Science.gov

Sample records for sic hydrogen sensor

  1. Development of High Temperature SiC Based Hydrogen/Hydrocarbon Sensors with Bond Pads for Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liangyu; Biagi-Labiosa, Azlin M.; Ward, Benjamin J.; Lukco, Dorothy; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Lampard, Peter S.; Artale, Michael A.; Hampton, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes efforts towards the transition of existing high temperature hydrogen and hydrocarbon Schottky diode sensor elements to packaged sensor structures that can be integrated into a testing system. Sensor modifications and the technical challenges involved are discussed. Testing of the sensors at 500 C or above is also presented along with plans for future development.

  2. Pd/Ta2O5/SiC Schottky-diode hydrogen sensors formed by using rapid thermal oxidation of Ta thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Sung-Jae; Choi, Je Hoon; Kim, Seong Jeen; Kim, Sang-Cheol

    2013-11-01

    Pd/Ta2O5/SiC Schottky-diode hydrogen sensors were fabricated, and their hydrogen gas sensing performance was investigated at 573 K and 773 K. Interfacial Ta2O5 films of 120 nm in thickness were formed by using rapid thermal oxidation (RTO) of the sputtered Ta films on SiC. The crystallinity of the Ta and the Ta2O5 films were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). As-sputtered Ta films on 4H-SiC are composed of α-Ta (body-centered-cubic) and β-Ta (tetragonal), and α-Ta (110) is the dominant orientation. After RTO at 573 K, the Ta films are converted to β-Ta2O5 (orthorhombic). The diode sensors show high sensitivity to H2 even at the low H2 concentration of 500 ppm, and the voltage change of the sensor upon H2 exposure is proportional to the H2 concentration in the range of 500 ˜ 2000 ppm at 573 K. The response voltage ΔV is shown to arise mostly from the change in the series resistance component of the sensor upon H2 exposure; the main origin of that change is believed to be the Ta2O5 interfacial layer. The response time t90 of the sensor at 573 K was estimated to be approximately 8 s.

  3. Improved performance of Pd/WO3/SiC Schottky-diode hydrogen gas sensor by using fluorine plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Tang, W. M.; Lai, P. T.

    2015-08-01

    A high-performance Pd/WO3/SiC Schottky-diode hydrogen gas sensor was fabricated by using fluorine plasma treatment on the WO3 film. From the electrical measurements under various hydrogen concentrations and temperatures, the plasma-treated sensor exhibited a maximum barrier-height change of 279 meV and a static gas sensitivity of more than 30 000, which is 30 times higher than that of the untreated sensor. This significant improvement is attributed to the larger adsorption area caused by the plasma-roughened WO3 film and the lower baseline leakage current induced by fluorine passivation of oxide traps. Additionally, the kinetics analysis and hydrogen coverage of the devices were studied to demonstrate the temperature dependence of the gas sensing behaviors. The hydrogen adsorption enthalpy at the Pd-WO3 interface significantly decreased from -31.2 kJ/mol to -57.6 kJ/mol after the plasma treatment. Therefore, the adsorption process on the plasma-treated sample is much easier and the suppression of sensing properties is more obvious at elevated temperatures above 423 K.

  4. Hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  5. Development of Sic Gas Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Neudeck, P. G.; Okojie, R. S.; Beheim, G. M.; Thomas, V.; Chen, L.; Lukco, D.; Liu, C. C.; Ward, B.; Makel, D.

    2002-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based gas sensors have significant potential to address the gas sensing needs of aerospace applications such as emission monitoring, fuel leak detection, and fire detection. However, in order to reach that potential, a range of technical challenges must be overcome. These challenges go beyond the development of the basic sensor itself and include the need for viable enabling technologies to make a complete gas sensor system: electrical contacts, packaging, and transfer of information from the sensor to the outside world. This paper reviews the status at NASA Glenn Research Center of SiC Schottky diode gas sensor development as well as that of enabling technologies supporting SiC gas sensor system implementation. A vision of a complete high temperature microfabricated SiC gas sensor system is proposed. In the long-term, it is believed that improvements in the SiC semiconductor material itself could have a dramatic effect on the performance of SiC gas sensor systems.

  6. Comparative studies of monoclinic and orthorhombic WO3 films used for hydrogen sensor fabrication on SiC crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, V. V.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Romanov, R. I.; Fominski, V. Y.; Volosova, M. A.; Demin, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    Amorphous WOx films were prepared on the SiC crystal by using two different methods, namely, reactive pulsed laser deposition (RPLD) and reactive deposition by ion sputtering (RDIS). After deposition, the WOx films were annealed in an air. The RISD film possessed a m-WO3 structure and consisted of closely packed microcrystals. Localized swelling of the films and micro-hills growth did not destroy dense crystal packing. RPLD film had layered β-WO3 structure with relatively smooth surface. Smoothness of the films were destroyed by localized swelling and the micro-openings formation was observed. Comparative study of m-WO3/SiC, Pt/m-WO3/SiC, and P-WO3/SiC samples shows that structural characteristics of the WO3 films strongly influence on the voltage/current response as well as on the rate of current growth during H2 detection at elevated temperatures.

  7. Pd/CeO2/SiC Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Weijie; Collins, W. Eugene

    2005-01-01

    The incorporation of nanostructured interfacial layers of CeO2 has been proposed to enhance the performances of Pd/SiC Schottky diodes used to sense hydrogen and hydrocarbons at high temperatures. If successful, this development could prove beneficial in numerous applications in which there are requirements to sense hydrogen and hydrocarbons at high temperatures: examples include monitoring of exhaust gases from engines and detecting fires. Sensitivity and thermal stability are major considerations affecting the development of high-temperature chemical sensors. In the case of a metal/SiC Schottky diode for a number of metals, the SiC becomes more chemically active in the presence of the thin metal film on the SiC surface at high temperature. This increase in chemical reactivity causes changes in chemical composition and structure of the metal/SiC interface. The practical effect of the changes is to alter the electronic and other properties of the device in such a manner as to degrade its performance as a chemical sensor. To delay or prevent these changes, it is necessary to limit operation to a temperature <450 C for these sensor structures. The present proposal to incorporate interfacial CeO2 films is based partly on the observation that nanostructured materials in general have potentially useful electrical properties, including an ability to enhance the transfer of electrons. In particular, nanostructured CeO2, that is CeO2 with nanosized grains, has shown promise for incorporation into hightemperature electronic devices. Nanostructured CeO2 films can be formed on SiC and have been shown to exhibit high thermal stability on SiC, characterized by the ability to withstand temperatures somewhat greater than 700 C for limited times. The exchanges of oxygen between CeO2 and SiC prevent the formation of carbon and other chemical species that are unfavorable for operation of a SiC-based Schottky diode as a chemical sensor. Consequently, it is anticipated that in a Pd

  8. REVIEW ARTICLE: SiC sensors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, N. G.; Horsfall, A. B.

    2007-10-01

    Silicon carbide has attracted considerable attention in recent years as a potential material for sensor devices. This paper reviews the current status of SiC technology for a wide range of sensor applications. It is shown that SiC MEMs devices are well-established with operational devices demonstrated at high temperatures (up to 500 °C) for the sensing of motion, acceleration and gas flow. SiC sensors devices using electrical properties as the sensing mechanism have also been demonstrated principally for gas composition and radiation detection and have wide potential use in scientific, medical and combustion monitoring applications.

  9. UV-induced SiC nanowire sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Gang; Zhou, Yingqiu; He, Yanlan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xue A.; Li, Gong Y.; Haick, Hossam

    2015-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-induced sensors based on a single SiC nanowire (NW) were fabricated and the photoelectric properties including I-V characteristics and time response of the UV sensors were studied. SiC NWs (NWs) were prepared through pyrolyzing a polymer precursor with ferrocene as the catalyst by a CVD route. To elucidate the physical mechanism giving rise to the photoelectrical response in SiC NW sensors, three kinds of contacts between electrodes and SiC NW were prepared, i.e. Schottky contact, p-n junction contact, and Ohmic contact. The photoelectric measurements of the device with Schottky contact indicates the lowest dark current and the largest photocurrent. The results suggest that photocurrent generated at SiC NW-electrode contacts is a result of the photovoltaic effect, in which a built-in electric field accelerates photo generated charge carriers to the electronic contacts. The UV sensors based on SiC NWs could be applied in a harsh environment due to the excellent physical stability and photoelectric properties.

  10. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Fleming, Pamela H.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  11. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  12. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  13. SiC device development for high temperature sensor applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, J. S.; Goldstein, David; Kurtz, A. D.; Osgood, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Progress made in the processing and characterization of 3C-SiC for high temperature sensor applications is reviewed. Piezoresistance properties of silicon carbide and the temperature coefficient of resistivity of n-type beta-SiC are presented. In addition, photoelectrical etching and dopant selective etch-stops in SiC and high temperature Ohmic contacts for n-type beta-SiC sensors are discussed.

  14. Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiggins, Bryan C.

    2007-01-01

    As fossil fuel supplies decline, hydrogen is quickly becoming an increasingly important fuel source. Currently hydrogen is the prime fuel of today's space vehicles (e.g., Space Shuttle) and featured as a fuel for some prototype vehicles such as the BMW seven series model. Hydrogen is a colorless, odorless gas with a 4% lower explosive limit which makes leak detection a priority. In an effort to support the use of hydrogen, a chemochromic (color changing) sensor was developed that is robust, simple to use, and does not require active operation. It can be made into a thin tape which can be conveniently used for leak detection at flanges, valves, or outlets. Chemochromic sensors can be either reversible or irreversible; however, irreversible chemochromic sensors will be analyzed in this report. The irreversible sensor is useful during hazardous operations when personnel cannot be present. To actively monitor leaks, testing of the irreversible sensor against environmental effects was completed and results indicated this material is suitable for outdoor use in the harsh beachside environment of Kennedy Space Center. The experiments in this report will give additional results to the environmental testing by adding solid rocket booster residue as a variable. The primary motivation for these experiments is to prepare the sensors for the launch pad environment at the Kennedy Space Center. In an effort to simulate the atmosphere at the pads before and after launch, the chemochromic sensors are exposed to solid rocket residue under various conditions.

  15. The Commercialization of the SiC Flame Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedison, Jeffrey B.

    2002-03-01

    The technical and scientific steps required to produce large quantities of SiC flame sensors is described. The technical challenges required to understand, fabricate, test and package SiC photodiodes in 1990 were numerous since SiC device know how was embryonic. A sense of urgency for a timely replacement of the Geiger Muller gas discharge tube soon entered the scene. New dual fuel GE Power Systems gas turbines, which were designed to lean burn either natural gas or oil for low NOx emissions required a much higher sensitivity sensor. Joint work between GE CRD and Cree Research sponsored by the GE Aircraft Engine Division developed the know how for the fabrication of high sensitivity, high yield, reliable SiC photodiodes. Yield issues were uncovered and overcome. The urgency for system insertion required that SiC diode and sensor circuitry development needed to be carried out simultaneously with power plant field tests of laboratory or prototype sensor assemblies. The sensor and reliability specifications were stringent since the sensors installed on power plant turbine combustor walls are subjected to high levels of vibration, elevated temperatures, and high pressures. Furthermore a fast recovery time was required to sense flame out in spite of the fact that the amplifier circuit needed have high gain and high dynamic range. SiC diode technical difficulties were encountered and overcome. The science of hydrocarbon flames will also be described together with the fortunate overlap of the strong OH emission band with the SiC photodiode sensitivity versus wavelength characteristic. The extremely low dark current (<1pA/cm^2) afforded by the wide band gap and the 3eV sensitivity cutoff at 400nm made if possible to produce low amplifier offsets, high sensitivity and high dynamic range along with immunity to black body radiation from combustor walls. Field tests at power plants that had experienced turbine tripping, whenever oil fuel and/or oil with steam injection for

  16. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Fleming, P.H.

    1994-11-22

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed. 6 figs.

  17. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

  18. Hydrogen Optical Fiber Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Robert A.; Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.

    2008-07-28

    Optically-based hydrogen sensors promise to deliver an added level of safety as hydrogen and fuel cell technologies enter the mainstream. More importantly, they offer reduced power consumption and lower cost, which are desirable for mass production applications such as automobiles and consumer appliances. This program addressed two of the major challenges previously identified in porous optrode-based optical hydrogen sensors: sensitivity to moisture (ambient humidity), and interference from the oxygen in air. Polymer coatings to inhibit moisture and oxygen were developed in conjunction with newer and novel hydrogen sensing chemistries. The results showed that it is possible to achieve sensitive hydrogen detection and rapid response with minimal interference from oxygen and humidity. As a result of this work, a new and more exciting avenue of investigation was developed: the elimination of the porous optrode and deposition of the sensor chemistry directly into the polymer film. Initial results have been promising, and open up a wider range of potential applications from extended optical fiber sensing networks, to simple plastic "stickers" for use around the home and office.

  19. Color Changing Hydrogen Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke B.; Williams, Martha; Captain, Janine E.; Mohajeri, Nahid; Raissi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Program, one of the most hazardous operation that occurred was the loading of liquid hydrogen (LH2) during fueling operations of the spacecraft. Due to hydrogen's low explosive limit, any amount leaked could lead to catastrophic event. Hydrogen's chemical properties make it ideal as a rocket fuel; however, the fuel is deemed unsafe for most commercial use because of the inability to easily detect the gas leaking. The increased use of hydrogen over traditional fossil fuels would reduce greenhouse gases and America's dependency on foreign oil. Therefore a technology that would improve safety at NASA and in the commercial sector while creating a new economic sector would have a huge impact to NASA's mission. The Chemochromic Detector for sensing hydrogen gas leakage is a color-changing detector that is useful in any application where it is important to know not only the presence but also the location of the hydrogen gas leak. This technology utilizes a chemochromicpigment and polymer matrix that can be molded or spun into rigid or pliable shapes useable in variable temperature environments including atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases. A change in color of the detector material indicates where gaseous hydrogen leaks are occurring. The irreversible sensor has a dramatic color change from beige to dark grey and remains dark grey after exposure. A reversible pigment changes from white to blue in the presence of hydrogen and reverts back to white in the presence of oxygen. Both versions of the sensor's pigments were comprised of a mixture of a metal oxide substrate and a hydro-chromic compound (i.e., the compound that changed color in the presence of hydrogen) and immediately notified the operator of the presence of low levels of hydrogen. The detector can be used in a variety of formats including paint, tape, caulking, injection molded parts, textiles and fabrics, composites, and films. This technology brings numerous

  20. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Yang-Tse; Poli, Andrea A.; Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

  1. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

    1999-03-23

    A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

  2. The development of hydrogen sensor technology for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Jefferson, G. D.; Madzsar, G. C.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    1993-01-01

    The motivation and present status of each of the major components of the NASA Lewis Research Center hydrogen sensor program. The testing facility used to test the sensors and the proposed expansion of this facility are discussed. The Schottky diode prototype sensors, the use of SiC as a semiconductor for a hydrogen sensor, and the present characterization of PdCr are addressed. Future directions for the program are examined. It is concluded that results thus far are encouraging and that further development work is necessary.

  3. Demonstration of SiC Pressure Sensors at 750 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of MEMS-based 4H-SiC piezoresistive pressure sensors tested at 750 C and in the process confirmed the existence of strain sensitivity recovery with increasing temperature above 400 C, eventually achieving near or up to 100% of the room temperature values at 750 C. This strain sensitivity recovery phenomenon in 4H-SiC is uncharacteristic of the well-known monotonic decrease in strain sensitivity with increasing temperature in silicon piezoresistors. For the three sensors tested, the room temperature full-scale output (FSO) at 200 psig ranged between 29 and 36 mV. Although the FSO at 400 C dropped by about 60%, full recovery was achieved at 750 C. This result will allow the operation of SiC pressure sensors at higher temperatures, thereby permitting deeper insertion into the engine combustion chamber to improve the accurate quantification of combustor dynamics.

  4. Conformers of hydrogenated SiC honeycomb structure: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Seemita; Majumder, Chiranjib

    2013-08-01

    The structural and electronic properties of fully hydrogenated SiC graphane-like nano-structures have been investigated. The objective of this study is to underscore the relative stability of different conformers of hydrogenated SiC sheet. All calculations are carried out using plane wave based pseudo-potential approach under the density functional theory. The results reveal that the fully hydrogenated SiC sheet forms five stable isomers, and the chair conformer is most stable. Further study through molecular dynamic simulation strategy demonstrates that even at room temperature the chair conformer remains stable.

  5. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  6. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Bruce R.; Prather, William S.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  7. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1992-10-06

    An apparatus and method are described for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer. 4 figs.

  8. Packaging Technologies for 500C SiC Electronics and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Various SiC electronics and sensors are currently under development for applications in 500C high temperature environments such as hot sections of aerospace engines and the surface of Venus. In order to conduct long-term test and eventually commercialize these SiC devices, compatible packaging technologies for the SiC electronics and sensors are required. This presentation reviews packaging technologies developed for 500C SiC electronics and sensors to address both component and subsystem level packaging needs for high temperature environments. The packaging system for high temperature SiC electronics includes ceramic chip-level packages, ceramic printed circuit boards (PCBs), and edge-connectors. High temperature durable die-attach and precious metal wire-bonding are used in the chip-level packaging process. A high temperature sensor package is specifically designed to address high temperature micro-fabricated capacitive pressure sensors for high differential pressure environments. This presentation describes development of these electronics and sensor packaging technologies, including some testing results of SiC electronics and capacitive pressure sensors using these packaging technologies.

  9. Hydrogen Leak Detection Sensor Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Barton D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the characteristics of the Hydrogen Sensor database. The database is the result of NASA's continuing interest in and improvement of its ability to detect and assess gas leaks in space applications. The database specifics and a snapshot of an entry in the database are reviewed. Attempts were made to determine the applicability of each of the 65 sensors for ground and/or vehicle use.

  10. Chemical reactions of atomic hydrogen at SiC surface and heterogeneous chemiluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styrov, V. V.; Tyutyunnikov, V. I.; Sergeev, O. T.; Oya, Y.; Okuno, K.

    2005-02-01

    In studies of the surface properties of SiC polytypes and chemical reactions of hydrogen atoms at SiC surfaces the surface (chemi)luminescence of SiC has been applied excited in the reaction of hydrogen atoms due to chemical energy released (heterogeneous chemiluminescence, HCL). The bulk photoluminescence (PL) have also been used for comparison with surface HCL. All the samples showed HCL, but only α-SiC (6H, 15R), technologically or specially doped (predominantly by N, B, Al), exhibited PL (λex=365 nm). Cubic polycrystalline β-SiC (or 3C SiC) did not show PL. The general luminescence band of α-SiC (6H, 15R) and B and Al doped SiC (6H) was a broad yellow band with λmax ranged from 620 to 650 nm for PL (110 K). Another less intensive luminescence band is a blue one, which has been observed only at low temperatures for α-SiC (6H,15R) and B and Al doped SiC (6H) in PL spectra and as a shoulder in HCL spectra (λmax=477 nm at 110 K for 15R SiC). The green band near 540 nm was also observed sometimes in PL spectra for α-SiC. The heat of adsorption of hydrogen atoms at polycrystalline β-SiC estimated from HCL data was found to be in the range from 2 to 3 eV.

  11. New Gas Polarographic Hydrogen Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Jesus A.; Barile, Ron

    2004-01-01

    Polarography is the measurement of the current that flows in solution as a function of an applied voltage. The actual form of the observed polarographic current depends upon the manner in which the voltage is applied and on the characteristics of the working electrode. The new gas polarographic H2 sensor shows a current level increment with concentration of the gaseous H2 similar to those relating to metal ions in liquid electrolytes in well-known polarography. This phenomenon is caused by the fact that the diffusion of the gaseous H2 through a gas diffusion hole built in the sensor is a rate-determining step in the gaseous-hydrogen sensing mechanism. The diffusion hole artificially limits the diffusion of the gaseous H2 toward the electrode located at the sensor cavity. This gas polarographic H2 sensor. is actually an electrochemical-pumping cell since the gaseous H2 is in fact pumped via the electrochemical driving force generated between the electrodes. Gaseous H2 enters the diffusion hole and reaches the first electrode (anode) located in the sensor cavity to be transformed into an H+ ions or protons; H+ ions pass through the electrolyte and reach the second electrode (cathode) to be reformed to gaseous H2. Gas polarographic 02 sensors are commercially available; a gas polarographic 02 sensor was used to prove the feasibility of building a new gas polarographic H2 sensor.

  12. Optical Fiber Grating Hydrogen Sensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jixiang; Zhu, Li; Wang, Gaopeng; Xiang, Feng; Qin, Yuhuan; Wang, Min; Yang, Minghong

    2017-01-01

    In terms of hydrogen sensing and detection, optical fiber hydrogen sensors have been a research issue due to their intrinsic safety and good anti-electromagnetic interference. Among these sensors, hydrogen sensors consisting of fiber grating coated with sensitive materials have attracted intensive research interests due to their good reliability and distributed measurements. This review paper mainly focuses on optical fiber hydrogen sensors associated with fiber gratings and various materials. Their configurations and sensing performances proposed by different groups worldwide are reviewed, compared and discussed in this paper. Meanwhile, the challenges for fiber grating hydrogen sensors are also addressed. PMID:28287499

  13. Wide Area and Distributed Hydrogen Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Zalosh, Robert G.; Barilo, Nick F.

    2009-09-18

    Recent advances in optical sensors show promise for the development of new wide area monitoring and distributed optical network hydrogen detection systems. Optical hydrogen sensing technologies reviewed here are: 1) open path Raman scattering systems, 2) back scattering from chemically treated solid polymer matrix optical fiber sensor cladding; and 3) shlieren and shearing interferometry imaging. Ultrasonic sensors for hydrogen release detection are also reviewed. The development status of these technologies and their demonstrated results in sensor path length, low hydrogen concentration detection ability, and response times are described and compared to the corresponding status of hydrogen spot sensor network technologies.

  14. Optical Fiber Grating Hydrogen Sensors: A Review.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jixiang; Zhu, Li; Wang, Gaopeng; Xiang, Feng; Qin, Yuhuan; Wang, Min; Yang, Minghong

    2017-03-12

    In terms of hydrogen sensing and detection, optical fiber hydrogen sensors have been a research issue due to their intrinsic safety and good anti-electromagnetic interference. Among these sensors, hydrogen sensors consisting of fiber grating coated with sensitive materials have attracted intensive research interests due to their good reliability and distributed measurements. This review paper mainly focuses on optical fiber hydrogen sensors associated with fiber gratings and various materials. Their configurations and sensing performances proposed by different groups worldwide are reviewed, compared and discussed in this paper. Meanwhile, the challenges for fiber grating hydrogen sensors are also addressed.

  15. SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Paul K.T. Liu

    2003-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. SiC macro-porous membranes have been successfully fabricated via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder. Also, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was prepared via our CVD/I technique. This composite membrane demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers and sol-gel techniques. Building upon the positive progress made in the membrane development study, we conducted an optimization study to develop an H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment. In addition, mathematical simulation has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed reactor for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the

  16. The development of hydrogen sensor technology at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Jefferson, G. D.; Madzsar, G. C.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    1993-01-01

    The detection of hydrogen leaks in aerospace applications, especially those involving hydrogen fuel propulsion systems, is of extreme importance for reasons of reliability, safety, and economy. Motivated by leaks occurring in liquid hydrogen lines supplying the main engine of the Space Shuttle, NASA Lewis has initiated a program to develop point-contact hydrogen sensors which address the needs of aerospace applications. Several different approaches are being explored. They include the fabrication of PdAg Schottky diode structures, the characterization of PdCr as a hydrogen sensitive alloy, and the use of SiC as a semiconductor for hydrogen sensors. This paper discusses the motivation behind and present status of each of the major components of the NASA LeRC hydrogen sensor program.

  17. Hydrogen adsorption on sulphur-doped SiC nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevak Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is an energy carrier and clean fuel that can be used for a broad range of applications that include fuel cell vehicles. Therefore, development of materials for hydrogen storage is demanded. Nanotubes, in this context, are appropriate materials. Recently, silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNTs) have been predicted as potential nanomaterials for hydrogen storage, and atomic doping into the nanotubes improves the H2 adsorption. Here, we report H2 adsorption properties of sulphur-doped (S-doped) SiCNTs using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The H2 adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of energy band structures, density of states (DOS), adsorption energy and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that, compared to the intrinsic SiCNT, S-doped SiCNT is more sensitive to H2 adsorption. H2 gas adsorption on S-doped C-sites of SiCNT brings about significant modulation of the electronic structure of the nanotube, which results in charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas, and dipole-dipole interactions cause chemisorptions of hydrogen. However, in the case of H2 gas adsorption on S-doped Si-sites of the nanotube, lesser charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas results in physisorptions of the gas. The efficient hydrogen sensing properties of S-doped SiCNTs, studied here, may have potential for its practical realization for hydrogen storage application.

  18. Hydrogen and oxygen sensor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farber, E. A.; Mahig, J.; Schaeper, H. R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A reliable and low cost gas sensor was investigated for instantaneously detecting H2 in N2, H2 in air, and O2 in N2. The major portion of the research was spent in developing a sensor which would instantaneously detect H2 to + or - 50 ppm even in the presence of trace amounts of other gases. The experimental procedures used to provide the performance characteristics for the various oscillators are discussed describing the equipment with help of schematics and photographs where applicable. The resulting performance is given in graphical form. In some cases both hydrogen and helium may be present and since both of them effect gas sensors similarly, a method was found to determine the concentration of each. The methods developed are grouped into the following four broad categories: pure metal response, variation in heat conductivity, reduction methods, and exotic processes. From the above it was decided for the present to use a copper oxide reduction process as this process was demonstrated to be capable of determining the concentrations of hydrogen and helium respectively in a gas mixture with air or nitrogen.

  19. OGS Hydrogen Sensor ORU R&R

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-04-18

    ISS030-E-236919 (18 April 2012) --- NASA astronaut Dan Burbank, Expedition 30 commander, works with the Oxygen Generator System (OGS) rack in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Burbank unpowered the OGS, purged the hydrogen sensor Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) with the Hydrogen Sensor ORU Purge Adapter (HOPA) for return to Earth, and replaced the hydrogen sensor with a new spare, then cleaned the rack Avionics Air Assembly (AAA).

  20. Hydrogen gas sensor and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    McKee, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the pressure of hydrogen gas in a nuclear reactor, and method of manufacturing the same. The sensor comprises an elongated tube of hydrogen permeable material which is connected to a pressure transducer through a feedthrough tube which passes through a wall at the boundary of the region in which hydrogen is present. The tube is pressurized and flushed with hydrogen gas at an elevated temperature during the manufacture of the sensor in order to remove all gasses other than hydrogen from the device.

  1. Packaging Technology Developed for High-Temperature SiC Sensors and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Lei, Jih-Fen

    2000-01-01

    A ceramic- and thick-film-materials-based prototype electronic package designed for silicon carbide (SiC) high-temperature sensors and electronics has been successfully tested at 500 C in an oxygen-containing air environment for 500 hours. This package was designed, fabricated, assembled, and electronically evaluated at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field with an in-house-fabricated SiC semiconductor test chip. High-temperature electronics and sensors are necessary for harsh-environment space and aeronautical applications, such as space missions to the inner solar system or the emission control electronics and sensors in aeronautical engines. Single-crystal SiC has such excellent physical and chemical material properties that SiC-based semiconductor electronics can operate at temperatures over 600 C, which is significantly higher than the limit for Si-based semiconductor devices. SiC semiconductor chips were recently demonstrated to be operable at temperatures as high as 600 C, but only in the probe station environment because suitable packaging technology for sensors and electronics at temperatures of 500 C and beyond did not exist. Thus, packaging technology for SiC-based sensors and electronics is immediately needed for both application and commercialization of high-temperature SiC sensors and electronics. In response to this need, researchers at Glenn designed, fabricated, and assembled a prototype electronic package for high-temperature electronics, sensors, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using aluminum nitride (AlN) substrate and gold (Au) thick-film materials. This prototype package successfully survived a soak test at 500 C in air for 500 hours. Packaging components tested included thick-film high-temperature metallization, internal wire bonds, external lead bonds, and a SiC diode chip die-attachment. Each test loop, which was composed of thick-film printed wire, wire bond, and lead bond was subjected to a 50-mA direct current for 250

  2. Optimization of Thermal Neutron Converter in SiC Sensors for Spectral Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Krolikowski, Igor; Cetnar, Jerzy; Issa, Fatima; Ferrone, Raffaello; Ottaviani, Laurent; Szalkai, Dora; Klix, Axel; Vermeeren, Ludo; Lyoussi, Abdalla; Saenger, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Optimization of the neutron converter in SiC sensors is presented. The sensors are used for spectral radiation measurements of thermal and fast neutrons and optionally gamma ray at elevated temperature in harsh radiation environment. The neutron converter, which is based on 10B, allows to detect thermal neutrons by means of neutron capture reaction. Two construction of the sensors were used to measure radiation in experiments. Sensor responses collected in experiments have been reproduced by the computer tool created by authors, it allows to validate the tool. The tool creates the response matrix function describing the characteristic of the sensors and it was used for detailed analyses of the sensor responses. Obtained results help to optimize the neutron converter in order to increase thermal neutron detection. Several enhanced construction of the sensors, which includes the neutron converter based on {sup 10}B or {sup 6}Li, were proposed. (authors)

  3. SiC nanotubes: A novel material for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Froudakis, George E; Lithoxoos, George P; Samios, Jannis

    2006-08-01

    A multiscale theoretical approach is used for the investigation of hydrogen storage in silicon-carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs). First, ab initio calculations at the density functional level of theory (DFT) showed an increase of 20% in the binding energy of H2 in SiCNTs compared with pure carbon nanotubes (CNTs). This is explained by the alternative charges that exist in the SiCNT walls. Second, classical Monte Carlo simulation of nanotube bundles showed an even larger increase of the storage capacity in SiCNTs, especially in low temperature and high-pressure conditions. Our results verify in both theoretical levels that SiCNTs seem to be more suitable materials for hydrogen storage than pure CNTs.

  4. Overview of North American Hydrogen Sensor Standards

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, Kathleen; Lopez, Hugo; Cairns, Julie; Wichert, Richard; Rivkin, Carl; Burgess, Robert; Buttner, William

    2015-08-11

    An overview of the main North American codes and standards associated with hydrogen safety sensors is provided. The distinction between a code and a standard is defined, and the relationship between standards and codes is clarified, especially for those circumstances where a standard or a certification requirement is explicitly referenced within a code. The report identifies three main types of standards commonly applied to hydrogen sensors (interface and controls standards, shock and hazard standards, and performance-based standards). The certification process and a list and description of the main standards and model codes associated with the use of hydrogen safety sensors in hydrogen infrastructure are presented.

  5. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Spherical Hydrogen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. This photograph taken September 18, 1963 shows a spherical hydrogen tank being constructed next to the S-IC test stand.

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Spherical Hydrogen Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. This photograph taken September 18, 1963 shows a spherical hydrogen tank being constructed next to the S-IC test stand.

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand Hydrogen Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. In the center portion of this photograph, taken September 5, 1963, the spherical hydrogen storage tanks are being constructed. One of the massive tower legs of the S-IC test stand is visible to the far right.

  8. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-01-01

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures. PMID:24113685

  9. Silicon carbide-based hydrogen gas sensors for high-temperature applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongjeen; Choi, Jehoon; Jung, Minsoo; Joo, Sungjae; Kim, Sangchoel

    2013-10-09

    We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC) was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  10. Platinum-functionalized black phosphorus hydrogen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geonyeop; Jung, Sunwoo; Jang, Soohwan; Kim, Jihyun

    2017-06-01

    Black phosphorus (BP), especially in its two-dimensional (2D) form, is an intriguing material because it exhibits higher chemical sensing ability as compared to other thin-film and 2D materials. However, its implementation into hydrogen sensors has been limited due to its insensitivity toward hydrogen. We functionalized exfoliated BP flakes with Pt nanoparticles to improve their hydrogen sensing efficiency. Pt-functionalized BP sensors with back-gated field-effect transistor configuration exhibited a fast response/decay, excellent reproducibility, and high sensitivities (over 50%) at room temperature. Langmuir isotherm model was employed to analyze the Pt-catalyzed BP sensors. Furthermore, the activation energy of hydrogen adsorption on Pt-decorated BP was evaluated, which is equal to the change in work function resulting from hydrogen adsorption on the Pt(111) surface. These results demonstrate that Pt-catalyzed BP exhibits a great potential for next-generation hydrogen sensors.

  11. MIS-based sensors with hydrogen selectivity

    DOEpatents

    Li,; Dongmei, [Boulder, CO; Medlin, J William [Boulder, CO; McDaniel, Anthony H [Livermore, CA; Bastasz, Robert J [Livermore, CA

    2008-03-11

    The invention provides hydrogen selective metal-insulator-semiconductor sensors which include a layer of hydrogen selective material. The hydrogen selective material can be polyimide layer having a thickness between 200 and 800 nm. Suitable polyimide materials include reaction products of benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride 4,4-oxydianiline m-phenylene diamine and other structurally similar materials.

  12. Conformal Thin Film Packaging for SiC Sensor Circuits in Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Karnick, David A.; Ponchak, George E.; Zorman, Christian A.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation sputtered silicon carbide annealed at 300 C for one hour is used as a conformal thin film package. A RF magnetron sputterer was used to deposit 500 nm silicon carbide films on gold metal structures on alumina wafers. To determine the reliability and resistance to immersion in harsh environments, samples were submerged in gold etchant for 24 hours, in BOE for 24 hours, and in an O2 plasma etch for one hour. The adhesion strength of the thin film was measured by a pull test before and after the chemical immersion, which indicated that the film has an adhesion strength better than 10(exp 8) N/m2; this is similar to the adhesion of the gold layer to the alumina wafer. MIM capacitors are used to determine the dielectric constant, which is dependent on the SiC anneal temperature. Finally, to demonstrate that the SiC, conformal, thin film may be used to package RF circuits and sensors, an LC resonator circuit was fabricated and tested with and without the conformal SiC thin film packaging. The results indicate that the SiC coating adds no appreciable degradation to the circuits RF performance. Index Terms Sputter, silicon carbide, MIM capacitors, LC resonators, gold etchants, BOE, O2 plasma

  13. Hydrogenated bilayer wurtzite SiC nanofilms: a two-dimensional bipolar magnetic semiconductor material.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Long; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong

    2013-01-14

    Recently, a new kind of spintronics material, bipolar magnetic semiconductors (BMS), has been proposed. The spin polarization of BMS can be conveniently controlled by a gate voltage, which makes it very attractive in device engineering. Now, the main challenge is finding more BMS materials. In this article, we propose that hydrogenated wurtzite SiC nanofilm is a two-dimensional BMS material. Its BMS character is very robust under the effect of strain, substrate or even a strong electric field. The proposed two-dimensional BMS material paves the way to use this promising new material in an integrated circuit.

  14. Planar SiC MEMS flame ionization sensor for in-engine monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolfe, D. A.; Wodin-Schwartz, S.; Alonso, R.; Pisano, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    A novel planar silicon carbide (SiC) MEMS flame ionization sensor was developed, fabricated and tested to measure the presence of a flame from the surface of an engine or other cooled surface while withstanding the high temperature and soot of a combustion environment. Silicon carbide, a ceramic semiconductor, was chosen as the sensor material because it has low surface energy and excellent mechanical and electrical properties at high temperatures. The sensor measures the conductivity of scattered charge carriers in the flame's quenching layer. This allows for flame detection, even when the sensor is situated several millimetres from the flame region. The sensor has been shown to detect the ionization of premixed methane and butane flames in a wide temperature range starting from room temperature. The sensors can measure both the flame chemi-ionization and the deposition of water vapour on the sensor surface. The width and speed of a premixed methane laminar flame front were measured with a series of two sensors fabricated on a single die. This research points to the feasibility of using either single sensors or arrays in internal combustion engine cylinders to optimize engine performance, or for using sensors to monitor flame stability in gas turbine applications.

  15. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  16. Electrochemical Hydrogen Sensor for Safety Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L P; Pham, A-Q; Glass, R S

    2003-04-25

    A hydrogen safety sensor is presented which provides high sensitivity and fast response time when operated in air. The target application for the sensor is external deployment near systems using or producing high concentrations of hydrogen. The sensor is composed of a catalytically active metal-oxide sensing electrode and a noble metal reference electrode attached to an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte. The sensing approach is based on the difference in oxidation rate of hydrogen on the different electrode materials. Results will be presented for a sensor using a sensing electrode of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). Response to H{sub 2}, and cross-sensitivity to hydrocarbon and H{sub 2}O are discussed.

  17. Hydrogen Sensors Demonstrated on the Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2000-01-01

    Microelectromechanical-systems- (MEMS-) based hydrogen sensor technology developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field and Case Western Reserve University was demonstrated on shuttle missions STS-95 (Senator Glenn s mission) and STS-96. These smart sensors, commercialized by Makel Engineering Inc., were part of an "Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring HEDS Technology Demonstration" series conducted at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The experiments were designed to demonstrate the effect of technological upgrades on shuttle performance. The hydrogen sensors were micro-fabricated for minimal size, weight, and power consumption. A temperature detector and heater were included on the sensor for temperature control. Two palladium chrome (PdCr) hydrogen detection devices were included in each sensor package: a Schottky diode for low concentrations and a resistor for high concentrations. These sensor designs allow operation in inert environments. "Smart" electronics developed by Makel Engineering were integrated with the sensors to control the sensor temperature and process the output of the various sensors. This complete hydrogen detection system (two sensors on a chip with smart electronics) flew on STS-95 (launched October 1998) and STS-96 (launched May 1999). It was installed in the aft compartment of the shuttle and used to monitor the hydrogen concentration in that region. Up to this time, a mass spectrometer had monitored the hydrogen concentration in the aft compartment before launch, and "grab" bottles had been used after launch. The inside of these bottles is at vacuum. During flight, the grab bottles are pyrotechnically opened for a brief period, and the gas in the aft compartment is captured in the bottle. Several of these bottles are opened at different times during takeoff, and their contents are used to determine the time profile of the gases in the aft chamber. However, this information is not available until after the flight. On the launch

  18. Bio-functionalization of silicon carbide nanostructures for SiC nanowire-based sensors realization.

    PubMed

    Fradetal, L; Stambouli, V; Bano, E; Pelissier, B; Choi, J H; Ollivier, M; Latu-Romain, L; Boudou, T; Pignot-Paintrand, I

    2014-05-01

    The bio-functionalization process consisting in grafting desoxyribo nucleic acid via aminopropyl-triethoxysilane is performed on several kinds of silicon carbide nanostructures. Prior, the organic layer is characterized on planar surface with fluorescence microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Then, the functionalization is performed on two kinds of nanopillar arrays. One is composed of top-down SiC nanopillars with a wide pitch of 5 microm while the other one is a dense array (pitch: 200 nm) of core-shell Si-SiC nanowires obtained by carburization of silicon nanowires. Depending on both the pillar morphology and the pitch, different results in term of DNA surface coverages are obtained, as seen from fluorescence microscopy images. Particularly, in the case of the wide pitch array, it has been shown that the DNA molecules are located all along the nanopillars. To achieve a DNA sensor based on a nanowire-field effect transistor, the functionalization must be conducted on a single SiC nanowire or nanopillar that constitutes the channel of the field effect transistor. The localization of the functionalization in a small area around the nanostructures guarantees high performances to the sensor. In this aim, the functionalization process is combined with common microelectronics techniques of lithography and lift-off. The DNA immobilization is investigated by fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  19. Improved fuel-cell-type hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudek, F. P.; Rutkowski, M. D.

    1968-01-01

    Modified hydrogen sensor replaces oxygen cathode with a cathode consisting of a sealed paste of gold hydroxide and a pure gold current collector. The net reaction which occurs during cell operation is the reduction of the gold hydroxide to gold and water, with a half-cell potential of 1.4 volts.

  20. Surface acoustic wave hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhethanabotla, Venkat R. (Inventor); Bhansali, Shekhar (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a delay line SAW device fabricated on a lithium niobate substrate and coated with a bilayer of nanocrystalline or other nanomaterials such as nanoparticles or nanowires of palladiumn and metal free pthalocyanine which will respond to hydrogen gas in near real time, at low (room) temperature, without being affected by CO, O.sub.2, CH.sub.4 and other gases, in air ambient or controlled ambient, providing sensitivity to low ppm levels.

  1. Hydrogen intercalation of single and multiple layer graphene synthesized on Si-terminated SiC(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sołtys, Jakub; Piechota, Jacek; Ptasinska, Maria; Krukowski, Stanisław

    2014-08-28

    Ab initio density functional theory simulations were used to investigate the influence of hydrogen intercalation on the electronic properties of single and multiple graphene layers deposited on the SiC(0001) surface (Si-face). It is shown that single carbon layer, known as a buffer layer, covalently bound to the SiC substrate, is liberated after hydrogen intercalation, showing characteristic Dirac cones in the band structure. This is in agreement with the results of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen intercalation of SiC-graphene samples. In contrast to that hydrogen intercalation has limited impact on the multiple sheet graphene, deposited on Si-terminated SiC surface. The covalently bound buffer layer is liberated attaining its graphene like structure and dispersion relation typical for multilayer graphene. Nevertheless, before and after intercalation, the four layer graphene preserved the following dispersion relations in the vicinity of K point: linear for (AAAA) stacking, direct parabolic for Bernal (ABAB) stacking and “wizard hat” parabolic for rhombohedral (ABCA) stacking.

  2. Hydrogen intercalation of single and multiple layer graphene synthesized on Si-terminated SiC(0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sołtys, Jakub; Piechota, Jacek; Ptasinska, Maria; Krukowski, Stanisław

    2014-08-01

    Ab initio density functional theory simulations were used to investigate the influence of hydrogen intercalation on the electronic properties of single and multiple graphene layers deposited on the SiC(0001) surface (Si-face). It is shown that single carbon layer, known as a buffer layer, covalently bound to the SiC substrate, is liberated after hydrogen intercalation, showing characteristic Dirac cones in the band structure. This is in agreement with the results of angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen intercalation of SiC-graphene samples. In contrast to that hydrogen intercalation has limited impact on the multiple sheet graphene, deposited on Si-terminated SiC surface. The covalently bound buffer layer is liberated attaining its graphene like structure and dispersion relation typical for multilayer graphene. Nevertheless, before and after intercalation, the four layer graphene preserved the following dispersion relations in the vicinity of K point: linear for (AAAA) stacking, direct parabolic for Bernal (ABAB) stacking and "wizard hat" parabolic for rhombohedral (ABCA) stacking.

  3. Tin oxide nanocluster hydrogen and ammonia sensors.

    PubMed

    Lassesson, A; Schulze, M; van Lith, J; Brown, S A

    2008-01-09

    We have prepared sensitive hydrogen and ammonia sensors from thin films of tin nanoclusters with diameters between 3 and 10 nm. By baking the samples at 200 °C in ambient air the clusters were oxidized, resulting in very stable films of tin oxide clusters with similar diameters to the original Sn clusters. By monitoring the electrical resistance, it is shown that the cluster films are highly responsive to hydrogen and ammonia at relatively low temperatures, thereby making them attractive for commercial applications in which low power consumption is required. Doping of the films by depositing Pd on top of the clusters resulted in much improved sensor response and response times. It is shown that optimal sensor properties are achieved for very thin cluster films (a few monolayers of clusters).

  4. Palladium Implanted Silicon Carbide for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntele, C. I.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Muntele, L.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Larkin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon carbide is intended for use in fabrication of high-temperature, efficient hydrogen sensors. Traditionally, when a palladium coating is applied on the exposed surface of SiC, the chemical reaction between palladium and hydrogen produces a detectable change in the surface chemical potential. We have produced both a palladium coated SiC as well as a palladium, ion implanted SiC sensor. The palladium implantation was done at 500 C into the Si face of 6H, N-type SiC at various energies, and at various fluences. Then, we measured the hydrogen sensitivity response of each fabricated sensor by exposing them to hydrogen while monitoring the current flow across the p-n junction(s), with respect to time. The sensitivity of each sensor was measured at temperatures between 27 and 300 C. The response of the SiC sensors produced by Pd implantation has revealed a completely different behaviour than the SiC sensors produced by Pd deposition. In the Pd-deposited SiC sensors as well as in the ones reported in the literature, the current rises in the presence of hydrogen at room temperature as well as at elevated temperatures. In the case of Pd-implanted SiC sensors, the current decreases in the presence of hydrogen whenever the temperature is raised above 100 C. We will present the details and conclusions from the results obtained during this meeting.

  5. Palladium Implanted Silicon Carbide for Hydrogen Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntele, C. I.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Muntele, L.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Larkin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon carbide is intended for use in fabrication of high-temperature, efficient hydrogen sensors. Traditionally, when a palladium coating is applied on the exposed surface of SiC, the chemical reaction between palladium and hydrogen produces a detectable change in the surface chemical potential. We have produced both a palladium coated SiC as well as a palladium, ion implanted SiC sensor. The palladium implantation was done at 500 C into the Si face of 6H, N-type SiC at various energies, and at various fluences. Then, we measured the hydrogen sensitivity response of each fabricated sensor by exposing them to hydrogen while monitoring the current flow across the p-n junction(s), with respect to time. The sensitivity of each sensor was measured at temperatures between 27 and 300 C. The response of the SiC sensors produced by Pd implantation has revealed a completely different behaviour than the SiC sensors produced by Pd deposition. In the Pd-deposited SiC sensors as well as in the ones reported in the literature, the current rises in the presence of hydrogen at room temperature as well as at elevated temperatures. In the case of Pd-implanted SiC sensors, the current decreases in the presence of hydrogen whenever the temperature is raised above 100 C. We will present the details and conclusions from the results obtained during this meeting.

  6. Exfoliation of graphene flake from SiC substrate using hydrogen injection; a first-principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bora; Han, Seungwu; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2009-03-01

    Recently there is an immense interest in studying graphene for investigating its unique electronic properties as well as practical applications to nanoscale devices. Up to now there are two methods to obtain graphene layers. The first one is a mechanical method in which the single graphene sheet is split off the bulk graphite crystals using adhesives. The other method is graphitization of SiC surfaces by annealing at elevated temperatures. Even though the latter approach can provide a graphene layer in a more controlled way, the exfoliation of the graphene layer still poses a big challenge. In this presentation, based on the first-principles results, we propose a novel exfoliation method using hydrogen. As a model system, the 6H-SiC(0001) 4x4 cell is used, which corresponds to the 3x3 graphene cell. We calculate the binding energy of single hydrogen atom in various places; above and below graphene surface and inside the first SiC layer. The binding energies of hydrogen are calculated for different coverages. It is found that at high coverages, the hydrogen atoms prefer to bind below the graphene surface, cutting the graphene-SiC bonds. This means that the graphene can be exfoliated in the hydrogen-rich environment. The detailed analysis including the electronic structures will be presented.

  7. Si quantum dots embedded in an amorphous SiC matrix: nanophase control by non-equilibrium plasma hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qijin; Tam, Eugene; Xu, Shuyan; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2010-04-01

    Nanophase nc-Si/a-SiC films that contain Si quantum dots (QDs) embedded in an amorphous SiC matrix were deposited on single-crystal silicon substrates using inductively coupled plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition from the reactive silane and methane precursor gases diluted with hydrogen at a substrate temperature of 200 degrees C. The effect of the hydrogen dilution ratio X (X is defined as the flow rate ratio of hydrogen-to-silane plus methane gases), ranging from 0 to 10.0, on the morphological, structural, and compositional properties of the deposited films, is extensively and systematically studied by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Effective nanophase segregation at a low hydrogen dilution ratio of 4.0 leads to the formation of highly uniform Si QDs embedded in the amorphous SiC matrix. It is also shown that with the increase of X, the crystallinity degree and the crystallite size increase while the carbon content and the growth rate decrease. The obtained experimental results are explained in terms of the effect of hydrogen dilution on the nucleation and growth processes of the Si QDs in the high-density plasmas. These results are highly relevant to the development of next-generation photovoltaic solar cells, light-emitting diodes, thin-film transistors, and other applications.

  8. A survey and analysis of commercially available hydrogen sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    1992-01-01

    The performance requirements for hydrogen detection in aerospace applications often exceed those of more traditional applications. In order to ascertain the applicability of existing hydrogen sensors to aerospace applications, a survey was conducted of commercially available point-contact hydrogen sensors, and their operation was analyzed. The operation of the majority of commercial hydrogen sensors falls into four main categories: catalytic combustion, electrochemical, semiconducting oxide sensors, and thermal conductivity detectors. The physical mechanism involved in hydrogen detection for each main category is discussed in detail. From an understanding of the detection mechanism, each category of sensor is evaluated for use in a variety of space and propulsion environments. In order to meet the needs of aerospace applications, the development of point-contact hydrogen sensors that are based on concepts beyond those used in commercial sensors is necessary.

  9. Hydrogen trapping in MAX phase Ti3SiC2: Insight from chemical bonding by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. F.; Ren, X. L.; Zhang, J. Y.; Huang, J.; Xu, C. H.; Du, A. J.; Wang, Y. X.

    2017-05-01

    Understanding hydrogen (H) isotope trapping in materials is essential to optimize the material performance in a nuclear environment for the fabrication of nuclear devices. By using the density functional theory (DFT), herein we have systematically investigated the behaviour of hydrogen in the MAX phase Ti3SiC2 in the presence and absence of a vacancy (V). When a vacancy is generated in a favorable plane for hydrogen accumulating (Si plane), two distinct behavours of hydrogen in the Si plane have been identified by chemical bond analysis, i.e., the Ti-H and Si-H bonding, which synergistically results in VH2 complexes prevailing in the host matrix. Different from metals and other ceramics, the trapping mechanism of H in Ti3SiC2 essentially originates from the spatially inhomogeneous distribution of free-charge density and large discrepancy of electronegativity between the host atoms. Our theoretical results offer great insights into the rational design of new high-performance nuclear materials.

  10. A survey and analysis of experimental hydrogen sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    1992-01-01

    In order to ascertain the applicability of hydrogen sensors to aerospace applications, a survey was conducted of promising experimental point-contact hydrogen sensors and their operation was analyzed. The techniques discussed are metal-oxide-semiconductor or MOS based sensors, catalytic resistor sensors, acoustic wave detectors, and pyroelectric detectors. All of these sensors depend on the interaction of hydrogen with Pd or a Pd-alloy. It is concluded that no single technique will meet the needs of aerospace applications but a combination of approaches is necessary. The most promising combination is an MOS based sensor with a catalytic resistor.

  11. Microfabricated hydrogen sensor technology for aerospace and commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Bickford, R. L.; Jansa, E. D.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, W. T.

    1994-08-01

    Leaks on the Space Shuttle while on the Launch Pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. An effective leak monitoring system requires reliable hydrogen sensors, hardware, and software to monitor the sensors. The system should process the sensor outputs and provide real-time leak monitoring information to the operator. This paper discusses the progress in developing such a complete leak monitoring system. Advanced microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and Gencorp Aerojet (Aerojet). Changes in the hydrogen concentrations are detected using a PdAg on silicon Schottky diode structure. Sensor temperature control is achieved with a temperature sensor and heater fabricated onto the sensor chip. Results of the characterization of these sensors are presented. These sensors can detect low concentrations of hydrogen in inert environments with high sensitivity and quick response time. Aerojet is developing the hardware and software for a multipoint leak monitoring system designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Work has commenced on integrating the NASA LeRC-CWRU hydrogen sensors with the Aerojet designed monitoring system. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. Possible commercialization of the system will also be discussed.

  12. Microfabricated hydrogen sensor technology for aerospace and commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Bickford, Randall L.; Jansa, E. D.; Makel, Darby B.; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, William T.

    1994-10-01

    Leaks on the Space Shuttle while on the Launch Pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. An effective leak monitoring system requires reliable hydrogen sensors, hardware, and software to monitor the sensors. The system should process the sensor outputs and provide real-time leak monitoring information to the operator. This paper discusses the progress in developing such a complete leak monitoring system. Advanced microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and Gencorp Aerojet (Aerojet). Changes in the hydrogen concentrations are detected using a PdAg on silicon Schottky diode structure. Sensor temperature control is achieved with a temperature sensor and heater fabricated onto the sensor chip. Results of the characterization of these sensors are presented. These sensors can detect low concentrations of hydrogen in inert environments with high sensitivity and quick response time. Aerojet is developing the hardware and software for a multipoint leak monitoring system designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Work has commenced on integrating the NASA LeRC-CWRU hydrogen sensors with the Aerojet designed monitoring system. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. Possible commercialization of the system will also be discussed.

  13. Microfabricated Hydrogen Sensor Technology for Aerospace and Commercial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Bickford, R. L.; Jansa, E. D.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, W. T.

    1994-01-01

    Leaks on the Space Shuttle while on the Launch Pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. An effective leak monitoring system requires reliable hydrogen sensors, hardware, and software to monitor the sensors. The system should process the sensor outputs and provide real-time leak monitoring information to the operator. This paper discusses the progress in developing such a complete leak monitoring system. Advanced microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and Gencorp Aerojet (Aerojet). Changes in the hydrogen concentrations are detected using a PdAg on silicon Schottky diode structure. Sensor temperature control is achieved with a temperature sensor and heater fabricated onto the sensor chip. Results of the characterization of these sensors are presented. These sensors can detect low concentrations of hydrogen in inert environments with high sensitivity and quick response time. Aerojet is developing the hardware and software for a multipoint leak monitoring system designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Work has commenced on integrating the NASA LeRC-CWRU hydrogen sensors with the Aerojet designed monitoring system. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. Possible commercialization of the system will also be discussed.

  14. Liquid Hydrogen Sensor Considerations for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2006-01-01

    The on-orbit management of liquid hydrogen planned for the return to the moon will introduce new considerations not encountered in previous missions. This paper identifies critical liquid hydrogen sensing needs from the perspective of reliable on-orbit cryogenic fluid management, and contrasts the fundamental differences in fluid and thermodynamic behavior for ground-based versus on-orbit conditions. Opportunities for advanced sensor development and implementation are explored in the context of critical Exploration Architecture operations such as on-orbit storage, docking, and trans-lunar injection burn. Key sensing needs relative to these operations are also examined, including: liquid/vapor detection, thermodynamic condition monitoring, mass gauging, and leak detection. Finally, operational aspects of an integrated system health management approach are discussed to highlight the potential impact on mission success.

  15. Packaging Technologies for 500 C SiC Electronics and Sensors: Challenges in Material Science and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Behelm, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500C silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chip-level packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550C. The 96 alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been successfully tested with high temperature SiC discrete transistor devices at 500C for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC junction field-effect-transistor (JFET) with a packaging system composed of a 96 alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board was tested on low earth orbit for eighteen months via a NASA International Space Station experiment. In addition to packaging systems for electronics, a spark-plug type sensor package based on this high temperature interconnection system for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was also developed and tested. In order to further significantly improve the performance of packaging system for higher packaging density, higher operation frequency, power rating, and even higher temperatures, some fundamental material challenges must be addressed. This presentation will discuss previous development and some of the challenges in material science (technology) to improve high temperature dielectrics for packaging applications.

  16. Effects of pressure, temperature, and hydrogen during graphene growth on SiC(0001) using propane-hydrogen chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Michon, A.; Vezian, S.; Roudon, E.; Lefebvre, D.; Portail, M.; Zielinski, M.; Chassagne, T.

    2013-05-28

    Graphene growth from a propane flow in a hydrogen environment (propane-hydrogen chemical vapor deposition (CVD)) on SiC differentiates from other growth methods in that it offers the possibility to obtain various graphene structures on the Si-face depending on growth conditions. The different structures include the (6{radical}3 Multiplication-Sign 6{radical}3)-R30 Degree-Sign reconstruction of the graphene/SiC interface, which is commonly observed on the Si-face, but also the rotational disorder which is generally observed on the C-face. In this work, growth mechanisms leading to the formation of the different structures are studied and discussed. For that purpose, we have grown graphene on SiC(0001) (Si-face) using propane-hydrogen CVD at various pressure and temperature and studied these samples extensively by means of low energy electron diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Pressure and temperature conditions leading to the formation of the different structures are identified and plotted in a pressure-temperature diagram. This diagram, together with other characterizations (X-ray photoemission and scanning tunneling microscopy), is the basis of further discussions on the carbon supply mechanisms and on the kinetics effects. The entire work underlines the important role of hydrogen during growth and its effects on the final graphene structure.

  17. Fabrication method for a room temperature hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Sudipta (Inventor); Shukla, Satyajit V. (Inventor); Ludwig, Lawrence (Inventor); Cho, Hyoung (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A sensor for selectively determining the presence and measuring the amount of hydrogen in the vicinity of the sensor. The sensor comprises a MEMS device coated with a nanostructured thin film of indium oxide doped tin oxide with an over layer of nanostructured barium cerate with platinum catalyst nanoparticles. Initial exposure to a UV light source, at room temperature, causes burning of organic residues present on the sensor surface and provides a clean surface for sensing hydrogen at room temperature. A giant room temperature hydrogen sensitivity is observed after making the UV source off. The hydrogen sensor of the invention can be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently used at room temperature.

  18. Process for manufacture of thick film hydrogen sensors

    DOEpatents

    Perdieu, Louisa H.

    2000-09-09

    A thick film process for producing hydrogen sensors capable of sensing down to a one percent concentration of hydrogen in carrier gasses such as argon, nitrogen, and air. The sensor is also suitable to detect hydrogen gas while immersed in transformer oil. The sensor includes a palladium resistance network thick film printed on a substrate, a portion of which network is coated with a protective hydrogen barrier. The process utilizes a sequence of printing of the requisite materials on a non-conductive substrate with firing temperatures at each step which are less than or equal to the temperature at the previous step.

  19. Triple redundant hydrogen sensor with in situ calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, J. B.; Powell, J. D.; Schubert, F. H.; Koszenski, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    To meet sensing and calibration needs, an in situ calibration technique was developed. It is based on electrolytic generation of a hydrogen/air atmosphere within a hydrogen sensor. The hydrogen is generated from water vapor in the air, and being electrical in nature, the in situ calibration can be performed completely automatically in remote locations. Triply redundant sensor elements are integrated within a single, compact housing, and digital logic provides inter-sensor comparisons to warn of and identify malfunctioning sensor elements. An evaluation of this concept is presented.

  20. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Nave, S.E.

    1998-07-21

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiber optic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences. 3 figs.

  1. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Nave, Stanley E.

    1998-01-01

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiberoptic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences.

  2. Structural Consequences of Hydrogen Intercalation of Epitaxial Graphene on SiC(0001)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-23

    reveals the positions of the constituent atomic layers along the SiC[0001] direction with sub-Å resolution and verifies the decoupling and vertical...calcu- lated from models comprised of k atomic layers defined by their positions (zk), occupancies (Hk), and distribution widths (rk), as described in...derived positions (zk), atomic layer occupancies (Hk), and distribution widths (rk) for AG- and QFS-EG/SiC for each k layer in the model. zk is reported

  3. Low-cost hydrogen sensors: Technology maturation progress

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Rogers, J.E.; Lauf, R.J.; Egert, C.M.; Haberman, D.P.

    1998-04-01

    The authors are developing a low-cost, solid-state hydrogen sensor to support the long-term goals of the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program to encourage acceptance and commercialization of renewable energy-based technologies. Development of efficient production, storage, and utilization technologies brings with it the need to detect and pinpoint hydrogen leaks to protect people and equipment. The solid-state hydrogen sensor, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is potentially well-suited to meet cost and performance objectives for many of these applications. Under a cooperative research and development Agreement and license agreement, they are teaming with a private company, DCH Technology, Inc., to develop the sensor for specific market applications related to the use of hydrogen as an energy vector. This report describes the current efforts to optimize materials and sensor performance to reach the goals of low-cost fabrication and suitability for relevant application areas.

  4. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development for Hydrogen Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, Eric L.

