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Sample records for silico transformation reveals

  1. Chromosome painting in silico in a bacterial species reveals fine population structure.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Koji; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi; Hattori, Masahira; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2013-06-01

    Identifying population structure forms an important basis for genetic and evolutionary studies. Most current methods to identify population structure have limitations in analyzing haplotypes and recombination across the genome. Recently, a method of chromosome painting in silico has been developed to overcome these shortcomings and has been applied to multiple human genome sequences. This method detects the genome-wide transfer of DNA sequence chunks through homologous recombination. Here, we apply it to the frequently recombining bacterial species Helicobacter pylori that has infected Homo sapiens since their birth in Africa and shows wide phylogeographic divergence. Multiple complete genome sequences were analyzed including sequences from Okinawa, Japan, that we recently sequenced. The newer method revealed a finer population structure than revealed by a previous method that examines only MLST housekeeping genes or a phylogenetic network analysis of the core genome. Novel subgroups were found in Europe, Amerind, and East Asia groups. Examination of genetic flux showed some singleton strains to be hybrids of subgroups and revealed evident signs of population admixture in Africa, Europe, and parts of Asia. We expect this approach to further our understanding of intraspecific bacterial evolution by revealing population structure at a finer scale.

  2. In silico synchronization reveals regulators of nuclear ruptures in lamin A/C deficient model cells

    PubMed Central

    Robijns, J.; Molenberghs, F.; Sieprath, T.; Corne, T. D. J.; Verschuuren, M.; De Vos, W. H.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear lamina is a critical regulator of nuclear structure and function. Nuclei from laminopathy patient cells experience repetitive disruptions of the nuclear envelope, causing transient intermingling of nuclear and cytoplasmic components. The exact causes and consequences of these events are not fully understood, but their stochastic occurrence complicates in-depth analyses. To resolve this, we have established a method that enables quantitative investigation of spontaneous nuclear ruptures, based on co-expression of a firmly bound nuclear reference marker and a fluorescent protein that shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm during ruptures. Minimally invasive imaging of both reporters, combined with automated tracking and in silico synchronization of individual rupture events, allowed extracting information on rupture frequency and recovery kinetics. Using this approach, we found that rupture frequency correlates inversely with lamin A/C levels, and can be reduced in genome-edited LMNA knockout cells by blocking actomyosin contractility or inhibiting the acetyl-transferase protein NAT10. Nuclear signal recovery followed a kinetic that is co-determined by the severity of the rupture event, and could be prolonged by knockdown of the ESCRT-III complex component CHMP4B. In conclusion, our approach reveals regulators of nuclear rupture induction and repair, which may have critical roles in disease development. PMID:27461848

  3. In silico synchronization reveals regulators of nuclear ruptures in lamin A/C deficient model cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robijns, J.; Molenberghs, F.; Sieprath, T.; Corne, T. D. J.; Verschuuren, M.; de Vos, W. H.

    2016-07-01

    The nuclear lamina is a critical regulator of nuclear structure and function. Nuclei from laminopathy patient cells experience repetitive disruptions of the nuclear envelope, causing transient intermingling of nuclear and cytoplasmic components. The exact causes and consequences of these events are not fully understood, but their stochastic occurrence complicates in-depth analyses. To resolve this, we have established a method that enables quantitative investigation of spontaneous nuclear ruptures, based on co-expression of a firmly bound nuclear reference marker and a fluorescent protein that shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm during ruptures. Minimally invasive imaging of both reporters, combined with automated tracking and in silico synchronization of individual rupture events, allowed extracting information on rupture frequency and recovery kinetics. Using this approach, we found that rupture frequency correlates inversely with lamin A/C levels, and can be reduced in genome-edited LMNA knockout cells by blocking actomyosin contractility or inhibiting the acetyl-transferase protein NAT10. Nuclear signal recovery followed a kinetic that is co-determined by the severity of the rupture event, and could be prolonged by knockdown of the ESCRT-III complex component CHMP4B. In conclusion, our approach reveals regulators of nuclear rupture induction and repair, which may have critical roles in disease development.

  4. Directed Evolution and In Silico Analysis of Reaction Centre Proteins Reveal Molecular Signatures of Photosynthesis Adaptation to Radiation Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Rea, Giuseppina; Lambreva, Maya; Polticelli, Fabio; Bertalan, Ivo; Antonacci, Amina; Pastorelli, Sandro; Damasso, Mario; Johanningmeier, Udo; Giardi, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary mechanisms adopted by the photosynthetic apparatus to modifications in the Earth's atmosphere on a geological time-scale remain a focus of intense research. The photosynthetic machinery has had to cope with continuously changing environmental conditions and particularly with the complex ionizing radiation emitted by solar flares. The photosynthetic D1 protein, being the site of electron tunneling-mediated charge separation and solar energy transduction, is a hot spot for the generation of radiation-induced radical injuries. We explored the possibility to produce D1 variants tolerant to ionizing radiation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and clarified the effect of radiation-induced oxidative damage on the photosynthetic proteins evolution. In vitro directed evolution strategies targeted at the D1 protein were adopted to create libraries of chlamydomonas random mutants, subsequently selected by exposures to radical-generating proton or neutron sources. The common trend observed in the D1 aminoacidic substitutions was the replacement of less polar by more polar amino acids. The applied selection pressure forced replacement of residues more sensitive to oxidative damage with less sensitive ones, suggesting that ionizing radiation may have been one of the driving forces in the evolution of the eukaryotic photosynthetic apparatus. A set of the identified aminoacidic substitutions, close to the secondary plastoquinone binding niche and oxygen evolving complex, were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis in un-transformed strains, and their sensitivity to free radicals attack analyzed. Mutants displayed reduced electron transport efficiency in physiological conditions, and increased photosynthetic performance stability and oxygen evolution capacity in stressful high-light conditions. Finally, comparative in silico analyses of D1 aminoacidic sequences of organisms differently located in the evolution chain, revealed a higher ratio of residues more sensitive to

  5. Environmental metabarcodes for insects: in silico PCR reveals potential for taxonomic bias.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Laurence J; Soubrier, Julien; Weyrich, Laura S; Cooper, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Studies of insect assemblages are suited to the simultaneous DNA-based identification of multiple taxa known as metabarcoding. To obtain accurate estimates of diversity, metabarcoding markers ideally possess appropriate taxonomic coverage to avoid PCR-amplification bias, as well as sufficient sequence divergence to resolve species. We used in silico PCR to compare the taxonomic coverage and resolution of newly designed insect metabarcodes (targeting 16S) with that of existing markers [16S and cytochrome oxidase c subunit I (COI)] and then compared their efficiency in vitro. Existing metabarcoding primers amplified in silico <75% of insect species with complete mitochondrial genomes available, whereas new primers targeting 16S provided >90% coverage. Furthermore, metabarcodes targeting COI appeared to introduce taxonomic PCR-amplification bias, typically amplifying a greater percentage of Lepidoptera and Diptera species, while failing to amplify certain orders in silico. To test whether bias predicted in silico was observed in vitro, we created an artificial DNA blend containing equal amounts of DNA from 14 species, representing 11 insect orders and one arachnid. We PCR-amplified the blend using five primer sets, targeting either COI or 16S, with high-throughput amplicon sequencing yielding more than 6 million reads. In vitro results typically corresponded to in silico PCR predictions, with newly designed 16S primers detecting 11 insect taxa present, thus providing equivalent or better taxonomic coverage than COI metabarcodes. Our results demonstrate that in silico PCR is a useful tool for predicting taxonomic bias in mixed template PCR and that researchers should be wary of potential bias when selecting metabarcoding markers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Revealing pharmacodynamics of medicinal plants using in silico approach: a case study with wet lab validation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Damanpreet; Gawande, Dinesh Y; Singh, Tanveer; Poroikov, Vladimir; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Exploration of therapeutic mechanism is an integral part of medicinal plant based drug discovery for better understanding of pharmacological behavior of these agents. But, its study using conventional hit and trial wet laboratory experiments proves to be very tedious, time consuming and expensive, thus encouraging development of in silico techniques. Hence, an in silico technique has been devised using a computer software Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substances (PASS) to study pharmacodynamics of medicinal plants. The technique has been presented with a case study using Ficus religiosa L. (Moraceae) in which its anticonvulsant mechanism has been elucidated with PASS and further validated experimentally. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced convulsion test was used to study the anticonvulsant effect of standardized bark extract of F. religiosa. Thereafter, structure of all the reported bioactive metabolites in the bark was subjected to PASS software to obtain biological activity spectrum of each compound. The mechanism signifying anticonvulsant effect was selected from the spectrum and was further validated using in vitro test. The extract showed significant anticonvulsant effect in PTZ test. PASS analysis showed a high activity score for GABA aminotransferase (GABA-AT) inhibitory effect of the bioactive metabolites present in the bark. In vitro GABA-AT enzyme assay results were in concordance with the predicted mechanism by PASS for the observed anticonvulsant effect, as the extract showed potent inhibition of the enzyme. The results of present study showed the in silico technique to be useful for elucidation of unknown therapeutic mechanisms of medicinal plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. In Silico and In Vivo Experiments Reveal M-CSF Injections Accelerate Regeneration Following Muscle Laceration.

    PubMed

    Martin, Kyle S; Kegelman, Christopher D; Virgilio, Kelley M; Passipieri, Julianna A; Christ, George J; Blemker, Silvia S; Peirce, Shayn M

    2017-03-01

    Numerous studies have pharmacologically modulated the muscle milieu in the hopes of promoting muscle regeneration; however, the timing and duration of these interventions are difficult to determine. This study utilized a combination of in silico and in vivo experiments to investigate how inflammation manipulation improves muscle recovery following injury. First, we measured macrophage populations following laceration injury in the rat tibialis anterior (TA). Then we calibrated an agent-based model (ABM) of muscle injury to mimic the observed inflammation profiles. The calibrated ABM was used to simulate macrophage and satellite stem cell (SC) dynamics, and suggested that delivering macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) prior to injury would promote SC-mediated injury recovery. Next, we performed an experiment wherein 1 day prior to injury, we injected M-CSF into the rat TA muscle. M-CSF increased the number of macrophages during the first 4 days post-injury. Furthermore, treated muscles experienced a swifter increase in the appearance of PAX7(+) SCs and regenerating muscle fibers. Our study suggests that computational models of muscle injury provide novel insights into cellular dynamics during regeneration, and further, that pharmacologically altering inflammation dynamics prior to injury can accelerate the muscle regeneration process.

  8. In silico pathway analysis in cervical carcinoma reveals potential new targets for treatment

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, Peter A.; van Dam, Pieter-Jan H. H.; Rolfo, Christian; Giallombardo, Marco; van Berckelaer, Christophe; Trinh, Xuan Bich; Altintas, Sevilay; Huizing, Manon; Papadimitriou, Kostas; Tjalma, Wiebren A. A.; van Laere, Steven

    2016-01-01

    An in silico pathway analysis was performed in order to improve current knowledge on the molecular drivers of cervical cancer and detect potential targets for treatment. Three publicly available Affymetrix gene expression data-sets (GSE5787, GSE7803, GSE9750) were retrieved, vouching for a total of 9 cervical cancer cell lines (CCCLs), 39 normal cervical samples, 7 CIN3 samples and 111 cervical cancer samples (CCSs). Predication analysis of microarrays was performed in the Affymetrix sets to identify cervical cancer biomarkers. To select cancer cell-specific genes the CCSs were compared to the CCCLs. Validated genes were submitted to a gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and Expression2Kinases (E2K). In the CCSs a total of 1,547 probe sets were identified that were overexpressed (FDR < 0.1). Comparing to CCCLs 560 probe sets (481 unique genes) had a cancer cell-specific expression profile, and 315 of these genes (65%) were validated. GSEA identified 5 cancer hallmarks enriched in CCSs (P < 0.01 and FDR < 0.25) showing that deregulation of the cell cycle is a major component of cervical cancer biology. E2K identified a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of 162 nodes (including 20 drugable kinases) and 1626 edges. This PPI-network consists of 5 signaling modules associated with MYC signaling (Module 1), cell cycle deregulation (Module 2), TGFβ-signaling (Module 3), MAPK signaling (Module 4) and chromatin modeling (Module 5). Potential targets for treatment which could be identified were CDK1, CDK2, ABL1, ATM, AKT1, MAPK1, MAPK3 among others. The present study identified important driver pathways in cervical carcinogenesis which should be assessed for their potential therapeutic drugability. PMID:26701206

  9. In silico serine β-lactamases analysis reveals a huge potential resistome in environmental and pathogenic species.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Christian; Braun, Sascha D; Stein, Claudia; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf; Pletz, Mathias W; Makarewicz, Oliwia

    2017-02-24

    The secretion of antimicrobial compounds is an ancient mechanism with clear survival benefits for microbes competing with other microorganisms. Consequently, mechanisms that confer resistance are also ancient and may represent an underestimated reservoir in environmental bacteria. In this context, β-lactamases (BLs) are of great interest due to their long-term presence and diversification in the hospital environment, leading to the emergence of Gram-negative pathogens that are resistant to cephalosporins (extended spectrum BLs = ESBLs) and carbapenems (carbapenemases). In the current study, protein sequence databases were used to analyze BLs, and the results revealed a substantial number of unknown and functionally uncharacterized BLs in a multitude of environmental and pathogenic species. Together, these BLs represent an uncharacterized reservoir of potentially transferable resistance genes. Considering all available data, in silico approaches appear to more adequately reflect a given resistome than analyses of limited datasets. This approach leads to a more precise definition of BL clades and conserved motifs. Moreover, it may support the prediction of new resistance determinants and improve the tailored development of robust molecular diagnostics.

  10. In silico serine β-lactamases analysis reveals a huge potential resistome in environmental and pathogenic species

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Christian; Braun, Sascha D.; Stein, Claudia; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf; Pletz, Mathias W.; Makarewicz, Oliwia

    2017-01-01

    The secretion of antimicrobial compounds is an ancient mechanism with clear survival benefits for microbes competing with other microorganisms. Consequently, mechanisms that confer resistance are also ancient and may represent an underestimated reservoir in environmental bacteria. In this context, β-lactamases (BLs) are of great interest due to their long-term presence and diversification in the hospital environment, leading to the emergence of Gram-negative pathogens that are resistant to cephalosporins (extended spectrum BLs = ESBLs) and carbapenems (carbapenemases). In the current study, protein sequence databases were used to analyze BLs, and the results revealed a substantial number of unknown and functionally uncharacterized BLs in a multitude of environmental and pathogenic species. Together, these BLs represent an uncharacterized reservoir of potentially transferable resistance genes. Considering all available data, in silico approaches appear to more adequately reflect a given resistome than analyses of limited datasets. This approach leads to a more precise definition of BL clades and conserved motifs. Moreover, it may support the prediction of new resistance determinants and improve the tailored development of robust molecular diagnostics. PMID:28233789

  11. Metabolomics and in-silico analysis reveal critical energy deregulations in animal models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Poliquin, Pierre O; Chen, Jingkui; Cloutier, Mathieu; Trudeau, Louis-Éric; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multifactorial disease known to result from a variety of factors. Although age is the principal risk factor, other etiological mechanisms have been identified, including gene mutations and exposure to toxins. Deregulation of energy metabolism, mostly through the loss of complex I efficiency, is involved in disease progression in both the genetic and sporadic forms of the disease. In this study, we investigated energy deregulation in the cerebral tissue of animal models (genetic and toxin induced) of PD using an approach that combines metabolomics and mathematical modelling. In a first step, quantitative measurements of energy-related metabolites in mouse brain slices revealed most affected pathways. A genetic model of PD, the Park2 knockout, was compared to the effect of CCCP, a mitochondrial uncoupler [corrected]. Model simulated and experimental results revealed a significant and sustained decrease in ATP after CCCP exposure, but not in the genetic mice model. In support to data analysis, a mathematical model of the relevant metabolic pathways was developed and calibrated onto experimental data. In this work, we show that a short-term stress response in nucleotide scavenging is most probably induced by the toxin exposure. In turn, the robustness of energy-related pathways in the model explains how genetic perturbations, at least in young animals, are not sufficient to induce significant changes at the metabolite level.

  12. Revealing the Functions of Tenascin-C in 3-D Breast Cancer Models Using Cell Biological and in Silico Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    in 3-D Breast Cancer Models Using Cell Biological and In Silico Approaches PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Agne Tarasevicuite...Functions of Tenascin-C in 3-D Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Models Using Cell Biological and In Silico Approaches 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH... cancer development and progression, yet its role in this disease remains obscure. To investigate the effects of stromal TN-C on normal human mammary

  13. In silico analysis of bacterial arsenic islands reveals remarkable synteny and functional relatedness between arsenate and phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hang; Li, Mingshun; Huang, Yinyan; Rensing, Christopher; Wang, Gejiao

    2013-01-01

    In order to construct a more universal model for understanding the genetic requirements for bacterial AsIII oxidation, an in silico examination of the available sequences in the GenBank was assessed and revealed 21 conserved 5–71 kb arsenic islands within phylogenetically diverse bacterial genomes. The arsenic islands included the AsIII oxidase structural genes aioBA, ars operons (e.g., arsRCB) which code for arsenic resistance, and pho, pst, and phn genes known to be part of the classical phosphate stress response and that encode functions associated with regulating and acquiring organic and inorganic phosphorus. The regulatory genes aioXSR were also an island component, but only in Proteobacteria and orientated differently depending on whether they were in α-Proteobacteria or β-/γ-Proteobacteria. Curiously though, while these regulatory genes have been shown to be essential to AsIII oxidation in the Proteobacteria, they are absent in most other organisms examined, inferring different regulatory mechanism(s) yet to be discovered. Phylogenetic analysis of the aio, ars, pst, and phn genes revealed evidence of both vertical inheritance and horizontal gene transfer (HGT). It is therefore likely the arsenic islands did not evolve as a whole unit but formed independently by acquisition of functionally related genes and operons in respective strains. Considering gene synteny and structural analogies between arsenate and phosphate, we presumed that these genes function together in helping these microbes to be able to use even low concentrations of phosphorus needed for vital functions under high concentrations of arsenic, and defined these sequences as the arsenic islands. PMID:24312089

  14. In silico scrutiny of genes revealing phylogenetic congruence with clinical prevalence or tropism properties of Chlamydia trachomatis strains.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rita; Antelo, Minia; Nunes, Alexandra; Borges, Vítor; Damião, Vera; Borrego, Maria José; Gomes, João Paulo

    2014-11-05

    Microbes possess a multiplicity of virulence factors that confer them the ability to specifically infect distinct biological niches. Contrary to what is known for other bacteria, for the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the knowledge of the molecular basis underlying serovars' tissue specificity is scarce. We examined all ~900 genes to evaluate the association between individual phylogenies and cell-appetence or ecological success of C. trachomatis strains. Only ~1% of the genes presented a tree topology showing the segregation of all three disease groups (ocular, urogenital, and lymphatic) into three well-supported clades. Approximately 28% of the genes, which include the majority of the genes encoding putative type III secretion system effectors and Inc proteins, present a phylogenetic tree where only lymphogranuloma venereum strains form a clade. Similarly, an exclusive phylogenetic segregation of the most prevalent genital serovars was observed for 61 proteins. Curiously, these serovars are phylogenetically cosegregated with the lymphogranuloma venereum serovars for ~20% of the genes. Some clade-specific pseudogenes were identified (novel findings include the conserved hypothetical protein CT037 and the predicted α-hemolysin CT473), suggesting their putative expendability for the infection of particular niches. Approximately 3.5% of the genes revealed a significant overrepresentation of nonsynonymous mutations, and the majority encode proteins that directly interact with the host. Overall, this in silico scrutiny of genes whose phylogeny is congruent with clinical prevalence or tissue specificity of C. trachomatis strains may constitute an important database of putative targets for future functional studies to evaluate their biological role in chlamydial infections. Copyright © 2015 Ferreira et al.

  15. Photodegradation of the UV filter ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate under ultraviolet light: Identification and in silico assessment of photo-transformation products in the context of grey water reuse.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, F; Olsson, O; Westphal, J; Reich, M; Leder, C; Kümmerer, K

    2016-12-01

    To prevent water shortages in the future and to reduce domestic water consumption, decentralized grey water (GW) reuse has become increasingly important. This water has, however, to be free of pollutants. Conventional treatment of GW does not fully eliminate micropollutants such as the UV filter substance ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate (EHMC). EHMC, which is commonly used in sunscreens and personal care products, is an endocrine disruptor and shows potential to bioaccumulation, which is also reflected in its low water solubility. Photolysis has been proposed as an alternative treatment method for other micropollutants, but it is not clear yet whether it can also be used to eliminate EHMC. One goal of this study was to better understand the basic pathways involved in this process. It aimed to identify photo-transformation products (photo-TPs) by using, in the test conditions, an initial concentration of EHMC higher than those expected in the environment. Acetonitrile (ACN) was added in low concentrations to the aqueous solution to overcome the low aquatic solubility of EHMC. The influence of this co-solvent on the degradation kinetics was studied. The photolysis experiments were carried out using a medium pressure mercury lamp, which emits UV light in the range of 200-400nm. The quantum yield of the photolysis of EHMC was 0.0042 and 0.0023mol·Einstein(-1) (for 0.2 and 0.5% ACN (v/v), respectively), and the relative and absolute UV photon fluxes were determined. HPLC was used to monitor the elimination kinetics of EHMC, which followed first-order kinetics. The results of LC-MS(n) analyses revealed that beside others, several oxidized and hydroxylized EHMC isomers were formed as photo-TPs in aqueous solution. Using a set of in silico quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models, this study also offered new insights concerning the environmental fate and toxicity of the TPs of EHMC.

  16. Quantitative X-ray Diffraction (QXRD) analysis for revealing thermal transformations of red mud.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chang-Zhong; Zeng, Lingmin; Shih, Kaimin

    2015-07-01

    Red mud is a worldwide environmental problem, and many authorities are trying to find an economic solution for its beneficial application or/and safe disposal. Ceramic production is one of the potential waste-to-resource strategies for using red mud as a raw material. Before implementing such a strategy, an unambiguous understanding of the reaction behavior of red mud under thermal conditions is essential. In this study, the phase compositions and transformation processes were revealed for the Pingguo red mud (PRM) heat-treated at different sintering temperatures. Hematite, perovskite, andradite, cancrinite, kaolinite, diaspore, gibbsite and calcite phases were observed in the samples. However, unlike those red mud samples from the other regions, no TiO2 (rutile or anatase) or quartz were observed. Titanium was found to exist mainly in perovskite and andradite while the iron mainly existed in hematite and andradite. A new silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) phase was found in samples treated at temperatures above 1100°C, and two possible formation pathways for SFCA were suggested. This is the first SFCA phase to be reported in thermally treated red mud, and this finding may turn PRM waste into a material resource for the iron-making industry. Titanium was found to be enriched in the perovskite phase after 1200°C thermal treatment, and this observation indicated a potential strategy for the recovery of titanium from PRM. In addition to noting these various resource recovery opportunities, this is also the first study to quantitatively summarize the reaction details of PRM phase transformations at various temperatures.

  17. Oil Oxidative Transformation Products Revealed by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, R. P.; Podgorski, D. C.; Ray, P. Z.; McKenna, A. M.; Chen, H.; Clingenpeel, A. C.; Rowland, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    The chemical transformation of petrogenic carbon in the environment yields an incredible complex mixture of products that can dramatically alter native petroleum chemical functionalities. The changes affect toxicity, solubility, tendency for emulsion/mousse formation, aggregation, and ultimately, bioavailability. However, these changes are difficult to track at the molecular level, as the qualitative understanding of the (predominately) oxidative weathering is hampered by the immense complexity of the unaltered oil and multiplicative increase in complexity post-oxidation. Simply, a large fraction of unaltered oil that was initially accessible by GC-methods is chemically transformed into species that preclude GC based analyses. Thus, the fate of petrogenic transformation products and their potential to form undesirable future contaminants remain unknown. However, recent advances in analytical methodology and instrumentation now allow a molecular-level insight into these complex systems. Combined with the comprehensive analysis of the unaltered well oil, detailed compositional analysis of oil-impacted sites along the Gulf of Mexico coast over the past 4 years has revealed tens-of-thousands of previously unidentified, unique, biotic and abiotic transformation products that persist. Here, we highlight efforts to characterize oxidized transformation products, identify their oxygen functionalities, and demonstrate how they affect physical/chemical behavior of weathered oil. Temporal analysis of field samples reveal compositional changes of weathered oil as a function of oil contamination levels. Once determined, abiotic microcosm results are compared to the field samples to assess how well they account for observed changes in field samples. Finally, chromatographic separation of unaltered well oil (and surrogate) into structurally defined fractions (saturate, 1-ring, 2-ring, 3-ring, 4-ring and 5+ring aromatics / polars), followed by subsequent photo-oxidation of each

  18. In-silico Taxonomic Classification of 373 Genomes Reveals Species Misidentification and New Genospecies within the Genus Pseudomonas

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phuong N.; Savka, Michael A.; Gan, Han Ming

    2017-01-01

    The genus Pseudomonas has one of the largest diversity of species within the Bacteria kingdom. To date, its taxonomy is still being revised and updated. Due to the non-standardized procedure and ambiguous thresholds at species level, largely based on 16S rRNA gene or conventional biochemical assay, species identification of publicly available Pseudomonas genomes remains questionable. In this study, we performed a large-scale analysis of all Pseudomonas genomes with species designation (excluding the well-defined P. aeruginosa) and re-evaluated their taxonomic assignment via in silico genome-genome hybridization and/or genetic comparison with valid type species. Three-hundred and seventy-three pseudomonad genomes were analyzed and subsequently clustered into 145 distinct genospecies. We detected 207 erroneous labels and corrected 43 to the proper species based on Average Nucleotide Identity Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) sequence similarity to the type strain. Surprisingly, more than half of the genomes initially designated as Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens should be classified either to a previously described species or to a new genospecies. Notably, high pairwise average nucleotide identity (>95%) indicating species-level similarity was observed between P. synxantha-P. libanensis, P. psychrotolerans–P. oryzihabitans, and P. kilonensis- P. brassicacearum, that were previously differentiated based on conventional biochemical tests and/or genome-genome hybridization techniques. PMID:28747902

  19. In Silico Prediction of Horizontal Gene Transfer Events in Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus Reveals Protocooperation in Yogurt Manufacturing▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengjin; Siezen, Roland J.; Nauta, Arjen

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, used in yogurt starter cultures, are well known for their stability and protocooperation during their coexistence in milk. In this study, we show that a close interaction between the two species also takes place at the genetic level. We performed an in silico analysis, combining gene composition and gene transfer mechanism-associated features, and predicted horizontally transferred genes in both L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus. Putative horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events that have occurred between the two bacterial species include the transfer of exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis genes, transferred from S. thermophilus to L. bulgaricus, and the gene cluster cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE for the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, transferred from L. bulgaricus or Lactobacillus helveticus to S. thermophilus. The HGT event for the cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE gene cluster was analyzed in detail, with respect to both evolutionary and functional aspects. It can be concluded that during the coexistence of both yogurt starter species in a milk environment, agonistic coevolution at the genetic level has probably been involved in the optimization of their combined growth and interactions. PMID:19395564

  20. In silico prediction of horizontal gene transfer events in Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus reveals protocooperation in yogurt manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengjin; Siezen, Roland J; Nauta, Arjen

    2009-06-01

    Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus, used in yogurt starter cultures, are well known for their stability and protocooperation during their coexistence in milk. In this study, we show that a close interaction between the two species also takes place at the genetic level. We performed an in silico analysis, combining gene composition and gene transfer mechanism-associated features, and predicted horizontally transferred genes in both L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus. Putative horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events that have occurred between the two bacterial species include the transfer of exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis genes, transferred from S. thermophilus to L. bulgaricus, and the gene cluster cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE for the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids, transferred from L. bulgaricus or Lactobacillus helveticus to S. thermophilus. The HGT event for the cbs-cblB(cglB)-cysE gene cluster was analyzed in detail, with respect to both evolutionary and functional aspects. It can be concluded that during the coexistence of both yogurt starter species in a milk environment, agonistic coevolution at the genetic level has probably been involved in the optimization of their combined growth and interactions.

  1. In silico activity profiling reveals the mechanism of action of antimalarials discovered in a high-throughput screen

    PubMed Central

    Plouffe, David; Brinker, Achim; McNamara, Case; Henson, Kerstin; Kato, Nobutaka; Kuhen, Kelli; Nagle, Advait; Adrián, Francisco; Matzen, Jason T.; Anderson, Paul; Nam, Tae-gyu; Gray, Nathanael S.; Chatterjee, Arnab; Janes, Jeff; Yan, S. Frank; Trager, Richard; Caldwell, Jeremy S.; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhou, Yingyao; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    The growing resistance to current first-line antimalarial drugs represents a major health challenge. To facilitate the discovery of new antimalarials, we have implemented an efficient and robust high-throughput cell-based screen (1,536-well format) based on proliferation of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) in erythrocytes. From a screen of ≈1.7 million compounds, we identified a diverse collection of ≈6,000 small molecules comprised of >530 distinct scaffolds, all of which show potent antimalarial activity (<1.25 μM). Most known antimalarials were identified in this screen, thus validating our approach. In addition, we identified many novel chemical scaffolds, which likely act through both known and novel pathways. We further show that in some cases the mechanism of action of these antimalarials can be determined by in silico compound activity profiling. This method uses large datasets from unrelated cellular and biochemical screens and the guilt-by-association principle to predict which cellular pathway and/or protein target is being inhibited by select compounds. In addition, the screening method has the potential to provide the malaria community with many new starting points for the development of biological probes and drugs with novel antiparasitic activities. PMID:18579783

  2. In Silico Modeling of Liver Metabolism in a Human Disease Reveals a Key Enzyme for Histidine and Histamine Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pagliarini, Roberto; Castello, Raffaele; Napolitano, Francesco; Borzone, Roberta; Annunziata, Patrizia; Mandrile, Giorgia; De Marchi, Mario; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; di Bernardo, Diego

    2016-06-07

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I (PH1) is an autosomal-recessive inborn error of liver metabolism caused by alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT) deficiency. In silico modeling of liver metabolism in PH1 recapitulated accumulation of known biomarkers as well as alteration of histidine and histamine levels, which we confirmed in vitro, in vivo, and in PH1 patients. AGT-deficient mice showed decreased vascular permeability, a readout of in vivo histamine activity. Histamine reduction is most likely caused by increased catabolism of the histamine precursor histidine, triggered by rerouting of alanine flux from AGT to the glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT, also known as the alanine-transaminase ALT). Alanine administration reduces histamine levels in wild-type mice, while overexpression of GPT in PH1 mice increases plasma histidine, normalizes histamine levels, restores vascular permeability, and decreases urinary oxalate levels. Our work demonstrates that genome-scale metabolic models are clinically relevant and can link genotype to phenotype in metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. In silico modelling of prostacyclin and other lipid mediators to nuclear receptors reveal novel thyroid hormone receptor antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Perez Diaz, Noelia; Zloh, Mire; Patel, Pryank; Mackenzie, Louise S

    2016-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a key mediator involved in cardiovascular homeostasis, acting predominantly on two receptor types; cell surface IP receptor and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ. Having a very short half-life, direct methods to determine its long term effects on cells is difficult, and little is known of its interactions with nuclear receptors. Here we used computational chemistry methods to investigate the potential for PGI2, beraprost (IP receptor agonist), and GW0742 (PPARβ/δ agonist), to bind to nuclear receptors, confirmed with pharmacological methods. In silico screening predicted that PGI2, beraprost, and GW0742 have the potential to bind to different nuclear receptors, in particular thyroid hormone β receptor (TRβ) and thyroid hormone α receptor (TRα). Docking analysis predicts a binding profile to residues thought to have allosteric control on the TR ligand binding site. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that beraprost and GW0742 display TRβ and TRα antagonistic properties; beraprost IC50 6.3 × 10(-5)mol/L and GW0742 IC50 4.9 × 10(-6) mol/L. Changes to triiodothyronine (T3) induced vasodilation of rat mesenteric arteries measured on the wire myograph were measured in the presence of the TR antagonist MLS000389544 (10(-5) mol/L), beraprost (10(-5) mol/L) and GW0742 (10(-5) mol/L); all significantly inhibited T3 induced vasodilation compared to controls. We have shown that both beraprost and GW0742 exhibit TRβ and TRα antagonist behaviour, and suggests that PGI2 has the ability to affect the long term function of cells through binding to and inactivating thyroid hormone receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. In silico and experimental methods revealed highly diverse bacteria with quorum sensing and aromatics biodegradation systems--a potential broad application on bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yili; Zeng, Yanhua; Yu, Zhiliang; Zhang, Jing; Feng, Hao; Lin, Xiuchun

    2013-11-01

    Phylogenetic overlaps between aromatics-degrading bacteria and acyl-homoserine-lactone (AHL) or autoinducer (AI) based quorum-sensing (QS) bacteria were evident in literatures; however, the diversity of bacteria with both activities had never been finely described. In-silico searching in NCBI genome database revealed that more than 11% of investigated population harbored both aromatic ring-hydroxylating-dioxygenase (RHD) gene and AHL/AI-synthetase gene. These bacteria were distributed in 10 orders, 15 families, 42 genus and 78 species. Horizontal transfers of both genes were common among them. Using enrichment and culture dependent method, 6 Sphingomonadales and 4 Rhizobiales with phenanthrene- or pyrene-degrading ability and AHL-production were isolated from marine, wetland and soil samples. Thin-layer-chromatography and gas-chromatography-mass-spectrum revealed that these Sphingomonads produced various AHL molecules. This is the first report of highly diverse bacteria that harbored both aromatics-degrading and QS systems. QS regulation may have broad impacts on aromatics biodegradation, and would be a new angle for developing bioremediation technology.

  5. Integrated in silico analyses of regulatory and metabolic networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 reveal relationships between gene centrality and essentiality

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hyun-Seob; McClure, Ryan S.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Overall, Christopher C.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2015-03-27

    Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as ‘topologically important.’ Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termed as ‘functionally important’ genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.

  6. Integrated in silico analyses of regulatory and metabolic networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 reveal relationships between gene centrality and essentiality

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Hyun-Seob; McClure, Ryan S.; Bernstein, Hans C.; ...

    2015-03-27

    Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as ‘topologically important.’ Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termedmore » as ‘functionally important’ genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.« less

  7. In silico screening reveals structurally diverse, nanomolar inhibitors of NQO2 that are functionally active in cells and can modulate NFκB signalling

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Karen A.; Dunstan, Mark S.; Caraher, Mary C.; Scott, Katherine A.; Leys, David; Stratford, Ian J.

