show that the optimization method and its fitness function can improve the perturbations of the vehicle planning path and real-time and reliability. PMID:26880881

  10. The Problems of Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Charles E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses some common pitfalls in problem-solving and outlines three basic approaches to successfully identifying problems and their causes. (Available from Business Horizons, School of Business, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47401; $2.50, single copy) (Author/JG)

  11. Multiple Damage Progression Paths in Model-Based Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew; Goebel, Kai Frank

    2011-01-01

    Model-based prognostics approaches employ domain knowledge about a system, its components, and how they fail through the use of physics-based models. Component wear is driven by several different degradation phenomena, each resulting in their own damage progression path, overlapping to contribute to the overall degradation of the component. We develop a model-based prognostics methodology using particle filters, in which the problem of characterizing multiple damage progression paths is cast as a joint state-parameter estimation problem. The estimate is represented as a probability distribution, allowing the prediction of end of life and remaining useful life within a probabilistic framework that supports uncertainty management. We also develop a novel variance control mechanism that maintains an uncertainty bound around the hidden parameters to limit the amount of estimation uncertainty and, consequently, reduce prediction uncertainty. We construct a detailed physics-based model of a centrifugal pump, to which we apply our model-based prognostics algorithms. We illustrate the operation of the prognostic solution with a number of simulation-based experiments and demonstrate the performance of the chosen approach when multiple damage mechanisms are active

  12. Oceanic Path Effects of Microseismic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Wen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Microseismic surface waves originating from sources in ocean would propagate along parts of oceanic path before being recorded by on-land seismic stations. Studying the path effects on waveform, travel-time, magnitude and other properties of these microseismic signals is important in accurately determining the location, strength and generating mechanism of the sources. Strong effects are observed in the microseismic signals generated by Hurricane Sandy in 2012, and verified by synthetic seismograms. We find that Sandy-related seismic signals are significantly affected by oceanic path: only seismic signals share a similar length of oceanic path are cross-correlated and a large portion of the correlated signals can be traced back to sources at the ocean-continent boundary within a narrow azimuthal range from the hurricane center. In this presentation, we report that these observations can be explained by strong path effect of wave propagation from a seismic source in the hurricane center. The strong directionality of waveform cross-correlation can be explained by the propagation effect that waveform characteristics of Rayleigh wave are mostly controlled by transitional propagating path from ocean to the continental region, resulting in seismic signals being correlated only among stations sharing similar length of oceanic path; the sources at the ocean-continent boundary can be attributed to strong seismic scattering in the ocean-continent boundary, generating apparent seismic "sources" there. We also compare the synthetic vertical/transverse magnitude ratio of Rayleigh waves in an anisotropic velocity model with observations. Our results indicate that these types of seismic observations would be particularly useful for studying seismic structure of crust and upper mantle in the ocean-continent area.

  13. Errata to the Werts-Linn Comments on Boyle's "Path Analysis and Ordinal Data."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werts, Charles E.; Linn, Robert L.

    The Werts-Linn procedure for dealing with categorical errors of measurement in "Comments on Boyle's 'Path Analysis and Ordinal Data'" in The American Journal of Sociology, volume 76, number 6, May 1971, is shown to be inappropriate to the problem of ordered categories. (For related document, see TM 002 301.) (DB)

  14. Clearing the Path tor All of Us Where Trains Once Ran.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Judy

    1990-01-01

    Describes the concept behind the rail-to-trails movement; the history, process and problems of converting abandoned railroad beds to bike and walking paths. Introduces the concept and trend of ergo, or linear parks, corridors, and greenways to meet the increasing need for public access to land for recreational purposes. (MCO)

  15. An Evaluation of the Preschool PATHS Curriculum on the Development of Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Cerian; Cline, Tony

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of preschool Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS), an early years curriculum designed to improve children's social and emotional competence, and reduce problem behaviour. Fifty-seven children aged three to four years took part in the study over one academic year. The control group (Group 1) received…

  16. Educational Process Navigator as Means of Creation of Individual Educational Path of a Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khuziakhmetov, Anvar N.; Sytina, Nadezhda S.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale of the problem stated in the article is caused by search for new alternative models for individual educational paths of students in the continuous multi-level education system on the basis of the navigators of the educational process, being a visual matrix of individual educational space. The purpose of the article is to develop the…

  17. Coherent-state path integrals in the continuum: The SU(2) case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordas, G.; Kalantzis, D.; Karanikas, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    We define the time-continuous spin coherent-state path integral in a way that is free from inconsistencies. The proposed definition is used to reproduce known exact results. Such a formalism opens new possibilities for applying approximations with improved accuracy and can be proven useful in a great variety of problems where spin Hamiltonians are used.

  18. Optimal UAV Path Planning for Tracking a Moving Ground Vehicle with a Gimbaled Camera

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    optimization. The next step is to find the optimal path for a given ground profile by using nonlinear programming ( NLP ) to solve the optimal control problem...that the choice of the NLP solver can have an effect on the solution. For more information about both the IPM and ASM solvers see reference [15]. The

  19. Promoting Social and Emotional Competencies among Young Children in Croatia with Preschool PATHS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihic, Josipa; Novak, Miranda; Basic, Josipa; Nix, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Preschool PATHS (Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies) is an evidence-based universal prevention program focused on promoting children's social and emotional competencies and reducing the likelihood of behaviour problems and negative relationships with peers and teachers. This paper examines changes in the social and emotional competencies of…

  20. Path Analysis on Educational Fiscal Decision-Making Mechanism in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Hongbin; Sun, Baicai

    2007-01-01

    In China's current educational fiscal decision making, problems are as follows: no law to trust or not abiding by available laws, absence of equity and efficiency, as well as the standardization of decision-making procedures. It is necessary to set up effective fiscal decision-making mechanism in education and rationally devise reliable paths.

  1. The formal path integral and quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson-Freyd, Theo

    2010-11-15

    Given an arbitrary Lagrangian function on R{sup d} and a choice of classical path, one can try to define Feynman's path integral supported near the classical path as a formal power series parameterized by 'Feynman diagrams', although these diagrams may diverge. We compute this expansion and show that it is (formally, if there are ultraviolet divergences) invariant under volume-preserving changes of coordinates. We prove that if the ultraviolet divergences cancel at each order, then our formal path integral satisfies a 'Fubini theorem' expressing the standard composition law for the time evolution operator in quantum mechanics. Moreover, we show that when the Lagrangian is inhomogeneous quadratic in velocity such that its homogeneous-quadratic part is given by a matrix with constant determinant, then the divergences cancel at each order. Thus, by 'cutting and pasting' and choosing volume-compatible local coordinates, our construction defines a Feynman-diagrammatic 'formal path integral' for the nonrelativistic quantum mechanics of a charged particle moving in a Riemannian manifold with an external electromagnetic field.

  2. Unbiased sampling of lattice Hamilton path ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansfield, Marc L.

    2006-10-01

    Hamilton paths, or Hamiltonian paths, are walks on a lattice which visit each site exactly once. They have been proposed as models of globular proteins and of compact polymers. A previously published algorithm [Mansfield, Macromolecules 27, 5924 (1994)] for sampling Hamilton paths on simple square and simple cubic lattices is tested for bias and for efficiency. Because the algorithm is a Metropolis Monte Carlo technique obviously satisfying detailed balance, we need only demonstrate ergodicity to ensure unbiased sampling. Two different tests for ergodicity (exact enumeration on small lattices, nonexhaustive enumeration on larger lattices) demonstrate ergodicity unequivocally for small lattices and provide strong support for ergodicity on larger lattices. Two other sampling algorithms [Ramakrishnan et al., J. Chem. Phys. 103, 7592 (1995); Lua et al., Polymer 45, 717 (2004)] are both known to produce biases on both 2×2×2 and 3×3×3 lattices, but it is shown here that the current algorithm gives unbiased sampling on these same lattices. Successive Hamilton paths are strongly correlated, so that many iterations are required between statistically independent samples. Rules for estimating the number of iterations needed to dissipate these correlations are given. However, the iteration time is so fast that the efficiency is still very good except on extremely large lattices. For example, even on lattices of total size 10×10×10 we are able to generate tens of thousands of uncorrelated Hamilton paths per hour of CPU time.

  3. Dynamical mechanism in aero-engine gas path system using minimum spanning tree and detrended cross-correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Keqiang; Zhang, Hong; Gao, You

    2017-01-01

    Identifying the mutual interaction in aero-engine gas path system is a crucial problem that facilitates the understanding of emerging structures in complex system. By employing the multiscale multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis method to aero-engine gas path system, the cross-correlation characteristics between gas path system parameters are established. Further, we apply multiscale multifractal detrended cross-correlation distance matrix and minimum spanning tree to investigate the mutual interactions of gas path variables. The results can infer that the low-spool rotor speed (N1) and engine pressure ratio (EPR) are main gas path parameters. The application of proposed method contributes to promote our understanding of the internal mechanisms and structures of aero-engine dynamics.

  4. When Does Changing Representation Improve Problem-Solving Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holte, Robert; Zimmer, Robert; MacDonald, Alan

    1992-01-01

    The aim of changing representation is the improvement of problem-solving efficiency. For the most widely studied family of methods of change of representation it is shown that the value of a single parameter, called the expulsion factor, is critical in determining (1) whether the change of representation will improve or degrade problem-solving efficiency and (2) whether the solutions produced using the change of representation will or will not be exponentially longer than the shortest solution. A method of computing the expansion factor for a given change of representation is sketched in general and described in detail for homomorphic changes of representation. The results are illustrated with homomorphic decompositions of the Towers of Hanoi problem.

  5. Speed-up hyperspheres homotopic path tracking algorithm for PWL circuits simulations.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Pinero, A; Vazquez-Leal, H; Jimenez-Fernandez, V M; Sedighi, H M; Rashidi, M M; Filobello-Nino, U; Castaneda-Sheissa, R; Huerta-Chua, J; Sarmiento-Reyes, L A; Laguna-Camacho, J R; Castro-Gonzalez, F

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we introduce an improved version of the hyperspheres path tracking method adapted for piecewise linear (PWL) circuits. This enhanced version takes advantage of the PWL characteristics from the homotopic curve, achieving faster path tracking and improving the performance of the homotopy continuation method (HCM). Faster computing time allows the study of complex circuits with higher complexity; the proposed method also decrease, significantly, the probability of having a diverging problem when using the Newton-Raphson method because it is applied just twice per linear region on the homotopic path. Equilibrium equations of the studied circuits are obtained applying the modified nodal analysis; this method allows to propose an algorithm for nonlinear circuit analysis. Besides, a starting point criteria is proposed to obtain better performance of the HCM and a technique for avoiding the reversion phenomenon is also proposed. To prove the efficiency of the path tracking method, several cases study with bipolar (BJT) and CMOS transistors are provided. Simulation results show that the proposed approach can be up to twelve times faster than the original path tracking method and also helps to avoid several reversion cases that appears when original hyperspheres path tracking scheme was employed.