    2012-07-10

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop a low cost, low power, durable, and reliable hydrogen safety sensor for a wide range of vehicle and infrastructure applications; (2) Continually advance test prototypes guided by materials selection, sensor design, electrochemical R&D investigation, fabrication, and rigorous life testing; (3) Disseminate packaged sensor prototypes and control systems to DOE Laboratories and commercial parties interested in testing and fielding advanced prototypes for cross-validation; (4) Evaluate manufacturing approaches for commercialization; and (5) Engage an industrial partner and execute technology transfer. Recent developments in the search for sustainable and renewable energy coupled with the advancements in fuel cell powered vehicles (FCVs) have augmented the demand for hydrogen safety sensors. There are several sensor technologies that have been developed to detect hydrogen, including deployed systems to detect leaks in manned space systems and hydrogen safety sensors for laboratory and industrial usage. Among the several sensing methods electrochemical devices that utilize high temperature-based ceramic electrolytes are largely unaffected by changes in humidity and are more resilient to electrode or electrolyte poisoning. The desired sensing technique should meet a detection threshold of 1% (10,000 ppm) H{sub 2} and response time of {approx_equal}1 min, which is a target for infrastructure and vehicular uses. Further, a review of electrochemical hydrogen sensors by Korotcenkov et.al and the report by Glass et.al suggest the need for inexpensive, low power, and compact sensors with long-term stability, minimal cross-sensitivity, and fast response. This view has been largely validated and supported by the fuel cell and hydrogen infrastructure industries by the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop held on June 8, 2011. Many of the issues preventing widespread adoption of best-available hydrogen sensing technologies available today

  5. Fiber-Optic Hydrogen Sensors Based upon Chromogenic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, Roland

    2002-03-01

    The development of lightweight, low cost, inherently safe, reliable hydrogen sensors is crucial to the development of an infrastructure for a hydrogen-based economy. Since the involvement of hydrogen in the Hindenburg disaster (May 7, 1937), the public perception is that hydrogen is dangerous to use, store, and handle. It will require extraordinary safety measures to ensure the public that hydrogen leaks can be detected and controlled early. Detection requires sensors to be arrayed in locations where explosive concentrations of hydrogen can accumulate, and mitigation of risk requires a control function associated with detection that can trigger alarms or actuate devices to prevent hydrogen concentrations from reaching the explosive limit. The approach at NREL to meet the needs for hydrogen detection that are anticipated in the transportation sector uses thin films to indicate the presence of hydrogen. The thin films react with hydrogen to produce a change in optical properties that can be sensed with a light beam propagating along a fiber-optic element. Sensitivity of the device is 200 ppm hydrogen in air, with response times less than one second. The sensor response is unique to hydrogen. It is inherently safe, in that no wires are used that could provide an ignition source in a monitored space. Sensor films can be deposited inexpensively on the end of commercial fiber optic cables, either glass or polymer. They are lightweight and resistant to interference from electric and magnetic fields. Arrays of sensors can be operated from a single detection and control point. Primary challenges involve stabilizing the response in real environments, where pollutants and contamination of the thin film surface interfere with response, and extending the lifetime of the sensor to periods of interest in the transportation sector.

  6. Multifunctional graphene sensors for magnetic and hydrogen detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Le; Zhang, Zhiyong; Li, Zishen; Chen, Bingyan; Ma, Xiaomeng; Dong, Lijun; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2015-05-13

    Multifunctional graphene magnetic/hydrogen sensors are constructed for the first time through a simple microfabrication process. The as-fabricated graphene sensor may act as excellent Hall magnetic detector, demonstrating small linearity error within 2% and high magnetic resolution up to 7 mG/Hz(0.5). Meanwhile the same graphene sensor is also demonstrated as high-performance hydrogen sensor with high gas response, excellent linearity, and great repeatability and selectivity. In particular, the graphene sensor exhibits high hydrogen response up to 32.5% when exposed to 1000 ppm hydrogen, outperforming most graphene-based hydrogen sensors. In addition the hydrogen-sensing mechanism of Pd-decorated graphene is systematically explored through investigating its transfer characteristics during gas detection. Our work demonstrates that graphene is a terrific material for multifunctional sensing, which may in principle reduce the complexity of manufacturing process, lower the number of sensors required in the sensing systems, and potentially derive new and more powerful functions.

  7. Hydrogen Sensors Boost Hybrids; Today's Models Losing Gas?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Advanced chemical sensors are used in aeronautic and space applications to provide safety monitoring, emission monitoring, and fire detection. In order to fully do their jobs, these sensors must be able to operate in a range of environments. NASA has developed sensor technologies addressing these needs with the intent of improving safety, optimizing combustion efficiencies, and controlling emissions. On the ground, the chemical sensors were developed by NASA engineers to detect potential hydrogen leaks during Space Shuttle launch operations. The Space Shuttle uses a combination of hydrogen and oxygen as fuel for its main engines. Liquid hydrogen is pumped to the external tank from a storage tank located several hundred feet away. Any hydrogen leak could potentially result in a hydrogen fire, which is invisible to the naked eye. It is important to detect the presence of a hydrogen fire in order to prevent a major accident. In the air, the same hydrogen-leak dangers are present. Stress and temperature changes can cause tiny cracks or holes to form in the tubes that line the Space Shuttle s main engine nozzle. Such defects could allow the hydrogen that is pumped through the nozzle during firing to escape. Responding to the challenges associated with pinpointing hydrogen leaks, NASA endeavored to improve propellant leak-detection capabilities during assembly, pre-launch operations, and flight. The objective was to reduce the operational cost of assembling and maintaining hydrogen delivery systems with automated detection systems. In particular, efforts have been focused on developing an automated hydrogen leak-detection system using multiple, networked hydrogen sensors that are operable in harsh conditions.

  8. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Based on Semiconductor Oxide Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haoshuang; Wang, Zhao; Hu, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the hydrogen gas sensing properties of semiconductor oxide (SMO) nanostructures have been widely investigated. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the research progress in the last five years concerning hydrogen gas sensors based on SMO thin film and one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. The hydrogen sensing mechanism of SMO nanostructures and some critical issues are discussed. Doping, noble metal-decoration, heterojunctions and size reduction have been investigated and proved to be effective methods for improving the sensing performance of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures. The effect on the hydrogen response of SMO thin films and 1D nanostructures of grain boundary and crystal orientation, as well as the sensor architecture, including electrode size and nanojunctions have also been studied. Finally, we also discuss some challenges for the future applications of SMO nanostructured hydrogen sensors. PMID:22778599

  9. Porous palladium coated conducting polymer nanoparticles for ultrasensitive hydrogen sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Seop; Kim, Sung Gun; Cho, Sunghun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-12-28

    Hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel, is of key importance to various industrial applications, including fuel cells and in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, hydrogen gas is odorless, colorless, and highly flammable; thus appropriate safety protocol implementation and monitoring are essential. Highly sensitive hydrogen leak detection and surveillance sensor systems are needed; additionally, the ability to maintain uniformity through repetitive hydrogen sensing is becoming increasingly important. In this report, we detail the fabrication of porous palladium coated conducting polymer (3-carboxylate polypyrrole) nanoparticles (Pd@CPPys) to detect hydrogen gas. The Pd@CPPys are produced by means of facile alkyl functionalization and chemical reduction of a pristine 3-carboxylate polypyrrole nanoparticle-contained palladium precursor (PdCl(2)) solution. The resulting Pd@CPPy-based sensor electrode exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity (0.1 ppm) and stability toward hydrogen gas at room temperature due to the palladium sensing layer.

  10. Development of Low Cost Sensors for Hydrogen Safety Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Holmes, W., Jr.; Lauf, R.J.; Maxey, L.C.; Salter, C.; Walker, D.

    1999-04-07

    We are developing rugged and reliable hydrogen safety sensors that can be easily manufactured. Potential applications also require an inexpensive sensor that can be easily deployed. Automotive applications demand low cost, while personnel safety applications emphasize light-weight, battery-operated, and wearable sensors. Our current efforts involve developing and optimizing sensor materials for stability and compatibility with typical thick-film manufacturing processes. We are also tailoring the sensor design and size along with various packaging and communication schemes for optimal acceptance by end users.

  11. Demonstration of a prototype hydrogen sensor and electronics package

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Amanda S.; Brosha, Eric

    2016-08-03

    This is a progress report for the demonstration of a prototype hydrogen sensor and electronics package. There are five tasks associated with this, and four have been completed as of August 2016: Station Demonstration and Site Recommendation, Order Sensor Equipment, Build Sensors, and Install Sensors. The final task to be completed is Sensor Demonstration and Data Analysis, and expected completion date is January 26, 2017. This progress report details each of the tasks and goes into detail about what is currently being worked on, along with the budget and planned work for July 27, 2016 to January 26, 2017.

  12. Hydrogen sensor based on metallic photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Nau, D; Seidel, A; Orzekowsky, R B; Lee, S-H; Deb, S; Giessen, H

    2010-09-15

    We present a hydrogen sensor based on metallic photonic crystal slabs. Tungsten trioxide (WO(3)) is used as a waveguide layer below an array of gold nanowires. Hydrogen exposure influences the optical properties of this photonic crystal arrangement by gasochromic mechanisms, where the photonic crystal geometry leads to sharp spectral resonances. Measurements reveal a change of the transmission depending on the hydrogen concentration. Theoretical limits for the detection range and sensitivity of this approach are discussed.

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide as an Oxygen Sensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance Although oxygen (O2)-sensing cells and tissues have been known for decades, the identity of the O2-sensing mechanism has remained elusive. Evidence is accumulating that O2-dependent metabolism of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is this enigmatic O2 sensor. Recent Advances The elucidation of biochemical pathways involved in H2S synthesis and metabolism have shown that reciprocal H2S/O2 interactions have been inexorably linked throughout eukaryotic evolution; there are multiple foci by which O2 controls H2S inactivation, and the effects of H2S on downstream signaling events are consistent with those activated by hypoxia. H2S-mediated O2 sensing has been demonstrated in a variety of O2-sensing tissues in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, including smooth muscle in systemic and respiratory blood vessels and airways, carotid body, adrenal medulla, and other peripheral as well as central chemoreceptors. Critical Issues Information is now needed on the intracellular location and stoichometry of these signaling processes and how and which downstream effectors are activated by H2S and its metabolites. Future Directions Development of specific inhibitors of H2S metabolism and effector activation as well as cellular organelle-targeted compounds that release H2S in a time- or environmentally controlled way will not only enhance our understanding of this signaling process but also provide direction for future therapeutic applications. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 377–397. “Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution” —Theodosius Dobzhansky (29) PMID:24801248

  14. Optical fibre hydrogen sensors based on palladium coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, L.; Silva, S. F. O.; Tafulo, Paula A. R.; Santos, J. L.; Frazão, O.; Malcata, F. X.

    2011-05-01

    Optical fibre sensors for Hydrogen detection at low concentrations has become a growing research area using Palladium as an active medium. Palladium is widely used in hydrogen sensing as it show a high and selective affinity for hydrogen. This metal is capable to absorb hydrogen up to 900 times its own volume which permits that during the expansion mechanical forces are applied in the fibre modifying the optical response. Several optical fibre hydrogen sensor heads coated with Palladium are presented and compared using different working principles: interferometric, intensity and fiber grating-based sensors. These principles were applied in Fabry-Perot cavities, fibre Bragg gratings written in fibre SMF28 with etching in the cladding, multimode interferometers and fibre end micro-mirrors. Palladium thin film coatings over the fibre surface and with thicknesses from 10nm to 350nm were produced by using the sputtering RF technique. These studies were performed in a Hydrogen/Nitrogen atmosphere with Hydrogen concentrations from 0% to 4% (lower limit explosion). The Bragg grating inscribed in a fibre with reduced cladding diameter appears to be one of the best approaches for a fibre optic sensing head for Hydrogen detection. Future work will continue the investigation of other fibre optic structures with Hydrogen sensing capabilities and their application in specific field situations will be assessed.

  15. Development of a hydrogen gas sensor using microfabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Qinghai; Stuczynski, Matthew; Madzsar, George C.

    1992-01-01

    Microfabrication and micromachining technologies are used to produce a hydrogen gas sensor based on a palladium-silver film. The sensor uses a heater that is fabricated by diffusing p-type borones into the substrate, forming a resistance heater. A diode for temperature measurement is produced using p-type boron and n-type phosphor diffused into the substrate. A thickness of the palladium-silver film is approximately 300 arcsec. The hydrogen gas sensor employs the proven palladium-silver diode structure and is surrounded by a phosphor doped resistance heater which can be heated up to a temperature of 250 C. Experimental results show that the sensor is capable of operating over a wide range of hydrogen concentration levels between 0-95 percent without any hysteresis effects.

  16. Development of a hydrogen gas sensor using microfabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Qinghai; Stuczynski, Matthew; Madzsar, George C.

    1992-01-01

    Microfabrication and micromachining technologies are used to produce a hydrogen gas sensor based on a palladium-silver film. The sensor uses a heater that is fabricated by diffusing p-type borones into the substrate, forming a resistance heater. A diode for temperature measurement is produced using p-type boron and n-type phosphor diffused into the substrate. A thickness of the palladium-silver film is approximately 300 arcsec. The hydrogen gas sensor employs the proven palladium-silver diode structure and is surrounded by a phosphor doped resistance heater which can be heated up to a temperature of 250 C. Experimental results show that the sensor is capable of operating over a wide range of hydrogen concentration levels between 0-95 percent without any hysteresis effects.

  17. Design of hydrogen gas sensors based on surface plasmon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Norman R.; Berini, Pierre; Tait, R. Niall

    2011-08-01

    The use of hydrogen (H2) as a clean energy source is gaining significant global interest. Hydrogen gas can be combustible in air at concentrations starting at 4%, so a low cost, compact and reliable leak detector for hydrogen gas integratable into systems is desired. A Long Range Surface Plasmon Polariton (LRSPP) membrane waveguide structure is discussed as a hydrogen sensor. Palladium on a silicon dioxide free-standing membrane is proposed as the waveguide structure. Palladium absorbs hydrogen thereby inducing a detectable change in its permittivity. The design of straight waveguide and Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) architectures are discussed. Finite element method (FEM) simulations are conducted to choose appropriate designs to maximize sensor sensitivity.

  18. Solid-state, resistive hydrogen sensors for safety monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.; Fleming, P.H.; Nave, S.E.

    1993-07-01

    Solid-state, resistive hydrogen sensors have been designed and fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Sensor response has been successfully tested with H{sub 2} gas in argon and air under ambient temperature and pressure, while immersed in transformer oil at temperatures between 25{degrees}C and 90{degrees}C, and under site-specific conditions at Westinghouse Savannah River Co. Current versions of the sensors (25 {times} 25 {times} 0.6 mm) are small enough to be incorporated into hand-held leak detectors or distributed sensor systems for safety monitoring throughout a large area. Another foreseeable application is in electrical power transformers where the buildup of hydrogen gas accompanies oil breakdown. The use of these sensors to monitor transformer oil changes could help predict and prevent catastrophic failure.

  19. The Development of Silicon Carbide Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide is a high temperature electronic material. Its potential for development of chemical sensors in a high temperature environment has not been explored. The objective of this study is to use silicon carbide as the substrate material for the construction of chemical sensors for high temperature applications. Sensors for the detection of hydrogen and hydrocarbon are developed in this program under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, NASA. Metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structures are used in this development. Specifically, using palladium-silicon carbide Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range of 100 to 400 C are designed, fabricated and assessed. The effect of heat treatment on the Pd-SiC Schottky diode is examined. Operation of the sensors at 400 C demonstrate sensitivity of the sensor to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. Substantial progress has been made in this study and we believe that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures. However, the long term stability and operational life of the sensor need to be assessed. This aspect is an important part of our future continuing investigation.

  20. Fiber laser hydrogen sensor codified in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmenkov, Yuri O.; Ortigosa-Blanch, Arturo; Diez, Antonio; Cruz Munoz, Jose Luis; Andres, Miguel V.

    2004-10-01

    A novel scheme for a fiber optic hydrogen sensor is presented. The sensor is based on an erbium-doped fiber laser with a Pd-coated tapered fiber within the laser cavity acting as the hydrogen-sensing element. When the sensing element is exposed to a hydrogen atmosphere, its attenuation decreases changing the cavity losses, which leads to a modification of the switching-on laser transient. The hydrogen concentration can be obtained by a simple measurement of the build-up time of the laser. This technique translates the measurement of hydrogen concentration into the time domain. Sensing techniques translating the measurement to the time domain offer the possibility to acquire and process the information very easily and accurately using reliable and low-cost electronics. We have also studied the influence of the pumping conditions. We have found that changing from a 100% modulation depth of the pump to biasing the laser with a certain pump power (being this value always below the laser threshold) the sensitivity of the sensor is substantially enhanced. Hence the sensitivity of the fiber laser sensor can be adjusted to certain requirements by simply controlling the pump. Relative build-up times variations of up to 55% for 10% hydrogen concentration are demonstrated.

  1. Research of surface plasma resonance optical fiber hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Zhonghua; Guo, Xiaowei; Chen, Dejun; Dai, Zhiyong; Peng, Zengshou; Liu, Yongzhi

    2008-12-01

    An optical fiber hydrogen sensor based on the measuring principle of surface plasma resonance is introduced. The structure of the hydrogen-sensitive head which is coated with Pd-Ag alloy film on the surface of the etched optical fiber is investigated theoretically. When hydrogen gas is absorbed into the Pd thin layer of the sensing head, the Pd hydride is formed and then the refraction index of the etched optical fiber surface will be changed with different hydrogen gas concentration. The surface plasma wave is stimulated by the light wave in optical fiber and the surface plasma resonance occurs between the thin metal layer and the medium surface of hydrogen gas. The Pd-Ag alloy film thickness versus the sensitivity of hydrogen sensing head is analyzed and optimized via the numerical method. The sensing head which is based on surface plasma resonance is manufactured and used in the experiment system of hydrogen gas detecting, and the experiment results demonstrate that the detecting system has high sensitivity with the hydrogen concentration in the range of 0%-4%, the accuracy, resolution and response time are respectively 5%, 0.1% and 30s. This sensor structure can be applied to detecting the low concentration of hydrogen gas.

  2. Extreme-Environment Silicon-Carbide (SiC) Wireless Sensor Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop an integrated silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite capable of in situ measurements of critical characteristics of NTP engine; Compose silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite of: Extreme-environment sensors center, Dedicated high-temperature (450 deg C) silicon-carbide electronics that provide power and signal conditioning capabilities as well as radio frequency modulation and wireless data transmission capabilities center, An onboard energy harvesting system as a power source.

  3. Selectivity and resistance to poisons of commercial hydrogen sensors

    DOE PAGES

    Palmisano, V.; Weidner, E.; Boon-Brett, L.; ...

    2015-03-20

    The resistance of several models of catalytic, workfunction-based metal-oxide-semiconductor and electrochemical hydrogen sensors to chemical contaminants such as SO2, H2S, NO2 and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDS) has been investigated. These sensor platforms are among the most commonly used for the detection of hydrogen. The evaluation protocols were based on the methods recommended in the ISO 26142:2010 standard. Permanent alteration of the sensor response to the target analyte (H2) following exposure to potential poisons at the concentrations specified in ISO 26142 was rarely observed. Although a shift in the baseline response was often observed during exposure to the potential poisons, only in amore » few cases did this shift persist after removal of the contaminants. Overall, the resistance of the sensors to poisoning was good. However, a change in sensitivity to hydrogen was observed in the electrochemical platform after exposure to NO2 and for a catalytic sensor during exposure to SO2. The siloxane resistance test prescribed in ISO 26142, based on exposure to 10 ppm HMDS, may possibly not properly reflect sensor robustness to siloxanes. In conclusion, further evaluation of the resistance of sensors to other Si-based contaminants and other exposure profiles (e.g., concentration, exposure times) is needed.« less

  4. A hydrogen leakage detection system using self-powered wireless hydrogen sensor nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, J.; Chou, B.; Lin, J.; Phipps, A.; Shengwen, X.; Ngo, K.; Johnson, D.; Kasyap, A.; Nishida, T.; Wang, H. T.; Kang, B. S.; Ren, F.; Tien, L. C.; Sadik, P. W.; Norton, D. P.; Voss, L. F.; Pearton, S. J.

    2007-07-01

    A self-powered wireless hydrogen sensor node has been designed and developed from a system level approach. By using multi-source energy harvesting circuitry such as scavenged or "reclaimed" energy from light emitting and vibrational sources as the source of power for commercial low power microcontrollers, amplifiers, and RF transmitters, the sensor node is capable of conditioning and deciphering the output of hydrogen sensitive ZnO nanorods sensors. Upon the detection of a discernible amount of hydrogen, the system will 'wake' from an idle state to create a wireless data communication link to relay the detection of hydrogen to a central monitoring station. Two modes of operation were designed for the use of hydrogen detection. The first mode would sense for the presence of hydrogen above a set threshold, and alert a central monitoring station of the detection of significant levels of hydrogen. In the second mode of operation, actual hydrogen concentrations starting as low as 10 ppm are relayed to the receiver to track the amount of hydrogen present.

  5. Novel High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Utilizing SiC Integrated Circuit Twin Ring Oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, M.; Neudeck, P.; Spry, D.; Meredith, R.; Jordan, J.; Prokop, N.; Krasowski, M.; Beheim, G.; Hunter, G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes initial development and testing of a novel high temperature capacitive pressure sensor system. The pressure sensor system consists of two 4H-SiC 11-stage ring oscillators and a SiCN capacitive pressure sensor. One oscillator has the capacitive pressure sensor fixed at one node in its feedback loop and varies as a function of pressure and temperature while the other provides a pressure-independent reference frequency which can be used to temperature compensate the output of the first oscillator. A two-day repeatability test was performed up to 500C on the oscillators and the oscillator fundamental frequency changed by only 1. The SiCN capacitive pressure sensor was characterized at room temperature from 0 to 300 psi. The sensor had an initial capacitance of 3.76 pF at 0 psi and 1.75 pF at 300 psi corresponding to a 54 change in capacitance. The integrated pressure sensor system was characterized from 0 to 300 psi in steps of 50 psi over a temperature range of 25 to 500C. The pressure sensor system sensitivity was 0.113 kHzpsi at 25C and 0.026 kHzpsi at 500C.

  6. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Hydrogen Sensors and Systems. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Sensor systems research was focused on hydrogen leak detection and smart sensors with adaptive feedback control for fuel cells. The goal was to integrate multifunction smart sensors, low-power high-efficiency wireless circuits, energy harvesting devices, and power management circuits in one module. Activities were focused on testing and demonstrating sensors in a realistic environment while also bringing them closer to production and commercial viability for eventual use in the actual operating environment.

  7. High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Employing a SiC Based Ring Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meredith, Roger D.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Ponchak, George E.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Scardelletti, Maximilian; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Spry, David J.; Krawowski, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to develop harsh environment electronic and sensor technologies for aircraft engine safety and monitoring, we have used capacitive-based pressure sensors to shift the frequency of a SiC-electronics-based oscillator to produce a pressure-indicating signal that can be readily transmitted, e.g. wirelessly, to a receiver located in a more benign environment. Our efforts target 500 C, a temperature well above normal operating conditions of commercial circuits but within areas of interest in aerospace engines, deep mining applications and for future missions to the Venus atmosphere. This paper reports for the first time a ring oscillator circuit integrated with a capacitive pressure sensor, both operating at 500 C. This demonstration represents a significant step towards a wireless pressure sensor that can operate at 500 C and confirms the viability of 500 C electronic sensor systems.

  8. Improved graphene growth in UHV: Pit-free surfaces by selective Si etching of SiC(0001)-Si with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandin, Andreas; Rowe, J. E. (Jack); Dougherty, Daniel B.

    2013-05-01

    We present a novel technique of growing UHV graphene using atomic hydrogen etching of SiC(0001)-Si surfaces. Hydrogen atoms generated from a hot tungsten filament selectively etch silicon surface atoms thereby facilitating the Si-sublimation process at temperatures around 1000 °C according to Auger Electron Spectroscopy. This allows for separate, non-thermal control of the rate of formation of the interfacial buffer layer formation to yield reduced pit formation observed by scanning tunneling microscopy during subsequent UHV graphene growth.

  9. Porous palladium coated conducting polymer nanoparticles for ultrasensitive hydrogen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun Seop; Kim, Sung Gun; Cho, Sunghun; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel, is of key importance to various industrial applications, including fuel cells and in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, hydrogen gas is odorless, colorless, and highly flammable; thus appropriate safety protocol implementation and monitoring are essential. Highly sensitive hydrogen leak detection and surveillance sensor systems are needed; additionally, the ability to maintain uniformity through repetitive hydrogen sensing is becoming increasingly important. In this report, we detail the fabrication of porous palladium coated conducting polymer (3-carboxylate polypyrrole) nanoparticles (Pd@CPPys) to detect hydrogen gas. The Pd@CPPys are produced by means of facile alkyl functionalization and chemical reduction of a pristine 3-carboxylate polypyrrole nanoparticle-contained palladium precursor (PdCl2) solution. The resulting Pd@CPPy-based sensor electrode exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity (0.1 ppm) and stability toward hydrogen gas at room temperature due to the palladium sensing layer.Hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel, is of key importance to various industrial applications, including fuel cells and in the aerospace and automotive industries. However, hydrogen gas is odorless, colorless, and highly flammable; thus appropriate safety protocol implementation and monitoring are essential. Highly sensitive hydrogen leak detection and surveillance sensor systems are needed; additionally, the ability to maintain uniformity through repetitive hydrogen sensing is becoming increasingly important. In this report, we detail the fabrication of porous palladium coated conducting polymer (3-carboxylate polypyrrole) nanoparticles (Pd@CPPys) to detect hydrogen gas. The Pd@CPPys are produced by means of facile alkyl functionalization and chemical reduction of a pristine 3-carboxylate polypyrrole nanoparticle-contained palladium precursor (PdCl2) solution. The resulting Pd@CPPy-based sensor electrode exhibits ultrahigh sensitivity (0.1 ppm

  10. Triboelectric Hydrogen Gas Sensor with Pd Functionalized Surface

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung-Ho; Kwon, Yang Hyeog; Kim, Young-Hwan; Jung, Joo-Yun; Nah, Junghyo

    2016-01-01

    Palladium (Pd)-based hydrogen (H2) gas sensors have been widely investigated thanks to its fast reaction and high sensitivity to hydrogen. Various sensing mechanisms have been adopted for H2 gas sensors; however, all the sensors must be powered through an external battery. We report here an H2 gas sensor that can detect H2 by measuring the output voltages generated during contact electrification between two friction surfaces. When the H2 sensor, composed of Pd-coated ITO (indium tin oxide) and PET (polyethylene Terephthalate) film, is exposed to H2, its output voltage is varied in proportion to H2 concentration because the work function (WF) of Pd-coated surface changes, altering triboelectric charging behavior. Specifically, the output voltage of the sensor is gradually increased as exposing H2 concentration increases. Reproducible and sensitive sensor response was observed up 1% H2 exposure. The approach introduced here can easily be adopted to development of triboelectric gas sensors detecting other gas species. PMID:28335313

  11. Integrated Micro-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensor. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Frank DiMeo, Jr.

    2000-10-02

    This report details our recent progress in developing novel MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) based hydrogen gas sensors. These sensors couple novel thin films as the active layer on a device structure known as a Micro-HotPlate. This coupling has resulted in a gas sensor that has several unique advantages in terms of speed, sensitivity, stability and amenability to large scale manufacture. This Phase-I research effort was focused on achieving the following three objectives: (1) Investigation of sensor fabrication parameters and their effects on sensor performance. (2) Hydrogen response testing of these sensors in wet/dry and oxygen-containing/oxygen-deficient atmospheres. (3) Investigation of the long-term stability of these thin film materials and identification of limiting factors. We have made substantial progress toward achieving each of these objectives, and highlights of our phase I results include the demonstration of signal responses with and without oxygen present, as well as in air with a high level of humidity. We have measured response times of <0.5 s to 1% H{sub 2} in air, and shown the ability to detect concentrations of <200 ppm. These results are extremely encouraging and suggest that this technology has substantial potential for meeting the needs of a hydrogen based economy. These achievements demonstrate the feasibility of using micro-hotplates structures in conjunction with palladium+coated metal-hydride films for sensing hydrogen in many of the environments required by a hydrogen based energy economy. Based on these findings, they propose to continue and expand the development of this technology in Phase II.

  12. Characteristics of SiC neutron sensor spectrum unfolding process based on Bayesian inference

    SciTech Connect

    Cetnar, Jerzy; Krolikowski, Igor; Ottaviani, L.; Lyoussi, A.

    2015-07-01

    This paper deals with SiC detector signal interpretation in neutron radiation measurements in mixed neutron gamma radiation fields, which is called the detector inverse problem or the spectrum unfolding, and it aims in finding a representation of the primary radiation, based on the measured detector signals. In our novel methodology we resort to Bayesian inference approach. In the developed procedure the resultant spectra is unfolded form detector channels reading, where the estimated neutron fluence in a group structure is obtained with its statistical characteristic comprising of standard deviation and correlation matrix. In the paper we present results of unfolding process for case of D-T neutron source in neutron moderating environment. Discussions of statistical properties of obtained results are presented as well as of the physical meaning of obtained correlation matrix of estimated group fluence. The presented works has been carried out within the I-SMART project, which is part of the KIC InnoEnergy R and D program. (authors)

  13. Investigation of the applicability of using the triple redundant hydrogen sensor for methane sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lantz, J. B.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Application specifications for the methane sensor were assembled and design guidelines, development goals and evaluation criteria were formulated. This was done to provide a framework to evaluate sensor performance and any design adjustments to the preprototype sensor that could be required to provide methane sensitivity. Good response to hydrogen was experimentally established for four hydrogen sensor elements to be later evaluated for methane response. Prior results were assembled and analyzed for other prototype hydrogen sensor performance parameters to form a comparison base. The four sensor elements previously shown to have good hydrogen response were experimentally evaluated for methane response in 2.5% methane-in-air. No response was obtained for any of the elements, despite the high methane concentration used (50% of the Lower Flammability Limit). It was concluded that the preprototype sensing elements were insensitive to methane and were hydrogen specific. Alternative sensor operating conditions and hardware design changes were considered to provide methane sensitivity to the preprototype sensor, including a variety of different methane sensing techniques. Minor changes to the existing sensor elements, sensor geometry and operating conditions will not make the preprototype hydrogen sensor respond to methane. New sensor elements that will provide methane and hydrogen sensitivity require replacement of the existing thermistor type elements. Some hydrogen sensing characteristics of the modified sensor will be compromised (larger in situ calibration gas volume and H2 nonspecificity). The preprototype hydrogen sensor should be retained for hydrogen monitoring and a separate methane sensor should be developed.

  14. Al-Al2O3-Pd junction hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, K.; Takinami, N.; Chiba, Y.; Ohshima, S.; Kambe, S.

    1994-07-01

    Al-Al2O3-Pd MIM (metal insulator metal) junctions fabricated on a glass substrate were tested as hydrogen sensors. The I-V (current versus voltage) characteristics of the junctions were measured at room temperature in a vacuum of 10-5 Torr and in H2 gas of 10-2-100 Torr. A significant increase in the current was observed upon introduction of H2 gas. This phenomenon is believed to occur due to the work function lowering of the hydrogen-absorbed Pd top electrode. The rise time was on the order of minutes, while the recovery time when hydrogen was purged was more than 20 h. However, when the junction was placed in an oxidizing ambient such as air, the recovery time was drastically reduced to the order of minutes, indicating that the device is operative as a hydrogen sensor in the atmospheric ambient. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption behavior of the Pd film was also investigated using a Pd coated quartz microbalance, and the results explained the current response of the Pd MIM junction to hydrogen in the presence of oxygen.

  15. Structural and electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0 0 0 1): a review of growth, characterization, transfer doping and hydrogen intercalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, C.; Coletti, C.; Starke, U.

    2010-09-01

    gap can be increased up to more than double its initial value. The hole doping allows the Fermi level to shift into the energy band gap. The impact of the interface layer can be completely eliminated by decoupling the graphene from the SiC substrate by a hydrogen intercalation technique. We demonstrate that hydrogen can migrate under the interface layer and passivate the underlying SiC substrate. The interface layer alone transforms into a quasi-free standing monolayer. Epitaxial monolayer graphene turns into a decoupled bilayer. In combination with atmospheric pressure graphitization, the intercalation process allows the production of quasi-free standing epitaxial graphene on large SiC wafers and represents a highly promising route towards epitaxial graphene based nanoelectronics.

  16. Overview of the U.S. DOE Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards Program. Part 4: Hydrogen Sensors; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Buttner, William J.; Rivkin, Carl; Burgess, Robert; Brosha, Eric; Mukundan, Rangachary; James, C. Will; Keller, Jay

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen sensors are recognized as a critical element in the safety design for any hydrogen system. In this role, sensors can perform several important functions including indication of unintended hydrogen releases, activation of mitigation strategies to preclude the development of dangerous situations, activation of alarm systems and communication to first responders, and to initiate system shutdown. The functionality of hydrogen sensors in this capacity is decoupled from the system being monitored, thereby providing an independent safety component that is not affected by the system itself. The importance of hydrogen sensors has been recognized by DOE and by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's Safety and Codes Standards (SCS) program in particular, which has for several years supported hydrogen safety sensor research and development. The SCS hydrogen sensor programs are currently led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The current SCS sensor program encompasses the full range of issues related to safety sensors, including development of advance sensor platforms with exemplary performance, development of sensor-related code and standards, outreach to stakeholders on the role sensors play in facilitating deployment, technology evaluation, and support on the proper selection and use of sensors.

  17. Robust, wide-range hydrogen sensor for use in commercial, space, and government applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhorter, P.; Rodriguez, J.

    Hydrogen leaks pose a constant fire and explosion threat, and existing techniques for detecting hydrogen suffer from a number of limitations. Existing hydrogen sensors have limited dynamic range, poor reproducibility and reversibility, are subject to false alarms, and tend to be slow, unreliable and difficult to use. In order to address this need, Sandia has designed, fabricated, tested, and demonstrated a new generation of hydrogen sensor which overcomes the limitations of existing technology. This new technology, known as the Robust, Wide-Range Hydrogen Sensor Technology, was created by integrating special catalytic alloy films into Sandia's existing CMOS micro-electronic based hydrogen sensor technology. The Sensor contains PdNi transistor sensors for detecting low concentrations of hydrogen, PdNi resistor sensors for detecting higher concentrations of hydrogen, and on-chip micro-thermometers and micro-heaters for maintaining constant chip temperature.

  18. Novel hydrogen sensors using evanescent microwave probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabib-Azar, M.; Sutapun, B.

    1999-09-01

    Gas sensing using local probes, such as atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopes, enables accurate measurement and detection of very small quantities of gas molecules and chemicals. Here, we report a unique application of the evanescent microwave probes (EMP) in detecting hydrogen. The EMP is extensively used to map resistivity and other nonuniformities in a variety of materials including metals, insulators, semiconductors (both organic and inorganic), composites, and biological specimens. The EMP detects the microwave resistivity of the sample and it has an exponential sensitivity to distance and thickness variations. Here, the EMP is used to detect deflections in a Pd-coated cantilever and to quantify the amount of stress and the resistivity change in the Pd film as a function of hydrogen concentration. The stress was in the range of 5.26-8.59×107Pa for H2 concentrations of 0.5%-1.4% at room temperature, which is about three times larger than that found in the bulk Pd for the same range of H2 concentrations. The Pd film's resistivity changed by 13.5% at 3.0%H2 concentration and it resulted in an 18% change in the EMP signal. The EMP with an appropriate frequency can also be used to resonantly detect various physi-absorbed molecules at the surface of an appropriate material as well. We discuss these possibilities along with some specific experimental data.

  19. 800 C Silicon Carbide (SiC) Pressure Sensors for Engine Ground Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    MEMS-based 4H-SiC piezoresistive pressure sensors have been demonstrated at 800 C, leading to the discovery of strain sensitivity recovery with increasing temperatures above 400 C, eventually achieving up to, or near, 100 recovery of the room temperature values at 800 C. This result will allow the insertion of highly sensitive pressure sensors closer to jet, rocket, and hypersonic engine combustion chambers to improve the quantification accuracy of combustor dynamics, performance, and increase safety margin. Also, by operating at higher temperature and locating closer to the combustion chamber, reduction of the length (weight) of pressure tubes that are currently used will be achieved. This will result in reduced costlb to access space.

  20. Micro-machined thin film hydrogen gas sensor, and method of making and using the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiMeo, Jr., Frank (Inventor); Bhandari, Gautam (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor including a thin film sensor element formed, e.g., by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) or physical vapor deposition (PVD), on a microhotplate structure. The thin film sensor element includes a film of a hydrogen-interactive metal film that reversibly interacts with hydrogen to provide a correspondingly altered response characteristic, such as optical transmissivity, electrical conductance, electrical resistance, electrical capacitance, magnetoresistance, photoconductivity, etc., relative to the response characteristic of the film in the absence of hydrogen. The hydrogen-interactive metal film may be overcoated with a thin film hydrogen-permeable barrier layer to protect the hydrogen-interactive film from deleterious interaction with non-hydrogen species. The hydrogen sensor of the invention may be usefully employed for the detection of hydrogen in an environment susceptible to the incursion or generation of hydrogen and may be conveniently configured as a hand-held apparatus.

  1. A new principle for low-cost hydrogen sensors for fuel cell technology safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liess, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Hydrogen sensors are of paramount importance for the safety of hydrogen fuel cell technology as result of the high pressure necessary in fuel tanks and its low explosion limit. I present a novel sensor principle based on thermal conduction that is very sensitive to hydrogen, highly specific and can operate on low temperatures. As opposed to other thermal sensors it can be operated with low cost and low power driving electronics. On top of this, as sensor element a modified standard of-the shelf MEMS thermopile IR-sensor can be used. The sensor principle presented is thus suited for the future mass markets of hydrogen fuel cell technology.S

  2. A new principle for low-cost hydrogen sensors for fuel cell technology safety

    SciTech Connect

    Liess, Martin

    2014-03-24

    Hydrogen sensors are of paramount importance for the safety of hydrogen fuel cell technology as result of the high pressure necessary in fuel tanks and its low explosion limit. I present a novel sensor principle based on thermal conduction that is very sensitive to hydrogen, highly specific and can operate on low temperatures. As opposed to other thermal sensors it can be operated with low cost and low power driving electronics. On top of this, as sensor element a modified standard of-the shelf MEMS thermopile IR-sensor can be used. The sensor principle presented is thus suited for the future mass markets of hydrogen fuel cell technology.S.

  3. Fiber optic sensor for diffusible hydrogen determination in high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rodney D., II; Olson, David L.; Wildeman, Tom; Benson, David K.

    2000-03-01

    With the increasing use of higher strength steels, the hydrogen content necessary to promote hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) has become very small. This much lower hydrogen content level is approaching the uncertainty level of present diffusible hydrogen analytical practices, thus requiring the development of new analytical techniques. Efforts are being made to develop more sensitive and less time consuming methods for hydrogen measurement. An advanced design for a transition metal oxide based fiber optic diffusible hydrogen sensor has therefore been developed. The sensor allows measurement of hydrogen content directly from a welded structure, eliminating the need for duplicate welded coupons. The sensor generates the necessary analytical signal in less than one hour, and has been calibrated to yield results in ml H2100 g weld metal. The sensor is also extremely sensitive to hydrogen and relatively inexpensive. The sensor shows excellent promise as an advanced hydrogen measurement technique, and research is continuing to establish procedures for transfer to industry.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide sensor using laser grade dye Rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaik, Amitansu; Sahare, P. D.; Nanda, Maitreyee

    2007-11-01

    Many chemical sensors based on fluorescence spectroscopy have been reported in applications, ranging from biomedical and environmental monitoring to industrial process control. In these diverse applications, the analyte can be probed directly, by measuring its intrinsic absorption, or by incorporating some transduction mechanism such as reagent chemistry to enhance sensitivity and selectivity. Hydrogen Peroxide is a colorless liquid. It is a common oxidizing and bleaching agent. It plays an important role in High Power Laser such as Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL). As it is on the Hazardous substance list and on the special health hazard substance list, detection of Hydrogen Peroxide is of great importance. In the present study the detection of hydrogen Peroxide is by fluorescence quenching of laser grade dye Rhodamine B. Estimation of rate constant of the bimolecular quenching reaction is made.

  5. Summary and Findings from the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop (June 8, 2011)

    SciTech Connect

    Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.; Post, M.; Rivkin, C.

    2012-07-01

    On June 8, 2011, DOE/NREL hosted a hydrogen sensor workshop attended by nearly forty participants from private organizations, government facilities, and academic institutions . The workshop participants represented a cross section of stakeholders in the hydrogen community, including sensor developers, end users, site safety officials, and code and standards developers. The goals of the workshop were to identify critical applications for the emerging hydrogen infrastructure that require or would benefit from hydrogen sensors, to assign performance specifications for sensor deployed in each application, and to identify shortcomings or deficiencies (i.e., technical gaps) in the ability of current sensor technology to meet the assigned performance requirements.

  6. SiC Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1998-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC)-based semiconductor electronic devices and circuits are presently being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot adequately perform. Silicon carbide's ability to function under such extreme conditions is expected to enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from greatly improved high-voltage switching [1- 4] for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric motor drives to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications [5-7] to sensors and controls for cleaner-burning more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. In the particular area of power devices, theoretical appraisals have indicated that SiC power MOSFET's and diode rectifiers would operate over higher voltage and temperature ranges, have superior switching characteristics, and yet have die sizes nearly 20 times smaller than correspondingly rated silicon-based devices [8]. However, these tremendous theoretical advantages have yet to be realized in experimental SiC devices, primarily due to the fact that SiC's relatively immature crystal growth and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for reliable incorporation into most electronic systems [9]. This chapter briefly surveys the SiC semiconductor electronics technology. In particular, the differences (both good and bad) between SiC electronics technology and well-known silicon VLSI technology are highlighted. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are highlighted for several large-scale applications. Key crystal growth and device-fabrication issues that presently limit the performance and capability of high temperature and/or high power SiC electronics are identified.

  7. The development of a solid-state hydrogen sensor for rocket engine leakage detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1994-01-01

    Hydrogen propellant leakage poses significant operational problems in the rocket propulsion industry as well as for space exploratory applications. Vigorous efforts have been devoted to minimizing hydrogen leakage in assembly, test, and launch operations related to hydrogen propellant. The objective has been to reduce the operational cost of assembling and maintaining hydrogen delivery systems. Specifically, efforts have been made to develop a hydrogen leak detection system for point-contact measurement. Under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, the Electronics Design Center at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, has undertaken the development of a point-contact hydrogen gas sensor with potential applications to the hydrogen propellant industry. We envision a sensor array consisting of numbers of discrete hydrogen sensors that can be located in potential leak sites. Silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining techniques are used in the fabrication of these sensor prototypes. Evaluations of the sensor are carried out in-house at Case Western Reserve University as well as at Lewis Research Center and GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, California. The hydrogen gas sensor is not only applicable in a hydrogen propulsion system, but also usable in many other civilian and industrial settings. This includes vehicles or facility use, or in the production of hydrogen gas. Dual space and commercial uses of these point-contacted hydrogen sensors are feasible and will directly meet the needs and objectives of NASA as well as various industrial segments.

  8. The development of a solid-state hydrogen sensor for rocket engine leakage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    Hydrogen propellant leakage poses significant operational problems in the rocket propulsion industry as well as for space exploratory applications. Vigorous efforts have been devoted to minimizing hydrogen leakage in assembly, test, and launch operations related to hydrogen propellant. The objective has been to reduce the operational cost of assembling and maintaining hydrogen delivery systems. Specifically, efforts have been made to develop a hydrogen leak detection system for point-contact measurement. Under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, the Electronics Design Center at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, has undertaken the development of a point-contact hydrogen gas sensor with potential applications to the hydrogen propellant industry. We envision a sensor array consisting of numbers of discrete hydrogen sensors that can be located in potential leak sites. Silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining techniques are used in the fabrication of these sensor prototypes. Evaluations of the sensor are carried out in-house at Case Western Reserve University as well as at Lewis Research Center and GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, California. The hydrogen gas sensor is not only applicable in a hydrogen propulsion system, but also usable in many other civilian and industrial settings. This includes vehicles or facility use, or in the production of hydrogen gas. Dual space and commercial uses of these point-contacted hydrogen sensors are feasible and will directly meet the needs and objectives of NASA as well as various industrial segments.

  9. Selective hydrogen gas sensor using CuFe2O4 nanoparticle based thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haija, Mohammad Abu; Ayesh, Ahmad I.; Ahmed, Sadiqa; Katsiotis, Marios S.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen gas sensors based on CuFe2O4 nanoparticle thin films are presented in this work. Each gas sensor was prepared by depositing CuFe2O4 thin film on a glass substrate by dc sputtering inside a high vacuum chamber. Argon inert gas was used to sputter the material from a composite sputtering target. Interdigitated metal electrodes were deposited on top of the thin films by thermal evaporation and shadow masking. The produced sensors were tested against hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and ethylene gases where they were found to be selective for hydrogen. The sensitivity of the produced sensors was maximum for hydrogen gas at 50 °C. In addition, the produced sensors exhibit linear response signal for hydrogen gas with concentrations up to 5%. Those sensors have potential to be used for industrial applications because of their low power requirement, functionality at low temperatures, and low production cost.

  10. NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in quantitative assessment of hydrogen sensors. Work was performed by the Safety Codes and Standards Group in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  11. Modeling of hydrogen atom diffusion and response behavior of hydrogen sensors in Pd-Y alloy nanofilm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Li, Yanli; Huang, Pengcheng; Song, Han; Zhang, Gang

    2016-11-15

    To detect hydrogen gas leakage rapidly, many types of hydrogen sensors containing palladium alloy film have been proposed and fabricated to date. However, the mechanisms and factors that determine the response rate of such hydrogen sensor have not been established theoretically. The manners in which response time is forecasted and sensitive film is designed are key issues in developing hydrogen sensors with nanometer film. In this paper, a unilateral diffusion model of hydrogen atoms in Pd alloy based on Fick's second law is proposed to describe the Pd-H reaction process. Model simulation shows that the hydrogen sensor response time with Pd alloy film is dominated by two factors (film thickness and hydrogen diffusion coefficient). Finally, a series of response rate experiments with varying thicknesses of Pd-Y (yttrium) alloy film are implemented to verify model validity. Our proposed model can help researchers in the precise optimization of film thickness to realize a simultaneously speedy and sensitive hydrogen sensor. This study also aids in evaluating the influence of manufacturing errors on performances and comparing the performances of sensors with different thicknesses.

  12. Modeling of hydrogen atom diffusion and response behavior of hydrogen sensors in Pd–Y alloy nanofilm

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Li, Yanli; Huang, Pengcheng; Song, Han; Zhang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    To detect hydrogen gas leakage rapidly, many types of hydrogen sensors containing palladium alloy film have been proposed and fabricated to date. However, the mechanisms and factors that determine the response rate of such hydrogen sensor have not been established theoretically. The manners in which response time is forecasted and sensitive film is designed are key issues in developing hydrogen sensors with nanometer film. In this paper, a unilateral diffusion model of hydrogen atoms in Pd alloy based on Fick’s second law is proposed to describe the Pd–H reaction process. Model simulation shows that the hydrogen sensor response time with Pd alloy film is dominated by two factors (film thickness and hydrogen diffusion coefficient). Finally, a series of response rate experiments with varying thicknesses of Pd–Y (yttrium) alloy film are implemented to verify model validity. Our proposed model can help researchers in the precise optimization of film thickness to realize a simultaneously speedy and sensitive hydrogen sensor. This study also aids in evaluating the influence of manufacturing errors on performances and comparing the performances of sensors with different thicknesses. PMID:27845408

  13. Modeling of hydrogen atom diffusion and response behavior of hydrogen sensors in Pd–Y alloy nanofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Yanli; Huang, Pengcheng; Song, Han; Zhang, Gang

    2016-11-01

    To detect hydrogen gas leakage rapidly, many types of hydrogen sensors containing palladium alloy film have been proposed and fabricated to date. However, the mechanisms and factors that determine the response rate of such hydrogen sensor have not been established theoretically. The manners in which response time is forecasted and sensitive film is designed are key issues in developing hydrogen sensors with nanometer film. In this paper, a unilateral diffusion model of hydrogen atoms in Pd alloy based on Fick’s second law is proposed to describe the Pd–H reaction process. Model simulation shows that the hydrogen sensor response time with Pd alloy film is dominated by two factors (film thickness and hydrogen diffusion coefficient). Finally, a series of response rate experiments with varying thicknesses of Pd–Y (yttrium) alloy film are implemented to verify model validity. Our proposed model can help researchers in the precise optimization of film thickness to realize a simultaneously speedy and sensitive hydrogen sensor. This study also aids in evaluating the influence of manufacturing errors on performances and comparing the performances of sensors with different thicknesses.

  14. Development of a reliable, miniaturized hydrogen safety sensor prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, Praveen K; Brosha, Eric L; Rangachary, Mukundan; Garzon, Fernando H; Williamson, Todd L

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the development and long-term testing of a hydrogen safety sensor for vehicle and infrastructure applications is presented. The working device is demonstrated through application of commercial and reproducible manufacturing methods and rigorous life testing results guided by materials selection, and sensor design. Fabricated using Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) as the sensing electrode, Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen ion conducting solid electrolyte and Platinum (Pt) as a pseudo-counter electrode, the device was subjected to interference studies, temperature cycling, and long-testing routine. The sensor responded in real time to varying concentrations of H{sub 2} (1000 to 20,000 ppm) monitored under a humidified condition. Among the interference gases tested such as nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), carbon monoxide (CO), and propylene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}), the sensor showed cross-sensitivity to C{sub 3}H{sub 6}. Analyzing the overall device performance over 4000 hrs of testing for 5000 ppm of H{sub 2}, (a) the sensitivity varied {+-}21% compared to response recorded at 0 hrs, and (c) the response rise time fluctuated between 3 to 46 s. The salient features of the H{sub 2} sensor prototype designed and co-developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are (a) stable three phase interface (electrode/electrolyte/gas) leading to reliable sensor operation, (b) low power consumption, (b) compactness to fit into critical areas of application, (c) simple operation, (d) fast response, (e) a direct voltage read-out circumventing the need for any additional conditioning circuitry, and (f) conducive to commercialization.

  15. Advances in materials for room temperature hydrogen sensors.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sunil K; Krishnan, Subramanian; Silva, Hayde; Jean, Sheila; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2012-06-21

    Hydrogen (H(2)), as a source of energy, continues to be a compelling choice in applications ranging from fuel cells and propulsion systems to feedstock for chemical, metallurgical and other industrial processes. H(2), being a clean, reliable, and affordable source, is finding ever increasing use in distributed electric power generation and H(2) fuelled cars. Although still under 0.1%, the distributed use of H(2) is the fastest growing area. In distributed H(2) storage, distribution, and consumption, safety continues to be a critical aspect. Affordable safety systems for distributed H(2) applications are critical for the H(2) economy to take hold. Advances in H(2) sensors are driven by specificity, reliability, repeatability, stability, cost, size, response time, recovery time, operating temperature, humidity range, and power consumption. Ambient temperature sensors for H(2) detection are increasingly being explored as they offer specificity, stability and robustness of high temperature sensors with lower operational costs and significantly longer operational lifetimes. This review summarizes and highlights recent developments in room temperature H(2) sensors.

  16. Study on Fiber-optic Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Wen, Jun-Qing; Zhang, Xiao-Zhen; Wang, Wei; Feng, De-Quan; Wang, Qi; Jia, Fei

    We describe a novel fiber-optic gas sensor which hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) gas can be detected by a silver coated fiber bragg grating (FBG). The H2S sensitive material Ag can be coated on the cladding surrounding surface of FBG by conventional silver mirror reaction. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) was applied to analysis the Ag film structure before and after the interaction with H2S gas. By conducting the experiment of Ag-coated optical sensor (AOS), the relation between the H2S gas concentration and absorption spectrum was built. Result shows that while the concentration alters from 0 to 9.32%, a linear response of AOS signal to H2S concentration was observed with the response sensitivity of 0.332 dBm/% and linearity R2=0.9966. Such H2S sensor is suitable for monitoring the H2S hazard as a one time disposable logging-while-drilling sensor.

  17. Evaluation of Hydrogen Sensors: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-547

    SciTech Connect

    Buttner, William

    2015-10-01

    In preparation for the projected 2015 release of commercial hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, KPA has been contracted by Toyota Motors to develop a hydrogen safety system for vehicle repair facilities. Repair facility safety designs will include hydrogen sensors. KPA will identify critical sensor specifications for vehicle repair facilities. In collaboration with NREL, KPA will select and purchase commercial hydrogen sensors that meet or nearly meet requirements for deployment in vehicle repair facility. A two-phase field deployment plan to verify sensor performance has been developed.

  18. Application of a newly developed hydrogen peroxide vapor phase sensor to HPV sterilizer.

    PubMed

    Taizo, I; Sinichi, A; Kawamura, K

    1998-01-01

    A new type of concentration sensor for hydrogen peroxide vapor has been developed by making use of a semiconductor. Output from the vapor sensor has been shown to have a good linear relationship with the logarithm of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor. Concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor introduced into the sterilization chamber could be kept constant by monitoring the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide vapor continuously and controlling the vapor supply. Temperature and humidity have also been kept constant. D-values for B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 at various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide vapor have been determined by using the combination system of the hydrogen peroxide vapor sensor, the hydrogen peroxide vapor supplier, thermosensor and humidity sensor. D-values at the temperature of 30 degrees C and the absolute humidity of 0.7 mg H2O/L thus obtained, were 0.2 minutes at hydrogen peroxide concentration of 600 ppm and 1.2 minutes at 200 ppm at the temperature of 30 degrees C and 0.7 mg/L absolute humidity. D-values for B. stearothermophilus ATCC 12980 at various temperatures, humidity and levels of hydrogen peroxide concentration have also been determined. These fundamental data indicate that the sterilization by hydrogen peroxide vapor can be validated as precisely as steam sterilization by measuring and controlling the concentration of hydrogen peroxide vapor using a combination of the hydrogen peroxide concentration sensor and the vapor generator. Influence of temperature and humidity have also been studied. The hydrogen peroxide sensor has been calibrated and standardized by using the standard hydrogen peroxide vapor whose concentration has been determined by calculating partial pressure of hydrogen peroxide over the water-hydrogen peroxide solution.

  19. Investigation on the Hydrogen Gas Sensor Based on Exothermicity Reaction by Hydrogen Absorption into the Pd Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Noriaki; Kimura, Mitsuteru

    We have proposed a novel micro-calorimetric hydrogen sensor based on the temperature difference detection due to the exothermic reaction caused by hydrogen absorption in the palladium (Pd) thin film as a hydrogen absorbing material, and demonstrated using the prototype hydrogen sensor with a microheater and a pair of cantilever SOI thermocouples that this H2 sensor by this proposed mechanism is surely possible. We have ascertained that the sensor output voltage is increased as the H2 concentration is increased, that the exothermic reaction ceases after finish of the hydrogen absorption, the exothermic reaction by hydrogen absorption occurs even in pure N2 gas, that larger output voltage is observed for lower ambient temperature even under no oxygen gas, and that this hydrogen sensor does not respond to the CH4 gas. We have found that the detection of H2 concentration based on the exothermic reaction is preferred to carried out after heating the sensing region rather than during heating it especially in lower H2 concentration than about 5 vol.%, because we can use the null method to detect the extremely low H2 concentration.

  20. Downhole geothermal well sensors comprising a hydrogen-resistant optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-02-08

    A new class of optical fiber based thermal sensors has been invented. The new sensors comprise hydrogen-resistant optical fibers which are able to withstand a hot, hydrogen-containing environment as is often found in the downhole well environment.

  1. SICS. A Sensor-Based In-Line Control System for the Surfaces of Continuously Cast Slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tzyy-Shuh

    2013-09-23

    The Phase II project has been carried out in accordance to the proposed tasks and budget, based on the original and extended schedule. The R&D team designed and implemented the test unit for the full width coverage, installed the unit in a caster. The development work further included enhanced image processing, in-depth defect study and process control models. The function, operation, and maintenance of the SICS was thoroughly studied during the Phase II research. The experience indicates additional hardware and procedures are required to make the SICS a commercially ready product in operation and maintenance aspect. Such developments have been finished and the team is contacting potential customers for the first commercial installation of SICS. Additionally, OGT is exploring the possibility to team up with a US company that specializes in surface cleaning for slabs/blooms/billets such that the in-line surface inspection can be integrated with in-line surface clean up for the maximum benefit to the steel industry.

  2. High-performance flexible hydrogen sensor made of WS₂ nanosheet-Pd nanoparticle composite film.

    PubMed

    Kuru, Cihan; Choi, Duyoung; Kargar, Alireza; Liu, Chin Hung; Yavuz, Serdar; Choi, Chulmin; Jin, Sungho; Bandaru, Prabhakar R

    2016-05-13

    We report a flexible hydrogen sensor, composed of WS2 nanosheet-Pd nanoparticle composite film, fabricated on a flexible polyimide substrate. The sensor offers the advantages of light-weight, mechanical durability, room temperature operation, and high sensitivity. The WS2-Pd composite film exhibits sensitivity (R 1/R 2, the ratio of the initial resistance to final resistance of the sensor) of 7.8 to 50,000 ppm hydrogen. Moreover, the WS2-Pd composite film distinctly outperforms the graphene-Pd composite, whose sensitivity is only 1.14. Furthermore, the ease of fabrication holds great potential for scalable and low-cost manufacturing of hydrogen sensors.

  3. Femtosecond-pulsed laser micromachining of a 4H SiC wafer for MEMS pressure sensor diaphragms and via holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yuanyuan; Nair, Rajeev; Molian, Raathai; Molian, Pal

    2008-03-01

    The challenging issues in conventional microfabrication of SiC pressure sensor diaphragms from bulk wafers are low etch rates, thicker (>40 µm) diaphragms, low spatial resolutions, rough surfaces and substantial contamination. In via hole drilling of SiC, the critical concern is the low drilling speed (nm per minute). In this work, femtosecond (fs)-pulsed laser ablation was conducted to overcome some of these deficiencies. Circular diaphragms (0.5 to 1 mm) by trepanning mode and via holes (30-50 µm) by percussion drilling mode were micromachined in 250 µm thick 4H-SiC single crystals using an 800 nm wavelength, 120 fs, 1 mJ Ti:sapphire laser. Pulse energy, number of pulses and scan rate were varied to obtain a high etch rate and high quality features. Results showed that the etch rates are 2-10 µm per pulse, diaphragm thicknesses are 20-200 µm, surface roughness is 1-2 µm Ra and via hole drilling speeds are up to 25 µm per second. The etch depth control was well within ± 1%. High aspect ratio features with excellent spatial resolutions were obtained due to the absence of thermal damages such as a recast layer and contamination. Thus, femtosecond-pulsed laser ablation by virtue of its unique characteristics such as multiphoton ionization and the absence of lattice heating offers high speed, precision and accuracy in micromachining 4H-SiC wafers.

  4. SiC-Based Gas Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    1997-01-01

    Electronic grade Silicon Carbide (SiC) is a ceramic material which can operate as a semiconductor at temperatures above 600 C. Recently, SiC semiconductors have been used in Schottky diode gas sensor structures. These sensors have been shown to be functional at temperatures significantly above the normal operating range of Si-based devices. SiC sensor operation at these higher temperatures allows detection of gases such as hydrocarbons which are not detectable at lower temperatures. This paper discusses the development of SiC-based Schottky diode gas sensors for the detection of hydrogen, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen oxides (NO(x)). Sensor designs for these applications are discussed. High sensitivity is observed for the hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensors using Pd on SiC Schottky diodes while the NO(x) sensors are still under development. A prototype sensor package has been fabricated which allows high temperature operation in a room temperature ambient by minimizing heat loss to that ambient. It is concluded that SiC-based gas sensors have considerable potential in a variety of gas sensing applications.

  5. A low-volume microstructured optical fiber hydrogen peroxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartner, E. P.; Murphy, D. F.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H.; Monro, T. M.

    2011-05-01

    The ability to measure the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in solution is critical for quality assessment and control in many disparate applications, including wine, aviation fuels and IVF. The objective of this research is to develop a rapid test for the hydrogen peroxide content that can be performed on very low volume samples (i.e. sub-μL) that is relatively independent of other products within the sample. For H2O2 detection we use suspended core optical fibers to achieve a high evanescent field interaction with the fluid of interest, without the constraint of limited interaction length that is generally inherent with nanowire structures. By filling the holes of the fiber with an analyte/fluorophore solution we seek to create a quick and effective sensor that should enable detection of desired species within liquid media. By choosing a fluorophore that reacts with our target species to produce an increase in fluorescence, we can correlate observed fluorescence intensity with the concentration of the target molecule.