    2011-01-01

    The NCI chemical database has been screened using in silico docking to identify novel nanomolar inhibitors of NRH:quinone oxidoreductase 2 (NQO2). The inhibitors identified from the screen exhibit a diverse range of scaffolds and the structure of one of the inhibitors, NSC13000 co-crystalized with NQO2, has been solved. This has been used to aid the generation of a structure/activity relationship between the computationally derived binding affinity and experimentally measured enzyme inhibitory potency. Many of the compounds are functionally active as inhibitors of NQO2 in cells at non toxic concentrations. To demonstrate this, advantage was taken of the NQO2-mediated toxicity of the chemotherapeutic drug CB1954. The toxicity of this drug is substantially reduced when the function of NQO2 is inhibited and many of the compounds achieve this in cells at nanomolar concentrations. The NQO2 inhibitors also attenuated TNFα-mediated, NFκB-driven transcriptional activity. The link between NQO2 and the regulation of NFκB was confirmed by using siRNA to NQO2 and by the observation that NRH, the cofactor for NQO2 enzyme activity, could regulate NFκB activity in an NQO2 dependent manner. NFκB is a potential therapeutic target and this study reveals an underlying mechanism that may exploitable for developing new anti-cancer drugs. PMID:22090421

  8. Integrated in silico Analyses of Regulatory and Metabolic Networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 Reveal Relationships between Gene Centrality and Essentiality

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Seob; McClure, Ryan S.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Overall, Christopher C.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as “topologically important.” Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termed as “functionally important” genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles. PMID:25826650

  9. Metabolomics and In-Silico Analysis Reveal Critical Energy Deregulations in Animal Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Poliquin, Pierre O.; Chen, Jingkui; Cloutier, Mathieu; Trudeau, Louis-Éric; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a multifactorial disease known to result from a variety of factors. Although age is the principal risk factor, other etiological mechanisms have been identified, including gene mutations and exposure to toxins. Deregulation of energy metabolism, mostly through the loss of complex I efficiency, is involved in disease progression in both the genetic and sporadic forms of the disease. In this study, we investigated energy deregulation in the cerebral tissue of animal models (genetic and toxin induced) of PD using an approach that combines metabolomics and mathematical modelling. In a first step, quantitative measurements of energy-related metabolites in mouse brain slices revealed most affected pathways. A genetic model of PD, the Park2 knockout, was compared to the effect of CCCP, a complex I blocker. Model simulated and experimental results revealed a significant and sustained decrease in ATP after CCCP exposure, but not in the genetic mice model. In support to data analysis, a mathematical model of the relevant metabolic pathways was developed and calibrated onto experimental data. In this work, we show that a short-term stress response in nucleotide scavenging is most probably induced by the toxin exposure. In turn, the robustness of energy-related pathways in the model explains how genetic perturbations, at least in young animals, are not sufficient to induce significant changes at the metabolite level. PMID:23935941

  10. In silico Analysis of Combinatorial microRNA Activity Reveals Target Genes and Pathways Associated with Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dombkowski, Alan A.; Sultana, Zakia; Craig, Douglas B.; Jamil, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    This is an open access article. Unrestricted non-commercial use is permitted provided the original work is properly cited. Aberrant microRNA activity has been reported in many diseases, and studies often find numerous microRNAs concurrently dysregulated. Most target genes have binding sites for multiple microRNAs, and mounting evidence indicates that it is important to consider their combinatorial effect on target gene repression. A recent study associated the coincident loss of expression of six microRNAs with metastatic potential in breast cancer. Here, we used a new computational method, miR-AT!, to investigate combinatorial activity among this group of microRNAs. We found that the set of transcripts having multiple target sites for these microRNAs was significantly enriched with genes involved in cellular processes commonly perturbed in metastatic tumors: cell cycle regulation, cytoskeleton organization, and cell adhesion. Network analysis revealed numerous target genes upstream of cyclin D1 and c-Myc, indicating that the collective loss of the six microRNAs may have a focal effect on these two key regulatory nodes. A number of genes previously implicated in cancer metastasis are among the predicted combinatorial targets, including TGFB1, ARPC3, and RANKL. In summary, our analysis reveals extensive combinatorial interactions that have notable implications for their potential role in breast cancer metastasis and in therapeutic development. PMID:21552493

  11. In Silico Analysis of Missense Mutations in LPAR6 Reveals Abnormal Phospholipid Signaling Pathway Leading to Hypotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Syed Irfan; Muhammad, Dost; Jan, Abid; Ali, Raja Hussain; Hassan, Mubashir; Ahmad, Wasim; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hypotrichosis is a rare genetic irreversible hair loss disorder characterized by sparse scalp hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, and sparse axillary and body hair. The study, presented here, established genetic linkage in four families showing similar phenotypes to lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6) gene on chromosome 13q14.11-q21.32. Subsequently, sequence analysis of the gene revealed two previously reported missense mutations including p.D63V in affected members of one and p.I188F in three other families. Molecular modeling and docking analysis was performed to investigate binding of a ligand oleoyl-L-alpha-lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) to modeled protein structures of normal and mutated (D63V, G146R, I188F, N248Y, S3T, L277P) LPAR6 receptors. The mutant receptors showed a complete shift in orientation of LPA at the binding site. In addition, hydropathy analysis revealed a significant change in the membrane spanning topology of LPAR6 helical segments. The present study further substantiated involvement of LPAR6-LPA signaling in the pathogenesis of hypotrichosis/woolly hair and provided additional insight into the molecular mechanism of hair development. PMID:25119526

  12. Revealing controllable nanowire transformation through cationic exchange for RRAM application.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Chiu, Chung-Hua; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2014-05-14

    One dimensional metal oxide nanostructures have attracted much attention owing to their fascinating functional properties. Among them, piezoelectricity and photocatalysts along with their related materials have stirred significant interests and widespread studies in recent years. In this work, we successfully transformed piezoelectric ZnO into photocatalytic TiO2 and formed TiO2/ZnO axial heterostructure nanowires with flat interfaces by solid to solid cationic exchange reactions in high vacuum (approximately 10(-8) Torr) transmission electron microscope (TEM). Kinetic behavior of the single crystalline TiO2 was systematically analyzed. The nanoscale growth rate of TiO2 has been measured using in situ TEM videos. On the basis of the rate, we can control the dimensions of the axial-nanoheterostructure. In addition, the unique Pt/ ZnO / TiO2/ ZnO /Pt heterostructures with complementary resistive switching (CRS) characteristics were designed to solve the important issue of sneak-peak current. The resistive switching behavior was attributed to the migration of oxygen and TiO2 layer served as reservoir, which was confirmed by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis. This study not only supplied a distinct method to explore the transformation mechanisms but also exhibited the potential application of ZnO/TiO2 heterostructure in nanoscale crossbar array resistive random-access memory (RRAM).

  13. Cadmium-transformed cells in the in vitro cell transformation assay reveal different proliferative behaviours and activated pathways.

    PubMed

    Forcella, M; Callegaro, G; Melchioretto, P; Gribaldo, L; Frattini, M; Stefanini, F M; Fusi, P; Urani, C

    2016-10-01

    The in vitro Cell Transformation Assay (CTA) is a powerful tool for mechanistic studies of carcinogenesis. The endpoint is the classification of transformed colonies (foci) by means of standard morphological features. To increase throughput and reliability of CTAs, one of the suggested follow-up activities is to exploit the comprehension of the mechanisms underlying cell transformation. To this end, we have performed CTAs testing CdCl2, a widespread environmental contaminant classified as a human carcinogen with the underlying mechanisms of action not completely understood. We have isolated and re-seeded the cells at the end (6weeks) of in vitro CTAs to further identify the biochemical pathways underlying the transformed phenotype of foci. Morphological evaluations and proliferative assays confirmed the loss of contact-inhibition and the higher proliferative rate of transformed clones. The biochemical analysis of EGFR pathway revealed that, despite the same initial carcinogenic stimulus (1μM CdCl2 for 24h), transformed clones are characterized by the activation of two different molecular pathways: proliferation (Erk activation) or survival (Akt activation). Our preliminary results on molecular characterization of cell clones from different foci could be exploited for CTAs improvement, supporting the comprehension of the in vivo process and complementing the morphological evaluation of foci.

  14. Comparative genomics of oral isolates of Streptococcus mutans by in silico genome subtraction does not reveal accessory DNA associated with severe early childhood caries.

    PubMed

    Argimón, Silvia; Konganti, Kranti; Chen, Hao; Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Brown, Stuart; Caufield, Page W

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomics is a popular method for the identification of microbial virulence determinants, especially since the sequencing of a large number of whole bacterial genomes from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains has become relatively inexpensive. The bioinformatics pipelines for comparative genomics usually include gene prediction and annotation and can require significant computer power. To circumvent this, we developed a rapid method for genome-scale in silico subtractive hybridization, based on blastn and independent of feature identification and annotation. Whole genome comparisons by in silico genome subtraction were performed to identify genetic loci specific to Streptococcus mutans strains associated with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC), compared to strains isolated from caries-free (CF) children. The genome similarity of the 20 S. mutans strains included in this study, calculated by Simrank k-mer sharing, ranged from 79.5% to 90.9%, confirming this is a genetically heterogeneous group of strains. We identified strain-specific genetic elements in 19 strains, with sizes ranging from 200 to 39 kb. These elements contained protein-coding regions with functions mostly associated with mobile DNA. We did not, however, identify any genetic loci consistently associated with dental caries, i.e., shared by all the S-ECC strains and absent in the CF strains. Conversely, we did not identify any genetic loci specific with the healthy group. Comparison of previously published genomes from pathogenic and carriage strains of Neisseria meningitidis with our in silico genome subtraction yielded the same set of genes specific to the pathogenic strains, thus validating our method. Our results suggest that S. mutans strains derived from caries active or caries free dentitions cannot be differentiated based on the presence or absence of specific genetic elements. Our in silico genome subtraction method is available as the Microbial Genome Comparison (MGC) tool

  15. Comparative Genomics of Oral Isolates of Streptococcus mutans by in silico Genome Subtraction Does Not Reveal Accessory DNA Associated with Severe Early Childhood Caries

    PubMed Central

    Argimón, Silvia; Konganti, Kranti; Chen, Hao; Alekseyenko, Alexander V.; Brown, Stuart; Caufield, Page W.

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomics is a popular method for the identification of microbial virulence determinants, especially since the sequencing of a large number of whole bacterial genomes from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains has become relatively inexpensive. The bioinformatics pipelines for comparative genomics usually include gene prediction and annotation and can require significant computer power. To circumvent this, we developed a rapid method for genome-scale in silico subtractive hybridization, based on blastn and independent of feature identification and annotation. Whole genome comparisons by in silico genome subtraction were performed to identify genetic loci specific to Streptococcus mutans strains associated with severe early childhood caries (S-ECC), compared to strains isolated from caries-free (CF) children. The genome similarity of the 20 S. mutans strains included in this study, calculated by Simrank k-mer sharing, ranged from 79.5 to 90.9%, confirming this is a genetically heterogeneous group of strains. We identified strain-specific genetic elements in 19 strains, with sizes ranging from 200 bp to 39 kb. These elements contained protein-coding regions with functions mostly associated with mobile DNA. We did not, however, identify any genetic loci consistently associated with dental caries, i.e., shared by all the S-ECC strains and absent in the CF strains. Conversely, we did not identify any genetic loci specific with the healthy group. Comparison of previously published genomes from pathogenic and carriage strains of Neisseria meningitidis with our in silico genome subtraction yielded the same set of genes specific to the pathogenic strains, thus validating our method. Our results suggest that S. mutans strains derived from caries active or caries free dentitions cannot be differentiated based on the presence or absence of specific genetic elements. Our in silico genome subtraction method is available as the Microbial Genome Comparison (MGC) tool

  16. TRANSFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    LACKS,S.A.

    2003-10-09

    Transformation, which alters the genetic makeup of an individual, is a concept that intrigues the human imagination. In Streptococcus pneumoniae such transformation was first demonstrated. Perhaps our fascination with genetics derived from our ancestors observing their own progeny, with its retention and assortment of parental traits, but such interest must have been accelerated after the dawn of agriculture. It was in pea plants that Gregor Mendel in the late 1800s examined inherited traits and found them to be determined by physical elements, or genes, passed from parents to progeny. In our day, the material basis of these genetic determinants was revealed to be DNA by the lowly bacteria, in particular, the pneumococcus. For this species, transformation by free DNA is a sexual process that enables cells to sport new combinations of genes and traits. Genetic transformation of the type found in S. pneumoniae occurs naturally in many species of bacteria (70), but, initially only a few other transformable species were found, namely, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, Neisseria gonorrheae, and Bacillus subtilis (96). Natural transformation, which requires a set of genes evolved for the purpose, contrasts with artificial transformation, which is accomplished by shocking cells either electrically, as in electroporation, or by ionic and temperature shifts. Although such artificial treatments can introduce very small amounts of DNA into virtually any type of cell, the amounts introduced by natural transformation are a million-fold greater, and S. pneumoniae can take up as much as 10% of its cellular DNA content (40).

  17. A comparative assessment of the transformation products of S-metolachlor and its commercial product Mercantor Gold(®) and their fate in the aquatic environment by employing a combination of experimental and in silico methods.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Lukasz; Olsson, Oliver; Leder, Christoph; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2015-02-15

    Even appropriately used, pesticides can enter the surface and groundwater by several routes where photochemical degradation along with biotic processes contributes to their fate, resulting sometimes in the formation of stable transformation products (TPs). Yet, little is known about S-metolachlor (SM) transformation in the aquatic environment. Furthermore, commercial formulation of a pesticide might have different physical and biological properties compared to its pure grade. The present study assessed the biodegradability of the pure SM and its commercial product Mercantor Gold(®) (MG) by employing two OECD biodegradation (301D, F) tests. Photolysis in water was investigated by using a Xe lamp. Subsequently the biodegradability of the photolysis mixtures was examined. The primary elimination of SM was monitored and structures of its TPs were elucidated by HPLC-UV-MS/MS. Additionally, a set of in silico prediction programs was applied for supporting analytical results and toxicity assessment of SM and TPs. S-metolachlor and Mercantor Gold(®) were not biodegraded. HPLC-UV analysis showed higher elimination of SM in MG compared to pure SM during photolysis. A total of 10 photo-TPs of SM and MG were identified. According to MS data and in silico predictions, chemical structures were proposed for all found photo-TPs. Likewise for the parent compounds, no biodegradation has been observed for their photo-TPs. However, in the 301F test new bio-TPs have been generated from photo-TPs which were observed for the first time according to authors' best knowledge. The results suggest that the MG formulation does not affect the biodegradation process, but it influences the photolysis efficiency and potentially might result in faster formation of TPs in the environment. This study also demonstrates that photo-TPs can be further transformed into new products due to bacterial activity in the water phase. Moreover biotransformation might lead to an increased toxicity compared with

  18. Empirical testing of 16S rRNA gene PCR primer pairs reveals variance in target specificity and efficacy not suggested by in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Morales, Sergio E; Holben, William E

    2009-05-01

    Phylogenetic and "fingerprinting" analyses of the 16S rRNA genes of prokaryotes have been a mainstay of microbial ecology during the last two decades. However, many methods and results from studies that rely on the 16S rRNA gene for detection and quantification of specific microbial taxa have seemingly received only cursory or even no validation. To directly examine the efficacy and specificity of 16S rRNA gene-based primers for phylum-, class-, and operational taxonomic unit-specific target amplification in quantitative PCR, we created a collection of primers based solely on an extensive soil bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone library containing approximately 5,000 sequences from a single soil sample (i.e., a closed site-specific library was used to create PCR primers for use at this site). These primers were initially tested in silico prior to empirical testing by PCR amplification of known target sequences and of controls based on disparate phylogenetic groups. Although all primers were highly specific according to the in silico analysis, the empirical analyses clearly exhibited a high degree of nonspecificity for many of the phyla or classes, while other primers proved to be highly specific. These findings suggest that significant care must be taken when interpreting studies whose results were obtained with target specific primers that were not adequately validated, especially where population densities or dynamics have been inferred from the data. Further, we suggest that the reliability of quantification of specific target abundance using 16S rRNA-based quantitative PCR is case specific and must be determined through rigorous empirical testing rather than solely in silico.

  19. In Silico and Wet Lab Studies Reveal the Cholesterol Lowering Efficacy of Lauric Acid, a Medium Chain Fat of Coconut Oil.

    PubMed

    Lekshmi Sheela, Devi; Nazeem, Puthiyaveetil Abdulla; Narayanankutty, Arunaksharan; Manalil, Jeksy Jos; Raghavamenon, Achuthan C

    2016-12-01

    The coconut oil (CO) contains 91 % of saturated fatty acids in which 72 % are medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) like lauric, capric and caprylic acids. In contrast to animal fat, coconut oil has no cholesterol. Despite this fact, CO is sidelined among other vegetable oils due to the health hazards attributed to the saturated fatty acids. Though various medicinal effects of CO have been reported including the hypolipidemic activity, people are still confused in the consumption of this natural oil. In silico analyses and wet lab experiments have been carried out to identify the hypolipidemic properties of MCFAs and phenolic acids in CO by using different protein targets involved in cholesterol synthesis. The molecular docking studies were carried out using CDOCKER protocol in Accelery's Discovery Studio, by taking different proteins like HMG- CoA reductase and cholesterol esterase as targets and the different phytocompounds in coconut as ligands. Molecular docking highlighted the potential of lauric acid in inhibiting the protein targets involved in hyperlipidemics. Further, validation of in silico results was carried out through in vivo studies. The activity of key enzymes HMG- CoA reductase and lipoprotein lipase were found reduced in animals fed with lauric acid and CO.

  20. Combined Virtual and Experimental Screening for CK1 Inhibitors Identifies a Modulator of p53 and Reveals Important Aspects of in Silico Screening Performance.

    PubMed

    Myrianthopoulos, Vassilios; Lozach, Olivier; Zareifi, Danae; Alexopoulos, Leonidas; Meijer, Laurent; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Mikros, Emmanuel

    2017-10-06

    A compound collection of pronounced structural diversity was comprehensively screened for inhibitors of the DNA damage-related kinase CK1. The collection was evaluated in vitro. A potent and selective CK1 inhibitor was discovered and its capacity to modulate the endogenous levels of the CK1-regulated tumor suppressor p53 was demonstrated in cancer cell lines. Administration of 10 μM of the compound resulted in significant increase of p53 levels, reaching almost 2-fold in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. In parallel to experimental screening, two representative and orthogonal in silico screening methodologies were implemented for enabling the retrospective assessment of virtual screening performance on a case-specific basis. Results showed that both techniques performed at an acceptable and fairly comparable level, with a slight advantage of the structure-based over the ligand-based approach. However, both approaches demonstrated notable sensitivity upon parameters such as screening template choice and treatment of redundancy in the enumerated compound collection. An effort to combine insight derived by sequential implementation of the two methods afforded poor further improvement of screening performance. Overall, the presented assessment highlights the relation between improper use of enrichment metrics and misleading results, and demonstrates the inherent delicacy of in silico methods, emphasizing the challenging character of virtual screening protocol optimization.

  1. In Silico and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Mapping Reveals Collinearity between the Pennisetum squamulatum Apomixis Carrier-Chromosome and Chromosome 2 of Sorghum and Foxtail Millet

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Sirjan; Conner, Joann A.; Hanna, Wayne W.; Simon, Bindu; Fengler, Kevin; Deschamps, Stéphane; Cigan, Mark; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis, or clonal propagation through seed, is a trait identified within multiple species of the grass family (Poaceae). The genetic locus controlling apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum (syn Cenchrus squamulatus) and Cenchrus ciliaris (syn Pennisetum ciliare, buffelgrass) is the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). Previously, the ASGR was shown to be highly conserved but inverted in marker order between P. squamulatum and C. ciliaris based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and varied in both karyotype and position of the ASGR on the ASGR-carrier chromosome among other apomictic Cenchrus/Pennisetum species. Using in silico transcript mapping and verification of physical positions of some of the transcripts via FISH, we discovered that the ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum is collinear with chromosome 2 of foxtail millet and sorghum outside of the ASGR. The in silico ordering of the ASGR-carrier chromosome markers, previously unmapped in P. squamulatum, allowed for the identification of a backcross line with structural changes to the P. squamulatum ASGR-carrier chromosome derived from gamma irradiated pollen. PMID:27031857

  2. In Silico and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Mapping Reveals Collinearity between the Pennisetum squamulatum Apomixis Carrier-Chromosome and Chromosome 2 of Sorghum and Foxtail Millet.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Sirjan; Conner, Joann A; Hanna, Wayne W; Simon, Bindu; Fengler, Kevin; Deschamps, Stéphane; Cigan, Mark; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis, or clonal propagation through seed, is a trait identified within multiple species of the grass family (Poaceae). The genetic locus controlling apomixis in Pennisetum squamulatum (syn Cenchrus squamulatus) and Cenchrus ciliaris (syn Pennisetum ciliare, buffelgrass) is the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). Previously, the ASGR was shown to be highly conserved but inverted in marker order between P. squamulatum and C. ciliaris based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and varied in both karyotype and position of the ASGR on the ASGR-carrier chromosome among other apomictic Cenchrus/Pennisetum species. Using in silico transcript mapping and verification of physical positions of some of the transcripts via FISH, we discovered that the ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum is collinear with chromosome 2 of foxtail millet and sorghum outside of the ASGR. The in silico ordering of the ASGR-carrier chromosome markers, previously unmapped in P. squamulatum, allowed for the identification of a backcross line with structural changes to the P. squamulatum ASGR-carrier chromosome derived from gamma irradiated pollen.

  3. Along Strike Heterogeneity of Seismic Slip Revealed by Oceanic Transform Fault Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aderhold, K.; Abercrombie, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Oceanic transform faults (OTFs) are considered to have relatively simple structure [thermal, geometric, compositional], with the brittle-ductile transition defined by the 600-800ºC isotherm. Earthquakes on these faults account for less than half of the expected slip (Boettcher & Jordan, 2004), leaving the majority of motion to be accommodated aseismically. The 2015 MW7.1 Charlie-Gibbs transform earthquake is the latest of seven large [M≥6.25] earthquakes that form two quasi-repeating sequences dating back to 1920. These two sequences are separated by a region of persistent aseismicity in the center of the transform, interpreted to be a rupture barrier that prevents the full extent of the transform from rupturing in a single earthquake. However, aseismic rupture barriers alone cannot account for the inferred deficit in the seismic budget of OTFs. A growing catalogue of slip distributions has revealed distinctive behavior for large OTF earthquakes. We present evidence from teleseismic body wave modeling for directivity and slip distribution of four MW ≥ 7.0 oceanic strike-slip earthquakes: the 2015 MW7.1 Charlie-Gibbs transform earthquake in the North Atlantic, the 2015 MW7.0 Fourier transform earthquake in the South Atlantic, and the 2013 MW7.3 and 2006 MW7.4 South Sandwich transform earthquakes in the Southern Ocean. Each earthquake initiates near the ridge with nominal slip then propagates unilaterally to rupture larger asperities nearer the middle of the transform, similar to behavior observed for the 1994 MW7.0 Romanche transform earthquake. Significant continental strike-slip earthquakes, such as the 2002 MW7.9 Denali earthquake and the 2001 MW7.8 Kunlun earthquake, also exhibit unilateral ruptures with a small initial slip. The slip distributions of large oceanic transform earthquakes suggest that seismic coupling of OTFs varies considerably along strike, with large slip asperities separated by areas of little or no slip. Substantial earthquakes are not

  4. Initial hazard screening for genotoxicity of photo-transformation products of ciprofloxacin by applying a combination of experimental and in-silico testing.

    PubMed

    Toolaram, Anju Priya; Haddad, Tarek; Leder, Christoph; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic found within μg/L concentration range in the aquatic environment. It is a known contributor of umuC induction in hospital wastewater samples. CIP can undergo photolysis to result in many transformation products (TPs) of mostly unknown toxicity. The aims of this study were to determine the genotoxicity of the UV mixtures and to understand the possible genotoxic role of the stable TPs. As such, CIP and its UV-irradiated mixtures were investigated in a battery of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in vitro assays. The combination index (CI) analysis of residual CIP in the irradiated mixtures was performed for the umu assay. Further, Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) predicted selected genotoxicity endpoints of the identified TPs. CIP achieved primary elimination after 128 min of irradiation but was not completely mineralized. Nine photo-TPs were identified. The irradiated mixtures were neither mutagenic in the Ames test nor genotoxic in the in vitro micronucleus (MN) test. Like CIP, the irradiated mixtures were umuC inducing. The CI analysis revealed that the irradiated mixtures and the corresponding CIP concentration in the mixtures shared similar umuC potentials. QSAR predictions suggested that the TPs may be capable of inducing chromosome aberration, MN in vivo, bacterial mutation and mammalian mutation. However, the experimental testing for a few genotoxic endpoints did not show significant genotoxic activity for the TPs present as a component of the whole mixture analysis and therefore, further genotoxic endpoints may need to be investigated to fully confirm this.

  5. In silico analysis of the genes encoding proteins that are involved in the biosynthesis of the RMS/MAX/D pathway revealed new roles of Strigolactones in plants.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Marek; Muszynska, Aleksandra

    2015-03-25

    Strigolactones were described as a new group of phytohormones in 2008 and since then notable large number of their functions has been uncovered, including the regulation of plant growth and development, interactions with other organisms and a plant's response to different abiotic stresses. In the last year, investigations of the strigolactone biosynthesis pathway in two model species, Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa, resulted in great progress in understanding the functions of four enzymes that are involved in this process. We performed in silico analyses, including the identification of the cis-regulatory elements in the promoters of genes encoding proteins of the strigolactone biosynthesis pathway and the identification of the miRNAs that are able to regulate their posttranscriptional level. We also searched the databases that contain the microarray data for the genes that were analyzed from both species in order to check their expression level under different growth conditions. The results that were obtained indicate that there are universal regulations of expression of all of the genes that are involved in the strigolactone biosynthesis in Arabidopsis and rice, but on the other hand each stage of strigolactone production may be additionally regulated independently. This work indicates the presence of crosstalk between strigolactones and almost all of the other phytohormones and suggests the role of strigolactones in the response to abiotic stresses, such as wounding, cold or flooding, as well as in the response to biotic stresses.

  6. Unusual molecular material formed through irreversible transformation and revealed by 4D electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Renske M; Tissot, Antoine; Hauser, Andreas; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2013-05-28

    Four-dimensional (4D) electron microscopy (EM) uniquely combines the high spatial resolution to pinpoint individual nano-objects, with the high temporal resolution necessary to address the dynamics of their laser-induced transformation. Here, using 4D-EM, we demonstrate the in situ irreversible transformation of individual nanoparticles of the molecular framework Fe(pyrazine)Pt(CN)4. The newly formed material exhibits an unusually large negative thermal expansion (i.e. contraction), which is revealed by time-resolved imaging and diffraction. Negative thermal expansion is a unique property exhibited by only few materials. Here we show that the increased flexibility of the metal-cyanide framework after the removal of the bridging pyrazine ligands is responsible for the negative thermal expansion behavior of the new material. This in situ visualization of single nanostructures during reactions should be extendable to other classes of reactive systems.

  7. In silico Analysis of HIV-1 Env-gp120 Reveals Structural Bases for Viral Adaptation in Growth-Restrictive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Masaru; Nomaguchi, Masako; Doi, Naoya; Kanda, Tadahito; Adachi, Akio; Sato, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    Variable V1/V2 and V3 loops on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope-gp120 core play key roles in modulating viral competence to recognize two infection receptors, CD4 and chemokine-receptors. However, molecular bases for the modulation largely remain unclear. To address these issues, we constructed structural models for a full-length gp120 in CD4-free and -bound states. The models showed topologies of gp120 surface loop that agree with those in reported structural data. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that in the unliganded state, V1/V2 loop settled into a thermodynamically stable arrangement near V3 loop for conformational masking of V3 tip, a potent neutralization epitope. In the CD4-bound state, however, V1/V2 loop was rearranged near the bound CD4 to support CD4 binding. In parallel, cell-based adaptation in the absence of anti-viral antibody pressures led to the identification of amino acid substitutions that individually enhance viral entry and growth efficiencies in association with reduced sensitivity to CCR5 antagonist TAK-779. Notably, all these substitutions were positioned on the receptors binding surfaces in V1/V2 or V3 loop. In silico structural studies predicted some physical changes of gp120 by substitutions with alterations in viral replication phenotypes. These data suggest that V1/V2 loop is critical for creating a gp120 structure that masks co-receptor binding site compatible with maintenance of viral infectivity, and for tuning a functional balance of gp120 between immune escape ability and infectivity to optimize HIV-1 replication fitness. PMID:26903989

  8. In silico Analysis Revealed High-risk Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Human Pentraxin-3 Gene and their Impact on Innate Immune Response against Microbial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Raman; Shankar, Jata

    2016-01-01

    Pentraxin-3 (PTX-3) protein is an evolutionary conserved protein that acts as a soluble pattern-recognition receptor for pathogens and plays important role in innate immune response. It recognizes various pathogens by interacting with extracellular moieties such as glactomannan of conidia (Aspergillus fumigatus), lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia and Salmonella typhimurium. Thus, PTX-3 protein helps to clear these pathogens by activating downstream innate immune process. In this study, computational methods were used to analyze various non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in PTX-3 gene. Three different databases were used to retrieve SNP data sets followed by seven different in silico algorithms to screen nsSNPs in PTX-3 gene. Sequence homology based approach was used to identify nsSNPs. Conservation profile of PTX-3 protein amino acid residues were predicted by ConSurf web server. In total, 10 high-risk nsSNPs were identified in pentraxin-domain of PTX-3 gene. Out of these 10 high-risk nsSNPs, 4 were present in the conserved structural and functional residues of the pentraxin-domain, hence, selected for structural analyses. The results showed alteration in the putative structure of pentraxin-domain. Prediction of protein–protein interactions analysis showed association of PTX-3 protein with C1q component of complement pathway. Different functional and structural residues along with various putative phosphorylation sites and evolutionary relationship were also predicted for PTX-3 protein. This is the first extensive computational analyses of pentraxin protein family with nsSNPs and will serve as a valuable resource for future population based studies. PMID:26941719

  9. Transformation products in the water cycle and the unsolved problem of their proactive assessment: A combined in vitro/in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Menz, Jakob; Toolaram, Anju Priya; Rastogi, Tushar; Leder, Christoph; Olsson, Oliver; Kümmerer, Klaus; Schneider, Mandy

    2017-01-01

    Transformation products (TPs) emerging from incomplete degradation of micropollutants in aquatic systems can retain the biological activity of the parent compound, or may even possess new unexpected toxic properties. The chemical identities of these substances remain largely unknown, and consequently, the risks caused by their presence in the water cycle cannot be assessed thoroughly. In this study, a combined approach for the proactive identification of hazardous elements in the chemical structures of TPs, comprising analytical, bioanalytical and computational methods, was assessed by the example of the pharmaceutically active micropollutant propranolol (PPL). PPL was photo-transformed using ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and 115 newly formed TPs were monitored in the reaction mixtures by LC-MS analysis. The reaction mixtures were screened for emerging effects using a battery of in vitro bioassays and the occurrence of cytotoxic and mutagenic activities in bacteria was found to be significantly correlated with the occurrence of specific TPs during the treatment process. The follow-up analysis of structure-activity-relationships further illustrated that only small chemical transformations, such as the hydroxylation or the oxidative opening of an aromatic ring system, could substantially alter the biological effects of micropollutants in aquatic systems. In conclusion, more efforts should be made to prevent the occurrence and transformation of micropollutants in the water cycle and to identify the principal degradation pathways leading to their toxicological activation. With regard to the latter, the judicious combination of bioanalytical and computational tools represents an appealing approach that should be developed further.

  10. In silico screening for palmitoyl substrates reveals a role for DHHC1/3/10 (zDHHC1/3/11)-mediated neurochondrin palmitoylation in its targeting to Rab5-positive endosomes.

    PubMed

    Oku, Shinichiro; Takahashi, Naoki; Fukata, Yuko; Fukata, Masaki

    2013-07-05

    Protein palmitoylation, a common post-translational lipid modification, plays an important role in protein trafficking and functions. Recently developed palmitoyl-proteomic methods identified many novel substrates. However, the whole picture of palmitoyl substrates has not been clarified. Here, we performed global in silico screening using the CSS-Palm 2.0 program, free software for prediction of palmitoylation sites, and selected 17 candidates as novel palmitoyl substrates. Of the 17 candidates, 10 proteins, including 6 synaptic proteins (Syd-1, transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) γ-2, TARP γ-8, cornichon-2, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα, and neurochondrin (Ncdn)/norbin), one focal adhesion protein (zyxin), two ion channels (TRPM8 and TRPC1), and one G-protein-coupled receptor (orexin 2 receptor), were palmitoylated. Using the DHHC palmitoylating enzyme library, we found that all tested substrates were palmitoylated by the Golgi-localized DHHC3/7 subfamily. Ncdn, a regulator for neurite outgrowth and synaptic plasticity, was robustly palmitoylated by the DHHC1/10 (zDHHC1/11; z1/11) subfamily, whose substrate has not yet been reported. As predicted by CSS-Palm 2.0, Cys-3 and Cys-4 are the palmitoylation sites for Ncdn. Ncdn was specifically localized in somato-dendritic regions, not in the axon of rat cultured neurons. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy revealed that Ncdn was localized to Rab5-positive early endosomes in a palmitoylation-dependent manner, where DHHC1/10 (z1/11) were also distributed. Knockdown of DHHC1, -3, or -10 (z11) resulted in the loss of Ncdn from Rab5-positive endosomes. Thus, through in silico screening, we demonstrate that Ncdn and the DHHC1/10 (z1/11) and DHHC3/7 subfamilies are novel palmitoyl substrate-enzyme pairs and that Ncdn palmitoylation plays an essential role in its specific endosomal targeting.

