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  1. Workflow Challenges of Enterprise Imaging: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Towbin, Alexander J; Roth, Christopher J; Bronkalla, Mark; Cram, Dawn

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of digital cameras, there has been an explosion in the number of medical specialties using images to diagnose or document disease and guide interventions. In many specialties, these images are not added to the patient's electronic medical record and are not distributed so that other providers caring for the patient can view them. As hospitals begin to develop enterprise imaging strategies, they have found that there are multiple challenges preventing the implementation of systems to manage image capture, image upload, and image management. This HIMSS-SIIM white paper will describe the key workflow challenges related to enterprise imaging and offer suggestions for potential solutions to these challenges.

  2. Workflow Challenges of Enterprise Imaging: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Towbin, Alexander J; Roth, Christopher J; Bronkalla, Mark; Cram, Dawn

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of digital cameras, there has been an explosion in the number of medical specialties using images to diagnose or document disease and guide interventions. In many specialties, these images are not added to the patient's electronic medical record and are not distributed so that other providers caring for the patient can view them. As hospitals begin to develop enterprise imaging strategies, they have found that there are multiple challenges preventing the implementation of systems to manage image capture, image upload, and image management. This HIMSS-SIIM white paper will describe the key workflow challenges related to enterprise imaging and offer suggestions for potential solutions to these challenges. PMID:27527613

  3. Orders- Versus Encounters-Based Image Capture: Implications Pre- and Post-Procedure Workflow, Technical and Build Capabilities, Resulting, Analytics and Revenue Capture: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Cram, Dawn; Roth, Christopher J; Towbin, Alexander J

    2016-10-01

    The decision to implement an orders-based versus an encounters-based imaging workflow poses various implications to image capture and storage. The impacts include workflows before and after an imaging procedure, electronic health record build, technical infrastructure, analytics, resulting, and revenue. Orders-based workflows tend to favor some imaging specialties while others require an encounters-based approach. The intent of this HIMSS-SIIM white paper is to offer lessons learned from early adopting institutions to physician champions and informatics leadership developing strategic planning and operational rollouts for specialties capturing clinical multimedia. PMID:27417208

  4. Orders- Versus Encounters-Based Image Capture: Implications Pre- and Post-Procedure Workflow, Technical and Build Capabilities, Resulting, Analytics and Revenue Capture: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Cram, Dawn; Roth, Christopher J; Towbin, Alexander J

    2016-10-01

    The decision to implement an orders-based versus an encounters-based imaging workflow poses various implications to image capture and storage. The impacts include workflows before and after an imaging procedure, electronic health record build, technical infrastructure, analytics, resulting, and revenue. Orders-based workflows tend to favor some imaging specialties while others require an encounters-based approach. The intent of this HIMSS-SIIM white paper is to offer lessons learned from early adopting institutions to physician champions and informatics leadership developing strategic planning and operational rollouts for specialties capturing clinical multimedia.

  5. Enterprise Imaging Governance: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christopher J; Lannum, Louis M; Joseph, Carol L

    2016-10-01

    Enterprise imaging governance is an emerging need in health enterprises today. This white paper highlights the decision-making body, framework, and process for optimal enterprise imaging governance inclusive of five areas of focus: program governance, technology governance, information governance, clinical governance, and financial governance. It outlines relevant parallels and differences when forming or optimizing imaging governance as compared with other established broad horizontal governance groups, such as for the electronic health record. It is intended for CMIOs and health informatics leaders looking to grow and govern a program to optimally capture, store, index, distribute, view, exchange, and analyze the images of their enterprise.

  6. Technical Challenges of Enterprise Imaging: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Clunie, David A; Dennison, Don K; Cram, Dawn; Persons, Kenneth R; Bronkalla, Mark D; Primo, Henri Rik

    2016-10-01

    This white paper explores the technical challenges and solutions for acquiring (capturing) and managing enterprise images, particularly those involving visible light applications. The types of acquisition devices used for various general-purpose photography and specialized applications including dermatology, endoscopy, and anatomic pathology are reviewed. The formats and standards used, and the associated metadata requirements and communication protocols for transfer and workflow are considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of metadata capture in both order- and encounter-based workflow. The benefits of using DICOM to provide a standard means of recording and accessing both metadata and image and video data are considered, as is the role of IHE and FHIR.