  6. PALLADIUM DOPED TIN OXIDE BASED HYDROGEN GAS SENSORS FOR SAFETY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, Upendra; Nadig, D. S.

    2010-04-09

    Hydrogen is considered to be a hazardous gas since it forms a flammable mixture between 4 to 75% by volume in air. Hence, the safety aspects of handling hydrogen are quite important. For this, ideally, highly selective, fast response, small size, hydrogen sensors are needed. Although sensors based on different technologies may be used, thin-film sensors based on palladium (Pd) are preferred due to their compactness and fast response. They detect hydrogen by monitoring the changes to the electrical, mechanical or optical properties of the films. We report the development of Pd-doped tin-oxide based gas sensors prepared on thin ceramic substrates with screen printed platinum (Pt) contacts and integrated nicrome wire heaters. The sensors are tested for their performances using hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixtures to a maximum of 4%H{sub 2} in N{sub 2}. The sensors detect hydrogen and their response times are less than a few seconds. Also, the sensor performance is not altered by the presence of helium in the test gas mixtures. By the above desired performance characteristics, field trials of these sensors have been undertaken. The paper presents the details of the sensor fabrication, electronic circuits, experimental setup for evaluation and the test results.

  7. Development of a fiber-optic sensor for hydrogen leak detection

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1995-09-01

    The real and perceived risks of hydrogen fuel use, particularly in passenger vehicles, will require extensive safety precautions including hydrogen leak detection. Conventional hydrogen gas sensors require electrical wiring and may be too expensive for deployment in multiple locations within a vehicle. In this recently initiated project, we are attempting to develop a reversible, thin-film, chemochromic sensor that can be applied to the end of a polymer optical fiber. The presence of hydrogen gas causes the film to become darker. A light beam transmitted from a central instrument in the vehicle along the sensor fibers will be reflected from the ends of the fiber back to individual light detectors. A decrease in the reflected light signal will indicate the presence and concentration of hydrogen in the vicinity of the fiber sensor. The typical thin film sensor consists of a layer of transparent, amorphous tungsten oxide covered by a very thin reflective layer of palladium. When the sensor is exposed to hydrogen, a portion of the hydrogen is dissociated, diffuses through the palladium and reacts with the tungsten oxide to form a blue insertion compound, H{sub X}WO{sub 3}- When the hydrogen gas is no longer present, the hydrogen will diffuse out of the H{sub X}WO{sub 3} and oxidize at the palladium/air interface, restoring the tungsten oxide film and the light signal to normal. The principle of this detection scheme has already been demonstrated by scientists in Japan. However, the design of the sensor has not been optimized for speed of response nor tested for its hydrogen selectivity in the presence of hydrocarbon gases. The challenge of this project is to modify the basic sensor design to achieve the required rapid response and assure sufficient selectivity to avoid false readings.

  8. Development of a rechargeable optical hydrogen peroxide sensor - sensor design and biological application.

    PubMed

    Koren, Klaus; Jensen, Peter Ø; Kühl, Michael

    2016-07-21

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important member of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) family. Among ROS, H2O2 is considered the most long-lived and can accumulate inside and outside of cells, where it is involved in both vital (signaling) and deadly (toxic) reactions depending on its concentration. Quantifying H2O2 within biological samples is challenging and often not possible. Here we present a quasi-reversible fiber-optic sensor capable of measuring H2O2 concentrations ranging from 1-100 μM within different biological samples. Based on a Prussian blue/white redox cycle and a simple sensor recharging and readout strategy, H2O2 can be measured with high spatial (∼500 μm) and temporal (∼30 s) resolution. The sensor has a broad applicability both in complex environmental and biomedical systems, as demonstrated by (i) H2O2 concentration profile measurements in natural photosynthetic biofilms under light stress reaching H2O2 concentrations as high as 15 μM, and (ii) the quantification of the transient increase of the extracellular concentration of H2O2 during stimulation of neutrophils.

  9. Pd/V{2}O{5} fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciak, E.; Opilski, Z.; Urbańczyk, M.

    2005-10-01

    The paper presents an optical-fiber hydrogen sensor. The sensor utilizes a layered sensing structure. This structure is a layered Fabry-Perot interferometer and includes gasochromic vanadium pentoxide (V{2}O{5}). A structure is made at the end of multi-mode optical fiber as a sensing element. The sensor permits to detect and to measure the concentration of hydrogen in a gaseous medium. The optical H{2} gas sensor has a very short response time and a fast regeneration time at room temperature.

  10. Flight Hydrogen Sensor for use in the ISS Oxygen Generation Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MSadoques, George, Jr.; Makel, Darby B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the hydrogen sensor Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) used on the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), to be operated on the International Space Station (ISS). The hydrogen sensor ORU is being provided by Makel Engineering, Inc. (MEI) to monitor the oxygen outlet for the presence of hydrogen. The hydrogen sensor ORU is a triple redundant design where each sensor converts raw measurements to actual hydrogen partial pressure that is reported to the OGA system controller. The signal outputs are utilized for system shutdown in the event that the hydrogen concentration in the oxygen outlet line exceeds the specified shutdown limit. Improvements have been made to the Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) based sensing element, screening, and calibration process to meet OGA operating requirements. Two flight hydrogen sensor ORUs have successfully completed the acceptance test phase. This paper also describes the sensor s performance during acceptance testing, additional tests planned to extend the operational performance calibration cycle, and integration with the OGA system.

  11. A Finite Element Model of a MEMS-based Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Sensor

    PubMed Central

    EL Gowini, Mohamed M.; Moussa, Walied A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen plays a significant role in various industrial applications, but careful handling and continuous monitoring are crucial since it is explosive when mixed with air. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) sensors provide desirable characteristics for hydrogen detection due to their small size, low fabrication cost, ease of integration and high sensitivity. In this paper a finite element model of a Surface Acoustic Wave sensor is developed using ANSYS12© and tested for hydrogen detection. The sensor consists of a YZ-lithium niobate substrate with interdigital electrodes (IDT) patterned on the surface. A thin palladium (Pd) film is added on the surface of the sensor due to its high affinity for hydrogen. With increased hydrogen absorption the palladium hydride structure undergoes a phase change due to the formation of the β-phase, which deteriorates the crystal structure. Therefore with increasing hydrogen concentration the stiffness and the density are significantly reduced. The values of the modulus of elasticity and the density at different hydrogen concentrations in palladium are utilized in the finite element model to determine the corresponding SAW sensor response. Results indicate that with increasing the hydrogen concentration the wave velocity decreases and the attenuation of the wave is reduced. PMID:22205865

  12. Stellar Origin of 15N-rich Presolar SiC Grains of Type AB: Supernovae with Explosive Hydrogen Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan; Nittler, Larry R.; Pignatari, Marco; O'D. Alexander, Conel M.; Wang, Jianhua

    2017-06-01

    We report C, N, and Si isotopic data for 59 highly 13C-enriched presolar submicron- to micron-sized SiC grains from the Murchison meteorite, including eight putative nova grains (PNGs) and 29 15N-rich (14N/15N ≤ solar) AB grains, and their Mg-Al, S, and Ca-Ti isotope data when available. These 37 grains are enriched in 13C, 15N, and 26Al with the PNGs showing more extreme enhancements. The 15N-rich AB grains show systematically higher 26Al and 30Si excesses than the 14N-rich AB grains. Thus, we propose to divide the AB grains into groups 1 (14N/15N < solar) and 2 (14N/15N ≥ solar). For the first time, we have obtained both S and Ti isotopic data for five AB1 grains and one PNG and found 32S and/or 50Ti enhancements. Interestingly, one AB1 grain had the largest 32S and 50Ti excesses, strongly suggesting a neutron-capture nucleosynthetic origin of the 32S excess and thus the initial presence of radiogenic 32Si (t 1/2 = 153 years). More importantly, we found that the 15N and 26Al excesses of AB1 grains form a trend that extends to the region in the N-Al isotope plot occupied by C2 grains, strongly indicating a common stellar origin for both AB1 and C2 grains. Comparison of supernova models with the AB1 and C2 grain data indicates that these grains came from supernovae that experienced H ingestion into the He/C zones of their progenitors.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide regulates cell adhesion through the redox sensor RPSA.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Bagulho, Ana; Tenente, Rita; Teixeira, Vitor H; Martins, Gabriel; da Costa, Gonçalo; Jerónimo, Ana; Cordeiro, Carlos; Machuqueiro, Miguel; Real, Carla

    2016-01-01

    To become metastatic, a tumor cell must acquire new adhesion properties that allow migration into the surrounding connective tissue, transmigration across endothelial cells to reach the blood stream and, at the site of metastasis, adhesion to endothelial cells and transmigration to colonize a new tissue. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a redox signaling molecule produced in tumor cell microenvironment with high relevance for tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms regulated by H2O2 in tumor cells are still poorly known. The identification of H2O2-target proteins in tumor cells and the understanding of their role in tumor cell adhesion are essential for the development of novel redox-based therapies for cancer. In this paper, we identified Ribosomal Protein SA (RPSA) as a target of H2O2 and showed that RPSA in the oxidized state accumulates in clusters that contain specific adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we showed that RPSA oxidation improves cell adhesion efficiency to laminin in vitro and promotes cell extravasation in vivo. Our results unravel a new mechanism for H2O2-dependent modulation of cell adhesion properties and identify RPSA as the H2O2 sensor in this process. This work indicates that high levels of RPSA expression might confer a selective advantage to tumor cells in an oxidative environment.

  14. Development of an Inexpensive RGB Color Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen Cyanide Gas.

    PubMed

    Greenawald, Lee A; Boss, Gerry R; Snyder, Jay L; Reeder, Aaron; Bell, Suzanne

    2017-10-12

    An inexpensive red, green, blue (RGB) color sensor was developed for detecting low ppm concentrations of hydrogen cyanide gas. A piece of glass fiber filter paper containing monocyanocobinamide [CN(H2O)Cbi] was placed directly above the RGB color sensor and an on chip LED. Light reflected from the paper was monitored for RGB color change upon exposure to hydrogen cyanide at concentrations of 1.0-10.0 ppm as a function of 25%, 50%, and 85% relative humidity. A rapid color change occurred within 10 s of exposure to 5.0 ppm hydrogen cyanide gas (near the NIOSH recommended exposure limit). A more rapid color change occurred at higher humidity, suggesting a more effective reaction between hydrogen cyanide and CN(H2O)Cbi. The sensor could provide the first real time respirator end-of-service-life alert for hydrogen cyanide gas.

  15. Optical fiber sensors in health monitoring of composite high-pressure vessels for hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gąsior, Paweł; Kaleta, Jerzy; Sankowska, Anna

    2007-06-01

    In the present work we present the results of our latest research into an implementation of optical fiber sensors for flaw tolerance test application on high pressure composite hydrogen vessels. For monitoring influence of flaws on composite parameters, as point measurement heads permanently installed on tank's surface, fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) were used. The aim of our experiments was to examine structural behavior of the composite hydrogen vessels and test appropriate topologies of sensors to detect the damages.

  16. Standard Hydrogen Test Protocols for the NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This brochure summarizes the test protocols used in the NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Laboratory for the quantitative assessment of critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Researchers at the NREL Hydrogen Safety Sensor Test Laboratory developed a variety of test protocols to quantitatively assess critical analytical performance specifications for hydrogen sensors. Many are similar to, but typically more rigorous than, the test procedures mandated by ISO Standard 26142 (Hydrogen Detector for Stationary Applications). Specific protocols were developed for linear range, short-term stability, and the impact of fluctuations in temperature (T), pressure (P), relative humidity (RH), and chemical environment. Specialized tests (e.g., oxygen requirement) may also be performed. Hydrogen safety sensors selected for evaluation are subjected to a thorough regimen of test protocols, as described. Sensor testing is performed at NREL on custom-built sensor test fixtures. Environmental parameters such as T, P, RH, and gas composition are rigorously controlled and monitored. The NREL evaluations are performed on commercial hydrogen detectors, on emerging sensing technologies, and for end users to validate sensor performance for specific application needs. Test results and data are shared with the manufacturer or client via summary reports, teleconference phone calls, and, when appropriate, site visits to manufacturer facilities. Client representatives may also monitor NREL's operation while their technologies are being tested. Manufacturers may use test data to illustrate the analytical capability of their technologies and, more importantly, to guide future developments. NREL uses the data to assess technology gaps and deployment considerations. Per NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory policy, test results are treated as proprietary and are not shared with other manufacturers or other entities without permission. The data may be used by NREL in open publications

  17. Wireless Hydrogen Smart Sensor Based on Pt/Graphene-Immobilized Radio-Frequency Identification Tag.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Seop; Oh, Jungkyun; Jun, Jaemoon; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-08-25

    Hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel, is of key importance to various industrial applications, including fuel cells and the aerospace and automotive industries. However, hydrogen gas is odorless, colorless, and highly flammable; thus, appropriate safety protocol implementation and monitoring are essential. Highly sensitive hydrogen-gas leak detection and surveillance systems are needed; additionally, the ability to monitor large areas (e.g., cities) via wireless networks is becoming increasingly important. In this report, we introduce a radio frequency identification (RFID)-based wireless smart-sensor system, composed of a Pt-decorated reduced graphene oxide (Pt_rGO)-immobilized RFID sensor tag and an RFID-reader antenna-connected network analyzer to detect hydrogen gas. The Pt_rGOs, produced using a simple chemical reduction process, were immobilized on an antenna pattern in the sensor tag through spin coating. The resulting Pt_rGO-based RFID sensor tag exhibited a high sensitivity to hydrogen gas at unprecedentedly low concentrations (1 ppm), with wireless communication between the sensor tag and RFID-reader antenna. The wireless sensor tag demonstrated flexibility and a long lifetime due to the strong immobilization of Pt_rGOs on the substrate and battery-independent operation during hydrogen sensing, respectively.

  18. Plastic optical fiber hydrogen detection sensor systems for harsh environment in aerospace application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Goswami, Kish; Mendoza, Edward; Kempen, Lothar

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the 1st successful Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) cable and Glass Optical Fiber (GOF) hydrogen detection sensor systems developed for the Boeing Evolved Expandable Lunch Vehicle (EELV) Delta IV Launch Vehicle harsh environment of engine section. H2 sensors are necessary to monitor the possible leak of rocket prior launch to avoid explosion, which can be highly dangerous. Due to harsh environment of launch vehicle, we developed the first combination of 100 m POF and glass fiber H2 sensors. The hydrogen sensor consisted of optrodes distributed at multiple locations along a fiber optic cable-based network. These hydrogen sensors were used on the Common Booster Core (CBC) of Delta IV had to perform in temperatures between -18° C and +60° C. The hydrogen sensor sensitive chemistry was fully reversible and had demonstrated a response to hydrogen gas in the range of 0% to 10% with a resolution of 0.1 % and a response time of 5 seconds measured at a gas flow rate of 1 cc/mm. The optical signature of the optrode in the visible spectrum varied proportionally to the local hydrogen gas concentration. To qualify the POF and fiber optic cables, performed detail investigation for attenuation loss, thermal, humidity, temperature, vibration and accelerate testing for life expectancy. Extensive networking using LabView were carried out for lab and actual field demonstrations.

  19. Development of Sensors and Sensing Technology for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, E L; Sekhar, P K; Mukundan, R; Williamson, T; Garzon, F H; Woo, L Y; Glass, R R

    2010-01-06

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features. Some of these devices (e.g. yaw sensors for dynamic stability control systems or tire presure warning RF-based devices) may be used on fuel cell vehicles without any modification. However the use of hydrogen as a fuel will dictate the development of completely new technologies for such requirements as the detection of hydrogen leaks, sensors and systems to continuously monitor hydrogen fuel purity and protect the fuel cell stack from poisoning, and for the important, yet often taken for granted, tasks such as determining the state of charge of the hydrogen fuel storage and delivery system. Two such sensors that rely on different transduction mechanisms will be highlighted in this presentation. The first is an electrochemical device for monitoring hydrogen levels in air. The other technology covered in this work, is an acoustic-based approach to determine the state of charge of a hydride storage system.

  20. The Capacitance and Temperature Effects of the SiC- and Si-Based MEMS Pressure Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsi, N.; Majlis, B. Y.; Mohd-Yasin, F.; Hamzah, A. A.

    2013-04-01

    This project develops the pressure sensor for monitoring the extreme conditions inside the gas turbine engine. The capacitive-based instead of piezoresistive-based pressure sensor is employed to avoid temperature drift. The deflecting (top) plate and the fixed (bottom) plate generate the capacitance, which is proportional to the applied input pressure and temperature. Two thin film materials of four different sizes are employed for the top plate, namely cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) and silicon (Si). Their performances in term of the sensitivity and linearity of the capacitance versus pressure are simulated at the temperature of 27°C, 500°C, 700°C and 1000°C. The results show that both materials display linear characteristics for temperature up to 500°C, although SiC-based sensor shows higher sensitivity. However, when the temperatures are increased to 700°C and 1000°C, the Si- based pressure sensor starts to malfunction at 50 MPa. However, the SiC-based pressure sensor continues to demonstrate high sensitivity and linearity at such high temperature and pressure. This paper validates the need of employing silicon carbide instead of silicon for sensing of extreme environments.

  1. Low-power, fast, selective nanoparticle-based hydrogen sulfide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickelson, William; Sussman, Allen; Zettl, Alex

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate a small, low-cost, low-power, highly sensitive, and selective nanomaterials-based gas sensor. A network of tungsten oxide nanoparticles is heated by an on-chip microhotplate while the conductance of the network is monitored. The device can be heated with short pulses, thereby drastically lowering the power consumption, without diminishing the sensor response. The sensor shows high sensitivity to hydrogen sulfide and does not have significant cross sensitivities to hydrogen, water, or methane, gases likely to be present in operation. A sensing mechanism is proposed, and its effect on electronic properties is discussed.

  2. Passive Dew Droplet Removal from Hydrogen Sensors for Fuel Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Masataka; Ishii, Makoto; Yoshinaga, Haruo; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    This paper describes three structures to passively remove condensed water droplets from a gas heat conduction type hydrogen sensor for fuel cell applications. The three structures are A: water-repellent coating surrounded by water-absorbing porous ceramic coating, B: suspended porous membrane over a water-repellent sensor surface and C: wettability gradient for water droplet elimination. A real hydrogen sensor was used as a platform for the water-droplet-removal structures. Using helium instead of hydrogen, A and B type sensors and a reference sensor without water-droplet-removal structures were tested in a wet and hot atmosphere simulating a fuel cell environment. B type sensor showed normal output even after exposure to a dew-condensing atmosphere, while the reference and A type sensors showed abnormal output, suggesting dew condensation on the sensor surfaces. For C type sensor, a photochromic compound film on a super-water-repellent undercoat, which changes its wettability by ultraviolet exposure, was used. It was confirmed that the wettability could be controlled by ultraviolet exposure from 157.9° to 72.8° in water contact angle.

  3. Hydrogen Sensors Using Nitride-Based Semiconductor Diodes: The Role of Metal/Semiconductor Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Irokawa, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I review my recent results in investigating hydrogen sensors using nitride-based semiconductor diodes, focusing on the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with the devices. Firstly, effects of interfacial modification in the devices on hydrogen detection sensitivity are discussed. Surface defects of GaN under Schottky electrodes do not play a critical role in hydrogen sensing characteristics. However, dielectric layers inserted in metal/semiconductor interfaces are found to cause dramatic changes in hydrogen sensing performance, implying that chemical selectivity to hydrogen could be realized. The capacitance-voltage (C–V) characteristics reveal that the work function change in the Schottky metal is not responsible mechanism for hydrogen sensitivity. The interface between the metal and the semiconductor plays a critical role in the interaction of hydrogen with semiconductor devises. Secondly, low-frequency C–V characterization is employed to investigate the interaction mechanism of hydrogen with diodes. As a result, it is suggested that the formation of a metal/semiconductor interfacial polarization could be attributed to hydrogen-related dipoles. In addition, using low-frequency C–V characterization leads to clear detection of 100 ppm hydrogen even at room temperature where it is hard to detect hydrogen by using conventional current-voltage (I–V) characterization, suggesting that low-frequency C–V method would be effective in detecting very low hydrogen concentrations. PMID:22346597

  4. Hydrogen gas detection using MOS capacitor sensor based on palladium nanoparticles-gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aval, Leila Fekri; Elahi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    In this study a palladium nanoparticles-gate MOS capacitor hydrogen sensor with Pd/SiO2/Si structure has been fabricated. The palladium nanoparticles by chemical method are synthesized and then characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-VIS spectrum. Also, the preferred orientation and grain size of the palladium nanoparticles have been studied. Hydrogen absorption and desorption of the palladium nanoparticles at the low and high pressure and as function of time have been investigated. The sensing mechanism of the hydrogen detection by MOS capacitor sensor has been explained and theoretical and experimental results have been compared. At 287 K, compared to another Pd MOS capacitor hydrogen sensor and ultrathin Pd MOS capacitor, the palladium nanoparticles gate MOS capacitor showed much faster response and recovery speed. The time interval for reaching to 95% of the steady state signal magnitude (t95%) for 1% and 2% hydrogen in nitrogen were 2 s and 1.5 s respectively. The time interval for recovery transients from 95% to 10% of steady state signal magnitude (t10%) for 1% and 2% hydrogen in nitrogen were 10 s and 11 s respectively. The presented sensor illustrates a designing of hydrogen detectors with very fast response and recovery speed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Self-compensated microstructure fiber optic sensor to detect high hydrogen concentration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuijing; Zhang, Bo; Li, Zhi; Dai, Jixiang; Wang, Gaopeng; Yang, Minghong

    2015-08-24

    Dual-cavity microstructure fiber optic hydrogen sensor based on evaporated Pt/WO(3) film was proposed and experimentally explored in this paper, which provides a novel solution to detect high hydrogen concentration (10-30% H(2)). Dual-cavity microstructure fabricated by splicer is composed of an inner air-cavity and a collapsed photonic crystal fiber cavity. The proposed sensor has the advantages of miniature structure, stable configuration, low cost. Based on three-beam interference model and verification experiments, the compensation function to the fluctuation of light source and fiber loss is proved from the theoretical simulation and experimental investigation. The sensor has a short response time (1min), good repeatability and reliability. Besides, the change of temperature affects the response value of the hydrogen sensor, but the impact can be neglected in 10-30% H(2).

  6. Hydrogen loading to the optic fibers for fiber grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chun; Zhang, Wen-yu; Zhu, Yuan; Pan, Zhi-yong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, fibers with different depths of hermetically coated carbon are hydrogen loaded and radiated, and it's found that too thick of carbon layer around fiber can't bring best radiation-resistant properties, because the thick carbon layer would make the entering of hydrogen difficult although it can help to stop the hydrogen escaping. We also research the duration of saturated hydrogen loading under the temperature of 60°C and 100°C respectively, and it's found that after 120h and 48h, the fibers' photo sensitivities tend to be flat. We also reload hydrogen into the fibers which have been loaded once, and these fibers are etched then, this help us to deep understand the mechanism of hydrogen loading for the fiber gratings.

  7. Hafnium-an optical hydrogen sensor spanning six orders in pressure.

    PubMed

    Boelsma, C; Bannenberg, L J; van Setten, M J; Steinke, N-J; van Well, A A; Dam, B

    2017-06-05

    Hydrogen detection is essential for its implementation as an energy vector. So far, palladium is considered to be the most effective hydrogen sensing material. Here we show that palladium-capped hafnium thin films show a highly reproducible change in optical transmission in response to a hydrogen exposure ranging over six orders of magnitude in pressure. The optical signal is hysteresis-free within this range, which includes a transition between two structural phases. A temperature change results in a uniform shift of the optical signal. This, to our knowledge unique, feature facilitates the sensor calibration and suggests a constant hydrogenation enthalpy. In addition, it suggests an anomalously steep increase of the entropy with the hydrogen/metal ratio that cannot be explained on the basis of a classical solid solution model. The optical behaviour as a function of its hydrogen content makes hafnium well-suited for use as a hydrogen detection material.

  8. Hafnium—an optical hydrogen sensor spanning six orders in pressure

    PubMed Central

    Boelsma, C.; Bannenberg, L. J.; van Setten, M. J.; Steinke, N.-J.; van Well, A. A.; Dam, B.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen detection is essential for its implementation as an energy vector. So far, palladium is considered to be the most effective hydrogen sensing material. Here we show that palladium-capped hafnium thin films show a highly reproducible change in optical transmission in response to a hydrogen exposure ranging over six orders of magnitude in pressure. The optical signal is hysteresis-free within this range, which includes a transition between two structural phases. A temperature change results in a uniform shift of the optical signal. This, to our knowledge unique, feature facilitates the sensor calibration and suggests a constant hydrogenation enthalpy. In addition, it suggests an anomalously steep increase of the entropy with the hydrogen/metal ratio that cannot be explained on the basis of a classical solid solution model. The optical behaviour as a function of its hydrogen content makes hafnium well-suited for use as a hydrogen detection material. PMID:28580959

  9. Hafnium--an optical hydrogen sensor spanning six orders in pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boelsma, C.; Bannenberg, L. J.; van Setten, M. J.; Steinke, N.-J.; van Well, A. A.; Dam, B.

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen detection is essential for its implementation as an energy vector. So far, palladium is considered to be the most effective hydrogen sensing material. Here we show that palladium-capped hafnium thin films show a highly reproducible change in optical transmission in response to a hydrogen exposure ranging over six orders of magnitude in pressure. The optical signal is hysteresis-free within this range, which includes a transition between two structural phases. A temperature change results in a uniform shift of the optical signal. This, to our knowledge unique, feature facilitates the sensor calibration and suggests a constant hydrogenation enthalpy. In addition, it suggests an anomalously steep increase of the entropy with the hydrogen/metal ratio that cannot be explained on the basis of a classical solid solution model. The optical behaviour as a function of its hydrogen content makes hafnium well-suited for use as a hydrogen detection material.

  10. Localized surface plasmon resonance sensor for simultaneous kinetic determination of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Tashkhourian, Javad; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza; Khodaveisi, Javad; Dashti, Razieh

    2013-01-31

    A new sensor for simultaneous determination of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide using silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) as a chromogenic reagent is introduced. The silver nanoparticles have the catalytic ability for the decomposition of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide; then the decomposition of them induces the degradation of silver nanoparticles. Hence, a remarkable change in the localized surface plasmon resonance absorbance strength could be observed. Spectra-kinetic approach and artificial neural network was applied for the simultaneous determination of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Linear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of (8.20×10(-5) to 2.00×10(-3) mol L(-1)) for peroxyacetic acid and (2.00×10(-5) to 4.80×10(-3) mol L(-1)) for hydrogen peroxide. The analytical performance of this sensor has been evaluated for the detection of simultaneous determination of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in real samples.

  11. Nox4: A Hydrogen Peroxide-Generating Oxygen Sensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nox4 is an oddity among members of the Nox family of NADPH oxidases [seven isoenzymes that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) from molecular oxygen] in that it is constitutively active. All other Nox enzymes except for Nox4 require upstream activators, either calcium or organizer/activator subunits (p47phox, NOXO1/p67phox, and NOXA1). Nox4 may also be unusual as it reportedly releases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in contrast to Nox1–Nox3 and Nox5, which release superoxide, although this result is controversial in part because of possible membrane compartmentalization of superoxide, which may prevent detection. Our studies were undertaken (1) to identify the Nox4 ROS product using a membrane-free, partially purified preparation of Nox4 and (2) to test the hypothesis that Nox4 activity is acutely regulated not by activator proteins or calcium, but by cellular pO2, allowing it to function as an O2 sensor, the output of which is signaling H2O2. We find that approximately 90% of the electron flux through isolated Nox4 produces H2O2 and 10% forms superoxide. The kinetic mechanism of H2O2 formation is consistent with a mechanism involving binding of one oxygen molecule, which is then sequentially reduced by the heme in two one-electron reduction steps first to form a bound superoxide intermediate and then H2O2; kinetics are not consistent with a previously proposed internal superoxide dismutation mechanism involving two oxygen binding/reduction steps for each H2O2 formed. Critically, Nox4 has an unusually high Km for oxygen (∼18%), similar to the values of known oxygen-sensing enzymes, compared with a Km of 2–3% for Nox2, the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This allows Nox4 to generate H2O2 as a function of oxygen concentration throughout a physiological range of pO2 values and to respond rapidly to changes in pO2. PMID:25062272

  12. Surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensor based on metallic grating with high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaiqun; Lu, Yonghua; Chen, Junxue; Zheng, Rongsheng; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai

    2008-11-10

    High sensitivity is obtained at larger resonant incident angle if negative diffraction order of metallic grating is used to excite the surface plasmon. A highly sensitive grating-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is designed for the hydrogen detection. A thin palladium (Pd) film deposited on the grating surface is used as transducer. The influences of grating period and the thickness of Pd on the performance of sensor are investigated using rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) method. The sensitivity as well as the width of the SPR curves and reflective amplitude is considered simultaneously for designing the grating-based SPR hydrogen sensor, and a set of optimized structural parameters is presented. The performance of grating-based SPR sensor is also compared with that of conventional prism-based SPR sensor.

  13. Hydrogen gas detection by means of a fiber optic interferometer sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciak, E.; Opilski, Z.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a simple fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) sensor that is used to detection and measure concentration of hydrogen gas in the air. The operating principle of the sensor is discussed in this paper, and it was noticed that the wavelength positions of the FPI reflectance peaks change with the concentration of hydrogen gas. The sensor has been successfully used to monitor concentration of H{2} in the air below Lower Explosion Limit (LEL). The sensor utilizes a layered sensing structure. This structure includes gasochromic titanium dioxide (TiO{2}) sensing film. The optical H{2} gas sensor has a very short response time and a fast regeneration time at room temperature.

  14. Computational simulation of the effects of oxygen on the electronic states of hydrogenated 3C-porous SiC

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A computational study of the dependence of the electronic band structure and density of states on the chemical surface passivation of cubic porous silicon carbide (pSiC) was performed using ab initio density functional theory and the supercell method. The effects of the porosity and the surface chemistry composition on the energetic stability of pSiC were also investigated. The porous structures were modeled by removing atoms in the [001] direction to produce two different surface chemistries: one fully composed of silicon atoms and one composed of only carbon atoms. The changes in the electronic states of the porous structures as a function of the oxygen (O) content at the surface were studied. Specifically, the oxygen content was increased by replacing pairs of hydrogen (H) atoms on the pore surface with O atoms attached to the surface via either a double bond (X = O) or a bridge bond (X-O-X, X = Si or C). The calculations show that for the fully H-passivated surfaces, the forbidden energy band is larger for the C-rich phase than for the Si-rich phase. For the partially oxygenated Si-rich surfaces, the band gap behavior depends on the O bond type. The energy gap increases as the number of O atoms increases in the supercell if the O atoms are bridge-bonded, whereas the band gap energy does not exhibit a clear trend if O is double-bonded to the surface. In all cases, the gradual oxygenation decreases the band gap of the C-rich surface due to the presence of trap-like states. PMID:22913486

  15. Computational simulation of the effects of oxygen on the electronic states of hydrogenated 3C-porous SiC.

    PubMed

    Trejo, Alejandro; Calvino, Marbella; Ramos, Estrella; Cruz-Irisson, Miguel

    2012-08-22

    A computational study of the dependence of the electronic band structure and density of states on the chemical surface passivation of cubic porous silicon carbide (pSiC) was performed using ab initio density functional theory and the supercell method. The effects of the porosity and the surface chemistry composition on the energetic stability of pSiC were also investigated. The porous structures were modeled by removing atoms in the [001] direction to produce two different surface chemistries: one fully composed of silicon atoms and one composed of only carbon atoms. The changes in the electronic states of the porous structures as a function of the oxygen (O) content at the surface were studied. Specifically, the oxygen content was increased by replacing pairs of hydrogen (H) atoms on the pore surface with O atoms attached to the surface via either a double bond (X = O) or a bridge bond (X-O-X, X = Si or C). The calculations show that for the fully H-passivated surfaces, the forbidden energy band is larger for the C-rich phase than for the Si-rich phase. For the partially oxygenated Si-rich surfaces, the band gap behavior depends on the O bond type. The energy gap increases as the number of O atoms increases in the supercell if the O atoms are bridge-bonded, whereas the band gap energy does not exhibit a clear trend if O is double-bonded to the surface. In all cases, the gradual oxygenation decreases the band gap of the C-rich surface due to the presence of trap-like states.

  16. Computational simulation of the effects of oxygen on the electronic states of hydrogenated 3C-porous SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo, Alejandro; Calvino, Marbella; Ramos, Estrella; Cruz-Irisson, Miguel

    2012-08-01

    A computational study of the dependence of the electronic band structure and density of states on the chemical surface passivation of cubic porous silicon carbide (pSiC) was performed using ab initio density functional theory and the supercell method. The effects of the porosity and the surface chemistry composition on the energetic stability of pSiC were also investigated. The porous structures were modeled by removing atoms in the [001] direction to produce two different surface chemistries: one fully composed of silicon atoms and one composed of only carbon atoms. The changes in the electronic states of the porous structures as a function of the oxygen (O) content at the surface were studied. Specifically, the oxygen content was increased by replacing pairs of hydrogen (H) atoms on the pore surface with O atoms attached to the surface via either a double bond (X = O) or a bridge bond (X-O-X, X = Si or C). The calculations show that for the fully H-passivated surfaces, the forbidden energy band is larger for the C-rich phase than for the Si-rich phase. For the partially oxygenated Si-rich surfaces, the band gap behavior depends on the O bond type. The energy gap increases as the number of O atoms increases in the supercell if the O atoms are bridge-bonded, whereas the band gap energy does not exhibit a clear trend if O is double-bonded to the surface. In all cases, the gradual oxygenation decreases the band gap of the C-rich surface due to the presence of trap-like states.

  17. Fiber Optic Hydrogen Sensor Development: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-05-00158

    SciTech Connect

    Ringer, M.

    2010-07-01

    NREL and Nuclear Filter Technology collaborated to develop a prototype product for a hydrogen threshold sensor that was used to monitor hydrogen production in the transport of nuclear waste transport containers.

  18. Development of sensors and sensing technology for hydrogen fuel cell vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, Eric L; Sekhar, Praveen K; Mukundan, Rangchary; Williamson, Todd L; Barzon, Fernando H; Woo, Leta Y; Glass, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    One related area of hydrogen fuel cell vehicle (FCV) development that cannot be overlooked is the anticipated requirement for new sensors for both the monitoring and control of the fuel cell's systems and for those devices that will be required for safety. Present day automobiles have dozens of sensors on-board including those for IC engine management/control, sensors for state-of-health monitoring/control of emissions systems, sensors for control of active safety systems, sensors for triggering passive safety systems, and sensors for more mundane tasks such as fluids level monitoring to name the more obvious. The number of sensors continues to grow every few years as a result of safety mandates but also in response to consumer demands for new conveniences and safety features.

  19. Efficient room temperature hydrogen sensor based on UV-activated ZnO nano-network.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mohit; Kumar, Rahul; Rajamani, Saravanan; Ranwa, Sapana; Fanetti, Mattia; Valant, Matjaz; Kumar, Mahesh

    2017-09-08

    Room temperature hydrogen sensors were fabricated from Au embedded ZnO nano-networks using a 30 mW GaN ultraviolet LED. The Au-decorated ZnO nano-networks were deposited on a SiO2/Si substrate by a chemical vapour deposition process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum analysis revealed a hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO and presence of Au. The ZnO nanoparticles were interconnected, forming nano-network structures. Au nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on ZnO surfaces, as confirmed by FESEM imaging. Interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) were fabricated on the ZnO nano-networks using optical lithography. Sensor performances were measured with and without UV illumination, at room temperate, with concentrations of hydrogen varying from 5 ppm to 1%. The sensor response was found to be ∼21.5% under UV illumination and 0% without UV at room temperature for low hydrogen concentration of 5 ppm. The UV-photoactivated mode enhanced the adsorption of photo-induced O(-) and O(2-) ions, and the d-band electron transition from the Au nanoparticles to ZnO-which increased the chemisorbed reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. The sensor response was also measured at 150 °C (without UV illumination) and found to be ∼18% at 5 ppm. Energy efficient low cost hydrogen sensors can be designed and fabricated with the combination of GaN UV LEDs and ZnO nanostructures.

  20. Efficient room temperature hydrogen sensor based on UV-activated ZnO nano-network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohit; Kumar, Rahul; Rajamani, Saravanan; Ranwa, Sapana; Fanetti, Mattia; Valant, Matjaz; Kumar, Mahesh

    2017-09-01

    Room temperature hydrogen sensors were fabricated from Au embedded ZnO nano-networks using a 30 mW GaN ultraviolet LED. The Au-decorated ZnO nano-networks were deposited on a SiO2/Si substrate by a chemical vapour deposition process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum analysis revealed a hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO and presence of Au. The ZnO nanoparticles were interconnected, forming nano-network structures. Au nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on ZnO surfaces, as confirmed by FESEM imaging. Interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) were fabricated on the ZnO nano-networks using optical lithography. Sensor performances were measured with and without UV illumination, at room temperate, with concentrations of hydrogen varying from 5 ppm to 1%. The sensor response was found to be ˜21.5% under UV illumination and 0% without UV at room temperature for low hydrogen concentration of 5 ppm. The UV-photoactivated mode enhanced the adsorption of photo-induced O- and O2- ions, and the d-band electron transition from the Au nanoparticles to ZnO—which increased the chemisorbed reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. The sensor response was also measured at 150 °C (without UV illumination) and found to be ˜18% at 5 ppm. Energy efficient low cost hydrogen sensors can be designed and fabricated with the combination of GaN UV LEDs and ZnO nanostructures.

  1. Optic fiber hydrogen sensor based on high-low reflectivity Bragg gratings and WO3-Pd-Pt multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jixiang; Yang, Minghong; Li, Zhi; Wang, Gaopeng; Huang, Chujia; Qi, Chongjie; Dai, Yutang; Wen, Xiaoyan; Cheng, Cheng; Guo, Huiyong

    2015-09-01

    A novel optic fiber hydrogen sensor is proposed in this paper. Two Bragg gratings with different reflectivity were written in single mode fiber with phase mask method by 248 nm excimer laser. The end-face of singe mode fiber was deposited with WO3-Pd-Pt multilayer films as sensing element. The peak intensity of low reflectivity FBG is employed for hydrogen characterization, while that of high reflectivity FBG is used as reference. The experimental results show the hydrogen sensor still has good repeatability when the optic intensity in the fiber is only 1/3 of its initial value. The hydrogen sensor has great potential in measurement of hydrogen concentration.

  2. Experimental verification of theoretical analysis of Pd/porous-GaAs as a hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikfarjam, Alireza; Jamshidi Kalantari, Dara

    2008-10-01

    The Pd/porous GaAs Schottky sensor reveals high potential for hydrogen detection at room temperature (Salehi et al 2006 Sensors Actuators B 113 419-27). The Pd/porous GaAs Schottky sensor fabricated in this study exhibited a considerable increase in sensitivity three times that of the non-porous sensor submitted to 500 ppm hydrogen gas at room temperature. The theoretical analysis presented here proves that the sensitivity of the porous sample should be more than that in the non-porous sample and this higher sensitivity refers to more hydrogen adsorption at the interface of the contact. The increased sensitivity coefficient in the porous sensor is related to the morphology of the surface and is a function of two parameters: increase in surface area and density of cavities between pore walls (number of pores which is important in catalyzers). We believe that porosity, in addition to increased surface area and adsorption site, causes an additional increase in sensitivity. Moreover, the response time of the sensors was modelled for non-porous and porous samples exposed to hydrogen gas. As analytical predictions were experimentally verified, the porous sample exhibited a rise time comparable to the non-porous sample but in spite of a low rise time the recovery time of the porous sample is much larger (about four times) than that of the non-porous sample.

  3. Theoretical investigation of conductivity sensitivities of SiC-based bio-chemical acoustic wave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Li; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    The phase velocities, electromechanical coupling coefficients, conductivity sensitivities, insert losses, and minimum detectable masses of Rayleigh and Lamb waves sensors based on silicon carbide (SiC) substrates are theoretically studied. The results are compared with the performances of the sensors based on conventional silicon substrates. It is found that the sensors using SiC substrates have higher electromechanical coupling coefficients and conductivity sensitivities than the conventional silicon-based sensors in virtue of piezoelectricity of the SiC. Moreover, higher phase velocities in SiC substrates can reduce the insert losses and minimum detectable masses of the sensors. In this case, in the detection of the gas with the tiny mass as the hydrogen, in which the conductivity sensitivity is more important than the mass sensitivity, the sensor based on the SiC substrate has a higher sensitivity and exhibits the potential to detect the gas with the concentration below the ppm level. According to the results, the performances of the sensors based on the Rayleigh and Lamb waves using the SiC substrates can be optimized by properly selecting piezoelectric films, structural parameters, and operating wavelengths.

  4. A fast response hydrogen sensor with Pd metallic grating onto a fiber's end-face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Haitao; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Qiu-Ze; Cao, Jingxiao; Han, Dao-Fu; Hao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated an integrated hydrogen sensor with Pd metallic grating fabricated on a fiber end-face. The grating consists of three thin metal layers in stacks, Au, WO3 and Pd. The WO3 is used as a waveguide layer between the Pd and Au layer. The Pd layer is etched by using a focused ion beam (FIB) method, forming a Pd metallic grating with period of 450 nm. The sensor is experimentally exposed to hydrogen gas environment. Changing the concentration from 0% to 4% which is the low explosive limit (LEL), the resonant wavelength measured from the reflection experienced 28.10 nm spectral changes in the visible range. The results demonstrated that the sensor is sensitive for hydrogen detection and it has fast response and low temperature effect.

  5. Nanocomposite polymer structures for optical sensors of hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, A. A.; Mironenko, A. Yu.; Nazirov, A. E.; Leonov, A. A.; Voznesenskii, S. S.

    2017-08-01

    Composite coatings based on gold and silver nanoparticles reduced in situ in the film of chitosan polysaccharide are studied. In the presence of hydrogen sulfide, the maximum of plasmon resonance of the nanoparticles that is proportional to the analyte concentration decreases. The detection limits for hydrogen sulfide are 0.1 and 5 ppm for the chitosan/silver and chitosan/gold nanocomposites, respectively.

  6. A fiber-optic sensor for accurately monitoring biofilm growth in a hydrogen production photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nianbing; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Chen, Rong

    2014-04-15

    A new simple fiber-optic evanescent wave sensor was created to accurately monitor the growth and hydrogen production performance of biofilms. The proposed sensor consists of two probes (i.e., a sensor and reference probe), using the etched fibers with an appropriate surface roughness to improve its sensitivity. The sensor probe measures the biofilm growth and change of liquid-phase concentration inside the biofilm. The reference probe is coated with a hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene membrane to separate the liquids from photosynthetic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris CQK 01 and to measure the liquid concentration. We also developed a model to demonstrate the accuracy of the measurement. The biofilm measurement was calibrated using an Olympus microscope. A linear relationship was obtained for the biofilm thickness range from 0 to 120 μm with a synthetic medium under continuous supply to the bioreactor. The highest level of hydrogen production rate occurred at a thickness of 115 μm.

  7. Distributed fiber optic chemical sensor for hydrogen sulfide and chlorine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukamal, Harold; Cordero, Steven R.; Ruiz, David; Beshay, Manal; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    Fiber optic sensors having their entire length as the sensing elements for chlorine or hydrogen sulfide are reported here. The chlorine fiber consists of a silica core and a chlorine-sensitive cladding, and the hydrogen sulfide fiber has a hydrogen sulfide sensitive cladding. Upon exposure to the corresponding challenge gas, the cladding very rapidly changes color resulting in attenuation of the light throughput of the fiber. A one-meter portion of the chlorine sensor fiber responds to 10 ppm chlorine in 20 seconds and to 1 ppm in several minutes. The attenuation after 10 minutes of exposure is very high, and is dependant on both chlorine concentration and fiber length. A ten-meter portion of the hydrogen sulfide sensor fiber responds to 100 ppm hydrogen sulfide in 30 seconds and to 10 ppm in 1 minute. The high sensitivity suggests that the propagating modes of the light interact strongly with the cladding, and that these interactions are massively increased (Beers Law) due to the extended sensor length. This approach will supersede the current method of having a collection of point-detectors to cover large areas.

  8. Study of a solid hydrogen cooler for spacecraft instruments and sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, A.

    1980-01-01

    The results of tests and studies to investigate the utilization of solid hydrogen for cooling of spacecraft instruments and sensors are presented. The results are presented in two sections; the first describing the tests in which an existing single stage solid cooler was filled and tested with solid hydrogen and the second which describes the analysis and design of a catalytic converter which will be tested in the vent line of the cooler.

  9. Hydrogen-loaded fiber Bragg grating for high-temperature sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bowei; Kahrizi, Mojtaba

    2004-11-01

    Bragg gratings have widespread applications in the rapidly growing field of optical sensors. Although fiber Bragg gratings are often referring to permanent refractive index structures, exposure in increased temperature usually results the decay of the refractive index modulation. Basically, the stability of the grating competence at high temperature is an important criterion for high temperature sensor applications. This report is a part on going research to develop high temperature optical sensors. We report our design and analyze of a hydrogen loaded fiber Bragg grating temperature sensor range from room temperature to around 1000°C. A basic setup has been built in our lab to examine the performance of the point temperature sensor based on the hydrogen loaded fiber Bragg grating. Until now, a grating has been shown to stabilize at temperatures in excess of 700°C and to survive at temperatures in excess of 930°C. The tested operation gratings around 700°C retain up to 80% reflectivity after one and a half hours. The thermal treatment of the tested hydrogen loaded fiber Bragg gratings is demonstrated capable to enhance effectively the grating's thermal stability. Our experimental results provide a better understanding of thermal response to the hydrogen loaded fiber Bragg gratings and their decay behavior at elevated temperatures.

  10. Design and optimization of the optical fiber surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensor based on wavelength modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingang; Tang, Yike; Zhou, Chuande; Liao, Bin

    2013-07-01

    An optimal design of an optical fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on wavelength modulation for hydrogen (H2) concentration detection is presented in this paper. The proposed sensor consists of a multimode fiber with a sensing region. The transfer matrix method for multilayer model is applied to calculate the normalized output power. Simulation results show that an optical fiber SPR hydrogen sensor based on wavelength modulation using platinum/tungsten oxide (Pt/WO3) composite films as sensitive materials has high sensitivity and good resolution, and the modulation layer with appropriate thickness and suitable material type plays an assistant role in strengthening SPR. The thickness of each layer is optimized. For the optimized structure (the 35 nm silver (Ag)/100 nm silica (SiO2)/180 nm WO3/3 nm Pt multilayer), the resonant wavelength theoretically shifts 17.4 nm at a concentration of 2% hydrogen in argon (Ar). Compared with other hydrogen sensors, the designed sensor can exhibit better performance.

  11. Multi-point hydrogen detection system using hetero-core structured optical fiber hydrogen tip sensor based on surface plasmon resonance and pseudorandom noise code correlation reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoki, Ai; Nishiyama, Michiko; Igawa, Hirotaka; Seki, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the multi-point hydrogen detection system using the hetero-core optical fiber hydrogen tip sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and Pseudorandom Noise code correlation reflectometry (PNCR) has been proposed. This method makes use of the correlation between a launched pseudorandom noise code signal and its reflection, can obtain a high signal to noise ration. We demonstrated the 4 sensors characteristics to 4% hydrogen. It was observed from experimental results that all sensors induced a response time of 15 s for 4% hydrogen for the 25-nm Au / 60-nm Ta2O5 / 5-nm Pd multi-layers film. In addition, all sensors were detected the hydrogen concentration with sufficient sensitivities.

  12. Optical fiber hydrogen sensor based on polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Yang, Fuling; Wang, Huan; Diao, Xungang; Liu, Qirong

    2014-05-01

    An intrinsic optical fiber hydrogen sensor based on polarization-maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF) Sagnac interferometer was proposed. The facing target sputtering technique with special Pd/Ag plate target structure was developed to deposit Pd/Ag composite film on PM-PCF. The characteristic of Pd/Ag film was measured and analyzed. An experimental setup for hydrogen sensing was built. The wavelength at different hydrogen concentration and the temperature interference were tested. The results showed the sensitivity was higher at low concentration range and good repeatability was obtained within measuring range of 4%. And the temperature affect was weak with special PM-PCF.

  13. Hydrogen Gas Sensors Fabricated on Atomically Flat 4H-SiC Webbed Cantilevers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Trunek, Andrew J.; Evans, Laura J.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Androjna, Drago

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on initial results from the first device tested of a "second generation" Pt-SiC Schottky diode hydrogen gas sensor that: 1) resides on the top of atomically flat 4H-SiC webbed cantilevers, 2) has integrated heater resistor, and 3) is bonded and packaged. With proper selection of heater resistor and sensor diode biases, rapid detection of H2 down to concentrations of 20 ppm was achieved. A stable sensor current gain of 125 +/- 11 standard deviation was demonstrated during 250 hours of cyclic test exposures to 0.5% H2 and N2/air.

  14. Germanium nano-cluster films as humidity and hydrogen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, D. M. A.; Brown, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    Films of germanium nano-clusters of 30 nm diameter were fabricated in a high-vacuum deposition apparatus utilizing an inert-gas-aggregation source. The germanium films readily formed an oxide layer in high vacuum along with a corresponding resistance increase, a process that accelerated when films were exposed to dry air. A decrease in resistance was observed when films were exposed to ambient air, and this was attributed to water vapour adsorbing on the surface. The effects of film-thickness were investigated. A reversible change in resistance of 2 orders of magnitude was observed for 99% humidity, with a response time of tens of minutes. It is proposed that the resistance-decrease occurs because water vapour creates surface defects which act as donors causing the electron concentration in the n-type film to increase. The films were also sensitive to hydrogen concentrations above 1% in dry air, with up to a factor of 25 decrease in resistance observed for 5% hydrogen concentration at room temperature. Unexpectedly, the sensitivity to hydrogen was only observed at temperatures below 100 °C, suggesting that surface moisture is necessary for films to show sensitivity to hydrogen.

  15. Thermochemical hydrogen sensor based on Pt-coated nanofiber catalyst deposited on pyramidally textured thermoelectric film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seil; Song, Yoseb; Lee, Young-In; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen gas-sensing performance has been systemically investigated of a new type of thermochemical hydrogen (TCH) sensor, composed of pyramidally textured thermoelectric (TE) film and catalytic Pt-coated nanofibers (NFs) deposited over the TE film. The TE film was composed of stoichiometric Bi2Te3, synthesized by means of cost-effective electrochemical deposition onto a textured silicon wafer. The resulting pyramidally textured TE film played a critical role in maximizing hydrogen gas flow around the overlying Pt NFs, which were synthesized by means of electrospinning followed by sputtering and acted as a heating catalyst. The optimal temperature increase of the Pt NFs was determined by means of optimizations of the electrospinning and sputtering durations. The output voltage signal of the optimized TCH sensor based on Pt NFs was 17.5 times higher than that of a Pt thin film coated directly onto the pyramidal TE material by using the same sputtering duration, under the fixed conditions of 3 vol% H2 in air at room temperature. This observation can be explained by the increased surface area of (111) planes accessible on the Pt-coated NFs. The best response time and recovery time observed for the optimized TCH sensor based on Pt-coated NFs were respectively 17 and 2 s under the same conditions. We believe that this type of TCH sensor can be widely used for supersensitive hydrogen gas detection by employing small-size Pt NFs and various chalcogenide thin films with high thermoelectric performance.

  16. Demonstration of a Prototype Hydrogen Sensor and Electronics Package - Progress Report 2

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Amanda S.; Brosha, Eric

    2016-06-14

    This is the second progress report on the demonstration of a prototype hydrogen sensor and electronics package. It goes into detail about the five tasks, four of which are already completed as of August 2016, with the final to be completed by January 26, 2017. Then the budget is detailed along with the planned work for May 27, 2016 to July 27, 2016.

  17. Pd/Ag coated fiber Bragg grating sensor for hydrogen monitoring in power transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, G. M.; Jiang, J.; Li, C. R.; Song, H. T.; Luo, Y. T.; Wang, H. B.

    2015-04-01

    Compared with conventional DGA (dissolved gas analysis) method for on-line monitoring of power transformers, FBG (fiber Bragg grating) hydrogen sensor represents marked advantages over immunity to electromagnetic field, time-saving, and convenience to defect location. Thus, a novel FBG hydrogen sensor based on Pd/Ag (Palladium/Silver) along with polyimide composite film to measure dissolved hydrogen concentration in large power transformers is proposed in this article. With the help of Pd/Ag composite coating, the enhanced performance on mechanical strength and sensitivity is demonstrated, moreover, the response time and sensitivity influenced by oil temperature are solved by correction lines. Sensitivity measurement and temperature calibration of the specific hydrogen sensor have been done respectively in the lab. And experiment results show a high sensitivity of 0.055 pm/(μl/l) with instant response time about 0.4 h under the typical operating temperature of power transformers, which proves a potential utilization inside power transformers to monitor the health status by detecting the dissolved hydrogen concentration.

  18. Development of a Zirconia-Based Electrochemical Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen in Air

    SciTech Connect

    Brosha, E; Mukundan, R; Lujan, R; Garzon, F; Woo, L; Worsley, M; Glass, B

    2008-07-16

    Mixed potential sensors utilizing a machined, dense indium-tin oxide working electrode (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:SnO{sub 2}; 90%:10%), a Pt wire counter electrode, and porous YSZ electrolyte were prepared using ceramic tape casting methods. The response of these devices to hydrogen concentrations up to 2% in air were studied from 600 to 740 C. The sensor response exhibited a reversible behavior and a fast response time with sensitivity increasing with decreasing temperature. GC analysis confirmed significant heterogeneous oxidation of the H{sub 2} on heated furnace tube wall surfaces thus driving sensor response at H{sub 2} concentrations greater than a few hundred ppm. The transition to a cold wall, miniature platform heater significantly reduced hydrogen oxidation although some flow rate dependence remains.

  19. Low-power, fast, selective nanoparticle-based hydrogen sulfide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Allen; Mickelson, William; Zettl, A.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a small, low-cost, low-power, highly sensitive, and selective nanomaterials-based gas sensor. A network of tungsten oxide nanoparticles is heated by an on-chip microhotplate while the conductance of the network is monitored. The device can be heated with short pulses, thereby drastically lowering the power consumption, without diminishing the sensor response. The sensor shows high sensitivity to hydrogen sulfide and does not have significant cross sensitivities to hydrogen, water, or methane, gases likely to be present in operation. A sensing mechanism is proposed, and its effect on electronic properties is discussed. The authors thank Eni S.p.A, the National Science Foundation-supported Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems under Grant No. EEC-083819 and U.S. Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231

  20. Superconducting characteristics of short MgB2 wires of long level sensor for liquid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.; Inoue, Y.; Maekawa, K.; Matsuno, Y.; Fujikawa, S.; Kumakura, H.

    2015-12-01

    To establish the worldwide storage and marine transport of hydrogen, it is important to develop a high-precision and long level sensor, such as a superconducting magnesium diboride (MgB2) level sensor for large liquid hydrogen (LH2) tanks on board ships. Three 1.7- m-long MgB2 wires were fabricated by an in situ method, and the superconducting characteristics of twenty-four 20-mm-long MgB2 wires on the 1.7-m-long wires were studied. In addition, the static level-detecting characteristics of five 500-mm-long MgB2 level sensors were evaluated under atmospheric pressure.

  1. Research on High Sensitive D-Shaped FBG Hydrogen Sensors in Power Transformer Oil

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ying-Ting; Wang, Hong-Bin; Ma, Guo-Ming; Song, Hong-Tu; Li, Chengrong; Jiang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved hydrogen is a symbol gas decomposed by power transformer oil for electrical faults such as overheat or partial discharges. A novel D-shaped fiber Bragg grating (D-FBG) sensor is herein proposed and was fabricated with magnetron sputtering to measure the dissolved hydrogen concentration in power transformer oil in this paper. Different from the RI (refractive index)-based effect, D-FBG in this case is sensitive to curvature caused by stress from sensing coating, leading to Bragg wavelength shifts accordingly. The relationship between the D-FBG wavelength shift and dissolved hydrogen concentration in oil was measured experimentally in the laboratory. The detected sensitivity could be as high as 1.96 μL/L at every 1-pm wavelength shift. The results proved that a simple, polished FBG-based hydrogen sensor provides a linear measuring characteristic in the range of low hydrogen concentrations in transformer oil. Moreover, the stable hydrogen sensing performance was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. PMID:27782034

  2. Research on High Sensitive D-Shaped FBG Hydrogen Sensors in Power Transformer Oil.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ying-Ting; Wang, Hong-Bin; Ma, Guo-Ming; Song, Hong-Tu; Li, Chengrong; Jiang, Jun

    2016-10-04

    Dissolved hydrogen is a symbol gas decomposed by power transformer oil for electrical faults such as overheat or partial discharges. A novel D-shaped fiber Bragg grating (D-FBG) sensor is herein proposed and was fabricated with magnetron sputtering to measure the dissolved hydrogen concentration in power transformer oil in this paper. Different from the RI (refractive index)-based effect, D-FBG in this case is sensitive to curvature caused by stress from sensing coating, leading to Bragg wavelength shifts accordingly. The relationship between the D-FBG wavelength shift and dissolved hydrogen concentration in oil was measured experimentally in the laboratory. The detected sensitivity could be as high as 1.96 μL/L at every 1-pm wavelength shift. The results proved that a simple, polished FBG-based hydrogen sensor provides a linear measuring characteristic in the range of low hydrogen concentrations in transformer oil. Moreover, the stable hydrogen sensing performance was investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis.

  3. Modeling analysis and experimental study on the optical fiber hydrogen sensor based on Pd-Y alloy thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Chen, You-ping; Song, Han; Zhang, Gang

    2012-07-01

    The failure of hydrogen sensor with palladium film is primarily the phase transition of PdH. To restrain this, a novel palladium and yttrium (Pd-Y) alloy film was prepared by the co-sputtering method and was used to design an optical fiber hydrogen sensor. A sensor model was established based on the optical film matrix method. The relationship between the reflectivity of the film and the hydrogen concentration was discussed. The experimental results show that this sensor is superior to the traditional sensor with Pd in shortening the response and recovery time, restraining drift, and promoting repeatability. The Pd-Y alloy film is an extremely promising material for detecting hydrogen.

  4. A Spectrometric Method for Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration Measurement with a Reusable and Cost-Efficient Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Cheng-Chih; Lo, Yuan-Rong; Lin, Yu-Chian; Shi, Yi-Cen; Li, Pang-Lung

    2015-01-01

    In this study we developed a low cost sensor for measuring the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in liquids utilizing a spectrometric method. The sensor was tested using various concentrations of a peroxidase enzyme immobilized on a glass substrate. H2O2 can be catalyzed by peroxidase and converted into water and oxygen. The reagent 4-amino-phenazone takes up oxygen together with phenol to form a colored product that has absorption peaks at 510 nm and 450 nm. The transmission intensity is strongly related to the hydrogen peroxide concentration, so can be used for quantitative analysis. The measurement range for hydrogen peroxide is from 5 × 10−5% to 1 × 10−3% (0.5 ppm to 10 ppm) and the results show high linearity. This device can achieve a sensitivity and resolution of 41,400 (photon count/%) and 3.49 × 10−5% (0.35 ppm), respectively. The response time of the sensor is less than 3 min and the sensor can be reused for 10 applications with similar performance. PMID:26473862

  5. Development of Fe-based superconducting wires for liquid-hydrogen level sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, S.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Mawatari, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Nakano, A.; Yoshida, Y.

    2017-07-01

    We developed liquid-hydrogen (LH2) level sensors with Ba(Fe1-x Co x )2As2 superconducting wires (Co-Ba122 wires) as their detection elements. We fabricated Co-Ba122 wires with different Co concentrations x by using the powder-in-tube method. The superconducting transition temperatures of the wires were successfully controlled in the range of 20-25 K by changing x from 0.06 to 0.10. The resistance-temperature curves of the wires exhibited sharp superconducting transitions with widths of 0.5-1.0 K. In addition, we performed an operation test of the Co-Ba122 level sensors with LH2. Close correspondence between the output resistance and the actual LH2 level was observed for a sensor equipped with x = 0.09 wire, demonstrating that this sensor can accurately measure LH2 levels.