  11. In Silico Screening for Palmitoyl Substrates Reveals a Role for DHHC1/3/10 (zDHHC1/3/11)-mediated Neurochondrin Palmitoylation in Its Targeting to Rab5-positive Endosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Oku, Shinichiro; Takahashi, Naoki; Fukata, Yuko; Fukata, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Protein palmitoylation, a common post-translational lipid modification, plays an important role in protein trafficking and functions. Recently developed palmitoyl-proteomic methods identified many novel substrates. However, the whole picture of palmitoyl substrates has not been clarified. Here, we performed global in silico screening using the CSS-Palm 2.0 program, free software for prediction of palmitoylation sites, and selected 17 candidates as novel palmitoyl substrates. Of the 17 candidates, 10 proteins, including 6 synaptic proteins (Syd-1, transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein (TARP) γ-2, TARP γ-8, cornichon-2, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα, and neurochondrin (Ncdn)/norbin), one focal adhesion protein (zyxin), two ion channels (TRPM8 and TRPC1), and one G-protein-coupled receptor (orexin 2 receptor), were palmitoylated. Using the DHHC palmitoylating enzyme library, we found that all tested substrates were palmitoylated by the Golgi-localized DHHC3/7 subfamily. Ncdn, a regulator for neurite outgrowth and synaptic plasticity, was robustly palmitoylated by the DHHC1/10 (zDHHC1/11; z1/11) subfamily, whose substrate has not yet been reported. As predicted by CSS-Palm 2.0, Cys-3 and Cys-4 are the palmitoylation sites for Ncdn. Ncdn was specifically localized in somato-dendritic regions, not in the axon of rat cultured neurons. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy revealed that Ncdn was localized to Rab5-positive early endosomes in a palmitoylation-dependent manner, where DHHC1/10 (z1/11) were also distributed. Knockdown of DHHC1, -3, or -10 (z11) resulted in the loss of Ncdn from Rab5-positive endosomes. Thus, through in silico screening, we demonstrate that Ncdn and the DHHC1/10 (z1/11) and DHHC3/7 subfamilies are novel palmitoyl substrate-enzyme pairs and that Ncdn palmitoylation plays an essential role in its specific endosomal targeting. PMID:23687301

  12. The Early ULF Signal of the Gigantic Jets Revealed By Hilbert-Huang Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po-Hsun; Bing-Chih Chen, Alfred

    2015-04-01

    The conventional Fourier analysis on the sferics in ULF and VLF bandpasses has been done for years. Several phenomena e.g. whistler and Schumann resonance have been well studied by the Fourier spectrum comprehensively. But the Fourier analysis is computed by an integration over time, therefore, the temporal resolution is smoothed, and limited not only by the sampling rate but also the size of the integration window. The instantaneous frequency can't be obtained through this conventional approach. We introduce the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) instead of Fourier transform to analyze the sferics of TLEs recorded at Lulin observatory. The Hilbert-Huang transform decomposes a signal into so-called intrinsic mode functions (IMF), and derive instantaneous frequency data by differentiating the phase angle yielded by Hilbert transform. Our analysis of HHT on several gigantic jets recorded by ground observation surprisingly revealed an early signal of frequency-change during the phase of the leading jet, and this early signal can not be identified by Fourier analysis. In the phase of leading jet, the amplitude of the sferics remains a constant and no significant features are recognized in the recorded waveform, but an obvious frequency change about 100-200 millisecond prior to the main discharge of the full development jets (FDJs), which can be clearly recognized in the HHT spectra of all observed gigantic jets. From a further simulation, this frequency change is confirmed to come from the nature of the discharge, not an alias or a false signal generated by the analysis method. This early signal may implies an in-cloud discharge process which is suggested by Krehbiel et al. [2008

  13. Composite Medicago truncatula plants harbouring Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed roots reveal normal mycorrhization by Glomus intraradices

    PubMed Central

    Mrosk, Cornelia; Forner, Susanne; Hause, Gerd; Küster, Helge; Kopka, Joachim; Hause, Bettina

    2009-01-01

    Composite plants consisting of a wild-type shoot and a transgenic root are frequently used for functional genomics in legume research. Although transformation of roots using Agrobacterium rhizogenes leads to morphologically normal roots, the question arises as to whether such roots interact with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in the same way as wild-type roots. To address this question, roots transformed with a vector containing the fluorescence marker DsRed were used to analyse AM in terms of mycorrhization rate, morphology of fungal and plant subcellular structures, as well as transcript and secondary metabolite accumulations. Mycorrhization rate, appearance, and developmental stages of arbuscules were identical in both types of roots. Using Mt16kOLI1Plus microarrays, transcript profiling of mycorrhizal roots showed that 222 and 73 genes exhibited at least a 2-fold induction and less than half of the expression, respectively, most of them described as AM regulated in the same direction in wild-type roots. To verify this, typical AM marker genes were analysed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and revealed equal transcript accumulation in transgenic and wild-type roots. Regarding secondary metabolites, several isoflavonoids and apocarotenoids, all known to accumulate in mycorrhizal wild-type roots, have been found to be up-regulated in mycorrhizal in comparison with non-mycorrhizal transgenic roots. This set of data revealed a substantial similarity in mycorrhization of transgenic and wild-type roots of Medicago truncatula, validating the use of composite plants for studying AM-related effects. PMID:19574251

  14. In silico clustering of Salmonella global gene expression data reveals novel genes co-regulated with the SPI-1 virulence genes through HilD

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Sánchez-Pérez, Mishael; Paredes, Claudia C.; Collado-Vides, Julio; Salgado, Heladia; Bustamante, Víctor H.

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of Salmonella enterica serovars cause intestinal and systemic infections to humans and animals. Salmonella Patogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1) is a chromosomal region containing 39 genes that have crucial virulence roles. The AraC-like transcriptional regulator HilD, encoded in SPI-1, positively controls the expression of the SPI-1 genes, as well as of several other virulence genes located outside SPI-1. In this study, we applied a clustering method to the global gene expression data of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium from the COLOMBOS database; thus genes that show an expression pattern similar to that of SPI-1 genes were selected. This analysis revealed nine novel genes that are co-expressed with SPI-1, which are located in different chromosomal regions. Expression analyses and protein-DNA interaction assays showed regulation by HilD for six of these genes: gtgE, phoH, sinR, SL1263 (lpxR) and SL4247 were regulated directly, whereas SL1896 was regulated indirectly. Interestingly, phoH is an ancestral gene conserved in most of bacteria, whereas the other genes show characteristics of genes acquired by Salmonella. A role in virulence has been previously demonstrated for gtgE, lpxR and sinR. Our results further expand the regulon of HilD and thus identify novel possible Salmonella virulence genes. PMID:27886269

  15. Proteome approaches combined with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed a distinctive biofilm physiology in Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Serra, Diego Omar; Lücking, Genia; Weiland, Florian; Schulz, Stefan; Görg, Angelika; Yantorno, Osvaldo Miguel; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2008-12-01

    Proteome analysis was combined with whole-cell metabolic fingerprinting to gain insight into the physiology of mature biofilm in Bordetella pertussis, the agent responsible for whooping cough. Recent reports indicate that B. pertussis adopts a sessile biofilm as a strategy to persistently colonize the human host. However, since research in the past mainly focused on the planktonic lifestyle of B. pertussis, knowledge on biofilm formation of this important human pathogen is still limited. Comparative studies were carried out by combining 2-DE and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy with multivariate statistical methods. These complementary approaches demonstrated that biofilm development has a distinctive impact on B. pertussis physiology. Results from MALDI-TOF/MS identification of proteins together with results from FT-IR spectroscopy revealed the biosynthesis of a putative acidic-type polysaccharide polymer as the most distinctive trait of B. pertussis life in a biofilm. Additionally, expression of proteins known to be involved in cellular regulatory circuits, cell attachment and virulence was altered in sessile cells, which strongly suggests a significant impact of biofilm development on B. pertussis pathogenesis. In summary, our work showed that the combination of proteomics and FT-IR spectroscopy with multivariate statistical analysis provides a powerful tool to gain further insight into bacterial lifestyles.

  16. The Complexity of Posttranscriptional Small RNA Regulatory Networks Revealed by In Silico Analysis of Gossypium arboreum L. Leaf, Flower and Boll Small Regulatory RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongtao; Rashotte, Aaron M.; Singh, Narendra K.; Weaver, David B.; Goertzen, Leslie R.; Singh, Shree R.; Locy, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and secondary small interfering RNAs (principally phased siRNAs or trans-acting siRNAs) are two distinct subfamilies of small RNAs (sRNAs) that are emerging as key regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression in plants. Both miRNAs and secondary-siRNAs (sec-siRNAs) are processed from longer RNA precursors by DICER-LIKE proteins (DCLs). Gossypium arboreum L., also known as tree cotton or Asian cotton, is a diploid, possibly ancestral relative of tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L., the predominant type of commercially grown cotton worldwide known as upland cotton. To understand the biological significance of these gene regulators in G. arboreum, a bioinformatics analysis was performed on G. arboreum small RNAs produced from G. arboreum leaf, flower, and boll tissues. Consequently, 263 miRNAs derived from 353 precursors, including 155 conserved miRNAs (cs-miRNAs) and 108 novel lineage-specific miRNAs (ls-miRNAs). Along with miRNAs, 2,033 miRNA variants (isomiRNAs) were identified as well. Those isomiRNAs with variation at the 3’-miRNA end were expressed at the highest levels, compared to other types of variants. In addition, 755 pha-siRNAs derived 319 pha-siRNA gene transcripts (PGTs) were identified, and the potential pha-siRNA initiators were predicted. Also, 2,251 non-phased siRNAs were found as well, of which 1,088 appeared to be produced by so-called cis- or trans-cleavage of the PGTs observed at positions differing from pha-siRNAs. Of those sRNAs, 148 miRNAs/isomiRNAs and 274 phased/non-phased siRNAs were differentially expressed in one or more pairs of tissues examined. Target analysis revealed that target genes for both miRNAs and pha-siRNAs are involved a broad range of metabolic and enzymatic activities. We demonstrate that secondary siRNA production could result from initial cleavage of precursors by both miRNAs or isomiRNAs, and that subsequently produced phased and unphased siRNAs could result that also serve as triggers of a

  17. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy reveals biochemical changes associated with glioma stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kenig, Saša; Bedolla, Diana E; Birarda, Giovanni; Faoro, Valentina; Mitri, Elisa; Vindigni, Alessandro; Storici, Paola; Vaccari, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    According to the cancer stem cell theory malignant glioma is incurable because of the presence of the cancer stem cells - a subpopulation of cells that are resistant to therapy and cause the recurrence of a tumor after surgical resection. Several protein markers of cancer stem cell were reported but none of those is fully reliable to grade the content of stem cells in a tumor. Hereby we propose Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy as an alternative, labelfree, non-damaging and fast method to identify glioma stem cells based on their own spectral characteristics. The analysis of FTIR data revealed that in NCH421k cells, a model of glioma stem cells, the relative content of lipids is higher than in their all-trans retinoic acid-differentiated counterparts. Moreover, it has been assessed that stem cells have more rigid cellular membranes and more phosphorylated proteins, whereas after differentiation glycogen level increases. The ability of FTIR to estimate the content of stem cells in a heterogeneous sample, on the base of the identified spectral markers, and to classify stem and non-stem cells into two separate populations was probed. Although it was not possible to calculate the exact percentage of each subpopulation, we could clearly see that with the increasing amount of differentiated cells in a sample, more hits occupy the PC space previously identified as a space of differentiated cells. The present study is therefore an initial step towards the development of a FTIR based protocol in clinical practice to estimate the content of stem cells in a tumor sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. TRANSFORMER

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1959-08-25

    Transformers of a type adapted for use with extreme high power vacuum tubes where current requirements may be of the order of 2,000 to 200,000 amperes are described. The transformer casing has the form of a re-entrant section being extended through an opening in one end of the cylinder to form a coaxial terminal arrangement. A toroidal multi-turn primary winding is disposed within the casing in coaxial relationship therein. In a second embodiment, means are provided for forming the casing as a multi-turn secondary. The transformer is characterized by minimized resistance heating, minimized external magnetic flux, and an economical construction.

  19. Expression of immunoglobulin genes in the avian embryo bone marrow revealed by retroviral transformation.

    PubMed

    Benatar, T; Iacampo, S; Tkalec, L; Ratcliffe, M J

    1991-10-01

    Analysis of the early stages of avian B lymphocyte differentiation has been hampered by the low frequency of extra-bursal B lineage cells in sites of hematopoiesis. Consequently, little is known about B lineage precursors prior to their migration into the bursa of Fabricius. Colonization of the bursa typically occurs between about days 8 and 14 of embryonic (e) development, although cells which can colonize the bursa, functionally defined as pre-bursal stem cells, can be demonstrated in embryo bone marrow up until about the time of hatch. As a novel approach to analyzing early stages of avian B lymphocyte development, we show here that transformed B lineage cells can be derived from chick embryo bone marrow after infection in vitro with the replication-defective retrovirus REV-T produced in the context of the non-cytopathic CSV helper virus. Thus, exposure of day 14e-15e chick embryo bone marrow cells to REV-T (CSV) results in the generation of transformed, polyclonal lines of cells. From these lines, cells expressing cell surface immunoglobulin were readily isolated by flow cytometric cell sorting and single cell cloning. Analysis of the phenotype of REV-T(CSV)-transformed clones with a panel of monoclonal antibody reagents demonstrated that transformation by v-rel likely leads to marked changes in cell surface antigen expression. Nonetheless, clones expressing cell surface immunoglobulin expressed apparently normal mRNA for immunoglobulin mu and light chain and contained apparently normal immunoglobulin heavy and light chain gene rearrangements. Furthermore, no evidence for chromosomal deletions or aberrations of the Ig loci was detected among either sIg+ or sIg- REV-T(CSV)-transformed clones.

  20. The effects of healthy aging on mental imagery as revealed by egocentric and allocentric mental spatial transformations.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Luca; Tomasino, Barbara; Marusic, Nela; Eleopra, Roberto; Rumiati, Raffaella Ida

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies suggest that mental rotation can be accomplished by using different mental spatial transformations. When adopting the allocentric transformation, individuals imagine the stimulus rotation referring to its intrinsic coordinate frame, while when adopting the egocentric transformation they rely on multisensory and sensory-motor mechanisms. However, how these mental transformations evolve during healthy aging has received little attention. Here we investigated how visual, multisensory, and sensory-motor components of mental imagery change with normal aging. Fifteen elderly and 15 young participants were asked to perform two different laterality tasks within either an allocentric or an egocentric frame of reference. Participants had to judge either the handedness of a visual hand (egocentric task) or the location of a marker placed on the left or right side of the same visual hand (allocentric task). Both left and right hands were presented at various angular departures to the left, the right, or to the center of the screen. When performing the egocentric task, elderly participants were less accurate and slower for biomechanically awkward hand postures (i.e., lateral hand orientations). Their performance also decreased when stimuli were presented laterally. The findings revealed that healthy aging is associated with a specific degradation of sensory-motor mechanisms necessary to accomplish complex effector-centered mental transformations. Moreover, failure to find a difference in judging left or right hand laterality suggests that aging does not necessarily impair non-dominant hand sensory-motor programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Transformation-tolerant object recognition in rats revealed by visual priming.

    PubMed

    Tafazoli, Sina; Di Filippo, Alessandro; Zoccolan, Davide

    2012-01-04

    Successful use of rodents as models for studying object vision crucially depends on the ability of their visual system to construct representations of visual objects that tolerate (i.e., remain relatively unchanged with respect to) the tremendous changes in object appearance produced, for instance, by size and viewpoint variation. Whether this is the case is still controversial, despite some recent demonstration of transformation-tolerant object recognition in rats. In fact, it remains unknown to what extent such a tolerant recognition has a spontaneous, perceptual basis, or, alternatively, mainly reflects learning of arbitrary associative relations among trained object appearances. In this study, we addressed this question by training rats to categorize a continuum of morph objects resulting from blending two object prototypes. The resulting psychometric curve (reporting the proportion of responses to one prototype along the morph line) served as a reference when, in a second phase of the experiment, either prototype was briefly presented as a prime, immediately before a test morph object. The resulting shift of the psychometric curve showed that recognition became biased toward the identity of the prime. Critically, this bias was observed also when the primes were transformed along a variety of dimensions (i.e., size, position, viewpoint, and their combination) that the animals had never experienced before. These results indicate that rats spontaneously perceive different views/appearances of an object as similar (i.e., as instances of the same object) and argue for the existence of neuronal substrates underlying formation of transformation-tolerant object representations in rats.

  2. In silico prediction of genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wichard, Jörg D

    2016-12-12

    The in silico prediction of genotoxicity has made considerable progress during the last years. The main driver for the pharmaceutical industry is the ICH M7 guideline about the assessment of DNA reactive impurities. An important component of this guideline is the use of in silico models as an alternative approach to experimental testing. The in silico prediction of genotoxicity provides an established and accepted method that defines the first step in the assessment of DNA reactive impurities. This was made possible by the growing amount of reliable Ames screening data, the attempts to understand the activity pathways and the subsequent development of computer-based prediction systems. This paper gives an overview of how the in silico prediction of genotoxicity is performed under the ICH M7 guideline.

  3. New Bathymetry Reveals Detailed History of Transform Fault Segmentation at the Clarion Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, T. A.; Kim, S. S.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Olive, J. A. L.; Howell, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    Between 150°W and 135°W, the Clarion Fracture Zone (FZ) coalesces from six discrete FZ traces to a single FZ over a period of 30 million years, coinciding with a change in plate motion that placed the associated transform fault (TF) in compression. Although FZ observations suggest segmented TFs may unify to a single TF as a response to tectonic compression, little is known about the timing of this process, as well as how it may alter lithosphere structure. Using new bathymetry and gravity data from the Clarion FZ, we investigate this process through interpreted structural maps of the seafloor, numerical simulations of a segmented FZ, and modeling of gravitational anomalies. From 3154 mapped volcanic ridges and faults, we observe temporally correlated changes in intra-transform spreading center (ITSC) fabrics and plate motions that suggest that ITSC fabrics further from the center of the FZ responded to compressional changes in plate motion sooner (up to 5 million years) than ITSC fabrics located near the center of the FZ. Using the 2D finite-difference, visco-elastic-plastic code SiStER, we simulate the tectonic evolution of a differentially cooling lithosphere broken by several FZs and subject to compression or extension. We vary parameters such as the number of initial ITSC segments (0-4) and the rate of compression or extension (0-4.5 mm/year). In some model cases, we also vary the strength of the initial FZ offset by introducing small, low-viscosity weaknesses in the modeled lithosphere at the FZ. Gravity anomalies are calculated from the simulated lithospheric structure by using Talwani's 2D polygon algorithm. We then compare model predicted and existing satellite-derived gravity anomalies over the segmented Clarion FZ to constrain the relative timing of compressional changes along individual transform segment traces and structural changes within the FZ. Our observations suggest that compression and extension are not uniformly distributed across a segmented

  4. Microchemical Structure of Soybean Seeds Revealed in Situ by Ultraspatially Resolved Synchrotron Fourier Transformed Infrared Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrzak,L.; Miller, S.

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of water in soybean seeds during imbibition varies with the chemical composition of the tissue. To understand the dynamics of imbibition, the proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates of the cotyledons and hilum region in mature soybean seeds were mapped using synchrotron Fourier transformed infrared microspectroscopy, based on characteristic peaks for each component: amide I at 1650 cm{sup -1} and amide II at 1550 cm{sup -1} for protein, lipid ester stretch at 1545 cm{sup -1}, and the region from 1200 to 900 cm{sup -1} for carbohydrates. The amount and configuration of the proteins varied across the cotyledon, as well as the amount of lipid and carbohydrate. It was found that protein distribution across the cotyledon is similar to water distribution during imbibition. The chemistry of the hilum region was also studied, as this is the point of water entry, and differences in the chemical composition of the tissues studied were observed.

  5. Poking vesicles in silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Ben; Bertrand, Martin; Joos, Bela

    2014-03-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is used to poke cells and study their mechanical properties. Using Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics simulations, we study the deformation and relaxation of lipid bilayer vesicles, when poked with a constant force. The relaxation time, equilibrium area expansion, and surface tension of the vesicle membrane are studied over a range of applied forces. The relaxation time exhibits a strong force-dependence. Our force-compression curves show a strong similarity with results from a recent experiment by Schafer et al. (Langmuir, 2013). They used an AFM to ``poke'' adherent giant liposomes with constant nanonewton forces and observed the resulting deformation with a Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope. Results of such experiments, whether on vesicles or cells, are often interpreted in terms of dashpots and springs. This simple approach used to describe the response of a whole cell --complete with cytoskeleton, organelles etc.-- can be problematic when trying to measure the contribution of a single cell component. Our modeling is a first step in a ``bottom-up'' approach where we investigate the viscoelastic properties of an in silico cell prototype with constituents added step by step. Supported by NSERC (Canada).

  6. Predominant but Previously-overlooked Prokaryotic Drivers of Reductive Nitrogen Transformation in Paddy Soils, Revealed by Metatranscriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Yoko; Itoh, Hideomi; Shiratori, Yutaka; Isobe, Kazuo; Otsuka, Shigeto; Senoo, Keishi

    2017-01-01

    Waterlogged paddy soils possess anoxic zones in which microbes actively induce reductive nitrogen transformation (RNT). In the present study, a shotgun RNA sequencing analysis (metatranscriptomics) of paddy soil samples revealed that most RNT gene transcripts in paddy soils were derived from Deltaproteobacteria, particularly the genera Anaeromyxobacter and Geobacter. Despite the frequent detection of the rRNA of these microbes in paddy soils, their RNT-associated genes have rarely been identified in previous PCR-based studies. This metatranscriptomic analysis provides novel insights into the diversity of RNT microbes present in paddy soils and the ecological function of Deltaproteobacteria predominating in these soils. PMID:28442658

  7. High-resolution 2-D Bragg diffraction reveal heterogeneous domain transformation behavior in a bulk relaxor ferroelectric

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanick, Abhijit; Stoica, Alexandru D.; An, Ke

    2016-08-29

    In-situ measurement of fine-structure of neutron Bragg diffraction peaks from a relaxor single-crystal using a time-of-flight instrument reveals highly heterogeneous mesoscale domain transformation behavior under applied electric fields. It is observed that only ∼25% of domains undergo reorientation or phase transition contributing to large average strains, while at least 40% remain invariant and exhibit microstrains. Such insights could be central for designing new relaxor materials with better performance and longevity. The current experimental technique can also be applied to resolve complex mesoscale phenomena in other functional materials.

  8. High-resolution 2-D Bragg diffraction reveal heterogeneous domain transformation behavior in a bulk relaxor ferroelectric

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanick, Abhijit; Stoica, Alexandru D.; An, Ke

    2016-09-02

    In-situ measurement of fine-structure of neutron Bragg diffraction peaks from a relaxor single-crystal using a time-of-flight instrument reveals highly heterogeneous mesoscale domain transformation behavior under applied electric fields. We observed that only 25% of domains undergo reorienta- tion or phase transition contributing to large average strains, while at least 40% remain invariant and exhibit microstrains. Such insights could be central for designing new relaxor materials with better performance and longevity. The current experimental technique can also be applied to resolve com- plex mesoscale phenomena in other functional materials.

  9. High-resolution 2-D Bragg diffraction reveal heterogeneous domain transformation behavior in a bulk relaxor ferroelectric

    DOE PAGES

    Pramanick, Abhijit; Stoica, Alexandru D.; An, Ke

    2016-09-02

    In-situ measurement of fine-structure of neutron Bragg diffraction peaks from a relaxor single-crystal using a time-of-flight instrument reveals highly heterogeneous mesoscale domain transformation behavior under applied electric fields. We observed that only 25% of domains undergo reorienta- tion or phase transition contributing to large average strains, while at least 40% remain invariant and exhibit microstrains. Such insights could be central for designing new relaxor materials with better performance and longevity. The current experimental technique can also be applied to resolve com- plex mesoscale phenomena in other functional materials.

  10. Martensitic transformation in a B2-containing CuZr-based BMG composite revealed by in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Gian; Lee, Chanho; Hong, Sung Hwan; ...

    2017-06-27

    Here, CuZr-based bulk-metallic-glass (BMG) composites reinforced by a B2-type CuZr crystalline-phase (CP) have been widely studied, and exhibit that the plastic deformation of the CP induces martensitic transformation from the B2 to B19', which plays a dominant role in the deformation behavior and mechanical properties. In the present study, 2.0% Co containing CuZr-based BMG composites were investigated using in-situ neutron-diffraction technique. The in-situ neutron-diffraction results reveal the continuous load transfer from the glass matrix to B2 CP and martensitic transformation from the B2 CP to B19' during the deformation of the composite. Moreover, it was found that the martensitic transformationmore » is initiated at the applied stress higher than 1500 MPa, and is significantly suppressed during the deformation, as compared to other 0.5% Co-containing CuZr-based BMG composites. Based on these in-situ neutron-diffraction results, the martensitic transformation is strongly affected by the amount of the addition of Co, which determines the mechanical properties of CP-reinforced BMG composites, such as ductility and hardening capability.« less

  11. Clonal Evolution Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing in a Case of Primary Myelofibrosis Transformed to Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Elizabeth K.; Fisher, Daniel A.C.; Miller, Christopher A.; McLellan, Michael D.; Fulton, Robert S.; Moore, Deborah M.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Oh, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    Clonal architecture in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) is poorly understood. Here we report genomic analyses of a patient with primary myelofibrosis (PMF) transformed to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was performed on PMF and sAML diagnosis samples, with skin included as a germline surrogate. Deep sequencing validation was performed on the WGS samples and an additional sample obtained during sAML remission/relapsed PMF. Clustering analysis of 649 validated somatic single nucleotide variants revealed four distinct clonal groups, each including putative driver mutations. The first group (including JAK2 and U2AF1), representing the founding clone, included mutations with high frequency at all three disease stages. The second clonal group (including MYB) was present only in PMF, suggesting the presence of a clone that was dispensable for transformation. The third group (including ASXL1) contained mutations with low frequency in PMF and high frequency in subsequent samples, indicating evolution of the dominant clone with disease progression. The fourth clonal group (including IDH1 and RUNX1) was acquired at sAML transformation and was predominantly absent at sAML remission/relapsed PMF. Taken together, these findings illustrate the complex clonal dynamics associated with disease evolution in MPNs and sAML. PMID:25252869

  12. A Quantitative Toxicogenomics Assay Reveals the Evolution and Nature of Toxicity during the Transformation of Environmental Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The incomplete mineralization of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) during the advanced oxidation processes can generate transformation products that exhibit toxicity comparable to or greater than that of the original contaminant. In this study, we demonstrated the application of a novel, fast, and cost-effective quantitative toxicogenomics-based approach for the evaluation of the evolution and nature of toxicity along the electro-Fenton oxidative degradation of three representative CECs whose oxidative degradation pathways have been relatively well studied, bisphenol A, triclosan, and ibuprofen. The evolution of toxicity as a result of the transformation of parent chemicals and production of intermediates during the course of degradation are monitored, and the quantitative toxicogenomics assay results revealed the dynamic toxicity changes and mechanisms, as well as their association with identified intermediates during the electro-Fenton oxidation process of the selected CECs. Although for the three CECs, a majority (>75%) of the parent compounds disappeared at the 15 min reaction time, the nearly complete elimination of toxicity required a minimal 30 min reaction time, and they seem to correspond to the disappearance of identified aromatic intermediates. Bisphenol A led to a wide range of stress responses, and some identified transformation products containing phenolic or quinone group, such as 1,4-benzoquinone and hydroquinone, likely contributed to the transit toxicity exhibited as DNA stress (genotoxicity) and membrane stress during the degradation. Triclosan is known to cause severe oxidative stress, and although the oxidative damage potential decreased concomitantly with the disappearance of triclosan after a 15 min reaction, the sustained toxicity associated with both membrane and protein stress was likely attributed at least partially to the production of 2,4-dichlorophenol that is known to cause the production of abnormal proteins and affect the cell

  13. Biostimulation and microbial community profiling reveal insights on RDX transformation in groundwater

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Dongping; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Marina, Oana; ...

    2016-11-17

    . putida strain II-B was specifically enriched in the RDX-degrading samples. Analysis of the accumulation of RDX-degradation products reveals that during active RDX degradation, there is a transient increase in the concentration of the degradation products MNX, DNX, TNX, and NDAB. The accumulation of these degradation products suggests that RDX is degraded via sequential reduction of the nitro functional groups followed by abiotic ring-cleavage. Here, the results suggest that strict anaerobic conditions are needed to stimulate RDX degradation under the TA-16 site-specific conditions.« less

  14. Biostimulation and microbial community profiling reveal insights on RDX transformation in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongping; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Marina, Oana; Ware, Doug S; Goering, Tim J; Sun, Fengjie; Daligault, Hajnalka E; Lo, Chien-Chi; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Starkenburg, Shawn R

    2017-04-01

    . putida strain II-B was specifically enriched in the RDX-degrading samples. Analysis of the accumulation of RDX-degradation products reveals that during active RDX degradation, there is a transient increase in the concentration of the degradation products MNX, DNX, TNX, and NDAB. The accumulation of these degradation products suggests that RDX is degraded via sequential reduction of the nitro functional groups followed by abiotic ring-cleavage. The results suggest that strict anaerobic conditions are needed to stimulate RDX degradation under the TA-16 site-specific conditions. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. New players in the same old game: a system level in silico study to predict type III secretion system and effector proteins in bacterial genomes reveals common themes in T3SS mediated pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sadarangani, Vineet; Datta, Sunando; Arunachalam, Manonmani

    2013-07-26

    Type III secretion system (T3SS) plays an important role in virulence or symbiosis of many pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria [CHM 2:291-294, 2007; Physiology (Bethesda) 20:326-339, 2005]. T3SS acts like a tunnel between a bacterium and its host through which the bacterium injects 'effector' proteins into the latter [Nature 444:567-573, 2006; COSB 18:258-266, 2008]. The effectors spatially and temporally modify the host signalling pathways [FEMS Microbiol Rev 35:1100-1125, 2011; Cell Host Microbe5:571-579, 2009]. In spite its crucial role in host-pathogen interaction, the study of T3SS and the associated effectors has been limited to a few bacteria [Cell Microbiol 13:1858-1869, 2011; Nat Rev Microbiol 6:11-16, 2008; Mol Microbiol 80:1420-1438, 2011]. Before one set out to perform systematic experimental studies on an unknown set of bacteria it would be beneficial to identify the potential candidates by developing an in silico screening algorithm. A system level study would also be advantageous over traditional laboratory methods to extract an overriding theme for host-pathogen interaction, if any, from the vast resources of data generated by sequencing multiple bacterial genomes. We have developed an in silico protocol in which the most conserved set of T3SS proteins was used as the query against the entire bacterial database with increasingly stringent search parameters. It enabled us to identify several uncharacterized T3SS positive bacteria. We adopted a similar strategy to predict the presence of the already known effectors in the newly identified T3SS positive bacteria. The huge resources of biochemical data [FEMS Microbiol Rev 35:1100-1125, 2011; Cell Host Microbe 5:571-579, 2009; BMC Bioinformatics 7(11):S4, 2010] on the T3SS effectors enabled us to search for the common theme in T3SS mediated pathogenesis. We identified few cellular signalling networks in the host, which are manipulated by most of the T3SS containing pathogens. We went on to look for

  16. Event-related brain potentials reveal correlates of the transformation of stimulus functions through derived relations in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, L M; Farina, F R; Hussey, I; Roche, R A P

    2015-03-02

    This research aimed to explore the neural correlates of relational learning by recording high-density EEG during a behavioural task involving derivation levels of varying complexity. A total of 15 participants (5 male; age range 18-23 years; mean age=20.0 years) completed contextual cue training, relational learning, function training and a derivation task while 128-channel event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from the scalp (Background). Differences in response latencies were observed between the two derived (symmetry and equivalence) and directly trained relations, with longest latencies found for equivalence and shortest for the directly trained relations. This pattern failed to reach statistical significance. Importantly, ERPs revealed an early P3a positivity (from 230 to 350ms) over right posterior scalp sites. Significantly larger mean amplitudes were found at three channels (P6, E115 and E121) for the equivalence relations compared to the two other types (Results). We believe this may constitute a first demonstration of differences in brain electrophysiology in the transformation of stimulus functions through derived relations of hierarchical levels of complexity (Conclusions). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Plastome sequences of Lygodium japonicum and Marsilea crenata reveal the genome organization transformation from basal ferns to core leptosporangiates.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Wang, Bo; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Ying-Juan; Wang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that core leptosporangiates, the most species-rich group of extant ferns (monilophytes), have a distinct plastid genome (plastome) organization pattern from basal fern lineages. However, the details of genome structure transformation from ancestral ferns to core leptosporangiates remain unclear because of limited plastome data available. Here, we have determined the complete chloroplast genome sequences of Lygodium japonicum (Lygodiaceae), a member of schizaeoid ferns (Schizaeales), and Marsilea crenata (Marsileaceae), a representative of heterosporous ferns (Salviniales). The two species represent the sister and the basal lineages of core leptosporangiates, respectively, for which the plastome sequences are currently unavailable. Comparative genomic analysis of all sequenced fern plastomes reveals that the gene order of L. japonicum plastome occupies an intermediate position between that of basal ferns and core leptosporangiates. The two exons of the fern ndhB gene have a unique pattern of intragenic copy number variances. Specifically, the substitution rate heterogeneity between the two exons is congruent with their copy number changes, confirming the constraint role that inverted repeats may play on the substitution rate of chloroplast gene sequences.

  18. Unique features revealed by the genome sequence of Acinetobacter sp. ADP1, a versatile and naturally transformation competent bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Valérie; Vallenet, David; Fonknechten, Nuria; Kreimeyer, Annett; Oztas, Sophie; Labarre, Laurent; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Robert, Catherine; Duprat, Simone; Wincker, Patrick; Ornston, L. Nicholas; Weissenbach, Jean; Marlière, Philippe; Cohen, Georges N.; Médigue, Claudine

    2004-01-01

    Acinetobacter sp. strain ADP1 is a nutritionally versatile soil bacterium closely related to representatives of the well-characterized Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. Unlike these bacteria, the Acinetobacter ADP1 is highly competent for natural transformation which affords extraordinary convenience for genetic manipulation. The circular chromosome of the Acinetobacter ADP1, presented here, encodes 3325 predicted coding sequences, of which 60% have been classified based on sequence similarity to other documented proteins. The close evolutionary proximity of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas species, as judged by the sequences of their 16S RNA genes and by the highest level of bidirectional best hits, contrasts with the extensive divergence in the GC content of their DNA (40 versus 62%). The chromosomes also differ significantly in size, with the Acinetobacter ADP1 chromosome <60% of the length of the Pseudomonas counterparts. Genome analysis of the Acinetobacter ADP1 revealed genes for metabolic pathways involved in utilization of a large variety of compounds. Almost all of these genes, with orthologs that are scattered in other species, are located in five major ‘islands of catabolic diversity’, now an apparent ‘archipelago of catabolic diversity’, within one-quarter of the overall genome. Acinetobacter ADP1 displays many features of other aerobic soil bacteria with metabolism oriented toward the degradation of organic compounds found in their natural habitat. A distinguishing feature of this genome is the absence of a gene corresponding to pyruvate kinase, the enzyme that generally catalyzes the terminal step in conversion of carbohydrates to pyruvate for respiration by the citric acid cycle. This finding supports the view that the cycle itself is centrally geared to the catabolic capabilities of this exceptionally versatile organism. PMID:15514110

  19. Insights from spectroscopic and in-silico techniques for the exploitation of biomolecular interactions between Human serum albumin and Paromomycin.