  6. The use of 3-D sensing techniques for on-line collision-free path planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, V.; Aubry, S.; Jasiukajc, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The state of the art in collision prevention for manipulators with revolute joints, showing that it is a particularly computationally hard problem, is discussed. Based on the analogy with other hard or undecidable problems such as theorem proving, an extensible multi-resolution architecture for path planning, based on a collection of weak methods is proposed. Finally, the role that sensors can play for an on-line use of sensor data is examined.

  7. Exploring Career Paths. A Guide for Students and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This five-section guide is designed to help students and their parents explore career paths. The first part of the guide is an introduction to the concept of career paths and an explanation of the steps students follow in exploring career paths. The second section, which makes up most of the booklet, covers five steps for exploring career paths:…

  8. Analysis of the contact graph routing algorithm: Bounding interplanetary paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrane, Edward; Burleigh, Scott; Kasch, Niels

    2012-06-01

    Interplanetary communication networks comprise orbiters, deep-space relays, and stations on planetary surfaces. These networks must overcome node mobility, constrained resources, and significant propagation delays. Opportunities for wireless contact rely on calculating transmit and receive opportunities, but the Euclidean-distance diameter of these networks (measured in light-seconds and light-minutes) precludes node discovery and contact negotiation. Propagation delay may be larger than the line-of-sight contact between nodes. For example, Mars and Earth orbiters may be separated by up to 20.8 min of signal propagation time. Such spacecraft may never share line-of-sight, but may uni-directionally communicate if one orbiter knows the other's future position. The Contact Graph Routing (CGR) approach is a family of algorithms presented to solve the messaging problem of interplanetary communications. These algorithms exploit networks where nodes exhibit deterministic mobility. For CGR, mobility and bandwidth information is pre-configured throughout the network allowing nodes to construct transmit opportunities. Once constructed, routing algorithms operate on this contact graph to build an efficient path through the network. The interpretation of the contact graph, and the construction of a bounded approximate path, is critically important for adoption in operational systems. Brute force approaches, while effective in small networks, are computationally expensive and will not scale. Methods of inferring cycles or other librations within the graph are difficult to detect and will guide the practical implementation of any routing algorithm. This paper presents a mathematical analysis of a multi-destination contact graph algorithm (MD-CGR), demonstrates that it is NP-complete, and proposes realistic constraints that make the problem solvable in polynomial time, as is the case with the originally proposed CGR algorithm. An analysis of path construction to complement hop

  9. A variational approach to path planning in three dimensions using level set methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecil, Thomas; Marthaler, Daniel E.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we extend the two-dimensional methods set forth in [T. Cecil, D. Marthaler, A variational approach to search and path planning using level set methods, UCLA CAM Report, 04-61, 2004], proposing a variational approach to a path planning problem in three dimensions using a level set framework. After defining an energy integral over the path, we use gradient flow on the defined energy and evolve the entire path until a locally optimal steady state is reached. We follow the framework for motion of curves in three dimensions set forth in [P. Burchard, L.-T. Cheng, B. Merriman, S. Osher, Motion of curves in three spatial dimensions using a level set approach, J. Comput. Phys. 170(2) (2001) 720-741], modified appropriately to take into account that we allow for paths with positive, varying widths. Applications of this method extend to robotic motion and visibility problems, for example. Numerical methods and algorithms are given, and examples are presented.

  10. IIR filtering based adaptive active vibration control methodology with online secondary path modeling using PZT actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boz, Utku; Basdogan, Ipek

    2015-12-01

    Structural vibrations is a major cause for noise problems, discomfort and mechanical failures in aerospace, automotive and marine systems, which are mainly composed of plate-like structures. In order to reduce structural vibrations on these structures, active vibration control (AVC) is an effective approach. Adaptive filtering methodologies are preferred in AVC due to their ability to adjust themselves for varying dynamics of the structure during the operation. The filtered-X LMS (FXLMS) algorithm is a simple adaptive filtering algorithm widely implemented in active control applications. Proper implementation of FXLMS requires availability of a reference signal to mimic the disturbance and model of the dynamics between the control actuator and the error sensor, namely the secondary path. However, the controller output could interfere with the reference signal and the secondary path dynamics may change during the operation. This interference problem can be resolved by using an infinite impulse response (IIR) filter which considers feedback of the one or more previous control signals to the controller output and the changing secondary path dynamics can be updated using an online modeling technique. In this paper, IIR filtering based filtered-U LMS (FULMS) controller is combined with online secondary path modeling algorithm to suppress the vibrations of a plate-like structure. The results are validated through numerical and experimental studies. The results show that the FULMS with online secondary path modeling approach has more vibration rejection capabilities with higher convergence rate than the FXLMS counterpart.

  11. Circular common-path point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongzhao; Feng, Guoying; Li, Hongru; Vargas, J; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2012-10-01

    A simple and compact point-diffraction interferometer with circular common-path geometry configuration is developed. The interferometer is constructed by a beam-splitter, two reflection mirrors, and a telescope system composed by two lenses. The signal and reference waves travel along the same path. Furthermore, an opaque mask containing a reference pinhole and a test object holder or test window is positioned in the common focal plane of the telescope system. The object wave is divided into two beams that take opposite paths along the interferometer. The reference wave is filtered by the reference pinhole, while the signal wave is transmitted through the object holder. The reference and signal waves are combined again in the beam-splitter and their interference is imaged in the CCD. The new design is compact, vibration insensitive, and suitable for the measurement of moving objects or dynamic processes.

  12. Paths to Licensure: Things Physicists Should Know

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Gay; Stewart, John

    2016-03-01

    The path to licensure can be quite complicated, and can thwart a physics department's efforts to produce more and better prepared high school physics teachers. Each state has different pathways to licensure. Acronyms like CAEP and SPA are not within the normal physicist's vocabulary. Some understanding of this topic can allow physics faculty advisers to help our students so that fewer are derailed on their path to the classroom, or take a path that will leave them less well prepared if they do find themselves there. Examples of different approaches that work within state licensure systems from two different states will be presented. Physics teacher preparation efforts in both Arkansas and West Virginia have been supported in part by the Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC).

  13. Least-cost paths in mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, W. G.

    2004-04-01

    Footpaths in a mountainous area of Wales are modelled as least-cost paths between the start and end points. The cost function is defined on the basis of topography alone, and is defined in such a way that the cost penalty for excessively steep slopes is an adjustable parameter of the model. Least-cost paths are calculated by applying Dijkstra's algorithm to a Digital Elevation Model. Comparison of these calculated least-cost paths with existing footpaths suggests that the latter do not usually follow the least-time route, but instead optimise the metabolic cost for human locomotion. The method developed here is proposed as a means of exploring possible routes for new footpaths in mountainous areas.

  14. Fermionic path integrals and local anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roepstorff, G.

    2003-05-01

    No doubt, the subject of path integrals proved to be an immensely fruitful human, i.e. Feynman's idea. No wonder it is more timely than ever. Some even claim that it is the most daring, innovative and revolutionary idea since the days of Heisenberg and Bohr. It is thus likely to generate enthusiasm, if not addiction among physicists who seek simplicity together with perfection. Professor Devreese's long-lasting interest in, if not passion on the subject stems from his firm conviction that, beyond being the tool of choice, path integration provides the key to all quantum phenomena, be it in solid state, atomic, molecular or particle physics as evidenced by the impressive list of publications at the address http://lib.ua.ac.be/AB/a867.html. In this note, I review a pitfall of fermionic path integrals and a way to get around it in situations relevant to the Standard Model of particle physics.

  15. A taxonomy of integral reaction path analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.

    2004-12-23

    W. C. Gardiner observed that achieving understanding through combustion modeling is limited by the ability to recognize the implications of what has been computed and to draw conclusions about the elementary steps underlying the reaction mechanism. This difficulty can be overcome in part by making better use of reaction path analysis in the context of multidimensional flame simulations. Following a survey of current practice, an integral reaction flux is formulated in terms of conserved scalars that can be calculated in a fully automated way. Conditional analyses are then introduced, and a taxonomy for bidirectional path analysis is explored. Many examples illustrate the resulting path analysis and uncover some new results about nonpremixed methane-air laminar jets.

  16. The path exchange method for hybrid LCA.

    PubMed

    Lenzen, Manfred; Crawford, Robert

    2009-11-01

    Hybrid techniques for Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) provide a way of combining the accuracy of process analysis and the completeness of input-output analysis. A number of methods have been suggested to implement a hybrid LCA in practice, with the main challenge being the integration of specific process data with an overarching input-output system. In this work we present a new hybrid LCA method which works at the finest input-output level of detail: structural paths. This new Path Exchange method avoids double-counting and system disturbance just as previous hybrid LCA methods, but instead of a large LCA database it requires only a minimum of external information on those structural paths that are to be represented by process data.

  17. Tornado intensity estimated from damage path dimensions.

    PubMed

    Elsner, James B; Jagger, Thomas H; Elsner, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    The Newcastle/Moore and El Reno tornadoes of May 2013 are recent reminders of the destructive power of tornadoes. A direct estimate of a tornado's power is difficult and dangerous to get. An indirect estimate on a categorical scale is available from a post-storm survery of the damage. Wind speed bounds are attached to the scale, but the scale is not adequate for analyzing trends in tornado intensity separate from trends in tornado frequency. Here tornado intensity on a continuum is estimated from damage path length and width, which are measured on continuous scales and correlated to the EF rating. The wind speeds on the EF scale are treated as interval censored data and regressed onto the path dimensions and fatalities. The regression model indicates a 25% increase in expected intensity over a threshold intensity of 29 m s(-1) for a 100 km increase in path length and a 17% increase in expected intensity for a one km increase in path width. The model shows a 43% increase in the expected intensity when fatalities are observed controlling for path dimensions. The estimated wind speeds correlate at a level of .77 (.34, .93) [95% confidence interval] with a small sample of wind speeds estimated independently from a doppler radar calibration. The estimated wind speeds allow analyses to be done on the tornado database that are not possible with the categorical scale. The modeled intensities can be used in climatology and in environmental and engineering applications. Research is needed to understand the upward trends in path length and width.