  6. Low-Power, Fast, Selective Nanoparticle-based Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Allen; Mickelson, William; Zettl, A.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate a small, fast, low-cost, low-power, highly sensitive and selective nanomaterials-based gas sensor that can operate under extreme temperature and humidity conditions. Gas sensors in industrial use today, on the other hand, suffer from high cost, high power consumption, lack of portability and/or inoperability in very dry or hot regions. The sensing substrate is a network of nanoparticles whose conductance is monitored. The sensor shows high sensitivity to hydrogen sulfide (H2S), but it does not have significant cross sensitivities to H2O or CH4, two gases likely to be seen in industrial operation, and is not sensitive to the high temperatures also likely to be seen. Such a sensor has the potential to enable significant advances in the fields of personal, broad area, and mobile monitoring of gases, such as environmental pollutants or toxic or flammable gases.

  7. Step-edge-induced resistance anisotropy in quasi-free-standing bilayer chemical vapor deposition graphene on SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Ciuk, Tymoteusz; Cakmakyapan, Semih; Ozbay, Ekmel; Caban, Piotr; Grodecki, Kacper; Pasternak, Iwona; Strupinski, Wlodek; Krajewska, Aleksandra; Szmidt, Jan

    2014-09-28

    The transport properties of quasi-free-standing (QFS) bilayer graphene on SiC depend on a range of scattering mechanisms. Most of them are isotropic in nature. However, the SiC substrate morphology marked by a distinctive pattern of the terraces gives rise to an anisotropy in graphene's sheet resistance, which may be considered an additional scattering mechanism. At a technological level, the growth-preceding in situ etching of the SiC surface promotes step bunching which results in macro steps ~10 nm in height. In this report, we study the qualitative and quantitative effects of SiC steps edges on the resistance of epitaxial graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. We experimentally determine the value of step edge resistivity in hydrogen-intercalated QFS-bilayer graphene to be ~190 Ωμm for step height hS = 10 nm and provide proof that it cannot originate from mechanical deformation of graphene but is likely to arise from lowered carrier concentration in the step area. Our results are confronted with the previously reported values of the step edge resistivity in monolayer graphene over SiC atomic steps. In our analysis, we focus on large-scale, statistical properties to foster the scalable technology of industrial graphene for electronics and sensor applications.

  8. Hydrogen in the Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, M. S.; Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallén, A.; Svensson, B. G.; Achtziger, N.; Unéus, L.; Lloyd Spetz, A.; Forsberg, U.

    In this paper we give a review of our recent results related to the incorporation of hydrogen (H) in silicon carbide (SiC) and its interaction with acceptor doping atoms and implantation induced defects. Hydrogen is an abundant impurity in the growth of epitaxial SiC since it is present in the precursor gases and since H2 is used as the carrier gas. High concentrations of hydrogen are indeed incorporated into highly doped p-type epi-layers and it is shown that the main source is the carrier gas. Furthermore, it is revealed that the entire substrate becomes homogeneously filled with hydrogen during growth and that this hydrogen is more thermally stable than that in the epi-layer. Incorporation of hydrogen from an H2 ambient, at temperatures considerably lower than those used for epitaxy, is also demonstrated in p-type samples coated with a catalytic metal film. This effect is most likely the cause for the increased series resistance observed in p-type SiC Schottky sensor devices using a catalytic metal gate after annealing at 600 °C in a H2 containing ambient. Hydrogen is found to passivate the acceptors Al and B by forming electrically neutral H-acceptor complexes. Unlike in Si and GaAs, the two H-acceptor complexes in SiC exhibit very different dissociation energies, suggesting that the atomic configurations of the complexes are significantly different. The migration of mobile hydrogen in the presence of externally applied, or internal built-in, electric fields further reveals that hydrogen is present as H+ in p-type SiC. Finally, the redistribution and subsequent out-diffusion of low energy implanted 1H and 2H is investigated. Two annealing phases for the redistribution are observed, and the activation energies for the processes are extracted.

  9. Development of calcium zirconate-based hydrogen sensors with oxide reference electrodes for molten aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Vivek

    Hydrogen is a major cause of gas porosity in aluminum and is frequently removed from the melt prior to casting. The degassing process can be better controlled if the hydrogen content in the melt is known. Thus, gas sensors which can make continuous in situ measurements in molten aluminum are needed. Current online hydrogen sensing systems are complex designs which are prohibitively expensive. Solid electrolyte based potentiometric sensors have been developed as an attractive alternate. These sensors have traditionally used a gas phase as the reference electrode. The present design has a condensed-phase reference electrode to avoid the need for transport of the reference gas into and out of the melt. The use of an oxide rather than a hydride phase reference is expected to considerably lower device cost and improve shelf life and reliability. The sensor element consists of a solid electrolyte tube based on 10 mol% Indoped CaZrO3, which was synthesized using both solid oxide and oxalate co-precipitation techniques. Precursor oxalate powders prepared using polymeric surfactants (PEG) were characterized using SEM, XRD, FTIR and particle size analysis. PEG was found to reduce particle size and also influence the process of perovskite formation. The oxalate co-precipitation technique enabled powder synthesis at reduced processing time and temperature. Closed-one-end tubes were slip cast and densified for use as solid electrolytes. Impedance spectroscopy and D.C. resistance measurements were made at temperatures between 650 and 900°C. Undoped CaZrO3 was found to be a p-type conductor in air. Indoped CaZrO3 acted as a proton conductor in air and argon+H2O, whereas the material was found to be a p-type conductor in pure argon. While bulk conduction was found to be homogenous with activation energies matching those from D.C. measurements, conduction across the grain boundary was found to be heterogeneous. Potentiometric sensors using In-doped CaZrO3 as the electrolyte, and

  10. Hydrogen Sensor Based on Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Electrolyte and Tin-Doped Indium Oxide Sensing Electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, L P; Glass, R S

    2004-03-26

    A solid state electrochemical sensor has been developed for hydrogen leak detection in ambient air. The sensor uses an yttria-stabilized electrolyte with a tin-doped indium oxide sensing electrode and a Pt reference electrode. Excellent sensitivity, and response time of one second or less, are reported for hydrogen gas over the concentration range of 0.03 to 5.5% in air. Cross-sensitivity to relative humidity and to CO{sub 2} are shown to be low. The response to methane, a potentially significant source of interference for such a sensor, is significantly less than that for hydrogen. The sensor shows good reproducibility and was unaffected by thermal cycling over the course of this investigation. The effects of sensing electrode thickness and thermal aging are also reported, and the sensing mechanism is discussed. The sensor is intended for use in vehicles powered by hydrogen fuel cells and hydrogen internal combustion engines. Those vehicles will use and/or store significant quantities of hydrogen, and will require safety sensor for monitoring potential hydrogen leakage in order to ensure passenger safety.

  11. Development of hydrogen sensors based on fiber Bragg grating with a palladium foil for online dissolved gas analysis in transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisser, Maximilian; Badcock, Rodney A.; Teal, Paul D.; Swanson, Adam; Hunze, Arvid

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen evolution, identified by dissolved gas analysis (DGA), is commonly used for fault detection in oil immersed electrical power equipment. Palladium (Pd) is often used as a sensing material due to its high hydrogen absorption capacity and related change in physical properties. Hydrogen is absorbed by Pd causing an expansion of the lattice. The solubility, and therefore lattice expansion, increases with increasing partial pressure of hydrogen and decreasing temperature. As long as a phase change is avoided the expansion is reversible and can be utilized to transfer strain into a sensing element. Fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) are a well-established optical fiber sensor (OFS), mainly used for temperature and strain sensing. A safe, inexpensive, reliable and precise hydrogen sensor can be constructed using an FBG strain sensor to transduce the volumetric expansion of Pd due to hydrogen absorption. This paper reports on the development, and evaluation, of an FBG gas sensing OFS and long term measurements of dissolved hydrogen in transformer mineral oil. We investigate the effects of Pd foil cross-section and strain transfer between foil and fiber on the sensitivity of the OFS. Two types of Pd metal sensors were manufactured using modified Pd foil with 20 and 100 μm thickness. The sensors were tested in transformer oil at 90°C and a hydrogen concentration range from 20- 3200 ppm.

  12. Hydrogen sensor based on Sm-doped SnO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Gurpreet; Hastir, Anita; Singh, Ravi Chand

    2016-05-23

    In this paper the effect of samarium doping on the structural and hydrogen gas sensing properties of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles has been reported. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results revealed tetragonal rutile structure of both undoped and Sm-doped SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. It has been observed that doping with samarium led to reduction in crystallite size of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles which was confirmed from XRD analysis. Shifting and broadening of Raman peaks in case of doped nanoparticles has been explained by well-known phonon confinement model. The optimum operable temperature of both the sensors was found to 400 °C and the sensor response towards hydrogen gas has been improved after doping with samarium which was attributed to increase in sensing sites for the gas adsorption.

  13. Development of a Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Double Saw Resonator System at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Yunusa, Zainab; Hamidon, Mohd Nizar; Ismail, Alyani; Isa, Maryam Mohd; Yaacob, Mohd Hanif; Rahmanian, Saeed; Ibrahim, Siti Azlida; Shabaneh, Arafat A.A

    2015-01-01

    A double SAW resonator system was developed as a novel method for gas sensing applications. The proposed system was investigated for hydrogen sensing. Commercial Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) resonators with resonance frequencies of 433.92 MHz and 433.42 MHz were employed in the double SAW resonator system configuration. The advantages of using this configuration include its ability for remote measurements, and insensitivity to vibrations and other external disturbances. The sensitive layer is composed of functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes and polyaniline nanofibers which were deposited on pre-patterned platinum metal electrodes fabricated on a piezoelectric substrate. This was mounted into the DSAWR circuit and connected in parallel. The sensor response was measured as the difference between the resonance frequencies of the SAW resonators, which is a measure of the gas concentration. The sensor showed good response towards hydrogen with a minimum detection limit of 1%. PMID:25730480

  14. Development of a Helium/Carbon Dioxide/Hydrogen Sensor System for SCUBA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-16

    cover- ed with a Teflon membrane. Between the glass surface and the membrane exists a thin film of dilute sodium bicarbonate solution. After diffusing...thin sheets of hydrophobic, micro-porous polypropylene material. The overall thickness of the sensor is less than 0.4 cm. After initial equilibration...layers are: A) Hydrogen Diffusion Membrane Material: Polyimide film , 0.0008 cm thick Source: E.I. duPont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware 45 R

  15. Investigation of a para-ortho hydrogen reactor for application to spacecraft sensor cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nast, T. C.

    1983-01-01

    The utilization of solid hydrogen in space for sensor and instrument cooling is a very efficient technique for long term cooling or for cooling at high heat rates. The solid hydrogen can provide temperatures as low as 7 to 8 K to instruments. Vapor cooling is utilized to reduce parasitic heat inputs to the 7 to 8 K stage and is effective in providing intermediate cooling for instrument components operating at higher temperatures. The use of solid hydrogen in place of helium may lead to weight reductions as large as a factor of ten and an attendent reduction in system volume. The results of an investigation of a catalytic reactor for use with a solid hydrogen cooling system is presented. Trade studies were performed on several configurations of reactor to meet the requirements of high reactor efficiency with low pressure drop. Results for the selected reactor design are presented for both liquid hydrogen systems operating at near atmospheric pressure and the solid hydrogen cooler operating as low as 1 torr.

  16. Perovskite-type oxide thin film integrated fiber optic sensor for high-temperature hydrogen measurement.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiling; Remmel, Kurtis; Lan, Xinwei; Deng, Jiangdong; Xiao, Hai; Dong, Junhang

    2009-09-15

    Small size fiber optic devices integrated with chemically sensitive photonic materials are emerging as a new class of high-performance optical chemical sensor that have the potential to meet many analytical challenges in future clean energy systems and environmental management. Here, we report the integration of a proton conducting perovskite oxide thin film with a long-period fiber grating (LPFG) device for high-temperature in situ measurement of bulk hydrogen in fossil- and biomass-derived syngas. The perovskite-type Sr(Ce(0.8)Zr(0.1))Y(0.1)O(2.95) (SCZY) nanocrystalline thin film is coated on the 125 microm diameter LPFG by a facile polymeric precursor route. This fiber optic sensor (FOS) operates by monitoring the LPFG resonant wavelength (lambda(R)), which is a function of the refractive index of the perovskite oxide overcoat. At high temperature, the types and population of the ionic and electronic defects in the SCZY structure depend on the surrounding hydrogen partial pressure. Thus, varying the H(2) concentration changes the SCZY film refractive index and light absorbing characteristics that in turn shifts the lambda(R) of the LPFG. The SCZY-coated LPFG sensor has been demonstrated for bulk hydrogen measurement at 500 degrees C for its sensitivity, stability/reversibility, and H(2)-selectivity over other relevant small gases including CO, CH(4), CO(2), H(2)O, and H(2)S, etc.

  17. High loading Pt nanoparticles on functionalization of carbon nanotubes for fabricating nonenzyme hydrogen peroxide sensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xiuhui; Wang, Weiwei; Li, Lin; Lu, Xiaoquan

    2014-09-15

    A very efficient, simple approach was developed to fabricate a high Pt nanoparticles-loading multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) amperometric sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) determination. In this strategy, MWCNTs were first functionalized with an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS); then the Pt nanoparticles (NPs) were loaded on MWCNTs-SDS by electrodepositing. The large amounts of Pt nanoparticles could be well deposited on the surface of the MWCNTs-SDS modified electrode, as revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, the PtNPs/MWCNTs-SDS composite was also characterized by electrochemical methods including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results demonstrated that the constructed electrode exhibited good catalytic activity toward the hydrogen peroxide, and obtained a wide linear range from 5.8×10(-9) to 1.1×10(-3) M with a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.9×10(-9) M, which was superior to that obtained with other H2O2 electrochemical sensors reported previously. Moreover, it can also be applied to real samples analysis. The excellent performance of hydrogen peroxide sensor was ascribed to the MWCNTs-SDS composites being used as effective load matrix for the deposition of PtNPs and the synergistic amplification effect of the two kinds of nanomaterials-PtNPs and MWCNTs.

  18. The study of hydrogen peroxide level under cisplatin action using genetically encoded sensor hyper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, A. S.; Orlova, A. G.; Maslennikova, A. V.; Brilkina, A. A.; Balalaeva, I. V.; Antonova, N. O.; Mishina, N. M.; Shakhova, N. M.; Belousov, V. V.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the work was to study the participation of hydrogen peroxide in reaction of cervical cancer cell line HeLa Kyoto on cisplatin action. Determination of hydrogen peroxide level was performed using genetically encoded fluorescent sensor HyPer2. The dependence of cell viability on cisplatin concentration was determined using MTT assay. Mechanisms of cell death as well as HyPer2 reaction was revealed by flow cytometry after 6-hours of incubation with cisplatin in different concentrations. Cisplatin used in low concentrations had no effect on hydrogen peroxide level in HeLa Kyoto cells. Increase of HyPer2 fluorescence was detected only after exposure with cisplatin in high concentration. The reaction was not the consequence of cell death.

  19. Miniaturized Metal (Metal Alloy)/PdO(x)/SiC Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO(x)). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600 C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sided sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  20. Miniaturized metal (metal alloy)/ PdO.sub.x/SiC hydrogen and hydrocarbon gas sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO.sub.x). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600.degree. C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sized sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  1. Miniaturized metal (metal alloy)/ PdO.sub.x/SiC hydrogen and hydrocarbon gas sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor); Xu, Jennifer C. (Inventor); Lukco, Dorothy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Schottky diode hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor and the method of making same is disclosed and claimed. The sensor comprises a catalytic metal layer, such as palladium, a silicon carbide substrate layer and a thin barrier layer in between the catalytic and substrate layers made of palladium oxide (PdO.sub.x ). This highly stable device provides sensitive gas detection at temperatures ranging from at least 450 to 600.degree. C. The barrier layer prevents reactions between the catalytic metal layer and the substrate layer. Conventional semiconductor fabrication techniques are used to fabricate the small-sized sensors. The use of a thicker palladium oxide barrier layer for other semiconductor structures such as a capacitor and transistor structures is also disclosed.

  2. COMPACT QEPAS SENSOR FOR TRACE METHANE AND AMMONIA DETECTION IN IMPURE HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J; Ferguson, B; Peters, B; Mcwhorter, S

    2011-11-02

    A compact two-gas sensor based on quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) was developed for trace methane and ammonia quantification in impure hydrogen. The sensor is equipped with a micro-resonator to confine the sound wave and enhance QEPAS signal. The normalized noise-equivalent absorption coefficients (1{sigma}) of 2.45 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -1}W/{radical}Hz and 9.1 x 10{sup -9} cm{sup -1}W/{radical}Hz for CH{sub 4} detection at 200 Torr and NH{sub 3} detection at 50 Torr were demonstrated with the QEPAS sensor configuration, respectively. The influence of water vapor on the CH{sub 4} channel was also investigated.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF SiC DEVICES FOR DIAGNOSTICS AND CONTROL OF COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN ENERGY PLANT ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby N. Ghosh; Peter Tobias

    2003-12-01

    A sensor based on the wide bandgap semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC), has been developed for the detection of combustion products in power plant environments. The sensor is a catalytic gate field effect device that can detect hydrogen containing species in chemically reactive, high temperature environments. The response of these metal/insulator/SiC (MISiC) devices to reducing gases has been assumed to be due to the reduction in the metal work function at the metal/oxide interface that shifts the capacitance to lower voltages. From in-situ capacitance-voltage measurements taken under sensor operating conditions we have discovered that two independent mechanisms are responsible for the sensor response to hydrogen and oxygen. We present a model of the device response based on the chemically induced shift of the metal/semiconductor barrier height as well as the passivation and creation of charged states at the SiO{sub 2}/SiC interface. The latter mechanism is much slower than the barrier height shift. Preliminary photoemission experiments have been performed to independently monitor the contribution of the two phenomena. We discuss in detail the effect of these results on sensor design and the choice of operating point for high temperature operation.

  4. "Un-annealed and Annealed Pd Ultra-Thin Film on SiC Characterized by Scanning Probe Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, W. J.; Shi, D. T.; Elshot, K.; Bryant, E.; Lafate, K.; Chen, H.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.

    1998-01-01

    Pd/SiC has been used as a hydrogen and a hydrocarbon gas sensor operated at high temperature. UHV (Ultra High Vacuum)-Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) techniques were applied to study the relationship between the morphology and chemical compositions for Pd ultra-thin films on SiC (less than 30 angstroms) at different annealing temperatures. Pd ultra-thin film on 6H-SiC was prepared by the RF sputtering method. The morphology from UHV-STM and AFM shows that the Pd thin film was well deposited on SiC substrate, and the Pd was partially aggregated to round shaped participates at an annealing temperature of 300 C. At 400 C, the amount of surface participates decreases, and some strap shape participates appear. From XPS, Pd2Si was formed on the surface after annealing at 300 C, and all Pd reacted with SiC to form Pd2Si after annealing at 400 C. The intensity of the XPS Pd peak decreases enormously at 400 C. The Pd film diffused into SiC, and the Schottky barrier height has almost no changes. The work shows the Pd sicilides/SiC have the same electronic properties with Pd/SiC, and explains why the Pd/SiC sensor still responds to hydrogen at high operating temperatures.

  5. Solid-state hydrogen sensors using palladium-nickel alloys: Effect of alloy composition on sensor response

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.; Buss, R.J. )

    1995-01-01

    Thin film alloys of Pd and Ni make good sensors for hydrogen partial pressures (pH[sub 2]) over a very wide range: from 10[sup [minus]3] to 700 Torr. For pH[sub 2] from 1 to 700 Torr the atomic percent of Ni in the alloy has a strong effect on the change in film resistance which is used as the sensing property. The phase transition from the [alpha]- to the hydride [beta]-phase must be avoided to maintain a reversible sensor. The characteristics of alloys with Ni of 3, 5.3, 8, and 15% are reported. The phase transition was found in the 5.3% alloy at about 250 Torr, but alloys of Ni >8% showed no phase change behavior up to 630 Torr (pure H[sub 2]) at ambient temperatures. Other characteristics of the Pd/Ni alloy sensors are also reported, including the effect of temperature, oxygen, and relative humidity, and the speed of response to step changes in pH[sub 2].

  6. Contributions to a reliable hydrogen sensor based on surface plasmon surface resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morjan, Martin; Züchner, Harald; Cammann, Karl

    2009-06-01

    Hydrogen is being seen as a potentially inexhaustible, clean power supply. Direct hydrogen production and storage techniques that would eliminate carbon by-products and compete in cost are accelerated in R&D due to the recent sharp price increase of crude oil. But hydrogen is also linked with certain risks of use, namely the danger of explosions if mixed with air due to the very low energy needed for ignition and the possibility to diminish the ozone layer by undetected leaks. To reduce those risks efficient, sensitive and very early warning systems are needed. This paper will contribute to this challenge in adopting the optical method of Surface-Plasmon-Resonance (SPR) Spectroscopy for a sensitive detection of hydrogen concentrations well below the lower explosion limit. The technique of SPR performed with fiberoptics would in principle allow a remote control without any electrical contacts in the potential explosion zone. A thin palladium metal layer has been studied as sensing element. A simulation programme to find an optimum sensor design lead to the conclusion that an Otto-configuration is more advantageous under intended "real world" measurement conditions than a Kretschmann configuration. This could be experimentally verified. The very small air gap in the Otto-configuration could be successfully replaced by a several hundred nm thick intermediate layer of MgF 2 or SiO 2 to ease the fabrication of hydrogen sensor-chips based on glass slide substrates. It could be demonstrated that by a separate detection of the TM- and TE-polarized light fractions the TE-polarized beam could be used as a reference signal, since the TE-part does not excite surface plasmons and thus is not influenced by the presence of hydrogen. Choosing the measured TM/TE intensity ratio as the analytical signal a sensor-chip made from a BK7 glass slide with a 425 nm thick intermediate layer of SiO 2 and a sensing layer of 50 nm Pd on top allowed a drift-free, reliable and reversible

  7. Chemically-modified cellulose paper as smart sensor device for colorimetric and optical detection of hydrogen sulfate in water.

    PubMed

    Rull-Barrull, Jordi; d'Halluin, Martin; Le Grognec, Erwan; Felpin, François-Xavier

    2016-02-11

    A portable, recyclable and highly selective paper-based sensor device for the colorimetric and optical detection of hydrogen sulfate anions in water was developed. The detection system features a rhodamine-based sensor covalently grafted onto the highly hydrophilic surface of cellulose paper.

  8. Temperature dependent dual hydrogen sensor response of Pd nanoparticle decorated Al doped ZnO surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D.; Barman, P. B.; Hazra, S. K.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, M.; Som, T.

    2015-10-28

    Sputter deposited Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films exhibit a dual hydrogen sensing response in the temperature range 40 °C–150 °C after surface modifications with palladium nanoparticles. The unmodified AZO films showed no response in hydrogen in the temperature range 40 °C–150 °C. The operational temperature windows on the low and high temperature sides have been estimated by isolating the semiconductor-to-metal transition temperature zone of the sensor device. The gas response pattern was modeled by considering various adsorption isotherms, which revealed the dominance of heterogeneous adsorption characteristics. The Arrhenius adsorption barrier showed dual variation with change in hydrogen gas concentration on either side of the semiconductor-to-metal transition. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen gas response pattern by considering the changes in nano palladium due to hydrogen adsorption, and semiconductor-to-metal transition of nanocrystalline Al doped ZnO layer due to temperature, along with material characterization studies by glancing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, are presented.

  9. Temperature dependent dual hydrogen sensor response of Pd nanoparticle decorated Al doped ZnO surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, D.; Dutta, D.; Kumar, M.; Barman, P. B.; Som, T.; Hazra, S. K.

    2015-10-01

    Sputter deposited Al doped ZnO (AZO) thin films exhibit a dual hydrogen sensing response in the temperature range 40 °C-150 °C after surface modifications with palladium nanoparticles. The unmodified AZO films showed no response in hydrogen in the temperature range 40 °C-150 °C. The operational temperature windows on the low and high temperature sides have been estimated by isolating the semiconductor-to-metal transition temperature zone of the sensor device. The gas response pattern was modeled by considering various adsorption isotherms, which revealed the dominance of heterogeneous adsorption characteristics. The Arrhenius adsorption barrier showed dual variation with change in hydrogen gas concentration on either side of the semiconductor-to-metal transition. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen gas response pattern by considering the changes in nano palladium due to hydrogen adsorption, and semiconductor-to-metal transition of nanocrystalline Al doped ZnO layer due to temperature, along with material characterization studies by glancing incidence X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, are presented.

  10. Integrated multi-channel nano-engineered optical hydrogen and temperature sensor detection systems for launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, M. Z.; Moreno, J.; Aitchison, J. S.; Mojahedi, M.; Kazemi, A. A.

    2008-08-01

    Launch vehicles and other satellite users need launch services that are highly reliable, less complex, easier to test, and cost effective. Being a very small molecule, hydrogen is prone to leakage through seals and micro-cracks. Hydrogen detection in space application is very challenging; public acceptance of hydrogen fuel would require the integration of a reliable hydrogen safety sensor. For detecting leakage of cryogenic fluids in spaceport facilities, launch vehicle industry and aerospace agencies are currently relying heavily on the bulky mass spectrometers, which fill one or more equipment racks, and weigh several hundred kilograms. Therefore, there is a critical need for miniaturized sensors and instruments suitable for use in space applications. This paper describes a novel multi-channel integrated nano-engineered optical sensor to detect hydrogen and monitor the temperature. The integrated optic sensor is made of multi-channel waveguide elements that measure hydrogen concentration in real Time. Our sensor is based on the use of a high index waveguide with a Ni/Pd overlay to detect hydrogen. When hydrogen is absorbed into the Ni/Pd alloy there is a change in the absorption of the material and the optical signal in the waveguide is increased. Our design uses a thin alloy (few nanometers thick) overlay which facilitates the absorption of the hydrogen and will result in a response time of approximately few seconds. Like other Pd/Pd-Ni based sensors the device response varies with temperature and hence the effects of temperature variations must be taken into account. One solution to this problem is simultaneous measurement of temperature in addition to hydrogen concentration at the same vicinity. Our approach here is to propose a temperature sensor that can easily be integrated on the same platform as the hydrogen sensor reported earlier by our group. One suitable choice of material system is silicon on insulator (SOI). Here, we propose a micro ring resonators

  11. Proton conducting perovskite-type ceramics for fiber optic sensors for hydrogen monitoring at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiling; Remmel, Kurtis; Sandker, Daniel; Xu, Zhi; Dong, Junhang

    2010-04-01

    A fiber optical sensor has been developed by coating proton conducting perovskite oxide (Sr(Ce0.8Zr0.1)Y0.1O2.95, SCZY) thin film on the long-period fiber grating (LPFG) for high temperature in situ measurement of bulk hydrogen in gas mixtures relevant to the fossil- and biomass-derived syngas. In this paper, we investigate in the H2-sensing mechanism of the SCZY-LPFG sensor. The high temperature H2 adsorbance in the SCZY, the SCZY electric conductivity in H2, and the resonant wavelength shift of the SCZY-LPFG (ΔλR,H2) have been experimentally studied to understand the effect of operation temperature on the sensor's sensitivity to H2. Because of the activation process of the H2 reaction with the perovskite oxide, increasing temperature benefits the H2 uptake in the SCZY phase and the sensitivity of the SCZY-LPFG sensor. However, the thermal stability of the LPFG and the microstructure of the SCZY nanocrystalline film limit the application temperature of the fiber optic sensor.

  12. Highly sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) gas sensors from viral-templated nanocrystalline gold nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Chung Hee; Zhang, Miluo; Myung, Nosang V.; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-04-01

    A facile, site-specific viral-templated assembly method was used to fabricate sensitive hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas sensors at room temperature. A gold-binding M13 bacteriophage served to organize gold nanoparticles into linear arrays which were used as seeds for subsequent nanowire formation through electroless deposition. Nanowire widths and densities within the sensors were modified by electroless deposition time and phage concentration, respectively, to tune device resistance. Chemiresistive H2S gas sensors with superior room temperature sensing performance were produced with sensitivity of 654%/ppmv, theoretical lowest detection limit of 2 ppbv, and 70% recovery within 9 min for 0.025 ppmv. The role of the viral template and associated gold-binding peptide was elucidated by removing organics using a short O2 plasma treatment followed by an ethanol dip. The template and gold-binding peptide were crucial to electrical and sensor performance. Without surface organics, the resistance fell by several orders of magnitude, the sensitivity dropped by more than a factor of 100 to 6%/ppmv, the lower limit of detection increased, and no recovery was detected with dry air flow. Viral templates provide a novel, alternative fabrication route for highly sensitive, nanostructured H2S gas sensors.

  13. A micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for detection of hydrogen and atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Chul; Yoon, Seung-Il; Lee, Chung-il; Kim, Yong-Jun; Song, Soonho

    2009-02-01

    This paper demonstrates the fabrication and performance of a micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for an effective and inexpensive gas analysis system. The proposed micro-thermoelectric gas sensor was fabricated by using a surface micromachining technique. The sensing mechanism, consisting of thermoelectric material and a novel metal catalyst, was fabricated on the highly thermally resistive layer for reduced heat transfer to the substrate allowing for a simple fabrication process. The micro-thermoelectric gas sensor detects target gas species by measuring the reaction heat of the catalytic reaction between the target gas and a novel metal catalyst using Cu-Bi thermopiles. The catalytic reaction occurs only on the hot junction of the sensing thermopile where the metal catalyst is deposited. In order to reduce the external thermal noise, a difference between the output voltage of the sensing and the reference thermopiles was measured by using a differential amplifier. The response of the fabricated sensor was linear to temperature difference. The fabricated sensor can be used to detect various concentrations of hydrogen and atomic oxygen, where the output voltage linearly increased with the gas concentration.

  14. Preparation of a Porous Composite Film for the Fabrication of a Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Mu-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Tsai, Rung-Ywan; Cheng, Wen; Cheng, Chun-Lin; Liu, Yin-Chih

    2011-01-01

    A series of dopant-type polyaniline-polyacrylic acid composite (PAn-PAA) films with porous structures were prepared and developed for an enzyme-free hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor. The composite films were highly electroactive in a neutral environment as compared to polyaniline (PAn). In addition, the carboxyl group of the PAA was found to react with H2O2 to form peroxy acid groups, and the peroxy acid could further oxidize the imine structure of PAn to form N-oxides. The N-oxides reverted to their original form via electrochemical reduction and increased the reduction current. Based on this result, PAn-PAA was used to modify a gold electrode (PAn-PAA/Au) as a working electrode for the non-enzymatic detection of H2O2. The characteristics of the proposed sensors could be tuned by the PAA/PAn molar ratio. Blending PAA with PAn enhanced the surface area, electrocatalytic activity, and conductivity of these sensors. Under optimal conditions, the linear concentration range of the H2O2 sensor was 0.04 to 12 mM with a sensitivity of 417.5 μA/mM-cm2. This enzyme-free H2O2 sensor also exhibited a rapid response time, excellent stability, and high selectivity. PMID:22163932

  15. Comment on "Adsorption of hydrogen and hydrocarbon molecules on SiC(001)" by Pollmann et al. (Surf. Sci. Rep. 69 (2014) 55-104)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, E.; Celasco, E.; Vattuone, L.; Savio, L.; Tejeda, A.; Silly, M.; D'angelo, M.; Sirotti, F.; Rocca, M.; Catellani, A.; Galli, G.; Douillard, L.; Semond, F.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Soukiassian, P.

    2016-02-01

    This comment clarifies two issues related to the (001) surface reconstructions of cubic SiC, namely: (i) The failure of the bridge-bond model for H atoms interacting with the 3C-SiC(001) 3 × 2 reconstruction to explain all the experimental data based on different techniques, while a recent model has reconciled theory and experimental results. This model has not been discussed or even mentioned in the review by Pollmann et al.; and (ii) In their review, two models of the Si-terminated c(4 × 2) 3C-SiC(001) surface reconstruction are presented as equally probable. This is clearly not the case and the reasons are explained in this comment.

  16. A highly sensitive hydrogen peroxide sensor based on (Ag-Au NPs)/poly[o-phenylenediamine] modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Karimi, Ziba; Amouzadeh Tabrizi, Mahmoud

    2015-11-01

    Herein, the poly(o-phenylenediamine) decorated with gold-silver nanoparticle (Ag-Au NPs) nanocomposite modified glassy carbon was used for the determination of hydrogen peroxide. Electrochemical experiments indicated that the proposed sensor possesses an excellent sensitivity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The resulting sensor exhibited a good response to hydrogen peroxide over linear range from 0.2 to 60.0μM with a limit of detection of 0.08μM, good reproducibility, long-term stability and negligible interference from ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine. The proposed sensor was successfully applied to the determination of hydrogen peroxide in human serum sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Synthesis of surface roughed Pt nanowires and their application as electrochemical sensors for hydrogen peroxide detection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fan; Li, Zhiyang; Ruan, Dajiang; Gu, Zhiyong

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, platinum nanowires with roughed surface textures were fabricated by a galvanostatic electrodeposition method for electrochemical sensors toward hydrogen peroxide detection. The electrochemical behavior of the glassy carbon electrode modified with these nanowires has been studied for oxidation of hydrogen peroxide by using cyclic voltammetry and amperometry in phosphate buffer solution. Surface roughness was found to enhance the sensitivity of the Pt nanowire based electrochemical sensor towards H2O2. The Pt nanowires with rough surfaces displayed higher electrocatalytic response compared to nanowires with smooth surfaces, with a sensitivity of 171 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), and linear dynamic range up to 35 mM. The nanowire concentration effect on the sensing behavior was investigated with the best sensitivity output found at a nanowire concentration of roughly 8.6 x 10(7) number of nanowires/cm2. The new sensor also showed good anti-interference property and exhibited high accuracy when a real water sample containing H2O2 was measured.

  18. Properties of Hydrogen Sulfide Sensors Based on Thin Films of Tin Dioxide and Tungsten Trioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevastianov, E. Yu.; Maksimova, N. K.; Chernikov, E. V.; Sergeichenko, N. V.; Rudov, F. V.

    2016-12-01

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide in the concentration range of 0-100 ppm on the characteristics of thin films of tin dioxide and tungsten trioxide obtained by the methods of magnetron deposition and modified with gold in the bulk and on the surface is studied. The impurities of antimony and nickel have been additionally introduced into the SnO2 bulk. An optimal operating temperature of sensors 350°C was determined, at which there is a satisfactory correlation between the values of the response to H2S and the response time. Degradation of the sensor characteristics is investigated in the long-term ( 0.5-1.5 years) tests at operating temperature and periodic exposure to hydrogen sulfide, as well as after conservation of samples in the laboratory air. It is shown that for the fabrication of H2S sensors, the most promising are thin nanocrystalline Au/WO3:Au films characterized by a linear concentration dependence of the response and high stability of parameters during exploitation.

  19. Facile one-step electrochemical deposition of copper nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide as nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moozarm Nia, Pooria; Woi, Pei Meng; Alias, Yatimah

    2017-08-01

    For several decades, hydrogen peroxide has exhibited to be an extremely significant analyte as an intermediate in several biological devices as well as in many industrial systems. A straightforward and novel one-step technique was employed to develop a sensitive non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor by simultaneous electrodeposition of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The electroreduction performance of the CuNPs-rGO for hydrogen peroxide detection was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (AMP) methods The CuNPs-rGO showed a synergistic effect of reduced graphene oxide and copper nanoparticles towards the electroreduction of hydrogen peroxide, indicating high reduction current. At detection potential of -0.2 V, the CuNPs-rGO sensor demonstrated a wide linear range up to 18 mM with a detection limit of 0.601 mM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, with addition of hydrogen peroxide, the sensor responded very quickly (<3 s). The CuNPs-rGO presents high selectivity, sensitivity, stability and fast amperometric sensing towards hydrogen peroxide which makes it favorable for the development of non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor.

  20. A distributed optical fiber sensor for hydrogen detection based on Pd, and Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotton, C.; Slaman, M.; Javahiraly, N.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.; Meyrueis, P.

    2010-04-01

    An optical fiber containing structured hydrogen sensing points, consisting of Palladium and/or Magnesium alloys is proposed and characterized. The sensitive layer is deposited on the outside of a multimode fiber, after removing the optical cladding. The sensor is based on a measurement technique which uses the Surface Plasmon Resonance effect. Compared to previous work which was performed at a single wavelength of 670nm, this study was done in the range of 450 to 900nm. A continuous change in intensity is observed as a function of the hydrogen concentration between 0.5% and 4% H2 in Ar. The response shows that the intensity transmitted can either decrease or increase, depending on the selected wavelength. The response time and the reproducibility of the detectors are also discussed. From our experiments and optical simulations we conclude that Pd covered indicator layers based on Mg alloys, such as Mg-Ti, would be even more advantageous compare to Pd layers thanks to their lower hydrogen equilibrium pressures. We will demonstrate an extended sensitivity range by juxtaposing different materials over a fiber section, having different hydrogen equilibrium pressures.

  1. Properties of SBA-15 modified by iron nanoparticles as potential hydrogen adsorbents and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazizi, N.; Ouargli, R.; Nousir, S.; Slama, R. Ben; Azzouz, A.

    2015-02-01

    SBA-15-Fe was synthesized via the incorporation of Fe0 nanoparticles (Fe(0)-Nps) in the mesoporous channels. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that dispersion of fine iron NPs occurs mainly inside the channels of SBA-15, producing a slight structure compaction. This was accompanied by a significant improvement of both the affinity towards hydrogen and electrical conductivity, as supported by hydrogen adsorption tests and impedance measurements. CO2 thermal programmed desorption measurements revealed an attenuation of the acid character of the solid surface. This was explained in terms of strong iron interaction with the lattice oxygen atoms that reduces the SiO-H bond polarity. The close vicinity of fine Fe(0)-Nps combined with the large pore size of SBA-15 appear to contribute to a synergistic improvement of the electrical conductivity. The results reported herein open new prospects for SBA-15 as potential adsorbents for hydrogen storage and carriers for hydrogen sensors. The use of iron in lieu of noble metals for designing such materials is a novelty, because such applications of iron-loaded silica have not been envisaged so far due to the high reactivity of iron towards air and water. The development of such technologies, if any, should address this issue.

  2. A Nose for Hydrogen Gas: Fast, Sensitive H2 Sensors Using Electrodeposited Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Penner, Reginald M

    2017-08-15

    Hydrogen gas (H2) is odorless and flammable at concentrations above 4% (v/v) in air. Sensors capable of detecting it rapidly at lower concentrations are needed to "sniff" for leaked H2 wherever it is used. Electrical H2 sensors are attractive because of their simplicity and low cost: Such sensors consist of a metal (usually palladium, Pd) resistor. Exposure to H2 causes a resistance increase, as Pd metal is converted into more resistive palladium hydride (PdHx). Sensors based upon Pd alloy films, developed in the early 1990s, were both too slow and too insensitive to meet the requirements of H2 safety sensing. In this Account, we describe the development of H2 sensors that are based upon electrodeposited nanomaterials. This story begins with the rise to prominence of nanowire-based sensors in 2001 and our demonstration that year of the first nanowire-based H2 sensor. The Pd nanowires used in these experiments were prepared by electrodepositing Pd at linear step-edge defects on a graphite electrode surface. In 2005, lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) provided the capability to pattern single Pd nanowires on dielectrics using electrodeposition. LPNE also provided control over the nanowire thickness (±1 nm) and width (±10-15%). Using single Pd nanowires, it was demonstrated in 2010 that smaller nanowires responded more rapidly to H2 exposure. Heating the nanowire using Joule self-heating (2010) also dramatically accelerated sensor response and recovery, leading to the conclusion that thermally activated H2 chemisorption and desorption of H2 were rate-limiting steps in sensor response to and recovery from H2 exposure. Platinum (Pt) nanowires, studied in 2012, showed an inverted resistance response to H2 exposure, that is, the resistance of Pt nanowires decreased instead of increased upon H2 exposure. H2 dissociatively chemisorbs at a Pt surface to form Pt-H, but in contrast to Pd, it stays on the Pt surface. Pt nanowires showed a faster

  3. Synthesis of hollow copper oxide by electrospinning and its application as a nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bijun; Luo, Liqiang; Ding, Yaping; Zhao, Dongsheng; Zhang, Qiaolin

    2012-09-01

    Cupric acetate/polyacrylonitrile composite nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning and hollow copper oxide (CuO) particles were produced after subsequent thermal treatment process. The electrospun hollow CuO particles modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) was demonstrated for the first time for nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) sensor. The structures and morphologies of hollow CuO particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction spectrum. The assay performance of the modified sensor to H(2)O(2) was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and amperometry, revealing high sensitivity (1746.50 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)), low detection limit (0.022 μM) and wide linear response of determination of H(2)O(2) oxidation in the range of 0.05 μM to 1.00 mM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hollow V₂O₅ Nanoassemblies for High-Performance Room-Temperature Hydrogen Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ting; Whang, Wha-Tzong; Chen, Chun-Hua

    2015-04-29

    Nanostructured oxides with characteristic morphologies are essential building blocks for high-performance gas-sensing devices. We describe the high-yield fabrication of a series of functionalized V2O5 nanoassemblies through a facile polyol approach with specific varieties of polyvinylpyrrolidone. The synthesized V2O5 nanoassemblies consisting of tiny one-dimensional nanoblocks with the absence of any extrinsic catalysts exhibit distinct hemispherical or spherical hollow morphologies and operate as room-temperature hydrogen sensors with remarkable sensitivities and responses.

  5. Proton conduction in electrolyte made of manganese dioxide for hydrogen gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Koyanaka, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshikatsu; Takeuchi, K; Kolesnikov, Alexander I

    2012-01-01

    We propose a network model of oxygen-pairs to store and conduct protons on the surface of manganese dioxide with a weak covalent bond like protons stored in pressured ice. The atomic distances of oxygen-pairs were estimated between 2.57 and 2.60 angstroms in crystal structures of ramsdellite-type and lambda-type manganese dioxides by using protonated samples and inelastic neutron scattering measurements. Good properties for a hydrogen gas sensor using electrolytes made of manganese dioxides that contain such oxygen-pairs were confirmed experimentally.

  6. Dimensionality aspects of nano micro integrated metal oxide based early stage leak detection room temperature hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Sameer Arun

    Detection of explosive gas leaks such as hydrogen (H2) becomes key element in the wake of counter-terrorism threats, introduction of hydrogen powered vehicles and use of hydrogen as a fuel for space explorations. In recent years, a significant interest has developed on metal oxide nanostructured sensors for the detection of hydrogen gas. Gas sensors properties such as sensitivity, selectivity and response time can be enhanced by tailoring the size, the shape, the structure and the surface of the nanostructures. Sensor properties (sensitivity, selectivity and response time) are largely modulated by operating temperature of the device. Issues like instability of nanostructures at high temperature, risk of hydrogen explosion and high energy consumption are driving the research towards detection of hydrogen at low temperatures. At low temperatures adsorption of O2- species on the sensor surface instead of O- (since O- species reacts easily with hydrogen) result in need of higher activation energy for hydrogen and adsorbed species interaction. This makes hydrogen detection at room temperature a challenging task. Higher surface area to volume ratio (resulting higher reaction sites), enhanced electronic properties by varying size, shape and doping foreign impurities (by modulating space charge region) makes nanocrystalline materials ideal candidate for room temperature gas sensing applications. In the present work various morphologies of nanostructured tin oxide (SnO 2) and indium (In) doped SnO2 and titanium oxide (titania, TiO2) were synthesized using sol-gel, hydrothermal, thermal evaporation techniques and successfully integrated with the micro-electromechanical devices H2 at ppm-level (as low as 100ppm) has been successfully detected at room temperature using the SnO2 nanoparticles, SnO2 (nanowires) and TiO2 (nanotubes) based MEMS sensors. While sensor based on indium doped tin oxide showed the highest sensitivity (S =Ra/Rg= 80000) and minimal response time (10sec

  7. Shape-controlled synthesis of palladium and copper superlattice nanowires for high-stability hydrogen sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dachi; Carpena-Núñez, Jennifer; Fonseca, Luis F.; Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin; Hunter, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    For hydrogen sensors built with pure Pd nanowires, the instabilities causing baseline drifting and temperature-driven sensing behavior are limiting factors when working within a wide temperature range. To enhance the material stability, we have developed superlattice-structured palladium and copper nanowires (PdCu NWs) with random-gapped, screw-threaded, and spiral shapes achieved by wet-chemical approaches. The microstructure of the PdCu NWs reveals novel superlattices composed of lattice groups structured by four-atomic layers of alternating Pd and Cu. Sensors built with these modified NWs show significantly reduced baseline drifting and lower critical temperature (259.4 K and 261 K depending on the PdCu structure) for the reverse sensing behavior than those with pure Pd NWs (287 K). Moreover, the response and recovery times of the PdCu NWs sensor were of ~9 and ~7 times faster than for Pd NWs sensors, respectively. PMID:24440892

  8. Shape-controlled synthesis of palladium and copper superlattice nanowires for high-stability hydrogen sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dachi; Carpena-Núñez, Jennifer; Fonseca, Luis F; Biaggi-Labiosa, Azlin; Hunter, Gary W

    2014-01-20

    For hydrogen sensors built with pure Pd nanowires, the instabilities causing baseline drifting and temperature-driven sensing behavior are limiting factors when working within a wide temperature range. To enhance the material stability, we have developed superlattice-structured palladium and copper nanowires (PdCu NWs) with random-gapped, screw-threaded, and spiral shapes achieved by wet-chemical approaches. The microstructure of the PdCu NWs reveals novel superlattices composed of lattice groups structured by four-atomic layers of alternating Pd and Cu. Sensors built with these modified NWs show significantly reduced baseline drifting and lower critical temperature (259.4 K and 261 K depending on the PdCu structure) for the reverse sensing behavior than those with pure Pd NWs (287 K). Moreover, the response and recovery times of the PdCu NWs sensor were of ~9 and ~7 times faster than for Pd NWs sensors, respectively.

  9. A hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Ag nanoparticles electrodeposited on natural nano-structure attapulgite modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huihui; Zhang, Zhe; Cai, Dongqing; Zhang, Shengyi; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin; Wu, Zhengyan

    2011-10-30

    A novel strategy to fabricate hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) sensor was developed by electrodepositing Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on a glassy carbon electrode modified with natural nano-structure attapulgite (ATP). The result of electrochemical experiments showed that such constructed sensor had a favorable catalytic ability to reduce H(2)O(2). The good catalytic activity of the sensor was ascribed to the ATP that facilitated the formation and homogenous distribution of small Ag NPs. The resulted sensor achieved 95% of the steady-state current within 2s and had a 2.4 μM detection limit of H(2)O(2).

  10. Water photolysis effect on the long-term stability of a fiber optic hydrogen sensor with Pt/WO3

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xuexiang; Yang, Minghong; Huang, Chujia; Wang, Gaopeng; Dai, Jixiang; Bai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    One of the technological challenges for hydrogen sensors is long-term stability and reliability. In this article, the UV-light irradiation was introduced into the hydrogen sensing process based on water photolysis effect of Pt/WO3. Ascribing to that, fiber optic hydrogen sensor with Pt/WO3 nanosheets as the sensing element was demonstrated with significantly improved performance of stability. Under UV irradiation, the hydrogen sensor exhibits higher sensitivity and resolution together with a smaller error range than that without UV irradiation. The enhanced performance could be attributed to the effective decomposition of water produced in the hydrogen sensing process due to the water photolysis effect of Pt/WO3. The influence of the water on stability was evaluated using experimental results, and the UV irradiation to remove water was analysed by theoretical and FT-IR spectra. This work provides new strategy of UV-light irradiation to promote the long-term stability of hydrogen sensor using Pt/WO3 as the sensing element. PMID:27966631

  11. Water photolysis effect on the long-term stability of a fiber optic hydrogen sensor with Pt/WO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xuexiang; Yang, Minghong; Huang, Chujia; Wang, Gaopeng; Dai, Jixiang; Bai, Wei

    2016-12-01

    One of the technological challenges for hydrogen sensors is long-term stability and reliability. In this article, the UV-light irradiation was introduced into the hydrogen sensing process based on water photolysis effect of Pt/WO3. Ascribing to that, fiber optic hydrogen sensor with Pt/WO3 nanosheets as the sensing element was demonstrated with significantly improved performance of stability. Under UV irradiation, the hydrogen sensor exhibits higher sensitivity and resolution together with a smaller error range than that without UV irradiation. The enhanced performance could be attributed to the effective decomposition of water produced in the hydrogen sensing process due to the water photolysis effect of Pt/WO3. The influence of the water on stability was evaluated using experimental results, and the UV irradiation to remove water was analysed by theoretical and FT-IR spectra. This work provides new strategy of UV-light irradiation to promote the long-term stability of hydrogen sensor using Pt/WO3 as the sensing element.

  12. FY 97 Report on hydrogen sensors for enhanced surveillance program project LL-ESP96-13

    SciTech Connect

    Nave, S.E.

    1997-09-30

    A prototype for an all fiber optic hydrogen sensor system was developed. Capability to measure concentrations of hydrogen in air or nitrogen in the range of 0.5 percent to 4.0 percent with a resolution of 0.1 percent was demonstrated. A DC planar magnetron sputter system was procured and assembled for use in the thin metal film deposition necessary for fabrication of the palladium and palladium-silver alloy sensors used in this development. A method was developed to coat the metal films with an organic coating permeable to hydrogen but not oxygen and other reactive gases. The results of tests on these sensors gave positive results but long-term studies are required to confirm protection under conditions expected to be encountered in a real world application. A new type of sensor base on a layered yttrium/palladium structure was constructed and tested. The greater magnitude and wavelength dependence of the spectral response observed may lead to a more robust sensor. However, the need to have oxygen present for this sensor in order for it to rapidly recover after exposure to hydrogen may complicate its use.

  13. Embedded SIC-POVMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hoan; Blanchfield, Kate; Bengtsson, Ingemar; Appleby, Marcus

    2013-03-01

    Symmetric informationally complete (SIC) sets of quantum states have applications in foundational studies of quantum mechanics, quantum tomography, quantum communication, quantum cryptography, and classical signal processing. However, their existence in every dimension has not been proven, and no general construction has been known. During our study of linear dependencies in Weyl-Heisenberg orbits, we discovered 2-dimensional SICs embedded in a 6-dimensional Hilbert space. This offers a robust construction for 2-dimensional SICs, and may potentially impact the SIC existence problem. In this talk, I will explain how this construction works, and present numerical results for some other dimensions. This work was supported in part by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and by the U. S. Office of Naval Research (Grant No. N00014-09-1-0247).

  14. Nanoparticle-based electrochemical sensors for the detection of lactate and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunoglu, Aytekin

    In the present study, electrochemical sensors for the detection of lactate and hydrogen peroxide were constructed by exploiting the physicochemical properties of metal ad metal oxide nanoparticles. This study can be divided into two main sections. While chapter 2, 3, and 4 report on the construction of electrochemical lactate biosensors using CeO2 and CeO2-based mixed metal oxide nanoparticles, chapter 5 and 6 show the development of electrochemical hydrogen peroxide sensors by the decoration of the electrode surface with palladium-based nanoparticles. First generation oxidase enzyme-based sensors suffer from oxygen dependency which results in errors in the response current of the sensors in O2-lean environments. To address this challenge, the surface of the sensors must be modified with oxygen rich materials. In this regard, we developed a novel electrochemical lactate biosensor design by exploiting the oxygen storage capacity of CeO2 and CeO 2-CuO nanoparticles. By the introduction of CeO2 nanoparticles into the enzyme layer of the sensors, negative interference effect of ascorbate which resulted from the formation of oxygen-lean regions was eliminated successfully. When CeO2-based design was exposed to higher degree of O2 -depleted environments, however, the response current of the biosensors experienced an almost 21 % decrease, showing that the OSC of CeO2 was not high enough to sustain the enzymatic reactions. When CeO2-CuO nanoparticles, which have 5 times higher OSC than pristine CeO2, were used as an oxygen supply in the enzyme layer, the biosensors did not show any drop in the performance when moving from oxygen-rich to oxygen-lean conditions. In the second part of the study, PdCu/SPCE and PdAg/rGO-based electrochemical H2O2 sensors were designed and their performances were evaluated to determine their sensitivity, linear range, detection limit, and storage stability. In addition, practical applicability of the sensors was studied in human serum. The

  15. Joule heating a palladium nanowire sensor for accelerated response and recovery to hydrogen gas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Taggart, David K; Penner, Reginald M

    2010-07-05

    The properties of a single heated palladium (Pd) nanowire for the detection of hydrogen gas (H(2)) are explored. In these experiments, a Pd nanowire, 48-98 microm in length, performs three functions in parallel: 1) Joule self-heating is used to elevate the nanowire temperature by up to 128 K, 2) the 4-contact wire resistance in the absence of H(2) is used to measure its temperature, and 3) the nanowire resistance in the presence of H(2) is correlated with its concentration, allowing it to function as a H(2) sensor. Compared with the room-temperature response of a Pd nanowire, the response of the heated nanowire to hydrogen is altered in two ways: First, the resistance change (DeltaR/R(0)) induced by H(2) exposure at any concentration is reduced by a factor of up to 30 and second, the rate of the resistance change - observed at the beginning ("response") and at the end ("recovery") of a pulse of H(2) - is increased by more than a factor of 50 at some H(2) concentrations. Heating nearly eliminates the retardation of response and recovery seen from 1-2% H(2), caused by the alpha --> beta phase transition of PdH(x), a pronounced effect for nanowires at room temperature. The activation energies associated with sensor response and recovery are measured and interpreted.

  16. A theoretical study on the linearity of the Id-T curve of a SiC MESFET for sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sutanu

    2017-01-01

    This theoretical study includes the impact of ambient temperature fluctuations on the drain current of a SiC MESFET considering two field regions under the gate at a considerably high drain field. The variations of drain current of the device with ambient temperature are studied and the sensitivity of the device with temperature is calculated. An analytical expression of temperature sensitivity of the device is derived for a MESFET operating under the two region model. The variations of device sensitivity with temperature are presented for different gate length and applied biases. The results show that the linearity of drain current over ambient thermal variation improves for proper biasing conditions of gate and drain terminals and selection of appropriate gate length. Moreover, an effort has been made to compare our work with an experimentally observed data reported earlier.

  17. A novel non-enzyme hydrogen peroxide sensor based on catalytic reduction property of silver nanowires.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xia; Wang, Huicai; Miao, Zhiying; Li, Junli; Chen, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    A novel strategy to fabricate a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor was developed based on silver nanowires modified Pt electrode. The sensor was fabricated by simple casting of silver nanowires (Ag NWs) aqueous solution on a Pt electrode. Silver nanowires were synthesized by an l-cysteine-assisted poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP)-mediated polyol route. UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to investigate the prepared nanowires. The electrochemical properties of H2O2 sensor were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry. The as-obtained silver nanowires exhibited favorable electroreduction activity toward H2O2, and results indicated that the Ag NWs modified Pt (Ag NWs/Pt) electrode might be gifted from CV scanning with higher surface area and more active sites that afford more effective surface exposure in the electrode-electrolyte interface and consequently improved electrochemical properties. At the applied potential of -0.2V vs. Ag/AgCl, the Ag NWs/Pt electrode as an enzyme-free sensor exhibited a wide linear range of 0.5μM-30mM to H2O2, with a remarkable sensitivity of 9.45μA/mM, a detection limit of 0.2μM estimated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and fast response time (within 5s). Moreover, it showed good reproducibility, anti-interferant ability and long-term stability. The excellent performance of the sensor might be attributed to the well-defined silver nanowires with special catalytic activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Packaging Technology for SiC High Temperature Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.; Nakley, Leah M.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2017-01-01

    High-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics are required for long-term exploration of Venus and distributed control of next generation aeronautical engines. Various silicon carbide (SiC) high temperature sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at and above 500 C. A compatible packaging system is essential for long-term testing and application of high temperature electronics and sensors in relevant environments. This talk will discuss a ceramic packaging system developed for high temperature electronics, and related testing results of SiC integrated circuits at 500 C facilitated by this high temperature packaging system, including the most recent progress.

  19. Comparison of the sensitive property between soman and its simulant DMMP by hydrogen-bond acidic polymer coated SAW sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Du, Xiaosong; Long, Yin; Jiang, Yadong

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA) polymers are widely used for the detection of dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP, a simulant of real nerve agents) based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors. This paper presented an HBA polymer PLF, and subsequently the polymer was dissolved into chloroform and spray-coated on a SAW device to fabricate a gas sensor. Then the sensor was equipped into a SAW test platform to investigate its sensitive property to soman vapor and its simulant DMMP at the concentrations below 20 mg/m3. Results revealed that the sensor showed high sensitivity to the analyte vapors, furthermore, the response of the sensor to soman vapor was relatively smaller and slower than that to DMMP. Tests to some common interference vapors were studied at the concentration of 10 mg/m3, and the results indicated that the sensor showed a good selective property.

  20. Influence of microstructure on hydrothermal corrosion of chemically vapor processed SiC composite tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daejong; Lee, Ho Jung; Jang, Changheui; Lee, Hyeon-Geun; Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Weon-Ju

    2017-08-01

    Multi-layered SiC composites consisting of monolithic SiC and a SiCf/SiC composite are one of the accident tolerant fuel cladding concepts in pressurized light water reactors. To evaluate the integrity of the SiC fuel cladding under normal operating conditions of a pressurized light water reactor, the hydrothermal corrosion behavior of multi-layered SiC composite tubes was investigated in the simulated primary water environment of a pressurized water reactor without neutron fluence. The results showed that SiC phases with good crystallinity such as Tyranno SA3 SiC fiber and monolithic SiC deposited at 1200 °C had good corrosion resistance. However, the SiC phase deposited at 1000 °C had less crystallinity and severely dissolved in water, particularly the amorphous SiC phase formed along grain boundaries. Dissolved hydrogen did not play a significant role in improving the hydrothermal corrosion resistance of the CVI-processed SiC phases containing amorphous SiC, resulting in a significant weight loss and reduction of hoop strength of the multi-layered SiC composite tubes after corrosion.

  1. Platinum vs. Palladium in Catalyst-Based Hydrogen Sensors Used for Wide Temperature Range Hydrazine Leak Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntele, Claudiu; Ila, Daryush

    2008-11-01

    Here we are addressing possible solutions to challenges associated with using palladium and platinum as active agents in reverse-biased p-n structures and linear (resistive) structures for hydrazine and hydrogen detection schemes to operate in a temperature range from cryogenic to ambient (room temperature). Preliminary results at room temperature on devices fabricated using high-temperature sensor technology show only a limited response to hydrogen as opposed to dry air.

  2. Hydrogen gas detection of Nb2O5 nanoparticle-decorated CuO nanorod sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheel, Hyejoon; Sun, Gun-Joo; Lee, Jae Kyung; Mirzaei, Ali; Choi, Seungbok; Lee, Chongmu

    2017-01-01

    Pristine and Nb2O5 nanoparticles-decorated CuO nanorods were prepared successfully by a two step process: the thermal evaporation of a Cu foil and the spin coating of NbCl5 solution on CuO nanorods followed by thermal annealing. X-ray diffraction was performed to examine the structure and purity of the synthesized nanoatuctures. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology and shape of the nanostuctures. The Nb2O5 nanoparticles-decorated CuO nanorod sensor showed responses of 217.05-862.54%, response times of 161-199 s and recovery times of 163-171 s toward H2 gas with concentrations in a range of 0.5 - 5% at the optimal working temperature of 300 °C. The Nb2O5 nanoparticle-decorated CuO nanorod sensor showed superior sensing performance to the pristine CuO nanorod sensor for the same H2 concentration range. The underlying mechanism for the enhanced hydrogen sensing performance of the CuO nanorods decorated with Nb2O5 nanoparticles is discussed.

  3. A hydrogen curing effect on surface plasmon resonance fiber optic hydrogen sensors using an annealed Au/Ta₂O₅/Pd multi-layers film.