    PubMed

    Raza, Muslim; Jiang, Yang; Wei, Yun; Ahmad, Aftab; Khan, Ajmal; Qipeng, Yuan

    2017-09-01

    The study of molecular interactions of drug-protein are extremely important from the biological aspect in all living organisms, and therefore such type of investigation hold a tremendous significance in rational drug design and discovery. In the present study, the molecular interactions between paromomycin (PAR) and human serum albumin (HSA) have been studied by different biophysical techniques and validated by in-silico approaches. The results obtained from Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) demonstrated a remarkable change upon the complexation of PAR with HSA. Circular Dichroism (CD), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) results revealed a significant secondary structure alteration and reduction of hydrodynamic radii upon the conjugation of PAR with HSA. The fluorescence spectroscopy results also apparently revealed the static quenching mechanism. The number of binding sites, binding constants, and Gibbs free energy values were calculated to illustrate the nature of intermolecular interactions. Similarly, the in-silico docking and molecular dynamics simulation clearly explain the theoretical basis of the binding mechanism of PAR with HSA. The experimental and docking approaches suggested that PAR binds to the hydrophobic cavity site I of HSA. The finding of present investigation will provide binding insight of PAR and associated alterations in the stability and conformation of HSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative Genome Analysis of Three Eukaryotic Parasites with Differing Abilities To Transform Leukocytes Reveals Key Mediators of Theileria-Induced Leukocyte Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Kyoko; Hara, Yuichiro; Abe, Takashi; Yamasaki, Chisato; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kosuge, Takehide; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kawashima, Shuichi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Wakaguri, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Noboru; Homma, Keiichi; Tada-Umezaki, Masahito; Yagi, Yukio; Fujii, Yasuyuki; Habara, Takuya; Kanehisa, Minoru; Watanabe, Hidemi; Ito, Kimihito; Gojobori, Takashi; Sugawara, Hideaki; Imanishi, Tadashi; Weir, William; Gardner, Malcolm; Pain, Arnab; Shiels, Brian; Hattori, Masahira; Nene, Vishvanath; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT We sequenced the genome of Theileria orientalis, a tick-borne apicomplexan protozoan parasite of cattle. The focus of this study was a comparative genome analysis of T. orientalis relative to other highly pathogenic Theileria species, T. parva and T. annulata. T. parva and T. annulata induce transformation of infected cells of lymphocyte or macrophage/monocyte lineages; in contrast, T. orientalis does not induce uncontrolled proliferation of infected leukocytes and multiplies predominantly within infected erythrocytes. While synteny across homologous chromosomes of the three Theileria species was found to be well conserved overall, subtelomeric structures were found to differ substantially, as T. orientalis lacks the large tandemly arrayed subtelomere-encoded variable secreted protein-encoding gene family. Moreover, expansion of particular gene families by gene duplication was found in the genomes of the two transforming Theileria species, most notably, the TashAT/TpHN and Tar/Tpr gene families. Gene families that are present only in T. parva and T. annulata and not in T. orientalis, Babesia bovis, or Plasmodium were also identified. Identification of differences between the genome sequences of Theileria species with different abilities to transform and immortalize bovine leukocytes will provide insight into proteins and mechanisms that have evolved to induce and regulate this process. The T. orientalis genome database is available at http://totdb.czc.hokudai.ac.jp/. PMID:22951932

  1. The atomistic mechanism of hcp-to-bcc martensitic transformation in the Ti-Nb system revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, JiaHao; Liu, BaiXin

    2015-02-14

    Applying the constructed Ti-Nb potentials, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the martensitic transformation of Ti100-xNbx alloys (x = 5, 10…25) from the α' phase (hcp) to the β phase (bcc). It is found that the transformation involved four phases, i.e. α', α'', fco (face-centered orthorhombic), and β phases. The structures of the obtained phases exhibit consistency with experimental data, verifying the validity of atomic simulations. The simulations not only revealed the processes of atomic displacements during the transformation, but also elucidated the underlying mechanism of the martensitic transformation at the atomic level. The martensitic transformation incorporates three types of coinstantaneous deformations i.e. slide, shear as well as extension, and the subsequent lattice constant relaxation. Furthermore, according to the proposed mechanism, the crystallographic correlation between the initial α' phase and the final β phase has been deduced. The simulation results provide a clear landscape on the martensitic transformation mechanism, facilitating our comprehensive understanding on the phase transition in the Ti-Nb system.

  2. Single-molecule experiments in vitro and in silico.

    PubMed

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-05-25

    Single-molecule force experiments in vitro enable the characterization of the mechanical response of biological matter at the nanometer scale. However, they do not reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying mechanical function. These can only be readily studied through molecular dynamics simulations of atomic structural models: "in silico" (by computer analysis) single-molecule experiments. Steered molecular dynamics simulations, in which external forces are used to explore the response and function of macromolecules, have become a powerful tool complementing and guiding in vitro single-molecule experiments. The insights provided by in silico experiments are illustrated here through a review of recent research in three areas of protein mechanics: elasticity of the muscle protein titin and the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin; linker-mediated elasticity of the cytoskeleton protein spectrin; and elasticity of ankyrin repeats, a protein module found ubiquitously in cells but with an as-yet unclear function.

  3. Provisional in-silico biopharmaceutics classification (BCS) to guide oral drug product development.

    PubMed

    Wolk, Omri; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate in-silico predictions of physicochemical properties, in order to guide oral drug development by provisional biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS). Four in-silico methods were used to estimate LogP: group contribution (CLogP) using two different software programs, atom contribution (ALogP), and element contribution (KLogP). The correlations (r(2)) of CLogP, ALogP and KLogP versus measured LogP data were 0.97, 0.82, and 0.71, respectively. The classification of drugs with reported intestinal permeability in humans was correct for 64.3%-72.4% of the 29 drugs on the dataset, and for 81.82%-90.91% of the 22 drugs that are passively absorbed using the different in-silico algorithms. Similar permeability classification was obtained with the various in-silico methods. The in-silico calculations, along with experimental melting points, were then incorporated into a thermodynamic equation for solubility estimations that largely matched the reference solubility values. It was revealed that the effect of melting point on the solubility is minor compared to the partition coefficient, and an average melting point (162.7 °C) could replace the experimental values, with similar results. The in-silico methods classified 20.76% (± 3.07%) as Class 1, 41.51% (± 3.32%) as Class 2, 30.49% (± 4.47%) as Class 3, and 6.27% (± 4.39%) as Class 4. In conclusion, in-silico methods can be used for BCS classification of drugs in early development, from merely their molecular formula and without foreknowledge of their chemical structure, which will allow for the improved selection, engineering, and developability of candidates. These in-silico methods could enhance success rates, reduce costs, and accelerate oral drug products development.

  4. Provisional in-silico biopharmaceutics classification (BCS) to guide oral drug product development

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, Omri; Agbaria, Riad; Dahan, Arik

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate in-silico predictions of physicochemical properties, in order to guide oral drug development by provisional biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS). Four in-silico methods were used to estimate LogP: group contribution (CLogP) using two different software programs, atom contribution (ALogP), and element contribution (KLogP). The correlations (r2) of CLogP, ALogP and KLogP versus measured LogP data were 0.97, 0.82, and 0.71, respectively. The classification of drugs with reported intestinal permeability in humans was correct for 64.3%–72.4% of the 29 drugs on the dataset, and for 81.82%–90.91% of the 22 drugs that are passively absorbed using the different in-silico algorithms. Similar permeability classification was obtained with the various in-silico methods. The in-silico calculations, along with experimental melting points, were then incorporated into a thermodynamic equation for solubility estimations that largely matched the reference solubility values. It was revealed that the effect of melting point on the solubility is minor compared to the partition coefficient, and an average melting point (162.7°C) could replace the experimental values, with similar results. The in-silico methods classified 20.76% (±3.07%) as Class 1, 41.51% (±3.32%) as Class 2, 30.49% (±4.47%) as Class 3, and 6.27% (±4.39%) as Class 4. In conclusion, in-silico methods can be used for BCS classification of drugs in early development, from merely their molecular formula and without foreknowledge of their chemical structure, which will allow for the improved selection, engineering, and developability of candidates. These in-silico methods could enhance success rates, reduce costs, and accelerate oral drug products development. PMID:25284986

  5. PCR-Independent Method of Transformation-Associated Recombination Reveals the Cosmomycin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in an Ocean Streptomycete.

    PubMed

    Larson, Charles B; Crüsemann, Max; Moore, Bradley S

    2017-04-28

    The transformation-associated recombination cloning methodology facilitates the genomic capture and heterologous expression of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). We have streamlined this procedure by introduction of synthetic DNA gene blocks for the efficient capture of BGCs. We show the successful capture and expression of the aromatic polyketide antitumor agent cosmomycin from streptomycete bacteria and the discovery of new cosmomycin analogues by mass spectral molecular networking.

  6. Accomplishments in genome-scale in silico modeling for industrial and medical biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Milne, Caroline B.; Kim, Pan-Jun; Eddy, James A.; Price, Nathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Driven by advancements in high-throughput biological technologies and the growing number of sequenced genomes, the construction of in silico models at the genome scale has provided powerful tools to investigate a vast array of biological systems and applications. Here, we review comprehensively the uses of such models in industrial and medical biotechnology, including biofuel generation, food production, and drug development. While the use of in silico models is still in its early stages for delivering to industry, significant initial successes have been achieved. For the cases presented here, genome-scale models predict engineering strategies to enhance properties of interest in an organism or to inhibit harmful mechanisms of pathogens or in disease. Going forward, genome-scale in silico models promise to extend their application and analysis scope to become a transformative tool in biotechnology. As such, genome-scale models can provide a basis for rational genome-scale engineering and synthetic biology. PMID:19946878

  7. Accomplishments in genome-scale in silico modeling for industrial and medical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Milne, Caroline B; Kim, Pan-Jun; Eddy, James A; Price, Nathan D

    2009-12-01

    Driven by advancements in high-throughput biological technologies and the growing number of sequenced genomes, the construction of in silico models at the genome scale has provided powerful tools to investigate a vast array of biological systems and applications. Here, we review comprehensively the uses of such models in industrial and medical biotechnology, including biofuel generation, food production, and drug development. While the use of in silico models is still in its early stages for delivering to industry, significant initial successes have been achieved. For the cases presented here, genome-scale models predict engineering strategies to enhance properties of interest in an organism or to inhibit harmful mechanisms of pathogens. Going forward, genome-scale in silico models promise to extend their application and analysis scope to become a trans-formative tool in biotechnology.

  8. In silico methods to predict drug toxicity.

    PubMed

    Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Benfenati, Emilio

    2013-10-01

    This review describes in silico methods to characterize the toxicity of pharmaceuticals, including tools which predict toxicity endpoints such as genotoxicity or organ-specific models, tools addressing ADME processes, and methods focusing on protein-ligand docking binding. These in silico tools are rapidly evolving. Nowadays, the interest has shifted from classical studies to support toxicity screening of candidates, toward the use of in silico methods to support the expert. These methods, previously considered useful only to provide a rough, initial estimation, currently have attracted interest as they can assist the expert in investigating toxic potential. They provide the expert with safety perspectives and insights within a weight-of-evidence strategy. This represents a shift of the general philosophy of in silico methodology, and it is likely to further evolve especially exploiting links with system biology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Overcoming drug resistance through in silico prediction.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Pablo; Trosset, Jean-Yves

    2014-03-01

    Prediction tools are commonly used in pre-clinical research to assist target selection, to optimize drug potency or to predict the pharmacological profile of drug candidates. In silico prediction and overcoming drug resistance is a new opportunity that creates a high interest in pharmaceutical research. This review presents two main in silico strategies to meet this challenge: a structure-based approach to study the influence of mutations on the drug-target interaction and a system-biology approach to identify resistance pathways for a given drug. In silico screening of synergies between therapeutic and resistant pathways through biological network analysis is an example of technique to escape drug resistance. Structure-based drug design and in silico system biology are complementary approaches to reach few objectives at once: increase efficiency, reduce toxicity and overcoming drug resistance.

  10. The structure and photochemical transformation of cyclopropylacetylene radical cation as revealed by matrix EPR and quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, Ekaterina S.; Tyurin, Daniil A.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2012-05-01

    The primary radical cation of cyclopropylacetylene was first characterized by EPR spectroscopy in low-temperature freon matrices. The assignment was confirmed by specific deuteration and quantum-chemical calculations at PBE0 and CCSD(T) levels. Photolysis with visible light led to irreversible transformation of the initial species to a ring-open structure. Detailed computational analysis of energy and magnetic resonance parameters of possible reaction products justified formation of pent-3-en-1-yne radical cation (presumably, a (Z)-isomer). This conclusion was also supported by the effect of specific deuteration.

  11. A new time-frequency method to reveal quantum dynamics of atomic hydrogen in intense laser pulses: Synchrosqueezing transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, Yae-lin; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Wu, Hau-tieng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Chu, Shih-I

    2014-11-15

    This study introduces a new adaptive time-frequency (TF) analysis technique, the synchrosqueezing transform (SST), to explore the dynamics of a laser-driven hydrogen atom at an ab initio level, upon which we have demonstrated its versatility as a new viable venue for further exploring quantum dynamics. For a signal composed of oscillatory components which can be characterized by instantaneous frequency, the SST enables rendering the decomposed signal based on the phase information inherited in the linear TF representation with mathematical support. Compared with the classical type of TF methods, the SST clearly depicts several intrinsic quantum dynamical processes such as selection rules, AC Stark effects, and high harmonic generation.

  12. Transformation of Eutypa dieback and esca disease pathogen toxins by antagonistic fungal strains reveals a second detoxification pathway not present in Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Christen, Danilo; Tharin, Manuel; Perrin-Cherioux, Sandrine; Abou-Mansour, Eliane; Tabacchi, Raphaël; Défago, Geneviève

    2005-09-07

    Eutypine, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and 3-phenyllactic acid are some of the phytotoxins produced by the pathogens causing Eutypa dieback and esca disease, two trunk diseases of grapevine (Vitis vinifera). Known biocontrol agents such as Fusarium lateritium and Trichoderma sp. were screened for their ability to consume these toxins. Transformation time courses were performed, and an high-performance liquid chromatography-based method was developed to analyze toxin metabolism and to identify and quantify the converted products. The results show that the aldehyde function of eutypine was reduced to eutypinol, as by V. vinifera cv. Merlot, the cultivar tolerant to Eutypa dieback. We revealed a supplementary detoxification pathway, not known in Merlot, where the aldehyde function was oxidized to eutypinic acid. Moreover, some strains tested could further metabolize the transformation products. Every strain tested could transform 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde to the corresponding alcohol and acid, and these intermediates disappeared totally at the end of the time courses. When biological assays on cells of V. vinifera cv. Chasselas were carried out, the transformation products exhibited a lower toxicity than the toxins. The possibility of selecting new biocontrol agents against trunk diseases of grapevine based on microbial detoxification is discussed.

  13. Biome representational in silico karyotyping

    PubMed Central

    Muthappan, Valliammai; Lee, Aaron Y.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Akileswaran, Lakshmi; Dintzis, Suzanne M.; Lee, Choli; Magrini, Vincent; Mardis, Elaine R.; Shendure, Jay; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomic characterization of complex biomes remains challenging. Here we describe a modification of digital karyotyping—biome representational in silico karyotyping (BRISK)—as a general technique for analyzing a defined representation of all DNA present in a sample. BRISK utilizes a Type IIB DNA restriction enzyme to create a defined representation of 27-mer DNAs in a sample. Massively parallel sequencing of this representation allows for construction of high-resolution karyotypes and identification of multiple species within a biome. Application to normal human tissue demonstrated linear recovery of tags by chromosome. We apply this technique to the biome of the oral mucosa and find that greater than 25% of recovered DNA is nonhuman. DNA from 41 microbial species could be identified from oral mucosa of two subjects. Of recovered nonhuman sequences, fewer than 30% are currently annotated. We characterized seven prevalent unknown sequences by chromosome walking and find these represent novel microbial sequences including two likely derived from novel phage genomes. Application of BRISK to archival tissue from a nasopharyngeal carcinoma resulted in identification of Epstein-Barr virus infection. These results suggest that BRISK is a powerful technique for the analysis of complex microbiomes and potentially for pathogen discovery. PMID:21324882

  14. Biome representational in silico karyotyping.

    PubMed

    Muthappan, Valliammai; Lee, Aaron Y; Lamprecht, Tamara L; Akileswaran, Lakshmi; Dintzis, Suzanne M; Lee, Choli; Magrini, Vincent; Mardis, Elaine R; Shendure, Jay; Van Gelder, Russell N

    2011-04-01

    Metagenomic characterization of complex biomes remains challenging. Here we describe a modification of digital karyotyping-biome representational in silico karyotyping (BRISK)-as a general technique for analyzing a defined representation of all DNA present in a sample. BRISK utilizes a Type IIB DNA restriction enzyme to create a defined representation of 27-mer DNAs in a sample. Massively parallel sequencing of this representation allows for construction of high-resolution karyotypes and identification of multiple species within a biome. Application to normal human tissue demonstrated linear recovery of tags by chromosome. We apply this technique to the biome of the oral mucosa and find that greater than 25% of recovered DNA is nonhuman. DNA from 41 microbial species could be identified from oral mucosa of two subjects. Of recovered nonhuman sequences, fewer than 30% are currently annotated. We characterized seven prevalent unknown sequences by chromosome walking and find these represent novel microbial sequences including two likely derived from novel phage genomes. Application of BRISK to archival tissue from a nasopharyngeal carcinoma resulted in identification of Epstein-Barr virus infection. These results suggest that BRISK is a powerful technique for the analysis of complex microbiomes and potentially for pathogen discovery.

  15. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy reveals unique phenotypes for human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell lines and their progeny.

    PubMed

    Cao, Julie; Ng, Elizabeth S; McNaughton, Don; Stanley, Edouard G; Elefanty, Andrew G; Tobin, Mark J; Heraud, Philip

    2014-10-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy was employed to elucidate the macromolecular phenotype of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and their differentiated progeny. Undifferentiated hESCs and hiPSC lines were found to be not clearly distinguishable from each other. However, although both hESC and hiPSC variants appeared to undergo similar changes during differentiation in terms of cell surface antigens, the derived cell types from all cell lines could be discriminated using FTIR spectroscopy. We foresee a possible future role for FTIR microspectroscopy as a powerful and objective investigative and quality control tool in regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Transformations to granular zircon revealed: Twinning, reidite, and ZrO2 in shocked zircon from Meteor Crater (Arizona, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cavosie, Aaron; Timms, Nicholas E.; Erickson, Timmons M.; Hagerty, Justin J.; Hörz, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Granular zircon in impact environments has long been recognized but remains poorly understood due to lack of experimental data to identify mechanisms involved in its genesis. Meteor Crater in Arizona (United States) contains abundant evidence of shock metamorphism, including shocked quartz, the high pressure polymorphs coesite and stishovite, diaplectic SiO2 glass, and lechatelierite (fused SiO2). Here we report the presence of granular zircon, a new shocked mineral discovery at Meteor Crater, that preserve critical orientation evidence of specific transformations that occurred during its formation at extreme impact conditions. The zircon grains occur as aggregates of sub-µm neoblasts in highly shocked Coconino Formation Sandstone (CFS) comprised of lechatelierite. Electron backscatter diffraction shows that each grain consists of multiple domains, some with boundaries disoriented by 65°, a known {112} shock-twin orientation. Other domains have crystallographic c-axes in alignment with {110} of neighboring domains, consistent with the former presence of the high pressure ZrSiO4 polymorph reidite. Additionally, nearly all zircon preserve ZrO2 + SiO2, providing evidence of partial dissociation. The genesis of CFS granular zircon started with detrital zircon that experienced shock-twinning and reidite formation from 20 to 30 GPa, ultimately yielding a phase that retained crystallographic memory; this phase subsequently recrystallized to systematically oriented zircon neoblasts, and in some areas partially dissociated to ZrO2. The lechatelierite matrix, experimentally constrained to form at >2000 °C, provided an ultra high-temperature environment for zircon dissociation (~1670 °C) and neoblast formation. The capacity of granular zircon to preserve a cumulative P-T record has not been recognized previously, and provides a new method for retrieving histories of impact-related mineral transformations in the crust at conditions far beyond which most rocks melt.

  17. Semi-Discrete Wavelet Transforms of Remote Sensing Data Reveal Long-Range Multifractal Correlations in Cloud Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, N. P.; Davis, A. B.

    2001-12-01

    Semi-discrete wavelet transforms are discrete in scale, as in Mallat's multi-resolution analysis, but continuous in position. The number of coefficients and algorithmic complexity then grows only as NlogN where N is the number of points (pixels) in the time-series (image). The redundancy of this representation at each scale has been exploited in denoising and data compression applications but we see it here as an asset when cumulating spatial statistics. Following Arnéodo, the wavelets are normalized in such a way that the scaling exponents of the moments of the coefficients are the same as for structure functions at all orders, at least in nonstationary/stationary-increment signals. We apply 1D and 2D semi-discrete transforms to remote sensing data on cloud structure from a variety of sources: NASA's MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Thematic Mapper (TM) on LandSat; high-resolution cloud scenes from DOE's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI); and an upward-looking mm-radar at one of DOE's climate observation sites supporting the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. We show that the scale-dependence of the variance of the wavelet coefficients is always a better discriminator of transition from stationary to nonstationary behavior than conventional methods based on auto-correlation analysis, 2nd-order structure function (a.k.a. the semi-variogram), or spectral analysis. Examples of stationary behavior are (delta-correlated) instrumental noise and large-scale decorrelation of cloudiness; here wavelet coefficients decrease with increasing scale. Examples of nonstationary behavior are the predominant turbulent structure of cloud layers as well as instrumental or physical smoothing in the data; here wavelet coefficients increase with scale. In all of these regimes, we have theoretical expectations and/or empirical evidence of power-law relations for wavelet statistics with respect to scale as is expected in physical (finite

  18. Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals differences between early and late M intermediates of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Rödig, C; Chizhov, I; Weidlich, O; Siebert, F

    1999-01-01

    In this report, from time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared investigations from 15 ns to 160 ms, we provide evidence for the subsequent rise of three different M states that differ in their structures. The first state rises with approximately 3 microseconds to only a small percentage. Its structure as judged from amide I/II bands differs in small but well-defined aspects from the L state. The next M state, which appears in approximately 40 microseconds, has almost all of the characteristics of the "late" M state, i.e., it differs considerably from the first one. Here, the L left arrow over right arrow M equilibrium is shifted toward M, although some percentage of L still persists. In the last M state (rise time approximately 130 microseconds), the equilibrium is shifted toward full deprotonation of the Schiff base, and only small additional structural changes take place. In addition to these results obtained for unbuffered conditions or at pH 7, experiments performed at lower and higher pH are presented. These results are discussed in terms of the molecular changes postulated to occur in the M intermediate to allow the shift of the L/M equilibrium toward M and possibly to regulate the change of the accessibility of the Schiff base necessary for effective proton pumping. PMID:10233083

  19. Structural Changes Revealed by Fourier Transform Infrared and Circular Dichroism Spectroscopic Analyses Underlie tNOX Periodic Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chinpal; Layman, Sara; Morré, Dorothy M.; Morré, D. James

    2005-01-01

    A recurring pattern of spectral changes indicative of periodic changes in the proportion of β-structure and a-helix of a recombinant ECTO-NOX fusion protein of tNOX, with a cellulose binding domain peptide, was demonstrated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic analyses. The pattern of structural changes correlated with oscillatory patterns of enzymatic activities exhibited by the protein previously interpreted as indicative of a clock function. The pattern consisted of a repeating pattern of oscillations with a period length of 21 min with five maxima (two separated by 5 min and 3 separated by 4 to 4.5 min) within each 21 min repeat. Oscillatory patterns were not obvious in comparable FTIR or CD spectra of albumin, ribonuclease or concanavalin A. The period length was constant at 5, 15, 25, 35 and 45° C (temperature compensated) and oscillations occurred independently of substrate presence. Spectra obtained in deuterium oxide yielded a longer period length of 26 min both for oscillations in enzymatic activity and absorbance ratios determined by FTIR. Taken together the findings suggest that the regular patterns of oscillations exhibited by the ECTO-NOX proteins are accompanied by recurrent global changes in the conformation of the protein backbone that directly modulate enzymatic activity. PMID:18648622

  20. Phase transformation mechanism in lithium manganese nickel oxide revealed by single-crystal hard X-ray microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Kuppan, Saravanan; Xu, Yahong; Liu, Yijin; ...

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the reaction pathway and kinetics of solid-state phase transformation is critical in designing advanced electrode materials with better performance and stability. Despite the first-order phase transition with a large lattice mismatch between the involved phases, spinel LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 is capable of fast rate even at large particle size, presenting an enigma yet to be understood. The present study uses advanced two-dimensional and three-dimensional nano-tomography on a series of well-formed LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) crystals to visualize the mesoscale phase distribution, as a function of Li content at the sub-particle level. Inhomogeneity along with the coexistence of Li-rich andmore » Li-poor phases are broadly observed on partially delithiated crystals, providing direct evidence for a concurrent nucleation and growth process instead of a shrinking-core or a particle-by-particle process. As a result, superior kinetics of (100) facets at the vertices of truncated octahedral particles promote preferential delithiation, whereas the observation of strain-induced cracking suggests mechanical degradation in the material.« less

  1. Sources of distortion product otoacoustic emissions revealed by suppression experiments and inverse fast Fourier transforms in normal ears.

    PubMed

    Konrad-Martin, D; Neely, S T; Keefe, D H; Dorn, P A; Gorga, M P

    2001-06-01

    Primary and secondary sources combine to produce the 2f1-f2 distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) measured in the ear canals of humans. DPOAEs were obtained in nine normal-hearing subjects using a fixed-f2 paradigm in which f1 was varied. The f2 was 2 or 4 kHz, and absolute and relative primary levels were varied. Data were obtained with and without a third tone (f3) placed 15.6 Hz below 2f1-f2. The level of f3 was varied in order to suppress the stimulus frequency otoacoustic emission (SFOAE) coming from the 2f1-f2 place. These data were converted from the complex frequency domain into an equivalent time representation using an inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT). IFFTs of unsuppressed DPOAE data were characterized by two or more peaks. Relative amplitudes of these peaks depended on overall primary level and on primary-level differences. The suppressor eliminated later peaks, but early peaks remained relatively unaltered. Results are interpreted to mean that the DPOAE measured in humans includes components from the f2 place (intermodulation distortion) and DP place (in the form of a SFOAE). These findings build on previous work by providing evidence that multiple peaks in the IFFT are due to a secondary source at the DP place.

  2. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy reveals that tissue culture conditions affect the macromolecular phenotype of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Julie; Ng, Elizabeth S; McNaughton, Don; Stanley, Edouard G; Elefanty, Andrew G; Tobin, Mark J; Heraud, Philip

    2013-07-21

    We employed Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy to investigate the effects of different tissue culture environments on the FTIR spectra of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and their differentiated progeny. First we tested whether there were any possible spectral artifacts resulting from the use of transflectance measurements by comparing them with transmission measurements and found no evidence of these concluding that the lack of any differences resulted from the homogeneity of the dried cytospun cellular monolayers. We found that hESCs that were enzymatically passaged onto mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) in KOSR based hESC medium, hESCs enzymatically passaged onto Matrigel in mTESR medium and hESCs mechanically passaged onto MEFs in KOSR-based hESC medium, possessed unique FTIR spectroscopic signatures that reflect differences in their macromolecular chemistry. Further, these spectroscopic differences persisted even upon differentiation towards mesendodermal lineages. Our results suggest that FTIR microspectroscopy is a powerful, objective, measurement modality that complements existing methods for studying the phenotype of hESCs and their progeny, particularly changes induced by the cellular environment.

  3. Phase transformation mechanism in lithium manganese nickel oxide revealed by single-crystal hard X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuppan, Saravanan; Xu, Yahong; Liu, Yijin; Chen, Guoying

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the reaction pathway and kinetics of solid-state phase transformation is critical in designing advanced electrode materials with better performance and stability. Despite the first-order phase transition with a large lattice mismatch between the involved phases, spinel LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 is capable of fast rate even at large particle size, presenting an enigma yet to be understood. The present study uses advanced two-dimensional and three-dimensional nano-tomography on a series of well-formed LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (0≤x≤1) crystals to visualize the mesoscale phase distribution, as a function of Li content at the sub-particle level. Inhomogeneity along with the coexistence of Li-rich and Li-poor phases are broadly observed on partially delithiated crystals, providing direct evidence for a concurrent nucleation and growth process instead of a shrinking-core or a particle-by-particle process. Superior kinetics of (100) facets at the vertices of truncated octahedral particles promote preferential delithiation, whereas the observation of strain-induced cracking suggests mechanical degradation in the material. PMID:28145406

  4. Phase transformation mechanism in lithium manganese nickel oxide revealed by single-crystal hard X-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppan, Saravanan; Xu, Yahong; Liu, Yijin; Chen, Guoying

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the reaction pathway and kinetics of solid-state phase transformation is critical in designing advanced electrode materials with better performance and stability. Despite the first-order phase transition with a large lattice mismatch between the involved phases, spinel LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 is capable of fast rate even at large particle size, presenting an enigma yet to be understood. The present study uses advanced two-dimensional and three-dimensional nano-tomography on a series of well-formed LixMn1.5Ni0.5O4 (0<=x<=1) crystals to visualize the mesoscale phase distribution, as a function of Li content at the sub-particle level. Inhomogeneity along with the coexistence of Li-rich and Li-poor phases are broadly observed on partially delithiated crystals, providing direct evidence for a concurrent nucleation and growth process instead of a shrinking-core or a particle-by-particle process. Superior kinetics of (100) facets at the vertices of truncated octahedral particles promote preferential delithiation, whereas the observation of strain-induced cracking suggests mechanical degradation in the material.

  5. Integrative Network Analysis Combined with Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Transforming Growth Factor-beta Receptor type-2 (TGFBR2) as a Novel Regulator of Glioblastoma Stem Cell Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Narushima, Yuta; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Oyama, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant brain tumors with poor prognosis and their development and progression are known to be driven by glioblastoma stem cells. Although glioblastoma stem cells lose their cancer stem cell properties during cultivation in serum-containing medium, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating signaling alteration in relation to reduction of stem cell-like characteristics. To elucidate the global phosphorylation-related signaling events, we performed a SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of serum-induced dynamics in glioblastoma stem cells established from the tumor tissues of the patient. Among a total of 2876 phosphorylation sites on 1584 proteins identified in our analysis, 732 phosphorylation sites on 419 proteins were regulated through the alteration of stem cell-like characteristics. The integrative computational analyses based on the quantified phosphoproteome data revealed the relevant changes of phosphorylation levels regarding the proteins associated with cytoskeleton reorganization such as Rho family GTPase and Intermediate filament signaling, in addition to transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 (TGFBR2) as a prominent upstream regulator involved in the serum-induced phosphoproteome regulation. The functional association of transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 with stem cell-like properties was experimentally validated through signaling perturbation using the corresponding inhibitors, which indicated that transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 could play an important role as a novel cell fate determinant in glioblastoma stem cell regulation. PMID:26670566

  6. Detailed characterization of polar compounds of residual oil in contaminated soil revealed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xu; Li, Guanghe

    2011-10-01

    Effects of remediation technologies on polar compounds of crude oil in contaminated soils have not been well understood when compared to hydrocarbons. In this study, ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to characterize the changes in NSO polar compounds of crude oil and residual oil after long-term natural attenuation, biostimulation and subsequent ozonation following biostimulation of contaminated soils. N1 and O1 species, which were abundant in the crude oil, were selectively biodegraded, and species with higher double bond equivalent values and smaller carbon numbers appeared to be more resistant to microbial alteration. O2-O6 species were enriched by biodegradation and contained a large number of compounds with a high degree of unsaturation. Ozone could react with a variety of polar compounds in residual oil after biodegradation and showed high reactivity with polar species containing aromatic or multi-aliphatic rings, including the residual N1 and O1 species, naphthenic acids and unsaturated O3-O6 compounds. Fatty acids and O3-O8 species dominated by saturated alkyl compounds were resistant to ozonation or the primarily incomplete ozonation products. Principal component analysis of identified peaks in the FT-ICR MS spectra provided a comprehensive overview of the complex samples at the molecular level and the results were consistent with the detailed analysis. Taken together, these results showed the high complexity of polar compounds in residual oils after biodegradation or ozonation in contaminated soil and would contribute to a better understanding of bioremediation and ozonation processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Probing the Functional Diversity of Global Pristine Soil Communities with 3-Chlorobenzoate Reveals that Communities of Generalists Dominate Catabolic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Albert N.; Fulthorpe, Roberta R.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of functional diversity of microbial populations has lagged description of their molecular diversity. Differences in substrate specificity, kinetics, products, and regulation can dramatically influence phenotypic variation among closely related strains, features that are missed when the strains studied are the fastest-growing and most easily isolated from serial enrichments. To investigate the broader bacterial diversity underlying degradation of anthropogenic chemicals in nature, we studied the 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CBA) degradation rate in a collection of aerobic 3-CBA degraders previously isolated from undisturbed soils in two representative ecosystems: (i) Mediterranean sclerophyllous woodlands in California, Chile, South Africa, and Australia and (ii) boreal forests in Canada and Russia. The majority of isolates degraded 3-CBA slowly and did not completely mineralize 1.0 mM 3-CBA within 1 week. Those with intermediate degradation rates had incomplete degradation pathways and produced colored intermediates indicative of chlorocatechol, a product likely metabolized by other members of the community. About 10% of the isolates grew rapidly and mineralized greater than 90% of the 3-CBA, but because of population heterogeneity in soil, they are likely not large contributors to a soil's total transformation capacity. This suggests that xenobiotic degradation in nature is carried out by a community of cometabolic generalists and not by the efficient specialists that have been traditionally studied in the laboratory. A subset of 58 genotypically distinct strains able to degrade >80% of the 3-CBA was examined for their catabolic versatility using 45 different compounds: mono- and dichlorinated benzoates, phenols, anilines, toluenes, nitrobenzenes, chlorobenzenes, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. The isolates degraded from 2 to more than 30 compounds with a median of 7, but there was no correlation to habitat of isolation or 3-CBA activity. However, these

  8. Probing the functional diversity of global pristine soil communities with 3-chlorobenzoate reveals that communities of generalists dominate catabolic transformation.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Albert N; Fulthorpe, Roberta R; Tiedje, James M

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of functional diversity of microbial populations has lagged description of their molecular diversity. Differences in substrate specificity, kinetics, products, and regulation can dramatically influence phenotypic variation among closely related strains, features that are missed when the strains studied are the fastest-growing and most easily isolated from serial enrichments. To investigate the broader bacterial diversity underlying degradation of anthropogenic chemicals in nature, we studied the 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CBA) degradation rate in a collection of aerobic 3-CBA degraders previously isolated from undisturbed soils in two representative ecosystems: (i) Mediterranean sclerophyllous woodlands in California, Chile, South Africa, and Australia and (ii) boreal forests in Canada and Russia. The majority of isolates degraded 3-CBA slowly and did not completely mineralize 1.0 mM 3-CBA within 1 week. Those with intermediate degradation rates had incomplete degradation pathways and produced colored intermediates indicative of chlorocatechol, a product likely metabolized by other members of the community. About 10% of the isolates grew rapidly and mineralized greater than 90% of the 3-CBA, but because of population heterogeneity in soil, they are likely not large contributors to a soil's total transformation capacity. This suggests that xenobiotic degradation in nature is carried out by a community of cometabolic generalists and not by the efficient specialists that have been traditionally studied in the laboratory. A subset of 58 genotypically distinct strains able to degrade >80% of the 3-CBA was examined for their catabolic versatility using 45 different compounds: mono- and dichlorinated benzoates, phenols, anilines, toluenes, nitrobenzenes, chlorobenzenes, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. The isolates degraded from 2 to more than 30 compounds with a median of 7, but there was no correlation to habitat of isolation or 3-CBA activity. However, these

  9. Structure-function evolution of the Transforming acidic coiled coil genes revealed by analysis of phylogenetically diverse organisms

    PubMed Central

    Still, Ivan H; Vettaikkorumakankauv, Ananthalakshmy K; DiMatteo, Anthony; Liang, Ping

    2004-01-01

    Background Examination of ancient gene families can provide an insight into how the evolution of gene structure can relate to function. Functional homologs of the evolutionarily conserved transforming acidic coiled coil (TACC) gene family are present in organisms from yeast to man. However, correlations between functional interactions and the evolution of these proteins have yet to be determined. Results We have performed an extensive database analysis to determine the genomic and cDNA sequences of the TACCs from phylogenetically diverse organisms. This analysis has determined the phylogenetic relationship of the TACC proteins to other coiled coil proteins, the resolution of the placement of the rabbit TACC4 as the orthologue of human TACC3, and RHAMM as a distinct family of coiled coil proteins. We have also extended the analysis of the TACCs to the interaction databases of C. elegans and D. melanogaster to identify potentially novel TACC interactions. The validity of this modeling was confirmed independently by the demonstration of direct binding of human TACC2 to the nuclear hormone receptor RXRβ. Conclusion The data so far suggest that the ancestral TACC protein played a role in centrosomal/mitotic spindle dynamics. TACC proteins were then recruited to complexes involved in protein translation, RNA processing and transcription by interactions with specific bridging proteins. However, during evolution, the TACC proteins have now acquired the ability to directly interact with components of these complexes (such as the LSm proteins, nuclear hormone receptors, GAS41, and transcription factors). This suggests that the function of the TACC proteins may have evolved from performing assembly or coordination functions in the centrosome to include a more intimate role in the functional evolution of chromatin remodeling, transcriptional and posttranscriptional complexes in the cell. PMID:15207008

  10. In silico verification and parallel reaction monitoring prevalidation of potential prostate cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Adeola, Henry A; Calder, Bridget; Soares, Nelson C; Kaestner, Lisa; Blackburn, Jonathan M; Zerbini, Luiz F

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics of potential biomarkers is often challenging. Hence, we developed an intermediate workflow to streamline potential urinary biomarkers of prostate cancer (PCa). Using previously discovered potential PCa biomarkers; we selected proteotypic peptides for targeted validation. Preliminary in silico immunohistochemical and single reaction monitoring (SRM) verification was performed. Successful PTPs were then prevalidated using parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) and reconfirmed in 15 publicly available databases. Stringency-based targetable potential biomarkers were shortlisted following in silico screening. PRM reveals top 12 potential biomarkers including the top ranking seven in silico verification-based biomarkers. Database reconfirmation showed differential expression between PCa and benign/normal prostatic urine samples. The pragmatic penultimate screening step, described herein, would immensely improve targeted proteomics validation of potential disease biomarkers.