  7. A Foundation for Enterprise Imaging: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christopher J; Lannum, Louis M; Persons, Kenneth R

    2016-10-01

    Care providers today routinely obtain valuable clinical multimedia with mobile devices, scope cameras, ultrasound, and many other modalities at the point of care. Image capture and storage workflows may be heterogeneous across an enterprise, and as a result, they often are not well incorporated in the electronic health record. Enterprise Imaging refers to a set of strategies, initiatives, and workflows implemented across a healthcare enterprise to consistently and optimally capture, index, manage, store, distribute, view, exchange, and analyze all clinical imaging and multimedia content to enhance the electronic health record. This paper is intended to introduce Enterprise Imaging as an important initiative to clinical and informatics leadership, and outline its key elements of governance, strategy, infrastructure, common multimedia content, acquisition workflows, enterprise image viewers, and image exchange services.

  8. The Current State and Path Forward For Enterprise Image Viewing: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christopher J; Lannum, Louis M; Dennison, Donald K; Towbin, Alexander J

    2016-10-01

    Clinical specialties have widely varied needs for diagnostic image interpretation, and clinical image and video image consumption. Enterprise viewers are being deployed as part of electronic health record implementations to present the broad spectrum of clinical imaging and multimedia content created in routine medical practice today. This white paper will describe the enterprise viewer use cases, drivers of recent growth, technical considerations, functionality differences between enterprise and specialty viewers, and likely future states. This white paper is aimed at CMIOs and CIOs interested in optimizing the image-enablement of their electronic health record or those who may be struggling with the many clinical image viewers their enterprises may employ today.

  9. The Current State and Path Forward For Enterprise Image Viewing: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christopher J; Lannum, Louis M; Dennison, Donald K; Towbin, Alexander J

    2016-10-01

    Clinical specialties have widely varied needs for diagnostic image interpretation, and clinical image and video image consumption. Enterprise viewers are being deployed as part of electronic health record implementations to present the broad spectrum of clinical imaging and multimedia content created in routine medical practice today. This white paper will describe the enterprise viewer use cases, drivers of recent growth, technical considerations, functionality differences between enterprise and specialty viewers, and likely future states. This white paper is aimed at CMIOs and CIOs interested in optimizing the image-enablement of their electronic health record or those who may be struggling with the many clinical image viewers their enterprises may employ today. PMID:27473474

  10. Technical Challenges of Enterprise Imaging: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Clunie, David A; Dennison, Don K; Cram, Dawn; Persons, Kenneth R; Bronkalla, Mark D; Primo, Henri Rik

    2016-10-01

    This white paper explores the technical challenges and solutions for acquiring (capturing) and managing enterprise images, particularly those involving visible light applications. The types of acquisition devices used for various general-purpose photography and specialized applications including dermatology, endoscopy, and anatomic pathology are reviewed. The formats and standards used, and the associated metadata requirements and communication protocols for transfer and workflow are considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of metadata capture in both order- and encounter-based workflow. The benefits of using DICOM to provide a standard means of recording and accessing both metadata and image and video data are considered, as is the role of IHE and FHIR. PMID:27576909

  11. Considerations for Exchanging and Sharing Medical Images for Improved Collaboration and Patient Care: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Vreeland, Amy; Persons, Kenneth R; Primo, Henri Rik; Bishop, Matthew; Garriott, Kimberley M; Doyle, Matthew K; Silver, Elliott; Brown, Danielle M; Bashall, Chris

    2016-10-01

    The need for providers and patients to exchange and share imaging has never been more apparent, yet many organizations are only now, as a part of a larger enterprise imaging initiative, taking steps to streamline an important process that has historically been facilitated with the use of CDs or insecure methods of communication. This paper will provide an introduction to concepts and common-use cases for image exchange, outline challenges that have hindered adoption to date, and describe standards for image exchange that show increasing promise of being adopted by vendors and providers.

  12. Considerations for Exchanging and Sharing Medical Images for Improved Collaboration and Patient Care: HIMSS-SIIM Collaborative White Paper.

    PubMed

    Vreeland, Amy; Persons, Kenneth R; Primo, Henri Rik; Bishop, Matthew; Garriott, Kimberley M; Doyle, Matthew K; Silver, Elliott; Brown, Danielle M; Bashall, Chris

    2016-10-01

    The need for providers and patients to exchange and share imaging has never been more apparent, yet many organizations are only now, as a part of a larger enterprise imaging initiative, taking steps to streamline an important process that has historically been facilitated with the use of CDs or insecure methods of communication. This paper will provide an introduction to concepts and common-use cases for image exchange, outline challenges that have hindered adoption to date, and describe standards for image exchange that show increasing promise of being adopted by vendors and providers. PMID:27351992

  13. New Automated System Available for Reporting Safety Concerns | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A new system has been developed for reporting safety issues in the workplace. The Environment, Health, and Safety’s (EHS’) Safety Inspection and Issue Management System (SIIMS) is an online resource where any employee can report a problem or issue, said Siobhan Tierney, program manager at EHS.