  18. Childbirth Problems

    MedlinePlus

    While childbirth usually goes well, complications can happen. They can cause a risk to the mother, baby, or both. Possible complications include Preterm (premature) labor, when labor starts before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy Problems with the umbilical cord Problems with ...

  19. Speech Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the respiratory system . The ability to understand language and produce speech is coordinated by the brain. So a person with brain damage from an accident, stroke, or birth defect may have speech and language problems. Some people with speech problems, particularly articulation ...

  20. Popular Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skovhus, Randi Boelskifte; Thomsen, Rie

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces a method to critical reviews and explores the ways in which problems have been formulated in knowledge production on career guidance in Denmark over a 10-year period from 2004 to 2014. The method draws upon the work of Bacchi focussing on the "What's the problem represented to be" (WPR) approach. Forty-nine…

  1. Parking Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This is the story of a real problem, not a problem that is contrived, or invented for the convenience of the appropriate planning tool. This activity by a group of students, defined simply as "8FN", might be likened to an "end of term concert". If you just happened to be a delegate at the ATM Conference 2003 you might remember…

  2. Optical tomography with discretized path integral

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Bingzhi; Tamaki, Toru; Kushida, Takahiro; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We present a framework for optical tomography based on a path integral. Instead of directly solving the radiative transport equations, which have been widely used in optical tomography, we use a path integral that has been developed for rendering participating media based on the volume rendering equation in computer graphics. For a discretized two-dimensional layered grid, we develop an algorithm to estimate the extinction coefficients of each voxel with an interior point method. Numerical simulation results are shown to demonstrate that the proposed method works well. PMID:26839903

  3. Gas Path Sealing in Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of gas path seals is presented with particular attention given to sealing clearance effects on engine component efficiency. The effects on compressor pressure ratio and stall margin are pointed out. Various case-rotor relative displacements, which affect gas path seal clearances, are identified. Forces produced by nonuniform sealing clearances and their effect on rotor stability are discussed qualitatively, and recent work on turbine-blade-tip sealing for high temperature is described. The need for active clearance control and for engine structural analysis is discussed. The functions of the internal-flow system and its seals are reviewed.

  4. Optical tomography with discretized path integral.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bingzhi; Tamaki, Toru; Kushida, Takahiro; Mukaigawa, Yasuhiro; Kubo, Hiroyuki; Raytchev, Bisser; Kaneda, Kazufumi

    2015-07-01

    We present a framework for optical tomography based on a path integral. Instead of directly solving the radiative transport equations, which have been widely used in optical tomography, we use a path integral that has been developed for rendering participating media based on the volume rendering equation in computer graphics. For a discretized two-dimensional layered grid, we develop an algorithm to estimate the extinction coefficients of each voxel with an interior point method. Numerical simulation results are shown to demonstrate that the proposed method works well.

  5. Mass spectrometric identification of N- and O-glycosylation sites of full-length rat selenoprotein P and determination of selenide-sulfide and disulfide linkages in the shortest isoform.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuguang; Hill, Kristina E; Burk, Raymond F; Caprioli, Richard M

    2003-08-19

    Rat selenoprotein P is an extracellular glycoprotein of 366 amino acid residues that is rich in cysteine and selenocysteine. Plasma contains four isoforms that differ principally by length at the C-terminal end. Mass spectrometry was used to identify sites of glycosylation on the full-length protein. Of the potential N-glycosylation sites, three located at residues 64, 155, and 169 were occupied, while the two at residues 351 and 356 were not occupied. Threonine 346 was variably O-glycosylated. Thus, full-length selenoprotein P is both N- and O-glycosylated. The shortest isoform of selenoprotein P, which terminates at residue 244, was analyzed for selenide-sulfide and disulfide linkages. In this isoform, a single selenocysteine and seven cysteines are present. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that a selenide-sulfide bond exists between Sec40 and Cys43. Two disulfides were also detected as Cys149-Cys167 and Cys153-Cys156. The finding of a selenide-sulfide bond in the shortest isoform is compatible with a redox function of this pair that might be analogous to the selenol-thiol pair near the C terminus of animal thioredoxin reductase. The disulfide formed by Cys153-Cys156 also has some characteristics of a redox active pair.

  6. An adaptation of Krylov subspace methods to path following

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H.F.

    1996-12-31

    Krylov subspace methods at present constitute a very well known and highly developed class of iterative linear algebra methods. These have been effectively applied to nonlinear system solving through Newton-Krylov methods, in which Krylov subspace methods are used to solve the linear systems that characterize steps of Newton`s method (the Newton equations). Here, we will discuss the application of Krylov subspace methods to path following problems, in which the object is to track a solution curve as a parameter varies. Path following methods are typically of predictor-corrector form, in which a point near the solution curve is {open_quotes}predicted{close_quotes} by some easy but relatively inaccurate means, and then a series of Newton-like corrector iterations is used to return approximately to the curve. The analogue of the Newton equation is underdetermined, and an additional linear condition must be specified to determine corrector steps uniquely. This is typically done by requiring that the steps be orthogonal to an approximate tangent direction. Augmenting the under-determined system with this orthogonality condition in a straightforward way typically works well if direct linear algebra methods are used, but Krylov subspace methods are often ineffective with this approach. We will discuss recent work in which this orthogonality condition is imposed directly as a constraint on the corrector steps in a certain way. The means of doing this preserves problem conditioning, allows the use of preconditioners constructed for the fixed-parameter case, and has certain other advantages. Experiments on standard PDE continuation test problems indicate that this approach is effective.

  7. A real-time path rating calculation tool powered by HPC

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-09

    If transmission path ratings are determined in real time and optimized control methods can be implemented, congestion problems can be more effectively managed using the existing transmission assets, reducing congestion costs, avoiding capital expenditures for new physical assets, increasing revenues from the existing system, and maintaining reliability. In just one illustrative case, a BPA study has shown that a 1000-MW rating increase for a transmission path generates $15M in annual revenue, even if only 25% of the increased margin can be tapped for just 25% of the year.

  8. Illustration of transition path theory on a collection of simple examples.

    PubMed

    Metzner, Philipp; Schütte, Christof; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2006-08-28

    Transition path theory (TPT) has been recently introduced as a theoretical framework to describe the reaction pathways of rare events between long lived states in complex systems. TPT gives detailed statistical information about the reactive trajectories involved in these rare events, which are beyond the realm of transition state theory or transition path sampling. In this paper the TPT approach is outlined, its distinction from other approaches is discussed, and, most importantly, the main insights and objects provided by TPT are illustrated in detail via a series of low dimensional test problems.

  9. Potential theory, path integrals and the Laplacian of the indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Rutger-Jan

    2012-11-01

    This paper links the field of potential theory — i.e. the Dirichlet and Neumann problems for the heat and Laplace equation — to that of the Feynman path integral, by postulating the following seemingly ill-defined potential: V(x):=∓ {{σ^2}}/2nabla_x^2{1_{{xin D}}} where the volatility is the reciprocal of the mass (i.e. m = 1/ σ 2) and ħ = 1. The Laplacian of the indicator can be interpreted using the theory of distributions: it is the d-dimensional analogue of the Dirac δ'-function, which can formally be defined as partial_x^2{1_{x>0 }} . We show, first, that the path integral's perturbation series (or Born series) matches the classical single and double boundary layer series of potential theory, thereby connecting two hitherto unrelated fields. Second, we show that the perturbation series is valid for all domains D that allow Green's theorem (i.e. with a finite number of corners, edges and cusps), thereby expanding the classical applicability of boundary layers. Third, we show that the minus (plus) in the potential holds for the Dirichlet (Neumann) boundary condition; showing for the first time a particularly close connection between these two classical problems. Fourth, we demonstrate that the perturbation series of the path integral converges as follows:

    mode of convergence absorbed propagator reflected propagator convex domain alternating monotone
  10. Quantum Calisthenics: Gaussians, The Path Integral and Guided Numerical Approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, Marvin; /SLAC

    2009-02-12

    It is apparent to anyone who thinks about it that, to a large degree, the basic concepts of Newtonian physics are quite intuitive, but quantum mechanics is not. My purpose in this talk is to introduce you to a new, much more intuitive way to understand how quantum mechanics works. I begin with an incredibly easy way to derive the time evolution of a Gaussian wave-packet for the case free and harmonic motion without any need to know the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian. This discussion is completely analytic and I will later use it to relate the solution for the behavior of the Gaussian packet to the Feynman path-integral and stationary phase approximation. It will be clear that using the information about the evolution of the Gaussian in this way goes far beyond what the stationary phase approximation tells us. Next, I introduce the concept of the bucket brigade approach to dealing with problems that cannot be handled totally analytically. This approach combines the intuition obtained in the initial discussion, as well as the intuition obtained from the path-integral, with simple numerical tools. My goal is to show that, for any specific process, there is a simple Hilbert space interpretation of the stationary phase approximation. I will then argue that, from the point of view of numerical approximations, the trajectory obtained from my generalization of the stationary phase approximation specifies that subspace of the full Hilbert space that is needed to compute the time evolution of the particular state under the full Hamiltonian. The prescription I will give is totally non-perturbative and we will see, by the grace of Maple animations computed for the case of the anharmonic oscillator Hamiltonian, that this approach allows surprisingly accurate computations to be performed with very little work. I think of this approach to the path-integral as defining what I call a guided numerical approximation scheme. After the discussion of the anharmonic oscillator I will

  11. On the complexity of Minimum Path Cover with Subpath Constraints for multi-assembly

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multi-assembly problems have gathered much attention in the last years, as Next-Generation Sequencing technologies have started being applied to mixed settings, such as reads from the transcriptome (RNA-Seq), or from viral quasi-species. One classical model that has resurfaced in many multi-assembly methods (e.g. in Cufflinks, ShoRAH, BRANCH, CLASS) is the Minimum Path Cover (MPC) Problem, which asks for the minimum number of directed paths that cover all the nodes of a directed acyclic graph. The MPC Problem is highly popular because the acyclicity of the graph ensures its polynomial-time solvability. Results In this paper, we consider two generalizations of it dealing with integrating constraints arising from long reads or paired-end reads; these extensions have also been considered by two recent methods, but not fully solved. More specifically, we study the two problems where also a set of subpaths, or pairs of subpaths, of the graph have to be entirely covered by some path in the MPC. We show that in the case of long reads (subpaths), the generalized problem can be solved in polynomial-time by a reduction to the classical MPC Problem. We also consider the weighted case, and show that it can be solved in polynomial-time by a reduction to a min-cost circulation problem. As a side result, we also improve the time complexity of the classical minimum weight MPC Problem. In the case of paired-end reads (pairs of subpaths), the generalized problem becomes NP-hard, but we show that it is fixed-parameter tractable (FPT) in the total number of constraints. This computational dichotomy between long reads and paired-end reads is also a general insight into multi-assembly problems. PMID:25252805