  11. In silico toxicology - non-testing methods.

    PubMed

    Raunio, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    In silico toxicology in its broadest sense means "anything that we can do with a computer in toxicology." Many different types of in silico methods have been developed to characterize and predict toxic outcomes in humans and environment. The term non-testing methods denote grouping approaches, structure-activity relationship, and expert systems. These methods are already used for regulatory purposes and it is anticipated that their role will be much more prominent in the near future. This Perspective will delineate the basic principles of non-testing methods and evaluate their role in current and future risk assessment of chemical compounds.

  12. High-Throughput Genotyping of Green Algal Mutants Reveals Random Distribution of Mutagenic Insertion Sites and Endonucleolytic Cleavage of Transforming DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ru; Patena, Weronika; Armbruster, Ute; Gang, Spencer S; Blum, Sean R; Jonikas, Martin C

    2014-04-01

    A high-throughput genetic screening platform in a single-celled photosynthetic eukaryote would be a transformative addition to the plant biology toolbox. Here, we present ChlaMmeSeq (Chlamydomonas MmeI-based insertion site Sequencing), a tool for simultaneous mapping of tens of thousands of mutagenic insertion sites in the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We first validated ChlaMmeSeq by in-depth characterization of individual insertion sites. We then applied ChlaMmeSeq to a mutant pool and mapped 11,478 insertions, covering 39% of annotated protein coding genes. We observe that insertions are distributed in a manner largely indistinguishable from random, indicating that mutants in nearly all genes can be obtained efficiently. The data reveal that sequence-specific endonucleolytic activities cleave the transforming DNA and allow us to propose a simple model to explain the origin of the poorly understood exogenous sequences that sometimes surround insertion sites. ChlaMmeSeq is quantitatively reproducible, enabling its use for pooled enrichment screens and for the generation of indexed mutant libraries. Additionally, ChlaMmeSeq allows genotyping of hits from Chlamydomonas screens on an unprecedented scale, opening the door to comprehensive identification of genes with roles in photosynthesis, algal lipid metabolism, the algal carbon-concentrating mechanism, phototaxis, the biogenesis and function of cilia, and other processes for which C. reinhardtii is a leading model system.

  13. In silico environmental chemical science: properties and processes from statistical and computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Tratnyek, Paul G; Bylaska, Eric J; Weber, Eric J

    2017-03-22

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) have long been used in the environmental sciences. More recently, molecular modeling and chemoinformatic methods have become widespread. These methods have the potential to expand and accelerate advances in environmental chemistry because they complement observational and experimental data with "in silico" results and analysis. The opportunities and challenges that arise at the intersection between statistical and theoretical in silico methods are most apparent in the context of properties that determine the environmental fate and effects of chemical contaminants (degradation rate constants, partition coefficients, toxicities, etc.). The main example of this is the calibration of QSARs using descriptor variable data calculated from molecular modeling, which can make QSARs more useful for predicting property data that are unavailable, but also can make them more powerful tools for diagnosis of fate determining pathways and mechanisms. Emerging opportunities for "in silico environmental chemical science" are to move beyond the calculation of specific chemical properties using statistical models and toward more fully in silico models, prediction of transformation pathways and products, incorporation of environmental factors into model predictions, integration of databases and predictive models into more comprehensive and efficient tools for exposure assessment, and extending the applicability of all the above from chemicals to biologicals and materials.

  14. High Accuracy in Silico Sulfotransferase Models*

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian; Wang, Ting; Falany, Charles N.; Leyh, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting enzymatic behavior in silico is an integral part of our efforts to understand biology. Hundreds of millions of compounds lie in targeted in silico libraries waiting for their metabolic potential to be discovered. In silico “enzymes” capable of accurately determining whether compounds can inhibit or react is often the missing piece in this endeavor. This problem has now been solved for the cytosolic sulfotransferases (SULTs). SULTs regulate the bioactivities of thousands of compounds—endogenous metabolites, drugs and other xenobiotics—by transferring the sulfuryl moiety (SO3) from 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate to the hydroxyls and primary amines of these acceptors. SULT1A1 and 2A1 catalyze the majority of sulfation that occurs during human Phase II metabolism. Here, recent insights into the structure and dynamics of SULT binding and reactivity are incorporated into in silico models of 1A1 and 2A1 that are used to identify substrates and inhibitors in a structurally diverse set of 1,455 high value compounds: the FDA-approved small molecule drugs. The SULT1A1 models predict 76 substrates. Of these, 53 were known substrates. Of the remaining 23, 21 were tested, and all were sulfated. The SULT2A1 models predict 22 substrates, 14 of which are known substrates. Of the remaining 8, 4 were tested, and all are substrates. The models proved to be 100% accurate in identifying substrates and made no false predictions at Kd thresholds of 100 μm. In total, 23 “new” drug substrates were identified, and new linkages to drug inhibitors are predicted. It now appears to be possible to accurately predict Phase II sulfonation in silico. PMID:24129576

  15. In silico analysis of the polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 from apple, Malus domestica.

    PubMed

    Matsaunyane, Lerato Bt; Oelofse, Dean; Dubery, Ian A

    2015-03-11

    The Malus domestica polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 (MdPGIP1) gene, encoding the M. domestica polygalacturonase inhibiting protein 1 (MdPGIP1), was isolated from the Granny Smith apple cultivar (GenBank accession no. DQ185063). The gene was used to transform tobacco and potato for enhanced resistance against fungal diseases. Analysis of the MdPGIP1 nucleotide sequence revealed that the gene comprises 993 nucleotides that encode a 330 amino acid polypeptide. In silico characterization of the MdPGIP1 polypeptide revealed domains typical of PGIP proteins, which include a 24 amino acid putative signal peptide, a potential cleavage site [Alanine-Leucine-Serine (ALS)] for the signal peptide, a 238 amino acid leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain, a 46 amino acid N-terminal domain and a 22 amino acid C-terminal domain. The hydropathic evaluation of MdPGIP1 indicated a repetitive hydrophobic motif in the LRR domain and a hydrophilic surface area consistent with a globular protein. The typical consensus glycosylation sequence of Asn-X-Ser/Thr was identified in MdPGIP1, indicating potential N-linked glycosylation of MdPGIP1. The molecular mass of non-glycosylated MdPGIP1 was calculated as 36.615 kDa and the theoretical isoelectric point as 6.98. Furthermore, the secondary and tertiary structure of MdPGIP1 was modelled, and revealed that MdPGIP1 is a curved and elongated molecule that contains sheet B1, sheet B2 and 310-helices on its LRR domain. The overall properties of the MdPGIP1 protein is similar to that of the prototypical Phaseolus vulgaris PGIP 2 (PvPGIP2), and the detected differences supported its use in biotechnological applications as an inhibitor of targeted fungal polygalacturonases (PGs).

  16. In silico model of drug permeability across sublingual mucosa.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Tarun; Kokate, Amit; Jasti, Bhaskara R; Li, Xiaoling

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop an in silico model to predict the sublingual permeability of a drug based on physicochemical descriptors of a molecule. Fourteen model drugs with diverse physicochemical properties were selected for this study. Molecular volume, molecular weight, logP, logD (pH 6.8), pKa, total polar surface area, hydrogen bond acceptors and donors (HBD), number of rotatable bonds, solubility (pH 6.8), and melting point were used as molecular descriptors. Apparent permeability coefficients (Pe) of drugs across porcine sublingual mucosa were determined experimentally. Multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to develop the model with permeability as the response variable and various descriptors as the predictive variables. Q(2), the cross-validated correlation coefficient, was used to assess the prediction ability of the model. MLR analysis showed that HBD and logD were the significant descriptors (P<0.05, Q(2)=0.88) in the sublingual permeability model. The resulting model is expressed as the following equation:An excellent fit with R(2) of 0.93 was obtained between experimental and predicted permeabilities. The analysis of contributions of molecular descriptors to sublingual permeability revealed the molecular structure basis of permeation across sublingual mucosa. In conclusion, an in silico model was developed to predict sublingual permeability of drugs using known descriptors for evaluating the feasibility of sublingual drug delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. C3 photosynthesis in silico.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Eichelmann, Hillar; Oja, Vello

    2006-10-01

    A computer model comprising light reactions, electron-proton transport, enzymatic reactions, and regulatory functions of C3 photosynthesis has been developed as a system of differential budget equations for intermediate compounds. The emphasis is on electron transport through PSII and PSI and on the modeling of Chl fluorescence and 810 nm absorptance signals. Non-photochemical quenching of PSII excitation is controlled by lumenal pH. Alternative electron transport is modeled as the Mehler type O2 reduction plus the malate-oxaloacetate shuttle based on the chloroplast malate dehydrogenase. Carbon reduction enzymes are redox-controlled by the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system, sucrose synthesis is controlled by the fructose 2,6-bisphosphate inhibition of cytosolic FBPase, and starch synthesis is controlled by ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Photorespiratory glycolate pathway is included in an integrated way, sufficient to reproduce steady-state rates of photorespiration. Rate-equations are designed on principles of multisubstrate-multiproduct enzyme kinetics. The parameters of the model were adopted from literature or were estimated from fitting the photosynthetic rate and pool sizes to experimental data. The model provided good simulations for steady-state photosynthesis, Chl fluorescence, and 810 nm transmittance signals under varying light, CO2 and O2 concentrations, as well as for the transients of post-illumination CO2 uptake, Chl fluorescence induction and the 810 nm signal. The modeling shows that the present understanding of photosynthesis incorporated in the model is basically correct, but still insufficient to reproduce the dark-light induction of photosynthesis, the time kinetics of non-photochemical quenching, 'photosynthetic control' of plastoquinone oxidation, cyclic electron flow around PSI, oscillations in photosynthesis. The model may find application for predicting the results of gene transformations, the analysis of kinetic experimental data, the

  18. In silico PCR primer designing and validation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Chordia, Nikita

    2015-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an enzymatic reaction whose efficiency and sensitivity largely depend on the efficiency of the primers that are used for the amplification of a concerned gene/DNA fragment. Selective amplification of nucleic acid molecules initially present in minute quantities provides a powerful tool for analyzing nucleic acids. In silico method helps in designing primers. There are various programs available for PCR primer design. Here we described designing of primers using web-based tools like "Primer3" and "Web Primer". For designing the primer, DNA template sequence is required that can be taken from any of the available sequence databases, e.g., RefSeq database. The in silico validation can be carried out using BLAST tool and Gene Runner software, which check their efficiency and specificity. Thereafter, the primers designed in silico can be validated in the wet lab. After that, these validated primers can be synthesized for use in the amplification of concerned gene/DNA fragment.

  19. In Silico 3D Modeling of Binding Activities.

    PubMed

    Moro, Stefano; Sturlese, Mattia; Ciancetta, Antonella; Floris, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    In silico three-dimensional (3D) molecular modeling tools based upon the receptor/enzyme-ligand docking simulation in protein crystal structures and/or homology modeling of receptors have been reliably used in pharmacological research and development for decades. Molecular docking methodologies are helpful for revealing facets of activation and inactivation, thus improving mechanistic understanding and predicting molecular ligand binding activity, and they can have a high level of accuracy, and have also been explored and applied in chemical risk assessment. This computational approach is, however, only applicable for chemical hazard identification situations where the specific target receptor for a given chemical is known and the crystal structure/homology model of the receptor is available.

  20. Chemical Functionalization of Germanium with Dextran Brushes for Immobilization of Proteins Revealed by Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Difference Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schartner, Jonas; Hoeck, Nina; Güldenhaupt, Jörn; Mavarani, Laven; Nabers, Andreas; Gerwert, Klaus; Kötting, Carsten

    2015-07-21

    Protein immobilization studied by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) difference spectroscopy is an emerging field enabling the study of proteins at atomic detail. Gold or glass surfaces are frequently used for protein immobilization. Here, we present an alternative method for protein immobilization on germanium. Because of its high refractive index and broad spectral window germanium is the best material for ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy of thin layers. So far, this technique was mainly used for protein monolayers, which lead to a limited signal-to-noise ratio. Further, undesired protein-protein interactions can occur in a dense layer. Here, the germanium surface was functionalized with thiols and stepwise a dextran brush was generated. Each step was monitored by ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. We compared a 70 kDa dextran with a 500 kDa dextran regarding the binding properties. All surfaces were characterized by atomic force microscopy, revealing thicknesses between 40 and 110 nm. To analyze the capability of our system we utilized N-Ras on mono-NTA (nitrilotriacetic acid) functionalized dextran, and the amount of immobilized Ras corresponded to several monolayers. The protein stability and loading capacity was further improved by means of tris-NTA for immobilization. Small-molecule-induced changes were revealed with an over 3 times higher signal-to-noise ratio compared to monolayers. This improvement may allow the observation of very small and so far hidden changes in proteins upon stimulus. Furthermore, we immobilized green fluorescent protein (GFP) and mCherry simultaneously enabling an analysis of the surface by fluorescence microscopy. The absence of a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal demonstrated a large protein-protein distance, indicating an even distribution of the protein within the dextran.

  1. Lower nanometer-scale size limit for the deformation of a metallic glass by shear transformations revealed by quantitative AFM indentation

    PubMed Central

    Bennewitz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Summary We combine non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and AFM indentation in ultra-high vacuum to quantitatively and reproducibly determine the hardness and deformation mechanisms of Pt(111) and a Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass with unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results on plastic deformation mechanisms of crystalline Pt(111) are consistent with the discrete mechanisms established for larger scales: Plasticity is mediated by dislocation gliding and no rate dependence is observed. For the metallic glass we have discovered that plastic deformation at the nanometer scale is not discrete but continuous and localized around the indenter, and does not exhibit rate dependence. This contrasts with the observation of serrated, rate-dependent flow of metallic glasses at larger scales. Our results reveal a lower size limit for metallic glasses below which shear transformation mechanisms are not activated by indentation. In the case of metallic glass, we conclude that the energy stored in the stressed volume during nanometer-scale indentation is insufficient to account for the interfacial energy of a shear band in the glassy matrix. PMID:26425424

  2. Size-dependent physicochemical and mechanical interactions in battery paste anodes of Si-microwires revealed by Fast-Fourier-Transform Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Sandra; Quiroga-González, Enrique; Carstensen, Jürgen; Adelung, Rainer; Föll, Helmut

    2017-05-01

    Perfectly aligned silicon microwire arrays show exceptionally high cycling stability with record setting (high) areal capacities of 4.25 mAh cm-2. Those wires have a special, modified length and thickness in order to perform this good. Geometry and sizes are the most important parameters of an anode to obtain batteries with high cycling stability without irreversible losses. The wires are prepared with a unique etching fabrication method, which allows to fabricate wires of very precise sizes. In order to investigate how good randomly oriented silicon wires perform in contrast to the perfect order of the array, the wires are embedded in a paste. This study reveals the fundamental correlation between geometry, mechanics and charge transfer kinetics of silicon electrodes. Using a suitable RC equivalent circuit allows to evaluate data from cyclic voltammetry and simultaneous FFT-Impedance Spectroscopy (FFT-IS), yielding in time-resolved resistances, time constants, and their direct correlation to the phase transformations. The change of the resistances during lithiation and delithiation correlates to kinetics and charge transfer mechanisms. This study demonstrates how the mechanical and physiochemical interactions at the silicon/paste interface inside the paste electrodes lead to void formation around silicon and with it to material loss and capacity fading.

  3. Lower nanometer-scale size limit for the deformation of a metallic glass by shear transformations revealed by quantitative AFM indentation.

    PubMed

    Caron, Arnaud; Bennewitz, Roland

    2015-01-01

    We combine non-contact atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and AFM indentation in ultra-high vacuum to quantitatively and reproducibly determine the hardness and deformation mechanisms of Pt(111) and a Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 metallic glass with unprecedented spatial resolution. Our results on plastic deformation mechanisms of crystalline Pt(111) are consistent with the discrete mechanisms established for larger scales: Plasticity is mediated by dislocation gliding and no rate dependence is observed. For the metallic glass we have discovered that plastic deformation at the nanometer scale is not discrete but continuous and localized around the indenter, and does not exhibit rate dependence. This contrasts with the observation of serrated, rate-dependent flow of metallic glasses at larger scales. Our results reveal a lower size limit for metallic glasses below which shear transformation mechanisms are not activated by indentation. In the case of metallic glass, we conclude that the energy stored in the stressed volume during nanometer-scale indentation is insufficient to account for the interfacial energy of a shear band in the glassy matrix.

  4. In silico toxicology for the pharmaceutical sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio, Luis G.

    2009-12-15

    The applied use of in silico technologies (a.k.a. computational toxicology, in silico toxicology, computer-assisted tox, e-tox, i-drug discovery, predictive ADME, etc.) for predicting preclinical toxicological endpoints, clinical adverse effects, and metabolism of pharmaceutical substances has become of high interest to the scientific community and the public. The increased accessibility of these technologies for scientists and recent regulations permitting their use for chemical risk assessment supports this notion. The scientific community is interested in the appropriate use of such technologies as a tool to enhance product development and safety of pharmaceuticals and other xenobiotics, while ensuring the reliability and accuracy of in silico approaches for the toxicological and pharmacological sciences. For pharmaceutical substances, this means active and impurity chemicals in the drug product may be screened using specialized software and databases designed to cover these substances through a chemical structure-based screening process and algorithm specific to a given software program. A major goal for use of these software programs is to enable industry scientists not only to enhance the discovery process but also to ensure the judicious use of in silico tools to support risk assessments of drug-induced toxicities and in safety evaluations. However, a great amount of applied research is still needed, and there are many limitations with these approaches which are described in this review. Currently, there is a wide range of endpoints available from predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models driven by many different computational software programs and data sources, and this is only expected to grow. For example, there are models based on non-proprietary and/or proprietary information specific to assessing potential rodent carcinogenicity, in silico screens for ICH genetic toxicity assays, reproductive and developmental toxicity, theoretical

  5. In silico toxicology for the pharmaceutical sciences.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Luis G

    2009-12-15

    The applied use of in silico technologies (a.k.a. computational toxicology, in silico toxicology, computer-assisted tox, e-tox, i-drug discovery, predictive ADME, etc.) for predicting preclinical toxicological endpoints, clinical adverse effects, and metabolism of pharmaceutical substances has become of high interest to the scientific community and the public. The increased accessibility of these technologies for scientists and recent regulations permitting their use for chemical risk assessment supports this notion. The scientific community is interested in the appropriate use of such technologies as a tool to enhance product development and safety of pharmaceuticals and other xenobiotics, while ensuring the reliability and accuracy of in silico approaches for the toxicological and pharmacological sciences. For pharmaceutical substances, this means active and impurity chemicals in the drug product may be screened using specialized software and databases designed to cover these substances through a chemical structure-based screening process and algorithm specific to a given software program. A major goal for use of these software programs is to enable industry scientists not only to enhance the discovery process but also to ensure the judicious use of in silico tools to support risk assessments of drug-induced toxicities and in safety evaluations. However, a great amount of applied research is still needed, and there are many limitations with these approaches which are described in this review. Currently, there is a wide range of endpoints available from predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models driven by many different computational software programs and data sources, and this is only expected to grow. For example, there are models based on non-proprietary and/or proprietary information specific to assessing potential rodent carcinogenicity, in silico screens for ICH genetic toxicity assays, reproductive and developmental toxicity, theoretical

  6. Regenerative orthopaedics: in vitro, in vivo...in silico.

    PubMed

    Geris, Liesbet

    2014-09-01

    In silico, defined in analogy to in vitro and in vivo as those studies that are performed on a computer, is an essential step in problem-solving and product development in classical engineering fields. The use of in silico models is now slowly easing its way into medicine. In silico models are already used in orthopaedics for the planning of complicated surgeries, personalised implant design and the analysis of gait measurements. However, these in silico models often lack the simulation of the response of the biological system over time. In silico models focusing on the response of the biological systems are in full development. This review starts with an introduction into in silico models of orthopaedic processes. Special attention is paid to the classification of models according to their spatiotemporal scale (gene/protein to population) and the information they were built on (data vs hypotheses). Subsequently, the review focuses on the in silico models used in regenerative orthopaedics research. Contributions of in silico models to an enhanced understanding and optimisation of four key elements-cells, carriers, culture and clinics-are illustrated. Finally, a number of challenges are identified, related to the computational aspects but also to the integration of in silico tools into clinical practice.

  7. In silico archeogenomics unveils modern plant genome organisation, regulation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Salse, Jérôme

    2012-04-01

    Increasing access to plant genome sequences as well as high resolution gene-based genetic maps have recently offered the opportunity to compare modern genomes and model their evolutionary history from their reconstructed founder ancestors on an unprecedented scale. In silico paleogenomic data have revealed the evolutionary forces that have shaped present-day genomes and allowed us to gain insight into how they are organised and regulated today. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Differences in the structural stability and cooperativity between monomeric variants of natural and de novo Cro proteins revealed by high-pressure Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Hiroshi; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Kato, Minoru

    2012-05-01

    It is widely accepted that pressure affects the structure and dynamics of proteins; however, the underlying mechanism remains unresolved. Our previous studies have investigated the effects of pressure on fundamental secondary structural elements using model peptides, because these peptides represent a basis for understanding the effects of pressure on more complex structures. This study targeted monomeric variants of naturally occurring bacteriophage λ Cro (natural Cro) and de novo designed λ Cro (SN4m), which are α + β proteins. The sequence of SN4m is 75% different from that of natural Cro, but the structures are almost identical. Consequently, a comparison of the folding properties of these proteins is of interest. Pressure- and temperature-variable Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses revealed that the α-helices and β-sheets of natural Cro are cooperatively and reversibly unfolded by pressure and temperature, whereas those of SN4m are not cooperatively unfolded by pressure; i.e., the α-helices of SN4m unfold at significantly higher pressures than the β-sheets and irreversibly unfold with increases in temperature. The higher unfolding pressure for the α-helices of SN4m indicates the presence of an intermediate structure of SN4m that does not retain β-sheet structure but does preserve the α-helices. These results demonstrate that the α-helices of natural Cro are stabilized by global tertiary contacts among the α-helices and the β-sheets, whereas the α-helices of SN4m are stabilized by local tertiary contacts between the α-helices.

  9. Ternary Complex of Transforming Growth Factor-[beta]1 Reveals Isoform-specific Ligand Recognition and Receptor Recruitment in the Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Radaev, Sergei; Zou, Zhongcheng; Huang, Tao; Lafer, Eileen M.; Hinck, Andrew P.; Sun, Peter D.

    2010-11-03

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}1, -{beta}2, and -{beta}3 are 25-kDa homodimeric polypeptides that play crucial nonoverlapping roles in embryogenesis, tissue development, carcinogenesis, and immune regulation. Here we report the 3.0-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the ternary complex between human TGF-{beta}1 and the extracellular domains of its type I and type II receptors, T{beta}RI and T{beta}RII. The TGF-{beta}1 ternary complex structure is similar to previously reported TGF-{beta}3 complex except with a 10{sup o} rotation in T{beta}RI docking orientation. Quantitative binding studies showed distinct kinetics between the receptors and the isoforms of TGF-{beta}. T{beta}RI showed significant binding to TGF-{beta}2 and TGF-{beta}3 but not TGF-{beta}1, and the binding to all three isoforms of TGF-{beta} was enhanced considerably in the presence of T{beta}RII. The preference of TGF-{beta}2 to T{beta}RI suggests a variation in its receptor recruitment in vivo. Although TGF-{beta}1 and TGF-{beta}3 bind and assemble their ternary complexes in a similar manner, their structural differences together with differences in the affinities and kinetics of their receptor binding may underlie their unique biological activities. Structural comparisons revealed that the receptor-ligand pairing in the TGF-{beta} superfamily is dictated by unique insertions, deletions, and disulfide bonds rather than amino acid conservation at the interface. The binding mode of T{beta}RII on TGF-{beta} is unique to TGF-{beta}s, whereas that of type II receptor for bone morphogenetic protein on bone morphogenetic protein appears common to all other cytokines in the superfamily. Further, extensive hydrogen bonds and salt bridges are present at the high affinity cytokine-receptor interfaces, whereas hydrophobic interactions dominate the low affinity receptor-ligand interfaces.

  10. Eukaryotic transcriptomics in silico: optimizing cDNA-AFLP efficiency.

    PubMed

    Stölting, Kai N; Gort, Gerrit; Wüst, Christian; Wilson, Anthony B

    2009-11-30

    Complementary-DNA based amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) is a commonly used tool for assessing the genetic regulation of traits through the correlation of trait expression with cDNA expression profiles. In spite of the frequent application of this method, studies on the optimization of the cDNA-AFLP assay design are rare and have typically been taxonomically restricted. Here, we model cDNA-AFLPs on all 92 eukaryotic species for which cDNA pools are currently available, using all combinations of eight restriction enzymes standard in cDNA-AFLP screens. In silco simulations reveal that cDNA pool coverage is largely determined by the choice of individual restriction enzymes and that, through the choice of optimal enzyme combinations, coverage can be increased from <40% to 75% without changing the underlying experimental design. We find evidence of phylogenetic signal in the coverage data, which is largely mediated by organismal GC content. There is nonetheless a high degree of consistency in cDNA pool coverage for particular enzyme combinations, indicating that our recommendations should be applicable to most eukaryotic systems. We also explore the relationship between the average observed fragment number per selective AFLP-PCR reaction and the size of the underlying cDNA pool, and show how AFLP experiments can be used to estimate the number of genes expressed in a target tissue. The insights gained from in silico screening of cDNA-AFLPs from a broad sampling of eukaryotes provide a set of guidelines that should help to substantially increase the efficiency of future cDNA-AFLP experiments in eukaryotes. In silico simulations also suggest a novel use of cDNA-AFLP screens to determine the number of transcripts expressed in a target tissue, an application that should be invaluable as next-generation sequencing technologies are adapted for differential display.

  11. In silico dissolution rates of pharmaceutical ingredients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Berna; Schneider, Julian; Reuter, Karsten

    2016-10-01

    The correlation between in vitro dissolution rates and the efficiency of drug formulations establishes an opportunity for accelerated drug development. Using in silico methods to predict the dissolution rates bears the prospect of further efficiency gains by avoiding the actual synthesis of candidate formulations. Here, we present a computational protocol that achieves such prediction for molecular crystals at low undersaturation. The protocol exploits the classic spiral dissolution model to minimize the number of material parameters that require explicit molecular simulations. Comparison to available data for acetylsalicylic acid and alpha lactose monohydrate indicates a tunable accuracy within one order of magnitude.

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis of silico-manganese nanohybrid for Cu(II) adsorption from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiufeng; Wang, Liting; An, Zehuan; Ye, Hong; Feng, Xudong

    2016-05-01

    A novel silico-manganese nanohybrid adsorbent (SMNA) was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method, and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and zeta potential measurement. The adsorption of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution on the SMNA was investigated with variations in contact time, pH and initial Cu(II) concentration. The results showed that hydrothermal method would generate nanowire/nanorod incomplete crystallite (δ-MnO2) adsorbent. The adsorption of Cu(II) onto SMNA increased sharply within 25 min and reached equilibrium gradually. The maximum adsorption capacities of SMNA for Cu(II) were ∼40-88 mg g-1, which was lower than δ-MnO2 (92.42 mg g-1) but had a lower pH dependency. As compared with δ-MnO2, higher adsorption capacities of SMNA (7.5-15 wt% of silica doping amount) for Cu(II) could be observed when pH of the aqueous solution was low (<4). The pseudo-second-order model was the best choice to describe the adsorption behavior of Cu(II) onto SMNA, suggesting that the removal of Cu(II) by the as-prepared adsorbents was dominated by migration of Cu(II). The possibility of Cu(II) recovery was also investigated and it revealed that SMNA was a promising recyclable adsorbent for removal of heavy metal ions in water and wastewater treatment.

  13. In silico environmental chemical science: properties and processes from statistical and computational modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Tratnyek, Paul G.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Weber, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSARs) have long been used in the environmental sciences. More recently, molecular modeling and chemoinformatic methods have become widespread. These methods have the potential to expand and accelerate advances in environmental chemistry because they complement observational and experimental data with “in silico” results and analysis. The opportunities and challenges that arise at the intersection between statistical and theoretical in silico methods are most apparent in the context of properties that determine the environmental fate and effects of chemical contaminants (degradation rate constants, partition coefficients, toxicities, etc.). The main example of this is the calibration of QSARs using descriptor variable data calculated from molecular modeling, which can make QSARs more useful for predicting property data that are unavailable, but also can make them more powerful tools for diagnosis of fate determining pathways and mechanisms. Emerging opportunities for “in silico environmental chemical science” are to move beyond the calculation of specific chemical properties using statistical models and toward more fully in silico models, prediction of transformation pathways and products, incorporation of environmental factors into model predictions, integration of databases and predictive models into more comprehensive and efficient tools for exposure assessment, and extending the applicability of all the above from chemicals to biologicals and materials.

  14. In silico modeling and evaluation of Gordonia alkanivorans for biodesulfurization.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Shilpi; Karimi, I A; Ivan, Gregorius Reinaldi

    2013-10-01

    The genus Gordonia is well known for its catabolic diversity and ability to transform several compounds including the various recalcitrant polyaromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) found in the fossil fuels. In fact, some strains offer the unique ability to desulfurize even benzothiophene (BT) and other thiophenic compounds, which most of the commonly studied rhodococci strains cannot. In this work, we present the first genome scale metabolic model for G. alkanivorans, a desulfurizing strain, to enable a holistic study of its metabolism and comparison with R. erythropolis. Our model consists of 881 unique metabolites and 922 reactions associated with 568 ORFs/genes and 544 unique enzymes. It successfully predicts the growth rates from experimental studies and quantitatively elucidates the pathways for the desulfurization of the commonly studied sulfur compounds, namely dibenzothiophene (DBT) and benzothiophene (BT). Using our model, we identify the minimal media for G. alkanivorans, and show the significant effect of carbon sources on desulfurization with ethanol as the best source. Our model shows that the sulfur-containing amino acids such as cysteine and methionine decrease desulfurization activity, and G. alkanivorans prefers BT over DBT as a sulfur source. It also suggests that this preference may be driven by the lower NADH requirements for BT metabolism rather than the higher affinity of the transport system for BT. Our in silico comparison of R. erythropolis and G. alkanivorans suggests the latter to be a better desulfurizing strain due to its versatility for both BT and DBT, higher desulfurization activity, and higher growth rate.

  15. QSAR Approaches Applied to Antidepressants Induced Neurogenesis--in vivo and in silico Applications.

    PubMed

    Avram, Speranta; Borcan, Florin; Borcan, Livia-Cristina; Milac, Adina L; Mihailescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Brain presents very complex advanced protective mechanisms. However, these mechanisms occasionally fail due to risk factors represented by genetic, environmental or social stress and consequently, severe psychiatric disorders such as depression, schizophrenia or psychotic depression are induced. Under such circumstances, latest strategies in experimental and in silico neuroscience consider essential to identify new applications of already clinically-approved drugs for the treatment of psychiatric disorders but also as promoters of neurogenesis and neurites outgrowth. Results of recent studies suggested that antidepressants are able to induce neurogenesis and neurites outgrowth by their agonistic effects on 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor (5-HT), especially 5-HT 1A, and sigma1 receptor (σ1R), but many molecular aspects of these processes are still unclear. Here we present structural aspects of molecular complexes (5-HT 1A and σ1R and their ligands) revealed by experimental and in silico studies. Here we present the chemical structures-biological activity relationship (SAR) of these molecules revealed by recent experimental and in silico studies, offering a new perspective on the antidepressants mechanism as neurogenesis and neurites outgrowth promoters.