    PubMed

    Hosoki, Ai; Nishiyama, Michiko; Igawa, Hirotaka; Seki, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-07-28

    In this paper, a response time of the surface plasmon resonance fiber optic hydrogen sensor has successfully improved with keeping sensor sensitivity high by means of hydrogen curing (immersing) process of annealed Au/Ta2O5/ Pd multi-layers film. The hydrogen curing effect on the response time and sensitivity has been experimentally revealed by changing the annealing temperatures of 400, 600, 800°C and through observing the optical loss change in the H2 curing process. When the 25-nm Au/60-nm Ta2O5/10-nm Pd multi-layers film annealed at 600°C is cured with 4% H2/N2 mixture, it is found that a lot of nano-sized cracks were produced on the Pd surface. After H2 curing process, the response time is improved to be 8 s, which is two times faster than previous reported one in the case of the 25-nm Au/60-nm Ta2O5/3-nm Pd multi-layers film with keeping the sensor sensitivity of 0.27 dB for 4% hydrogen adding. Discussions most likely responsible for this effect are given by introducing the α-β transition Pd structure in the H2 curing process.

  4. Realization of an ultra-sensitive hydrogen peroxide sensor with conductance change of horseradish peroxidase-immobilized polyaniline and investigation of the sensing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fang, Kuan-Chung; Hsu, Chen-Pin; Kang, Yen-Wen; Fang, Jung-Ying; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Huang, Yu-Fen; Chen, Chih-Chen; Li, Sheng-Shian; Andrew Yeh, J; Yao, Da-Jeng; Wang, Yu-Lin

    2014-05-15

    In this study, we fabricate an ultra-sensitive hydrogen peroxide sensor by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-immobilized conducting polymer, polyaniline (PANI). With the proposed detection mechanism, hydrogen peroxide first oxidizes HRP, which then oxidizes polyaniline, thus resulting in decreased conductivity of the polyaniline thin film. The reduced HRP can be further oxidized by hydrogen peroxide and the cycle of the oxidation/reduction would continue until all hydrogen peroxide are reacted, leading to the high sensitivity of the sensor due to the signal contributed from all hydrogen peroxide molecule. The detection limit of this sensor is only 0.7 nM. The detectable concentration of H2O2 is from 0.7 nM to 1 μM. Beyond 1 μM, the sensor gradually saturates and some H2O2 remains, indicating the inhibition of HRP activity at high concentration of H2O2. There is no response to hydrogen peroxide once the PANI is standalone without HRP immobilized, showing the enzymatic reaction is required in the process of hydrogen peroxide detection. The simple process for the sensor fabrication allows the sensor to be cost-effective and disposable. This electronic hydrogen peroxide sensor is promising in applications for low concentration hydrogen peroxide detections, such as the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in oxidative stress studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Viral-templated nanocrystalline Pd nanowires for chemiresistive hydrogen (H2) sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Chung Hee; Yan, Yiran; Zhang, Miluo; Myung, Nosang V.; Haberer, Elaine D.

    2014-08-01

    A palladium (Pd) nanowire-based hydrogen (H2) sensor has been fabricated with a novel viral-templated assembly route. A filamentous M13 bacteriophage was used as the viral-template for assembly of Pd nanowires at ambient conditions. Scanning electron microscopy determined Pd nanowire distribution and morphology with the devices. The phage template concentration controlled the number of physical and electrical nanowire connections across the device. A greater phage concentration resulted in a higher connection density and thicker Pd deposition. A lower phage concentration generated devices which formed chain-like nanowires of Pd nanocrystals, whereas a higher phage concentration formed devices with a continuous mesh-like structure. The lower concentration devices showed 51-78% instantaneous response to 2000 ppm H2 and response time less than 30 s.

  6. Green synthesis of nanosilver as a sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in water.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Vineet K; Yadav, Raghvendra S; Yadav, Poonam; Pandey, Avinash C

    2012-04-30

    Present "green" synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach for nanosilver formation, which offers numerous benefits over physiochemical approaches. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern suggests the formation and crystallinity of nanosilver. The average particle size of silver nanoparticles was 8.25±1.37 nm as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UV-vis absorption spectrum shows a characteristic absorption peak of silver nanoparticles at 410 nm. FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation. In addition, the nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The produced nanosilver is stable and comparable in size. These silver nanoparticles show potential applications in the field of sensors, catalysis, fuel cells and nanodevices.

  7. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor based on an etched Bragg grating coated with palladium.

    PubMed

    Coelho, L; de Almeida, J M M M; Santos, J L; Viegas, D

    2015-12-10

    A study of a sensor for hydrogen (H2) detection based on fiber Bragg gratings coated with palladium (Pd) with self-temperature compensation is presented. The cladding around the gratings was reduced down to 50 μm diameter by a chemical etching process. One of the gratings was left uncoated, and the other was coated with 150 nm of Pd. It was observed that palladium hydride has unstable behavior in environments with high humidity level. A simple solution to overcome this problem based on a Teflon tape is presented. The sensing device studied was able to respond to H2 concentrations in the range 0%-1% v/v at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, achieving sensitivities larger than 20 pm/% v/v. Considering H2 concentrations in nitrogen up to 1%, the performance of the sensing head was characterized for different thicknesses of Pd coating ranging from 50 to 200 nm.

  8. Transparent Pd Wire Network-Based Areal Hydrogen Sensor with Inherent Joule Heater.

    PubMed

    Walia, Sunil; Gupta, Ritu; Rao, K D M; Kulkarni, Giridhar U

    2016-09-07

    A high degree of transparency in devices is considered highly desirable for futuristic technology. This demands that both the active material and the electrodes are made of transparent materials. In this work, a transparent Pd wire network (∼1 cm(2)), fabricated using crackle lithography technique with sheet resistance and transmittance of ∼200 Ohm per square and ∼80%, respectively, serves multiple roles; besides being an electrode, it acts as an active material for H2 sensing as well as an in-built electrothermal heater. The sensor works over a wide range of hydrogen (H2) concentration down to 0.02% with a response time of ∼41 s, which could be improved to ∼13 s by in situ Joule heating to ∼75 °C. Importantly, the device has the potential of scale-up to a window size transparent panel and to be flexible when desired.

  9. Fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor utilizing surface plasmon resonance and native defects of zinc oxide by palladium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2016-01-01

    We present an experimental study on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based fiber optic hydrogen gas sensor employing a palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposite (ZnO(1-x)Pd x , 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.85) layer over the silver coated unclad core of the fiber. Palladium doped zinc oxide nanocomposites (ZnO(1-x)Pd x ) are prepared by a chemical route for different composition ratios and their structural, morphological and hydrogen sensing properties are investigated experimentally. The sensing principle involves the absorption of hydrogen gas by ZnO(1-x)Pd x , altering its dielectric function. The change in the dielectric constant is analyzed in terms of the red shift of the resonance wavelength in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum. To check the sensing capability of sensing probes fabricated with varying composition ratio (x) of nanocomposite, the SPR curves are recorded typically for 0% H2 and 4% H2 in N2 atmosphere for each fabricated probe. On changing the concentration of hydrogen gas from 0% to 4%, the red shift in the SPR spectrum confirms the change in dielectric constant of ZnO(1-x)Pd x on exposure to hydrogen gas. It is noted that the shift in the SPR spectrum increases monotonically up to a certain fraction of Pd in zinc oxide, beyond which it starts decreasing. SEM images and the photoluminescence (PL) spectra reveal that Pd dopant atoms substitutionally incorporated into the ZnO lattice profoundly affect its defect levels; this is responsible for the optimal composition of ZnO(1-x)Pd x to sense the hydrogen gas. The sensor is highly selective to hydrogen gas and possesses high sensitivity. Since optical fiber sensing technology is employed along with the SPR technique, the present sensor is capable of remote sensing and online monitoring of hydrogen gas.

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on Schottky-contacted vertically aligned ZnO nanorod-based hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranwa, Sapana; Singh Barala, Surendra; Fanetti, Mattia; Kumar, Mahesh

    2016-08-01

    We report the impact of gamma irradiation on the performance of a gold Schottky-contacted ZnO nanorod-based hydrogen sensor. RF-sputtered vertically aligned highly c-axis-oriented ZnO NRs were grown on Si(100) substrate. X-ray diffraction shows no significant change in crystal structure at low gamma doses from 1 to 5 kGy. As gamma irradiation doses increase to 10 kGy, the single crystalline ZnO structure converts to polycrystalline. The photoluminescence spectra also shows suppression of the near-band emission peak and the huge wide-band spectrum indicates the generation of structural defects at high gamma doses. At 1 kGy, the hydrogen sensor response was enhanced from 67% to 77% for 1% hydrogen in pure argon at a 150 °C operating temperature. However, at 10 kGy, the relative response decreases to 33.5%. High gamma irradiation causes displacement damage and defects in ZnO NRs, and as a result, degrades the sensor’s performance as a result. Low gamma irradiation doses activate the ZnO NR surface through ionization, which enhances the sensor performance. The relative response of the hydrogen sensor was enhanced by ∼14.9% with respect to pristine ZnO using 1 kGy gamma ray treatment.

  11. Well-defined and high resolution Pt nanowire arrays for a high performance hydrogen sensor by a surface scattering phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hae-Wook; Cho, Soo-Yeon; Jeon, Hwan-Jin; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2015-02-03

    Developing hydrogen (H2) sensors with a high sensitivity, rapid response, long-term stability, and high throughput is one of the critical issues in energy and environmental technology [Hübert et al. Sens. Actuators, B 2011, 157, 329]. To date, H2 sensors have been mainly developed using palladium (Pd) as the channel material because of its high selectivity and strong affinity to the H2 molecule [(Xu et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2005, 86, 203104), (Offermans et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 2009, 94, 223110), (Yang et al. Nano Lett. 2009, 9, 2177), (Yang et al. ACS Nano 2010, 4, 5233), and (Zou et al. Chem. Commun. 2012, 48, 1033)]. Despite significant progress in this area, Pd based H2 sensors suffer from fractures on their structure due to hydrogen adsorption induced volumetric swelling during the α → β phase transition, leading to poor long-term stability and reliability [(Favier et al. Science 2001, 293, 2227), (Walter et al. Microelectron. Eng. 2002, 61–62, 555), and (Walter et al. Anal. Chem. 2002, 74, 1546)]. In this study, we developed a platinum (Pt) nanostructure based H2 sensor that avoids the stability limitations of Pd based sensors. This sensor exhibited an excellent sensing performance, low limit of detection (LOD, 1 ppm), reproducibility, and good recovery behavior at room temperature. This Pt based H2 sensor relies on a highly periodic, small cross sectional dimension (10–40 nm) and a well-defined configuration of Pt nanowire arrays over a large area. The resistance of the Pt nanowire arrays significantly decreased upon exposure to H2 due to reduced electron scattering in the cross section of the hydrogen adsorbed Pt nanowires, as compared to the oxygen terminated original state. Therefore, these well-defined Pt nanowire arrays prepared using advanced lithographic techniques can facilitate the production of high performance H2 sensors.

  12. Ab initio prediction of SiC nanotubes with negative strain energy

    SciTech Connect

    Alfieri, G.; Kimoto, T.

    2014-01-20

    Single-layer SiC nanotubes (SiCNTs) are known to be metastable structures that is why only nanotubular fibers or polygrained nanotubes have been obtained experimentally. In this study, we report on how hydrogen helps to overcome the metastability of SiCNTs. Starting from SiC graphitic sheets, we analyzed the impact of either partial or full hydrogenation on the electronic properties and structural stability of SiCNTs. It is shown that, in general, hydrogenation widens the band gap of both SiC graphitic sheets and nanotubes and, irrespective of the difference in chirality and diameter, leads to the formation of energetically stable SiCNTs.

  13. A titania nanotube-array room-temperature sensor for selective detection of hydrogen at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Oomman K; Mor, Gopal K; Grimes, Craig A; Paulose, Maggie; Mukherjee, Niloy

    2004-09-01

    A tremendous variation in electrical resistance, from the semiconductor to metallic range, has been observed in titania nanotube arrays at room temperature, approximately 25 degrees C, in the presence of < or = 1000 ppm hydrogen gas. The nanotube arrays are fabricated by anodizing titanium foil in an aqueous electrolyte solution containing hydrofluoric acid and acetic acid. Subsequently, the arrays are coated with a 10 nm layer of palladium by evaporation. Electrical contacts are made by sputtering a 2 mm diameter platinum disk atop the Pd-coated nanotube array. These sensors exhibit a resistance variation of the order of 10(4) in the presence of 100 ppm hydrogen at 25 degrees C. The sensors demonstrate complete reversibility, repeatability, high selectivity, negligible drift and wide dynamic range. The nanoscale geometry of the nanotubes, in particular the points of tube-to-tube contact, is believed to be responsible for the outstanding hydrogen gas sensitivities.

  14. Calorimetric Thermoelectric Gas Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen, Methane and Mixed Gases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Nam-Hee; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Itoh, Toshio; Izu, Noriya; Shin, Woosuck

    2014-01-01

    A novel miniaturized calorimeter-type sensor device with a dual-catalyst structure was fabricated by integrating different catalysts on the hot (Pd/θ-Al2O3) and cold (Pt/α-Al2O3) ends of the device. The device comprises a calorimeter with a thermoelectric gas sensor (calorimetric-TGS), combining catalytic combustion and thermoelectric technologies. Its response for a model fuel gas of hydrogen and methane was investigated with various combustor catalyst compositions. The calorimetric-TGS devices detected H2, CH4, and a mixture of the two with concentrations ranging between 200 and 2000 ppm at temperatures of 100–400 °C, in terms of the calorie content of the gases. It was necessary to reduce the much higher response voltage of the TGS to H2 compared to CH4. We enhanced the H2 combustion on the cold side so that the temperature differences and response voltages to H2 were reduced. The device response to H2 combustion was reduced by 50% by controlling the Pt concentration in the Pt/α-Al2O3 catalyst on the cold side to 3 wt%. PMID:24818660

  15. Developing an amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor for an exhaled breath analysis system.

    PubMed

    Wiedemair, Justyna; van Dorp, Henriëtte D S; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we present a chip-integrated amperometric sensor targeted at the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) in the gaseous phase. Electrode chips are manufactured in a series of microfabrication steps and characterized electrochemically. Using such devices detection of H₂O₂ in an aqueous phase is shown by means of cyclic voltammetry and amperometry. Furthermore, it is discussed that variation of conditions such as the composition of the supporting electrolyte largely influences the obtained electrochemical signal. Additionally, electrochemical pretreatment of platinum working electrodes aiming at surface oxidation improves the limit of detection of the sensor and the linearity of the calibration curve at low H₂O₂ concentrations (<10 μM). Agarose-coated electrode chips are used for the measurement of H₂O₂ in the gaseous phase. Detection of H₂O₂ is shown in a static and in a flow-through setup. We find a limit of detection of approximately 42 ppb. Current work focuses on expanding the presented device to detection of H₂O₂ in exhaled breath condensate. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Amperometric Non-Enzymatic Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on Aligned Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hardan, Naif H.; Abdul Hamid, Muhammad Azmi; Shamsudin, Roslinda; Othman, Norinsan Kamil; Kar Keng, Lim

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) have been synthesized via the hydrothermal process. The NRs were grown over a conductive glass substrate. A non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), based on the prepared ZnO NRs, was examined through the use of current-voltage measurements. The measured currents, as a function of H2O2 concentrations ranging from 10 μM to 700 μM, revealed two distinct behaviours and good performance, with a lower detection limit (LOD) of 42 μM for the low range of H2O2 concentrations (first region), and a LOD of 143.5 μM for the higher range of H2O2 concentrations (second region). The prepared ZnO NRs show excellent electrocatalytic activity. This enables a measurable and stable output current. The results were correlated with the oxidation process of the H2O2 and revealed a good performance for the ZnO NR non-enzymatic H2O2 sensor. PMID:27367693

  17. Recent advances in graphene-based nanomaterials for fabricating electrochemical hydrogen peroxide sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruizhong; Chen, Wei

    2017-03-15

    Due to the large specific surface area, extraordinary mechanical flexibility, chemical stability, and superior electrical and thermal conductivities, graphene (G)-based materials have recently opened up an exciting field in the science and technology of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials with continuously growing academic and technological impetus. In the past several years, graphene-based materials have been well designed, synthesized, and investigated for sensing applications. In this review, we discuss the synthesis and application of graphene-based 2D nanomaterials for the fabrication of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) electrochemical sensors. In particular, graphene-based nanomaterials as immobilization matrix of heme proteins for the fabrication of enzymatic H2O2 electrochemical biosensors is first summarized. Then, the application of graphene-based electrocatalysts (metal-free, noble-metals and non-noble metals) in constructing non-enzymatic H2O2 electrochemical sensors is discussed in detail. We hope that this review is helpful to push forward the advancement of this academic issue (189 references).

  18. Calorimetric thermoelectric gas sensor for the detection of hydrogen, methane and mixed gases.

    PubMed

    Park, Nam-Hee; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Itoh, Toshio; Izu, Noriya; Shin, Woosuck

    2014-05-09

    A novel miniaturized calorimeter-type sensor device with a dual-catalyst structure was fabricated by integrating different catalysts on the hot (Pd/θ-Al2O3) and cold (Pt/α-Al2O3) ends of the device. The device comprises a calorimeter with a thermoelectric gas sensor (calorimetric-TGS), combining catalytic combustion and thermoelectric technologies. Its response for a model fuel gas of hydrogen and methane was investigated with various combustor catalyst compositions. The calorimetric-TGS devices detected H2, CH4, and a mixture of the two with concentrations ranging between 200 and 2000 ppm at temperatures of 100-400 °C, in terms of the calorie content of the gases. It was necessary to reduce the much higher response voltage of the TGS to H2 compared to CH4. We enhanced the H2 combustion on the cold side so that the temperature differences and response voltages to H2 were reduced. The device response to H2 combustion was reduced by 50% by controlling the Pt concentration in the Pt/α-Al2O3 catalyst on the cold side to 3 wt%.

  19. Amperometric sensor for hydrogen peroxide based on immobilized cytochrome c on binary self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xueping; Nakamura, Toshio

    2009-05-01

    A sensitive sensor for the determination of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was fabricated by immobilizing cytochrome c (cyt c) on binary self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 5-(1,2-dithiolan-3-yl)valeric acid (thioctic acid, T-COOH) and 5-(1,2-dithiolan-3-yl)valeramide (thioctic acid amide, T-NH(2)) on gold electrodes. The electrochemical characteristics of immobilized cyt c were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry. The modified electrode showed good electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of H(2)O(2). The catalytic current is linear with the H(2)O(2) concentration ranging from 10.0 to 300 microM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)(app)) was found to be 619 microM. The sensor achieved 95% of the steady-state current within 10 s, exhibiting high sensitivity (1.7 nA microM(-1) cm(-2)).

  20. Development of a Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with Inkjet-Printed Prussian Blue Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cinti, Stefano; Arduini, Fabiana; Moscone, Danila; Palleschi, Giuseppe; Killard, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    A sensor for the simple and sensitive measurement of hydrogen peroxide has been developed which is based on screen printed electrodes (SPEs) modified with Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) deposited using piezoelectric inkjet printing. PBNP-modified SPEs were characterized using physical and electrochemical techniques to optimize the PBNP layer thickness and electroanalytical conditions for optimum measurement of hydrogen peroxide. Sensor optimization resulted in a limit of detection of 2 × 10−7 M, a linear range from 0 to 4.5 mM and a sensitivity of 762 μA·mM−1·cm−2 which was achieved using 20 layers of printed PBNPs. Sensors also demonstrated excellent reproducibility (<5% rsd). PMID:25093348

  1. Theoretical investigation into the optimized design of a durable OFSPR hydrogen sensor based on a PdY alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, F.; Taylor, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen sensing technology by definition necessitates high accuracy, rapid response time, and durability. Thin film Pd has demonstrated excellent use in this field owing to large sensitivity and fast detection time. Interaction with hydrogen causes a crystallographic phase transition of the Pd lattice resulting in expansion. Subsequently repeated hydrogen loading cycles increases mechanical stress on the Pd lattice and thus leads to delamination of the hydrogen sensitive layer. By alloying Pd with Y, it is possible to mitigate the unwanted phase transition thereby significantly improving durability. We present the first optical fibre surface plasmon resonance (OFSPR) hydrogen sensor based on a multilayer Ag/SiO2/PdY deposited on the unclad core of a silica optical fibre. In this submission, we investigated the spectral influence of fibre numerical aperture in addition to Ag and SiO2 thickness within the multilayer. Sensor sensitivity and figure of merit were found to reach a maximum when a fixed Ag thickness was paired with a set of corresponding SiO2 thicknesses. We demonstrate that changing the thickness of one of these layers alters the optimal thickness of the other. We present a figure by which an array of optimal sensing structures can be determined. The largest sensor figure of merit in this study was found to be 0.062732, and was produced using Ag = 50nm, and SiO2 = 70nm. This sensor operates with sensitivity of 17.57nm to 4% hydrogen, detection accuracy of 0.014282nm-1, and operated at a spectral centre of 524.09nm.

  2. Defects and electronic transport in hydrogenated amorphous SiC films of interest for low dielectric constant back end of the line dielectric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomorski, T. A.; Bittel, B. C.; Cochrane, C. J.; Lenahan, P. M.; Bielefeld, J.; King, S. W.

    2013-08-01

    Back end of line dielectrics with low dielectric constants are needed for current and future integrated circuit technology. However, an understanding of the defects that cause leakage currents and limit reliability in these films is not yet developed. We utilize conventional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR), and leakage current measurements, complimented by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Rutherford back scattering results, to investigate a-SiC:H dielectrics which have great potential use for back end of line dielectrics. We observe a strong correlation between conventional EPR defect density measurements and leakage currents. There is also a very strong correlation between hydrogen content and both leakage current and EPR defect density. The close correspondence between the EPR results and the leakage currents strongly indicates that the defects observed by EPR are largely responsible for the leakage currents and likely limit the dielectric reliability. Important reliability phenomena in these films are time-dependent dielectric breakdown and stress induced leakage current. Additionally, we have utilized EDMR via spin dependent trap assisted tunneling to investigate the direct link between defects observed in EPR and electrical transport.

  3. Evaluation of hydrogen and ammonia gas mixtures with the suspended- gate field-effect transistor sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Domansky, K.; Li, H.S.; Josowicz, M.; Janata, J.

    1995-12-01

    Generation of hydrogen represents a severe industrial hazard primarily because the mixture of hydrogen with air in the ratio 4.0--74.2 vol % is explosive. In some industrial applications, such as waste remediation, hydrogen, as a product of radiolysis and corrosion, occurs in the presence of ammonia, nitrous oxide, water vapor and other molecules. A low cost, reliable method for monitoring these gaseous mixtures is essential. Palladium-based layers have been used successfully as hydrogen sensitive layers in several potentiometric sensors for many years. Since the sensing mechanism is based on the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen molecules, other hydrogen-bearing gases can also produce a response. From this viewpoint, using an array of sensing elements with catalytic and noncatalytic chemically selective layers in these applications can be highly effective. Moreover, integration of this array on a single chip can be routinely achieved. The Suspended Gate Field-Effect Transistor (SGFET) is microfabricated in silicon. The metal gate of the transistor is separated from the substrate by an air gap. The chemically sensitive layer is electrodeposited on the bottom of the suspended gate. Chemical species can penetrate into the gate area and interact with the sensing layer. This interaction modulates the work function of the layer. The change in the work function results in the shift of the transistor threshold voltage. The measured threshold voltage shift is a function of the gas concentration in the sensor vicinity. By passing a small current through the suspended gate, it is possible to control the operating temperature of the sensing layer (up to 200{degrees}C) and, therefore, to modulate the sensor sensitivity, selectivity, response and recovery times. Due to the very low thermal mass, the heat is localized on the gate so that many devices can be operated on a single chip, each with the gate at different temperature.

  4. The role of boron nitride nanotube as a new chemical sensor and potential reservoir for hydrogen halides environmental pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoosefian, Mehdi; Etminan, Nazanin; Moghani, Maryam Zeraati; Mirzaei, Samaneh; Abbasi, Shima

    2016-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) studies on the interaction of hydrogen halides (HX) environmental pollutants and the boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have been reported. To exploit the possibility of BNNTs as gas sensors, the adsorption of hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen bromide (HBr) on the side wall of armchair (5,5) boron nitride nanotubes have been investigated. B3LYP/6-31G (d) level were used to analyze the structural and electronic properties of investigate sensor. The adsorption process were interpreted by highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), natural bond orbital (NBO) and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) analysis. Topological parameters of bond critical points have been used to calculate as measure of hydrogen bond (HB) strength. Stronger binding energy, larger charge transfer and charge density illustrate that HF gas possesses chemisorbed adsorption process. The obtained results also show the strongest HB in HF/BNNT complex. We expect that results could provide helpful information for the design of new BNNTs based sensing devices.

  5. Long-term measurements of SPR hydrogen sensor based on hetero-core optical fiber with Au/Ta2O5/Pd/Au multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ken; Hosoki, Ai; Nishiyama, Michiko; Igawa, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-03-01

    Demands for a hydrogen fuel has been increased due to usages as an ecological and alternative energy resource. On the other hand, hydrogen easily causes an explosion above concentrations of 4 % in air, hence hydrogen sensors are need to have rapidity and accuracy for detecting hydrogen. Conventional hydrogen sensors have mainly used palladium (Pd) which is known as a hydrogen detecting material with high sensitivities and selectivity to hydrogen. Generally, Pd absorbs hydrogen in large amounts and forms Pd hydride, moreover, Pd experiences α-β phase transition during volume change of Pd with hydrogen absorption. As a result, the volume change of Pd induces a deterioration which affects time responses and sensitivities of hydrogen sensors. To keep Pd from deteriorating, alloying Pd with metals, such as Au and Ag, has been utilized as preventing Pd from experiencing α-β phase transition. In this paper, we propose a hetero-core optical fiber hydrogen sensor based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with multi-layers of Au/Ta2O5/Pd/Au in order to suppress the deterioration of Pd. A few sensors were prepared with the same construction of sensitive film 25-nm Au/ 60-nm Ta2O5/ thicknesses with stacks of annealed 3 double layers of 1.4-nm Pd and 0.6-nm Au or 5-nm pure Pd, and evaluated in terms of the time response and sensitivities. The response times at the 1st and the 15th hydrogen absorption test were experimentally observed to be from 3 s to 6 s for annealed Pd-Au, in contrast, to be from about 16 s to 22 s for pure Pd at 4 % hydrogen concentration, respectively.

  6. A Dual Sensor for pH and Hydrogen Peroxide Using Polymer-Coated Optical Fibre Tips

    PubMed Central

    Purdey, Malcolm S.; Thompson, Jeremy G.; Monro, Tanya M.; Abell, Andrew D.; Schartner, Erik P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the first single optical fibre tip probe for concurrent detection of both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration and pH of a solution. The sensor is constructed by embedding two fluorophores: carboxyperoxyfluor-1 (CPF1) and seminaphtharhodafluor-2 (SNARF2) within a polymer matrix located on the tip of the optical fibre. The functionalised fibre probe reproducibly measures pH, and is able to accurately detect H2O2 over a biologically relevant concentration range. This sensor offers potential for non-invasive detection of pH and H2O2 in biological environments using a single optical fibre. PMID:26694413

  7. A Dual Sensor for pH and Hydrogen Peroxide Using Polymer-Coated Optical Fibre Tips.

    PubMed

    Purdey, Malcolm S; Thompson, Jeremy G; Monro, Tanya M; Abell, Andrew D; Schartner, Erik P

    2015-12-17

    This paper demonstrates the first single optical fibre tip probe for concurrent detection of both hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) concentration and pH of a solution. The sensor is constructed by embedding two fluorophores: carboxyperoxyfluor-1 (CPF1) and seminaphtharhodafluor-2 (SNARF2) within a polymer matrix located on the tip of the optical fibre. The functionalised fibre probe reproducibly measures pH, and is able to accurately detect H₂O₂ over a biologically relevant concentration range. This sensor offers potential for non-invasive detection of pH and H₂O₂ in biological environments using a single optical fibre.

  8. Amperometric sensor for hydrogen peroxide based on direct electron transfer of spinach ferredoxin on Au electrode.

    PubMed

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Lee, Taek; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2011-02-01

    A protein-based electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was developed by an easy and effective film fabrication method where spinach ferredoxin (Fdx) containing [2Fe-2S] metal center was cross linked with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) on a gold (Au) surface. The surface morphology of Fdx molecules on Au electrodes was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were employed to study the electrochemical behavior of adsorbed Fdx on Au. The interfacial properties of the modified electrode were evaluated in the presence of Fe(CN)(6)(3-/4-) redox couple as a probe. From CV, a pair of well-defined and quasi-reversible redox peaks of Fdx was obtained in 10mM, pH 7.0 Tris-HCl buffer solution at -170 and -120mV respectively. One electron reduction of the [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster occurs at one of the iron atoms to give the reduced [2Fe-2S](+). The formal reduction potential of Fdx ca. -150mV (vs. Ag/AgCl electrode) at pH 7.0. The electron-transfer rate constant, k(s), for electron transfer between the Au electrode and Fdx was estimated to be 0.12s(-1). From the electrochemical experiments, it is observed that Fdx/MUA/Au promoted direct electron transfer between Fdx and electrode and it catalyzes the reduction of H(2)O(2). The Fdx/MUA/Au electrode displays a linear increase in amperometric current for increasing concentration of H(2)O(2).The sensor calibration plot was linear with r(2)=0.998 with sensitivity approximately 68.24μAm M(-1)cm(-2). Further, the effect of nitrite on the developed sensor was examined which does not interfere with the detection of H(2)O(2). Finally, the addition of H(2)O(2) on MUA/Au electrode was observed which has no effect on amperometric current. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. All-fiber hydrogen sensor based on stimulated Raman gain spectroscopy with a 1550-nm hollow-core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Jin, Wei

    2017-04-01

    We report a highly sensitive all-fiber hydrogen sensor based on continuous-wave stimulated Raman gain spectroscopy with a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber operating around 1550 nm. A pump-probe configuration is used, in which the frequency difference between the pump and the probe lasers is tuned to the S0(0) transition of para-hydrogen with a Raman shift of 354 cm-1. Preliminary experiments demonstrate a detection limit down to 17 ppm with a 250 s averaging time, and further improvement is possible. The all-fiber configuration operating in the telecommunication wavelength band would enable cost-effective and compact sensors for high sensitivity and high-resolution trace analysis.

  10. Hollow Pd-Ag Composite Nanowires for Fast Responding and Transparent Hydrogen Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji-Soo; Qiao, Shaopeng; Choi, Seon-Jin; Jha, Gaurav; Ogata, Alana F; Koo, Won-Tae; Kim, Dong-Ha; Kim, Il-Doo; Penner, Reginald M

    2017-09-22

    Pd based alloy materials with hollow nanostructures are ideal hydrogen (H2) sensor building blocks because of the ultra-high surface area afforded by this architecture. In this work, for the first time, we report a simple fabrication process for preparing hollow Pd-Ag alloy nanowires (Pd@Ag HNWs) by using the electrodeposition of lithographically patterned silver nanowires and followed galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) to form palladium. By controlling the GRR time of aligned Ag NWs within an aqueous Pd2+-containing solution, the compositional transition and morphological evolution from Ag NWs to Pd@Ag HNWs simultaneously occurred, and the relative atomic ratio between Pt and Ag was controlled. Interestingly, a GRR duration of 17 h transformed Ag NWs into Pd@Ag HNWs, that showed enhanced H2 response and faster sensing response time - reduced 2.5-fold - as compared to silver nanowires subjected to a shorter GRR period of 10 h. Furthermore, Pd@Ag HNWs patterned on the colorless and flexible polyimide (cPI) substrate showed highly reversible H2 sensing characteristics. To further demonstrate the potential use of Pd@Ag HNWs as sensing layers for all-transparent, wearable H2 sensing devices, we patterned the Au NWs perpendicular to Pd@Ag HNWs to form heterogeneous grid-type metallic NWs electrode which showed reversible H2 sensing properties in both bent and flat state.

  11. First-principles study of terpyrrole as a potential hydrogen cyanide sensor: DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Shokuhi Rad, Ali; Zardoost, Mohammad Reza; Abedini, Ehsan

    2015-10-01

    The sensitivity of terpyrrole (TPy; used as a polypyrrole model) to toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) adsorption was studied by using DFT to perform geometry optimization and to calculate the adsorption energy of HCN on TPy as well as orbital properties. The interaction of terpyrrole with HCN was studied for different relative orientations of the molecules. The adsorption energy, charge analysis, and the density of states were used to evaluate the ability of TPy to sense HCN in these different relative orientations. The adsorption energy was calculated to be -3.9 and -3.1 kcal mol(-1) for two possible relative orientations. Frontier molecular orbitals and energies indicated that some hybridization occurs during the adsorption of HCN on TPy when the molecules have appropriate relative orientations, resulting in an increase in conductivity. Considering the changes in the HOMO-LUMO energy gap that were calculated to occur during HCN adsorption, it is clear that TPy is sensitive to HCN adsorption, suggesting that TPy has the potential to act as an HCN sensor. Graphical abstract HCN adsorption on TPy.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide sensor based on carbon nanowalls grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomatsu, Masakazu; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Foord, John S.; Kondo, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Takeda, Keigo; Hori, Masaru

    2017-06-01

    Fabrication of an electrochemical sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection was demonstrated. H2O2 is a major messenger molecule in various redox-dependent cellular signaling transductions. Therefore, sensitive detection of H2O2 is greatly important in health inspection and environmental protection. Carbon nanowalls (CNWs) are composed of few-layer graphenes standing almost vertically on a substrate forming a three-dimensional structure. In this work, CNWs were used as a platform for H2O2 sensing, which is based on the large surface area of conducting carbon and surface decoration with platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs). CNWs were grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) by inductively coupled plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition to increase the surface area. Then, the CNW surface was decorated with Pt-NPs by the reduction of H2PtCl6. Cyclic voltammetry results indicate that the Pt-decorated CNW/CFP electrode possesses excellent electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of H2O2. Amperometric responses indicate the high-sensitivity detection capability of the Pt-decorated CNW/CFP electrode for H2O2.

  13. Safe and simple detection of sparse hydrogen by Pd-Au alloy/air based 1D photonic crystal sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Biswas, T.; Chattopadhyay, R.; Ghosh, J.; Bysakh, S.; Bhadra, S. K.

    2016-11-01

    A simple integrated hydrogen sensor using Pd-Au alloy/air based one dimensional photonic crystal with an air defect layer is theoretically modeled. Structural parameters of the photonic crystal are delicately scaled to generate photonic band gap frequencies in a visible spectral regime. An optimized defect thickness permits a localized defect mode operating at a frequency within the photonic band gap region. Hydrogen absorption causes modification in the band gap characteristics due to variation of refractive index and lattice parameters of the alloy. As a result, the transmission peak appeared due to the resonant defect state gets shifted. This peak shifting is utilized to detect sparse amount of hydrogen present in the surrounding environment. A theoretical framework is built to calculate the refractive index profile of hydrogen loaded alloy using density functional theory and Bruggeman's effective medium approximation. The calculated refractive index variation of Pd3Au alloy film due to hydrogen loading is verified experimentally by measuring the reflectance characteristics. Lattice expansion properties of the alloy are studied through X-ray diffraction analyses. The proposed structure shows about 3 nm red shift of the transmission peak for a rise of 1% atomic hydrogen concentration in the alloy.

  14. A novel electrochemical sensor surface for the detection of hydrogen peroxide using cyclic bisureas/gold nanoparticle composite.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Manjusha; Sandhyarani, N

    2011-10-15

    A novel electrochemical sensor surface with enhanced sensitivity for the detection of hydrogen peroxide has been developed based on the layer-by-layer assembly of mercapto propionic acid (MPA), cystine-based polymethylene-bridged cyclic bisureas (CBU)/gold nanoparticle (AuNP) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on gold electrode. Possibility of a large number of hydrogen bonds, allowed by the chemical and sterical structure of the CBU ensures the proper immobilization of the enzyme in favorable orientation and retention of enzymatic activity. Efficient electron tunneling property of AuNP together with its electrocatalytic activity leads to higher sensitivity in the detection of H(2)O(2). In cyclic voltammetry measurements a cathodic current due to direct electron transfer of HRP is observed which, indicates excellent electrocatalytic activity of the sensor surface. The biosensor surface modified with gold nanoparticle and CBU showed a lower detection limit of 50 nM for hydrogen peroxide. Chronoamperometry is performed at -0.3 V and Michaelis-Menten constant K(M)(app) value is estimated to be 4.5 μM. The newly developed sensor surface showed very high stability, reproducibility and high sensitivity.

  15. Dependences of Characteristics of Sensors Based on Tin Dioxide on the Hydrogen Concentration and Humidity of Gas Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaman, V. I.; Almaev, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    An expression is obtained for the energy band bending eφsH on the surface of the SnO2 film in the clean air + hydrogen mixture. It is assumed that the value of eφsH depends not only on the surface charge density of adsorbed oxygen ions O¯, but also on the negative charged hydroxyl groups (OH¯). The results of the analysis of the dependences of eφsH on the hydrogen concentration {n}_{{H}_2} and the absolute humidity of the gas mixture obtained during the operation of the sensor in the thermo-cyclic mode are presented. A method for the determining {n}_{{H}_2} in the examined gas mixture is proposed. The method based on the dependence of eφsH on the hydrogen concentration established during the calibration of the sensor is proposed. The dependences of the energy band bending on the SnO2 surface at {n}_{{H}_2} = 0 and the conductivity of the sensor on its temperature during the heating period are discussed.

  16. Influence of Conditions of Pd/SnO2 Nanomaterial Formation on Properties of Hydrogen Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokovykh, E. V.; Oleksenko, L. P.; Maksymovych, N. P.; Matushko, I. P.

    2017-06-01

    Metal oxide sensors were created using nanosized tin dioxide obtained by a sol-gel method. Gas-sensitive layers of the sensors were impregnated with PdCl2 solutions of different concentrations to increase sensitivities of the proposed sensors. Influence of different temperature conditions of the sensor formation on the sensor properties was studied. It was found that decreasing duration of high-temperature sensor treatment prevents enlargement of particles of the gas-sensitive materials. It was shown that the sensors based on materials with smaller particle sizes showed higher sensor responses to 40 ppm H2. Obtained results were explained in terms of substantial influence of length of the common boundaries between the material particles of tin dioxide and palladium on the gas-sensitive properties of the sensors. The obtained sensors had possessed a fast response and recovery time and demonstrated stable characteristics during their long-term operation.

  17. Influence of Conditions of Pd/SnO2 Nanomaterial Formation on Properties of Hydrogen Sensors.

    PubMed

    Sokovykh, E V; Oleksenko, L P; Maksymovych, N P; Matushko, I P

    2017-12-01

    Metal oxide sensors were created using nanosized tin dioxide obtained by a sol-gel method. Gas-sensitive layers of the sensors were impregnated with PdCl2 solutions of different concentrations to increase sensitivities of the proposed sensors. Influence of different temperature conditions of the sensor formation on the sensor properties was studied. It was found that decreasing duration of high-temperature sensor treatment prevents enlargement of particles of the gas-sensitive materials. It was shown that the sensors based on materials with smaller particle sizes showed higher sensor responses to 40 ppm H2. Obtained results were explained in terms of substantial influence of length of the common boundaries between the material particles of tin dioxide and palladium on the gas-sensitive properties of the sensors. The obtained sensors had possessed a fast response and recovery time and demonstrated stable characteristics during their long-term operation.

  18. Reusable sensor based on high magnetization carboxyl-modified graphene oxide with intrinsic hydrogen peroxide catalytic activity for hydrogen peroxide and glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Chen, Shi-Lian; Tsai, Rung-Ywan

    2013-03-15

    We propose a new strategy to improve the enzyme stability, construction and sensitivity of a multifunctional sensor. An exfoliated graphene oxide sheet with carboxyl-long-chains (GO-CLC) was prepared in one step from primitive graphite via Friedel-Crafts acylation. Magnetic nanoparticles, glucose oxidase (GOD) and poly[aniline-co-N-(1-one-butyric acid) aniline] (SPAnH) were then incorporated to form an electrochemical film (SPAnH-HMGO-CLC-GOD) for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and glucose. The GO and Fe(3)O(4) have intrinsic hydrogen peroxide catalytic activity and the activity will be enhanced by the combination of SPAnH coating and induces an amplification of electrochemical reduction current. This response can be used as a glucose sensor by tracing the released H(2)O(2) after enzymatic reaction of bound GOD. Our sensor was linear within the range from 0.01 mM to 1mM H(2)O(2) and 0.1mM to 1.4mM glucose, with high sensitivities of 4340.6 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and 1074.6 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSD) were 5.4% for H(2)O(2) detection and 5.8% for glucose detection. The true detecting range was 0.4-40 mM for H(2)O(2) and 4-56 mM for glucose, which multiplied by 40-fold of dilution. This sensor based on the catalysis of organic SPAnH and the enzymatic activity of GOD can be used for both H(2)O(2) and glucose sensing in potential clinical, environmental and industrial applications.

  19. Recent Developments in SiC Device Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, C. I.; Konstantinov, A. O.

    Silicon Carbide is fast emerging as a mature semiconductor. The unique combination of material properties offered by SiC will allow it to establish itself in applications where the ever dominant Si is approaching the physical (not technical) limits of it's operation. Three key areas will be explored in this paper: (i) High power electronics. SiC devices operating at several kV and capable of MW power handling will revolutionise the way electrical power is transmitted and made use of. Recent progress supported by ABB in Sweden suggests these breakthroughs will begin to play a key role soon after the turn of the century. (ii) High frequency devices made from SiC will also play an increasingly important part in the mobile telecommunication revolution in which we currently live. Northrop Grumman in the USA have demonstrated the transmission of digital TV using SiC based devices. The high power density achieved from such devices make them also suitable for base stations for mobile telephones. (iii) Finally we look at some examples of how SiC is being used to develop new types of sensors that can be used in extreme environments such as high temperatures, high pressures or corrosive environments. Feedback from such sensors is seen as essential to understanding how we effect the world around us and thereby how we can limit pollution.

  20. Advances in Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide, and Hydrocarbon Gas Sensor Technology Using GaN and ZnO-Based Devices

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Travis; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen; Kang, Byoung Sam; Wang, Hung-Ta; Chang, Chih-Yang; Lin, Jenshan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we review our recent results in developing gas sensors for hydrogen using various device structures, including ZnO nanowires and GaN High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs). ZnO nanowires are particularly interesting because they have a large surface area to volume ratio, which will improve sensitivity, and because they operate at low current levels, will have low power requirements in a sensor module. GaN-based devices offer the advantage of the HEMT structure, high temperature operation, and simple integration with existing fabrication technology and sensing systems. Improvements in sensitivity, recoverability, and reliability are presented. Also reported are demonstrations of detection of other gases, including CO2 and C2H4 using functionalized GaN HEMTs. This is critical for the development of lab-on-a-chip type systems and can provide a significant advance towards a market-ready sensor application. PMID:22408548

  1. Harsh Environment Silicon Carbide Sensor Technology for Geothermal Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, Albert P.

    2013-04-26

    This project utilizes Silicon Carbide (SiC) materials platform to fabricate advanced sensors to be used as high-temperature downhole instrumentation for the DOE’s Geothermal Technologies Program on Enhanced Geothermal Systems. The scope of the proposed research is to 1) develop a SiC pressure sensor that can operate in harsh supercritical conditions, 2) develop a SiC temperature sensor that can operate in harsh supercritical conditions, 3) develop a bonding process for adhering SiC sensor die to well casing couplers, and 4) perform experimental exposure testing of sensor materials and the sensor devices.

  2. SICs and Algebraic Number Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleby, Marcus; Flammia, Steven; McConnell, Gary; Yard, Jon

    2017-08-01

    We give an overview of some remarkable connections between symmetric informationally complete measurements (SIC-POVMs, or SICs) and algebraic number theory, in particular, a connection with Hilbert's 12th problem. The paper is meant to be intelligible to a physicist who has no prior knowledge of either Galois theory or algebraic number theory.

  3. An optical sensor for hydrogen sulfide detection in open path using WMS-2 f/1 f technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li-mei; Liu, Li-wen; Yang, Yan-gang; Guo, Qing-hua; Xi, Jiang-tao

    2016-11-01

    An optical hydrogen sulfide (H2S) sensor based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy with the second harmonic (2 f) corrected by the first harmonic (1 f) signal (WMS-2 f/1 f) is developed using a distributed feedback (DFB) laser emitting at 1.578 μm and a homemade gas cell with 1-m-long optical path length. The novel sensor is constructed by an electrical cabinet and an optical reflecting and receiving end. The DFB laser is employed for targeting a strong H2S line at 6 336.62 cm-1 in the fundamental absorption band of H2S. The sensor performance, including the minimum detection limit and the stability, can be improved by reducing the laser intensity drift and common mode noise by means of the WMS-2 f/1 f technique. The experimental results indicate that the linearity and response time of the sensor are 0.999 26 and 6 s (in concentration range of 15.2—45.6 mg/m3), respectively. The maximum relative deviation for continuous detection (60 min) of 30.4 mg/m3 H2S is 0.48% and the minimum detection limit obtained by Allan variance is 79 μg/m3 with optimal integration time of 32 s. The optical H2S sensor can be applied to environmental monitoring and industrial production, and it has significance for real-time online detection in many fields.

  4. Effect of air-pressure on room temperature hydrogen sensing characteristics of nanocrystalline doped tin oxide MEMS-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Satyajit; Ludwig, Lawrence; Cho, Hyoung J; Duarte, Julian; Seal, Sudipta

    2005-11-01

    Nanocrystalline indium oxide (In2O3)-doped tin oxide (SnO2) thin film sensor has been sol-gel dip-coated on a microelectrochemical system (MEMS) device using a sol-gel dip-coating technique. Hydrogen (H2) at ppm-level has been successfully detected at room temperature using the present MEMS-based sensor. The room temperature H2 sensing characteristics (sensitivity, response and recovery time, and recovery rate) of the present MEMS-based sensor has been investigated as a function of air-pressure (50-600 Torr) with and without the ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure. It has been demonstrated that, the concentration of the surface-adsorbed oxygen-ions (which is related to the sensor-resistance in air), the ppm-level H2, and the oxygen (O2) partial pressure are the three major factors, which determine the variation in the room temperature H2 sensing characteristics of the present MEMS-based sensor as a function of air-pressure.

  5. Ultrafast and ultrasensitive hydrogen sensors based on self-assembly monolayer promoted 2-dimensional palladium nanoclusters

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Tao; Zach, Michael P.; Xiao, Zhili

    2007-02-06

    A device and method of making same. The device or hydrogen detector has a non-conducting substrate with a metal film capable of absorbing hydrogen to form a stable metal hydride. The metal film is being on the threshold of percolation and is connected to mechanism for sensing a change in electrical resistance in response to the presence of hydrogen in contact with the metal film which causes an increase in conductivity.

  6. Ultrafast and ultrasensitive hydrogen sensors based on self-assembly monolayer promoted 2-dimensional palladium nanoclusters

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Tao [Darien, IL; Zach, Michael P [Darien, IL; Xiao, Zhili [Naperville, IL

    2008-06-24

    A device and method of making same. The device or hydrogen detector has a non-conducting substrate with a metal film capable of absorbing hydrogen to form a stable metal hydride. The metal film is on the threshold of percolation and is connected to mechanism for sensing a change in electrical resistance in response to the presence of hydrogen in contact with the metal film which causes an increase in conductivity.

  7. Sensor for measuring hydrogen partial pressure in parabolic trough power plant expansion tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzmaier, Greg C.; Cooney, Daniel A.

    2017-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Acciona Energy North America are working together to design and implement a process system that provides a permanent solution to the issue of hydrogen buildup at parabolic trough power plants. We are pursuing a method that selectively removes hydrogen from the expansion tanks that serve as reservoirs for the heat transfer fluid (HTF) that circulates in the collector field and power block components. Our modeling shows that removing hydrogen from the expansion tanks at a design rate reduces and maintains dissolved hydrogen in the circulating HTF to a selected target level. Our collaborative work consists of several tasks that are needed to advance this process concept to a development stage, where it is ready for implementation at a commercial power plant. Our main effort is to design and evaluate likely process-unit operations that remove hydrogen from the expansion tanks at a specified rate. Additionally, we designed and demonstrated a method and instrumentation to measure hydrogen partial pressure and concentration in the expansion-tank headspace gas. We measured hydrogen partial pressure in the headspace gas mixture using a palladium-alloy membrane, which is permeable exclusively to hydrogen. The membrane establishes a pure hydrogen gas phase that is in equilibrium with the hydrogen in the gas mixture. We designed and fabricated instrumentation, and demonstrated its effectiveness in measuring hydrogen partial pressures over a range of three orders of magnitude. Our goal is to install this instrument at the Nevada Solar One power plant and to demonstrate its effectiveness in measuring hydrogen levels in the expansion tanks under normal plant operating conditions.

  8. Development of a Prototype Optical Hydrogen Gas Sensor Using a Getter-Doped Polymer Transducer for Monitoring Cumulative Exposure: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Maitland, D J; Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Letts, S A; Trebes, J E

    2008-06-05

    A novel prototype optical sensor for monitoring cumulative hydrogen gas exposure was fabricated and evaluated. Chemical-to-optical transduction was accomplished by detecting the intensity of 670 nm laser light transmitted through a hydrogen getter-doped polymer film mounted at the end of an optical fiber; the transmittance of the composite film increased with uptake of hydrogen by the embedded getter. The composite film consisted of the hydrogen getter 1,4-bis(phenylethynyl)benzene, also known as DEB, with carbon-supported palladium catalyst embedded in silicone elastomer. Because the change in transmittance was irreversible and occurred continuously as the getter captured hydrogen, the sensor behaved like a dosimeter, providing a unique indication of the cumulative gas exposure.

  9. Fluorescent hydrogen peroxide sensor based on cupric oxide nanoparticles and its application for glucose and L-lactate detection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ai-Ling; Liu, Yin-Huan; Deng, Hao-Hua; Hong, Guo-Lin; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lin, Xin-Hua; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Wei

    2014-11-15

    A novel fluorescent hydrogen peroxide sensor was developed based on the peroxidase-like activity of cupric oxide nanoparticles. Cupric oxide nanoparticles effectively catalyzed the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into hydroxyl radicals. Then terephthalic acid was oxidized by hydroxyl radical to form a highly fluorescent product. The linear range of hydrogen peroxide estimated to be 5.0 × 10(-6)-2.0 × 10(-4)M with a detection limit of 3.4 × 10(-7)M. Moreover, this detection system enabled the sensing of analytes which can enzymatically generate hydrogen peroxide. By coupling the oxidation of glucose or L-lactate catalyzed by their corresponding oxidase enzymes with terephthalic acid oxidation catalyzed by cupric oxide nanoparticles, sensitive assays of glucose and l-lactate with detection limits of 1.0 × 10(-6) and 4.5 × 10(-8)M were realized. The successful applications of this approach in human serum samples have also been demonstrated.

  10. Enhancing performances of resistivity-type hydrogen sensor based on Pd/SnO2/RGO nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yitian; Zheng, Lulu; Zou, Kun; Li, Cong

    2017-03-31

    The Pd/SnO2/reduced graphene oxide (Pd/SnO2/RGO) nanocomposites that Pd and SnO2 crystalline nanoparticles of high density and uniformity coated on RGO have been synthesized by two-step reduction process. A novel hydrogen(H2) sensor based on Pd/SnO2/RGO nanocomposites was fabricated by placing a Pd/SnO2/RGO nanocomposites onto a pair of gold electrodes. The Pd/SnO2/RGO nanocomposites based sensor exhibits higher responses than Pd/RGO to H2 because the introduce of SnO2 nanoparticles enhance H2 adsorption and form P-N junction with graphene. The sensor shows high response of 55% to 10000ppm H2, and low detection limit, fast response, good selectivity and repeatability due to combination effect of Pd and SnO2 nanoparticles. The studies provide a novel strategy for great potential applications of graphene based gas sensor.

  11. Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Bockris, John O’M.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech. PMID:28824125

  12. Characteristics of Hydrogen Sensor Based on Monolayer of Pt Nanoparticles Decorated on Single-Layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Nguyen Hai; Long, Cung Thanh; Nam, Nguyen Hoang; Hue, Nguyen Thi; Phuong, Nguyen Huy; Hong, Hoang Si

    2017-01-01

    We report the construction and testing of a resistive-type H2 sensor composed of a monolayer of platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) deposited using an immersion method on single-layer graphene. It was found that the Pt NP monolayer significantly reduced the response/recovery time of the graphene-based H2 sensor. The very rapid response of the sensor is attributed to the short diffusion length between the monolayer Pt nanoparticles and single-layer graphene. The sensor showed response time of 6 s and recovery time of 69 s at the optimal working temperature of 150°C. In addition, the fabricated device exhibited good repeatability at 10,000 ppm H2, detection range of 10 ppm to 10,000 ppm, and good thermal stability, satisfying the requirements for H2 sensors for safety applications.

  13. Structural effects of naphthalimide-based fluorescent sensor for hydrogen sulfide and imaging in live zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seon-Ae; Park, Chul Soon; Kwon, Oh Seok; Giong, Hoi-Khoanh; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Ha, Tai Hwan; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biological messenger, but few biologically-compatible methods are available for its detection in aqueous solution. Herein, we report a highly water-soluble naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe (L1), which is a highly versatile building unit that absorbs and emits at long wavelengths and is selective for hydrogen sulfide over cysteine, glutathione, and other reactive sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen species in aqueous solution. We describe turn-on fluorescent probes based on azide group reduction on the fluorogenic ‘naphthalene’ moiety to fluorescent amines and intracellular hydrogen sulfide detection without the use of an organic solvent. L1 and L2 were synthetically modified to functional groups with comparable solubility on the N-imide site, showing a marked change in turn-on fluorescent intensity in response to hydrogen sulfide in both PBS buffer and living cells. The probes were readily employed to assess intracellular hydrogen sulfide level changes by imaging endogenous hydrogen sulfide signal in RAW264.7 cells incubated with L1 and L2. Expanding the use of L1 to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we successfully visualized hydrogen sulfide detection in the yolk, brain and spinal cord of living zebrafish embryos, thereby providing a powerful approach for live imaging for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems.

  14. Structural effects of naphthalimide-based fluorescent sensor for hydrogen sulfide and imaging in live zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seon-Ae; Park, Chul Soon; Kwon, Oh Seok; Giong, Hoi-Khoanh; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Ha, Tai Hwan; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important biological messenger, but few biologically-compatible methods are available for its detection in aqueous solution. Herein, we report a highly water-soluble naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe (L1), which is a highly versatile building unit that absorbs and emits at long wavelengths and is selective for hydrogen sulfide over cysteine, glutathione, and other reactive sulfur, nitrogen, and oxygen species in aqueous solution. We describe turn-on fluorescent probes based on azide group reduction on the fluorogenic ‘naphthalene’ moiety to fluorescent amines and intracellular hydrogen sulfide detection without the use of an organic solvent. L1 and L2 were synthetically modified to functional groups with comparable solubility on the N-imide site, showing a marked change in turn-on fluorescent intensity in response to hydrogen sulfide in both PBS buffer and living cells. The probes were readily employed to assess intracellular hydrogen sulfide level changes by imaging endogenous hydrogen sulfide signal in RAW264.7 cells incubated with L1 and L2. Expanding the use of L1 to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we successfully visualized hydrogen sulfide detection in the yolk, brain and spinal cord of living zebrafish embryos, thereby providing a powerful approach for live imaging for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems. PMID:27188400

  15. Hydrogen concentration in expired air analyzed with a new hydrogen sensor, plasma glucose rise, and symptoms of lactose intolerance after oral administration of 100 gram lactose.

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Eriksson, M; Bárány, F; Einarsson, K; Sundgren, H; Nylander, C; Lundström, I; Blomstrand, R

    1985-09-01

    A rapid breath hydrogen analyzer to detect lactose malabsorption is described. After ingestion of a lactose solution the patient expires into a mouthpiece attached to a hydrogen sensor at 30-min intervals for 3 1/2 h. The hydrogen of the expired air causes a voltage change that can be transformed into ppm from a calibration curve. A tolerance test with a load of 100 g lactose was performed in 43 consecutive patients with various gastrointestinal disturbances, referred to the laboratory for the commonly used lactose tolerance test based on plasma glucose measurements. Eleven patients developed symptoms of lactose intolerance during the test. Biopsy specimens from the distal duodenum or proximal jejunum showed partial villous atrophy in one, in whom celiac disease with lactose intolerance was diagnosed; the other 10 had normal specimens. In nine of them lactose intolerance was diagnosed and confirmed by observation for months on a lactose-poor diet. The 10th patient (H.P.L.) did not improve on such a diet. He also showed pronounced symptoms of intolerance during a test with monosaccharides (glucose + galactose). His intestinal disease remained undiagnosed. The 11 patients with symptoms of intolerance and 3 patients without symptoms during the lactose load showed a flat plasma glucose curve after drinking the lactose solution--that is, a maximum rise of the glucose concentration of 1.5 mmol/l. One of the symptom-free patients dropped out and could not be observed, another did not improve on a lactose-poor diet, and the third noticed a favorable effect of the diet on stool consistency but not on other abdominal symptoms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Ultrasensitive hydrogen sensor based on Pt-decorated WO₃ nanorods prepared by glancing-angle dc magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Horprathum, M; Srichaiyaperk, T; Samransuksamer, B; Wisitsoraat, A; Eiamchai, P; Limwichean, S; Chananonnawathorn, C; Aiempanakit, K; Nuntawong, N; Patthanasettakul, V; Oros, C; Porntheeraphat, S; Songsiriritthigul, P; Nakajima, H; Tuantranont, A; Chindaudom, P

    2014-12-24

    In this work, we report an ultrasensitive hydrogen (H2) sensor based on tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanorods decorated with platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. WO3 nanorods were fabricated by dc magnetron sputtering with a glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique, and decorations of Pt nanoparticles were performed by normal dc sputtering on WO3 nanorods with varying deposition time from 2.5 to 15 s. Crystal structures, morphologies, and chemical information on Pt-decorated WO3 nanorods were characterized by grazing-incident X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The effect of the Pt nanoparticles on the H2-sensing performance of WO3 nanorods was investigated over a low concentration range of 150-3000 ppm of H2 at 150-350 °C working temperatures. The results showed that the H2 response greatly increased with increasing Pt-deposition time up to 10 s but then substantially deteriorated as the deposition time increased further. The optimally decorated Pt-WO3 nanorod sensor exhibited an ultrahigh H2 response from 1530 and 214,000 to 150 and 3000 ppm of H2, respectively, at 200 °C. The outstanding gas-sensing properties may be attributed to the excellent dispersion of fine Pt nanoparticles on WO3 nanorods having a very large effective surface area, leading to highly effective spillover of molecular hydrogen through Pt nanoparticles onto the WO3 nanorod surface.

  17. Highly-ordered perpendicularly immobilized FWCNTs on the thionine monolayer-modified electrode for hydrogen peroxide and glucose sensors.