  12. Gender Differences in Career Paths in Banking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Sandra; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed career paths of middle managers in bank. Study of matched pairs found that men (n=25) advanced faster and reached middle management through fewer promotions and positions than did women (n=25). Men had significantly more work experience outside of banking. In banking careers, men held more jobs in lending, whereas women occupied more…

  13. Bond paths as privileged exchange channels.

    PubMed

    Pendás, A Martín; Francisco, Evelio; Blanco, Miguel A; Gatti, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Evidence that the bond paths of the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules (QTAIM) signal preferred quantum-mechanical exchange channels is presented. We show how bond paths between an atom A and the atoms B in its environment appear to be determined by competition among the A-B exchange-correlation energies that always contribute to stabilize the A-B interactions. These pairwise additive stabilizations depend neither on the attractive or repulsive nature of the classical electrostatic interaction between the atoms' charge densities, nor on the change in the self energies of the atoms involved. These other terms may well cause an overall molecular-energy increase in spite of a possibly large A-B exchange-correlation stabilization. After our proposal, bond paths, both at and out of equilibrium geometries, are endowed with a specific energetic meaning that should contribute to reconcile the orthodox QTAIM interpretation with other widely accepted views, and to settle recent controversies questioning the meaning of hydrogen-hydrogen bonding and the nature of the so-called "steric interactions", the role of bond paths in endohedral complexes, and the generality of the results provided by the QTAIM. Implications for the nature of more general closed-shell interactions are also briefly discussed.

  14. Planning Flight Paths of Autonomous Aerobots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulczycki, Eric; Elfes, Alberto; Sharma, Shivanjli

    2009-01-01

    Algorithms for planning flight paths of autonomous aerobots (robotic blimps) to be deployed in scientific exploration of remote planets are undergoing development. These algorithms are also adaptable to terrestrial applications involving robotic submarines as well as aerobots and other autonomous aircraft used to acquire scientific data or to perform surveying or monitoring functions.

  15. Visualizing Transmedia Networks: Links, Paths and Peripheries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppel, Marc Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    'Visualizing Transmedia Networks: Links, Paths and Peripheries' examines the increasingly complex rhetorical intersections between narrative and media ("old" and "new") in the creation of transmedia fictions, loosely defined as multisensory and multimodal stories told extensively across a diverse media set. In order…

  16. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum... must be accelerated on the ground to VEF at which point the critical engine must be made inoperative... takeoff surface, the available gradient of climb must not be less than— (i) 1.2 percent for...

  17. 14 CFR 23.57 - Takeoff path.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... path. For normal, utility, and acrobatic category multiengine jets of more than 6,000 pounds maximum... must be accelerated on the ground to VEF at which point the critical engine must be made inoperative... takeoff surface, the available gradient of climb must not be less than— (i) 1.2 percent for...

  18. Path integration in tactile perception of shapes.

    PubMed

    Moscatelli, Alessandro; Naceri, Abdeldjallil; Ernst, Marc O

    2014-11-01

    Whenever we move the hand across a surface, tactile signals provide information about the relative velocity between the skin and the surface. If the system were able to integrate the tactile velocity information over time, cutaneous touch may provide an estimate of the relative displacement between the hand and the surface. Here, we asked whether humans are able to form a reliable representation of the motion path from tactile cues only, integrating motion information over time. In order to address this issue, we conducted three experiments using tactile motion and asked participants (1) to estimate the length of a simulated triangle, (2) to reproduce the shape of a simulated triangular path, and (3) to estimate the angle between two-line segments. Participants were able to accurately indicate the length of the path, whereas the perceived direction was affected by a direction bias (inward bias). The response pattern was thus qualitatively similar to the ones reported in classical path integration studies involving locomotion. However, we explain the directional biases as the result of a tactile motion aftereffect.

  19. Disabled nurses discover new career paths.

    PubMed

    Bemis, Patricia Ann

    2009-06-01

    When confronted with a disability, the steps learned from the nursing process help nurses maintain employability. The nursing process teaches nurses to gather information, evaluate the information, develop a plan, implement the plan, evaluate the outcome, modify the plan, implement again, etc. By following the process to modify their career paths and/or implement adaptive devices, nurses maintain their employability.

  20. Ambivalent Journey: Teacher Career Paths in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David W.; Al-Barwani, Thuwayba; Al Mawali, Fathiya; Green, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the career paths of 625 university graduates who prepared to be secondary school teachers in Oman, their assessment of their current work situation, and the extent to which their initial commitment to teaching was related to their subsequent career satisfaction and intention to remain in teaching. While nearly all graduates…

    1. Service-Learning Partnerships: Paths of Engagement

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Dorado, Silvia; Giles, Dwight E., Jr.

      2004-01-01

      This article furthers research and theory on the initiation and development of service-learning partnerships. It identifies three paths of engagement between university and community agencies: tentative engagement, aligned engagement, and committed engagement. This conceptualization helps to understand how service-learning partnerships evolve over…

    2. Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward

      SciTech Connect

      Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban

      2012-08-14

      Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

    3. Explore the Many Paths to Leadership

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Crow, Tracy

      2015-01-01

      The road to leadership is not necessarily one that educators plan carefully with a series of logical steps. Certainly some educators start as teachers and then systematically work through a traditional hierarchy on their way to the superintendency. No matter their role or their path, education leaders demand more from themselves and others and…

    4. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

      DOEpatents

      Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

      1995-08-08

      A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.

    5. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

      DOEpatents

      Carangelo, Robert M.; Wright, David D.

      1995-01-01

      A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

    6. The Erratic Path of Hungarian Higher Education

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Marcus, Jon

      2014-01-01

      This article reviews the path of funding higher education in Hungary, where funding cuts have resulted in understaffing, escalating tuition, growing student debt, and declining enrollment. Graduation rates are low, government policies favor vocational disciplines, and the system of preparation and access gives preference to students from wealthier…

    7. Global Cloud Liquid Water Path Simulations(.

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lemus, Lilia; Rikus, Lawrie; Martin, C.; Platt, R.

      1997-01-01

      A new parameterization of cloud liquid water and ice content has been included in the Bureau of Meteorology Global Assimilation and Prediction System. The cloud liquid water content is derived from the mean cloud temperatures in the model using an empirical relationship based on observations. The results from perpetual January and July simulations are presented and show that the total cloud water path steadily decreases toward high latitudes, with two relative maxima at midlatitudes and a peak at low latitudes. To validate the scheme, the simulated fields need to be processed to produce liquid water paths that can be directly compared with the corresponding field derived from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) data. This requires the identification of cloud ice water content within the parameterization and a prescription to account for the treatment of strongly precipitating subgrid-scale cloud. The resultant cloud liquid water paths agree qualitatively with the SSM/I data but show some systematic errors that are attributed to corresponding errors in the model's simulation of cloud amounts. Given that a more quantitative validation requires substantial improvement in the model's diagnostic cloud scheme, the comparison with the SSM/I data indicates that the cloud water path, derived from the cloud liquid water content parameterization introduced in this paper, is consistent with the observations and can be usefully incorporated in the prediction system.

    8. Motion on Cycloid Paths: A Project

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Gluck, P.

      2010-01-01

      This article reports a high school laboratory project whose theme is the motion of a small ball on cycloidal tracks. Models were built both of a brachistochrone and of a Huygens pendulum clock whose bob is constrained to move on a cycloidal path. Photogates and a data acquisition system were employed in order to investigate experimentally the…

    9. Unified classical path theories of pressure broadening.

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Bottcher, C.

      1971-01-01

      Derivation of a unified classical path theory of pressure broadening, using only elementary concepts. It is shown that the theory of Smith, Cooper and Vidal (1969) is only correct at all frequencies to first order in the number density of perturbers.

    10. Sleep Problems

      MedlinePlus

      ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Sleep Problems Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... PDF 474KB) En Español Medicines to Help You Sleep Tips for Better Sleep Basic Facts about Sleep ...

    11. Thyroid Problems

      MedlinePlus

      ... treated differently. Common thyroid disorders and problems include: Hypothyroidism Hypothyroidism is a disorder in which your thyroid doesn’ ... normal after you get better. If you have hypothyroidism, however, the levels of T4 in your blood ...

    12. Breathing Problems

      MedlinePlus

      ... getting enough air. Sometimes you can have mild breathing problems because of a stuffy nose or intense ... panic attacks Allergies If you often have trouble breathing, it is important to find out the cause.

    13. Kidney Problems

      MedlinePlus

      ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Kidney Problems Basic Facts & Information The kidneys are two ... the production of red blood cells. What are Kidney Diseases? For about one-third of older people, ...

    14. Sexual Problems

      MedlinePlus

      ... for a healthy life Mental health for men Sexual health for men Male infertility Prostate health Sexual problems ... updates. Enter email address Submit Home > Men's Health > Sexual health for men Men's Health This information in Spanish ( ...

    15. Nipple problems

      MedlinePlus

      ... nipple; Nipple problems Images Female breast Intraductal papilloma Mammary gland Abnormal discharge from the nipple Normal female breast ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 8. Read More Breast cancer Endocrine glands Intraductal papilloma Review Date 11/16/2014 Updated ...

    16. Speech Problems

      MedlinePlus

      ... thinking, but it becomes disorganized as they're speaking. So, someone who clutters may speak in bursts ... refuse to wait patiently for them to finish speaking. If you have a speech problem, it's fine ...