  16. In Silico Constraint-Based Strain Optimization Methods: the Quest for Optimal Cell Factories

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Paulo; Rocha, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Shifting from chemical to biotechnological processes is one of the cornerstones of 21st century industry. The production of a great range of chemicals via biotechnological means is a key challenge on the way toward a bio-based economy. However, this shift is occurring at a pace slower than initially expected. The development of efficient cell factories that allow for competitive production yields is of paramount importance for this leap to happen. Constraint-based models of metabolism, together with in silico strain design algorithms, promise to reveal insights into the best genetic design strategies, a step further toward achieving that goal. In this work, a thorough analysis of the main in silico constraint-based strain design strategies and algorithms is presented, their application in real-world case studies is analyzed, and a path for the future is discussed. PMID:26609052

  17. Transformational Learners: Transformational Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Marguerite

    2009-01-01

    Transformational learning, according to Mezirow (1981), involves transforming taken-for-granted frames of reference into more discriminating, flexible "habits of mind". In teacher education, transformative learning impacts on the development of students' action theories, self-efficacy and professional attributes. Although considered…

  18. The Transformations of Transformations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Francis Y.

    2000-01-01

    Harris's original idea of transformations has been changed several times in Chomsky's work. This article explicates these transformations, arguing that though their motivations are highly understandable, these transformations are not necessary for understanding the workings of natural languages. (Author/VWL)

  19. In silico prediction of drug properties.

    PubMed

    Hutter, M C

    2009-01-01

    Drug design has become inconceivable without the assistance of computer-aided methods. In this context in silico was chosen as designation to emphasize the relationship to in vitro and in vivo testing. Nowadays, virtual screening covers much more than estimation of solubility and oral bioavailability of compounds. Along with the challenge of parsing virtual compound libraries, the necessity to model more specific metabolic and toxicological aspects has emerged. Here, recent developments in prediction models are summarized, covering optimization problems in the fields of cytochrome P450 metabolism, blood-brain-barrier permeability, central nervous system activity, and blockade of the hERG-potassium channel. Aspects arising from the use of homology models and quantum chemical calculations are considered with respect to the biological functions. Furthermore, approaches to distinguish drug-like substances from nondrugs by the means of machine learning algorithms are compared in order to derive guidelines for the design of new agents with appropriate properties.

  20. In Vivo and In Silico Investigation Into Mechanisms of Frequency Dependence of Repolarization Alternans in Human Ventricular Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso; Orini, Michele; Hanson, Ben; Hayward, Martin; Taggart, Peter; Lambiase, Pier D.; Burrage, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Repolarization alternans (RA) are associated with arrhythmogenesis. Animal studies have revealed potential mechanisms, but human-focused studies are needed. RA generation and frequency dependence may be determined by cell-to-cell variability in protein expression, which is regulated by genetic and external factors. Objective: To characterize in vivo RA in human and to investigate in silico using human models, the ionic mechanisms underlying the frequency-dependent differences in RA behavior identified in vivo. Methods and Results: In vivo electrograms were acquired at 240 sites covering the epicardium of 41 patients at 6 cycle lengths (600–350 ms). In silico investigations were conducted using a population of biophysically detailed human models incorporating variability in protein expression and calibrated using in vivo recordings. Both in silico and in vivo, 2 types of RA were identified, with Fork- and Eye-type restitution curves, based on RA persistence or disappearance, respectively, at fast pacing rates. In silico simulations show that RA are strongly correlated with fluctuations in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium, because of strong release and weak reuptake. Large L-type calcium current conductance is responsible for RA disappearance at fast frequencies in Eye-type (30% larger in Eye-type versus Fork-type; P<0.01), because of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase pump potentiation caused by frequency-induced increase in intracellular calcium. Large Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current is the main driver in translating Ca2+ fluctuations into RA. Conclusions: In human in vivo and in silico, 2 types of RA are identified, with RA persistence/disappearance as frequency increases. In silico, L-type calcium current and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger current determine RA human cell-to-cell differences through intracellular and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium regulation. PMID:26602864

  1. Psychoanalytic transformations.

    PubMed

    Riolo, Fernando

    2007-12-01

    The author describes how Bion took Freud's conception of dreams as a form of thought and used it as the basis of his theory of transformations. Bion developed an expanded theory of 'dream thought', understood as a process of selection and transformation of sensory and emotional experiences. In this theory, the work of analysis is in turn conceived as a process not only of deciphering symbols, of revealing already existing unconscious meanings, but also of symbol production--of a process for generating thoughts and conferring meaning on experiences that have never been conscious and never been repressed because they have never been 'thought'. Analysis, in its specific operational sense, becomes a system of transformation whereby unconscious somatopsychic processes acquire the conditions for representability and become capable of translation into thoughts, words and interpretations. The rules of transformation applied by the patient in his representations and those applied by the analyst in his interpretations have the same importance for the analytic process as those described by Freud for the process of dreaming. The author discusses the broad categories of transformation adduced by Bion (rigid motion, projective, and in hallucinosis) and introduces some further distinctions within them.

  2. Large-scale benchmarking reveals false discoveries and count transformation sensitivity in 16S rRNA gene amplicon data analysis methods used in microbiome studies.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Jonathan; Brejnrod, Asker; Mortensen, Martin; Rasmussen, Morten A; Stokholm, Jakob; Al-Soud, Waleed Abu; Sørensen, Søren; Bisgaard, Hans; Waage, Johannes

    2016-11-25

    There is an immense scientific interest in the human microbiome and its effects on human physiology, health, and disease. A common approach for examining bacterial communities is high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene hypervariable regions, aggregating sequence-similar amplicons into operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Strategies for detecting differential relative abundance of OTUs between sample conditions include classical statistical approaches as well as a plethora of newer methods, many borrowing from the related field of RNA-seq analysis. This effort is complicated by unique data characteristics, including sparsity, sequencing depth variation, and nonconformity of read counts to theoretical distributions, which is often exacerbated by exploratory and/or unbalanced study designs. Here, we assess the robustness of available methods for (1) inference in differential relative abundance analysis and (2) beta-diversity-based sample separation, using a rigorous benchmarking framework based on large clinical 16S microbiome datasets from different sources. Running more than 380,000 full differential relative abundance tests on real datasets with permuted case/control assignments and in silico-spiked OTUs, we identify large differences in method performance on a range of parameters, including false positive rates, sensitivity to sparsity and case/control balances, and spike-in retrieval rate. In large datasets, methods with the highest false positive rates also tend to have the best detection power. For beta-diversity-based sample separation, we show that library size normalization has very little effect and that the distance metric is the most important factor in terms of separation power. Our results, generalizable to datasets from different sequencing platforms, demonstrate how the choice of method considerably affects analysis outcome. Here, we give recommendations for tools that exhibit low false positive rates, have good retrieval power across effect sizes

  3. In silico-based high-throughput screen for discovery of novel combinations for tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ragini; Ramachandran, Vasanthi; Shandil, Radha; Sharma, Sreevalli; Khandelwal, Swati; Karmarkar, Malancha; Kumar, Naveen; Solapure, Suresh; Saralaya, Ramanatha; Nanduri, Robert; Panduga, Vijender; Reddy, Jitendar; Prabhakar, K R; Rajagopalan, Swaminathan; Rao, Narasimha; Narayanan, Shridhar; Anandkumar, Anand; Balasubramanian, V; Datta, Santanu

    2015-09-01

    There are currently 18 drug classes for the treatment of tuberculosis, including those in the development pipeline. An in silico simulation enabled combing the innumerably large search space to derive multidrug combinations. Through the use of ordinary differential equations (ODE), we constructed an in silico kinetic platform in which the major metabolic pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the mechanisms of the antituberculosis drugs were integrated into a virtual proteome. The optimized model was used to evaluate 816 triplets from the set of 18 drugs. The experimentally derived cumulative fractional inhibitory concentration (∑FIC) value was within twofold of the model prediction. Bacterial enumeration revealed that a significant number of combinations that were synergistic for growth inhibition were also synergistic for bactericidal effect. The in silico-based screen provided new starting points for testing in a mouse model of tuberculosis, in which two novel triplets and five novel quartets were significantly superior to the reference drug triplet of isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol (HRE) or the quartet of HRE plus pyrazinamide (HREZ).

  4. In Silico Approach to Finding New Active Compounds from Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Family.

    PubMed

    Yanuar, Arry; Azminah, EmptyYN Y; Andika, EmptyYN Y; Erlina, Linda; Syahdi, Rezi Riadhi

    2016-01-01

    Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes in the human body play an important role in the transcriptional regulation of gene expression. In the last decade, HDAC inhibitors and activators have been explored and have become known as therapeutic agents for many diseases such as osteodystrophy, neurogenerative disorders, cardiomyopathy, cancer, and diabetes. In recent years, the development of HDAC inhibitors or activators to obtain new potent lead compounds has been conducted using in vitro, in vivo, and in silico methods. Some HDAC family inhibitors and activators have been discovered. But some compounds have limitations such as not selectively binding to one of the HDAC variants. At present, through bioinformation, HDAC family sequences have been revealed, and some in silico methods such as molecular modelling (homology modelling and pharmacophore modelling), virtual screening, and molecular dynamics are widely used to find and develop new potent and selective compounds. The main utilization of molecular modelling in this work is intended to complete the HDAC structure that partially lacks data regarding its amino acid monomer. Virtual screening methods are helpful in finding the best binding affinity of the test compounds. By molecular dynamic simulation, the temperature, time, and pressure can be adjusted to analyze the hydrogen bond. Combining these in silico approaches will be a more effective and efficient solution in finding new lead compounds for HDAC drug discovery research in the future.

  5. Structural analysis of in silico mutant experiments of human inner-kinetochore structure.

    PubMed

    Henze, Richard; Huwald, Jan; Mostajo, Nelly; Dittrich, Peter; Ibrahim, Bashar

    2015-01-01

    Large multi-molecular complexes like the kinetochore are lacking of suitable methods to determine their spatial structure. Here, we use and evaluate a novel modeling approach that combines rule-bases reaction network models with spatial molecular geometries. In particular, we introduce a method that allows to study in silico the influence of single interactions (e.g. bonds) on the spatial organization of large multi-molecular complexes and apply this method to an extended model of the human inner-kinetochore. Our computational analysis method encompasses determination of bond frequency, geometrical distances, statistical moments, and inter-dependencies between bonds using mutual information. For the analysis we have extend our previously reported human inner-kinetochore model by adding 13 new protein interactions and three protein geometry details. The model is validated by comparing the results of in silico with reported in vitro single protein deletion experiments. Our studies revealed that most simulations mimic the in vitro behavior of the kinetochore complex as expected. To identify the most important bonds in this model, we have created 39 mutants in silico by selectively disabling single protein interactions. In a total of 11,800 simulation runs we have compared the resulting structures to the wild-type. In particular, this allowed us to identify the interaction Cenp-W-H3 and Cenp-S-Cenp-X as having the strongest influence on the inner-kinetochore's structure. We conclude that our approach can become a useful tool for the in silico dynamical study of large, multi-molecular complexes.

  6. In Silico Strategies for Modeling Stereoselective Metabolism of Pyrethroids

    EPA Science Inventory

    In silico methods are invaluable tools to researchers seeking to understand and predict metabolic processes within PBPK models. Even though these methods have been successfully utilized to predict and quantify metabolic processes, there are many challenges involved. Stereochemica...

  7. In Silico Strategies for Modeling Stereoselective Metabolism of Pyrethroids

    EPA Science Inventory

    In silico methods are invaluable tools to researchers seeking to understand and predict metabolic processes within PBPK models. Even though these methods have been successfully utilized to predict and quantify metabolic processes, there are many challenges involved. Stereochemica...

  8. 4 Years after the Deepwater Horizon Spill: Molecular Transformation of Macondo Well Oil in Louisiana Salt Marsh Sediments Revealed by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan; Hou, Aixin; Corilo, Yuri E; Lin, Qianxin; Lu, Jie; Mendelssohn, Irving A; Zhang, Rui; Rodgers, Ryan P; McKenna, Amy M

    2016-09-06

    Gulf of Mexico saltmarsh sediments were heavily impacted by Macondo well oil (MWO) released from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill. Detailed molecular-level characterization of sediment extracts collected over 48 months post-spill highlights the chemical complexity of highly polar, oxygen-containing compounds that remain environmentally persistent. Electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS), combined with chromatographic prefractionation, correlates bulk chemical properties to elemental compositions of oil-transformation products as a function of time. Carboxylic acid incorporation into parent MWO hydrocarbons detected in sediment extracts (corrected for mass loss relative to C30 hopane) proceeds with an increase of ∼3-fold in O2 species after 9 months to a maximum of a ∼5.5-fold increase after 36 months, compared to the parent MWO. More importantly, higher-order oxygenated compounds (O4-O6) not detected in the parent MWO increase in relative abundance with time as lower-order oxygenated species are transformed into highly polar, oxygen-containing compounds (Ox, where x > 3). Here, we present the first molecular-level characterization of temporal compositional changes that occur in Deepwater Horizon derived oil contamination deposited in a saltmarsh ecosystem from 9 to 48 months post-spill and identify highly oxidized Macondo well oil compounds that are not detectable by routine gas-chromatography-based techniques.

  9. Global gene expression profiling of brown to white adipose tissue transformation in sheep reveals novel transcriptional components linked to adipose remodeling.

    PubMed

    Basse, Astrid L; Dixen, Karen; Yadav, Rachita; Tygesen, Malin P; Qvortrup, Klaus; Kristiansen, Karsten; Quistorff, Bjørn; Gupta, Ramneek; Wang, Jun; Hansen, Jacob B

    2015-03-19

    Large mammals are capable of thermoregulation shortly after birth due to the presence of brown adipose tissue (BAT). The majority of BAT disappears after birth and is replaced by white adipose tissue (WAT). We analyzed the postnatal transformation of adipose in sheep with a time course study of the perirenal adipose depot. We observed changes in tissue morphology, gene expression and metabolism within the first two weeks of postnatal life consistent with the expected transition from BAT to WAT. The transformation was characterized by massively decreased mitochondrial abundance and down-regulation of gene expression related to mitochondrial function and oxidative phosphorylation. Global gene expression profiling demonstrated that the time points grouped into three phases: a brown adipose phase, a transition phase and a white adipose phase. Between the brown adipose and the transition phase 170 genes were differentially expressed, and 717 genes were differentially expressed between the transition and the white adipose phase. Thirty-eight genes were shared among the two sets of differentially expressed genes. We identified a number of regulated transcription factors, including NR1H3, MYC, KLF4, ESR1, RELA and BCL6, which were linked to the overall changes in gene expression during the adipose tissue remodeling. Finally, the perirenal adipose tissue expressed both brown and brite/beige adipocyte marker genes at birth, the expression of which changed substantially over time. Using global gene expression profiling of the postnatal BAT to WAT transformation in sheep, we provide novel insight into adipose tissue plasticity in a large mammal, including identification of novel transcriptional components linked to adipose tissue remodeling. Moreover, our data set provides a useful resource for further studies in adipose tissue plasticity.

  10. Expression and In Silico Analysis of the Recombinant Bovine Papillomavirus E6 Protein as a Model for Viral Oncoproteins Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J.; Carvalho, R. F.; Ruiz, R. M.; Melo, T. C.; Araldi, R. P.; Carvalho, E.; Thompson, C. E.; Sircili, M. P.; Beçak, W.; Stocco, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) are recognized as the causal agents of economical relevant diseases in cattle, associated with the development of tumors in skin and mucosa. The oncogenesis process is mainly associated with different viral oncoprotein expressions, which are involved in cell transformation. The expression and characterization of recombinant viral oncoproteins represent an attractive strategy to obtain biotechnological products as antibodies and potential vaccines, Thus, the aim of this work was to clone and express the BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins and perform in silico analysis in order to develop a strategy for the systematic study of other papillomaviruses oncoproteins. The results demonstrated that BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from bacterial system as well as its in silico analysis was performed in order to explore and predict biological characteristics of these proteins. PMID:23878806

  11. Expression and in Silico analysis of the recombinant bovine papillomavirus E6 protein as a model for viral oncoproteins studies.

    PubMed

    Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J; Carvalho, R F; Ruiz, R M; Melo, T C; Araldi, R P; Carvalho, E; Thompson, C E; Sircili, M P; Beçak, W; Stocco, R C

    2013-01-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) are recognized as the causal agents of economical relevant diseases in cattle, associated with the development of tumors in skin and mucosa. The oncogenesis process is mainly associated with different viral oncoprotein expressions, which are involved in cell transformation. The expression and characterization of recombinant viral oncoproteins represent an attractive strategy to obtain biotechnological products as antibodies and potential vaccines, Thus, the aim of this work was to clone and express the BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins and perform in silico analysis in order to develop a strategy for the systematic study of other papillomaviruses oncoproteins. The results demonstrated that BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from bacterial system as well as its in silico analysis was performed in order to explore and predict biological characteristics of these proteins.

  12. Predicting human blood viscosity in silico

    SciTech Connect

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Pan, Wenxiao; Caswell, Bruce; Gompper, Gerhard; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-07-05

    Cellular suspensions such as blood are a part of living organisms and their rheological and flow characteristics determine and affect majority of vital functions. The rheological and flow properties of cell suspensions are determined by collective dynamics of cells, their structure or arrangement, cell properties and interactions. We study these relations for blood in silico using a mesoscopic particle-based method and two different models (multi-scale/low-dimensional) of red blood cells. The models yield accurate quantitative predictions of the dependence of blood viscosity on shear rate and hematocrit. We explicitly model cell aggregation interactions and demonstrate the formation of reversible rouleaux structures resulting in a tremendous increase of blood viscosity at low shear rates and yield stress, in agreement with experiments. The non-Newtonian behavior of such cell suspensions (e.g., shear thinning, yield stress) is analyzed and related to the suspension’s microstructure, deformation and dynamics of single cells. We provide the flrst quantitative estimates of normal stress differences and magnitude of aggregation forces in blood. Finally, the flexibility of the cell models allows them to be employed for quantitative analysis of a much wider class of complex fluids including cell, capsule, and vesicle suspensions.

  13. In Silico Approaches for Predicting Adme Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Judith C.

    A drug requires a suitable pharmacokinetic profile to be efficacious in vivo in humans. The relevant pharmacokinetic properties include the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) profile of the drug. This chapter provides an overview of the definition and meaning of key ADME properties, recent models developed to predict these properties, and a guide as to how to select the most appropriate model(s) for a given query. Many tools using the state-of-the-art in silico methodology are now available to users, and it is anticipated that the continual evolution of these tools will provide greater ability to predict ADME properties in the future. However, caution must be exercised in applying these tools as data are generally available only for "successful" drugs, i.e., those that reach the marketplace, and little supplementary information, such as that for drugs that have a poor pharmacokinetic profile, is available. The possibilities of using these methods and possible integration into toxicity prediction are explored.

  14. Deletion mutants of Harvey ras p21 protein reveal the absolute requirement of at least two distant regions for GTP-binding and transforming activities.

    PubMed Central

    Lacal, J C; Anderson, P S; Aaronson, S A

    1986-01-01

    Deletions of small sequences from the viral Harvey ras gene have been generated, and resulting ras p21 mutants have been expressed in Escherichia coli. Purification of each deleted protein allowed the in vitro characterization of GTP-binding, GTPase and autokinase activity of the proteins. Microinjection of the highly purified proteins into quiescent NIH/3T3 cells, as well as transfection experiments utilizing a long terminal repeat (LTR)-containing vector, were utilized to analyze the biological activity of the deleted proteins. Two small regions located at 6-23 and 152-165 residues are shown to be absolutely required for in vitro and in vivo activities of the ras product. By contrast, the variable region comprising amino acids 165-184 was shown not to be necessary for either in vitro or in vivo activities. Thus, we demonstrate that: (i) amino acid sequences at positions 5-23 and 152-165 of ras p21 protein are probably directly involved in the GTP-binding activity; (ii) GTP-binding is required for the transforming activity of ras p21 and by extension for the normal function of the proto-oncogene product; and (iii) the variable region at the C-terminal end of the ras p21 molecule from amino acids 165 to 184 is not required for transformation. Images Fig.2. Fig.4. PMID:3011420

  15. Revealing martensitic transformation and α/β interface evolution in electron beam melting three-dimensional-printed Ti-6Al-4V.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xipeng; Kok, Yihong; Toh, Wei Quan; Tan, Yu Jun; Descoins, Marion; Mangelinck, Dominique; Tor, Shu Beng; Leong, Kah Fai; Chua, Chee Kai

    2016-05-17

    As an important metal three-dimensional printing technology, electron beam melting (EBM) is gaining increasing attention due to its huge potential applications in aerospace and biomedical fields. EBM processing of Ti-6Al-4V as well as its microstructure and mechanical properties were extensively investigated. However, it is still lack of quantitative studies regarding its microstructural evolution, indicative of EBM thermal process. Here, we report α' martensitic transformation and α/β interface evolution in varied printing thicknesses of EBM-printed Ti-6Al-4V block samples by means of atom probe tomography. Quantitative chemical composition analysis suggests a general phase transformation sequence. By increasing in-fill hatched thickness, elemental partitioning ratios arise and β volume fraction is increased. Furthermore, we observe kinetic vanadium segregation and aluminum depletion at interface front and the resultant α/β interface widening phenomenon. It may give rise to an increased α/β lattice mismatch and weakened α/β interfaces, which could account for the degraded strength as printing thickness increases.

  16. Revealing martensitic transformation and α/β interface evolution in electron beam melting three-dimensional-printed Ti-6Al-4V

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xipeng; Kok, Yihong; Toh, Wei Quan; Tan, Yu Jun; Descoins, Marion; Mangelinck, Dominique; Tor, Shu Beng; Leong, Kah Fai; Chua, Chee Kai

    2016-01-01

    As an important metal three-dimensional printing technology, electron beam melting (EBM) is gaining increasing attention due to its huge potential applications in aerospace and biomedical fields. EBM processing of Ti-6Al-4V as well as its microstructure and mechanical properties were extensively investigated. However, it is still lack of quantitative studies regarding its microstructural evolution, indicative of EBM thermal process. Here, we report α′ martensitic transformation and α/β interface evolution in varied printing thicknesses of EBM-printed Ti-6Al-4V block samples by means of atom probe tomography. Quantitative chemical composition analysis suggests a general phase transformation sequence. By increasing in-fill hatched thickness, elemental partitioning ratios arise and β volume fraction is increased. Furthermore, we observe kinetic vanadium segregation and aluminum depletion at interface front and the resultant α/β interface widening phenomenon. It may give rise to an increased α/β lattice mismatch and weakened α/β interfaces, which could account for the degraded strength as printing thickness increases. PMID:27185285

  17. Revealing martensitic transformation and α/β interface evolution in electron beam melting three-dimensional-printed Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xipeng; Kok, Yihong; Toh, Wei Quan; Tan, Yu Jun; Descoins, Marion; Mangelinck, Dominique; Tor, Shu Beng; Leong, Kah Fai; Chua, Chee Kai

    2016-05-01

    As an important metal three-dimensional printing technology, electron beam melting (EBM) is gaining increasing attention due to its huge potential applications in aerospace and biomedical fields. EBM processing of Ti-6Al-4V as well as its microstructure and mechanical properties were extensively investigated. However, it is still lack of quantitative studies regarding its microstructural evolution, indicative of EBM thermal process. Here, we report α‧ martensitic transformation and α/β interface evolution in varied printing thicknesses of EBM-printed Ti-6Al-4V block samples by means of atom probe tomography. Quantitative chemical composition analysis suggests a general phase transformation sequence. By increasing in-fill hatched thickness, elemental partitioning ratios arise and β volume fraction is increased. Furthermore, we observe kinetic vanadium segregation and aluminum depletion at interface front and the resultant α/β interface widening phenomenon. It may give rise to an increased α/β lattice mismatch and weakened α/β interfaces, which could account for the degraded strength as printing thickness increases.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime analyses reveal how the high light-responsive protein LHCSR3 transforms PSII light-harvesting complexes into an energy-dissipative state.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunchul; Akimoto, Seiji; Tokutsu, Ryutaro; Yokono, Makio; Minagawa, Jun

    2017-09-27

    In green algae, light-harvesting complex stress-related 3 (LHCSR3) is responsible for the pH-dependent dissipation of absorbed light energy, a function vital for survival under high-light conditions. LHCSR3 binds the photosystem II and light-harvesting complex II (PSII-LHCII) supercomplex and transforms it into an energy-dissipative form under acidic conditions, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, LHCSR3 modulates the excitation energy flow and dissipates the excitation energy within the light-harvesting complexes of the PSII supercomplex. Using fluorescence decay-associated spectra analysis, we found that, when the PSII supercomplex is associated with LHCSR3 under high-light conditions, excitation energy transfer from light-harvesting complexes to the chlorophyll-binding protein CP43 is selectively inhibited compared with that to CP47, preventing excess excitation energy from overloading the reaction center. By analyzing femtosecond upconversion fluorescence kinetics, we further found that pH- and LHCSR3-dependent quenching of the PSII-LHCII-LHCSR3 supercomplex is accompanied by a fluorescence emission centered at 684 nm, with a decay time constant of 18.6 ps, which is equivalent to the rise time constant of the lutein radical cation generated within a chlorophyll-lutein heterodimer. These results suggest a mechanism in which LHCSR3 transforms the PSII supercomplex into an energy-dissipative state and provide critical insight into the molecular events and characteristics in LHCSR3-dependent energy quenching. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Genome wide in silico characterization of Dof gene families of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp.).

    PubMed

    Malviya, N; Gupta, S; Singh, V K; Yadav, M K; Bisht, N C; Sarangi, B K; Yadav, D

    2015-02-01

    The DNA binding with One Finger (Dof) protein is a plant specific transcription factor involved in the regulation of wide range of processes. The analysis of whole genome sequence of pigeonpea has identified 38 putative Dof genes (CcDof) distributed on 8 chromosomes. A total of 17 out of 38 CcDof genes were found to be intronless. A comprehensive in silico characterization of CcDof gene family including the gene structure, chromosome location, protein motif, phylogeny, gene duplication and functional divergence has been attempted. The phylogenetic analysis resulted in 3 major clusters with closely related members in phylogenetic tree revealed common motif distribution. The in silico cis-regulatory element analysis revealed functional diversity with predominance of light responsive and stress responsive elements indicating the possibility of these CcDof genes to be associated with photoperiodic control and biotic and abiotic stress. The duplication pattern showed that tandem duplication is predominant over segmental duplication events. The comparative phylogenetic analysis of these Dof proteins along with 78 soybean, 36 Arabidopsis and 30 rice Dof proteins revealed 7 major clusters. Several groups of orthologs and paralogs were identified based on phylogenetic tree constructed. Our study provides useful information for functional characterization of CcDof genes.

  20. In silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Tim; Lewis, Richard; Luker, Tim; Bonnert, Roger; Bernstein, Michael A.; Birkinshaw, Timothy N.; Thom, Stephen; Wenlock, Mark; Paine, Stuart

    2011-11-01

    Drugs and drug candidates containing a carboxylic acid moiety, including many widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often metabolized to form acyl glucuronides (AGs). NSAIDs such as Ibuprofen are amongst the most widely used drugs on the market, whereas similar carboxylic acid drugs such as Suprofen have been withdrawn due to adverse events. Although the link between these AG metabolites and toxicity is not proven, there is circumstantial literature evidence to suggest that more reactive acyl glucuronides may, in some cases, present a greater risk of exhibiting toxic effects. We wished therefore to rank the reactivity of potential new carboxylate-containing drug candidates, and performed kinetic studies on synthetic acyl glucuronides to benchmark our key compounds. Driven by the desire to quickly rank the reactivity of compounds without the need for lengthy synthesis of the acyl glucuronide, a correlation was established between the degradation half-life of the acyl glucuronide and the half life for the hydrolysis of the more readily available methyl ester derivative. This finding enabled a considerable broadening of chemical property space to be investigated. The need for kinetic measurements was subsequently eliminated altogether by correlating the methyl ester hydrolysis half-life with the predicted 13C NMR chemical shift of the carbonyl carbon together with readily available steric descriptors in a PLS model. This completely in silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity is applicable within the earliest stages of drug design with low cost and acceptable accuracy to guide intelligent molecular design. This reactivity data will be useful alongside the more complex additional pharmacokinetic exposure and distribution data that is generated later in the drug discovery process for assessing the overall toxicological risk of acidic drugs.

  1. Changes in hemp secondary fiber production related to technical fiber variability revealed by light microscopy and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Tendero, Eva; Day, Arnaud; Legros, Sandrine; Habrant, Anouck; Hawkins, Simon; Chabbert, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Interest in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is increasing due to the development of a new range of industrial applications based on bast fibers. However the variability of bast fiber yield and quality represents an important barrier to further exploitation. Primary and secondary fiber content was examined in two commercial hemp varieties (Fedora 17, Santhica 27) grown under contrasted sowing density and irrigation conditions. Both growing conditions and hemp varieties impact stem tissue architecture with a large effect on the proportion of secondary fibers but not primary fibers. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy allowed the discrimination of manually-isolated native primary fibers and secondary fibers but did not reveal any clustering according to growing conditions and variety. Infrared data were confirmed by wet chemistry analyses that revealed slight but significant differences between primary and secondary fiber cell wall composition. Infrared spectroscopy of technical fibers obtained after mechanical defibering revealed differences with native primary, but not secondary fibers and also discriminated samples obtained from plants grown under different conditions. Altogether the results suggested that the observed variability of hemp technical fibers could be partially explained by i) differences in secondary fiber production and ii) differential behavior during mechanical defibering resulting in unequal separation of primary and secondary fibers.

  2. Changes in hemp secondary fiber production related to technical fiber variability revealed by light microscopy and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Tendero, Eva; Day, Arnaud; Legros, Sandrine; Habrant, Anouck; Hawkins, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Interest in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) is increasing due to the development of a new range of industrial applications based on bast fibers. However the variability of bast fiber yield and quality represents an important barrier to further exploitation. Primary and secondary fiber content was examined in two commercial hemp varieties (Fedora 17, Santhica 27) grown under contrasted sowing density and irrigation conditions. Both growing conditions and hemp varieties impact stem tissue architecture with a large effect on the proportion of secondary fibers but not primary fibers. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy allowed the discrimination of manually-isolated native primary fibers and secondary fibers but did not reveal any clustering according to growing conditions and variety. Infrared data were confirmed by wet chemistry analyses that revealed slight but significant differences between primary and secondary fiber cell wall composition. Infrared spectroscopy of technical fibers obtained after mechanical defibering revealed differences with native primary, but not secondary fibers and also discriminated samples obtained from plants grown under different conditions. Altogether the results suggested that the observed variability of hemp technical fibers could be partially explained by i) differences in secondary fiber production and ii) differential behavior during mechanical defibering resulting in unequal separation of primary and secondary fibers. PMID:28640922

  3. Using provenance to manage knowledge of in silico experiments.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Robert; Zhao, Jun; Goble, Carole

    2007-05-01

    This article offers a briefing in one of the knowledge management issues of in silico experimentation in bioinformatics. Recording of the provenance of an experiment-what was done; where, how and why, etc. is an important aspect of scientific best practice that should be extended to in silico experimentation. We will do this in the context of eScience which has been part of the move of bioinformatics towards an industrial setting. Despite the computational nature of bioinformatics, these analyses are scientific and thus necessitate their own versions of typical scientific rigour. Just as recording who, what, why, when, where and how of an experiment is central to the scientific process in laboratory science, so it should be in silico science. The generation and recording of these aspects, or provenance, of an experiment are necessary knowledge management goals if we are to introduce scientific rigour into routine bioinformatics. In Silico experimental protocols should themselves be a form of managing the knowledge of how to perform bioinformatics analyses. Several systems now exist that offer support for the generation and collection of provenance information about how a particular in silico experiment was run, what results were generated, how they were generated, etc. In reviewing provenance support, we will review one of the important knowledge management issues in bioinformatics.

  4. Networks inferred from biochemical data reveal profound differences in toll-like receptor and inflammatory signaling between normal and transformed hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Leonidas G; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Cosgrove, Benjamin D; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Sorger, Peter K

    2010-09-01

    Systematic study of cell signaling networks increasingly involves high throughput proteomics, transcriptional profiling, and automated literature mining with the aim of assembling large scale interaction networks. In contrast, functional analysis of cell signaling usually focuses on a much smaller sets of proteins and eschews computation but focuses directly on cellular responses to environment and perturbation. We sought to combine these two traditions by collecting cell response measures on a reasonably large scale and then attempting to infer differences in network topology between two cell types. Human hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines were exposed to inducers of inflammation, innate immunity, and proliferation in the presence and absence of small molecule drugs, and multiplex biochemical measurement was then performed on intra- and extracellular signaling molecules. We uncovered major differences between primary and transformed hepatocytes with respect to the engagement of toll-like receptor and NF-kappaB-dependent secretion of chemokines and cytokines that prime and attract immune cells. Overall, our results serve as a proof of principle for an approach to network analysis that is systematic, comparative, and biochemically focused. More specifically, our data support the hypothesis that hepatocellular carcinoma cells down-regulate normal inflammatory and immune responses to avoid immune editing.

  5. Noggin-Mediated Retinal Induction Reveals a Novel Interplay Between Bone Morphogenetic Protein Inhibition, Transforming Growth Factor β, and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Messina, Andrea; Lan, Lei; Incitti, Tania; Bozza, Angela; Andreazzoli, Massimiliano; Vignali, Robert; Cremisi, Federico; Bozzi, Yuri; Casarosa, Simona

    2015-08-01

    It has long been known that the depletion of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) is one of the key factors necessary for the development of anterior neuroectodermal structures. However, the precise molecular mechanisms that underlie forebrain regionalization are still not completely understood. Here, we show that Noggin1 is involved in the regionalization of anterior neural structures in a dose-dependent manner. Low doses of Noggin1 expand prosencephalic territories, while higher doses specify diencephalic and retinal regions at the expense of telencephalic areas. A similar dose-dependent mechanism determines the ability of Noggin1 to convert pluripotent cells in prosencephalic or diencephalic/retinal precursors, as shown by transplant experiments and molecular analyses. At a molecular level, the strong inhibition of BMP signaling exerted by high doses of Noggin1 reinforces the Nodal/transforming growth factor (TGF)β signaling pathway, leading to activation of Gli1 and Gli2 and subsequent activation of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling. We propose a new role for Noggin1 in determining specific anterior neural structures by the modulation of TGFβ and SHH signaling.