    PubMed

    Ma, Min; Miao, Zhiying; Zhang, Di; Du, Xin; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Cong; Lin, Jiahui; Chen, Qiang

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we innovatively immobilized few-walled carbon nanotubes (FWCNTs) perpendicularly on Au surface through conductive thionine instead of aminoalkanethiols so as to improve electrochemical properties. Because FWCNTs own smaller aggregates, stronger chemical corrosion resistant, and higher conductivity than single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and thionine is a good electron transfer mediator can provide amino and sulfhydryl groups playing the same function as insulating aminoalkanethiols. The strategy for obtaining perpendicularly aligned FWCNTs (p-FWCNTs) is electrostatically assembled thionine and 11-amino-n-undecanethiol (AUT) on Au surface via Au-S bond to provide amino groups for covalently combining terminus-carboxylated FWCNTs, we confirmed and compared the results by AFM, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical methods. In order to prove the constructed basement has excellent electrochemical properties can provide a good platform for sensors fabrication, we developed a novel non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor by electrodepositing Pt nanoparticles (PtNPs) on p-FWCNTs/Thionine/Au electrode surface, and verified the result by TEM, EDX and electrochemical techniques. Furthermore, polyallylamine (PAA) and poly(vinyl sulfate) (PVS) permselective layer, poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDDA) and glucose oxidase (GOx) multilayer films were layer-by-layer self-assembled on p-FWCNTs/Thionine/Au surface to fabricate a glucose biosensor. Either the non-enzymatic H2O2 sensor or the enzyme-based glucose biosensor showed good sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and stability, both them had been applied for biological sample analysis with satisfactory results. The results show that the p-FWCNTs/Thionine/Au electrode can work as an ideal platform for the development of highly sensitive sensors, coupled with p-FWCNTs are rich in functional groups could be used for fabricating diverse sensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis of new copper nanoparticle-decorated anchored type ligands: applications as non-enzymatic electrochemical sensors for hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Zandi-Atashbar, N; Ghiaci, M; Taghizadeh, M; Rezaei, B

    2015-02-01

    In this work, copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) decorated on two new anchored type ligands were utilized to prepare two electrochemical sensors. These ligands are made from bonding amine chains to silica support including SiO2-pro-NH2 (compound I) and SiO2-pro-NH-cyanuric-NH2 (compound II). The morphology of synthesized CuNPs was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nano-particles were in the range of 13-37 nm with the average size of 23 nm. These materials were used to modify carbon paste electrode. Different electrochemical techniques, including cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and hydrodynamic chronoamperometry, were used to study the sensor behavior. These electrochemical sensors were used as a model for non-enzymatic detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). To evaluate the abilities of the modified electrodes for H2O2 detection, the electrochemical signals were compared in the absence and presence of H2O2. From them, two modified electrodes showed significant responses vs. H2O2 addition. The amperograms illustrated that the sensors were selective for H2O2 sensing with linear ranges of 5.14-1250 μmol L(-1) and 1.14-1120 μmol L(-1) with detection limits of 0.85 and 0.27 μmol L(-1) H2O2, sensitivities of 3545 and 11,293 μA mmol(-1)L and with response times less than 5s for I/CPE and II/CPE, respectively. As further verification of the selected sensor, H2O2 contained in milk sample was analyzed and the obtained results were comparable with the ones from classical control titration method.

  19. Sensitive hydrogen sensor based on selectively infiltrated photonic crystal fiber with Pt-loaded WO₃ coating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, D N; Yang, Fan; Li, Zhi; Yang, Minghong

    2014-07-01

    A sensitive hydrogen sensing device based on a selectively infiltrated photonic crystal fiber (PCF) coated with Pt-loaded WO₃ is demonstrated. With Pt-loaded WO₃ coating acting as the catalytic layer, hydrogen undergoes an exothermic reaction with oxygen and releases heat when the device is exposed to gas mixtures of air and hydrogen, which induces local temperature change in the PCF and hence leads to the resonant wavelength shift of the proposed device. The maximum wavelength shift of 98.5 nm is obtained with a 10-mm-long infiltrated PCF for 4% (v/v) H₂ concentration, and a hydrogen sensitivity of 32.3 nm/% (v/v) H₂ is achieved within the range of 1%-4% (v/v) H₂ in air.

  20. High performance hydrogen sensor based on Mn implanted ZnO nanowires array fabricated on ITO substrate.

    PubMed

    Renitta, A; Vijayalakshmi, K

    2017-08-01

    In the present research, we propose a novel approach for the detection of hydrogen gas using Mn implanted ZnO nanowires fabricated onto ITO coated glass substrate by chemical spray pyrolysis deposition. The effect of Mn concentration on the structural, optical and morphological properties of ZnO films were investigated. X-ray diffraction studies showed that the Mn implanted ZnO films were grown as a polycrystalline hexagonal wurtzite phase without any impurities. The (101) peak position of ZnO-Mn films was shifted towards a lower angle with increasing Mn concentration. The optical band gap decreased from 3.45eV to 3.23eV with increasing Mn content. PL spectra, revealed sharp and strong near band edge emission which suggests that ZnO nanowires exhibit high crystalline quality. FE-SEM images of Mn implanted ZnO show perfectly aligned nanowires for all the films fabricated on ITO. The material (Zn, O, Mn) was confirmed by EDX spectra. The hydrogen sensing mechanism of the Mn implanted ZnO nanowire sensor was also discussed. It was found that H2 response was significantly enhanced by more than one order of magnitude with increasing Mn doping concentrations. The studied ZnO-Mn films coated on ITO substrate can be used as a low cost and easy-fabrication hydrogen sensing material. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of Gate and Base Drive Using SiC Junction Field Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Development of Gate and Base Drive Using SiC Junction Field Effect Transistors by Timothy E. Griffin ARL-TR-4475 May 2008...Development of Gate and Base Drive Using SiC Junction Field Effect Transistors Timothy E. Griffin Sensors and Electron Devices...Effect Transistors 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Timothy E. Griffin 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER

  2. Research on the interaction of hydrogen-bond acidic polymer sensitive sensor materials with chemical warfare agents simulants by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-06-02

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper.

  3. Research on the Interaction of Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer Sensitive Sensor Materials with Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants by Inverse Gas Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Huang, Feng; Qin, Molin; Guo, Chenghai; Ding, Mingyu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond acidic polymers are important high affinity materials sensitive to organophosphates in the chemical warfare agent sensor detection process. Interactions between the sensor sensitive materials and chemical warfare agent simulants were studied by inverse gas chromatography. Hydrogen bonded acidic polymers, i.e., BSP3, were prepared for micro-packed columns to examine the interaction. DMMP (a nerve gas simulant) and 2-CEES (a blister agent simulant) were used as probes. Chemical and physical parameters such as heats of absorption and Henry constants of the polymers to DMMP and 2-CEES were determined by inverse gas chromatography. Details concerning absorption performance are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26043177

  4. Hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Prussian blue electrodeposited on (3-mercaptopropyl)-trimethoxysilane polymer-modified gold electrode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2011-02-01

    A hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) sensor was developed by electrodepositing Prussian blue (PB) on a gold electrode modified with (3-mercaptopropyl)-trimethoxysilane (MPS) polymer. The characterization of the self-assembled electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results of electrochemical experiments showed that such constructed sensor had a favorable catalytic ability to reduce H(2)O(2). The MPS film on the modified gold electrode greatly enhanced the pH-adaptive range of PB. Large surface-to-volume ratio property of double-layer 2d-network MPS-modified PB electrode enabled stable and highly sensitive performance of the non-enzymatic H(2)O(2) sensor. The linear range of H(2)O(2) determined is from 2.0 × 10(-6) to 2.0 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a detection limit for H(2)O(2) of 1.8 × 10(-6) mol L(-1). The influences of the potentially interfering substances on the determination of H(2)O(2) were investigated. This modified electrode exhibits a good selectivity and high sensitivity with satisfactory results.

  5. Enzyme-free hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yancai; Zhang, Yayun; Zhong, Yanmei; Li, Shunxing

    2015-08-01

    The well-designed Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites were synthesized via a facile method, and were used to fabricate an enzyme-free amperometric hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor. The size, shape, elementary composition and structure of the nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy-dispersed spectrum (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The outermost layer of the nanocomposites was amorphous carbon, the second layer was Ag and the core was Au. The Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites exhibit attractive activity for electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 according to the electrochemical experiments. It also demonstrates the H2O2 sensor possess well performance with a wide linear range of 5.0 μM to 4.75 mM and a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 0.14 μM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the interference from the common interfering species, such as glucose, ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid can be effectively avoided. In a word, the Au@Ag@C nanocomposites are promising candidates for enzyme-free H2O2 sensor.

  6. Soil water content determination with cosmic-ray neutron sensor: Correcting aboveground hydrogen effects with thermal/fast neutron ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhengchao; Li, Zizhong; Liu, Gang; Li, Baoguo; Ren, Tusheng

    2016-09-01

    The cosmic-ray neutron sensor (CRNS), which estimates field scale soil water content, bridges the gap between point measurement and remote sensing. The accuracy of CRNS measurements, however, is affected by additional hydrogen pools (e.g., vegetation, snow, and rainfall interception). The objectives of this study are to: (i) evaluate the accuracy of CRNS estimates in a farmland system using depth and horizontal weighted point measurements, (ii) introduce a novel method for estimating the amounts of hydrogen from biomass and snow cover in CRNS data, and (iii) propose a simple approach for correcting the influences of aboveground hydrogen pool (expressed as aboveground water equivalent, AWE) on CRNS measurements. A field experiment was conducted in northeast China to compare soil water content results from CRNS to in-situ data with time domain reflectometry (TDR) and neutron probe (NP) in the 0-40 cm soil layers. The biomass water equivalent (BWE) and snow water equivalent (SWE) were observed to have separate linear relationships with the thermal/fast neutron ratio, and the dynamics of BWE and SWE were estimated correctly in the crop seasons and snow-covered seasons, respectively. A simple approach, which considered the AWE, AWE at calibration, and the effective measurement depth of CRNS, was introduced to correct the errors caused by BWE and SWE. After correction, the correlation coefficients between soil water contents determined by CRNS and TDR were 0.79 and 0.77 during the 2014 and 2015 crop seasons, respectively, and CRNS measurements had RMSEs of 0.028, 0.030, and 0.039 m3 m-3 in the 2014 and 2015 crop seasons and the snow-covered seasons, respectively. The experimental results also indicated that the accuracies of CRNS estimated BWE and SWE were affected by the distributions of aboveground hydrogen pools, which were related to the height of the CRNS device above ground surface.

  7. Norharmane: old yet highly selective dual channel ratiometric fluoride and hydrogen sulfate ion sensor.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Arabinda; Katayama, Tetsuro; Ishibasi, Yukihide; Yasuda, Masakazu; Miyasaka, Hiroshi

    2011-01-21

    Norharmane provides a simple unexplored class of anion receptor, that allows for the ratiometric selective detection of F(-) and HSO(4)(-) ions. The presence of a strong base can easily form hydrogen bonds with the acidic hydrogen bond donor moiety and the relatively strong acid can easily protonate the basic hydrogen bond acceptor moiety, which can modulate the optical response and can detect the anions efficiently with high selectivity. In view of that, it is promising to conceive the use of these systems in various sensing applications as well as in other situations, such as anion transport and purification, where the availability of cheap and easy-to-make anion receptors, would be advantageous.

  8. Eye readable metal hydride based hydrogen tape sensor for health applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngene, Peter; Radeva, Tsveta; Westerwaal, Ruud; Schreuders, Herman; Dam, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    Using the change in the intrinsic optical properties of YMg-based thin films upon exposure to hydrogen, we observe the presence of hydrogen at concentrations as low as 20 ppm just by a change in color. The eye-visible color change circumvents the use of any electronics in this device, thereby making it an inexpensive H2 detector. The detector shows high selectivity towards H2 in H2-O2 - mixtures, and responds within 20 s to 0.25% H2 in the presence of 18% O2.

  9. Femtosecond Laser Ablated FBG with Composite Microstructure for Hydrogen Sensor Application

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Meng; Dai, Yutang; Zhou, Xian; Dong, Ke; Yang, Minghong

    2016-01-01

    A composite microstructure in fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with film deposition for hydrogen detection is presented. Through ablated to FBG cladding by a femtosecond laser, straight-trenches and spiral micro-pits are formed. A Pd–Ag film is sputtered on the surface of the laser processed FBG single mode fiber, and acts as hydrogen sensing transducer. The demonstrated experimental outcomes show that a composite structure produced the highest sensitivity of 26.3 pm/%H, nearly sevenfold more sensitive compared with original standard FBG. It offers great potential in engineering applications for its good structure stability and sensitivity. PMID:27916933

  10. Femtosecond Laser Ablated FBG with Composite Microstructure for Hydrogen Sensor Application.

    PubMed

    Zou, Meng; Dai, Yutang; Zhou, Xian; Dong, Ke; Yang, Minghong

    2016-12-01

    A composite microstructure in fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with film deposition for hydrogen detection is presented. Through ablated to FBG cladding by a femtosecond laser, straight-trenches and spiral micro-pits are formed. A Pd-Ag film is sputtered on the surface of the laser processed FBG single mode fiber, and acts as hydrogen sensing transducer. The demonstrated experimental outcomes show that a composite structure produced the highest sensitivity of 26.3 pm/%H, nearly sevenfold more sensitive compared with original standard FBG. It offers great potential in engineering applications for its good structure stability and sensitivity.

  11. Single ZnO Nanowire-Based Gas Sensors to Detect Low Concentrations of Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Cardoza-Contreras, Marlene N.; Romo-Herrera, José M.; Ríos, Luis A.; García-Gutiérrez, R.; Zepeda, T. A.; Contreras, Oscar E.

    2015-01-01

    Low concentrations of hazardous gases are difficult to detect with common gas sensors. Using semiconductor nanostructures as a sensor element is an alternative. Single ZnO nanowire gas sensor devices were fabricated by manipulation and connection of a single nanowire into a four-electrode aluminum probe in situ in a dual-beam scanning electron microscope-focused ion beam with a manipulator and a gas injection system in/column. The electrical response of the manufactured devices shows response times up to 29 s for a 121 ppm of H2 pulse, with a variation in the nanowire resistance appreciable at room temperature and at 373.15 K of approximately 8% and 14% respectively, showing that ZnO nanowires are good candidates to detect low concentrations of H2. PMID:26690158

  12. Prussian blue @ platinum nanoparticles/graphite felt nanocomposite electrodes: application as hydrogen peroxide sensor.

    PubMed

    Han, Lijuan; Tricard, Simon; Fang, Jian; Zhao, Jihua; Shen, Weiguo

    2013-05-15

    In this study, we report a triple-component sensor fabricated by freestanding graphite felt (GF), platinum nanoparticles (Pt) and Prussian blue (PB). Pt is ultrasonically-electrodeposited on GF to increase the conductivity and to render the catalysts to the chemical deposition of PB. Cyclic voltammetric and amperometric measurements show that the double porous PB@Pt/GF sensor exhibits two pairs of well-defined redox peaks and a prominent electrocatalytic activity toward H2O2 reduction. This resulting sensor displays impressive results with regard to a low detection limit of 1.2×10(-9)M and very high detection sensitivity of 40.9Acm(-2)M(-1), using a potential work of 0.0V.

  13. Defect-free ZnO nanorods for low temperature hydrogen sensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ranwa, Sapana; Kumar, Mahesh; Kulriya, Pawan K.; Sahu, Vikas Kumar; Kukreja, L. M.

    2014-11-24

    Uniformly distributed and defect-free vertically aligned ZnO nanorods (NRs) with high aspect ratio are deposited on Si by sputtering technique. X-ray diffraction along with transmission electron microscopy studies confirmed the single crystalline wurtzite structure of ZnO. Absence of wide band emission in photoluminescence spectra showed defect-free growth of ZnO NRs which was further conformed by diamagnetic behavior of the NRs. H{sub 2} sensing mechanism based on the change in physical dimension of channel is proposed to explain the fast response (∼21.6 s) and recovery times (∼27 s) of ZnO NRs/Si/ZnO NRs sensors. Proposed H{sub 2} sensor operates at low temperature (∼70 °C) unlike the existing high temperature (>150 °C) sensors.

  14. TRACE-P OH and HO2 Measurements with the Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) on the DC-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.; Martinez-Harder, Monica; Harder, Hartwig

    2004-01-01

    The Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS) measures OH and HO2 from the NASA DC-8. This instrument detects OH by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in detection chambers at low pressure and detects HO2 by chemical conversion with NO followed by LIF detection. The demonstrated detection limit (S/N=2, 5 min.) for OH is about 0.005 pptv (1x10(exp 6)/cu cm at 2 km altitude) and for HO2 is 0.05 pptv (1x10(exp 6)/cu cm at 2 km altitude). We will use ATHOS to measure OH, HO2, and HO2/OH during TRACE- P, analyze these results by comparing them against fundamental relationships and computer models, and publish the analyses. TRACE-P HO(x), measurements will help develop a clearer picture of the atmospheric oxidation and 0 3 production that occur as Asian pollution spreads across the Pacific Ocean.

  15. Fast detection and low power hydrogen sensor using edge-oriented vertically aligned 3-D network of MoS2 flakes at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, A. V.; Kumar, R.; Venkatesan, S.; Zakhidov, A.; Zhu, Z.; Bao, Jiming; Kumar, Mahesh; Kumar, Mukesh

    2017-08-01

    The increased usage of hydrogen as a next generation clean fuel strongly demands the parallel development of room temperature and low power hydrogen sensors for their safety operation. In this work, we report strong evidence for preferential hydrogen adsorption at edge-sites in an edge oriented vertically aligned 3-D network of MoS2 flakes at room temperature. The vertically aligned edge-oriented MoS2 flakes were synthesised by a modified CVD process on a SiO2/Si substrate and confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and PL spectroscopy reveal the signature of few-layer MoS2 flakes in the sample. The sensor's performance was tested from room temperature to 150 °C for 1% hydrogen concentration. The device shows a fast response of 14.3 s even at room temperature. The sensitivity of the device strongly depends on temperature and increases from ˜1% to ˜11% as temperature increases. A detail hydrogen sensing mechanism was proposed based on the preferential hydrogen adsorption at MoS2 edge sites. The proposed gas sensing mechanism was verified by depositing ˜2-3 nm of ZnO on top of the MoS2 flakes that partially passivated the edge sites. We found a decrease in the relative response of MoS2-ZnO hybrid structures. This study provides a strong experimental evidence for the role of MoS2 edge-sites in the fast hydrogen sensing and a step closer towards room temperature, low power (0.3 mW), hydrogen sensor development.

  16. Development of novel low-temperature selective hydrogen gas sensors made of palladium/oxide or nitride capped Magnesium-transition metal hydride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu Ming

    Palladium capped Mg-based transition metal alloy film (Pd/Mg-TM) is a potentially useful hydrogen gas (H2) sensing material, which can operate at low temperature for detection of H2 leakage in an environment to ensure safe use and storage of the gas. The Pd layer catalytically dissociates hydrogen molecules, and the hydrogen atoms produced can enter (hydridation) or be detached (dehydridation) from the alloy layer. These processes are reversible, such that the film is switchable between a metal state and a hydride state, giving rise to substantial changes in its optical transmittance/reflectance and electrical resistivity. Unlike a conventional metal-oxide (MOx) H2 sensor, hydridation of an Mg-TM film is associated with relatively low enthalpy, and hence can perform at temperature much lower than the operation temperature of an MOx sensor (typically around 500°C or above). As such, an Mg-TM based sensor does not experience undesired annealing effect during operation, and hence is much more stable and durable. Furthermore, the detection selectivity of a Pd/Mg-TM film versus other reducing gases is superior to most conventional MOx-type hydrogen sensors. In this project, we systematically investigated the H2 sensing properties of Pd/Mg-TM films.

  17. The Different Sensitive Behaviors of a Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer-Coated SAW Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants.

    PubMed

    Long, Yin; Wang, Yang; Du, Xiaosong; Cheng, Luhua; Wu, Penglin; Jiang, Yadong

    2015-07-28

    A linear hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA) linear functionalized polymer (PLF), was deposited onto a bare surface acoustic wave (SAW) device to fabricate a chemical sensor. Real-time responses of the sensor to a series of compounds including sarin (GB), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), mustard gas (HD), chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (2-CEES), 1,5-dichloropentane (DCP) and some organic solvents were studied. The results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to GB and DMMP, and has low sensitivity to HD and DCP, as expected. However, the sensor possesses an unexpected high sensitivity toward 2-CEES. This good sensing performance can't be solely or mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction since the sensor is not sensitive to some high polarity solvents. We believe the lone pair electrons around the sulphur atom of 2-CEES provide an electron-rich site, which facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding between PLF and 2-CEES. On the contrary, the electron cloud on the sulphur atom of the HD molecule is offset or depleted by its two neighbouring strong electron-withdrawing groups, hence, hydrogen bonding can hardly be formed.

  18. The Different Sensitive Behaviors of a Hydrogen-Bond Acidic Polymer-Coated SAW Sensor for Chemical Warfare Agents and Their Simulants

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yin; Wang, Yang; Du, Xiaosong; Cheng, Luhua; Wu, Penglin; Jiang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    A linear hydrogen-bond acidic (HBA) linear functionalized polymer (PLF), was deposited onto a bare surface acoustic wave (SAW) device to fabricate a chemical sensor. Real-time responses of the sensor to a series of compounds including sarin (GB), dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), mustard gas (HD), chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (2-CEES), 1,5-dichloropentane (DCP) and some organic solvents were studied. The results show that the sensor is highly sensitive to GB and DMMP, and has low sensitivity to HD and DCP, as expected. However, the sensor possesses an unexpected high sensitivity toward 2-CEES. This good sensing performance can’t be solely or mainly attributed to the dipole-dipole interaction since the sensor is not sensitive to some high polarity solvents. We believe the lone pair electrons around the sulphur atom of 2-CEES provide an electron-rich site, which facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding between PLF and 2-CEES. On the contrary, the electron cloud on the sulphur atom of the HD molecule is offset or depleted by its two neighbouring strong electron-withdrawing groups, hence, hydrogen bonding can hardly be formed. PMID:26225975

  19. Photopatternable hydrogel materials for reversible optical hydrogen peroxide and glucose sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pick, C.; Boresi, M.; Kim, C.; Henthorn, D.

    2009-05-01

    In this work, a novel photopatternable hydrogel-based material for the fluorescent detection of hydrogen peroxide was developed and studied as a possible sensing element in optical biosensors. This composite hydrogel material was developed to maximize analyte transport, be amenable to existing microfabrication techniques, and dovetail with various enzyme immobilization strategies. Nanoparticles loaded with a hydrogen peroxide sensitive europium tetracycline complex (EuTc) were mixed with monomer and crosslinker to form a photopolymerizable precursor. Sensitivity to glucose can be introduced through addition of methacrylated glucose oxidase into the precursor solution, allowing for covalent immobilization of the enzyme. As a result, the material can be integrated directly into optical biosensors for continuous glucose monitoring.

  20. Hybrid organic/inorganic copolymers with strongly hydrogen-bond acidic properties for acoustic wave and optical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, J.W.; Kaganove, S.N.; Patrash, S.J.

    1997-05-01

    Hybrid organic/inorganic polymers have been prepared incorporating fluoroalkyl-substituted bisphenol groups linked using oligosiloxane spacers. These hydrogen-bond acidic materials have glass-to-rubber transition temperatures below room temperature and are excellent sorbents for basic vapors. The physical properties such as viscosity and refractive index can be tuned by varying the length of the oligosiloxane spacers and the molecular weight. In addition, the materials are easily cross-linked to yield solid elastomers. The potential use of these materials for chemical sensing has been demonstrated by applying them to surface acoustic wave devices as thin films and detecting the hydrogen-bond basic vapor dimethyl methylphosphonate with high sensitivity. It has also been demonstrated that one of these materials with suitable viscosity and refractive index can be used to clad silica optical fibers; the cladding was applied to freshly drawn fiber using a fiber drawing tower. These fibers have potential as evanescent wave optical fiber sensors. 38 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Hydrogen Sensor Based on Pd/GeO{sub 2} Using a Low Cost Electrochemical Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jawad, M. J.; Hashim, M. R.; Ali, N. K.

    2011-05-25

    This work reports on a synthesis of sub micron germanium dioxide (GeO{sub 2}) on porous silicon (PS) by electrochemical deposition. n-type Si (100) wafer was used to fabricate (PS) using conventional method of electrochemical etching in HF based solution. A GeCl{sub 4} was directly hydrolyzed by hydrogen peroxide to produce pure GeO{sub 2}, and then electrochemically deposited on PS. Followed by palladium (Pd) contact on GeO{sub 2} /PS was achieved by using RF sputtering technique. The grown GeO{sub 2} crystals were characterized using SEM and EDX. I-V characteristics of Pd/ GeO{sub 2} were recorded before and after hydrogen gas exposure as well as with different H{sub 2} concentrations and different applied temperatures. The sensitivity of Pd/ GeO{sub 2} also has been investigated it could be seen to increase significantly with increased hydrogen concentration while it decreased with increase temperature.

  2. Electrochemical behavior of Azure A/gold nanoclusters modified electrode and its application as non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor.

    PubMed

    Priya, C; Sivasankari, G; Narayanan, S Sriman

    2012-09-01

    A novel non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor was developed using Azure A/gold nanoclusters modified graphite electrode. The method of preparation of Azure A/gold nanoclusters was simple and it was characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and confocal Raman microscopy. The electrochemical properties of Azure A/gold nanoclusters modified graphite electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry. In 0.1M H(2)SO(4) the modified electrode showed redox peaks which correspond to the redox behavior of gold nanoparticle. In 0.1M PBS the modified electrode exhibited well defined redox peaks with the formal potential of -0.253 V which is analogous to the redox reaction of Azure A. The results have shown that the gold nanoclusters has reduced the formal potential of Azure A and enhanced the current due to the fast charge transfer kinetics. Also the modified electrode showed an enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of H(2)O(2) in the concentration range of 3.26×10(-6)M to 3.2×10(-3)M with a detection limit of 1.08×10(-6)M (S/N=3). The proposed electrode exhibited good stability and reproducibility, and it has the potential application as a sensor for other biologically significant compounds.

  3. Quenching of pH-Responsive Luminescence of a Benzoindolizine Sensor by Ultrafast Hydrogen Shift

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawang; Outlaw, Victor K.; Townsend, Craig A.; Bragg, Arthur E.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent-sensor design requires consideration of how photochemical dynamics control properties of a sensing state. Transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy reveals an ultrafast net [1,3] H shift following excitation of a protonated methoxy benzoindolizine (bi) sensor in solution. These photochemical dynamics explain a quenched pH-responsive fluorescence shift and dramatically reduced fluorescence quantum yield relative to other (e.g. methyl) bi compounds that do not tautomerize. Calculations predict the energetic and structural feasibility for rearrangement in protonated bi compounds, such that interaction between the pi-network and strongly electron-donating methoxyl must lower the barrier for suprafacial H or H+ shift across an allylic moiety. As bi compounds broadly exhibit pH-responsive emission shifts, chemical interactions that modulate this electronic interaction and suppress tautomerization could be used to facilitate binding- or surface-specific acid-responsive sensing. PMID:27549912

  4. Synthesis of one-dimensional SiC nanostructures from a glassy buckypaper.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mengning; Star, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    A simple and scalable synthetic strategy was developed for the fabrication of one-dimensional SiC nanostructures-nanorods and nanowires. Thin sheets of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by vacuum filtration and were washed repeatedly with sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) solution. The resulting "glassy buckypaper" was heated at 1300-1500 °C under Ar/H2 to allow a solid state reaction between C and Si precursors to form a variety of SiC nanostructures. The morphology and crystal structures of SiC nanorods and nanowires were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), electron diffraction (ED), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Furthermore, electrical conductance measurements were performed on SiC nanorods, demonstrating their potential applications in high-temperature sensors and control systems.

  5. Synthesis of One-Dimensional SiC Nanostructures from a Glassy Buckypaper

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Mengning; Star, Alexander

    2013-02-21

    A simple and scalable synthetic strategy was developed for the fabrication of one-dimensional SiC nanostructures - nanorods and nanowires. Thin sheets of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by vacuum filtration and were washed repeatedly with sodium silicate (Na₂SiO₃) solution. The resulting “glassy buckypaper” was heated at 1300 - 1500 °C under Ar/H₂ to allow a solid state reaction between C and Si precursors to form a variety of SiC nanostructures. The morphology and crystal structures of SiC nanorods and nanowires were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy dispersive xray spectroscopy (EDX), electron diffraction (ED) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. Furthermore, electrical conductance measurements were performed on SiC nanorods, demonstrating their potential applications in high-temperature sensors and control systems.

  6. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 10, 1963. Spherical liquid hydrogen tanks can be seen to the left.

  7. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 22, 1963. Spherical liquid hydrogen tanks can be seen to the left. Just to the lower front of those are the cylindrical liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks.

  8. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 22, 1963. Spherical liquid hydrogen tanks can be seen to the left. Just to the lower front of those are the cylindrical liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks.

  9. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. This photo shows the progress of the S-IC test stand as of October 10, 1963. Spherical liquid hydrogen tanks can be seen to the left.

  10. Hydrogen gas sensors based on electrostatically spray deposited nickel oxide thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamal, Raied K.; Aadim, Kadhim A.; Al-Zaidi, Qahtan G.; Taaban, Iman N.

    2015-09-01

    A simple, low-cost, and home-built electrostatic spray deposition (ESD) system with the stable cone-jet mode was used to deposit nickel oxide (NiO) thin films on glass substrates kept at temperature of 400 °C as the primary precursor solution of 0.1 M concentration hydrated nickel chloride was dissolved in isopropyl alcohol. Electrical measurements showed that these films were of n-type conductivity while their resistance response to hydrogen flow in air ambient was varied by 2.81% with the rise and recovery time of 48 s and 40 s, respectively.

  11. A novel colorimetric fluoride sensor based on a semi-rigid chromophore controlled by hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiling; Xu, Xiaoyong; Shao, Xusheng; Li, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    A novel semi-rigid latent chromophore E1, containing an amide subunit activated by an adjacent semi-rigid intramolecular hydrogen-bonding (IHB) unit, was designed for the detection of fluoride ion by the 'naked-eye' in CH3CN. Comparative studies on structural analogs (E2, E3, and E4) provided significant insight into the structural and functional role of the amide N-H and IHB segment in the selective recognition of fluoride ions. The deprotonation of the amide N-H followed by the enhancement of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) induced the colorimetric detection of E1 for fluoride ion.

  12. Hydrogen sensors based on electrophoretically deposited Pd nanoparticles onto InP

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition of palladium nanoparticles prepared by the reverse micelle technique onto InP substrates is addressed. We demonstrate that the substrate pre-deposition treatment and the deposition conditions can extensively influence the morphology of the deposited palladium nanoparticle films. Schottky diodes based on these films show notably high values of the barrier height and of the rectification ratio giving evidence of a small degree of the Fermi level pinning. Moreover, electrical characteristics of these diodes are exceptionally sensitive to the exposure to gas mixtures with small hydrogen content. PMID:21711912

  13. Study of properties of SiC layer in TRISO coated particles grown using different alkyl-silicon compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Jyoti; Ghosh, Sunil; Venugopalan, Ramani; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    2013-06-01

    The silicon carbide (SiC) layer used for the formation of Tri-isostatic (TRISO) coated fuel particles is normally produced at high temperatures via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition from methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) in a hydrogen environment. In this work, we show the deposition of uniform SiC layers using different organosilicon precursors such as MTS and hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) via spouted bed chemical vapor deposition. From the X-ray diffraction pattern it could be inferred that the SiC deposits obtained through different precursors have the β-SiC phase. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the fabricated SiC coating were studied. The hardness and fracture toughness of the fabricated SiC coatings using MTS and HMDS were nearly the same and close to the theoretical value for pure silicon carbide.

  14. Membrane selectivity versus sensor response in hydrogenated amorphous silicon CHEMFETs using a semi-empirical model.

    PubMed

    Costa, J; Fernandes, M; Vieira, M; Lavareda, G; Karmali, A

    2011-10-01

    Toxic amides, such as acrylamide, are potentially harmful to Human health, so there is great interest in the fabrication of compact and economical devices to measure their concentration in food products and effluents. The CHEmically Modified Field Effect Transistor (CHEMFET) based on amorphous silicon technology is a candidate for this type of application due to its low fabrication cost. In this article we have used a semi-empirical model of the device to predict its performance in a solution of interfering ions. The actual semiconductor unit of the sensor was fabricated by the PECVD technique in the top gate configuration. The CHEMFET simulation was performed based on the experimental current-voltage curves of the semiconductor unit and on an empirical model of the polymeric membrane. Results presented here are useful for selection and design of CHEMFET membranes and provide an idea of the limitations of the amorphous CHEMFET device. In addition to the economical advantage, the small size of this prototype means it is appropriate for in situ operation and integration in a sensor array.

  15. Mid-ultraviolet pulsed laser micromachining of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Litao; Li, Mingxing; Lin, Haipeng; Hu, Jinping; Tang, Qingju; Liu, Chunsheng

    2014-11-01

    This paper provides an investigation of the ablation behavior of single crystal 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC wafer to improve the manufacturability and high-temperature performance of SiC using laser applications. 266nm pulsed laser micromachining of SiC was investigated. The purpose is to establish suitable laser parametric regime for the fabrication of high accuracy, high spatial resolution and thin diaphragms for high-temperature MEMS pressure sensor applications. Etch rate, ablation threshold and quality of micromachined features were evaluated. The governing ablation mechanisms, such as thermal vaporization, phase explosion, and photomechanical fragmentation, were correlated with the effects of pulse energy. The ablation threshold is obtained with ultraviolet pulsed laser ablation. The results suggested ultraviolet pulsed laser's potential for rapid manufacturing. Excellent quality of machined features with little collateral thermal damage was obtained in the lower pulse energy range. The leading material removal mechanisms under these conditions were discussed.

  16. Silicon Carbide Gas Sensors for Propulsion Emissions and Safety Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J.; Neudeck, P. G.; Lukco, D.; Trunek, A.; Spry, D.; Lampard, P.; Androjna, D.; Makel, D.; Ward, B.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based gas sensors have the ability to meet the needs of a range of aerospace propulsion applications including emissions monitoring, leak detection, and hydrazine monitoring. These applications often require sensitive gas detection in a range of environments. An effective sensing approach to meet the needs of these applications is a Schottky diode based on a SiC semiconductor. The primary advantage of using SiC as a semiconductor is its inherent stability and capability to operate at a wide range of temperatures. The complete SiC Schottky diode gas sensing structure includes both the SiC semiconductor and gas sensitive thin film metal layers; reliable operation of the SiC-based gas sensing structure requires good control of the interface between these gas sensitive layers and the SiC. This paper reports on the development of SiC gas sensors. The focus is on two efforts to better control the SiC gas sensitive Schottky diode interface. First, the use of palladium oxide (PdOx) as a barrier layer between the metal and SiC is discussed. Second, the use of atomically flat SiC to provide an improved SiC semiconductor surface for gas sensor element deposition is explored. The use of SiC gas sensors in a multi-parameter detection system is briefly discussed. It is concluded that SiC gas sensors have potential in a range of propulsion system applications, but tailoring of the sensor for each application is necessary.

  17. Study of Erosive Wear Behaviour on SIC/SIC Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Min-Soo

    In the field of aerospace propulsion system, erosive wear on continuous silicon carbide (SiC) fibre-reinforced SiC (SiC/SiC) composites is of significant issue to achieve high energy efficiency. This paper proposes a crucial factor and a design guideline of SiC/SiC composites for higher erosion performance regarding cost effectiveness. Fabrication and evaluation of impacts and wear on SiC/SiC composites are successfully carried out. Erosive wear behaviours of the CVI and the LPS composites evidently show that the crucial fabrication factor against solid particle erosion (SPE). Erosive wear mechanisms on various SiC/SiC composites are determined based on the analysis of erosive wear behaviour. Designing guideline for the SiC/SiC composites for pursuit of high erosion performance is also proposed as focusing on the followings; volume fraction of matrix, strength of the matrix, bonding strength, and PyC interface.

  18. Molybdenum disulfide nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide: highly sensitive and selective hydrogen sensor.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, A; Rathi, Servin; Lee, In-Yeal; Park, Jinwoo; Lim, Dongsuk; Kang, Moonshik; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Gil-Ho; Kannan, E S

    2017-09-08

    In this work, we report on the hydrogen (H2) sensing behavior of reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nano particles (NPs) based composite film. The RGO/MoS2 composite exhibited a highly enhanced H2 response (∼15.6%) for 200 ppm at an operating temperature of 60 °C. Furthermore, the RGO/MoS2 composite showed excellent selectivity to H2 with respect to ammonia (NH3) and nitric oxide (NO) which are highly reactive gas species. The composite's response to H2 is 2.9 times higher than that of NH3 whereas for NO it is 3.5. This highly improved H2 sensing response and selectivity of RGO/MoS2 at low operating temperatures were attributed to the structural integration of MoS2 nanoparticles in the nanochannels and pores in the RGO layer.

  19. A hydrogen peroxide electrochemical sensor based on silver nanoparticles decorated three-dimensional graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Beibei; Liu, Changbing; Shi, Huaxia; Li, Chen; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei E-mail: iamwhuang@njtech.edu.cn; Dong, Xiaochen E-mail: iamwhuang@njtech.edu.cn

    2014-06-16

    A facile strategy has been developed to synthesize sliver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) decorated three-dimensional graphene (3DG) through hydrothermal process. The AgNPs-3DG composites are directly fabricated into a free standing sensing electrode for electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in phosphate buffered solutions. Various techniques equipments including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the morphology and structure of the as-prepared composite. The electrochemical experiments reveal the AgNPs-3DG based biosensor exhibits fast amperometric sensing, low detection limitation, wide linear responding range, and perfect selectivity for non-enzyme H{sub 2}O{sub 2} detection, indicating the well synergistic effect of Ag NPs high electrocatalytic activity and 3DG high conductivity and large surface area.

  20. Molybdenum disulfide nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide: highly sensitive and selective hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, A.; Rathi, Servin; Lee, In-yeal; Park, Jinwoo; Lim, Dongsuk; Kang, Moonshik; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Gil-Ho; Kannan, E. S.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we report on the hydrogen (H2) sensing behavior of reduced graphene oxide (RGO)/molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nano particles (NPs) based composite film. The RGO/MoS2 composite exhibited a highly enhanced H2 response (∼15.6%) for 200 ppm at an operating temperature of 60 °C. Furthermore, the RGO/MoS2 composite showed excellent selectivity to H2 with respect to ammonia (NH3) and nitric oxide (NO) which are highly reactive gas species. The composite’s response to H2 is 2.9 times higher than that of NH3 whereas for NO it is 3.5. This highly improved H2 sensing response and selectivity of RGO/MoS2 at low operating temperatures were attributed to the structural integration of MoS2 nanoparticles in the nanochannels and pores in the RGO layer.

  1. A hydrogen peroxide electrochemical sensor based on silver nanoparticles decorated three-dimensional graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Beibei; Liu, Changbing; Shi, Huaxia; Li, Chen; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Dong, Xiaochen

    2014-06-01

    A facile strategy has been developed to synthesize sliver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) decorated three-dimensional graphene (3DG) through hydrothermal process. The AgNPs-3DG composites are directly fabricated into a free standing sensing electrode for electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in phosphate buffered solutions. Various techniques equipments including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the morphology and structure of the as-prepared composite. The electrochemical experiments reveal the AgNPs-3DG based biosensor exhibits fast amperometric sensing, low detection limitation, wide linear responding range, and perfect selectivity for non-enzyme H2O2 detection, indicating the well synergistic effect of Ag NPs high electrocatalytic activity and 3DG high conductivity and large surface area.

  2. Peroxynitrite and hydrogen peroxide elicit similar cellular stress responses mediated by the Ccp1 sensor protein.

    PubMed

    Martins, Dorival; Bakas, Iolie; McIntosh, Kelly; English, Ann M

    2015-08-01

    Peroxynitrite [ONOO(H)] is an oxidant associated with deleterious effects in cells. Because it is an inorganic peroxide that reacts rapidly with peroxidases, we speculated that cells may respond to ONOO(H) and H2O2 challenge in a similar manner. We exposed yeast cells to SIN-1, a well-characterized ONOO(H) generator, and observed stimulation of catalase and peroxiredoxin (Prx) activities. Previously, we reported that H2O2 challenge increases these activities in wild-type cells and in cells producing the hyperactive mutant H2O2 sensor Ccp1(W191F) but not in Ccp1-knockout cells (ccp1Δ). We find here that the response of ccp1Δ and ccp1(W191F) cells to SIN-1 mirrors that to H2O2, identifying Ccp1 as a sensor of both peroxides. SIN-1 simultaneously releases (•)NO and O2(•-), which react to form ONOO(H), but exposure of the three strains separately to an (•)NO donor (spermine-NONOate) or an O2(•-) generator (paraquat) mainly depresses catalase or Prx activity, whereas co-challenge with the NONOate and paraquat stimulates these activities. Because Ccp1 appears to sense ONOO(H) in cells, we examined its reaction with ONOO(H) in vitro and found that peroxynitrous acid (ONOOH) rapidly (k2>10(6)M(-1)s(-1)) oxidizes purified Ccp1 to an intermediate with spectral and ferrocytochrome-oxidizing properties indistinguishable from those of its well-characterized compound I formed with H2O2. Importantly, the nitrite released from ONOOH is not oxidized to (•)NO2 by Ccp1(׳)s compound I, unlike peroxidases involved in immune defense. Overall, our results reveal that yeast cells mount a common antioxidant response to ONOO(H) and H2O2, with Ccp1 playing a pivotal role as an inorganic peroxide sensor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards a high performing UV-A sensor based on Silicon Carbide and hydrogenated Silicon Nitride absorbing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzillo, M.; Sciuto, A.; Mannino, G.; Renna, L.; Costa, N.; Badalà, P.

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major risk factor for most skin cancers. The sun is our primary natural source of UV radiation. The strength of the sun's ultraviolet radiation is expressed as Solar UV Index (UVI). UV-A (320-400 nm) and UV-B (290-320 nm) rays mostly contribute to UVI. UV-B is typically the most destructive form of UV radiation because it has enough energy to cause photochemical damage to cellular DNA. Also overexposure to UV-A rays, although these are less energetic than UV-B photons, has been associated with toughening of the skin, suppression of the immune system, and cataract formation. The use of preventive measures to decrease sunlight UV radiation absorption is fundamental to reduce acute and irreversible health diseases to skin, eyes and immune system. In this perspective UV sensors able to monitor in a monolithic and compact chip the UV Index and relative UV-A and UV-B components of solar spectrum can play a relevant role for prevention, especially in view of the integration of these detectors in close at hand portable devices. Here we present the preliminary results obtained on our UV-A sensor technology based on the use of hydrogenated Silicon Nitride (SiN:H) thin passivating layers deposited on the surface of thin continuous metal film Ni2Si/4H-SiC Schottky detectors, already used for UV-Index monitoring. The first UV-A detector prototypes exhibit a very low leakage current density of about 0.2 pA/mm2 and a peak responsivity value of 0.027 A/W at 330 nm, both measured at 0V bias.

  4. A highly sensitive hydrogen peroxide amperometric sensor based on MnO2-modified vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Ye, Min-Ling; Yu, Yu-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-De

    2010-07-26

    In this report, a highly sensitive amperometric sensor based on MnO(2)-modified vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MnO(2)/VACNTs) for determination of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was fabricated by electrodeposition. The morphology of the nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer and X-ray diffraction. Cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were applied to investigate the electrochemical properties of the MnO(2)/VACNTs nanocomposite electrode. The mechanism for the electrochemical reaction of H(2)O(2) at the MnO(2)/VACNTs nanocomposite electrode was also discussed. In borate buffer (pH 7.8, 0.20 M), the MnO(2)/VACNTs nanocomposite electrode exhibits a linear dependence (R=0.998) on the concentration of H(2)O(2) from 1.2 x 10(-6)M to 1.8 x 10(-3)M, a high sensitivity of 1.08 x 10(6) microA M(-1) cm(-2) and a detection limit of 8.0 x 10(-7) M (signal/noise=3). Meanwhile, the MnO(2)/VACNTs nanocomposite electrode is also highly resistant towards typical inorganic salts and some biomolecules such as acetic acid, citric acid, uric acid and D-(+)-glucose, etc. In addition, the sensor based on the MnO(2)/VACNTs nanocomposite electrode was applied for the determination of trace of H(2)O(2) in milk with high accuracy, demonstrating its potential for practical application. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A non-enzymatic amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor based on iron nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Amanulla, Baishnisha; Palanisamy, Selvakumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Chiu, Te-Wei; Chen, Tse-Wei; Ramaraj, Sayee Kannan

    2017-02-01

    A simple and facile green process was used for the synthesis of iron nanoparticles (FeNPs) decorated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanocomposite by using Ipomoea pes-tigridis leaf extract as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The as-prepared rGO/FeNPs nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The nanocomposite was further modified on the glassy carbon electrode and used for non-enzymatic sensing of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cyclic voltammetry results reveal that rGO/FeNPs nanocomposite has excellent electro-reduction behavior to H2O2 when compared to the response of FeNPs and rGO modified electrodes. Furthermore, the nanocomposite modified electrode shows 9 and 6 folds enhanced reduction current response to H2O2 than that of rGO and FeNPs modified electrodes. Amperometric method was further used to quantify the H2O2 using rGO/FeNPs nanocomposite, and the response was linear over the concentration ranging from 0.1μM to 2.15mM. The detection limit and sensitivity of the sensor were estimated as 0.056μM and 0.2085μAμM(-1)cm(-2), respectively. The fabricated sensor also utilized for detection of H2O2 in the presence of potentially active interfering species, and found high selectivity towards H2O2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Design and fabrication of large-scale lightweight SiC space mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianhan; Zhang, Yumin; Han, Jiecai; He, Xiaodong; Yao, Wang

    2006-02-01

    Silicon carbide is a new type of optics material developed in recent years because it offered some advantages over other traditional optical substrate materials such as low density, low thermal expansion coefficient, high thermal conductivity, big special heat, big modulus of elasticity and potential cost and schedule. So in this paper, the silicon carbide space mirror was fabricated by both reaction bonded (RB) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The green body of the space mirror was prepared by silicon carbide powder, carbon powder, dilution and solidified agent using slip casting method. The space mirror blank was prepared by green body and pure silicon powder. They were laid in vacuum sintering furnace and sintered at 1500°C. In this temperature, silicon was melting then infiltrated in SiC green body and reacted with carbon to generate the new SiC, at the same time, bonded original SiC powder, in the end, the nonporous SiC/Si space mirror blank was fabricated. The reaction bonded silicon carbide (RBSiC) was consistent with original SiC powder, new generated SiC and unreacted Si. Because RBSiC was SiC/Si two-phase structure, the hardness difference between SiC and Si made the space mirror difficult to achieve precision optical surface by grinding. So a full density SiC thin film was coated on the surface of space mirror blank with RBSiC by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The raw material was CH3SiCl3. The hydrogen (H2) was catalyst. The deposition temperature was 1300°C. The cooling rate could be controlled. The SiC space mirror was honeycomb open back lightweight structure. The honeycomb cellar could be triangle, rectangle, hexogen and sector. The biggest diameter of SiC space mirror blank which has been fabricated is approach one meter by forgoing process. In order to the forgoing process was feasible, a flat round SiC space mirror with 250mm diameter. The space mirror was composed of a 4mm thick round plane faceplate and hexagonal cellar

  7. Hydrogen peroxide sensor based on horseradish peroxidase immobilized nanostructured cerium oxide film.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Anees A; Solanki, Pratima R; Malhotra, B D

    2009-06-15

    Nanostructured cerium oxide (NanoCeO(2)) film deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate by solution casting has been used for immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) via physiosorption technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis and electrochemical techniques have been utilized for characterization of NanoCeO(2)/ITO electrode and HRP/NanoCeO(2)/ITO bioelectrode. The HRP/NanoCeO(2)/ITO electrode exhibits value of the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) as 2.21 microM, linear regression coefficient as 0.998 and linearity for hydrogen peroxide as 1.0-170 microM obtained using electrochemical response measurements. Besides this, HRP/NanoCeO(2)/ITO bioelectrode can be used about 20 times and is stable for 5 weeks at 4 degrees C. The results of photo-response studies carried out on HRP/NanoCeO(2)/ITO bioelectrode indicate reasonable agreement with those obtained using amperometric technique.

  8. Low-cost fabrication of highly sensitive room temperature hydrogen sensor based on ordered mesoporous Co-doped TiO2 structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Haidry, Azhar Ali; Wang, Tao; Yao, Zheng Jun

    2017-07-01

    The development of cost-effective gas sensors with improved sensing properties and minimum power consumption for room temperature hydrogen leakage monitoring is in increasing demand. In this context, this report focus on the facile fabrication of ordered mesoporous TiO2 via evaporation-induced self-assembly route. With the controlled doping threshold (3%Co-TiO2), the output resistance change to 1000 ppm H2 is ˜4.1 × 103 with the response time of 66 s. The sensor response exhibits power law dependence with an increase in the hydrogen concentration, where the power law coefficient was found not only specific to the kind of target gas but also related to temperature. Further, the effect of structure integrity with doping level and humidity on sensing characteristics is interpreted in terms of variation in surface potential eVS and depletion region w caused by the adsorption of molecular oxygen O2-.

  9. Hydrogen gas sensors from polysilicon nanobelt devices selectively modified with sensing materials.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nhan Ai; Pan, Fu-Ming; Sheu, Jeng-Tzong

    2016-12-16

    Double-junction n(+)/n(-)/n(+) polysilicon nanobelts featuring selectively deposited sensing materials have been investigated for application as H2 gas sensors. The selective modification of the devices was performed through a combination of localized ablation of a resist and lift-off of a previous catalyst material deposited through e-beam evaporation. Four nanobelt devices, differentiated by their doping concentrations at the n(-) region (from 2.5 × 10(13) to 2.5 × 10(14) cm(-2)), were analyzed in terms of the responses to H2 and their self-heating effects. A low doping concentration improved the response at room temperature, owing to a longer Debye length. The variation in the H2-induced surface potential associated with temperature, accounting for degradation in the response of the nanobelts with Joule heating bias, was analyzed in terms of the I-V characteristics of the double-junction device. Among various catalysts (Pt, Pd, Pt/Pd) evaluated for their H2 sensing characteristics, an ultrathin film of Pt/Pd was most favorable.

  10. Sampler-sensor for preconcentration and quantitation of atmospheric hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    LaRue, R.; Ataman, O.Y.; Hautman, D.P.; Gerhardt, G.; Zimmer, H.; Mark, H.B. Jr.

    1987-09-15

    Increasing concern over atmospheric environmental problems has necessitated the design and development of new analytical techniques in order to introduce alternatives to the presently employed methods. The use of solid sorbents for collection of pollutants in air has gained general acceptance, and criteria for this type of system have often been presented. In general practice, solid sorbents are subjected to a desorption process in order to prepare an analyte solution prior to an analytical detection procedure of choice. Therefore, in general, the solid sorbents employed are designed to provide physical and chemical characteristics for efficient takeup of analyte and yet allow effective desorption procedures. This results in a high overall recovery value necessary for required accuracy. Collection of atmospheric H/sub 2/S on a Cd(II)-exchanged zeolite as a solid sorbent and application of several analytical techniques as diverse as X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, combustion analysis by nondispersive infrared (IR) measurement, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, visible spectrometry, and photoacoustic spectrometry on both intact solid sorbent and its leached solution after conversion to methylene blue have been studied. The present paper reports the initial data on a novel sampler-sensor that uses a filter paper pretreated system as a solid sorbent sampler having an air channel in the shape of a planar spiral which gives a direct visual readout of low levels of H/sub 2/S.

  11. Hydrogen gas sensors from polysilicon nanobelt devices selectively modified with sensing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nhan Ai; Pan, Fu-Ming; Sheu, Jeng-Tzong

    2016-12-01

    Double-junction n+/n-/n+ polysilicon nanobelts featuring selectively deposited sensing materials have been investigated for application as H2 gas sensors. The selective modification of the devices was performed through a combination of localized ablation of a resist and lift-off of a previous catalyst material deposited through e-beam evaporation. Four nanobelt devices, differentiated by their doping concentrations at the n- region (from 2.5 × 1013 to 2.5 × 1014 cm-2), were analyzed in terms of the responses to H2 and their self-heating effects. A low doping concentration improved the response at room temperature, owing to a longer Debye length. The variation in the H2-induced surface potential associated with temperature, accounting for degradation in the response of the nanobelts with Joule heating bias, was analyzed in terms of the I-V characteristics of the double-junction device. Among various catalysts (Pt, Pd, Pt/Pd) evaluated for their H2 sensing characteristics, an ultrathin film of Pt/Pd was most favorable.

  12. A reagentless non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor presented using electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Mutyala, Sankararao; Mathiyarasu, Jayaraman

    2016-12-01

    Herein, we report a simple, facile and reproducible non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor using electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The modified electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV-Visible, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) analysis revealed that ERGO/GCE exhibited virtuous charge transfer properties for a standard redox systems and showed excellent performance towards electroreduction of H2O2. Amperometric study using ERGO/GCE showed high sensitivity (0.3μA/μM) and faster response upon the addition of H2O2 at an applied potential of -0.25V vs. Ag/AgCl. The detection limit is assessed to be 0.7μM (S/N=3) and the time to reach a stable study state current is <3s for a linear range of H2O2 concentration (1-16μM). In addition, the modified electrode exhibited good reproducibility and long-term stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A theoretical study of silicon-doped boron nitride nanotubes serving as a potential chemical sensor for hydrogen cyanide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoxi; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Yongjun; Liu, Chengbu

    2009-12-16

    In order to search for a novel sensor to detect and control exposure to hydrogen cyanide (HCN) pollutant molecule in environments, the reactivities of pristine and silicon-doped (Si-doped) (8, 0) single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) towards the HCN molecule are investigated by performing density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The HCN molecule presents strong chemisorption on both the silicon-substituted boron defect site and the silicon-substituted nitrogen defect site of the BNNT, which is in sharp contrast to its weak physisorption on pristine BNNT. A remarkable charge transfer occurs between the HCN molecule and the Si-doped BNNT as proved by the electronic charge densities. The calculated data for the electronic density of states (DOSs) further indicate that the doping of the Si atom improves the electronic transport property of the BNNT, and increases its adsorption sensitivity towards the HCN molecule. Based on calculated results, the Si-doped BNNT is expected to be a potential resource for detecting the presence of toxic HCN.

  14. Non-enzymatic Hydrogen Peroxide Sensors Based on Multi-wall Carbon Nanotube/Pt Nanoparticle Nanohybrids

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Zhiying; Zhang, Di; Chen, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    A novel strategy to fabricate a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor was developed by using platinum (Pt) electrodes modified with multi-wall carbon nanotube-platinum nanoparticle nanohybrids (MWCNTs/Pt nanohybrids). The process to synthesize MWCNTs/Pt nanohybrids was simple and effective. Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) were generated in situ in a potassium chloroplatinate aqueous solution in the presence of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), and readily attached to the MWCNTs convex surfaces without any additional reducing reagents or irradiation treatment. The MWCNT/Pt nanohybrids were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), and the redox properties of MWCNTs/Pt nanohybrids-modified Pt electrode were studied by electrochemical measurements. The MWCNTs/Pt-modified electrodes exhibited a favorable catalytic ability in the reduction of H2O2. The modified electrodes can be used to detect H2O2 in the range of 0.01–2 mM with a lower detection limit of 0.3 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The sensitivity of the electrode to H2O2 was calculated to be 205.80 μA mM−1 cm−2 at working potential of 0 mV. In addition, the electrodes exhibited an excellent reusability and long-term stability as well as negligible interference from ascorbic acid, uric acid, and acetaminophen. PMID:28788600

  15. U.S. Department of Energy Accident Resistant SiC Clad Nuclear Fuel Development

    SciTech Connect

    George W. Griffith

    2011-10-01

    A significant effort is being placed on silicon carbide ceramic matrix composite (SiC CMC) nuclear fuel cladding by Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. The intent of this work is to invest in a high-risk, high-reward technology that can be introduced in a relatively short time. The LWRS goal is to demonstrate successful advanced fuels technology that suitable for commercial development to support nuclear relicensing. Ceramic matrix composites are an established non-nuclear technology that utilizes ceramic fibers embedded in a ceramic matrix. A thin interfacial layer between the fibers and the matrix allows for ductile behavior. The SiC CMC has relatively high strength at high reactor accident temperatures when compared to metallic cladding. SiC also has a very low chemical reactivity and doesn't react exothermically with the reactor cooling water. The radiation behavior of SiC has also been studied extensively as structural fusion system components. The SiC CMC technology is in the early stages of development and will need to mature before confidence in the developed designs can created. The advanced SiC CMC materials do offer the potential for greatly improved safety because of their high temperature strength, chemical stability and reduced hydrogen generation.

  16. Theoretical investigation into the optimisation of an optical fibre surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensor based on a PdY alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, F.; Taylor, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel optical fibre surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensor which utilises a sensing multilayer capped with an alloy of Pd and Y as the hydrogen sensitive layer. The PdY alloy mitigates transition of the Pd crystalline lattice from the α  →  β phase during hydrogen absorption (Liu et al 2012 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83 1-5) reducing mechanical stress on the sensing film during operation and prolonging the lifetime of the device. We theoretically investigate the performance of the sensor in terms of sensitivity and detection accuracy, finding a trade-off between the two. Therefore, a figure of merit (FOM) which encompasses both these parameters is introduced. We determine the dimensions of the multilayer which give optimum sensing performance. The optimal sensor demonstrated a FOM of 0.063 and had an Ag thickness of 50.5 nm and a SiO2 thickness of 72 nm. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity of 17.64 nm to 4% hydrogen and a detection accuracy of 0.014 \\text{n}{{\\text{m}}-1} and operated at a spectral centre of 528.87 nm. In a practical application, the optimum sensing performance is also dependent on the spectrum of the light source used. For the first time, we show how the optimum dimensions of the multilayer are influenced by the spectral centre of the light source and we present these optimal dimensions for a wavelength range encompassing the visible to near-IR spectrum.

  17. Hydrogen sensor based on Au and YSZ/HgO/Hg electrode for in situ measurement of dissolved H2 in high-temperature and -pressure fluids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R H; Hu, S M; Zhang, X T; Wang, Y

    2008-11-15

    Gold as a hydrogen-sensing electrode for in situ measurement of dissolved H2 in aqueous solutions under extreme conditions is reported. The dissolved H2 sensor, constructed with a Au-based sensing element and coupled with a YSZ/HgO/Hg electrode, is well suited for determining dissolved H2 concentrations of aqueous fluids at elevated temperatures and pressures. The Au electrode is made of Au wire mounted in a quartz bar, which can be pressurized and heated in the high-pressure and -temperature conditions. The Au-YSZ sensor has been tested for its potential response to the concentrations of dissolved H2 in fluids by using a flow-through reactor at high temperatures up to 400 degrees C and pressures to 38 MPa. Good sensitivity and linear response between the hydrogen concentrations in the fluids and the H2 sensor potentials are reported for hydrogen gas in the concentration range of 0.1-0.001 M H2 in aqueous fluids at temperatures up to 340 degrees C and 30 MPa. Nernstian response of the cell potential to dissolved H2 in fluids was determined at 340 degrees C and 30 MPa, described as follows: DeltaE = 0.9444 + 0. 0603 log m H2 The experimental results indicate that the Au-YSZ/HgO/Hg cell can be used to measure the solubility of H2 in aqueous fluid at temperatures and pressures near to the critical state of water. Thus, this type of Au hydrogen sensor could be easily used for in situ measurement of H2 in hydrothermal fluids in a high-pressure vessel, or at midocean ridge, due to its structure of compression resistance.

  18. Catalytic-Metal/PdO(sub x)/SiC Schottky-Diode Gas Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Xu, Jennifer C.; Lukco, Dorothy

    2006-01-01

    Miniaturized hydrogen- and hydrocarbon-gas sensors, heretofore often consisting of Schottky diodes based on catalytic metal in contact with SiC, can be improved by incorporating palladium oxide (PdOx, where 0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1) between the catalytic metal and the SiC. In prior such sensors in which the catalytic metal was the alloy PdCr, diffusion and the consequent formation of oxides and silicides of Pd and Cr during operation at high temperature were observed to cause loss of sensitivity. However, it was also observed that any PdOx layers that formed and remained at PdCr/SiC interfaces acted as barriers to diffusion, preventing further deterioration by preventing the subsequent formation of metal silicides. In the present improvement, the lesson learned from these observations is applied by placing PdOx at the catalytic metal/SiC interfaces in a controlled and uniform manner to form stable diffusion barriers that prevent formation of metal silicides. A major advantage of PdOx over other candidate diffusion-barrier materials is that PdOx is a highly stable oxide that can be incorporated into gas sensor structures by use of deposition techniques that are standard in the semiconductor industry. The PdOx layer can be used in a gas sensor structure for improved sensor stability, while maintaining sensitivity. For example, in proof-of-concept experiments, Pt/PdOx/SiC Schottky-diode gas sensors were fabricated and tested. The fabrication process included controlled sputter deposition of PdOx to a thickness of 50 Angstroms on a 400-m-thick SiC substrate, followed by deposition of Pt to a thickness of 450 Angstroms on the PdOx. The SiC substrate (400 microns in thickness) was patterned with photoresist and a Schottky-diode photomask. A lift-off process completed the definition of the Schottky-diode pattern. The sensors were tested by measuring changes in forward currents at a bias potential of 1 V during exposure to H2 in N2 at temperatures

  19. Sagnac interferometer hydrogen sensor based on panda fiber with Pt-loaded WO3/SiO2 coating.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ben; Zhao, C L; Yang, Fan; Gong, Huaping; Wang, D N; Dai, JiXiang; Yang, Minghong

    2016-04-01

    A highly sensitive optical fiber Sagnac interferometer hydrogen sensor is proposed and demonstrated. The device is fabricated by inserting a segment of panda fiber coated with Pt-loaded WO3/SiO2 into a Sagnac interferometer loop. When Pt/WO3 film is exposed to hydrogen, the exothermic reaction raises the temperature of the panda fiber, resulting in the resonant wavelength shift of the interferometer, and the resonant dip obtained has a large extinction ratio of ∼25  dB and a narrow linewidth of 2.5 nm. Such a device responds fast to hydrogen, exhibits a high sensitivity of -7.877  nm/% (vol. %) within the range of 0%-1.0% and is robust, low cost, and easy to fabricate.