    17. Adaptive Networks For Sequential Decision Problems

      DTIC Science & Technology

      1992-09-01

      Problems of this kind can be viewed as discrete-time stochastic control problems. The theory of stochastic sequential decision making and the computational...is to use reinforcement learning as a component of a more complex system. We experimented with a kind of " bahavior based" reinforcement learning in...navigatiwn functions that are computed by using the harmonic function approach t,, path- planning recently developed by Connolly and Grupen

    18. Photon path length retrieval from GOSAT observations

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kremmling, Beke; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Deutschmann, Tim; Wagner, Thomas

      2013-04-01

      The influence of clouds on the atmospheric radiation budget is investigated, focussing on the photon path length distributions of the scattered sunlight. Apart from the reflection of incoming solar radiation at the cloud top, clouds can also introduce a large number of additional scattering events causing an enhancement of the photon paths. In certain cloud formations, these scattering events also result in a ``ping-pong`` behaviour between different cloud patches and cloud layers. It has been shown from ground based measurements that it is possible to retrieve photon path lengths by analysis of high resolution oxygen A-band spectra (O. Funk et al.). This study uses similar space based measurements of the oxygen A-band for the path length retrieval. The oxygen A-band spectra are retrieved from the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) which was successfully launched in 2009. The high spectral resolution of the GOSAT TANSO-FTS instrument allows to almost completely resolve the individual absorption lines. The considered spectral range is particularly suitable for this study because it shows clear absorption structures of different strength. From the analysis of the spectral signatures, cloud properties and the underlying path length distributions can be derived. The retrieval is done by analysis and comparison of the extracted TANSO-FTS spectra with simulations from the Monte Carlo radiative transfer Model McArtim. The model permits modelling of altitude dependent oxygen absorption cross sections and three-dimensional cloud patterns. Case studies of clear and cloudy sky scenarios will be presented. Future studies will focus on more complicated cloud structures, especially considering three-dimensional geometries and heterogeneities.

    19. Kinematics, controls, and path planning results for a redundant manipulator

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Gretz, Bruce; Tilley, Scott W.

      1989-01-01

      The inverse kinematics solution, a modal position control algorithm, and path planning results for a 7 degree of freedom manipulator are presented. The redundant arm consists of two links with shoulder and elbow joints and a spherical wrist. The inverse kinematics problem for tip position is solved and the redundant joint is identified. It is also shown that a locus of tip positions exists in which there are kinematic limitations on self-motion. A computationally simple modal position control algorithm has been developed which guarantees a nearly constant closed-loop dynamic response throughout the workspace. If all closed-loop poles are assigned to the same location, the algorithm can be implemented with very little computation. To further reduce the required computation, the modal gains are updated only at discrete time intervals. Criteria are developed for the frequency of these updates. For commanding manipulator movements, a 5th-order spline which minimizes jerk provides a smooth tip-space path. Schemes for deriving a corresponding joint-space trajectory are discussed. Modifying the trajectory to avoid joint torque saturation when a tip payload is added is also considered. Simulation results are presented.

    20. Drosophila learn efficient paths to a food source.

      PubMed

      Navawongse, Rapeechai; Choudhury, Deepak; Raczkowska, Marlena; Stewart, James Charles; Lim, Terrence; Rahman, Mashiur; Toh, Alicia Guek Geok; Wang, Zhiping; Claridge-Chang, Adam

      2016-05-01

      Elucidating the genetic, and neuronal bases for learned behavior is a central problem in neuroscience. A leading system for neurogenetic discovery is the vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster; fly memory research has identified genes and circuits that mediate aversive and appetitive learning. However, methods to study adaptive food-seeking behavior in this animal have lagged decades behind rodent feeding analysis, largely due to the challenges presented by their small scale. There is currently no method to dynamically control flies' access to food. In rodents, protocols that use dynamic food delivery are a central element of experimental paradigms that date back to the influential work of Skinner. This method is still commonly used in the analysis of learning, memory, addiction, feeding, and many other subjects in experimental psychology. The difficulty of microscale food delivery means this is not a technique used in fly behavior. In the present manuscript we describe a microfluidic chip integrated with machine vision and automation to dynamically control defined liquid food presentations and sensory stimuli. Strikingly, repeated presentations of food at a fixed location produced improvements in path efficiency during food approach. This shows that improved path choice is a learned behavior. Active control of food availability using this microfluidic system is a valuable addition to the methods currently available for the analysis of learned feeding behavior in flies.

    1. Density shrinking algorithm for community detection with path based similarity

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wu, Jianshe; Hou, Yunting; Jiao, Yang; Li, Yong; Li, Xiaoxiao; Jiao, Licheng

      2015-09-01

      Community structure is ubiquitous in real world complex networks. Finding the communities is the key to understand the functions of those networks. A lot of works have been done in designing algorithms for community detection, but it remains a challenge in the field. Traditional modularity optimization suffers from the resolution limit problem. Recent researches show that combining the density based technique with the modularity optimization can overcome the resolution limit and an efficient algorithm named DenShrink was provided. The main procedure of DenShrink is repeatedly finding and merging micro-communities (broad sense) into super nodes until they cannot merge. Analyses in this paper show that if the procedure is replaced by finding and merging only dense pairs, both of the detection accuracy and runtime can be obviously improved. Thus an improved density-based algorithm: ImDS is provided. Since the time complexity, path based similarity indexes are difficult to be applied in community detection for high performance. In this paper, the path based Katz index is simplified and used in the ImDS algorithm.

    2. Preserving correlations between trajectories for efficient path sampling

      SciTech Connect

      Gingrich, Todd R.; Geissler, Phillip L.

      2015-06-21

      Importance sampling of trajectories has proved a uniquely successful strategy for exploring rare dynamical behaviors of complex systems in an unbiased way. Carrying out this sampling, however, requires an ability to propose changes to dynamical pathways that are substantial, yet sufficiently modest to obtain reasonable acceptance rates. Satisfying this requirement becomes very challenging in the case of long trajectories, due to the characteristic divergences of chaotic dynamics. Here, we examine schemes for addressing this problem, which engineer correlation between a trial trajectory and its reference path, for instance using artificial forces. Our analysis is facilitated by a modern perspective on Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling, inspired by non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, which clarifies the types of sampling strategies that can scale to long trajectories. Viewed in this light, the most promising such strategy guides a trial trajectory by manipulating the sequence of random numbers that advance its stochastic time evolution, as done in a handful of existing methods. In cases where this “noise guidance” synchronizes trajectories effectively, as the Glauber dynamics of a two-dimensional Ising model, we show that efficient path sampling can be achieved for even very long trajectories.

    3. Approximate resolution of hard numbering problems

      SciTech Connect

      Bailleux, O.; Chabrier, J.J.

      1996-12-31

      We present a new method for estimating the number of solutions of constraint satisfaction problems. We use a stochastic forward checking algorithm for drawing a sample of paths from a search tree. With this sample, we compute two values related to the number of solutions of a CSP instance. First, an unbiased estimate, second, a lower bound with an arbitrary low error probability. We will describe applications to the Boolean Satisfiability problem and the Queens problem. We shall give some experimental results for these problems.

    4. Energy-Aware Path Planning for UAS Persistent Sampling and Surveillance

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Shaw-Cortez, Wenceslao

      The focus of this work is to develop an energy-aware path planning algorithm that maximizes UAS endurance, while performing sampling and surveillance missions in a known, stationary wind environment. The energy-aware aspect is specifically tailored to extract energy from the wind to reduce thrust use, thereby increasing aircraft endurance. Wind energy extraction is performed by static soaring and dynamic soaring. Static soaring involves using upward wind currents to increase altitude and potential energy. Dynamic soaring involves taking advantage of wind gradients to exchange potential and kinetic energy. The path planning algorithm developed in this work uses optimization to combine these soaring trajectories with the overarching sampling and surveillance mission. The path planning algorithm uses a simplified aircraft model to tractably optimize soaring trajectories. This aircraft model is presented and along with the derivation of the equations of motion. A nonlinear program is used to create the soaring trajectories based on a given optimization problem. This optimization problem is defined using a heuristic decision tree, which defines appropriate problems given a sampling and surveillance mission and a wind model. Simulations are performed to assess the path planning algorithm. The results are used to identify properties of soaring trajectories as well as to determine what wind conditions support minimal thrust soaring. Additional results show how the path planning algorithm can be tuned between maximizing aircraft endurance and performing the sampling and surveillance mission. A means of trajectory stitching is demonstrated to show how the periodic soaring segments can be combined together to provide a full solution to an infinite/long horizon problem.

    5. Computing LS factor by runoff paths on TIN

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kavka, Petr; Krasa, Josef; Bek, Stanislav

      2013-04-01

      The article shows results of topographic factor (the LS factor in USLE) derivation enhancement focused on detailed Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) based DEMs. It describes a flow paths generation technique using triangulated irregular network (TIN) for terrain morphology description, which is not yet established in soil loss computations. This technique was compared with other procedures of flow direction and flow paths generation based on commonly used raster model (DEM). These overland flow characteristics together with therefrom derived flow accumulation are significant inputs for many scientific models. Particularly they are used in all USLE-based soil erosion models, from which USLE2D, RUSLE3D, Watem/Sedem or USPED can be named as the most acknowledged. Flow routing characteristics are also essential parameters in physically based hydrological and soil erosion models like HEC-HMS, Wepp, Erosion3D, LISEM, SMODERP, etc. Mentioned models are based on regular raster grids, where the identification of runoff direction is problematic. The most common method is Steepest descent (one directional flow), which corresponds well with the concentration of surface runoff into concentrated flow. The Steepest descent algorithm for the flow routing doesn't provide satisfying results, it often creates parallel and narrow flow lines while not respecting real morphological conditions. To overcome this problem, other methods (such as Flux Decomposition, Multiple flow, Deterministic Infinity algorithm etc.) separate the outflow into several components. This approach leads to unrealistic diffusion propagation of the runoff and makes it impossible to be used for simulation of dominant morphological features, such as artificial rills, hedges, sediment traps etc. The modern methods of mapping ground elevations, especially ALS, provide very detailed models even for large river basins, including morphological details. New algorithms for derivation a runoff direction have been developed as

    6. The relationships between problem characteristics, achievement-related behaviors, and academic achievement in problem-based learning.

      PubMed

      Sockalingam, Nachamma; Rotgans, Jerome I; Schmidt, Henk G

      2011-10-01

      This study investigated the influence of five problem characteristics on students' achievement-related classroom behaviors and academic achievement. Data from 5,949 polytechnic students in PBL curricula across 170 courses were analyzed by means of path analysis. The five problem characteristics were: (1) problem clarity, (2) problem familiarity, (3) the extent to which the problem stimulated group discussion, (4) self-study, and (5) identification of learning goals. The results showed that problem clarity led to more group discussion, identification of learning goals, and self-study than problem familiarity. On the other hand, problem familiarity had a stronger and direct impact on academic achievement.

    7. Real-time fuzzy inference based robot path planning

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Pacini, Peter J.; Teichrow, Jon S.