  6. RNA sequencing of transformed lymphoblastoid cells from siblings discordant for autism spectrum disorders reveals transcriptomic and functional alterations: Evidence for sex-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Tylee, Daniel S; Espinoza, Alfred J; Hess, Jonathan L; Tahir, Muhammad A; McCoy, Sarah Y; Rim, Joshua K; Dhimal, Totadri; Cohen, Ori S; Glatt, Stephen J

    2017-03-01

    Genome-wide expression studies of samples derived from individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their unaffected siblings have been widely used to shed light on transcriptomic differences associated with this condition. Females have historically been under-represented in ASD genomic studies. Emerging evidence from studies of structural genetic variants and peripheral biomarkers suggest that sex-differences may exist in the biological correlates of ASD. Relatively few studies have explicitly examined whether sex-differences exist in the transcriptomic signature of ASD. The present study quantified genome-wide expression values by performing RNA sequencing on transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines and identified transcripts differentially expressed between same-sex, proximal-aged sibling pairs. We found that performing separate analyses for each sex improved our ability to detect ASD-related transcriptomic differences; we observed a larger number of dysregulated genes within our smaller set of female samples (n = 12 sibling pairs), as compared with the set of male samples (n = 24 sibling pairs), with small, but statistically significant overlap between the sexes. Permutation-based gene-set analyses and weighted gene co-expression network analyses also supported the idea that the transcriptomic signature of ASD may differ between males and females. We discuss our findings in the context of the relevant literature, underscoring the need for future ASD studies to explicitly account for differences between the sexes. Autism Res 2017, 10: 439-455. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Neoepitopes reveal the features of type II collagen cleavage and the identity of a collagenase involved in the transformation of the epiphyses anlagen in development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunice R; Lamplugh, Lisa; Kluczyk, Beata; Leblond, Charles P; Mort, John S

    2009-06-01

    In long bone development, the evolution of the cartilaginous anlagen into a secondary ossification center is initiated by the formation of canals. The excavation to create the canals is achieved through lysis of the two major cartilage components, aggrecan, and the type II collagen (COL2) fibril. The present study examines the lysis of the fibril. Because it is known that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) cleave COL2 in vitro at the Gly(775)-Leu(776) bond, it has been reasoned that, if such cleavage is detected in relation to the canals, it can be concluded that a collagenase is involved. Furthermore, because MMPs undergo change in domain structure with activation resulting in propeptide domain loss then, if such a loss is revealed in relation to the cleavage of COL2, this MMP is likely involved. The collective findings reveal that COL2 is attacked at the afore-described susceptible peptide bond at the surface of cartilage canals and, that MMP-13 cleaves it. Developmental Dynamics 238:1547-1563, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Development of an in silico profiler for respiratory sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Enoch, Steven J; Roberts, David W; Madden, Judith C; Cronin, Mark T D

    2014-12-01

    In this article, we outline work that led the QSAR and Molecular Modelling Group at Liverpool John Moores University to be jointly awarded the 2013 Lush Science Prize. Our research focuses around the development of in silico profilers for category formation within the Adverse Outcome Pathway paradigm. The development of a well-defined chemical category allows toxicity to be predicted via read-across. This is the central approach used by the OECD QSAR Toolbox. The specific work for which we were awarded the Lush Prize was for the development of such an in silico profiler for respiratory sensitisation. The profiler was developed by an analysis of the mechanistic chemistry associated with covalent bond formation in the lung. The data analysed were collated from clinical reports of occupational asthma in humans. The impact of the development of in silico profilers on the Three Rs is also discussed.

  9. Applications and limitations of in silico models in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sacan, Ahmet; Ekins, Sean; Kortagere, Sandhya

    2012-01-01

    Drug discovery in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century has witnessed a myriad of changes that were adopted to predict whether a compound is likely to be successful, or conversely enable identification of molecules with liabilities as early as possible. These changes include integration of in silico strategies for lead design and optimization that perform complementary roles to that of the traditional in vitro and in vivo approaches. The in silico models are facilitated by the availability of large datasets associated with high-throughput screening, bioinformatics algorithms to mine and annotate the data from a target perspective, and chemoinformatics methods to integrate chemistry methods into lead design process. This chapter highlights the applications of some of these methods and their limitations. We hope this serves as an introduction to in silico drug discovery.

  10. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging Microspectroscopy and Tissue-Level Mechanical Testing Reveal Intraspecies Variation in Mouse Bone Mineral and Matrix Composition

    PubMed Central

    Courtland, Hayden-William; Nasser, Philip; Goldstone, Andrew B.; Spevak, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L.; Jepsen, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    Fracture susceptibility is heritable and dependent upon bone morphology and quality. However, studies of bone quality are typically overshadowed by emphasis on bone geometry and bone mineral density. Given that differences in mineral and matrix composition exist in a variety of species, we hypothesized that genetic variation in bone quality and tissue-level mechanical properties would also exist within species. Sixteen-week-old female A/J, C57BL/6J (B6), and C3H/HeJ (C3H) inbred mouse femora were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared imaging and tissue-level mechanical testing for variation in mineral composition, mineral maturity, collagen cross-link ratio, and tissue-level mechanical properties. A/J femora had an increased mineral-to-matrix ratio compared to B6. The C3H mineral-to-matrix ratio was intermediate of A/J and B6. C3H femora had reduced acid phosphate and carbonate levels and an increased collagen cross-link ratio compared to A/J and B6. Modulus values paralleled mineral-to-matrix values, with A/J femora being the most stiff, B6 being the least stiff, and C3H having intermediate stiffness. In addition, work-to-failure varied among the strains, with the highly mineralized and brittle A/J femora performing the least amount of work-to-failure. Inbred mice are therefore able to differentially modulate the composition of their bone mineral and the maturity of their bone matrix in conjunction with tissue-level mechanical properties. These results suggest that specific combinations of bone quality and morphological traits are genetically regulated such that mechanically functional bones can be constructed in different ways. PMID:18855037

  11. Bacterial Community Structure after Long-term Organic and Inorganic Fertilization Reveals Important Associations between Soil Nutrients and Specific Taxa Involved in Nutrient Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Jiabao; Yin, Jun; Huang, Shaomin

    2017-01-01

    Fertilization has a large impact on the soil microbial communities, which play pivotal roles in soil biogeochemical cycling and ecological processes. While the effects of changes in nutrient availability due to fertilization on the soil microbial communities have received considerable attention, specific microbial taxa strongly influenced by long-term organic and inorganic fertilization, their potential effects and associations with soil nutrients remain unclear. Here, we use deep 16S amplicon sequencing to investigate bacterial community characteristics in a fluvo-aquic soil treated for 24 years with inorganic fertilizers and organics (manure and straw)-inorganic fertilizers, and uncover potential links between soil nutrient parameters and specific bacterial taxa. Our results showed that combined organic-inorganic fertilization increased soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents and altered bacterial community composition, while inorganic fertilization had little impact on soil nutrients and bacterial community composition. SOC and TN emerged as the major determinants of community composition. The abundances of specific taxa, especially Arenimonas, Gemmatimonas, and an unclassified member of Xanthomonadaceae, were substantially increased by organic-inorganic amendments rather than inorganic amendments only. A co-occurrence based network analysis demonstrated that SOC and TN had strong positive associations with some taxa (Gemmatimonas and the members of Acidobacteria subgroup 6, Myxococcales, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes), and Gemmatimonas, Flavobacterium, and an unclassified member of Verrucomicrobia were identified as the keystone taxa. These specific taxa identified above are implicated in the decomposition of complex organic matters and soil carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus transformations. The present work strengthens our current understanding of the soil microbial community structure and functions under long-term fertilization

  12. Spatiotemporal relationships between growth and microtubule orientation as revealed in living root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana transformed with green-fluorescent-protein gene construct GFP-MBD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, C. L.; Cyr, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transformed with GFP-MBD (J. Marc et al., Plant Cell 10: 1927-1939, 1998) under the control of a constitutive (35S) or copper-inducible promoter. GFP-specific fluorescence distributions, levels, and persistence were determined and found to vary with age, tissue type, transgenic line, and individual plant. With the exception of an increased frequency of abnormal roots of 35S GFP-MBD plants grown on kanamycin-containing media, expression of GFP-MBD does not appear to affect plant phenotype. The number of leaves, branches, bolts, and siliques as well as overall height, leaf size, and seed set are similar between wild-type and transgenic plants as is the rate of root growth. Thus, we conclude that the transgenic plants can serve as a living model system in which the dynamic behavior of microtubules can be visualized. Confocal microscopy was used to simultaneously monitor growth and microtubule behavior within individual cells as they passed through the elongation zone of the Arabidopsis root. Generally, microtubules reoriented from transverse to oblique or longitudinal orientations as growth declined. Microtubule reorientation initiated at the ends of the cell did not necessarily occur simultaneously in adjacent neighboring cells and did not involve complete disintegration and repolymerization of microtubule arrays. Although growth rates correlated with microtubule reorientation, the two processes were not tightly coupled in terms of their temporal relationships, suggesting that other factor(s) may be involved in regulating both events. Additionally, microtubule orientation was more defined in cells whose growth was accelerating and less stringent in cells whose growth was decelerating, indicating that microtubule-orienting factor(s) may be sensitive to growth acceleration, rather than growth per se.

  13. Nitrate isotopic composition reveals nitrogen deposition and transformation dynamics along the canopy-soil continuum of a suburban forest in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun; Ohte, Nobuhito; Tokuchi, Naoko; Imamura, Naohiro; Nagayama, Miyuki; Oda, Tomoki; Suzuki, Masakazu

    2014-12-15

    Heavy nitrogen (N) deposition often causes high nitrate (NO3(-)) accumulation in soils in temperate forested ecosystems. To clarify the sources and production pathways of this NO3(-), we investigated NO3(-) isotope signatures in deposition processes along the canopy-soil continuum of a suburban forest in Japan. The stable isotopes of N and oxygen (O) were used to trace the source and transformation dynamics of nitrate (NO3(-)) in two forest stands: a plantation of Cryptomeria japonica (coniferous tree; CJ) and a natural secondary forest of Quercus acutissima (broadleaf, deciduous tree; QA). The NO3(-) and ammonium (NH4(+)) concentrations were measured, as well as the δ(15)N and δ(18)O values of NO3(-), in rainfall, throughfall, stem flow, litter layer water, and soil water (10, 30, and 70 cm depths). Seasonal variations were observed in the δ(15)N values of throughfall and stem flow NO3(-) at both sites, and in the δ(18)O values of throughfall and stem flow NO3(-) at the QA site. The range in the δ(18)O values of rainfall and throughfall NO3(-) was large (65-70‰) but decreased dramatically to 2-5‰ in soil water at both sites. At the QA site, the δ(18)O values of stem flow NO3(-) decreased to 40‰ during several rain events, especially in the growing season. NO3(-) from atmospheric deposition was replaced by microbially generated NO3(-) mainly in the organic horizon and surface portion of the mineral soil under excess N deposition in this suburban forest. Microbial activity, including both immobilization and nitrification in organic-rich horizons near the surface, contributed to incorporating atmospheric NO3(-) quickly into the internal microbial N cycle. We also found evidence of microbial nitrification in the canopy of the QA stand during the growing season. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Spatiotemporal relationships between growth and microtubule orientation as revealed in living root cells of Arabidopsis thaliana transformed with green-fluorescent-protein gene construct GFP-MBD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, C. L.; Cyr, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transformed with GFP-MBD (J. Marc et al., Plant Cell 10: 1927-1939, 1998) under the control of a constitutive (35S) or copper-inducible promoter. GFP-specific fluorescence distributions, levels, and persistence were determined and found to vary with age, tissue type, transgenic line, and individual plant. With the exception of an increased frequency of abnormal roots of 35S GFP-MBD plants grown on kanamycin-containing media, expression of GFP-MBD does not appear to affect plant phenotype. The number of leaves, branches, bolts, and siliques as well as overall height, leaf size, and seed set are similar between wild-type and transgenic plants as is the rate of root growth. Thus, we conclude that the transgenic plants can serve as a living model system in which the dynamic behavior of microtubules can be visualized. Confocal microscopy was used to simultaneously monitor growth and microtubule behavior within individual cells as they passed through the elongation zone of the Arabidopsis root. Generally, microtubules reoriented from transverse to oblique or longitudinal orientations as growth declined. Microtubule reorientation initiated at the ends of the cell did not necessarily occur simultaneously in adjacent neighboring cells and did not involve complete disintegration and repolymerization of microtubule arrays. Although growth rates correlated with microtubule reorientation, the two processes were not tightly coupled in terms of their temporal relationships, suggesting that other factor(s) may be involved in regulating both events. Additionally, microtubule orientation was more defined in cells whose growth was accelerating and less stringent in cells whose growth was decelerating, indicating that microtubule-orienting factor(s) may be sensitive to growth acceleration, rather than growth per se.

  15. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Roles for Candidate Phyla and Other Microbial Community Members in Biogeochemical Transformations in Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Tom, Lauren; Singh, Andrea; Thomas, Brian C.; Baker, Brett J.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oil reservoirs are major sites of methane production and carbon turnover, processes with significant impacts on energy resources and global biogeochemical cycles. We applied a cultivation-independent genomic approach to define microbial community membership and predict roles for specific organisms in biogeochemical transformations in Alaska North Slope oil fields. Produced water samples were collected from six locations between 1,128 m (24 to 27°C) and 2,743 m (80 to 83°C) below the surface. Microbial community complexity decreased with increasing temperature, and the potential to degrade hydrocarbon compounds was most prevalent in the lower-temperature reservoirs. Sulfate availability, rather than sulfate reduction potential, seems to be the limiting factor for sulfide production in some of the reservoirs under investigation. Most microorganisms in the intermediate- and higher-temperature samples were related to previously studied methanogenic and nonmethanogenic archaea and thermophilic bacteria, but one candidate phylum bacterium, a member of the Acetothermia (OP1), was present in Kuparuk sample K3. The greatest numbers of candidate phyla were recovered from the mesothermic reservoir samples SB1 and SB2. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome for an organism from the candidate phylum Parcubacteria (OD1) that was abundant in sample SB1. Consistent with prior findings for members of this lineage, the OD1 genome is small, and metabolic predictions support an obligately anaerobic, fermentation-based lifestyle. At moderate abundance in samples SB1 and SB2 were members of bacteria from other candidate phyla, including Microgenomates (OP11), Atribacteria (OP9), candidate phyla TA06 and WS6, and Marinimicrobia (SAR406). The results presented here elucidate potential roles of organisms in oil reservoir biological processes. PMID:26787827

  16. Deep sequencing of the ancestral tobacco species Nicotiana tomentosiformis reveals multiple T-DNA inserts and a complex evolutionary history of natural transformation in the genus Nicotiana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Dorlhac de Borne, François; Szegedi, Ernö; Otten, Léon

    2014-11-01

    Nicotiana species carry cellular T-DNA sequences (cT-DNAs), acquired by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. We characterized the cT-DNA sequences of the ancestral Nicotiana tabacum species Nicotiana tomentosiformis by deep sequencing. N. tomentosiformis contains four cT-DNA inserts derived from different Agrobacterium strains. Each has an incomplete inverted-repeat structure. TA is similar to part of the Agrobacterium rhizogenes 1724 mikimopine-type T-DNA, but has unusual orf14 and mis genes. TB carries a 1724 mikimopine-type orf14-mis fragment and a mannopine-agropine synthesis region (mas2-mas1-ags). The mas2' gene codes for an active enzyme. TC is similar to the left part of the A. rhizogenes A4 T-DNA, but also carries octopine synthase-like (ocl) and c-like genes normally found in A. tumefaciens. TD shows a complex rearrangement of T-DNA fragments similar to the right end of the A4 TL-DNA, and including an orf14-like gene and a gene with unknown function, orf511. The TA, TB, TC and TD insertion sites were identified by alignment with N. tabacum and Nicotiana sylvestris sequences. The divergence values for the TA, TB, TC and TD repeats provide an estimate for their relative introduction times. A large deletion has occurred in the central part of the N. tabacum cv. Basma/Xanthi TA region, and another deletion removed the complete TC region in N. tabacum. Nicotiana otophora lacks TA, TB and TD, but contains TC and another cT-DNA, TE. This analysis, together with that of Nicotiana glauca and other Nicotiana species, indicates multiple sequential insertions of cT-DNAs during the evolution of the genus Nicotiana. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. An In silico approach for the evaluation of DNA barcodes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA barcoding is a key tool for assessing biodiversity in both taxonomic and environmental studies. Essential features of barcodes include their applicability to a wide spectrum of taxa and their ability to identify even closely related species. Several DNA regions have been proposed as barcodes and the region selected strongly influences the output of a study. However, formal comparisons between barcodes remained limited until now. Here we present a standard method for evaluating barcode quality, based on the use of a new bioinformatic tool that performs in silico PCR over large databases. We illustrate this approach by comparing the taxonomic coverage and the resolution of several DNA regions already proposed for the barcoding of vertebrates. To assess the relationship between in silico and in vitro PCR, we also developed specific primers amplifying different species of Felidae, and we tested them using both kinds of PCR Results Tests on specific primers confirmed the correspondence between in silico and in vitro PCR. Nevertheless, results of in silico and in vitro PCRs can be somehow different, also because tuning PCR conditions can increase the performance of primers with limited taxonomic coverage. The in silico evaluation of DNA barcodes showed a strong variation of taxonomic coverage (i.e., universality): barcodes based on highly degenerated primers and those corresponding to the conserved region of the Cyt-b showed the highest coverage. As expected, longer barcodes had a better resolution than shorter ones, which are however more convenient for ecological studies analysing environmental samples. Conclusions In silico PCR could be used to improve the performance of a study, by allowing the preliminary comparison of several DNA regions in order to identify the most appropriate barcode depending on the study aims. PMID:20637073

  18. In Silico Toxicology – Non-Testing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Raunio, Hannu

    2011-01-01

    In silico toxicology in its broadest sense means “anything that we can do with a computer in toxicology.” Many different types of in silico methods have been developed to characterize and predict toxic outcomes in humans and environment. The term non-testing methods denote grouping approaches, structure–activity relationship, and expert systems. These methods are already used for regulatory purposes and it is anticipated that their role will be much more prominent in the near future. This Perspective will delineate the basic principles of non-testing methods and evaluate their role in current and future risk assessment of chemical compounds. PMID:21772821

  19. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Roles for Candidate Phyla and Other Microbial Community Members in Biogeochemical Transformations in Oil Reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Ping; Tom, Lauren; Singh, Andrea; ...

    2016-01-19

    Oil reservoirs are major sites of methane production and carbon turnover, processes with significant impacts on energy resources and global biogeochemical cycles. We applied a cultivation-independent genomic approach to define microbial community membership and predict roles for specific organisms in biogeochemical transformations in Alaska North Slope oil fields. Produced water samples were collected from six locations between 1,128 m (24 to 27°C) and 2,743 m (80 to 83°C) below the surface. Microbial community complexity decreased with increasing temperature, and the potential to degrade hydrocarbon compounds was most prevalent in the lower-temperature reservoirs. Sulfate availability, rather than sulfate reduction potential, seems to bemore » the limiting factor for sulfide production in some of the reservoirs under investigation. Most microorganisms in the intermediate- and higher-temperature samples were related to previously studied methanogenic and nonmethanogenic archaea and thermophilic bacteria, but one candidate phylum bacterium, a member of theAcetothermia(OP1), was present in Kuparuk sample K3. The greatest numbers of candidate phyla were recovered from the mesothermic reservoir samples SB1 and SB2. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome for an organism from the candidate phylumParcubacteria(OD1) that was abundant in sample SB1. Consistent with prior findings for members of this lineage, the OD1 genome is small, and metabolic predictions support an obligately anaerobic, fermentation-based lifestyle. At moderate abundance in samples SB1 and SB2 were members of bacteria from other candidate phyla, includingMicrogenomates(OP11),Atribacteria(OP9), candidate phyla TA06 and WS6, andMarinimicrobia(SAR406). The results presented here elucidate potential roles of organisms in oil reservoir biological processes. The activities of microorganisms in oil reservoirs impact petroleum resource quality and the global carbon cycle. In conclusion, we show that

  20. Deciphering Dimerization Modes of PAS Domains: Computational and Experimental Analyses of the AhR:ARNT Complex Reveal New Insights Into the Mechanisms of AhR Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Corrada, Dario; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor that mediates the biochemical response to xenobiotics and the toxic effects of a number of environmental contaminants, including dioxins. Recently, endogenous regulatory roles for the AhR in normal physiology and development have also been reported, thus extending the interest in understanding its molecular mechanisms of activation. Since dimerization with the AhR Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) protein, occurring through the Helix-Loop-Helix (HLH) and PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domains, is needed to convert the AhR into its transcriptionally active form, deciphering the AhR:ARNT dimerization mode would provide insights into the mechanisms of AhR transformation. Here we present homology models of the murine AhR:ARNT PAS domain dimer developed using recently available X-ray structures of other bHLH-PAS protein dimers. Due to the different reciprocal orientation and interaction surfaces in the different template dimers, two alternative models were developed for both the PAS-A and PAS-B dimers and they were characterized by combining a number of computational evaluations. Both well-established hot spot prediction methods and new approaches to analyze individual residue and residue-pairwise contributions to the MM-GBSA binding free energies were adopted to predict residues critical for dimer stabilization. On this basis, a mutagenesis strategy for both the murine AhR and ARNT proteins was designed and ligand-dependent DNA binding ability of the AhR:ARNT heterodimer mutants was evaluated. While functional analysis disfavored the HIF2α:ARNT heterodimer-based PAS-B model, most mutants derived from the CLOCK:BMAL1-based AhR:ARNT dimer models of both the PAS-A and the PAS-B dramatically decreased the levels of DNA binding, suggesting this latter model as the most suitable for describing AhR:ARNT dimerization. These novel results open new research directions focused at elucidating basic molecular mechanisms underlying the

  1. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Roles for Candidate Phyla and Other Microbial Community Members in Biogeochemical Transformations in Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ping; Tom, Lauren; Singh, Andrea; Thomas, Brian C.; Baker, Brett J.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Andersen, Gary L.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2016-01-19

    ABSTRACT

    Oil reservoirs are major sites of methane production and carbon turnover, processes with significant impacts on energy resources and global biogeochemical cycles. We applied a cultivation-independent genomic approach to define microbial community membership and predict roles for specific organisms in biogeochemical transformations in Alaska North Slope oil fields. Produced water samples were collected from six locations between 1,128 m (24 to 27°C) and 2,743 m (80 to 83°C) below the surface. Microbial community complexity decreased with increasing temperature, and the potential to degrade hydrocarbon compounds was most prevalent in the lower-temperature reservoirs. Sulfate availability, rather than sulfate reduction potential, seems to be the limiting factor for sulfide production in some of the reservoirs under investigation. Most microorganisms in the intermediate- and higher-temperature samples were related to previously studied methanogenic and nonmethanogenic archaea and thermophilic bacteria, but one candidate phylum bacterium, a member of theAcetothermia(OP1), was present in Kuparuk sample K3. The greatest numbers of candidate phyla were recovered from the mesothermic reservoir samples SB1 and SB2. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome for an organism from the candidate phylumParcubacteria(OD1) that was abundant in sample SB1. Consistent with prior findings for members of this lineage, the OD1 genome is small, and metabolic predictions support an obligately anaerobic, fermentation-based lifestyle. At moderate abundance in samples SB1 and SB2 were members of bacteria from other candidate phyla, includingMicrogenomates(OP11),Atribacteria(OP9), candidate phyla TA06 and WS6, andMarinimicrobia(SAR406). The results presented here elucidate potential roles of organisms in oil reservoir biological processes.

  2. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Roles for Candidate Phyla and Other Microbial Community Members in Biogeochemical Transformations in Oil Reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Ping; Tom, Lauren; Singh, Andrea; ...

    2016-01-19

    Oil reservoirs are major sites of methane production and carbon turnover, processes with significant impacts on energy resources and global biogeochemical cycles. We applied a cultivation-independent genomic approach to define microbial community membership and predict roles for specific organisms in biogeochemical transformations in Alaska North Slope oil fields. Produced water samples were collected from six locations between 1,128 m (24 to 27°C) and 2,743 m (80 to 83°C) below the surface. Microbial community complexity decreased with increasing temperature, and the potential to degrade hydrocarbon compounds was most prevalent in the lower-temperature reservoirs. Sulfate availability, rather than sulfate reduction potential, seems tomore » be the limiting factor for sulfide production in some of the reservoirs under investigation. Most microorganisms in the intermediate- and higher-temperature samples were related to previously studied methanogenic and nonmethanogenic archaea and thermophilic bacteria, but one candidate phylum bacterium, a member of theAcetothermia(OP1), was present in Kuparuk sample K3. The greatest numbers of candidate phyla were recovered from the mesothermic reservoir samples SB1 and SB2. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome for an organism from the candidate phylumParcubacteria(OD1) that was abundant in sample SB1. Consistent with prior findings for members of this lineage, the OD1 genome is small, and metabolic predictions support an obligately anaerobic, fermentation-based lifestyle. At moderate abundance in samples SB1 and SB2 were members of bacteria from other candidate phyla, includingMicrogenomates(OP11),Atribacteria(OP9), candidate phyla TA06 and WS6, andMarinimicrobia(SAR406). The results presented here elucidate potential roles of organisms in oil reservoir biological processes. IMPORTANCEThe activities of microorganisms in oil reservoirs impact petroleum resource quality and the global carbon cycle. We show that

  3. Functional Roles of D2-Lys317 and the Interacting Chloride Ion in the Water Oxidation Reaction of Photosystem II As Revealed by Fourier Transform Infrared Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic water oxidation in plants and cyanobacteria is catalyzed by a Mn4CaO5 cluster within the photosystem II (PSII) protein complex. Two Cl– ions bound near the Mn4CaO5 cluster act as indispensable cofactors, but their functional roles remain to be clarified. We have investigated the role of the Cl– ion interacting with D2-K317 (designated Cl-1) by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the D2-K317R mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 in combination with Cl–/NO3– replacement. The D2-K317R mutation perturbed the bands in the regions of the COO– stretching and backbone amide vibrations in the FTIR difference spectrum upon the S1 → S2 transition. In addition, this mutation altered the 15N isotope-edited NO3– bands in the spectrum of NO3–-treated PSII. These results provide the first experimental evidence that the Cl-1 site is coupled with the Mn4CaO5 cluster and its interaction is affected by the S1 → S2 transition. It was also shown that a negative band at 1748 cm–1 arising from COOH group(s) was altered to a positive intensity by the D2-K317R mutation as well as by NO3– treatment, suggesting that the Cl-1 site affects the pKa of COOH/COO– group(s) near the Mn4CaO5 cluster in a common hydrogen bond network. Together with the observation that the efficiency of the S3 → S0 transition significantly decreased in the core complexes of D2-K317R upon moderate dehydration, it is suggested that D2-K317 and Cl-1 are involved in a proton transfer pathway from the Mn4CaO5 cluster to the lumen, which functions in the S3 → S0 transition. PMID:23786399

  4. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Roles for Candidate Phyla and Other Microbial Community Members in Biogeochemical Transformations in Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ping; Tom, Lauren; Singh, Andrea; Thomas, Brian C.; Baker, Brett J.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Andersen, Gary L.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2016-01-19

    Oil reservoirs are major sites of methane production and carbon turnover, processes with significant impacts on energy resources and global biogeochemical cycles. We applied a cultivation-independent genomic approach to define microbial community membership and predict roles for specific organisms in biogeochemical transformations in Alaska North Slope oil fields. Produced water samples were collected from six locations between 1,128 m (24 to 27°C) and 2,743 m (80 to 83°C) below the surface. Microbial community complexity decreased with increasing temperature, and the potential to degrade hydrocarbon compounds was most prevalent in the lower-temperature reservoirs. Sulfate availability, rather than sulfate reduction potential, seems to be the limiting factor for sulfide production in some of the reservoirs under investigation. Most microorganisms in the intermediate- and higher-temperature samples were related to previously studied methanogenic and nonmethanogenic archaea and thermophilic bacteria, but one candidate phylum bacterium, a member of theAcetothermia(OP1), was present in Kuparuk sample K3. The greatest numbers of candidate phyla were recovered from the mesothermic reservoir samples SB1 and SB2. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome for an organism from the candidate phylumParcubacteria(OD1) that was abundant in sample SB1. Consistent with prior findings for members of this lineage, the OD1 genome is small, and metabolic predictions support an obligately anaerobic, fermentation-based lifestyle. At moderate abundance in samples SB1 and SB2 were members of bacteria from other candidate phyla, includingMicrogenomates(OP11),Atribacteria(OP9), candidate phyla TA06 and WS6, andMarinimicrobia(SAR406). The results presented here elucidate potential roles of organisms in oil reservoir biological processes. The activities of microorganisms in oil reservoirs impact petroleum

  5. In Silico Discovery of High Deliverable Capacity Metal-Organic Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yi; Martin, Richard; Simon, Cory; Haranczyk, Maciej; Smit, Berend; Deem, Michael; Michael W. Deem Team; Maciej Haranczyk Team; Berend Smit Team

    2015-03-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are actively being explored as potential adsorbed natural gas storage materials for small vehicles. Experimental exploration of potential materials is limited by the throughput of synthetic chemistry. We here describe a computational methodology to complement and guide these experimental efforts. The method uses known chemical transformations in silico to identify MOFs with high methane deliverable capacity. The procedure explicitly considers synthesizability with geometric requirements on organic linkers. We efficiently search the composition and conformation space of organic linkers for nine MOF networks, finding 48 materials with higher predicted deliverable capacity (at 65 bar storage, 5.8 bar depletion, and 298 K) than MOF-5 in four of the nine networks. The best material has a predicted deliverable capacity 8% higher than that of MOF-5. US Department of Energy.

  6. An integrated multi-omics analysis of the NK603 Roundup-tolerant GM maize reveals metabolism disturbances caused by the transformation process.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Z; Vilperte, Vinicius; Renney, George; Ward, Malcolm; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Nodari, Rubens O; Antoniou, Michael N

    2016-12-19

    Glyphosate tolerant genetically modified (GM) maize NK603 was assessed as 'substantially equivalent' to its isogenic counterpart by a nutrient composition analysis in order to be granted market approval. We have applied contemporary in depth molecular profiling methods of NK603 maize kernels (sprayed or unsprayed with Roundup) and the isogenic corn to reassess its substantial equivalence status. Proteome profiles of the maize kernels revealed alterations in the levels of enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle pathways, which were reflective of an imbalance in energy metabolism. Changes in proteins and metabolites of glutathione metabolism were indicative of increased oxidative stress. The most pronounced metabolome differences between NK603 and its isogenic counterpart consisted of an increase in polyamines including N-acetyl-cadaverine (2.9-fold), N-acetylputrescine (1.8-fold), putrescine (2.7-fold) and cadaverine (28-fold), which depending on context can be either protective or a cause of toxicity. Our molecular profiling results show that NK603 and its isogenic control are not substantially equivalent.

  7. An integrated multi-omics analysis of the NK603 Roundup-tolerant GM maize reveals metabolism disturbances caused by the transformation process

    PubMed Central

    Mesnage, Robin; Agapito-Tenfen, Sarah Z.; Vilperte, Vinicius; Renney, George; Ward, Malcolm; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Nodari, Rubens O.; Antoniou, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate tolerant genetically modified (GM) maize NK603 was assessed as ‘substantially equivalent’ to its isogenic counterpart by a nutrient composition analysis in order to be granted market approval. We have applied contemporary in depth molecular profiling methods of NK603 maize kernels (sprayed or unsprayed with Roundup) and the isogenic corn to reassess its substantial equivalence status. Proteome profiles of the maize kernels revealed alterations in the levels of enzymes of glycolysis and TCA cycle pathways, which were reflective of an imbalance in energy metabolism. Changes in proteins and metabolites of glutathione metabolism were indicative of increased oxidative stress. The most pronounced metabolome differences between NK603 and its isogenic counterpart consisted of an increase in polyamines including N-acetyl-cadaverine (2.9-fold), N-acetylputrescine (1.8-fold), putrescine (2.7-fold) and cadaverine (28-fold), which depending on context can be either protective or a cause of toxicity. Our molecular profiling results show that NK603 and its isogenic control are not substantially equivalent. PMID:27991589

  8. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Liansheng; Li, Bin; Chen, Yankun; Li, Lingling; Chen, Xi; Wang, Lingzhi; Lu, Fang; Luo, Ganggang; Li, Gongyu; Zhang, Yanling

    2016-01-01

    Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L.) was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain potential oligopeptides, which were further identified by biochemistry assay and molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, ten sequences of adlay prolamins were collected and in silico hydrolyzed to construct the oligopeptide library with 134 oligopeptides. This library was reverse screened by anti-hypertensive pharmacophore database, which was constructed by our research team and contained ten anti-hypertensive targets. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) was identified as the main potential target for the anti-hypertensive activity of adlay oligopeptides. Three crystal structures of ACE were utilized for docking studies and 19 oligopeptides were finally identified with potential ACE inhibitory activity. According to mapping features and evaluation indexes of pharmacophore and docking, three oligopeptides were selected for biochemistry assay. An oligopeptide sequence, NPATY (IC50 = 61.88 ± 2.77 µM), was identified as the ACE inhibitor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay. Molecular dynamics simulation of NPATY was further utilized to analyze interactive bonds and key residues. ALA354 was identified as a key residue of ACE inhibitors. Hydrophobic effect of VAL518 and electrostatic effects of HIS383, HIS387, HIS513 and Zn2+ were also regarded as playing a key role in inhibiting ACE activities. This study provides a research strategy to explore the pharmacological mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) proteins based on in silico

  9. In silico prediction of Ara h 2 T cell epitopes in peanut-allergic children.

    PubMed

    Pascal, M; Konstantinou, G N; Masilamani, M; Lieberman, J; Sampson, H A

    2013-01-01

    Despite the frequency and severity of peanut allergy, the only approved treatment is strict avoidance. Different types of immunotherapy with crude peanut extract are not universally effective and have been associated with relatively high adverse reaction rates. We sought to determine whether in silico predictive algorithms were useful in identifying candidate peptides for an Ara h 2 peptide-based vaccine using peanut-allergic patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro. A human leucocyte antigen (HLA) distribution analysis was also performed. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class II-binding peptides were predicted using NetMHCIIpan-2.0 and NetMHCII-2.2 algorithms. PBMCs from 80 peanut-allergic patients were stimulated with overlapping 20-mer Ara h 2 peptides. Cell supernatant cytokine profiles were evaluated by multiplex assays. HLA-DRB1* and HLA-DQB1* typing were performed. Four regions of overlapping sequences induced PBMC proliferation and predominant Th2 cytokine production. HLA genotyping showed 30 different DRB1* allele specificities and eight DQ serological specificities. The in silico analysis revealed similar relevant regions and predicted identical or similar core 9-mer epitopes to those identified in vitro. If relevant peptides, as determined by either in vitro or in silico analysis (15 peptides and 9 core epitopes respectively), were used in a peptide-based vaccine, they would cover virtually all subjects in the cohort studied. Four dominant regions in Ara h 2 have been identified, containing sequences that could serve as potential candidates for peptide-based immunotherapy. MHC-class II-based T cell epitope prediction algorithms for HLA-DR and -DQ loci accurately predicted Ara h 2 T cell epitopes in peanut-allergic subjects, suggesting their potential utility in a peptide-based vaccine design for food allergy. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Discovery of Anti-Hypertensive Oligopeptides from Adlay Based on In Silico Proteolysis and Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liansheng; Li, Bin; Chen, Yankun; Li, Lingling; Chen, Xi; Wang, Lingzhi; Lu, Fang; Luo, Ganggang; Li, Gongyu; Zhang, Yanling

    2016-12-14

    Adlay (Coix larchryma-jobi L.) was the commonly used Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with high content of seed storage protein. The hydrolyzed bioactive oligopeptides of adlay have been proven to be anti-hypertensive effective components. However, the structures and anti-hypertensive mechanism of bioactive oligopeptides from adlay were not clear. To discover the definite anti-hypertensive oligopeptides from adlay, in silico proteolysis and virtual screening were implemented to obtain potential oligopeptides, which were further identified by biochemistry assay and molecular dynamics simulation. In this paper, ten sequences of adlay prolamins were collected and in silico hydrolyzed to construct the oligopeptide library with 134 oligopeptides. This library was reverse screened by anti-hypertensive pharmacophore database, which was constructed by our research team and contained ten anti-hypertensive targets. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) was identified as the main potential target for the anti-hypertensive activity of adlay oligopeptides. Three crystal structures of ACE were utilized for docking studies and 19 oligopeptides were finally identified with potential ACE inhibitory activity. According to mapping features and evaluation indexes of pharmacophore and docking, three oligopeptides were selected for biochemistry assay. An oligopeptide sequence, NPATY (IC50 = 61.88 ± 2.77 µM), was identified as the ACE inhibitor by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) assay. Molecular dynamics simulation of NPATY was further utilized to analyze interactive bonds and key residues. ALA354 was identified as a key residue of ACE inhibitors. Hydrophobic effect of VAL518 and electrostatic effects of HIS383, HIS387, HIS513 and Zn(2+) were also regarded as playing a key role in inhibiting ACE activities. This study provides a research strategy to explore the pharmacological mechanism of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) proteins based on in silico

  11. Feldspar megacrysts from the Santa Angélica composite pluton - Formation/transformation path revealed by combined CL, Raman and LA-ICP-MS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słaby, Ewa; De Campos, Cristina P.; Majzner, Katarzyna; Simon, Klaus; Gros, Katarzyna; Moszumańska, Izabela; Jokubauskas, Petras

    2017-04-01

    The studied feldspar megacrysts from the Santa Angélica hybrid rock unit feature complex growth morphologies and geochemical compositions. Early crystallization formed zoned K-Na alkali-feldspar and unzoned oligoclase-andesine. The chemical composition of the zoned alkali-feldspar reflects crystallization in contact with different magma batches, and the chemical composition of the plagioclase indicates growth from a homogeneous magma. Further feldspar development produced mineral chemistry and growth morphology patterns (in both alkali feldspar and plagioclase) that indicate a multi-stage process caused by the combination of chaotic mixing and replenishment. Alkali feldspar and plagioclase megacrysts show dissolution and regrowth textures. Their compositional fields are not separated. Different crystallized and recrystallized domains pass smoothly from one to another. A multiple reequilibration process limited the ordering of the feldspar domain structure. A younger generation of feldspar strongly enriched in K and Na grew over the dissolved margins of the alkali feldspar and plagioclase megacrysts, filling all embayments. Some domains of the alkali feldspar megacrysts recrystallized, resulting in a K- and Ba-rich composition. The trace element patterns of these domains define relatively consistent trends, which may indicate a new stage of equilibrium. In turn, the trace element patterns of previously crystallized and recrystallized domains are irregular, pointing to blurring of the original compositional relationship. Some voids in the megacrysts, formed due to dissolution, are cemented with quartz. The sequential early to late crystallization, recrystallization, and alteration processes are clearly revealed by Polytopic Vector Analysis (PVA). This analysis shows the changes in the alkali-feldspar and plagioclase compositions in two different directions: an initial shift from megacryst crystallization environment towards alkali-rich magma and a second shift

  12. Biophysical insight reveals tannic acid as amyloid inducer and conformation transformer from amorphous to amyloid aggregates in Concanavalin A (ConA).