  14. Hair Zinc Level in Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yenigun, Ayse; Ozkinay, Ferda; Cogulu, Ozgur; Coker, Canan; Cetiner, Nurten; Ozden, Gonca; Aksu, Oguz; Ozkinay, Cihangir

    2004-01-01

    Immunological, endocrinological, and haematological abnormalities are relatively common in people with Down syndrome (Cuadrado & Barrena, 1996; Decoq & Vincker, 1995; Hestnes et al., 1991; Sustrova & Strbak, 1994; Nespoli, Burgio, Ugazio & Maccario, 1993; Kempski, Chessells & Reeves, 1997; Kivivuori, Rajantie, & Siimes, 1996; David et al., 1996;…

  15. Learning, Adjustment and Stress Disorders: With Special Reference to Tsunami Affected Regions. Beitrage zur Padagogischen und Rehabilitationspsychologie. Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witruk, Evelin, Ed.; Riha, David, Ed.; Teichert, Alexandra, Ed.; Haase, Norman, Ed.; Stueck, Marcus, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This book contains selected contributions from the international workshop Learning, "Adjustment and Stress Disorders--with special reference to Tsunami affected Regions" organised by Evelin Witruk and the team of Educational and Rehabilitative Psychology at the University of Leipzig in January 2006. The book contains new results and the state of…

  16. 78 FR 48773 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... MARY ETTLIN-THRUELSEN MARY KAREN EU ANDREW DOUGLAS EVELIN CAROL LINDSEY FADI CHRISTINE MARIE FAID CAROL... SUNGPIL CHOW JULIETTE LIP MING CHOW KIMMIE KIN MING CHRIST NICOLAS MARTIN CHU VANEESE WING YEE CHU LI MARY... VANESSA STEPHANIE DENNEMEYER MARY CATHERINE DENNETT FRANCES ELIZABETH DER BURG ELSBETH VON...

  17. Transforming the radiological interpretation process: TRIP - Where are we now?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice

    2010-03-01

    In 2003, the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) recognized the problem of rapidly increasing number of images in a radiology study as well as the growing number of studies per patient and the increasing number of patients. This produces a developing issue for radiologists, there was simply no way to efficiently manage the number of images that were produced per day with the available tools. SIIM members organized to help encourage research and development in areas that would transform the radiological interpretation process and trademarked the initiative TRIP™. Since the initiative was started, technology and development has advanced, but has it solved the problem? This paper reviews the literature published in the Journal of Digital Imaging from 2003 until now and analyzes the advances that have been made and what still needs to be done.

  18. High titer gluconic acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger from dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover without detoxification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongsen; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2016-03-01

    This study reported a high titer gluconic acid fermentation using dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover (DDAP) hydrolysate without detoxification. The selected fermenting strain Aspergillus niger SIIM M276 was capable of inhibitor degradation thus no detoxification on pretreated corn stover was required. Parameters of gluconic acid fermentation in corn stover hydrolysate were optimized in flasks and in fermentors to achieve 76.67 g/L gluconic acid with overall yield of 94.91%. The sodium gluconate obtained from corn stover was used as additive for extending setting time of cement mortar and similar function was obtained with starch based sodium gluconate. This study provided the first high titer gluconic acid production from lignocellulosic feedstock with potential of industrial applications.