      1990-01-01

      This project addresses the problem of adaptive trajectory generation for a robot arm. Conventional trajectory generation involves computing a path in real time to minimize a performance measure such as expended energy. This method can be computationally intensive, and it may yield poor results if the trajectory is weakly constrained. Typically some implicit constraints are known, but cannot be encoded analytically. The alternative approach used here is to formulate domain-specific knowledge, including implicit and ill-defined constraints, in terms of fuzzy rules. These rules utilize linguistic terms to relate input variables to output variables. Since the fuzzy rulebase is determined off-line, only high-level, computationally light processing is required in real time. Potential applications for adaptive trajectory generation include missile guidance and various sophisticated robot control tasks, such as automotive assembly, high speed electrical parts insertion, stepper alignment, and motion control for high speed parcel transfer systems.

    8. A whole-path importance-sampling scheme for Feynman path integral calculations of absolute partition functions and free energies.

      PubMed

      Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G

      2016-01-21

      Using Feynman path integrals, a molecular partition function can be written as a double integral with the inner integral involving all closed paths centered at a given molecular configuration, and the outer integral involving all possible molecular configurations. In previous work employing Monte Carlo methods to evaluate such partition functions, we presented schemes for importance sampling and stratification in the molecular configurations that constitute the path centroids, but we relied on free-particle paths for sampling the path integrals. At low temperatures, the path sampling is expensive because the paths can travel far from the centroid configuration. We now present a scheme for importance sampling of whole Feynman paths based on harmonic information from an instantaneous normal mode calculation at the centroid configuration, which we refer to as harmonically guided whole-path importance sampling (WPIS). We obtain paths conforming to our chosen importance function by rejection sampling from a distribution of free-particle paths. Sample calculations on CH4 demonstrate that at a temperature of 200 K, about 99.9% of the free-particle paths can be rejected without integration, and at 300 K, about 98% can be rejected. We also show that it is typically possible to reduce the overhead associated with the WPIS scheme by sampling the paths using a significantly lower-order path discretization than that which is needed to converge the partition function.

    9. The controversial path of Atlantic Water in the Eastern Mediterranean

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ciappa, Achille Carlo

      2014-04-01

      The Atlantic Water (AW) path suggested by two decades of thermal satellite data observations in the Eastern Mediterranean is similar to the path followed by the AW in the Western Mediterranean but is in contrast with the scheme proposed after the Physical Oceanography of the Eastern Mediterranean (POEM) experiment during the 1990s. Evidence of the AW path along the Libyo-Egyptian coast (Libyo-Egyptian Current; LEC) and around anti-cyclonic eddies of variable size and position (Libyo-Egyptian Eddies; LEEs) is reported in XBT transects, high resolution models and drifter trajectories. In the POEM scheme, the AW was carried eastwards by the Mid-Mediterranean Jet (MMJ) flowing in the middle of the Levantine basin. The MMJ is still noted in recent drifter trajectory analyses, and seasonal surveys and glider missions report that the AW is transferred towards the Levantine basin by the MMJ in subsurface layers. The issue is investigated in this study by considering whether the determination of the AW path and the resolution of the surface circulation are, unlike in the Western Mediterranean, two distinct problems. Historical hydrographic datasets and numerical experiments illustrated in this study demonstrate that satellite observations in the Eastern Mediterranean reveal the path of the surface water of Atlantic origin, which is modified by heating and evaporation into the saltier and warmer Levantine Surface Water (LSW), but do not reveal the path of the submerged AW that maintains the distinctive character of fresh AW in the Levantine basin. Differences between the surface and the submerged circulation in the Mersa-Matruh area explain the reason for the discrepancy. In summer the AW departs from the Sicily Channel at the sea surface and crosses the Ionian Sea in a surface layer 30 m deep. At the entrance to the Levantine basin, part of the AW re-circulates westwards in two separate branches, one directed to the Southern Ionian and the other towards the Central Ionian

    10. An efficient algorithm for finding the minimum energy path for cation migration in ionic materials.

      PubMed

      Rong, Ziqin; Kitchaev, Daniil; Canepa, Pieremanuele; Huang, Wenxuan; Ceder, Gerbrand

      2016-08-21

      The Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) is an established method for finding minimum-energy paths and energy barriers of ion migration in materials, but has been hampered in its general application by its significant computational expense when coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Typically, an NEB calculation is initialized from a linear interpolation of successive intermediate structures (also known as images) between known initial and final states. However, the linear interpolation introduces two problems: (1) slow convergence of the calculation, particularly in cases where the final path exhibits notable curvature; (2) divergence of the NEB calculations if any intermediate image comes too close to a non-diffusing species, causing instabilities in the ensuing calculation. In this work, we propose a new scheme to accelerate NEB calculations through an improved path initialization and associated energy estimation workflow. We demonstrate that for cation migration in an ionic framework, initializing the diffusion path as the minimum energy path through a static potential built upon the DFT charge density reproduces the true NEB path within a 0.2 Å deviation and yields up to a 25% improvement in typical NEB runtimes. Furthermore, we find that the locally relaxed energy barrier derived from this initialization yields a good approximation of the NEB barrier, with errors within 20 meV of the true NEB value, while reducing computational expense by up to a factor of 5. Finally, and of critical importance for the automation of migration path calculations in high-throughput studies, we find that the new approach significantly enhances the stability of the calculation by avoiding unphysical image initialization. Our algorithm promises to enable efficient calculations of diffusion pathways, resolving a long-standing obstacle to the computational screening of intercalation compounds for Li-ion and multivalent batteries.

    11. An efficient algorithm for finding the minimum energy path for cation migration in ionic materials

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Rong, Ziqin; Kitchaev, Daniil; Canepa, Pieremanuele; Huang, Wenxuan; Ceder, Gerbrand

      2016-08-01

      The Nudged Elastic Band (NEB) is an established method for finding minimum-energy paths and energy barriers of ion migration in materials, but has been hampered in its general application by its significant computational expense when coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Typically, an NEB calculation is initialized from a linear interpolation of successive intermediate structures (also known as images) between known initial and final states. However, the linear interpolation introduces two problems: (1) slow convergence of the calculation, particularly in cases where the final path exhibits notable curvature; (2) divergence of the NEB calculations if any intermediate image comes too close to a non-diffusing species, causing instabilities in the ensuing calculation. In this work, we propose a new scheme to accelerate NEB calculations through an improved path initialization and associated energy estimation workflow. We demonstrate that for cation migration in an ionic framework, initializing the diffusion path as the minimum energy path through a static potential built upon the DFT charge density reproduces the true NEB path within a 0.2 Å deviation and yields up to a 25% improvement in typical NEB runtimes. Furthermore, we find that the locally relaxed energy barrier derived from this initialization yields a good approximation of the NEB barrier, with errors within 20 meV of the true NEB value, while reducing computational expense by up to a factor of 5. Finally, and of critical importance for the automation of migration path calculations in high-throughput studies, we find that the new approach significantly enhances the stability of the calculation by avoiding unphysical image initialization. Our algorithm promises to enable efficient calculations of diffusion pathways, resolving a long-standing obstacle to the computational screening of intercalation compounds for Li-ion and multivalent batteries.

    12. Transition path time distribution and the transition path free energy barrier.

      PubMed

      Pollak, Eli

      2016-10-19

      The recent experimental measurement of the transition path time distributions of proteins presents several challenges to theory. Firstly, why do the fits of the experimental data to a theoretical expression lead to barrier heights which are much lower than the free energies of activation of the observed transitions? Secondly, there is the theoretical question of determining the transition path time distribution, without invoking the Smoluchowski limit. In this paper, we derive an exact expression for a transition path time distribution which is valid for arbitrary memory friction using the normal mode transformation which underlies Kramers' rate theory. We then recall that for low barriers, there is a noticeable difference between the transition path time distribution obtained with absorbing boundary conditions and free boundary conditions. For the former, the transition times are shorter, since recrossings of the boundaries are disallowed. As a result, if one uses the distribution based on absorbing boundary conditions to fit the experimental data, one will find that the transition path barrier will be larger than the values found based on a theory with free boundary conditions. We then introduce the paradigm of a transition path barrier height, and show that one should always expect it to be much smaller than the activation energy.

    13. Arena geometry and path shape: when rats travel in straight or in circuitous paths?

      PubMed

      Yaski, Osnat; Portugali, Juval; Eilam, David

      2011-12-01

      We show here that the global geometry of the environment affects the shape of the paths of travel in rats. To examine this, individual rats were introduced into an unfamiliar arena. One group of rats (n=8) was tested in a square arena (2 m × 2 m), and the other group (n=8) in a round arena (2 m diameter). Testing was in a total darkness, since in the absence of visual information the geometry is not perceived immediately and the extraction of environment shape is slower. We found that while the level of the rats' activity did not seem to differ between both arenas, path shape differed significantly. When traveling along the perimeter, path shape basically followed the arena walls, with perimeter paths curving along the walls of the round arena, while being straight along the walls of the square arena. A similar impact of arena geometry was observed for travel away from the arena walls. Indeed, when the rats abandoned the arena walls to crosscut through the center of the arena, their center paths were circuitous in the round arena and relatively straight in the square arena. We suggest that the shapes of these paths are exploited for the same spatial task: returning back to a familiar location in the unsighted environment.

    14. Measurement of the transmission phase of an electron in a quantum two-path interferometer

      SciTech Connect

      Takada, S. Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Bäuerle, C.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Tarucha, S.

      2015-08-10

      A quantum two-path interferometer allows for direct measurement of the transmission phase shift of an electron, providing useful information on coherent scattering problems. In mesoscopic systems, however, the two-path interference is easily smeared by contributions from other paths, and this makes it difficult to observe the true transmission phase shift. To eliminate this problem, multi-terminal Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometers have been used to derive the phase shift by assuming that the relative phase shift of the electrons between the two paths is simply obtained when a smooth shift of the AB oscillations is observed. Nevertheless, the phase shifts using such a criterion have sometimes been inconsistent with theory. On the other hand, we have used an AB ring contacted to tunnel-coupled wires and acquired the phase shift consistent with theory when the two output currents through the coupled wires oscillate with well-defined anti-phase. Here, we investigate thoroughly these two criteria used to ensure a reliable phase measurement, the anti-phase relation of the two output currents, and the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation. We confirm that the well-defined anti-phase relation ensures a correct phase measurement with a quantum two-path interference. In contrast, we find that even in a situation where the anti-phase relation is less well-defined, the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation can still occur but does not give the correct transmission phase due to contributions from multiple paths. This indicates that the phase relation of the two output currents in our interferometer gives a good criterion for the measurement of the true transmission phase, while the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation itself does not.

    15. Path dependence and strength anisotropy of mechanical behavior in cold-compacted powders

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Galen, Steven A.