  20. Ternary nanohybrid of reduced graphene oxide-nafion@silver nanoparticles for boosting the sensor performance in non-enzymatic amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Norazriena; Rameshkumar, Perumal; Mehmood, Muhammad Shahid; Pandikumar, Alagarsamy; Lee, Hing Wah; Huang, Nay Ming

    2017-01-15

    A sensitive and novel electrochemical sensor was developed for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using a reduced graphene oxide-nafion@silver6 (rGO-Nf@Ag6) nanohybrid modified glassy carbon electrode (GC/rGO-Nf@Ag6). The GC/rGO-Nf@Ag6 electrode exhibited an excellent electrochemical sensing ability for determining H2O2 with high sensitivity and selectivity. The detection limit of the electrochemical sensor using the GC/rGO-Nf@Ag6 electrode for H2O2 determination was calculated to be 5.35×10(-7)M with sensitivity of 0.4508µAµM(-1). The coupling between rGO-Nf with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) significantly boosted the electroanalytical performance by providing more active area for analyte interaction, thereby allowing more rapid interfacial electron transfer process. The interfering effect on the current response of H2O2 was studied and the results revealed that the sensor electrode exhibited an excellent immunity from most common interferents. The proposed non-enzymatic electrochemical sensor was used for determining H2O2 in apple juice, and the sensor electrode provided satisfactory results with reliable recovery values. These studies revealed that the novel GC/rGO-Nf@Ag6 sensor electrode could be a potential candidate for the detection of H2O2.

  1. Application of ZnO single-crystal wire grown by the thermal evaporation method as a chemical gas sensor for hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Park, N K; Lee, S Y; Lee, T J

    2011-01-01

    A zinc oxide single-crystal wire was synthesized for application as a gas-sensing material for hydrogen sulfide, and its gas-sensing properties were investigated in this study. The gas sensor consisted of a ZnO thin film as the buffer layer and a ZnO single-crystal wire. The ZnO thin film was deposited over a patterning silicon substrate with a gold electrode by the CFR method. The ZnO single-crystal wire was synthesized over the ZnO thin film using zinc and activated carbon as the precursor for the thermal evaporation method at 800 degrees C. The electrical properties of the gas sensors that were prepared for the growth of ZnO single-crystal wire varied with the amount of zinc contained in the precursor. The charged current on the gas sensors increased with the increasing amount of zinc in the precursor. It was concluded that the charged current on the gas sensors was related to ZnO single-crystal wire growth on the silicon substrate area between the two electrodes. The charged current on the gas sensor was enhanced when the ZnO single-crystal wire was exposed to a H2S stream. The experimental results obtained in this study confirmed that a ZnO single-crystal wire can be used as a gas sensor for H2S.

  2. High sensitivity hydrogen peroxide and hydrazine sensor based on silver nanocubes with rich {100} facets as an enhanced electrochemical sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinhu; Yang, Xuejuan; Bai, Jing; Jiang, Xiue; Fan, Gungyin

    2013-05-15

    We report a novel hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydrazine sensor based on low-cost poly(vinylpyrrolidone)-protected silver nanocubes (PVP-AgNCs). The monodisperse silver nanocubes were prepared by adding a trace amount of sodium sulfide in the conventional polyol synthesis for fast reduction of silver nitrate under protection of argon. The sensor was fabricated by simple casting of PVP-AgNCs aqueous solution on a glassy carbon electrode and the performance was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and amperometric techniques. It was found that the resulting sensor exhibited extremely good performance toward H2O2 detection with wide linear response ranging from 0.05 to 70mM (R=0.996) at -0.3V and low detection limit of 0.18μM estimated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. In addition, the fabricated sensor also exhibited high sensitivity toward the detection of hydrazine with a low detection limit of 1.1μM, wide linear range from 0.005 to 0.46mM (R=0.999) at 0.4V and rapid amperometric response time of less than 2s. For both analytes, the sensor exhibited good reproducibility, selectivity and stability. The excellent performance of the sensor might be attributed to the enhanced electrochemical sensing property of well-defined PVP-AgNCs with rich {100} facets.

  3. Sporadic SICs and the Normed Division Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, Blake C.

    2017-08-01

    Symmetric informationally complete quantum measurements, or SICs, are mathematically intriguing structures, which in practice have turned out to exhibit even more symmetry than their definition requires. Recently, Zhu classified all the SICs whose symmetry groups act doubly transitively. I show that lattices of integers in the complex numbers, the quaternions and the octonions yield the key parts of these symmetry groups.

  4. Synthesis and Consolidation of Nano-Sized Cu Coated SiC Powders by a Chemical Method and Spark Plasma Sintering.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Young-Keun; Bang, Su-Ryong; Oh, Sung-Tag

    2016-02-01

    Cu-70 vol% SIC composites with dense microstructure and sound interface between Cu and SIC grains were fabricated by solution chemistry route and spark plasma sintering. Two methods for developing powder mixtures of Cu and uncoated or pre-coated SIC were compared on the basis of the resulting microstructures. The pre-coating of Si(Al)OC onto SiC powders was prepared by curing and pyrolysis of Al-modified polycarbosilane. SiC/Cu composites were obtained by hydrogen reduction and densified using spark plasma sintering of pre-coated SIC and Cu-nitrate powder mixtures. The powder mixture showed a homogenous dispersion of nano-sized Cu particles on the surface of SIC powers. Microstructural observation revealed that the sintered composite using powder mixture with pre-coating of Al-PCS onto SiC powders showed dense microstructure and good contact between Cu and SIC grains due to the improved wettability by barrier coating. The results suggested that the SiC/Cu composite with required microstructural characteristics can be fabricated by using Al-PCS coated SIC powder mixture, more effectively.

  5. Evaluation of a new electrochemical sensor for selective detection of non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide based on hierarchical nanostructures of zirconium molybdate.

    PubMed

    Vinoth Kumar, J; Karthik, R; Chen, Shen-Ming; Raja, N; Selvam, V; Muthuraj, V

    2017-03-31

    The construction and characterization of selective and sensitive non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) electrochemical sensor based on sphere-like zirconium molybdate (ZrMo2O8) nanostructure are reported for the first time. The sphere-like ZrMo2O8 were prepared via a simple hydrothermal route followed by annealing process. The structural and morphological properties were investigated by various analytical and spectroscopic techniques such as XRD, Raman, SEM, EDX, TEM, and XPS analysis. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and amperometric techniques. The obtained results displayed that the prepared ZrMo2O8 materials hold excellent-crystallinity, well-defined sphere-like formation and demonstrated superior electrochemical properties. Interestingly, the electrochemical H2O2 sensor was constructed based on ZrMo2O8 nanostructure on the glassy carbon electrode exhibited wide linear response ranges, good sensitivity and lower detection limit (LOD). The estimated sensitivity, wide linear ranges and LOD of the fabricated electrochemical sensor was 2.584μAμM(-1)cm(-2), 0.05-523, 543-3053μM and 0.01μM respectively. The proposed sensor had excellent selectivity even in the presence of biologically co-interfering substances such as uric acid, dopamine, ascorbic acid and glucose. This effortless, fast, inexpensive technique for constructing a modified electrode is a gorgeous approach to the growth of new sensors.

  6. Graphene wrapped Cu2O nanocubes: non-enzymatic electrochemical sensors for the detection of glucose and hydrogen peroxide with enhanced stability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minmin; Liu, Ru; Chen, Wei

    2013-07-15

    In this study, a sensor for the detection of glucose and hydrogen peroxide was developed on the basis of Cu2O nanocubes wrapped by graphene nanosheets (Cu2O/GNs) as electrocatalysts. Cubic Cu2O nanocrystals/graphene hybrid has been successfully fabricated by a chemical reduction method at low temperature. The morphologies of the synthesized materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and powder X-ray diffraction measurements (XRD). As a non-enzymatic amperometric sensor, the resulting Cu2O/graphene composite exhibited high sensitivity for the detection of glucose and H2O2. Moreover, the graphene coating was found to be able to effectively improve the electrochemical cycling stability of the fabricated sensor. With the Cu2O/GNs modified electrode, amperometric sensing of glucose was realized with a linear response over the concentration range from 0.3 to 3.3mM, a detection limit of 3.3 μM (S/N=3), high selectivity and short response time (<9s). Compared to unsupported Cu2O nanocubes, the graphene-wrapped Cu2O nanocubes exhibited higher catalytic activity for glucose oxidation with higher sensitivity and lower detection limit. The enzymeless sensor also exhibited good response toward H2O2, with the linear response ranging from 0.3 to 7.8mM at -0.4V and the detection limit of 20.8 μM. Moreover, because the surface is covered by graphene nanosheets, the as-synthesized Cu2O/GNs exhibited improved electrochemical stability. Such novel graphene nanosheets wrapped Cu2O nanocubes represent promising enzyme-free glucose and hydrogen peroxide sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity, improved stability and fast amperometric response.

  7. Charge neutrality in epitaxial graphene on 6 H -SiC(0001) via nitrogen intercalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffrey, Nuala M.; Armiento, Rickard; Yakimova, Rositsa; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2015-08-01

    The electronic properties of epitaxial graphene grown on SiC(0001) are known to be impaired relative to those of freestanding graphene. This is due to the formation of a carbon buffer layer between the graphene layers and the substrate, which causes the graphene layers to become strongly n -doped. Charge neutrality can be achieved by completely passivating the dangling bonds of the clean SiC surface using atomic intercalation. So far, only one element, hydrogen, has been identified as a promising candidate. We show, using first-principles density functional calculations, how it can also be accomplished via the growth of a thin layer of silicon nitride on the SiC surface. The subsequently grown graphene layers display the electronic properties associated with charge neutral graphene. We show that the surface energy of this structure is considerably lower than that of others with intercalated atomic nitrogen and determine how its stability depends on the N2 chemical potential.

  8. Effect of H2 and NH3 Adsorption on Electronic Transport Properties of SiC Nanowires: A DFT Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasumathi, R.; Thayumanavan, A.; Sriram, S.

    2017-02-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanowire structures with and without hydrogen (H2) and ammonia (NH3) molecules have been constructed and optimized using density functional theory to study their electronic and transport properties. The adsorption energies calculated for the SiC nanowire structures reveal that the adsorption process of H2 and NH3 molecules is endothermic in nature. Nonequilibrium Green's function transport theory is employed to study the electronic transport properties of the SiC nanowire devices with and without H2 and NH3 molecules. The voltage-current (V-I) characteristic shows negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior for all the SiC nanowire devices when bias voltage is applied. It is inferred that the NDR behavior is due to shift of quasibound states near the Fermi level because of the applied bias voltage. This observed NDR behavior may be useful for fabrication of nanoelectronic devices.

  9. Effect of H2 and NH3 Adsorption on Electronic Transport Properties of SiC Nanowires: A DFT Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasumathi, R.; Thayumanavan, A.; Sriram, S.

    2017-07-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanowire structures with and without hydrogen (H2) and ammonia (NH3) molecules have been constructed and optimized using density functional theory to study their electronic and transport properties. The adsorption energies calculated for the SiC nanowire structures reveal that the adsorption process of H2 and NH3 molecules is endothermic in nature. Nonequilibrium Green's function transport theory is employed to study the electronic transport properties of the SiC nanowire devices with and without H2 and NH3 molecules. The voltage-current ( V- I) characteristic shows negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior for all the SiC nanowire devices when bias voltage is applied. It is inferred that the NDR behavior is due to shift of quasibound states near the Fermi level because of the applied bias voltage. This observed NDR behavior may be useful for fabrication of nanoelectronic devices.

  10. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo of the S-IC test stand, taken October 2, 1963, the flame deflector can be seen in the bottom center portion

  11. Construction Progress of the S-IC Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built to the northeast of the stand was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed through small holes in the stand's 1900 ton flame deflector at the rate of 320,000 gallons per minute. In this photo of the S-IC test stand, taken October 2, 1963, the flame deflector can be seen in the bottom center portion

  12. D-region ion-neutral coupled chemistry (Sodankylä Ion Chemistry, SIC) within the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM 4) - WACCM-SIC and WACCM-rSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, Tamás; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Nagy, Tibor; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Verronen, Pekka T.; Andersson, Monika E.; Newnham, David A.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Marsh, Daniel R.

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a new ion-neutral chemical model coupled into the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The ionospheric D-region (altitudes ˜ 50-90 km) chemistry is based on the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC) model, a one-dimensional model containing 307 ion-neutral and ion recombination, 16 photodissociation and 7 photoionization reactions of neutral species, positive and negative ions, and electrons. The SIC mechanism was reduced using the simulation error minimization connectivity method (SEM-CM) to produce a reaction scheme of 181 ion-molecule reactions of 181 ion-molecule reactions of 27 positive and 18 negative ions. This scheme describes the concentration profiles at altitudes between 20 km and 120 km of a set of major neutral species (HNO3, O3, H2O2, NO, NO2, HO2, OH, N2O5) and ions (O2+, O4+, NO+, NO+(H2O), O2+(H2O), H+(H2O), H+(H2O)2, H+(H2O)3, H+(H2O)4, O3-, NO2-, O-, O2, OH-, O2-(H2O), O2-(H2O)2, O4-, CO3-, CO3-(H2O), CO4-, HCO3-, NO2-, NO3-, NO3-(H2O), NO3-(H2O)2, NO3-(HNO3), NO3-(HNO3)2, Cl-, ClO-), which agree with the full SIC mechanism within a 5 % tolerance. Four 3-D model simulations were then performed, using the impact of the January 2005 solar proton event (SPE) on D-region HOx and NOx chemistry as a test case of four different model versions: the standard WACCM (no negative ions and a very limited set of positive ions); WACCM-SIC (standard WACCM with the full SIC chemistry of positive and negative ions); WACCM-D (standard WACCM with a heuristic reduction of the SIC chemistry, recently used to examine HNO3 formation following an SPE); and WACCM-rSIC (standard WACCM with a reduction of SIC chemistry using the SEM-CM method). The standard WACCM misses the HNO3 enhancement during the SPE, while the full and reduced model versions predict significant NOx, HOx and HNO3 enhancements in the mesosphere during solar proton events. The SEM-CM reduction also identifies the important ion-molecule reactions that affect the partitioning of

  13. SiC Optically Modulated Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood

    2009-01-01

    An optically modulated field-effect transistor (OFET) based on a silicon carbide junction field-effect transistor (JFET) is under study as, potentially, a prototype of devices that could be useful for detecting ultraviolet light. The SiC OFET is an experimental device that is one of several devices, including commercial and experimental photodiodes, that were initially evaluated as detectors of ultraviolet light from combustion and that could be incorporated into SiC integrated circuits to be designed to function as combustion sensors. The ultraviolet-detection sensitivity of the photodiodes was found to be less than desired, such that it would be necessary to process their outputs using high-gain amplification circuitry. On the other hand, in principle, the function of the OFET could be characterized as a combination of detection and amplification. In effect, its sensitivity could be considerably greater than that of a photodiode, such that the need for amplification external to the photodetector could be reduced or eliminated. The experimental SiC OFET was made by processes similar to JFET-fabrication processes developed at Glenn Research Center. The gate of the OFET is very long, wide, and thin, relative to the gates of typical prior SiC JFETs. Unlike in prior SiC FETs, the gate is almost completely transparent to near-ultraviolet and visible light. More specifically: The OFET includes a p+ gate layer less than 1/4 m thick, through which photons can be transported efficiently to the p+/p body interface. The gate is relatively long and wide (about 0.5 by 0.5 mm), such that holes generated at the body interface form a depletion layer that modulates the conductivity of the channel between the drain and the source. The exact physical mechanism of modulation of conductivity is a subject of continuing research. It is known that injection of minority charge carriers (in this case, holes) at the interface exerts a strong effect on the channel, resulting in amplification

  14. Ethynyl-linked (pyreno)pyrrole-naphthyridine and aniline-naphthyridine molecules as fluorescent sensors of guanine via multiple hydrogen bondings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shao-Hung; Selvi, Srinivasan; Fang, Jim-Min

    2007-01-05

    New fluorescent molecular sensors for 9-alkylguanines were constructed by conjugation of 2-acetamido-1,8-naphthyridine with N-Boc-pyrrole, N-Boc-pyreno[2,1-b]pyrrole, or acetanilide moieties via an ethynyl bridge. In combination with the triple hydrogen-bonding motif of 2-acetamidonaphthyridine toward alkylguanine, an additional binding site was provided by the substituent properly located on the pyrrole or aniline ring to enhance the affinity of these receptor molecules. Besides the ESI-MS analyses, the binding events were readily monitored by the absorption and fluorescence changes in the visible region.

  15. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Sic Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Miller, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide with a refractory oxide coating is potentially a very attractive ceramic system. It offers the desirable mechanical and physical properties of SiC and the environmental durability of a refractory oxide. The development of a thermal shock resistant plasma-sprayed mullite coating on SiC is discussed. The durability of the mullite/SiC in oxidizing, reducing, and molten salt environments is discussed. In general, this system exhibits better behavior than uncoated SiC. Areas for further developments are discussed.

  16. Development of sensitive amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor using a CuNPs/MB/MWCNT-C60-Cs-IL nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Roushani, Mahmoud; Bakyas, Kobra; Zare Dizajdizi, Behruz

    2016-07-01

    A sensitive hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensor was constructed based on copper nanoparticles/methylene blue/multiwall carbon nanotubes-fullerene-chitosan-ionic liquid (CuNPs/MB/MWCNTs-C60-Cs-IL) nanocomposites. The MB/MWCNTs-C60-Cs-IL and CuNPs were modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by the physical adsorption and electrodeposition of copper nitrate solution, respectively. The physical morphology and chemical composition of the surface of modified electrode was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The electrochemical properties of CuNPs/MB/MWCNTs-C60-Cs-IL/GCE were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometry techniques and the sensor exhibited remarkably strong electrocatalytic activities toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The peak currents possess a linear relationship with the concentration of H2O2 in the range of 0.2μM to 2.0mM, and the detection limit is 55.0nM (S/N=3). In addition, the modified electrode was used to determine H2O2 concentration in human blood serum sample with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Contact formation in SiC devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pécz, B.

    2001-12-01

    In SiC devices designed for high temperature and high power applications, both ohmic and Schottky contacts are required which are stable at high temperature. The microstructure of contacts is very important to learn. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful method to reveal the microstructure of the contacts. Various contacts to SiC were investigated by TEM in cross-section and are discussed. TiN, Ni and Ni 2Si are ohmic contacts to n-type SiC, while multilayers and WN x contacts are used for Schottky purposes. Magnetron sputtered TiN layers were deposited at 700 °C onto cubic and hexagonal SiC as well. The contacts are ohmic, single crystalline, epitaxial, non-reactive and stable at high temperature. Ni contacts evaporated onto hexagonal SiC and subsequently annealed at 950 °C showed ohmic behavior, but Ni reacted with SiC. The reaction resulted in the formation of nickel silicide together with the formation of high number of voids. Deposition and annealing of Si/Ni multilayer contacts resulted in a void-free Ni 2Si contact layer preserving low contact resistivity. For Schottky purposes, multilayered contacts of Ti/Pt/Au/Ti can be used up to 575 °C, while WN x contacts are rectifying at least up to 800 °C.

  18. Amperometric sensor for hydrogen peroxide based on electric wire composed of horseradish peroxidase and toluidine blue-multiwalled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2008-01-15

    A kind of nanocomposites with good dispersion in water was prepared through noncovalent adsorption of toluidine blue (Tb) on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for electric communication between horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and electrode. The nanocomposites could be conveniently cast on electrode surface. With the aid of chitosan, HRP was then immobilized on the nanostructure to form a reagentless amperometric sensor for hydrogen peroxide. UV-vis spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to characterize the adsorption of Tb on MWCNT. The presence of both Tb as mediator of electron transfer and MWCNT as conductor enhanced greatly the enzymatic response to the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The novel biosensor exhibited fast response towards hydrogen peroxide with a detection limit of 1.7x10(-6)M and the linear range extended up to 4x10(-4)M without the interference of ascorbic acid and uric acid. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K'(m)) of the immobilized HRP was evaluated to be 0.16mM.

  19. A novel nonenzymatic amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor based on CuO@Cu2O nanowires embedded into poly(vinyl alcohol).

    PubMed

    Chirizzi, Daniela; Guascito, Maria Rachele; Filippo, Emanuela; Tepore, Antonio

    2016-01-15

    A new, very simple, rapid and inexpensive nonenzymatic amperometric sensor for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection is proposed. It is based on the immobilization of cupric/cuprous oxide core shell nanowires (CuO@Cu2O-NWs) in a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) matrix directly drop casted on a glassy carbon electrode surface to make a CuO@Cu2O core shell like NWs PVA embedded (CuO@Cu2O-NWs/PVA) sensor. CuO nanowires with mean diameters of 120-170nm and length in the range 2-5μm were grown by a simple catalyst-free thermal oxidation process based on resistive heating of pure copper wires at ambient conditions. The oxidation process of the copper wire surface led to the formation of a three layered structure: a thick Cu2O bottom layer, a CuO thin intermediate layer and CuO nanowires. CuO nanowires were carefully scratched from Cu2O layer with a sharp knife, dispersed into ethanol and sonicated. Then, the NWs were embedded in PVA matrix. The morphological and spectroscopic characterization of synthesized CuO-NWs and CuO@Cu2O-NWs/PVA were performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area diffraction pattern (SAD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Moreover a complete electrochemical characterization of these new CuO@Cu2O-NWs/PVA modified glassy carbon electrodes was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) and Cronoamperometry (CA) in phosphate buffer (pH=7; I=0.2) to investigate the sensing properties of this material against H2O2. The electrochemical performances of proposed sensors as high sensitivity, fast response, reproducibility and selectivity make them suitable for the quantitative determination of hydrogen peroxide substrate in batch analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved Method of Manufacturing SiC Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    The phrase, "common-layered architecture for semiconductor silicon carbide" ("CLASSiC") denotes a method of batch fabrication of microelectromechanical and semiconductor devices from bulk silicon carbide. CLASSiC is the latest in a series of related methods developed in recent years in continuing efforts to standardize SiC-fabrication processes. CLASSiC encompasses both institutional and technological innovations that can be exploited separately or in combination to make the manufacture of SiC devices more economical. Examples of such devices are piezoresistive pressure sensors, strain gauges, vibration sensors, and turbulence-intensity sensors for use in harsh environments (e.g., high-temperature, high-pressure, corrosive atmospheres). The institutional innovation is to manufacture devices for different customers (individuals, companies, and/or other entities) simultaneously in the same batch. This innovation is based on utilization of the capability for fabrication, on the same substrate, of multiple SiC devices having different functionalities (see figure). Multiple customers can purchase shares of the area on the same substrate, each customer s share being apportioned according to the customer s production-volume requirement. This makes it possible for multiple customers to share costs in a common foundry, so that the capital equipment cost per customer in the inherently low-volume SiC-product market can be reduced significantly. One of the technological innovations is a five-mask process that is based on an established set of process design rules. The rules provide for standardization of the fabrication process, yet are flexible enough to enable multiple customers to lay out masks for their portions of the SiC substrate to provide for simultaneous batch fabrication of their various devices. In a related prior method, denoted multi-user fabrication in silicon carbide (MUSiC), the fabrication process is based largely on surface micromachining of poly SiC

  1. Nano-assemblies consisting of Pd/Pt nanodendrites and poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride)-coated reduced graphene oxide on glassy carbon electrode for hydrogen peroxide sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Di; Ma, Min; Wang, Weizhen; Chen, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sensors were fabricated on the basis of glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with palladium (Pd) core-platinum (Pt) nanodendrites (Pt-NDs) and poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO). A facile wet-chemical method was developed for preparing Pd core-Pt nanodendrites. In this approach, the growth of Pt NDs was directed by Pd nanocrystal which could be regarded as seed. The PDDA-coated rGO could form uniform film on the surface of GC electrode, which provided a support for Pd core- Pt NDs adsorption by self-assembly. The morphologies of the nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (spectrum). Electrocatalytic ability of the nanocomposites was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric methods. The sensor fabricated by Pd core-Pt NDs/PDDA-rGO/GCE exhibited high sensitivity (672.753 μA mM(-1) cm(-2)), low detection limit (0.027 μM), wider linear range (0.005-0.5mM) and rapid response time (within 5s). Besides, it also exhibited superior reproducibility, excellent anti-interference performance and long-term stability. The present work could afford a viable method and efficient platform for fabricating all kinds of amperometric sensors and biosensors.

  2. Optimization of the HyPer sensor for robust real-time detection of hydrogen peroxide in the rice blast fungus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kun; Caplan, Jeff; Sweigard, James A; Czymmek, Kirk J; Donofrio, Nicole M

    2017-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and breakdown have been studied in detail in plant-pathogenic fungi, including the rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae; however, the examination of the dynamic process of ROS production in real time has proven to be challenging. We resynthesized an existing ROS sensor, called HyPer, to exhibit optimized codon bias for fungi, specifically Neurospora crassa, and used a combination of microscopy and plate reader assays to determine whether this construct could detect changes in fungal ROS during the plant infection process. Using confocal microscopy, we were able to visualize fluctuating ROS levels during the formation of an appressorium on an artificial hydrophobic surface, as well as during infection on host leaves. Using the plate reader, we were able to ascertain measurements of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels in conidia as detected by the MoHyPer sensor. Overall, by the optimization of codon usage for N. crassa and related fungal genomes, the MoHyPer sensor can be used as a robust, dynamic and powerful tool to both monitor and quantify H2 O2 dynamics in real time during important stages of the plant infection process.

  3. The electrodeposition of Ag nanoparticles on a type I collagen-modified glassy carbon electrode and their applications as a hydrogen peroxide sensor.

    PubMed

    Song, Yonghai; Cui, Kang; Wang, Li; Chen, Shouhui

    2009-03-11

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) attached to type I collagen-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrodes were successfully synthesized by the electrodepositing method. Atomic force microscopy images showed that many Ag NPs with homogeneous size were formed and uniformly distributed on the type I collagen/GC electrode. The amount, size and distribution of Ag NPs could be controlled by the collagen. The results of electrochemical experiments showed that Ag NPs had an excellent catalytic ability for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), suggesting that they could be used as a sensor to determine H(2)O(2). The good catalytic activity of the Ag NPs was ascribed to the type I collagen that resulted in the homogeneous distribution of Ag NPs with small size. The effects of type I collagen concentration and electrodeposition time on Ag NPs were investigated. When the Ag NPs were used as a sensor to determine H(2)O(2), the sensor could achieve 95% of the steady-state current in less than 2 s and had a linear range of 5.0 microM to 40.6 mM and a 0.7 microM detection limit of H(2)O(2) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.

  4. Nanoplasmonic hydrogen sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    In this review we discuss the evolution of surface plasmon resonance and localized surface plasmon resonance based hydrogen sensors. We put particular focus on how they are used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and the single nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes. However, nanoplasmonic hydrogen sensors are not only of academic interest but may also find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier.

  5. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  6. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  7. Cryogenic Performance of Trex SiC Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, Colby; Kane, Dave; Bray, Donald; Hadaway, James

    2005-01-01

    Low cost, high performance lightweight Silicon Carbide (Sic) mirrors provide an alternative to Beryllium mirrors. A Trex Enterprises 0.25m diameter lightweight Sic mirror using its patented Chemical Vapor Composites (CVC) technology was evaluated for its optical performance. CVC Sic is chemically pure, thermally stable, and mechanically stiff. CVC technology yields higher growth rate than that of CVD Sic. NASA has funded lightweight optical materials technology development efforts involving Sic mirrors for future space based telescope programs. As part of these efforts, a Trex Sic was measured interferometrically from room temperature to 30 degrees Kelvin. This paper will discuss the test goals, the test instrumentation, test results, and lessons learned.

  8. Characterization of Liquid Phase Sitered sic and Sic/sic Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moon Hee; Lee, Sang Pill; Hur, Kwan Do

    The characterization of liquid phase sintered(LPS) SiC based materials has been investigated with the analysis of microstructure and flexural strength. Especially, LPS-SiC materials were examined for the variation of test temperature and composition ratios (Al2O3,/Y2O3) of sintering additives. LPS-SiC based materials were fabricated by hot pressing(HP) associated with the liquid phase formation of sintering additives(Al2O3,Y2O3). LPS-SiCf/SiC composites were also fabricated with plane-woven(PW) Tyranno-SA fibers without an interfacial layer. LPS-SiC materials showed a dense morphology with the creation of the secondary phase like YAG. The composition ratio of sintering additives led to the variation of sintered density and flexural strength. The flexural strength of LPS-SiC materials was greatly decreased at the temperature higher than 1000°C. LPS-SiCf/SiC composites represented an average flexural strength of about 260 MPa, accompanying the catastrophic fracture behavior without any full-out phenomena.

  9. H.sub.2O doped WO.sub.3, ultra-fast, high-sensitivity hydrogen sensors

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ping [Denver, CO; Tracy, C Edwin [Golden, CO; Pitts, J Roland [Lakewood, CO; Lee, Se-Hee [Lakewood, CO

    2011-03-22

    An ultra-fast response, high sensitivity structure for optical detection of low concentrations of hydrogen gas, comprising: a substrate; a water-doped WO.sub.3 layer coated on the substrate; and a palladium layer coated on the water-doped WO.sub.3 layer.

  10. A specific nucleophilic ring-opening reaction of aziridines as a unique platform for the construction of hydrogen polysulfides sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Rosser, Ethan W; Zhang, Di; Shi, Wen; Li, Yilin; Dong, Wen-Ji; Ma, Huimin; Hu, Dehong; Xian, Ming

    2015-06-05

    A hydrogen polysulfide mediated aziridine ring-opening reaction was discovered. Based on this reaction, a novel H2S(n)-specific chemosensor (AP) was developed. AP showed high sensitivity and selectivity for H2S(n). Notably, the fluorescent turn-on product (1) exhibited excellent two-photon photophysical properties, a large Stokes shift, and high solid state luminescent efficiency.

  11. Silicon Carbide Sensors and Electronics for Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor has been studied for electronic and sensing applications in extreme environment (high temperature, extreme vibration, harsh chemical media, and high radiation) that is beyond the capability of conventional semiconductors such as silicon. This is due to its near inert chemistry, superior thermomechanical and electronic properties that include high breakdown voltage and wide bandgap. An overview of SiC sensors and electronics work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) will be presented. The main focus will be two technologies currently being investigated: 1) harsh environment SiC pressure transducers and 2) high temperature SiC electronics. Work highlighted will include the design, fabrication, and application of SiC sensors and electronics, with recent advancements in state-of-the-art discussed as well. These combined technologies are studied for the goal of developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion systems, as well as enhancing tools for exploration systems.

  12. Electronic and Optical Properties of Nitrogen Doped SiC Nanocrystals: First Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javan, Masoud Bezi

    2013-05-01

    A typical nitrogen doped spherical SiC nanocrystal with a diameter of 1.2 nm (Si43C44H76) using linear combination atomic orbital (LCAO) in combination with pseudopotential density functional calculation have been studied. Our selected SiC nanocrystal has been modeled taking all the cubic bulk SiC atoms contained within a sphere of a given radius and terminating the surface dangling bonds with hydrogen atoms. We have examined nine possible situations in which nitrogen has a high probability for replacement in the lattice or placed between atoms in the nanocrystal. We have found that the silicone can substitute with a nitrogen atom in each layer as the constructed nanocrystals remain thermodynamically stable. Also the nitrogen atom can be placed between the free atomic spaces as the more thermodynamically stable position of the nitrogen is between the topmost layers. Also the optical absorption and refractive index energy dispersions of the pure and various stable doped SiC nanocrystals were studied.

  13. Chemical bath deposition growth and characterization of zinc oxide nanostructures on plain and platinum-coated glass substrates for hydrogen peroxide gas sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamasali, Y. D. J.; Alguno, A. C.

    2015-06-01

    Growth of zinc oxide on plain and Pt-coated glass substrate via chemical bath deposition technique (CBD) were studied. Aqueous solutions of ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) and zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) were used as the precursor substances in the synthesis. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) was performed to determine the energy band gap and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to examine crystallinity. Sensitivity measurements were carried out in order to examine its potential to be fabricated as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) gas sensor. Experimental results in the sensitivity experiment show that in the presence of H2O2 gas, the resistance of ZnOincrease which can be used as the basis for H2O-2 detection. UV-Vis showed variation of energy band gap values but were all near the generally accepted value. XRD spectra further verify that ZnOwere indeed synthesized.

  14. Solute embrittlement of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Enrique, Raúl A.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2014-09-21

    The energies and stresses associated with the decohesion of β-SiC in the presence of mobile Pd and Ag impurities are studied from first principles. Density functional theory calculations are parameterized with a generalized cohesive zone model and are analyzed within a thermodynamic framework that accounts for realistic boundary conditions in the presence of mobile impurities. We find that Pd impurities will embrittle SiC when Pd is in equilibrium with metallic Pd precipitates. Our thermodynamic analysis predicts that Pd embrittles SiC by substantially reducing the maximum stress of decohesion as a result of a phase transition between decohering planes involving an influx of Pd atoms. The methods presented in this work can be applied to study the thermodynamics of decohesion of SiC in other aggressive environments containing oxygen and water, for example, and yield environment dependent cohesive zone models for use in continuum approaches to study crack propagation and fracture.

  15. Amplifiers dedicated for large area SiC photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doroz, P.; Duk, M.; Korwin-Pawlowski, M. L.; Borecki, M.

    2016-09-01

    Large area SiC photodiodes find applications in optoelectronic sensors working at special conditions. These conditions include detection of UV radiation in harsh environment. Moreover, the mentioned sensors have to be selective and resistant to unwanted signals. For this purpose, the modulation of light at source unit and the rejection of constant current and low frequency component of signal at detector unit are used. The popular frequency used for modulation in such sensor is 1kHz. The large area photodiodes are characterized by a large capacitance and low shunt resistance that varies with polarization of the photodiode and can significantly modify the conditions of signal pre-amplification. In this paper two pre-amplifiers topology are analyzed: the transimpedance amplifier and the non-inverting voltage to voltage amplifier with negative feedback. The feedback loops of both pre-amplifiers are equipped with elements used for initial constant current and low frequency signals rejections. Both circuits are analyzed and compared using simulation and experimental approaches.

  16. C60 on SiC nanomesh.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Hong Liang; Xu, Hai; Tok, Eng Soon; Loh, Kian Ping; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2006-11-02

    A SiC nanomesh is used as a nanotemplate to direct the epitaxy of C60 molecules. The epitaxial growth of C60 molecules on SiC nanomesh at room temperature is investigated by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy, revealing a typical Stranski-Krastanov mode (i.e., for the first one or two monolayers, it is a layer-by-layer growth or 2-D nucleation mode; at higher thicknesses, it changes to island growth or a 3-D nucleation mode). At submonolayer (0.04 and 0.2 ML) coverage, C60 molecules tend to aggregate to form single-layer C60 islands that mainly decorate terrace edges, leaving the uncovered SiC nanomesh almost free of C60 molecules. At 1 ML C60 coverage, a complete wetting layer of hexagonally close-packed C60 molecules forms on top of the SiC nanomesh. At higher coverage from 4.5 ML onward, the C60 stacking adopts a (111) oriented face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure. Strong bright and dim molecular contrasts have been observed on the first layer of C60 molecules, which are proposed to originate from electronic effects in a single-layer C60 island or the different coupling of C60 molecules to SiC nanomesh. These STM molecular contrast patterns completely disappear on the second and all the subsequent C60 layers. It is also found that the nanomesh can be fully recovered by annealing the C60/SiC nanomesh sample at 200 degrees C for 20 min.

  17. SiC for Space Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellman, John

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes SiC mirrors that are large, ultra-lightweight, and actively controlled, for use in space telescopes. "Advanced Hybrid Mirrors” (AHMs) utilize SiC substrates, with embedded solid-state actuators, bonded to Nanolaminate metal foil reflective surfaces. They use replication techniques for high optical quality as well as rapid, low cost manufacturing. AHMs up to 1.35m in size have been made and tested, demonstrating wavefront error to better than the visible diffraction limit. AHMs can be fabricated at production rates after the first unit delivery as fast as 48 day intervals. "Superpolished Si/SiC Active Mirrors” (SSAMs) are similar to AHMs but the SiC mirror substrates have a layer of Si deposited on them to enable direct superpolishing. SSAMs can be much larger, can operate over a wider temperature range, and are better suited to UV astronomy. To make SSAMs larger than 1.8 m, multiple substrates can be joined together, using brazing techniques. Using wavefront sensing and control technology to command the embedded solid-state actuators, final mirror figure will be set after launch. This gives the active SiC mirror the ability to correct nearly any optical error, occurring anywhere in the optical system. As a result, active SiC mirrors can be made to relaxed figure requirements, enabling optical replication, or speeding up polishing, while assuring excellent final performance. Active SiC mirrors will reduce cost, risk and schedule for future astrophysics missions. Their high control authority allows relaxation of fabrication and assembly tolerances from optical to mechanical levels, speeding I & T. They enable rapid system testing to within required performance levels, even in 1 G, lowering mission risk. They are lighter weight and more durable than glass mirrors.

  18. Advanced Packaging Technology Used in Fabricating a High-Temperature Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn M.

    2003-01-01

    The development of new aircraft engines requires the measurement of pressures in hot areas such as the combustor and the final stages of the compressor. The needs of the aircraft engine industry are not fully met by commercially available high-temperature pressure sensors, which are fabricated using silicon. Kulite Semiconductor Products and the NASA Glenn Research Center have been working together to develop silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors for use at high temperatures. At temperatures above 850 F, silicon begins to lose its nearly ideal elastic properties, so the output of a silicon pressure sensor will drift. SiC, however, maintains its nearly ideal mechanical properties to extremely high temperatures. Given a suitable sensor material, a key to the development of a practical high-temperature pressure sensor is the package. A SiC pressure sensor capable of operating at 930 F was fabricated using a newly developed package. The durability of this sensor was demonstrated in an on-engine test. The SiC pressure sensor uses a SiC diaphragm, which is fabricated using deep reactive ion etching. SiC strain gauges on the surface of the diaphragm sense the pressure difference across the diaphragm. Conventionally, the SiC chip is mounted to the package with the strain gauges outward, which exposes the sensitive metal contacts on the chip to the hostile measurement environment. In the new Kulite leadless package, the SiC chip is flipped over so that the metal contacts are protected from oxidation by a hermetic seal around the perimeter of the chip. In the leadless package, a conductive glass provides the electrical connection between the pins of the package and the chip, which eliminates the fragile gold wires used previously. The durability of the leadless SiC pressure sensor was demonstrated when two 930 F sensors were tested in the combustor of a Pratt & Whitney PW4000 series engine. Since the gas temperatures in these locations reach 1200 to 1300 F, the sensors were

  19. Microwave joining of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Silberglitt, R.; Ahmad, I.; Tian, Y.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to optimize the properties of SiC-SiC joints made using microwave energy. The current focus is on identification of the most effective joining methods for scale-up to large tube assemblies, including joining using SiC produced in situ from chemical precursors. During FY 1996, a new microwave applicator was designed, fabricated and tested that provides the capability for vacuum baking of the specimens and insulation and for processing under inert environment. This applicator was used to join continuous fiber-reinforced (CFCC) SiC/SiC composites using a polymer precursor to form a SiC interlayer in situ.

  20. SiC MEMS For Harsh Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    allowed for high g shock loading of a functioning SiC MEMS accelerometer , with published results [1]. 2 2 HIGH TEMPERATURE TESTING OF SiC Measuring...2800 °C, thus capable of being operated in the temperature range of 600-1000 °C [4,5]. The need for the mechanical properties (modulus) of these SiC...VOR-MELT rheometers used for mechanical modulus measurements had a solids fixture, which held both ends of a vertically oriented rectangular cross

  1. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This illustration shows a cutaway drawing with callouts of the major components for the S-IC (first) stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle. The S-IC stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing more than 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimball for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  2. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This is a cutaway view of the Saturn V first stage, known as the S-IC, detailing the five F-1 engines and fuel cells. The S-IC stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing more than 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through the five F-1 engines that are powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  3. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This cutaway illustration shows the Saturn V S-IC (first) stage with detailed callouts of the components. The S-IC Stage is 138 feet long and 33 feet in diameter, producing 7,500,000 pounds of thrust through five F-1 engines that are powered by liquid oxygen and kerosene. Four of the engines are mounted on an outer ring and gimbal for control purposes. The fifth engine is rigidly mounted in the center. When ignited, the roar produced by the five engines equals the sound of 8,000,000 hi-fi sets.

  4. Genomic analysis reveals multiple [FeFe] hydrogenases and hydrogen sensors encoded by treponemes from the H(2)-rich termite gut.

    PubMed

    Ballor, Nicholas R; Paulsen, Ian; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2012-02-01

    We have completed a bioinformatic analysis of the hydrogenases encoded in the genomes of three termite gut treponeme isolates: hydrogenotrophic, homoacetogenic Treponema primitia strains ZAS-1 and ZAS-2, and the hydrogen-producing, sugar-fermenting Treponema azotonutricium ZAS-9. H(2) is an important free intermediate in the breakdown of wood by termite gut microbial communities, reaching concentrations in some species exceeding those measured for any other biological system. The spirochetes encoded 4, 8, and 5 [FeFe] hydrogenase-like proteins, identified by their H domains, respectively, but no other recognizable hydrogenases. The [FeFe] hydrogenases represented many sequence families previously proposed in an analysis of termite gut metagenomic data. Each strain encoded both putative [FeFe] hydrogenase enzymes and evolutionarily related hydrogen sensor/transducer proteins likely involved in phosphorelay or methylation pathways, and possibly even chemotaxis. A new family of [FeFe] hydrogenases (FDH-Linked) is proposed that may form a multimeric complex with formate dehydrogenase to provide reducing equivalents for reductive acetogenesis in T. primitia. The many and diverse [FeFe] hydrogenase-like proteins encoded within the sequenced genomes of the termite gut treponemes has enabled the discovery of a putative new class of [FeFe] hydrogenase proteins potentially involved in acetogenesis and furthered present understanding of many families, including sensory, of H domain proteins beyond what was possible through the use of fragmentary termite gut metagenome sequence data alone, from which they were initially defined.

  5. Crystal growth of SiC for electronic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1989-01-01

    The development of SiC as a high temperature semiconductor material is discussed, focusing on the epitaxial growth of single crystal SiC films on inexpensive single crystal silicon wafers. Progress in the improvement of film morphology and the elimination of antiphase disorder is examined. Potential candidate materials for high temperature semiconductor devices are compared and SiC films are evaluated.

  6. The origin of high electrocatalytic activity of hydrogen peroxide reduction reaction by a g-C3N4/HOPG sensor.

    PubMed

    Gomez, C G; Silva, A M; Strumia, M C; Avalle, L B; Rojas, M I

    2017-08-10

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was synthesized from a low-cost precursor by means of a thermal process. The product was characterized by several spectroscopic techniques and the crystallinity was analyzed by X-ray diffraction. In the manufacture of the sensor, g-C3N4 was chemically exfoliated and a film was placed on the surface of a Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG). We compared the electrocatalytic activities of g-C3N4/HOPG and pristine HOPG surfaces as sensors for H2O2 quantification in buffer solution at pH 7. The results indicate that the surface of g-C3N4/HOPG exhibits striking analytical stability as well as reproducibility, enabling a reliable and sensitive determination within the 0.12-120 μM interval with a detection limit of 0.12 μM. These results suggest that this g-C3N4 film is a really particularly good nano-structured material to be applied as a biosensor. Chemical and physical factors are responsible for the outstanding electrocatalytic activity observed. The N in the g-C3N4 allows huge uptake of H2O2 through the hydrogen-bonding interaction and the change in the electronic structure since the HOPG/g-C3N4 heterojunction favors the charge transfer process through the interface.

  7. Universal Converter Using SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Dallas Marckx; Brian Ratliff; Amit Jain; Matthew Jones

    2007-01-01

    The grantee designed a high power (over 1MW) inverter for use in renewable and distributed energy systems, such as PV cells, fuel cells, variable speed wind turbines, micro turbines, variable speed gensets and various energy storage methods. The inverter uses 10,000V SiC power devices which enable the use of a straight-forward topology for medium voltage (4,160VAC) without the need to cascade devices or topologies as is done in all commercial, 4,160VAC inverters today. The use of medium voltage reduces the current by nearly an order of magnitude in all current carrying components of the energy system, thus reducing size and cost. The use of SiC not only enables medium voltage, but also the use of higher temperatures and switching frequencies, further reducing size and cost. In this project, the grantee addressed several technical issues that stand in the way of success. The two primary issues addressed are the determination of real heat losses in candidate SiC devices at elevated temperature and the development of high temperature packaging for SiC devices.

  8. Microwave joining of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Silberglitt, R.; Ahmad, I.; Black, W.M.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to optimize the properties of SiC-SiC joints made using microwave energy. The current focus is on optimization of time-temperature profiles, production of SiC from chemical precursors, and design of new applicators for joining of long tubes.

  9. Passive SiC irradiation temperature monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, G.E.

    1996-04-01

    A new, improved passive irradiation temperature monitoring method was examined after an irradiation test at 627{degrees}C. The method is based on the analysis of thermal diffusivity changes during postirradiation annealing of polycrystalline SiC. Based on results from this test, several advantages for using this new method rather than a method based on length or lattice parameter changes are given.

  10. Development of SiC Large Tapered Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Majority of very large potential benefits of wide band gap semiconductor power electronics have NOT been realized due in large part to high cost and high defect density of commercial wafers. Despite 20 years of development, present SiC wafer growth approach is yet to deliver majority of SiC's inherent performance and cost benefits to power systems. Commercial SiC power devices are significantly de-rated in order to function reliably due to the adverse effects of SiC crystal dislocation defects (thousands per sq cm) in the SiC wafer.

  11. Large-area SiC membrane produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at relatively high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu; Xie, Changqing

    2015-09-15

    Advances in the growth of silicon carbide (SiC) thin films with outstanding thermal and mechanical properties have received considerable attention. However, the fabrication of large-area free-standing SiC membrane still remains a challenge. Here, the authors report a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at a relatively high temperature to improve the free-standing SiC membrane area. A systematic study on the microstructural, mechanical, and optical properties of hydrogenated polycrystalline silicon carbide (poly-SiC{sub x}:H) thin films deposited at 600 °C with different annealing temperatures has been performed. In the as-deposited state, SiC{sub x}:H thin films show a polycrystalline structure. The crystallinity degree can be further improved with the increase of the postdeposition annealing temperature. The resulting process produced free-standing 2-μm-thick SiC membranes up to 70 mm in diameter with root mean square roughness of 3.384 nm and optical transparency of about 70% at 632.8 nm wavelength. The large-area SiC membranes made out of poly-SiC{sub x}:H thin films deposited at a relatively high temperature can be beneficial for a wide variety of applications, such as x-ray diffractive optical elements, optical and mechanical filtering, lithography mask, lightweight space telescopes, etc.

  12. Construction of a zinc porphyrin-fullerene-derivative based nonenzymatic electrochemical sensor for sensitive sensing of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai; Fan, Suhua; Jin, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Hong; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiaoyong

    2014-07-01

    Enzymatic sensors possess high selectivity but suffer from some limitations such as instability, complicated modified procedure, and critical environmental factors, which stimulate the development of more sensitive and stable nonenzymatic electrochemical sensors. Herein, a novel nonenzymatic electrochemical sensor is proposed based on a new zinc porphyrin-fullerene (C60) derivative (ZnP-C60), which was designed and synthesized according to the conformational calculations and the electronic structures of two typical ZnP-C60 derivatives of para-ZnP-C60 (ZnP(p)-C60) and ortho-ZnP-C60 (ZnP(o)-C60). The two derivatives were first investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and ZnP(p)-C60 with a bent conformation was verified to possess a smaller energy gap and better electron-transport ability. Then ZnP(p)-C60 was entrapped in tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOAB) film and modified on glassy carbon electrode (TOAB/ZnP(p)-C60/GCE). The TOAB/ZnP(p)-C60/GCE showed four well-defined quasi-reversible redox couples with extremely fast direct electron transfer and excellent nonenzymatic sensing ability. The electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 showed a wide linear range from 0.035 to 3.40 mM, with a high sensitivity of 215.6 μA mM(-1) and a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 0.81 μM. The electrocatalytic oxidation of nitrite showed a linear range from 2.0 μM to 0.164 mM, with a sensitivity of 249.9 μA mM(-1) and a LOD down to 1.44 μM. Moreover, the TOAB/ZnP(p)-C60/GCE showed excellent stability and reproducibility, and good testing recoveries for analysis of the nitrite levels of river water and rainwater. The ZnP(p)-C60 can be used as a novel material for the fabrication of nonenzymatic electrochemical sensors.

  13. Hyper, a hydrogen peroxide sensor, indicates the sensitivity of the Arabidopsis root elongation zone to aluminum treatment.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Barrera, Alejandra; Velarde-Buendía, Ana; Zepeda, Isaac; Sanchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen; Sánchez-Lopez, Rosana; Cheung, Alice Y; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cardenas, Luis

    2015-01-06

    Emerging evidence indicates that some reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide anion radical and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are central regulators of plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, the cellular levels of ROS are thought to be tightly regulated by an efficient and elaborate pro- and antioxidant system that modulates the production and scavenging of ROS. Until recently, studies of ROS in plant cells have been limited to biochemical assays and the use of fluorescent probes; however, the irreversible oxidation of these fluorescent probes makes it impossible to visualize dynamic changes in ROS levels. In this work, we describe the use of Hyper, a recently developed live cell probe for H2O2 measurements in living cells, to monitor oxidative stress in Arabidopsis roots subjected to aluminum treatment. Hyper consists of a circularly permuted YFP (cpYFP) inserted into the regulatory domain of the Escherichia coli hydrogen peroxide-binding protein (OxyR), and is a H2O2-specific ratiometric, and therefore quantitative, probe that can be expressed in plant and animal cells. Now we demonstrate that H2O2 levels drop sharply in the elongation zone of roots treated with aluminum. This response could contribute to root growth arrest and provides evidence that H2O2 is involved in early Al sensing.

  14. Hyper, a Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor, Indicates the Sensitivity of the Arabidopsis Root Elongation Zone to Aluminum Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Barrera, Alejandra; Velarde-Buendía, Ana; Zepeda, Isaac; Sanchez, Federico; Quinto, Carmen; Sánchez-Lopez, Rosana; Cheung, Alice Y.; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cardenas, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that some reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide anion radical and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are central regulators of plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, the cellular levels of ROS are thought to be tightly regulated by an efficient and elaborate pro- and antioxidant system that modulates the production and scavenging of ROS. Until recently, studies of ROS in plant cells have been limited to biochemical assays and the use of fluorescent probes; however, the irreversible oxidation of these fluorescent probes makes it impossible to visualize dynamic changes in ROS levels. In this work, we describe the use of Hyper, a recently developed live cell probe for H2O2 measurements in living cells, to monitor oxidative stress in Arabidopsis roots subjected to aluminum treatment. Hyper consists of a circularly permuted YFP (cpYFP) inserted into the regulatory domain of the Escherichia coli hydrogen peroxide-binding protein (OxyR), and is a H2O2-specific ratiometric, and therefore quantitative, probe that can be expressed in plant and animal cells. Now we demonstrate that H2O2 levels drop sharply in the elongation zone of roots treated with aluminum. This response could contribute to root growth arrest and provides evidence that H2O2 is involved in early Al sensing. PMID:25569758

  15. Ultra-long Zn2SnO4-ZnO microwires based gas sensor for hydrogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hong; Xu, Shucong; Cao, Xianmin; Liu, Daoxi; Yin, Yaoyu; Hao, Haiyong; Wei, Dezhou; Shen, Yanbai

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-long Zn2SnO4-ZnO microwires were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixture of SnO2, ZnO and C powders. Microstructural characterization by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that Zn2SnO4-ZnO microwires with excellent crystallinity were 2.8-3.2 μm in diameter and 4.0-4.2 mm in length. The maximal length-to-diameter ratio of Zn2SnO4-ZnO microwires is approximately 1500. H2 sensing properties showed that Zn2SnO4-ZnO microwires exhibited not only excellent reversibility to H2, but also a good linear relationship between the sensor response and H2 concentration. The response time and recovery time decreased as the operating temperature increased. The highest sensor response of 9.6 to 1000 ppm H2 was achieved at an operating temperature of 300 °C. The electron depletion theory was used for explaining H2 sensing mechanism by the chemical adsorption and reaction of H2 molecules on the surface of Zn2SnO4-ZnO microwires.

  16. Erosion and strength degradation of biomorphic SiC.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Fernandez, J.; de Arellano-Lopez, A. R; Varela-Feria, F. M.; Orlova, T. S.; Goretta, K. C.; Gutierrez-Mora, F.; Chen, N.; Routbort, J. L.; Energy Technology; Univ. de Sevilla; Russian Academy of Sciences

    2004-05-01

    Solid-particle-erosion studies were conducted on biomorphic SiC based on eucalyptus and pine, reaction-bonded (RB) SiC, and hot-pressed (HP) SiC. The erodents were angular SiC abrasives of average diameter 63, 143, or 390 {mu}m and the impact velocity was 100 m s{sup -1}. Impact occurred at normal incidence. Material loss in all targets occurred by brittle fracture. The biomorphic specimens eroded by formation of both lateral and radial cracks and their erosion rates were higher than both conventional SiCs. The RB SiC eroded as a classic brittle material, by formation and propagation of lateral cracks. The HP SiC, the hardest target, was the most erosion resistant. In erosion of the HP SiC, the abrasive particles, especially the largest ones, fragmented upon impact. The resulting dissipation of energy led to relatively low erosion rates. Flexural strength before and after erosion was measured for the biomorphic eucalyptus, RB SiC, and HP SiC. Erosion damage reduced the flexural strengths of all of the specimens. The relative strength reductions were lowest for the biomorphic eucalyptus and highest for the HP SiC. The hot-pressed SiC responded as predicted by accepted models of impact damage in brittle solids. The responses of the biomorphic and reaction-bonded SiC specimens were modeled as if they consisted of only SiC and porosity. This approximation agreed reasonably well with observed degradations of strength.

  17. Band-gap modulation of graphane-like SiC nanoribbons under uniaxial elastic strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ben-Ling; Xu, Qing-Qiang; Ke, San-Huang; Xu, Ning; Hu, Guang; Wang, Yanzong; Liang, Feng; Tang, Yalu; Xiong, Shi-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The band-gap modulation of zigzag and armchair graphane-like SiC nanoribbons (GSiCNs) under uniaxial elastic strain is investigated using the density functional theory. The results show that band gap of both structures all decreases when being compressed or tensed. In compression, both zigzag and armchair GSiCNs are semiconductors with a direct band gap. However, in tension, the armchair GSiCNs undergo a direct-to-indirect band-gap transition but the zigzag GSiCNs still have a direct band gap. These results are also proved by HSE06 method. This implies a potential application of the graphane-like SiC nanoribbons in the future pressure sensor and optical electronics nanodevices.

  18. A Specific Nucleophilic Ring-Opening Reaction of Aziridines as a Unique Platform for the Construction of Hydrogen Polysulfides Sensors

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Wei; Rosser, Ethan W.; Zhang, Di; ...

    2015-05-11

    Hydrogen polysulfides (H2Sn, n>1) have been recently suggested to be the actual signalling molecules that involved in sulfur-related redox biology. However the exact mechanisms of H2Sn are still poorly understood and a major hurdle in this field is the lack of reliable and convenient methods for H2Sn detection. In this work we report a unique ring-opening reaction of N-sulfonylaziridine by Na2S2 under mild conditions. Based on this reaction a novel H2Sn-specific fluorescent probe (AP) was developed. The probe showed high sensitivity and selectivity for H2Sn. Notably, the fluorescent turn-on product, i.e. compound 1, exhibited excellent two-photon photophysical properties and amore » large Stokes shift. Moreover, the high solid state luminescent efficiency of compound 1 makes it a potential candidate for organic emitters and solid-state lighting devices.« less

  19. Enhanced functionality in GaN and SiC devices by using novel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearton, S. J.; Abernathy, C. R.; Gila, B. P.; Ren, F.; Zavada, J. M.; Park, Y. D.

    2004-11-01

    Some examples of recent advances in enhancing or adding functionality to GaN and SiC devices through the use of novel processing techniques are discussed. The first example is the use of ion implantation to incorporate transition metals such as Mn, Cr and Co at atomic percent levels in the wide bandgap semiconductors to produce room temperature ferromagnetism. A discussion is given of the phase space within which single-phase material can be obtained and the requirements for demonstrating the presence of a true dilute magnetic semiconductor. The ability to make GaN and SiC ferromagnetic leads to the possibility of magnetic devices with gain, spin FETs operating at low voltages and spin polarized light emitters. The second example is the use of novel oxides such as Sc 2O 3 and MgO as gate dielectrics or surface passivants on GaN. True inversion behavior has been demonstrated in gated MOS-GaN diodes with implanted n-regions supplying the minority carriers need for inversion. These oxide layers also effectively mitigate current collapse in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs through their passivation of surface states in the gate-drain region. The third example is the use of laser drilling to make through-wafer via holes in SiC, sapphire and GaN. The ablation rate is sufficiently high that this maskless, serial process appears capable of achieving similar throughput to the more conventional approach of plasma etching of vias. The fourth example is the use of either ungated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs or simple GaN and SiC Schottky diodes as sensors for chemicals, biogens, radiation, combustion gases or strain. The sensitivity of either the channel carrier density or the barrier height to changes in surface condition make these materials systems ideal for compact robust sensors capable of operating at elevated temperatures.

  20. Atomic-Thick PtNi Nanowires Assembled on Graphene for High-Sensitivity Extracellular Hydrogen Peroxide Sensors.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingjun; Luo, Mingchuan; Qin, Yingnan; Zhu, Sihao; Li, Yingjie; Xu, Nuoyan; Meng, Xiangxi; Ren, Qiushi; Wang, Lei; Guo, Shaojun

    2017-10-11

    H2O2 sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity are essential for monitoring the normal activities of cells. Inorganic catalytic nanomaterials show the obvious advantage in boosting the sensitivity of H2O2 sensors; however, the H2O2 detection limit of reported inorganic catalysts is still limited, which is not suitable for high-sensitivity detection of H2O2 in real cells. Herein, novel atomic-thick PtNi nanowires (NWs) were synthesized and assembled on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) via an ultrasonic self-assembly method to attain PtNi NWs/rGO composite for boosting the electroanalysis of H2O2. In 0.05 M phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4) solution, the as-prepared PtNi NWs/rGO shows an extraordinary performance in quantifying H2O2 in a wide range of concentrations from 1 nM to 5.3 mM. Significantly, the detection limit of PtNi NWs/rGO reaches unprecedented 0.3 nM at an applied potential of -0.6 V (vs Ag/AgCl), which enables the detection of traced amounts of H2O2 released from Raw 264.7 cells. The excellent performance of H2O2 detection on PtNi NWs/rGO is ascribed to the high-density active sites of atomic-thick PtNi NWs.