  19. The dietary intake of a group of vegetarian children aged 7-11 years compared with matched omnivores.

    PubMed

    Nathan, I; Hackett, A F; Kirby, S

    1996-04-01

    There is a lack of information concerning the diet of vegetarian children. The present study compared the dietary intake of fifty vegetarian children, aged 7-11 years, with fifty matched omnivores. Three 3 d food records were completed by each child at intervals of 6 months. The day after completing the record each child was interviewed to clarify food items and assess portion sizes. Food records were analysed using Microdiet (University of Salford). Finger-prick cholesterol and haemoglobin measurements were taken from a subsample of the group. Only one child's family was a member of the Vegetarian Society and almost one-third of vegetarian children had omnivorous parents (seventeen of fifty subjects). The energy intake (MJ) of the vegetarians was significantly lower than that of the omnivores, 7.6 (SD 1.05) and 8.0 (SD 1.36) respectively; there were no significant differences in Fe or fat intakes. For the vegetarians polyunsaturated:saturated fat ratio (P:S 0.7 (SD 0.04)) and NSP intake (13.8 (SD 0.7) g/d) were significantly higher than those of the omnivores (P:S 0.5 (SD 0.02), NSP 10.3 (SD 0.4) g/d). There was no significant difference in cholesterol measurements (mmol/l) between the two groups: vegetarian 3.5 (SD 0.12), omnivores 3.7 (SD 0.15). The haemoglobin level (g/l) of the vegetarians (11.8 (SD 0.2)) was significantly below that of the omnivores (12.4 (SD 0.2)); 47.5% of the vegetarian children fell below the third percentile of the Dallman reference curves (Dallman & Siimes, 1979). The intake of the vegetarians more closely resembled current recommendations (Department of Health, 1991), although they need to be as aware as omnivores of the need to reduce fat intake. The haemoglobin levels of vegetarian children suggest that they need dietary advice to ensure optimal absorption of Fe.

  20. Milky Way's Super-efficient Particle Accelerators Caught in The Act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-06-01

    Thanks to a unique "ballistic study" that combines data from ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have now solved a long-standing mystery of the Milky Way's particle accelerators. They show in a paper published today on Science Express that cosmic rays from our galaxy are very efficiently accelerated in the remnants of exploded stars. During the Apollo flights astronauts reported seeing odd flashes of light, visible even with their eyes closed. We have since learnt that the cause was cosmic rays - extremely energetic particles from outside the Solar System arriving at the Earth, and constantly bombarding its atmosphere. Once they reach Earth, they still have sufficient energy to cause glitches in electronic components. Galactic cosmic rays come from sources inside our home galaxy, the Milky Way, and consist mostly of protons moving at close to the speed of light, the "ultimate speed limit" in the Universe. These protons have been accelerated to energies exceeding by far the energies that even CERN's Large Hadron Collider will be able to achieve. "It has long been thought that the super-accelerators that produce these cosmic rays in the Milky Way are the expanding envelopes created by exploded stars, but our observations reveal the smoking gun that proves it", says Eveline Helder from the Astronomical Institute Utrecht of Utrecht University in the Netherlands, the first author of the new study. "You could even say that we have now confirmed the calibre of the gun used to accelerate cosmic rays to their tremendous energies", adds collaborator Jacco Vink, also from the Astronomical Institute Utrecht. For the first time Helder, Vink and colleagues have come up with a measurement that solves the long-standing astronomical quandary of whether or not stellar explosions produce enough accelerated particles to explain the number of cosmic rays that hit the Earth's atmosphere. The team's study indicates that they indeed do and it

  1. Milky Way's super-efficient particle accelerators caught in the act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-06-01

    Thanks to a unique "ballistic study" that combines data from ESO's Very Large Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have now solved a long-standing mystery of the Milky Way's particle accelerators. They show in a paper published today on Science Express that cosmic rays from our galaxy are very efficiently accelerated in the remnants of exploded stars. ESO PR Photo 23a/09 The rim of RCW 86 ESO PR Photo 23b/09 DSS + insert, annotated ESO PR Photo 23c/09 DSS image ESO PR Video 23a/09 Zoom-in RCW 86 During the Apollo flights astronauts reported seeing odd flashes of light, visible even with their eyes closed. We have since learnt that the cause was cosmic rays -- extremely energetic particles from outside the Solar System arriving at the Earth, and constantly bombarding its atmosphere. Once they reach Earth, they still have sufficient energy to cause glitches in electronic components. Galactic cosmic rays come from sources inside our home galaxy, the Milky Way, and consist mostly of protons moving at close to the speed of light, the "ultimate speed limit" in the Universe. These protons have been accelerated to energies exceeding by far the energies that even CERN's Large Hadron Collider will be able to achieve. "It has long been thought that the super-accelerators that produce these cosmic rays in the Milky Way are the expanding envelopes created by exploded stars, but our observations reveal the smoking gun that proves it", says Eveline Helder from the Astronomical Institute Utrecht of Utrecht University in the Netherlands, the first author of the new study. "You could even say that we have now confirmed the calibre of the gun used to accelerate cosmic rays to their tremendous energies", adds collaborator Jacco Vink, also from the Astronomical Institute Utrecht. For the first time Helder, Vink and colleagues have come up with a measurement that solves the long-standing astronomical quandary of whether or not stellar explosions produce enough