      2005-12-01

      The problem of compaction of powders at low homologous temperatures has been studied over the last twenty years in many fields including powder metallurgy, ceramics, pharmaceutical, agricultural, and mining. Recent emphasis of research efforts has been on the use of phenomenological models that are capable of predicting compaction loads and density distributions in the final product. However, the mechanical properties of the compact cannot be predicted from current models since they consider strength as a function of density alone. A number of studies have shown that strength is dependent on other variables besides density, including the stress path used for consolidation. In prior work, path dependence in ductile powders has been shown experimentally. In this thesis, a ceramic, dibasic calcium phosphate, was consolidated using a variety of stress paths, ranging from nearly isostatic to nearly closed-die. Yield loci were shown to be dependent on stress path as well as compact density. Strength anisotropy in ductile and brittle powders was shown to exist after closed-die compaction and is dependent on compact density. Ductile powders become increasingly anisotropic with density. Brittle powders exhibit anisotropy during the early stages of compaction, but this diminishes as densification continues. Separate mechanisms to explain these behaviors are proposed and supported with experimental data from tensile strength testing, SEM fracture surface analysis and surface area testing. Finally, path dependence and strength anisotropy are shown to have a common origin, namely, directionality of microstructure resulting from initial particle morphology and particle deformation during compaction.

    16. Feynman path integral application on deriving black-scholes diffusion equation for european option pricing

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Utama, Briandhika; Purqon, Acep

      2016-08-01

      Path Integral is a method to transform a function from its initial condition to final condition through multiplying its initial condition with the transition probability function, known as propagator. At the early development, several studies focused to apply this method for solving problems only in Quantum Mechanics. Nevertheless, Path Integral could also apply to other subjects with some modifications in the propagator function. In this study, we investigate the application of Path Integral method in financial derivatives, stock options. Black-Scholes Model (Nobel 1997) was a beginning anchor in Option Pricing study. Though this model did not successfully predict option price perfectly, especially because its sensitivity for the major changing on market, Black-Scholes Model still is a legitimate equation in pricing an option. The derivation of Black-Scholes has a high difficulty level because it is a stochastic partial differential equation. Black-Scholes equation has a similar principle with Path Integral, where in Black-Scholes the share's initial price is transformed to its final price. The Black-Scholes propagator function then derived by introducing a modified Lagrange based on Black-Scholes equation. Furthermore, we study the correlation between path integral analytical solution and Monte-Carlo numeric solution to find the similarity between this two methods.

    17. A path model of aircraft noise annoyance

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Taylor, S. M.

      1984-09-01

      This paper describes the development and testing of a path model of aircraft noise annoyance by using noise and social survey data collected in the vicinity of Toronto International Airport. Path analysis is used to estimate the direct and indirect effects of seventeen independent variables on individual annoyance. The results show that the strongest direct effects are for speech interference, attitudes toward aircraft operations, sleep interruption and personal sensitivity to noise. The strongest indirect effects are for aircraft Leq(24) and sensitivity. Overall the model explains 41 percent of the variation in the annoyance reported by the 673 survey respondents. The findings both support and extend existing statements in the literature on the antecedents of annoyance.

    18. Adaptive path planning for flexible manufacturing

      SciTech Connect

      Chen, Pang C.

      1994-08-01

      Path planning needs to be fast to facilitate real-time robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To overcome this difficulty, we present an adaptive algorithm that uses past experience to speed up future performance. It is a learning algorithm suitable for automating flexible manufacturing in incrementally-changing environments. The algorithm allows the robot to adapt to its environment by having two experience manipulation schemes: For minor environmental change, we use an object-attached experience abstraction scheme to increase the flexibility of the learned experience; for major environmental change, we use an on-demand experience repair scheme to retain those experiences that remain valid and useful. Using this algorithm, we can effectively reduce the overall robot planning time by re-using the computation result for one task to plan a path for another.

    19. Broadband Phase Spectroscopy over Turbulent Air Paths.

      PubMed

      Giorgetta, Fabrizio R; Rieker, Gregory B; Baumann, Esther; Swann, William C; Sinclair, Laura C; Kofler, Jon; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R

      2015-09-04

      Broadband atmospheric phase spectra are acquired with a phase-sensitive dual-frequency-comb spectrometer by implementing adaptive compensation for the strong decoherence from atmospheric turbulence. The compensation is possible due to the pistonlike behavior of turbulence across a single spatial-mode path combined with the intrinsic frequency stability and high sampling speed associated with dual-comb spectroscopy. The atmospheric phase spectrum is measured across 2 km of air at each of the 70,000 comb teeth spanning 233  cm(-1) across hundreds of near-infrared rovibrational resonances of CO(2), CH(4), and H(2)O with submilliradian uncertainty, corresponding to a 10(-13) refractive index sensitivity. Trace gas concentrations extracted directly from the phase spectrum reach 0.7 ppm uncertainty, demonstrated here for CO(2). While conventional broadband spectroscopy only measures intensity absorption, this approach enables measurement of the full complex susceptibility even in practical open path sensing.

    20. Mining Preferred Traversal Paths with HITS

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Yeh, Jieh-Shan; Lin, Ying-Lin; Chen, Yu-Cheng

      Web usage mining can discover useful information hidden in web logs data. However, many previous algorithms do not consider the structure of web pages, but regard all web pages with the same importance. This paper utilizes HITS values and PNT preferences as measures to mine users' preferred traversal paths. Wë structure mining uses HITS (hypertext induced topic selection) to rank web pages. PNT (preferred navigation tree) is an algorithm that finds users' preferred navigation paths. This paper introduces the Preferred Navigation Tree with HITS (PNTH) algorithm, which is an extension of PNT. This algorithm uses the concept of PNT and takes into account the relationships among web pages using HITS algorithm. This algorithm is suitable for E-commerce applications such as improving web site design and web server performance.

    1. Broadband Phase Spectroscopy over Turbulent Air Paths

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Rieker, Gregory B.; Baumann, Esther; Swann, William C.; Sinclair, Laura C.; Kofler, Jon; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R.

      2015-09-01

      Broadband atmospheric phase spectra are acquired with a phase-sensitive dual-frequency-comb spectrometer by implementing adaptive compensation for the strong decoherence from atmospheric turbulence. The compensation is possible due to the pistonlike behavior of turbulence across a single spatial-mode path combined with the intrinsic frequency stability and high sampling speed associated with dual-comb spectroscopy. The atmospheric phase spectrum is measured across 2 km of air at each of the 70 000 comb teeth spanning 233 cm-1 across hundreds of near-infrared rovibrational resonances of CO2 , CH4 , and H2O with submilliradian uncertainty, corresponding to a 10-13 refractive index sensitivity. Trace gas concentrations extracted directly from the phase spectrum reach 0.7 ppm uncertainty, demonstrated here for CO2 . While conventional broadband spectroscopy only measures intensity absorption, this approach enables measurement of the full complex susceptibility even in practical open path sensing.

    2. Hamiltonian formalism and path entropy maximization

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Davis, Sergio; González, Diego

      2015-10-01

      Maximization of the path information entropy is a clear prescription for constructing models in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here it is shown that, following this prescription under the assumption of arbitrary instantaneous constraints on position and velocity, a Lagrangian emerges which determines the most probable trajectory. Deviations from the probability maximum can be consistently described as slices in time by a Hamiltonian, according to a nonlinear Langevin equation and its associated Fokker-Planck equation. The connections unveiled between the maximization of path entropy and the Langevin/Fokker-Planck equations imply that missing information about the phase space coordinate never decreases in time, a purely information-theoretical version of the second law of thermodynamics. All of these results are independent of any physical assumptions, and thus valid for any generalized coordinate as a function of time, or any other parameter. This reinforces the view that the second law is a fundamental property of plausible inference.

    3. An alternative path integral for quantum gravity

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Krishnan, Chethan; Kumar, K. V. Pavan; Raju, Avinash

      2016-10-01

      We define a (semi-classical) path integral for gravity with Neumann boundary conditions in D dimensions, and show how to relate this new partition function to the usual picture of Euclidean quantum gravity. We also write down the action in ADM Hamiltonian formulation and use it to reproduce the entropy of black holes and cosmological horizons. A comparison between the (background-subtracted) covariant and Hamiltonian ways of semi-classically evaluating this path integral in flat space reproduces the generalized Smarr formula and the first law. This "Neumann ensemble" perspective on gravitational thermodynamics is parallel to the canonical (Dirichlet) ensemble of Gibbons-Hawking and the microcanonical approach of Brown-York.

    4. Quantitative molecular thermochemistry based on path integrals.

      PubMed

      Glaesemann, Kurt R; Fried, Laurence E

      2005-07-15

      The calculation of thermochemical data requires accurate molecular energies and heat capacities. Traditional methods rely upon the standard harmonic normal-mode analysis to calculate the vibrational and rotational contributions. We utilize path-integral Monte Carlo for going beyond the harmonic analysis and to calculate the vibrational and rotational contributions to ab initio energies. This is an application and an extension of a method previously developed in our group [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 1596 (2003)].

    5. Do-It-Yourself Critical Path Method.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Morris, Edward P., Jr.

      This report describes the critical path method (CPM), a system for planning and scheduling work to get the best time-cost combination for any particular job. With the use of diagrams, the report describes how CPM works on a step-by-step basis. CPM uses a network to show which parts of a job must be done and how they would eventually fit together…

    6. Vertical flight path steering system for aircraft

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Lambregts, Antonius A. (Inventor)

      1983-01-01

      Disclosed is a vertical flight path angle steering system for aircraft, utilizing a digital flight control computer which processes pilot control inputs and aircraft response parameters into suitable elevator commands and control information for display to the pilot on a cathode ray tube. The system yields desirable airplane control handling qualities and responses as well as improvements in pilot workload and safety during airplane operation in the terminal area and under windshear conditions.