  1. A novel enzyme-free amperometric sensor for hydrogen peroxide based on Nafion/exfoliated graphene oxide-Co3O4 nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Ensafi, Ali A; Jafari-Asl, M; Rezaei, B

    2013-01-15

    Electrochemical detection of H(2)O(2) was investigated on a Nafion/exfoliated graphene oxide/Co(3)O(4) nanocomposite (Nafion/EGO/Co(3)O(4)) coated glassy carbon electrode. The morphological characterization was examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The modified electrode showed well defined and stable redox couples signal in both alkaline and natural aqueous solutions with excellent electrocatalytic activity for oxidation of hydrogen peroxide. The response of the modified electrode to H(2)O(2) was examined using amperometry (at 0.76 V vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrode) in a phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4). The detection limit was 0.3 μmol L(-1) with a linearity of up to four orders of magnitude and a sensitivity of 560 μA mmol(-1)Lcm(-2). The response time of the electrode to achieve 95% of the steady-state current was recorded at 4s. The ability of the sensor for routine analyses was demonstrated by the detection of H(2)O(2) presents in milk samples with appreciable recovery values. In addition, the Nafion/EGO/Co(3)O(4)-GCE showed good selectivity for H(2)O(2) detection in the presence of ascorbic acid, uric acid, and glucose. The attractive analytical performances such as remarkable catalytic activity, good reproducibility, long term stability, and facile preparation method made this novel nanocomposite electrode promising for the development of effective H(2)O(2) sensor.

  2. Conversion of a heme-based oxygen sensor to a heme oxygenase by hydrogen sulfide: effects of mutations in the heme distal side of a heme-based oxygen sensor phosphodiesterase (Ec DOS).

    PubMed

    Du, Yongming; Liu, Gefei; Yan, Yinxia; Huang, Dongyang; Luo, Wenhong; Martinkova, Marketa; Man, Petr; Shimizu, Toru

    2013-10-01

    The heme-based oxygen-sensor phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli (Ec DOS), is composed of an N-terminal heme-bound oxygen sensing domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. Oxygen (O2) binding to the heme Fe(II) complex in Ec DOS substantially enhances catalysis. Addition of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to the heme Fe(III) complex in Ec DOS also remarkably stimulates catalysis in part due to the heme Fe(III)-SH and heme Fe(II)-O2 complexes formed by H2S. In this study, we examined the roles of the heme distal amino acids, M95 (the axial ligand of the heme Fe(II) complex) and R97 (the O2 binding site in the heme Fe(II)-O2 complex) of the isolated heme-binding domain of Ec DOS (Ec DOS-PAS) in the binding of H2S under aerobic conditions. Interestingly, R97A and R97I mutant proteins formed an oxygen-incorporated modified heme, verdoheme, following addition of H2S combined with H2O2 generated by the reactions. Time-dependent mass spectroscopic data corroborated the findings. In contrast, H2S did not interact with the heme Fe(III) complex of M95H and R97E mutants. Thus, M95 and/or R97 on the heme distal side in Ec DOS-PAS significantly contribute to the interaction of H2S with the Fe(III) heme complex and also to the modification of the heme Fe(III) complex with reactive oxygen species. Importantly, mutations of the O2 binding site of the heme protein converted its function from oxygen sensor to that of a heme oxygenase. This study establishes the novel role of H2S in modifying the heme iron complex to form verdoheme with the aid of reactive oxygen species.

  3. An Improved Metal-Packaged Strain Sensor Based on A Regenerated Fiber Bragg Grating in Hydrogen-Loaded Boron–Germanium Co-Doped Photosensitive Fiber for High-Temperature Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yun; Ye, Lin; Zhou, Shao-Ping; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2017-01-01

    Local strain measurements are considered as an effective method for structural health monitoring of high-temperature components, which require accurate, reliable and durable sensors. To develop strain sensors that can be used in higher temperature environments, an improved metal-packaged strain sensor based on a regenerated fiber Bragg grating (RFBG) fabricated in hydrogen (H2)-loaded boron–germanium (B–Ge) co-doped photosensitive fiber is developed using the process of combining magnetron sputtering and electroplating, addressing the limitation of mechanical strength degradation of silica optical fibers after annealing at a high temperature for regeneration. The regeneration characteristics of the RFBGs and the strain characteristics of the sensor are evaluated. Numerical simulation of the sensor is conducted using a three-dimensional finite element model. Anomalous decay behavior of two regeneration regimes is observed for the FBGs written in H2-loaded B–Ge co-doped fiber. The strain sensor exhibits good linearity, stability and repeatability when exposed to constant high temperatures of up to 540 °C. A satisfactory agreement is obtained between the experimental and numerical results in strain sensitivity. The results demonstrate that the improved metal-packaged strain sensors based on RFBGs in H2-loaded B–Ge co-doped fiber provide great potential for high-temperature applications by addressing the issues of mechanical integrity and packaging. PMID:28241465

  4. An Improved Metal-Packaged Strain Sensor Based on A Regenerated Fiber Bragg Grating in Hydrogen-Loaded Boron-Germanium Co-Doped Photosensitive Fiber for High-Temperature Applications.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yun; Ye, Lin; Zhou, Shao-Ping; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2017-02-23

    Local strain measurements are considered as an effective method for structural health monitoring of high-temperature components, which require accurate, reliable and durable sensors. To develop strain sensors that can be used in higher temperature environments, an improved metal-packaged strain sensor based on a regenerated fiber Bragg grating (RFBG) fabricated in hydrogen (H₂)-loaded boron-germanium (B-Ge) co-doped photosensitive fiber is developed using the process of combining magnetron sputtering and electroplating, addressing the limitation of mechanical strength degradation of silica optical fibers after annealing at a high temperature for regeneration. The regeneration characteristics of the RFBGs and the strain characteristics of the sensor are evaluated. Numerical simulation of the sensor is conducted using a three-dimensional finite element model. Anomalous decay behavior of two regeneration regimes is observed for the FBGs written in H₂-loaded B-Ge co-doped fiber. The strain sensor exhibits good linearity, stability and repeatability when exposed to constant high temperatures of up to 540 °C. A satisfactory agreement is obtained between the experimental and numerical results in strain sensitivity. The results demonstrate that the improved metal-packaged strain sensors based on RFBGs in H₂-loaded B-Ge co-doped fiber provide great potential for high-temperature applications by addressing the issues of mechanical integrity and packaging.

  5. Electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide on platinum-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon sensors and evaluation of their biofouling properties.

    PubMed

    Tujunen, Noora; Kaivosoja, Emilia; Protopopova, Vera; Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Österberg, Monika; Koskinen, Jari; Laurila, Tomi

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is the product of various enzymatic reactions, and is thus typically utilized as the analyte in biosensors. However, its detection with conventional materials, such as noble metals or glassy carbon, is often hindered by slow kinetics and biofouling of the electrode. In this study electrochemical properties and suitability to peroxide detection as well as ability to resist biofouling of Pt-doped ta-C samples were evaluated. Pure ta-C and pure Pt were used as references. According to the results presented here it is proposed that combining ta-C with Pt results in good electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 oxidation with better tolerance towards aqueous environment mimicking physiological conditions compared to pure Pt. In biofouling experiments, however, both the hybrid material and Pt were almost completely blocked after immersion in protein-containing solutions and did not produce any peaks for ferrocenemethanol oxidation or reduction. On the contrary, it was still possible to obtain clear peaks for H2O2 oxidation with them after similar treatment. Moreover, quartz crystal microbalance experiment showed less protein adsorption on the hybrid sample compared to Pt which is also supported by the electrochemical biofouling experiments for H2O2 detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Specific Nucleophilic Ring-Opening Reaction of Aziridines as a Unique Platform for the Construction of Hydrogen Polysulfides Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Rosser, Ethan W.; Zhang, Di; Shi, Wen; Li, Yilin; Dong, Wen-Ji; Ma, Huimin; Hu, Dehong; Xian, Ming

    2015-05-11

    Hydrogen polysulfides (H2Sn, n>1) have been recently suggested to be the actual signalling molecules that involved in sulfur-related redox biology. However the exact mechanisms of H2Sn are still poorly understood and a major hurdle in this field is the lack of reliable and convenient methods for H2Sn detection. In this work we report a unique ring-opening reaction of N-sulfonylaziridine by Na2S2 under mild conditions. Based on this reaction a novel H2Sn-specific fluorescent probe (AP) was developed. The probe showed high sensitivity and selectivity for H2Sn. Notably, the fluorescent turn-on product, i.e. compound 1, exhibited excellent two-photon photophysical properties and a large Stokes shift. Moreover, the high solid state luminescent efficiency of compound 1 makes it a potential candidate for organic emitters and solid-state lighting devices.

  7. Novel Ag@TiO2 nanocomposite synthesized by electrochemically active biofilm for nonenzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Mansoob; Ansari, Sajid Ali; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2013-12-01

    A novel nonenzymatic sensor for H2O2 was developed based on an Ag@TiO2 nanocomposite synthesized using a simple and cost effective approach with an electrochemically active biofilm. The optical, structural, morphological and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared Ag@TiO2 nanocomposite were examined by UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The Ag@TiO2 nanocomposite was fabricated on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and their electrochemical performance was analyzed by CV, differential pulse voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The Ag@TiO2 nanocomposite modified GCE (Ag@TiO2/GCE) displayed excellent performance towards H2O2 sensing at -0.73 V in the linear response range from 0.83 μM to 43.3 μM, within a detection limit and sensitivity of 0.83 μM and ~65.2328±0.01 μA μM(-1) cm(-2), respectively. In addition, Ag@TiO2/GCE exhibited good operational reproducibility and long term stability. © 2013.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, and electrochemiluminescence of luminol-reduced gold nanoparticles and their application in a hydrogen peroxide sensor.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hua; Wang, Wei; Duan, Chun-Feng; Dong, Yong-Ping; Guo, Ji-Zhao

    2007-01-01

    It was found that chloroauric acid (HAuCl(4)) could be directly reduced by the luminescent reagent luminol in aqueous solution to form gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), the size of which depended on the amount of luminol. The morphology and surface state of as-prepared AuNPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, UV/visible spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. All results indicated that residual luminol and its oxidation product 3-aminophthalate coexisted on the surface of AuNPs through the weak covalent interaction between gold and nitrogen atoms in their amino groups. Subsequently, a luminol-capped AuNP-modified electrode was fabricated by the immobilization of AuNPs on a gold electrode by virtue of cysteine molecules and then immersion in a luminol solution. The modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The as-prepared modified electrode exhibited an electrochemiluminescence (ECL) response in alkaline aqueous solution under a double-step potential. H2O2 was found to enhance the ECL. On this basis, an ECL sensor for the detection of H2O2 was developed. The method is simple, fast, and reagent free. It is applicable to the determination of H2O2 in the range of 3x10(-7)-1x10(-3) mol L(-1) with a detection limit of 1x10(-7) mol L(-1) (S/N=3).

  9. Hydrogen peroxide sensors for cellular imaging based on horse radish peroxidase reconstituted on polymer-functionalized TiO₂ nanorods.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; André, Rute; Sahoo, Jugal Kishore; Jochum, Florian D; Theato, Patrick; Natalio, Filipe; Berger, Rüdiger; Branscheid, Robert; Kolb, Ute; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    We describe the reconstitution of apo-horse radish peroxidase (apo-HRP) onto TiO(2) nanorods functionalized with a multifunctional polymer. After functionalization, the horse radish peroxidase (HRP) functionalized TiO(2) nanorods were well dispersible in aqueous solution, catalytically active and biocompatible, and they could be used to quantify and image H(2)O(2) which is a harmful secondary product of cellular metabolism. The shape, size and structure of TiO(2) nanorods (anatase) were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM), electron diffraction (ED) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface functionalization, HRP reconstitution and catalytic activity were confirmed by UV-Vis, FT-IR, CLSM and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Biocompatibility and cellular internalization of active HRP reconstituted TiO(2) nanorods were confirmed by a classical MTT cytotoxicity assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) imaging, respectively. The intracellular localization allowed H(2)O(2) detection, imaging and quantification in HeLa cells. The polymer functionalized hybrid system creates a complete sensor including a "cell positioning system" in each single particle. The flexible synthetic concept with functionalization by post-polymerization modification allows introduction of various dyes for sensitisation at different wavelengths and introduction of various anchor groups for anchoring on different particles.

  10. Optical characterization of SiC wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J.C.; Pophristic, M.; Long, F.H.; Ferguson, I.

    1999-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate wafers of both 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC. The two-phonon Raman spectra from both 4H- and 6H-SiC have been measured and found to be polytype dependent, consistent with changes in the vibrational density of states. They have observed electronic Raman scattering from nitrogen defect levels in both 4H- and 6H-SiC at room temperature. They have found that electronic Raman scattering from the nitrogen defect levels is significantly enhanced with excitation by red or near IR laser light. These results demonstrate that the laser wavelength is a key parameter in the characterization of SiC by Raman scattering. These results suggest that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a noninvasive, in situ diagnostic for SiC wafer production and substrate evaluation. They also present results on time-resolved photoluminescence spectra of n-type SiC wafers.

  11. Redox mediated synthesis of hierarchical Bi2O3/MnO2 nanoflowers: a non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide electrochemical sensor.

    PubMed

    Ray, Chaiti; Dutta, Soumen; Roy, Anindita; Sahoo, Ramkrishna; Pal, Tarasankar

    2016-03-21

    Uniform hierarchical Bi2O3/MnO2 nanoflowers (BM NFs) are fabricated via a reaction strategy by combining redox reaction and hydrothermal treatment. This wet chemical method reports for the first time a one pot synthesis of Bi2O3/MnO2 nanoflowers via a thermodynamically allowed galvanic reaction between Bi(0) and KMnO4 in aqueous solution under modified hydrothermal (MHT) conditions. The Bi2O3/MnO2 NF composites are then applied as a catalyst for electrochemical hydrogen peroxide detection. Exceedingly high H2O2 detection sensitivity (0.914 μA μM(-1) cm(-2)) lies in a wide linear range of 0.2-290 μM and the detection limit goes down to 0.05 μM (S/N = 3) for non-enzymatic detection of H2O2 in solution. This prototype sensor demonstrates an admirable analytical performance considering its long-term stability, good reproducibility and acceptable selectivity against common interfering species. The employment of the stable nanocomposite for real sample analysis makes it a deliverable for H2O2 sensing.

  12. Ultralight, Strong, Three-Dimensional SiC Structures.

    PubMed

    Chabi, Sakineh; Rocha, Victoria G; García-Tuñón, Esther; Ferraro, Claudio; Saiz, Eduardo; Xia, Yongde; Zhu, Yanqiu

    2016-02-23

    Ultralight and strong three-dimensional (3D) silicon carbide (SiC) structures have been generated by the carbothermal reduction of SiO with a graphene foam (GF). The resulting SiC foams have an average height of 2 mm and density ranging between 9 and 17 mg cm(-3). They are the lightest reported SiC structures. They consist of hollow struts made from ultrathin SiC flakes and long 1D SiC nanowires growing from the trusses, edges, and defect sites between layers. AFM results revealed an average flake thickness of 2-3 nm and lateral size of 2 μm. In-situ compression tests in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) show that, compared with most of the existing lightweight foams, the present 3D SiC exhibited superior compression strengths and significant recovery after compression strains of about 70%.

  13. Growth protocols and characterization of epitaxial graphene on SiC elaborated in a graphite enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, B.; Baraket, M.; Paillet, M.; Huntzinger, J.-R.; Tiberj, A.; Jansen, A. G. M.; Vila, L.; Cubuku, M.; Vergnaud, C.; Jamet, M.; Lapertot, G.; Rouchon, D.; Zahab, A.-A.; Sauvajol, J.-L.; Dubois, L.; Lefloch, F.; Duclairoir, F.

    2016-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of graphene by the sublimation of Si-terminated silicon carbide (SiC) is studied inside a graphite enclosure in a radio-frequency furnace by comparing different in situ processes involving hydrogen etching or not and different growth conditions. For the growth under vacuum, even with the surface preparation of hydrogen etching, the morphology of the synthesized graphene is found full of voids and defects in the form of a multilayer graphene film. For the growth under Ar, the hydrogen etching plays a vital role to improve the graphene quality in terms of surface roughness, the number of graphene layers and the domain size. For the graphene samples grown with the proposed protocol, the original combination of micro-probe Raman spectroscopy and simultaneous optical transmission and reflection measurements reveals a detailed spatially resolved image of the graphene domains with monolayer domain size of ~5×5 μm2 on about 2/3 of the total sample surface. The magnetotransport data yield charge-carrier mobilities up to 2900 cm2/Vs as found for high quality graphene on the Si-face of SiC. The observed magnetoquantum oscillations in the magnetoresistance confirm the expected behavior of single-layer graphene.

  14. Pressure induced structural phase transition in SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorai, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Kondayya, G.

    2017-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is an excellent ceramic material which exists in several polytypes. In this work, we obtained the structural properties of the ambient Zinc-Blende and high pressure Rock-Salt structures of SiC from density functional theory (DFT). We studied the structural phase transition occurring under compression using Debye Gruneisen theory based on scaled binding energy model. We observed excellent agreement of our predicted 300 K isotherm for SiC with experimental data.

  15. Structural and magnetic properties of irradiated SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yutian; Helm, Manfred; Chen, Xuliang; Yang, Zhaorong; Li, Lin; Shalimov, Artem; Prucnal, Slawomir; Munnik, Frans; Skorupa, Wolfgang; Zhou, Shengqiang; Tong, Wei

    2014-05-07

    We present a comprehensive structural characterization of ferromagnetic SiC single crystals induced by Ne ion irradiation. The ferromagnetism has been confirmed by electron spin resonance, and possible transition metal impurities can be excluded to be the origin of the observed ferromagnetism. Using X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectroscopy, we estimate the damage to the crystallinity of SiC, which mutually influences the ferromagnetism in SiC.

  16. Predictive sensor method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambridge, Vivien J.; Koger, Thomas L.

    1993-01-01

    A microprocessor and electronics package employing predictive methodology was developed to accelerate the response time of slowly responding hydrogen sensors. The system developed improved sensor response time from approximately 90 seconds to 8.5 seconds. The microprocessor works in real-time providing accurate hydrogen concentration corrected for fluctuations in sensor output resulting from changes in atmospheric pressure and temperature. Following the successful development of the hydrogen sensor system, the system and predictive methodology was adapted to a commercial medical thermometer probe. Results of the experiment indicate that, with some customization of hardware and software, response time improvements are possible for medical thermometers as well as other slowly responding sensors.

  17. Early implementation of SiC cladding fuel performance models in BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Jeffrey J.

    2015-09-18

    SiC-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) [5–8] are being developed and evaluated internationally as potential LWR cladding options. These development activities include interests within both the DOE-NE LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and the DOE-NE Advanced Fuels Campaign. The LWRS Program considers SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) as offering potentially revolutionary gains as a cladding material, with possible benefits including more efficient normal operating conditions and higher safety margins under accident conditions [9]. Within the Advanced Fuels Campaign, SiC-based composites are a candidate ATF cladding material that could achieve several goals, such as reducing the rates of heat and hydrogen generation due to lower cladding oxidation rates in HT steam [10]. This work focuses on the application of SiC cladding as an ATF cladding material in PWRs, but these work efforts also support the general development and assessment of SiC as an LWR cladding material in a much broader sense.

  18. Ultrafast Optical Measurements of Thermal Conductivity and Sound Velocity of Amorphous SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondongwa, Donald; Olasov, Lauren; Daly, Brian; King, Sean; Bielefeld, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    We present ultrafast optical measurements of longitudinal sound velocity and thermal transport in hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-SiC:H) films. The films were grown on Si wafers by PECVD using combinations of methylsilanes and H2 and He diluent gases. The films were well characterized and found to have densities (1.0 -- 2.5 g cm-3) and dielectric constants (2.8 -- 7.2) that spanned a wide range of values. Prior to their measurement, the a-SiC:H films were coated with 40-70 nm of polycrystalline Al. The pump-probe measurements were performed at room temperature using a modelocked Ti:sapphire laser. Transient reflectivity changes that are associated with very high frequency sound waves (picosecond ultrasonics) and the cooling rate of the SiC sample (Time Domain Thermorerflectance (TDTR)) were measured. We extract values for the thermal conductivity and sound velocity of the SiC films, and analyze the results in terms of rigidity percolation effects within the SiC layers. This work was supported by NSF award DMR-0906753.

  19. Growth and Properties of Hexagonal SiC Bulk Crystals and Epilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Skowronski, Marek

    2007-06-14

    Growth of bulk hexagonal SiC crystals by Physical Vapor Transport relies on sublimation / condensation of a solid SiC charge performed in a semi-closed crucible at 2200-2400 deg. C. The gradual loss of silicon-rich vapor results in the shift of crystal stoichiometry from silicon to carbon rich and associated change of nitrogen dopants. The thermal gradients during growth induce stresses sometimes in excess of critical resolved shear stress reduced by high growth temperatures. This results in plastic deformation of the growing boules through the activation of <11-20>(0001) slip system. SiC epitaxial layers are deposited by Chemical Vapor Deposition process performed at 1500-1700 deg. C using silane and propane in hydrogen carrier gas. Since the polytype nucleating at these temperature is 3C-SiC, the layers are grown on off-cut substrates in step flow mode. Approaches to epitaxy producing layers suitable for high voltage power devices i.e. with low defect density (<1 cm-2), low doping (1x1015 cm-3), and long carrier lifetimes (>1 {mu}s) are described.

  20. Corrosion pitting of SiC by molten salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Smialek, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The corrosion of SiC by thin films of Na2CO3 and Na2SO4 at 1000 C is characterized by a severe pitting attack of the SiC substrate. A range of different Si and SiC substrates were examined to isolate the factors critical to pitting. Two types of pitting attack are identified: attack at structural discontinuities and a crater-like attack. The crater-like pits are correlated with bubble formation during oxidation of the SiC. It appears that bubbles create unprotected regions, which are susceptible to enhanced attack and, hence, pit formation.

  1. Paralinear Oxidation of CVD SiC in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Hann, Raiford E., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of CVD SiC were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in a 50% H2O/50% O2 gas mixture flowing at 4.4 cm/s for temperatures between 1200 and 1400 C. Paralinear weight change kinetics were observed as the water vapor oxidized the SiC and simultaneously volatilized the silica scale. The long-term degradation rate of SiC is determined by the volatility of the silica scale. Rapid SiC surface recession rates were estimated from these data for actual aircraft engine combustor conditions.

  2. SiC Power MOSFET with Improved Gate Dielectric

    SciTech Connect

    Sbrockey, Nick M; Tompa, Gary S; Spencer, Michael G; Chandrashekhar, Chandra MVS

    2010-08-23

    In this STTR program, Structured Materials Industries (SMI), and Cornell University are developing novel gate oxide technology, as a critical enabler for silicon carbide (SiC) devices. SiC is a wide bandgap semiconductor material, with many unique properties. SiC devices are ideally suited for high-power, highvoltage, high-frequency, high-temperature and radiation resistant applications. The DOE has expressed interest in developing SiC devices for use in extreme environments, in high energy physics applications and in power generation. The development of transistors based on the Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) structure will be critical to these applications.

  3. Amorphous and excimer laser annealed SiC films for TFT fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, B.; Estrada, M.; Albertin, K. F.; Carreño, M. N. P.; Pereyra, I.; Resendiz, L.

    2006-02-01

    The characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films prepared by PECVD and crystallized by KrF UV excimer laser annealing (ELA), for different annealing conditions, are studied to determine particulate size, surface roughness, band gap and resistivity in order to apply them to TFTs fabrication. Raman spectra for ELA SiC films indicate the presence of 6H-SiC polytype together with Si and C crystallites. We also describe the fabrication process to obtain a-Si 1- xC x:H TFTs and ELA TFTs on the same wafer, comparing their output and transfer characteristics.

  4. First principles many-body calculations of electronic structure and optical properties of SiC nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaal, Naresh; Loganathan, Vaideesh; Medhekar, Nikhil; Shukla, Alok

    2016-03-01

    A first principles many-body approach is employed to calculate the band structure and optical response of nanometer-sized ribbons of SiC. Many-body effects are incorporated using the GW approximation, and excitonic effects are included using the Bethe-Salpeter equation. Both unpassivated and hydrogen-passivated armchair SiC nanoribbons are studied. As a consequence of low dimensionality, large quasiparticle corrections are seen to the Kohn-Sham energy gaps. In both cases quasiparticle band gaps are increased by up to 2 eV, as compared to their Kohn-Sham energy values. Inclusion of electron-hole interactions modifies the absorption spectra significantly, giving rise to strongly bound excitonic peaks in these systems. The results suggest that hydrogen passivated armchair SiC nanoribbons have the potential to be used in optoelectronic devices operating in the UV-Vis region of the spectrum. We also compute the formation energies of these nanoribbons as a function of their widths, and conclude that hydrogen-saturated ribbons will be much more stable as compared to bare ones.

  5. Developing an electrochemical sensor based on a carbon paste electrode modified with nano-composite of reduced graphene oxide and CuFe2O4 nanoparticles for determination of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Benvidi, Ali; Nafar, Mohammad Taghi; Jahanbani, Shahriar; Tezerjani, Marzieh Dehghan; Rezaeinasab, Masoud; Dalirnasab, Sudabeh

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a highly sensitive voltammetric sensor based on a carbon paste electrode with CuFe2O4 nanoparticle (RGO/CuFe2O4/CPE) was designed for determination of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2 was examined using various techniques such as cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry, amperometry and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). CuFe2O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method and characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) techniques. Then, a high conductive platform based on a carbon paste electrode modified with RGO and CuFe2O4 nanoparticles was prepared as a suitable platform for determination of hydrogen peroxide. Under the optimum conditions (pH5), the modified electrode indicated a fast amperometric response of <2s, good linear range of 2 to 200μM, low detection limit of 0.52μM for determination of hydrogen peroxide. Also, the peak current of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) of hydrogen peroxide is increased linearly with its concentration in the ranges of 2 to 10μM and 10 to 1000μM. The obtained detection limit for hydrogen peroxide was evaluated to be 0.064μM by DPV. The designed sensor was successfully applied for the assay of hydrogen peroxide in biological and pharmaceutical samples such as milk, green tea, and hair dye cream and mouthwash solution. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Wafer-scale epitaxial graphene on SiC for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Mikael; Wang, Qin; Zhao, Yichen; Zhao, Wei; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Iakimov, Tihomir; Ali, Amer; Yakimova, Rositza; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Ivanov, Ivan G.

    2015-12-01

    The epitaxial graphene-on-silicon carbide (SiC-G) has advantages of high quality and large area coverage owing to a natural interface between graphene and SiC substrate with dimension up to 100 mm. It enables cost effective and reliable solutions for bridging the graphene-based sensors/devices from lab to industrial applications and commercialization. In this work, the structural, optical and electrical properties of wafer-scale graphene grown on 2'' 4H semi-insulating (SI) SiC utilizing sublimation process were systemically investigated with focus on evaluation of the graphene's uniformity across the wafer. As proof of concept, two types of glucose sensors based on SiC-G/Nafion/Glucose-oxidase (GOx) and SiC-G/Nafion/Chitosan/GOx were fabricated and their electrochemical properties were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements. In addition, a few similar glucose sensors based on graphene by chemical synthesis using modified Hummer's method were also fabricated for comparison.

  7. An Overview of Wide Bandgap Silicon Carbide Sensors and Electronics Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Okojie, Robert S.; Chen, Liangyu; Spry, D.; Trunek, A.

    2007-01-01

    A brief overview is presented of the sensors and electronics development work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center which is intended to meet the needs of future aerospace applications. Three major technology areas are discussed: 1) high temperature SiC electronics, 2) SiC gas sensor technology development, and 3) packaging of harsh environment devices. Highlights of this work include world-record operation of SiC electronic devices including 500?C JFET transistor operation with excellent properties, atomically flat SiC gas sensors integrated with an on-chip temperature detector/heater, and operation of a packaged AC amplifier. A description of the state-of-the-art is given for each topic. It is concluded that significant progress has been made and that given recent advancements the development of high temperature smart sensors is envisioned.

  8. SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-12-01

    A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. During Year I, we have successfully fabricated SiC macro porous membranes via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder, which were then deposited with thin, micro-porous (6 to 40{angstrom} in pore size) films via sol-gel technique as intermediate layers. Finally, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was deposited on this substrate via our CVD/I technique. The composite membrane thus prepared demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers. Building upon the positive progress made in the Year I preliminary study, we will conduct an optimization study in Year II to develop an optimized H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment.

  9. Predictive sensor method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nail, William L. (Inventor); Koger, Thomas L. (Inventor); Cambridge, Vivien (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A predictive algorithm is used to determine, in near real time, the steady state response of a slow responding sensor such as hydrogen gas sensor of the type which produces an output current proportional to the partial pressure of the hydrogen present. A microprocessor connected to the sensor samples the sensor output at small regular time intervals and predicts the steady state response of the sensor in response to a perturbation in the parameter being sensed, based on the beginning and end samples of the sensor output for the current sample time interval.

  10. From Half-Metal to Semiconductor: Electron-Correlation Effects in Zigzag SiC Nanoribbons From First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaal, Naresh; Loganathan, Vaideesh; Medhekar, Nikhil; Shukla, Alok

    2017-06-01

    We perform electronic-structure calculations based on the first-principles many-body-theory approach in order to study quasiparticle band gaps and optical absorption spectra of hydrogen-passivated zigzag SiC nanoribbons. Self-energy corrections are included using the G W approximation, and excitonic effects are included using the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We systematically study nanoribbons that have widths between 0.6 and 2.2 nm. Quasiparticle corrections widen the Kohn-Sham band gaps because of enhanced interaction effects, caused by reduced dimensionality. Zigzag SiC nanoribbons with widths larger than 1 nm exhibit half-metallicity at the mean-field level. The self-energy corrections increase band gaps substantially, thereby transforming the half-metallic zigzag SiC nanoribbons to narrow gap spin-polarized semiconductors. Optical absorption spectra of these nanoribbons get dramatically modified upon inclusion of electron-hole interactions, and the narrowest ribbon exhibits strongly bound excitons, with binding energy of 2.1 eV. Thus, the narrowest zigzag SiC nanoribbon has the potential to be used in optoelectronic devices operating in the IR region of the spectrum, while the broader ones, exhibiting spin polarization, can be utilized in spintronic applications.

  11. Silicon carbide recovered from photovoltaic industry waste as photocatalysts for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Hu, Yu; Zeng, Hongmei; Zhong, Lin; Liu, Kewei; Cao, Hongmei; Li, Wei; Yan, Hongjian

    2017-05-05

    In recent years, the focus on creating a dependable and efficient means to recycle or recover the valuable parts from the waste material has drawn significantly attention as an environmentally friendly way to deal with the industrial wastes. The silicon carbide (SiC) crystalline is one of reusable material in the slurry wastes generated during wafer slicing. Here we report the use of recovered SiC from the slurry wastes as photocatalysts to produce hydrogen in the presence of Na2SO3-Na2S as electron donor. The recovered SiC were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra (XPS), UV-vis (UV-vis) spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The morphology of SiC loaded with 1wt% Pt as cocatalyst by thermal-reduction method was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results reveal that the recovered SiC is mainly consist of 3C-SiC, 6H-SiC and some silicon oxycarbides on the surface of the SiC. The highest hydrogen production rate is 191.8μmolh(-1)g(-1). This study provides a way to recycle crystalline SiC from the discharged waste in the photovoltaic industry and reuse it as photocatalyst to yield hydrogen with the advantage of low energy consumption, low pollution and easy operation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High Temperature Electronics for Intelligent Harsh Environment Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    The development of intelligent instrumentation systems is of high interest in both public and private sectors. In order to obtain this ideal in extreme environments (i.e., high temperature, extreme vibration, harsh chemical media, and high radiation), both sensors and electronics must be developed concurrently in order that the entire system will survive for extended periods of time. The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has been studied for electronic and sensing applications in extreme environment that is beyond the capability of conventional semiconductors such as silicon. The advantages of SiC over conventional materials include its near inert chemistry, superior thermomechanical properties in harsh environments, and electronic properties that include high breakdown voltage and wide bandgap. An overview of SiC sensors and electronics work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) will be presented. The main focus will be two technologies currently being investigated: 1) harsh environment SiC pressure transducers and 2) high temperature SiC electronics. Work highlighted will include the design, fabrication, and application of SiC sensors and electronics, with recent advancements in state-of-the-art discussed as well. These combined technologies are studied for the goal of developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion systems, as well as enhancing tools for exploration systems.

  13. Pristine SiC Candidates: Spectral Imaging and Auger Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croat, T. K.; Lebsack, E.; Bernatowicz, T. J.

    2010-03-01

    We describe a new spectral imaging method to locate pristine SiCs (those prepared without acid dissolution) from within Murchison matrix material. We present images,X-ray and Auger electron spectra from pristine SiCs, which show carbonaceous surface coatings.

  14. Smart Sensor Systems for Aerospace Applications: From Sensor Development to Application Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, G. W.; Xu, J. C.; Dungan, L. K.; Ward, B. J.; Rowe, S.; Williams, J.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Chang, C. W.

    2008-01-01

    The application of Smart Sensor Systems for aerospace applications is a multidisciplinary process consisting of sensor element development, element integration into Smart Sensor hardware, and testing of the resulting sensor systems in application environments. This paper provides a cross-section of these activities for multiple aerospace applications illustrating the technology challenges involved. The development and application testing topics discussed are: 1) The broadening of sensitivity and operational range of silicon carbide (SiC) Schottky gas sensor elements; 2) Integration of fire detection sensor technology into a "Lick and Stick" Smart Sensor hardware platform for Crew Exploration Vehicle applications; 3) Extended testing for zirconia based oxygen sensors in the basic "Lick and Stick" platform for environmental monitoring applications. It is concluded that that both core sensor platform technology and a basic hardware platform can enhance the viability of implementing smart sensor systems in aerospace applications.

  15. Aerospace Sensor Systems: From Sensor Development To Vehicle Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of years of sensor system development and application for aerospace systems. The emphasis of this work is on developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion and crew vehicle systems as well as monitoring the safety of those systems. Specific areas of work include chemical species sensors, thin film thermocouples and strain gages, heat flux gages, fuel gages, SiC based electronic devices and sensors, space qualified electronics, and MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) as well as integrated and multifunctional sensor systems. Each sensor type has its own technical challenges related to integration and reliability in a given application. The general approach has been to develop base sensor technology using microfabrication techniques, integrate sensors with "smart" hardware and software, and demonstrate those systems in a range of aerospace applications. Descriptions of the sensor elements, their integration into sensors systems, and examples of sensor system applications will be discussed. Finally, suggestions related to the future of sensor technology will be given. It is concluded that smart micro/nano sensor technology can revolutionize aerospace applications, but significant challenges exist in maturing the technology and demonstrating its value in real-life applications.

  16. Porous silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A semiconductor device employs at least one layer of semiconducting porous silicon carbide (SiC). The porous SiC layer has a monocrystalline structure wherein the pore sizes, shapes, and spacing are determined by the processing conditions. In one embodiment, the semiconductor device is a p-n junction diode in which a layer of n-type SiC is positioned on a p-type layer of SiC, with the p-type layer positioned on a layer of silicon dioxide. Because of the UV luminescent properties of the semiconducting porous SiC layer, it may also be utilized for other devices such as LEDs and optoelectronic devices.

  17. Three-dimensional crystalline SiC nanowire flowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ghim Wei; Weng Wong, Andrew See; Kang, Dae-Joon; Welland, Mark E.

    2004-08-01

    Several techniques have already been developed for synthesizing silicon carbide (SiC) material in the form of nanospheres and nanowires/rods. Here, we report the synthesis of a distinctly different kind of SiC nanostructure in the form of three-dimensional crystalline nanowire-based flower-like structures. Interest in such structures centres around the combination of a simple growth process based on SiC nanowire formation, with a resultant structure having potentially complex mechanical and optical properties, the latter a consequence of the wide band gap of bulk SiC. The synthesis of these SiC nanowire flowers is via a vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) process, on which a detailed study of both the chemical and structural composition has been carried out.

  18. Processing of sintered alpha SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Processing methods of sintered alpha SiC for engine applications are developed in a cost effective manner, using a submicron sized powder blended with sintering aids (boron and carbon). The processes for forming a green powder compact, such as dry pressing, cold isostatic pressing and green machining, slip casting, aqueous extrusion, plastic extrusion, and injection molding, are described. Dry pressing is the simplest route to component fabrication, and is carried out at approximately 10,000 psi pressure, while in the cold isostatic method the pressure could go as high as 20,000 psi. Surfactants are added to control settling rates and casting characteristics in the slip casting. The aqueous extrusion process is accomplished by a hydraulic ram forcing the aqueous mixture through a die. The plastic forming processes of extrusion and injection molding offer the potential of greater diversity in shape capacity. The physical properties of sintered alpha SiC (hardness, Young's modulus, shear modulus, and thermal diffusivity) are extensively tested. Corrosion resistance test results of silicon carbide are included.

  19. Packaging Technologies for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500 C silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chip-level packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550 C. A 96% alumina based edge connector for a PCB level subsystem interconnection has also been demonstrated recently. The 96% alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been tested with high temperature SiC devices at 500 C for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC JFET with a packaging system composed of a 96% alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board mounted on a data acquisition circuit board was launched as a part of the MISSE-7 suite to the International Space Station via a Shuttle mission. This packaged SiC transistor was successfully tested in orbit for eighteen months. A spark-plug type sensor package designed for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was developed. This sensor package combines the high temperature interconnection system with a commercial high temperature high pressure stainless steel seal gland (electrical feed-through). Test results of a packaged high temperature capacitive pressure sensor at 500 C are also discussed. In addition to the pressure sensor package, efforts for packaging high temperature SiC diode-based gas chemical sensors are in process.

  20. Packaging Technologies for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liangyu; Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500degC silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chiplevel packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550degC. A 96% alumina based edge connector for a PCB level subsystem interconnection has also been demonstrated recently. The 96% alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been tested with high temperature SiC devices at 500degC for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC JFET with a packaging system composed of a 96% alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board mounted on a data acquisition circuit board was launched as a part of the MISSE-7 suite to the International Space Station via a Shuttle mission. This packaged SiC transistor was successfully tested in orbit for eighteen months. A spark-plug type sensor package designed for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was developed. This sensor package combines the high temperature interconnection system with a commercial high temperature high pressure stainless steel seal gland (electrical feed-through). Test results of a packaged high temperature capacitive pressure sensor at 500degC are also discussed. In addition to the pressure sensor package, efforts for packaging high temperature SiC diode-based gas chemical sensors are in process.

  1. Growth Of Graphitic Polyhedra, SiC Platelets, And Carbon Nanotubes Filled With SiC Nanowires By Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kokai, Fumio; Uchiyama, Kunihiro; Chigusa, Hajime; Nozaki, Iori; Noguchi, Eriko; Kameda, Yuto; Koshio, Akira

    2010-10-08

    Three characteristic silicon/carbon nanostructures, i.e., graphitic polyhedral (GP) particles, silicon carbide (SiC) platelets, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with SiC nanowires, were synthesized by the laser ablation of Si-C targets in the presence of high-pressure Ar gas up to 0.9 MPa. The growth of nanostructures was controlled merely by adjusting the Si content in graphite and the ambient Ar gas pressure. Deposits containing GP particles were purified by heat treatment at 550 deg. C in a pure oxygen atmosphere for 1 h. CNTs filled with SiC nanowires were grown without a catalyst. Unlike previous studies of CNTs filled with metals or compounds, all the CNTs checked by transmission electron microscopy contained SiC nanowires and no unfilled CNTs were produced. We discuss the growth mechanisms of the three nanostructures.

  2. Plasma-Modified, Epitaxial Fabricated Graphene on SiC for the Electrochemical Detection of TNT

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Scott A.; Hernández, Sandra C.; Myers-Ward, Rachael L.; Zabetakis, Daniel; Stenger, David A.; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Walton, Scott G.

    2016-01-01

    Using square wave voltammetry, we show an increase in the electrochemical detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT) with a working electrode constructed from plasma modified graphene on a SiC surface vs. unmodified graphene. The graphene surface was chemically modified using electron beam generated plasmas produced in oxygen or nitrogen containing backgrounds to introduce oxygen or nitrogen moieties. The use of this chemical modification route enabled enhancement of the electrochemical signal for TNT, with the oxygen treatment showing a more pronounced detection than the nitrogen treatment. For graphene modified with oxygen, the electrochemical response to TNT can be fit to a two-site Langmuir isotherm suggesting different sites on the graphene surface with different affinities for TNT. We estimate a limit of detection for TNT equal to 20 ppb based on the analytical standard S/N ratio of 3. In addition, this approach to sensor fabrication is inherently a high-throughput, high-volume process amenable to industrial applications. High quality epitaxial graphene is easily grown over large area SiC substrates, while plasma processing is a rapid approach to large area substrate processing. This combination facilitates low cost, mass production of sensors. PMID:27529251

  3. Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) SiC Recession Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    SiC stability and recession rates were modeled in hydrogen/oxygen combustion environments for the Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) program. The IHPRPT program is a government and industry program to improve U.S. rocket propulsion systems. Within this program SiC-based ceramic matrix composites are being considered for transpiration cooled injector faceplates or rocket engine thrust chamber liners. Material testing under conditions representative of these environments was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cell 22. For the study described herein, SiC degradation was modeled under these Cell 22 test conditions for comparison to actual test results: molar mixture ratio, MR (O2:H2) = 6, material temperatures to 1700 C, combustion gas pressures between 0.34 and 2.10 atm, and gas velocities between 8,000 and 12,000 fps. Recession was calculated assuming rates were controlled by volatility of thermally grown silica limited by gas boundary layer transport. Assumptions for use of this model were explored, including the presence of silica on the SiC surface, laminar gas boundary layer limited volatility, and accuracy of thermochemical data for volatile Si-O-H species. Recession rates were calculated as a function of temperature. It was found that at 1700 C, the highest temperature considered, the calculated recession rates were negligible, about 200 m/h, relative to the expected lifetime of the material. Results compared favorably to testing observations. Other mechanisms contributing to SiC recession are briefly described including consumption of underlying carbon and pitting. A simple expression for liquid flow on the material surface was developed from a one-dimensional treatment of the Navier-Stokes Equation. This relationship is useful to determine under which conditions glassy coatings or thermally grown silica would flow on the material surface, removing protective layers by shear forces. The velocity of liquid flow was found to

  4. Active Oxidation of SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Myers,Dwight L.; Harder, Bryan J.

    2011-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation of silicon carbide occurs in either a passive or active mode, depending on temperature and oxygen potential. Passive oxidation forms a protective oxide film which limits attack of the SiC:SiC(s) + 3/2 O2(g) = SiO2(s) + CO(g.) Active oxidation forms a volatile oxide and leads to extensive attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + O2(g) = SiO(g) + CO(g). The transition points and rates of active oxidation are a major issue. Previous studies are reviewed and the leading theories of passive/active transitions summarized. Comparisons are made to the active/passive transitions in pure Si, which are relatively well-understood. Critical questions remain about the difference between the active-to-passive transition and passive-to-active transition. For Si, Wagner [2] points out that the active-to-passive transition is governed by the criterion for a stable Si/SiO2 equilibria and the passive-to-active transition is governed by the decomposition of the SiO2 film. This suggests a significant oxygen potential difference between these two transitions and our experiments confirm this. For Si, the initial stages of active oxidation are characterized by the formation of SiO(g) and further oxidation to SiO2(s) as micron-sized rods, with a distinctive morphology. SiC shows significant differences. The active-to-passive and the passive-to-active transitions are close. The SiO2 rods only appear as the passive film breaks down. These differences are explained in terms of the reactions at the SiC/SiO2 interface. In order to understand the breakdown of the passive film, pre-oxidation experiments are conducted. These involve forming dense protective scales of 0.5, 1, and 2 microns and then subjecting the samples with these scales to a known active oxidation environment. Microstructural studies show that SiC/SiO2 interfacial reactions lead to a breakdown of the scale with a distinct morphology.

  5. Fabrication of large aperture SiC brazing mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ang; Wang, Peipei; Dong, Huiwen; Wang, Peng

    2016-10-01

    The SiC brazing mirror is the mirror whose blank is made by assembling together smaller SiC pieces with brazing technique. Using such kinds of joining techniques, people can manufacture large and complex SiC assemblies. The key technologies of fabricating and testing SiC brazing flat mirror especially for large aperture were studied. The SiC brazing flat mirror was ground by smart ultrasonic-milling machine, and then it was lapped by the lapping smart robot and measured by Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM). After the PV of the surface below 4um, we did classic coarse polishing to the surface and studied the shape of the polishing tool which directly effects removal amount distribution. Finally, it was figured by the polishing smart robot and measured by Fizeau interferometer. We also studied the influence of machining path and removal functions of smart robots on the manufacturing results and discussed the use of abrasive in this process. At last, an example for fabricating and measuring a similar SiC brazing flat mirror with the aperture of 600 mm made by Shanghai Institute of Ceramics was given. The mirror blank consists of 6 SiC sectors and the surface was finally processed to a result of the Peak-to-Valley (PV) 150nm and Root Mean Square (RMS) 12nm.

  6. Packaging Technology Designed, Fabricated, and Assembled for High-Temperature SiC Microsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Liang-Yu

    2003-01-01

    A series of ceramic substrates and thick-film metalization-based prototype microsystem packages designed for silicon carbide (SiC) high-temperature microsystems have been developed for operation in 500 C harsh environments. These prototype packages were designed, fabricated, and assembled at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Both the electrical interconnection system and the die-attach scheme for this packaging system have been tested extensively at high temperatures. Printed circuit boards used to interconnect these chip-level packages and passive components also are being fabricated and tested. NASA space and aeronautical missions need harsh-environment, especially high-temperature, operable microsystems for probing the inner solar planets and for in situ monitoring and control of next-generation aeronautical engines. Various SiC high-temperature-operable microelectromechanical system (MEMS) sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at temperatures as high as 600 C, but most of these devices were demonstrated only in the laboratory environment partially because systematic packaging technology for supporting these devices at temperatures of 500 C and beyond was not available. Thus, the development of a systematic high-temperature packaging technology is essential for both in situ testing and the commercialization of high-temperature SiC MEMS. Researchers at Glenn developed new prototype packages for high-temperature microsystems using ceramic substrates (aluminum nitride and 96- and 90-wt% aluminum oxides) and gold (Au) thick-film metalization. Packaging components, which include a thick-film metalization-based wirebond interconnection system and a low-electrical-resistance SiC die-attachment scheme, have been tested at temperatures up to 500 C. The interconnection system composed of Au thick-film printed wire and 1-mil Au wire bond was tested in 500 C oxidizing air with and without 50-mA direct current for over 5000 hr. The Au thick

  7. Compatibility of SiC and SiC Composites with Molten Lead

    SciTech Connect

    H Tunison

    2006-03-07

    The choice of structural material candidates to contain Lead at 1000 C are limited in number. Silicon carbide composites comprise one choice of possible containment materials. Short term screening studies (120 hours) were undertaken to study the behavior of Silicon Carbide, Silicon Nitride, elemental Silicon and various Silicon Carbide fiber composites focusing mainly on melt infiltrated composites. Isothermal experiments at 1000 C utilized graphite fixtures to contain the Lead and material specimens under a low oxygen partial pressure environment. The corrosion weight loss values (grams/cm{sup 2} Hr) obtained for each of the pure materials showed SiC (monolithic CVD or Hexoloy) to have the best materials compatibility with Lead at this temperature. Increased weight loss values were observed for pure Silicon Nitride and elemental Silicon. For the SiC fiber composite samples those prepared using a SiC matrix material performed better than Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as a matrix material. Composites prepared using a silicon melt infiltration process showed larger corrosion weight loss values due to the solubility of silicon in lead at these temperatures. When excess silicon was removed from these composite samples the corrosion performance for these material improved. These screening studies were used to guide future long term exposure (both isothermal and non-isothermal) experiments and Silicon Carbide composite fabrication work.

  8. Quantification Of 4H- To 3C-Polymorphism In Silicon Carbide (SiC) Epilayers And An Investigation Of Recombination-Enhanced Dislocation Motion In SiC By Optical Emission Microscopy (Oem) Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speer, Kevin M.

    2004-01-01

    Environments that impose operational constraints on conventional silicon-(Si) based semiconductor devices frequently appear in military- and space-grade applications. These constraints include high temperature, high power, and high radiation environments. Silicon carbide (SiC), an alternative type of semiconductor material, has received abundant research attention in the past few years, owing to its radiation-hardened properties as well as its capability to withstand high temperatures and power levels. However, the growth and manufacture of SiC devices is still comparatively immature, and there are severe limitations in present crystal growth and device fabrication processes. Among these limitations is a variety of crystal imperfections known as defects. These imperfections can be point defects (e.g., vacancies and interstitials), line defects (e.g., edge and screw dislocations), or planar defects (e.g., stacking faults and double-positioning boundaries). All of these defects have been experimentally shown to be detrimental to the performance of electron devices made from SiC. As such, it is imperative that these defects are significantly reduced in order for SiC devices to become a viable entity in the electronics world. The NASA Glenn High Temperature Integrated Electronics & Sensors Team (HTIES) is working to identify and eliminate these defects in SiC by implementing improved epitaxial crystal growth procedures. HTIES takes two-inch SiC wafers and etches patterns, producing thousands of mesas into each wafer. Crystal growth is then carried out on top of these mesas in an effort to produce films of improved quality-resulting in electron devices that demonstrate superior performance-as well as fabrication processes that are cost-effective, reliable, and reproducible. In this work, further steps are taken to automate HTIES' SiC wafer inspection system. National Instruments LabVIEW image processing and pattern recognition routines are developed that are capable of

  9. Quantification Of 4H- To 3C-Polymorphism In Silicon Carbide (SiC) Epilayers And An Investigation Of Recombination-Enhanced Dislocation Motion In SiC By Optical Emission Microscopy (Oem) Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speer, Kevin M.

    2004-01-01

    Environments that impose operational constraints on conventional silicon-(Si) based semiconductor devices frequently appear in military- and space-grade applications. These constraints include high temperature, high power, and high radiation environments. Silicon carbide (SiC), an alternative type of semiconductor material, has received abundant research attention in the past few years, owing to its radiation-hardened properties as well as its capability to withstand high temperatures and power levels. However, the growth and manufacture of SiC devices is still comparatively immature, and there are severe limitations in present crystal growth and device fabrication processes. Among these limitations is a variety of crystal imperfections known as defects. These imperfections can be point defects (e.g., vacancies and interstitials), line defects (e.g., edge and screw dislocations), or planar defects (e.g., stacking faults and double-positioning boundaries). All of these defects have been experimentally shown to be detrimental to the performance of electron devices made from SiC. As such, it is imperative that these defects are significantly reduced in order for SiC devices to become a viable entity in the electronics world. The NASA Glenn High Temperature Integrated Electronics & Sensors Team (HTIES) is working to identify and eliminate these defects in SiC by implementing improved epitaxial crystal growth procedures. HTIES takes two-inch SiC wafers and etches patterns, producing thousands of mesas into each wafer. Crystal growth is then carried out on top of these mesas in an effort to produce films of improved quality-resulting in electron devices that demonstrate superior performance-as well as fabrication processes that are cost-effective, reliable, and reproducible. In this work, further steps are taken to automate HTIES' SiC wafer inspection system. National Instruments LabVIEW image processing and pattern recognition routines are developed that are capable of

  10. ICP Etching of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Grow, J.M.; Lambers, E.S.; Ostling, M.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Wang, J.J.; Zetterling, C.-M.

    1999-02-04

    A number of different plasma chemistries, including NF{sub 3}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/Ar, ICl, IBr, Cl{sub 2}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/Ar and CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar, have been investigated for dry etching of 6H and 3C-SiC in a Inductively Coupled Plasma tool. Rates above 2,000 {angstrom} cm{sup {minus}1} are found with fluorine-based chemistries at high ion currents. Surprisingly, Cl{sub 2}-based etching does not provide high rates, even though the potential etch products (SiCi{sub 4} and CCl{sub 4}) are volatile. Photoresist masks have poor selectivity over SiC in F{sub 2}-based plasmas under normal conditions, and ITO or Ni are preferred.

  11. Bubble formation in oxide scales on SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mieskowski, D. M.; Mitchell, T. E.; Heuer, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation of alpha-SiC single crystals and sintered alphaand beta-SiC polycrystals has been investigated at elevated temperatures. Bubble formation is commonly observed in oxide scales on polycrystalline SiC, but is rarely found on single-crystal scales; bubbles result from the preferential oxidation of C inclusions, which are abundant in SiC polycrystals. The absence of bubbles on single crystals, in fact, implies that diffusion of the gaseous species formed on oxidation, CO (or possibly SiO), controls the rate of oxidation of SiC.

  12. Bubble formation in oxide scales on SiC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mieskowski, D. M.; Mitchell, T. E.; Heuer, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation of alpha-SiC single crystals and sintered alphaand beta-SiC polycrystals has been investigated at elevated temperatures. Bubble formation is commonly observed in oxide scales on polycrystalline SiC, but is rarely found on single-crystal scales; bubbles result from the preferential oxidation of C inclusions, which are abundant in SiC polycrystals. The absence of bubbles on single crystals, in fact, implies that diffusion of the gaseous species formed on oxidation, CO (or possibly SiO), controls the rate of oxidation of SiC.

  13. Cast joining between SiC and aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Kenji; Kagawa, Yutaka

    1989-10-01

    A simple cast joining process between reaction-bonded SiC and aluminum has been investigated. Processing variables to obtain strong bonding strength were examined. Metallurgical observation showed that an SiC particle/Al-Si alloy composite layer was formed between RB-SiC and solidified aluminum, and Al4C3 was formed between the SiC particle, in the composite layer, and the Al-Si alloy matrix. Formation of Al4C3 and the composite layer was controlled by casting temperature and time, respectively. The bonding strength increased with decreasing of an unjoined area which formed at the joined surface.

  14. Polymer precursors for SiC ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litt, Morton H.

    1986-01-01

    Work on precursor polymers to SiC was performed, concentrating on polymers made from decamethyl cyclohexasilyene units. The initial approach was to synthesize mixed diphenyl decamethyl cyclohexasilane, dephenylate, and polymerize. This produced polymers which had yields of up to 50 percent SiC. (Theoretical yield is 75 percent). The present approach is to make the polymer through the intermediate trans-1,4-diphenyl decamethyl cyclohexasilane. This should produce a crystalline polymer and high strength fibers. These will be thermally decomposed to SiC fibers. This requires new chemistry which is currently being studied.

  15. Slush hydrogen liquid level system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamlet, J. F.; Adams, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    A discrete capacitance liquid level system developed is specifically for slush hydrogen, but applicable to LOX, LN2, LH2, and RP1 without modification is described. The signal processing portion of the system is compatible with conventional liquid level sensors. Compatibility with slush hydrogen was achieved by designing the sensor with adequate spacing, while retaining the electrical characteristics of conventional sensors. Tests indicate excellent stability of the system over a temperature range of -20 C to 70 C for the circuit and to cryogenic temperatures of the sensor. The sensor was tested up to 40 g's rms random vibration with no damage to the sensor. Operation with 305 m of cable between the sensor and signal processor was demonstrated. It is concluded that this design is more than adequate for most flight and ground applications.

  16. SiC Composite Turbine Vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M.; Verilli, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Turbine inlet guide vanes have been fabricated from composites of silicon carbide fibers in silicon carbide matrices. A unique design for a cloth made from SiC fibers makes it possible to realize the geometric features necessary to form these vanes in the same airfoil shapes as those of prior metal vanes. The fiber component of each of these vanes was made from SiC-fiber cloth coated with boron nitride. The matrix was formed by chemical-vapor infiltration with SiC, then slurry-casting of SiC, followed by melt infiltration with silicon. These SiC/SiC vanes were found to be capable of withstanding temperatures 400 F (222 C) greater than those that can be withstood by nickel-base-superalloy turbine airfoils now in common use in gas turbine engines. The higher temperature capability of SiC/SiC parts is expected to make it possible to use them with significantly less cooling than is used for metallic parts, thereby enabling engines to operate more efficiently while emitting smaller amounts of NOx and CO. The SiC/SiC composite vanes were fabricated in two different configurations. Each vane of one of the configurations has two internal cavities formed by a web between the suction and the pressure sides of the vane. Each vane of the other configuration has no web (see Figure 1). It is difficult to fabricate components having small radii, like those of the trailing edges of these vanes, by use of stiff stoichiometric SiC fibers currently preferred for SiC/SiC composites. To satisfy the severe geometric and structural requirements for these vanes, the aforementioned unique cloth design, denoted by the term Y-cloth, was conceived (see Figure 2). In the regions away from the trailing edge, the Y-cloth features a fiber architecture that had been well characterized and successfully demonstrated in combustor liners. To form a sharp trailing edge (having a radius of 0.3 mm), the cloth was split into two planes during the weaving process. The fiber tows forming the trailing

  17. Characteristics of Commercial SiC and Synthetic SiC as an Aggregate in Geopolymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfanita, R.; Afifah, K. N.; Asrianti; Subaer

    2017-03-01

    This main objective of this study is to investigate the effect silicon carbide (SiC) as an aggregate on the mechanical strength and microstructure of the geopolymer composites. The geopolymers binder were produced by using alkaline activation method of metakaolin and cured at 70oC for 2 hours. In this study commercial and synthetic SiC were used as aggregate to produce composite structure. Synthetic SiC was produced from rice husk ash and coconut shell carbon calcined at 750oC for 2 hours. The addition of SiC in geopolymers paste was varied from 0.25g, 0.50g to 0.75g to form geopolymers composites. The chemical compositions and crystallinity level of SiC and the resulting composites were measured by means of Rigaku MiniFlexII X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The microstructure of SiC and the composites were examined by using Tescan Vega3SB Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The physical and mechanical properties of the samples were determined based on apparent porosity, bulk density, and three bending flexural strength measurements. The results showed that the commercial and synthetic SiC were effectively produced geopolymers composites with different microstructure, physical and mechanical strength.

  18. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  19. C/sic Life Prediction for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Halbig, Michael C.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Thomas, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Accurate life prediction is critical to successful use of ceramic matrix composites (CMC). The tools to accomplish this are immature and not oriented toward the behavior of carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC), the primary system of interest for many reusable and single mission launch vehicle propulsion and airframe applications. This paper describes an approach and process made to satisfy the need to develop an integrated life prediction system that addresses mechanical durability and environmental degradation of C/SiC. Issues such as oxidation, steam and hydrogen effects on material behavior are discussed. Preliminary tests indicate that steam will aggressively remove SiC seal coat and matrix in line with past experience. The kinetics of water vapor reaction with carbon fibers is negligible at 600 C, but comparable to air attack at 1200 C. The mitigating effect of steam observed in fiber oxidation studies has also been observed in stress rupture tests. Detailed microscopy of oxidized specimens is being carried out to develop the oxidation model. Carbon oxidation kinetics are reaction controlled at intermediate temperatures and diffusion controlled at high temperatures (approximately 1000 C). Activation energies for T-300 and interface pyrolytic carbon were determined as key inputs to the oxidation model. Crack opening as a function of temperature and stress was calculated. Mechanical property tests to develop and verify the probabilistic life model are very encouraging except for residual strength prediction. Gage width is a key variable governing edge oxidation of seal coated specimens. Future efforts will include architectural effects, enhanced coatings, biaxial tests, and LCF. Modeling will need to account for combined effects.

  20. C/SIC Life Prediction for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Opula, Elizabeth J.; Halbig, Michael C.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Thomas, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Accurate life prediction is critical to successful use of ceramic matrix composites (CMC). The tools to accomplish this are immature and not oriented toward the behavior of carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC), the primary system of interest for many reusable and single mission launch vehicle propulsion and airframe applications. This paper describes an approach and progress made to satisfy the need to develop an integrated life prediction system that addresses mechanical durability and environmental degradation of C/SiC. Issues such as oxidation, steam and hydrogen effects on material behavior are discussed. Preliminary tests indicate that stream will aggressively remove SiC seal coat and matrix in line with past experience. The kinetics of water vapor reaction with carbon fibers is negligible at 600 C, but comparable to air attack at 1200 C. The mitigating effect of steam observed in fiber oxidation studies has also been observed in stress rupture tests. Detailed microscopy of oxidized specimens is being carried out to develop the oxidation model. Carbon oxidation kinetics are reaction controlled at intermediate temperatures and diffusion controlled at high temperatures (approx. 1000 C). Activation energies for T-300 and interface pyrolytic carbon were determined as key inputs to the oxidation model. Crack opening as a function of temperature and stress was calculated. Mechanical property tests to develop and verify the probabilistic life model are very encouraging except for residual strength prediction. Gage width is a key variable governing edge oxidation of seal coated specimens. Future efforts will include architectural effects, enhanced coatings, biaxial tests, and LCF. Modeling will need to account for combined effects.