    7. Converging Towards the Optimal Path to Extinction

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2011-01-01

      to extinction is the path that minimizes the action in either the Hamiltonian or Lagrangian representation. We compute the trajectory satisfying the...probability distribution, which falls steeply away from the steady state. This approximation leads to a conserved quan- tity that is called the Hamiltonian ...35]. From the Hamiltonian , one can find a set of conservative ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that are known as Hamilton’s equations. These

    8. Evolutionary software for autonomous path planning

      SciTech Connect

      Couture, S; Hage, M

      1999-02-10

      This research project demonstrated the effectiveness of using evolutionary software techniques in the development of path-planning algorithms and control programs for mobile vehicles in radioactive environments. The goal was to take maximum advantage of the programmer's intelligence by tasking the programmer with encoding the measures of success for a path-planning algorithm, rather than developing the path-planning algorithms themselves. Evolutionary software development techniques could then be used to develop algorithms most suitable to the particular environments of interest. The measures of path-planning success were encoded in the form of a fitness function for an evolutionary software development engine. The task for the evolutionary software development engine was to evaluate the performance of individual algorithms, select the best performers for the population based on the fitness function, and breed them to evolve the next generation of algorithms. The process continued for a set number of generations or until the algorithm converged to an optimal solution. The task environment was the navigation of a rover from an initial location to a goal, then to a processing point, in an environment containing physical and radioactive obstacles. Genetic algorithms were developed for a variety of environmental configurations. Algorithms were simple and non-robust strings of behaviors, but they could be evolved to be nearly optimal for a given environment. In addition, a genetic program was evolved in the form of a control algorithm that operates at every motion of the robot. Programs were more complex than algorithms and less optimal in a given environment. However, after training in a variety of different environments, they were more robust and could perform acceptably in environments they were not trained in. This paper describes the evolutionary software development engine and the performance of algorithms and programs evolved by it for the chosen task.

    9. Heat Problems.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Connors, G. Patrick

      Heat problems and heat cramps related to jogging can be caused by fluid imbalances, medications, dietary insufficiency, vomiting or diarrhea, among other factors. If the condition keeps reoccurring, the advice of a physician should be sought. Some preventive measures that can be taken include: (1) running during the cooler hours of the day; (2)…

    10. Puzzles & Problems.

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Murphy, Pat, Ed.

      1993-01-01

      "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception, produced by Exploratorium in collaboration with other participating museums. This issue focuses on puzzles and problem solving. Brain teasers, puzzles, and the strategies for solving them are included. Features include: (1) "Homework Assignment #3" (Paul Doherty);…

    11. Optimum flight paths of turbojet aircraft

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Miele, Angelo

      1955-01-01

      The climb of turbojet aircraft is analyzed and discussed including the accelerations. Three particular flight performances are examined: minimum time of climb, climb with minimum fuel consumption, and steepest climb. The theoretical results obtained from a previous study are put in a form that is suitable for application on the following simplifying assumptions: the Mach number is considered an independent variable instead of the velocity; the variations of the airplane mass due to fuel consumption are disregarded; the airplane polar is assumed to be parabolic; the path curvatures and the squares of the path angles are disregarded in the projection of the equation of motion on the normal to the path; lastly, an ideal turbojet with performance independent of the velocity is involved. The optimum Mach number for each flight condition is obtained from the solution of a sixth order equation in which the coefficients are functions of two fundamental parameters: the ratio of minimum drag in level flight to the thrust and the Mach number which represents the flight at constant altitude and maximum lift-drag ratio.

    12. Path Models of Vocal Emotion Communication.

      PubMed

      Bänziger, Tanja; Hosoya, Georg; Scherer, Klaus R

      2015-01-01

      We propose to use a comprehensive path model of vocal emotion communication, encompassing encoding, transmission, and decoding processes, to empirically model data sets on emotion expression and recognition. The utility of the approach is demonstrated for two data sets from two different cultures and languages, based on corpora of vocal emotion enactment by professional actors and emotion inference by naïve listeners. Lens model equations, hierarchical regression, and multivariate path analysis are used to compare the relative contributions of objectively measured acoustic cues in the enacted expressions and subjective voice cues as perceived by listeners to the variance in emotion inference from vocal expressions for four emotion families (fear, anger, happiness, and sadness). While the results confirm the central role of arousal in vocal emotion communication, the utility of applying an extended path modeling framework is demonstrated by the identification of unique combinations of distal cues and proximal percepts carrying information about specific emotion families, independent of arousal. The statistical models generated show that more sophisticated acoustic parameters need to be developed to explain the distal underpinnings of subjective voice quality percepts that account for much of the variance in emotion inference, in particular voice instability and roughness. The general approach advocated here, as well as the specific results, open up new research strategies for work in psychology (specifically emotion and social perception research) and engineering and computer science (specifically research and development in the domain of affective computing, particularly on automatic emotion detection and synthetic emotion expression in avatars).

    13. All new custom path photo book creation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wang, Wiley; Muzzolini, Russ

      2012-03-01

      In this paper, we present an all new custom path to allow consumers to have full control to their photos and the format of their books, while providing them with guidance to make their creation fast and easy. The users can choose to fully automate the initial creation, and then customize every page. The system manage many design themes along with numerous design elements, such as layouts, backgrounds, embellishments and pattern bands. The users can also utilize photos from multiple sources including their computers, Shutterfly accounts, Shutterfly Share sites and Facebook. The users can also use a photo as background, add, move and resize photos and text - putting what they want where they want instead of being confined to templates. The new path allows users to add embellishments anywhere in the book, and the high-performance platform can support up to 1,000 photos per book and up to 25 pictures per page. The path offers either Smart Autofill or Storyboard features allowing customers to populate their books with photos so they can add captions and customize the pages.

    14. Toroidal path filter for orbital conjunction screening

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Alfano, Salvatore

      2012-07-01

      For satellite conjunction prediction containing many objects, timely processing can be a concern. Various filters are used to identify orbiting pairs that cannot come close enough over a prescribed time period to be considered hazardous. Such pairings can then be eliminated from further computation to quicken the overall processing time. One such filter is the orbit path filter (also known as the geometric pre-filter), designed to eliminate pairs of objects based on characteristics of orbital motion. The goal of this filter is to eliminate pairings where the distance (geometry) between their orbits remains above some user-defined threshold, irrespective of the actual locations of the satellites along their paths. Rather than using a single distance bound, this work presents a toroid approach, providing a measure of versatility by allowing the user to specify different in-plane and out-of-plane bounds for the path filter. The primary orbit is used to define a focus-centered elliptical ring torus with user-defined thresholds. An assessment is then made to determine if the secondary orbit can touch or penetrate this torus. The method detailed here can be used on coplanar, as well as non-coplanar, orbits.

    15. Path Models of Vocal Emotion Communication

      PubMed Central

      Bänziger, Tanja; Hosoya, Georg; Scherer, Klaus R.

      2015-01-01

      We propose to use a comprehensive path model of vocal emotion communication, encompassing encoding, transmission, and decoding processes, to empirically model data sets on emotion expression and recognition. The utility of the approach is demonstrated for two data sets from two different cultures and languages, based on corpora of vocal emotion enactment by professional actors and emotion inference by naïve listeners. Lens model equations, hierarchical regression, and multivariate path analysis are used to compare the relative contributions of objectively measured acoustic cues in the enacted expressions and subjective voice cues as perceived by listeners to the variance in emotion inference from vocal expressions for four emotion families (fear, anger, happiness, and sadness). While the results confirm the central role of arousal in vocal emotion communication, the utility of applying an extended path modeling framework is demonstrated by the identification of unique combinations of distal cues and proximal percepts carrying information about specific emotion families, independent of arousal. The statistical models generated show that more sophisticated acoustic parameters need to be developed to explain the distal underpinnings of subjective voice quality percepts that account for much of the variance in emotion inference, in particular voice instability and roughness. The general approach advocated here, as well as the specific results, open up new research strategies for work in psychology (specifically emotion and social perception research) and engineering and computer science (specifically research and development in the domain of affective computing, particularly on automatic emotion detection and synthetic emotion expression in avatars). PMID:26325076

    16. 75 FR 51750 - Accessibility Guidelines for Shared Use Paths

      Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

      2010-08-23

      ... opportunity for individuals with disabilities, designers of shared use paths, and those with expertise in this... opportunity for individuals with disabilities, designers of shared use paths, and those with expertise in...

    17. 1. AERIAL VIEW OF THE PATH TRANSIT SYSTEM BRIDGE, LOOKING ...

      Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

      1. AERIAL VIEW OF THE PATH TRANSIT SYSTEM BRIDGE, LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE CONRAIL BRIDGE (HAER No. NJ-43) AND THE NEWARK TURNPIKE ARE VISIBLE IN THE BACKGROUND - Path Transit System Bridge, Spanning Hackensack River, Kearny, Hudson County, NJ

    18. A Note on the Stochastic Nature of Feynman Quantum Paths

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Botelho, Luiz C. L.

      2016-11-01

      We propose a Fresnel stochastic white noise framework to analyze the stochastic nature of the Feynman paths entering on the Feynman Path Integral expression for the Feynman Propagator of a particle quantum mechanically moving under a time-independent potential.

    19. A path-oriented knowledge representation system: Defusing the combinatorial system

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Karamouzis, Stamos T.; Barry, John S.; Smith, Steven L.; Feyock, Stefan

      1995-01-01

      LIMAP is a programming system oriented toward efficient information manipulation over fixed finite domains, and quantification over paths and predicates. A generalization of Warshall's Algorithm to precompute paths in a sparse matrix representation of semantic nets is employed to allow questions involving paths between components to be posed and answered easily. LIMAP's ability to cache all paths between two components in a matrix cell proved to be a computational obstacle, however, when the semantic net grew to realistic size. The present paper describes a means of mitigating this combinatorial explosion to an extent that makes the use of the LIMAP representation feasible for problems of significant size. The technique we describe radically reduces the size of the search space in which LIMAP must operate; semantic nets of more than 500 nodes have been attacked successfully. Furthermore, it appears that the procedure described is applicable not only to LIMAP, but to a number of other combinatorially explosive search space problems found in AI as well.

    20. Along signal paths: an empirical gene set approach exploiting pathway topology

      PubMed Central

      Martini, Paolo; Sales, Gabriele; Massa, M. Sofia; Chiogna, Monica; Romualdi, Chiara

      2013-01-01

      Gene set analysis using biological pathways has become a widely used statistical approach for gene expression analysis. A biological pathway can be represented through a graph where genes and their interactions are, respectively, nodes and edges of the graph. From a biological point of view only some portions of a pathway are expected to be altered; however, few methods using pathway topology have been proposed and none of them tries to identify the signal paths, within a pathway, mostly involved in the biological problem. Here, we present a novel algorithm for pathway analysis clipper, that tries to fill in this gap. clipper implements a two-step empirical approach based on the exploitation of graph decomposition into a junction tree to reconstruct the most relevant signal path. In the first step clipper selects significant pathways according to statistical tests on the means and the concentration matrices of the graphs derived from pathway topologies. Then, it identifies within these pathways the signal paths having the greatest association with a specific phenotype. We test our approach on simulated and two real expression datasets. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of clipper in the identification of signal transduction paths totally coherent with the biological problem. PMID:23002139