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohsin Vahid; Ishtikhar, Mohd; Siddiqui, Mohammad Khursheed; Zaman, Masihuz; Chandel, Tajalli Ilm; Majid, Nabeela; Ajmal, Mohd Rehan; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Shahein, Yasser E; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2017-04-27

    The aggregation phenomenon (amyloid and amorphous) is associated with several pathological complications in human, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington, Cataract diseases, and Diabetes mellitus type 2. In the present study we are offering evidence and breaking the general belief with regard to the polyphenols action as protein aggregate inhibitors. Herein we confirm that tannic acid (TA) is not only an amyloid inducer, but also it switches one type of conformation, ultimately morphology, into another. We ascertain based on our findings that aggregates are not rigid structures and the stability can be challenged under certain conditions. This study also confirms that unfolded and amorphous aggregates can serve as precursors of amyloids and TA interactions with unordered aggregates (amorphous) bringing orderliness in the conformation via amyloidosis. The shifting of unordered conformation toward orderliness is governed by the modulation in surface hydrophobic patches in Concanavalin A (ConA). Hence, a degree of exposed hydrophobic cluster can be claimed as a strong parameter to detect and distinguish the native, amorphous and both types of amyloids. Turbidity and Rayleigh light scattering measurements followed similar pattern while Thioflavin T and 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate fluorescence assays of the binding with amorphous and amyloid followed an inverse relation. Electron microscopic studies revealed the morphological variation in the ConA at 65°C as amorphous while the ConA treated with TA followed by heat treatment at 65°C was defined as amyloid in nature. Interestingly for the first time we are reporting the slight agglutination activity by the ConA amyloids.

  13. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole/time of flight mass spectrometry based chemical profiling approach to rapidly reveal chemical transformation of sulfur-fumigated medicinal herbs, a case study on white ginseng.

    PubMed

    Li, Song-Lin; Shen, Hong; Zhu, Ling-Ying; Xu, Jun; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Lin, Ge; Cai, Hao; Cai, Bao-Chang; Chen, Shi-Lin; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2012-03-30

    Sulfur-fumigation may induce chemical transformation of medicinal herbs. Development of rapid method to reveal potential sulfur-fumigation induced chemical transformation of herbs is a very important issue for efficacy and safety of herb application. In present study, a new strategy was proposed to rapidly reveal chemical transformation of sulfur-fumigated herbs by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole/time of flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS) based chemical profiling approach. The non-fumigated herb was water-wetted and further treated with burning sulfur to get sulfur-fumigated herb. Then the chemical fingerprints of both non-fumigated and sulfur-fumigated samples were compared by UHPLC-QTOF-MS/MS analysis. The identities of all detected peaks, in particular those newly generated in sulfur-fumigated samples were confirmed by comparing the mass spectra and retention times of peaks with that of reference compounds, and/or tentatively assigned by matching empirical molecular formula with that of published compounds, and/or elucidating quasi-molecular ions and fragment ions referring to available literature information. The identification could be rationalized through deducing possible reactions involved in the generation of these newly detected compounds. The proposed strategy was extensively investigated in the case of white ginseng. Total 82 components were detected in non-fumigated and sulfur-fumigated white ginseng samples, among them 35 sulfur-containing compounds detected only in sulfur-fumigated white ginseng and its decoction were assigned to be sulfate or sulfite derivatives of original ginsenosides, and were deduced to be generated via reactions of esterification, addition, hydrolysis and dehydration during sulfur-fumigation and decocting of white ginseng. The established approach was applied to discriminate sulfur-fumigated white ginseng among commercial samples from America, Canada, and Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR and Mainland of

  14. The phase transformation of methane caused by pressure change during its rise from the seafloor revealed by video observation and acoustic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, C.

    2013-12-01

    Acoustic reflection depending on physical property differences among solid of methane hydrates and methane gas bubbles from seafloor and sea water.By sending ultrasonic waves from the transducer of an echo sounder or a sonar system through the water and measuring the echo of the back-scatterings from the methane hydrates or bubbles,it is possible that a visualized image of the methane plumes is displayed on the display of an echo sounder or a sonar system.Estimates of the amount of the methane plumes are extremely important for the global environment as part of the carbon cycle.The observations were carried out at Umitaka Spur and Joetsu knoll in the Sea of Japan every year since 2004. There are many methane plumes in the same ocean area. Thus, we investigate minutely about methane plumes in this study.In order to recognize estimates of the methane plumes, we observed the image of methane plumes using a remotely operated submarine vehicle (Hyper Dolphin, of the Japan Agency of Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)), and captured the methane bubble using a funnel.We observe the images of the methane plumes seeping points on the seafloor taken by a high-definition camera loaded in the vehicle, measure the surfacing velocity of the gushed methane plumes, and compute the surfacing velocity of the gas and solid substance using a theoretical formula.The observation was carried out at Umitaka Spur in the Japan Sea. The depth was 1000 m and the seawater temperature was 0.3 C°.From 3 seeping points, we gathered 300ml of methane in 643 seconds in the funnel with an opening of 20 cm in diameter.If it is assumed that the seeping points are equally scattered in the area, the seeping volume per unit area is 5.4×104cm3 per hour, which is 4.7×102m3 per year.The experiment in the ocean revealed the followings.The methane hydrate particles that are seeping out from seafloor are solid substances just above the seafloor.In the studied ocean area, 7.7×104m3 of methane

  15. In silico prediction of splice-affecting nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Houdayer, Claude

    2011-01-01

    It appears that all types of genomic nucleotide variations can be deleterious by affecting normal pre-mRNA splicing via disruption/creation of splice site consensus sequences. As it is neither pertinent nor realistic to perform functional testing for all of these variants, it is important to identify those that could lead to a splice defect in order to restrict experimental transcript analyses to the most appropriate cases. In silico tools designed to provide this type of prediction are available. In this chapter, we present in silico splice tools integrated in the Alamut (Interactive Biosoftware) application and detail their use in routine diagnostic applications. At this time, in silico predictions are useful for variants that decrease the strength of wild-type splice sites or create a cryptic splice site. Importantly, in silico predictions are not sufficient to classify variants as neutral or deleterious: they should be used as part of the decision-making process to detect potential candidates for splicing anomalies, prompting molecular geneticists to carry out transcript analyses in a limited and pertinent number of cases which could be managed in routine settings.

  16. In Silico Proficiency Testing for Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Duncavage, Eric J; Abel, Haley J; Pfeifer, John D

    2017-01-01

    Quality assurance for clinical next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based assays is difficult given the complex methods and the range of sequence variants such assays can detect. As the number and range of mutations detected by clinical NGS assays has increased, it is difficult to apply standard analyte-specific proficiency testing (PT). Most current proficiency testing challenges for NGS are methods-based PT surveys that use DNA from reference samples engineered to harbor specific mutations that test both sequence generation and bioinformatics analysis. These methods-based PTs are limited by the number and types of mutations that can be physically introduced into a single DNA sample. In silico proficiency testing, which evaluates only the bioinformatics component of NGS assays, is a recently introduced PT method that allows for evaluation of numerous mutations spanning a range of variant classes. In silico PT data sets can be generated from simulated or actual sequencing data and are used to test alignment through variant detection and annotation steps. In silico PT has several advantages over the use of physical samples, including greater flexibility in tested variants, the ability to design laboratory-specific challenges, and lower costs. Herein, we review the use of in silico PT as an alternative to traditional methods-based PT as it is evolving in oncology applications and discuss how the approach is applicable more broadly.

  17. Development of a Computational (in silico) Model of Ocular Teratogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ToxCast™ project is profiling the in vitro bioactivity of chemical compounds to assess pathway-level and cell-based signatures that are highly correlated with observed in vivo toxicity. In silico models provide a framework for interpreting the in vitro results and for simul...

  18. In silico models for development of insect repellents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In silico modeling a common term to describe computer-assisted molecular modeling has been used to make remarkable advances in mechanistic drug design and in the discovery of new potential bioactive chemical entities in recent years. The goal of this chapter will be to focus on new, next-generation ...

  19. Editorial: in silico drug design and medicinal chemistry).

    PubMed

    Singla, Rajeev K

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal chemistry is not limited to molecules, their structures and design but also highly cohesive to pharmacological activities. The potency of a molecule varies by its structure. Hence structural activity relationship is the sub-branch which deals with the estimation of ability of a molecule in depicting any pharmacological activity. In silico drug design is a novel technique which is employed in designing a molecule by using computer aided software’s and bringing a superior and potent molecule. In recent years, in silico drug design has been merged with medicinal chemistry especially by the techniques like ligand based strategy to isolate the required structures. By such strategic techniques, there are high chances of delivering high throughput screening which involves of screening large number of molecules in a very less time. Involvement of such techniques would be a boon for development of new drug entity as it can aid in development of newer, safe, effective and potent drug molecules. Hence, the present issue is aimed to emphasize the cohesion between in silico drug design and it significance in medicinal chemistry. The articles which would be published will mainly focus on the role of in silico drug design techniques in the development of molecules to target various disease and disorders. Molecules can from natural/ synthetic/semi synthetic origin. Articles will be a treasure box consisting of employment of computational methods for unprecedented molecules. The issue will be sure an endorsement for international readership and researchers.

  20. In silico ADME-Tox modeling: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Saeed

    2017-10-09

    Although significant progress has been made in high-throughput screening of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and toxicity (ADME-Tox) properties in drug discovery and development, in silico ADME-Tox prediction continues to play an important role in facilitating the appropriate selection of candidate drugs by pharmaceutical companies prior to expensive clinical trials. Areas covered: This review provides an overview of the available in silico models that have been used to predict the ADME-Tox properties of compounds. It also provides a comprehensive overview and summarization of the latest modeling methods and algorithms available for the prediction of physicochemical characteristics, ADME properties, and drug toxicity issues. Expert opinion: The in silico models currently available have greatly contributed to the knowledge of screening approaches in the early stages of drug discovery and the development process. As the definitive goal of in silico molding is to predict the pharmacokinetics and disposition of compounds in vivo by assembling all kinetic processes within one global model, PBPK models can serve this purpose. However, much work remains to be done in this area to generate more data and input parameters to build more reliable and accurate prediction models.

  1. In silico drug discovery approaches on grid computing infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Antje; Shahid, Mohammad; Kasam, Vinod; Ziegler, Wolfgang; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The first step in finding a "drug" is screening chemical compound databases against a protein target. In silico approaches like virtual screening by molecular docking are well established in modern drug discovery. As molecular databases of compounds and target structures are becoming larger and more and more computational screening approaches are available, there is an increased need in compute power and more complex workflows. In this regard, computational Grids are predestined and offer seamless compute and storage capacity. In recent projects related to pharmaceutical research, the high computational and data storage demands of large-scale in silico drug discovery approaches have been addressed by using Grid computing infrastructures, in both; pharmaceutical industry as well as academic research. Grid infrastructures are part of the so-called eScience paradigm, where a digital infrastructure supports collaborative processes by providing relevant resources and tools for data- and compute-intensive applications. Substantial computing resources, large data collections and services for data analysis are shared on the Grid infrastructure and can be mobilized on demand. This review gives an overview on the use of Grid computing for in silico drug discovery and tries to provide a vision of future development of more complex and integrated workflows on Grids, spanning from target identification and target validation via protein-structure and ligand dependent screenings to advanced mining of large scale in silico experiments.

  2. Development of a Computational (in silico) Model of Ocular Teratogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s ToxCast™ project is profiling the in vitro bioactivity of chemical compounds to assess pathway-level and cell-based signatures that are highly correlated with observed in vivo toxicity. In silico models provide a framework for interpreting the in vitro results and for simul...

  3. In silico Testing of Environmental Impact on Embryonic Vascular Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding risks to embryonic development from exposure to environmental chemicals is a significant challenge given the diverse chemical landscape and paucity of data for most of these compounds. EPA’s Virtual Embryo project is building in silico models of morphogenesis to tes...

  4. In-silico models of stem cell and developmental systems.

    PubMed

    Setty, Yaki

    2014-01-08

    Understanding how developmental systems evolve over time is a key question in stem cell and developmental biology research. However, due to hurdles of existing experimental techniques, our understanding of these systems as a whole remains partial and coarse. In recent years, we have been constructing in-silico models that synthesize experimental knowledge using software engineering tools. Our approach integrates known isolated mechanisms with simplified assumptions where the knowledge is limited. This has proven to be a powerful, yet underutilized, tool to analyze the developmental process. The models provide a means to study development in-silico by altering the model's specifications, and thereby predict unforeseen phenomena to guide future experimental trials. To date, three organs from diverse evolutionary organisms have been modeled: the mouse pancreas, the C. elegans gonad, and partial rodent brain development. Analysis and execution of the models recapitulated the development of the organs, anticipated known experimental results and gave rise to novel testable predictions. Some of these results had already been validated experimentally. In this paper, I review our efforts in realistic in-silico modeling of stem cell research and developmental biology and discuss achievements and challenges. I envision that in the future, in-silico models as presented in this paper would become a common and useful technique for research in developmental biology and related research fields, particularly regenerative medicine, tissue engineering and cancer therapeutics.

  5. In silico Testing of Environmental Impact on Embryonic Vascular Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding risks to embryonic development from exposure to environmental chemicals is a significant challenge given the diverse chemical landscape and paucity of data for most of these compounds. EPA’s Virtual Embryo project is building in silico models of morphogenesis to tes...

  6. A Novel Approach for Mining Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joseph I.; Nichols, Hazel J.

    2011-01-01

    An important emerging application of high-throughput 454 sequencing is the isolation of molecular markers such as microsatellites from genomic DNA. However, few studies have developed microsatellites from cDNA despite the added potential for targeting candidate genes. Moreover, to develop microsatellites usually requires the evaluation of numerous primer pairs for polymorphism in the focal species. This can be time-consuming and wasteful, particularly for taxa with low genetic diversity where the majority of primers often yield monomorphic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. Transcriptome assemblies provide a convenient solution, functional annotation of transcripts allowing markers to be targeted towards candidate genes, while high sequence coverage in principle permits the assessment of variability in silico. Consequently, we evaluated fifty primer pairs designed to amplify microsatellites, primarily residing within transcripts related to immunity and growth, identified from an Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) transcriptome assembly. In silico visualization was used to classify each microsatellite as being either polymorphic or monomorphic and to quantify the number of distinct length variants, each taken to represent a different allele. The majority of loci (n = 36, 76.0%) yielded interpretable PCR products, 23 of which were polymorphic in a sample of 24 fur seal individuals. Loci that appeared variable in silico were significantly more likely to yield polymorphic PCR products, even after controlling for microsatellite length measured in silico. We also found a significant positive relationship between inferred and observed allele number. This study not only demonstrates the feasibility of generating modest panels of microsatellites targeted towards specific classes of gene, but also suggests that in silico microsatellite variability may provide a useful proxy for PCR product polymorphism. PMID:21853104

  7. Fumaric Acid Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by In Silico Aided Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoqiang; Zou, Wei; Chen, Xiulai; Xu, Nan; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Fumaric acid (FA) is a promising biomass-derived building-block chemical. Bio-based FA production from renewable feedstock is a promising and sustainable alternative to petroleum-based chemical synthesis. Here we report on FA production by direct fermentation using metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the aid of in silico analysis of a genome-scale metabolic model. First, FUM1 was selected as the target gene on the basis of extensive literature mining. Flux balance analysis (FBA) revealed that FUM1 deletion can lead to FA production and slightly lower growth of S. cerevisiae. The engineered S. cerevisiae strain obtained by deleting FUM1 can produce FA up to a concentration of 610±31 mg L–1 without any apparent change in growth in fed-batch culture. FT-IR and 1H and 13C NMR spectra confirmed that FA was synthesized by the engineered S. cerevisiae strain. FBA identified pyruvate carboxylase as one of the factors limiting higher FA production. When the RoPYC gene was introduced, S. cerevisiae produced 1134±48 mg L–1 FA. Furthermore, the final engineered S. cerevisiae strain was able to produce 1675±52 mg L–1 FA in batch culture when the SFC1 gene encoding a succinate–fumarate transporter was introduced. These results demonstrate that the model shows great predictive capability for metabolic engineering. Moreover, FA production in S. cerevisiae can be efficiently developed with the aid of in silico metabolic engineering. PMID:23300594

  8. In Silico Characterization of Functional Divergence of Two Cathelicidin Variants in Indian Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Kamaljeet K; Arora, Jaspreet S; Mukhopadhyay, Chandra S; Dubey, Prem P

    2015-01-01

    The present work focuses on the in silico characterization of functional divergence of two ovine cathelicidin coding sequence (cds) variants (ie, Cath1 and Cath2) of Indian sheep. Overlapping partial cds of both the cathelicidin variants were cloned in pJet1.2/blunt vector and sequenced. Evolutionary analysis of the Cath2 and Cath1 indicated that the mammalian cathelicidins clustered separately from avian fowlicidins. The avian fowlicidins, which are very different from mammalian cathelicidins (Caths), clearly displayed signatures of purifying selection. The pairwise sequence alignments of translated amino acid sequences of these two sheep cathelicidins showed gaps in the antimicrobial domain of Cath1 variant; however, the amino terminal cathelin regions of both the Caths were conserved. Amino acid sequence analysis of full-length cathelicidins available at public database revealed that Cath1, Cath2, and Cath7 of different ruminant species (including our Cath1 and Cath2 variants) formed individual clads, suggesting that these types have evolved to target specific types of microbes. In silico analysis of Cath1 and Cath2 peptide sequences indicated that the C-terminal antimicrobial peptide domain of Cath2 is more immunogenic than that of the ovine Cath1 due to its higher positive antigenic index, making Cath1 a promising antigen for production of monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26380546

  9. In vitro antioxidant, antiinflammatory and in silico molecular docking studies of thiosemicarbazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhashree, G. R.; Haribabu, J.; Saranya, S.; Yuvaraj, P.; Anantha Krishnan, D.; Karvembu, R.; Gayathri, D.

    2017-10-01

    A series of 5-methoxysalicylaldehyde appended thiosemicarbazones (1-4) and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde appended thiosemicarbazones (5-8) was obtained from the reactions between 5-methoxysalicylaldehyde/2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and (un)substituted thiosemicarbazides with the view to ascertain their biological properties brought about by the change in substitution at N-terminal position of the thiosemicarbazide derivatives. The compounds were fully characterized by elemental analyses, and various spectroscopic techniques (UV-Visible, FT-IR, NMR and mass). The solid-state structure of three compounds (1, 2 and 7) was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction method. The compounds (1, 2 and 7) have adopted a monoclinic crystal system with P21/c (1 and 2) or C2/c (7) space group. Antioxidant and non-haemolysis activities of the compounds (1-8) were analyzed by in vitro DPPH and haemolysis assays, respectively. Antiinflammatory potential was verified by in vitro PLA2 inhibition assay and in silico molecular docking study. In vitro and in silico studies revealed promising antiinflammatory potential of the thiosemicarbazone derivatives. Compounds 2, 4, 6, 7 and 8 showed significant antiinflammatory activity.

  10. Identification of novel bacterial DNA gyrase inhibitors: An in silico study.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Hamzeh; Najafi, Ali; Eslami, Habib; Negahdari, Babak; Moghaddam, Mehrdad Moosazadeh

    2016-01-01

    Owing to essential role in bacterial survival, DNA gyrase has been exploited as a validated drug target. However, rapidly emerging resistance to gyrase-targeted drugs such as widely utilized fluoroquinolones reveals the necessity to develop novel compounds with new mechanism of actions against this enzyme. Here, an attempt has been made to identify new drug-like molecules for Shigella flexneri DNA gyrase inhibition through in silico approaches. The structural similarity search was carried out using the natural product simocyclinone D8, a unique gyrase inhibitor, to virtually screen ZINC database. A total of 11830 retrieved hits were further screened for selection of high-affinity compounds by implementing molecular docking followed by investigation of druggability according to Lipinski's rule, biological activity and physiochemical properties. Among the hits initially identified, three molecules were then confirmed to have reasonable gyrase-binding affinity and to follow Lipinski's rule. Based on these in silico findings, three compounds with different chemical structures from previously identified gyrase inhibitors were proposed as potential candidates for the treatment of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains and deserve further investigations.

  11. Reveal Protein Molecular Structural-Chemical Differrences Between Two Types of Winterfat (Forage) Seeds with Physiological Differences in Low Temperature Tolerance Using Synchrotron-Based Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.; Wang, R.; Bai, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Winterfat (Krascheninnikovia lanata) (forage seed) is a long-lived native shrub with superior forage quality for livestock and wildlife. The objectives of this study were to use advanced synchrotron technology [S-Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR)] as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular structural-chemical differences in terms of protein secondary structures between the two types of winterfat (forage) seeds, which show physiological differences in low-temperature tolerances. This experiment was performed at beamline U10B at the National Synchrotron Light Source NSLS in Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL, U.S. Department of Energy (NSLS-BNL, New York). The results showed that with the synchrotron analytical technique (S-FTIR), the molecular structural-chemical makeup and characteristics of the winterfat seed tissues could be imaged and revealed. The protein secondary structures differed between the large and the small seed tissues. By using the multicomponent peaks modeling method, the results show that the large seeds contained no significant differences (P > 0.05) in percentage of {beta}-sheet (average 37.0%) and {alpha}-helix (average 24.1%). However, the large seeds contained a lower (P < 0.05) percentage of {beta}-turns (18.1 vs. 20.1%) and a lower (P < 0.05) ratio of {beta}-turns to {alpha}-helices (0.8 vs. 0.9) and {beta}-turns to {beta}-sheets (0.5 vs. 0.6). Our results demonstrate the potential of highly spatially resolved synchrotron-based FTIR microspectroscopy to reveal differences of structural molecular chemistry and protein secondary structures, which are associated with seed size variation and may affect germination behaviors.

  12. From Structure and Function of Proteins Toward in Silico Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamato, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Researches of biology are targeted on three major flows, materials (or chemicals), energy, and information. I have been mainly concerned with the studies on bioenergy transducing mechanisms. I have studied the mechanism of secondary active transport systems and proposed an affinity change mechanism as a general hypothesis, then tried to confirm that it is applicable to other kinds of bioenergy transducing systems. Choosing Na+-translocating V-type ATPase from Enterococcus hirae as target, I hypothesized the affinity change mechanism for the energy transduction of this ATPase. Here I describe several three dimensional structures of parts of the ATPase supporting my hypothesis. From such detailed and extensive researches on protein structure/function relationship, we can proceed toward the in silico biology, which I described previously in 2007 ([1] "Toward in silico biology").

  13. Mobile Genetic Elements: In Silico, In Vitro, In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arkhipova, Irina R.; Rice, Phoebe A.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements (MGEs), also called transposable elements (TEs), represent universal components of most genomes and are intimately involved in nearly all aspects of genome organization, function, and evolution. However, there is currently a gap between fast-paced TE discovery in silico, stimulated by exponential growth of comparative genomic studies, and a limited number of experimental models amenable to more traditional in vitro and in vivo studies of structural, mechanistic, and regulatory properties of diverse MGEs. Experimental and computational scientists came together to bridge this gap at a recent conference, “Mobile Genetic Elements: in silico, in vitro, in vivo,” held at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, MA, USA. PMID:26822117

  14. Reconstruction of biological pathways and metabolic networks from in silico labeled metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hadadi, Noushin; Hafner, Jasmin; Soh, Keng Cher; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2017-01-01

    Reaction atom mappings track the positional changes of all of the atoms between the substrates and the products as they undergo the biochemical transformation. However, information on atom transitions in the context of metabolic pathways is not widely available in the literature. The understanding of metabolic pathways at the atomic level is of great importance as it can deconvolute the overlapping catabolic/anabolic pathways resulting in the observed metabolic phenotype. The automated identification of atom transitions within a metabolic network is a very challenging task since the degree of complexity of metabolic networks dramatically increases when we transit from metabolite-level studies to atom-level studies. Despite being studied extensively in various approaches, the field of atom mapping of metabolic networks is lacking an automated approach, which (i) accounts for the information of reaction mechanism for atom mapping and (ii) is extendable from individual atom-mapped reactions to atom-mapped reaction networks. Hereby, we introduce a computational framework, iAM.NICE (in silico Atom Mapped Network Integrated Computational Explorer), for the systematic atom-level reconstruction of metabolic networks from in silico labelled substrates. iAM.NICE is to our knowledge the first automated atom-mapping algorithm that is based on the underlying enzymatic biotransformation mechanisms, and its application goes beyond individual reactions and it can be used for the reconstruction of atom-mapped metabolic networks. We illustrate the applicability of our method through the reconstruction of atom-mapped reactions of the KEGG database and we provide an example of an atom-level representation of the core metabolic network of E. coli.

  15. Ion exchange of cesium by crystalline silico-titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhixin; Anthony, R.G.; Miller, J.E.; Trudell, D.

    1995-12-01

    The crystalline silico-titanates developed by the Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University, Sandia National Laboratories and UOP exhibits extremely high ion exchange selectivity for removing cesium from aqueous defense wastes. Based on experimental data and structure studies, a competitive ion exchange model was proposed to predict the ion exchange performance in different simulated waste solutions. The predicted distribution coefficients were within 10% of the experimentally determined values.

  16. In silico pooling of ChIP-seq control experiments.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guannan; Srinivasan, Rajini; Lopez-Anido, Camila; Hung, Holly A; Svaren, John; Keleş, Sündüz

    2014-01-01

    As next generation sequencing technologies are becoming more economical, large-scale ChIP-seq studies are enabling the investigation of the roles of transcription factor binding and epigenome on phenotypic variation. Studying such variation requires individual level ChIP-seq experiments. Standard designs for ChIP-seq experiments employ a paired control per ChIP-seq sample. Genomic coverage for control experiments is often sacrificed to increase the resources for ChIP samples. However, the quality of ChIP-enriched regions identifiable from a ChIP-seq experiment depends on the quality and the coverage of the control experiments. Insufficient coverage leads to loss of power in detecting enrichment. We investigate the effect of in silico pooling of control samples within multiple biological replicates, multiple treatment conditions, and multiple cell lines and tissues across multiple datasets with varying levels of genomic coverage. Our computational studies suggest guidelines for performing in silico pooling of control experiments. Using vast amounts of ENCODE data, we show that pairwise correlations between control samples originating from multiple biological replicates, treatments, and cell lines/tissues can be grouped into two classes representing whether or not in silico pooling leads to power gain in detecting enrichment between the ChIP and the control samples. Our findings have important implications for multiplexing samples.

  17. 3-compartment dynamic model of talaporfin sodium pharmacokinetics in silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Emiyu; Uno, Yuko; Ohtani, Keishi; Maehara, Sachio; Imai, Kentaro; Ono, Shotaro; Usuda, Jitsuo; Arai, Tsunenori

    2017-02-01

    We studied a 3-compartment dynamic model of talaporfin sodium pharmacokinetics in silico. Drug distribution might change after intravenous injection from plasma to interstitial space and then into myocardial cells. We have developed a new cardiac ablation using photosensitization reaction with laser irradiation shortly after talaporfin sodium injection. We think that the major cell-killing factor in our cardiac ablation would be an oxidation by singlet oxygen produced in the interstitial space in myocardium with laser irradiation shortly after the photosensitizer administration. So that the talaporfin sodium concentration change in time in the interstitial space should be investigated. We constructed the pharmacokinetics dynamic model composed by 3-compartments, that is, plasma, interstitial space, and cell. We measured talaporfin sodium fluorescence time change in human skin by our developed fluorescence measurement system in vivo. Using the measured concentration data in plasma and skin in human, we verified the calculation accuracy of our in silico model. We compared the simulated transition tendency of talaporfin sodium concentration from interstitial space to cells in our in silico model with the reported uptake tendency using cultured myocardial cell. We identified the transition coefficients between plasma, interstitial space, and cell compartment, and metabolization coefficient from plasma by the fitting with measured data.

  18. In silico ADME/T modelling for rational drug design.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulan; Xing, Jing; Xu, Yuan; Zhou, Nannan; Peng, Jianlong; Xiong, Zhaoping; Liu, Xian; Luo, Xiaomin; Luo, Cheng; Chen, Kaixian; Zheng, Mingyue; Jiang, Hualiang

    2015-11-01

    In recent decades, in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion (ADME), and toxicity (T) modelling as a tool for rational drug design has received considerable attention from pharmaceutical scientists, and various ADME/T-related prediction models have been reported. The high-throughput and low-cost nature of these models permits a more streamlined drug development process in which the identification of hits or their structural optimization can be guided based on a parallel investigation of bioavailability and safety, along with activity. However, the effectiveness of these tools is highly dependent on their capacity to cope with needs at different stages, e.g. their use in candidate selection has been limited due to their lack of the required predictability. For some events or endpoints involving more complex mechanisms, the current in silico approaches still need further improvement. In this review, we will briefly introduce the development of in silico models for some physicochemical parameters, ADME properties and toxicity evaluation, with an emphasis on the modelling approaches thereof, their application in drug discovery, and the potential merits or deficiencies of these models. Finally, the outlook for future ADME/T modelling based on big data analysis and systems sciences will be discussed.

  19. AutoClickChem: Click Chemistry in Silico

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, Jacob D.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Academic researchers and many in industry often lack the financial resources available to scientists working in “big pharma.” High costs include those associated with high-throughput screening and chemical synthesis. In order to address these challenges, many researchers have in part turned to alternate methodologies. Virtual screening, for example, often substitutes for high-throughput screening, and click chemistry ensures that chemical synthesis is fast, cheap, and comparatively easy. Though both in silico screening and click chemistry seek to make drug discovery more feasible, it is not yet routine to couple these two methodologies. We here present a novel computer algorithm, called AutoClickChem, capable of performing many click-chemistry reactions in silico. AutoClickChem can be used to produce large combinatorial libraries of compound models for use in virtual screens. As the compounds of these libraries are constructed according to the reactions of click chemistry, they can be easily synthesized for subsequent testing in biochemical assays. Additionally, in silico modeling of click-chemistry products may prove useful in rational drug design and drug optimization. AutoClickChem is based on the pymolecule toolbox, a framework that may facilitate the development of future python-based programs that require the manipulation of molecular models. Both the pymolecule toolbox and AutoClickChem are released under the GNU General Public License version 3 and are available for download from http://autoclickchem.ucsd.edu. PMID:22438795

  20. Transformed Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mary Ann; Blombery, Piers; Seymour, John F

    2016-12-01

    Transformed lymphoma is a complex syndrome that encompasses an array of different underlying low-grade lymphoproliferative conditions transforming into more aggressive disease as manifest by morphologic, clinical, and genetic features. Over the last decade, advances in chemoimmunotherapy have led to new options. Knowledge surrounding the genetic changes driving the process of transformation is leading to novel targeted therapies. This article focuses on the transformation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and follicular lymphoma into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

  1. In silico dissection of cell-type-associated patterns of gene expression in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Robert O.; Wachsman, William; Berry, Charles C.; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Wasserman, Linda; Klacansky, Igor; Masys, Dan; Arden, Karen; Goodison, Steven; McClelland, Michael; Wang, Yipeng; Sawyers, Anne; Kalcheva, Iveta; Tarin, David; Mercola, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Prostate tumors are complex entities composed of malignant cells mixed and interacting with nonmalignant cells. However, molecular analyses by standard gene expression profiling are limited because spatial information and nontumor cell types are lost in sample preparation. We scored 88 prostate specimens for relative content of tumor, benign hyperplastic epithelium, stroma, and dilated cystic glands. The proportions of these cell types were then linked in silico to gene expression levels determined by microarray analysis, revealing unique cell-specific profiles. Gene expression differences for malignant and nonmalignant epithelial cells (tumor versus benign hyperplastic epithelium) could be identified without being confounded by contributions from stroma that dominate many samples or sacrificing possible paracrine influences. Cell-specific expression of selected genes was validated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. The results provide patterns of gene expression for these three lineages with relevance to pathogenetic, diagnostic, and therapeutic considerations. PMID:14722351

  2. Heterotetracenes: Flexible Synthesis and in Silico Assessment of the Hole-Transport Properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifan; Gryn'ova, Ganna; Saenz, Felipe; Jeanbourquin, Xavier; Sivula, Kevin; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Waser, Jérôme

    2017-06-12

    Thienoacenes and furoacenes are among the most frequent molecular units found in organic materials. The efficient synthesis of morphologically different heteroacenes and the rapid determination of their solid-state and electronic properties are still challenging tasks, which slow down progress in the development of new materials. Here, we report a flexible and efficient synthesis of unprecedented heterotetracenes based on a platinum- and gold-catalyzed cyclization-alkynylation domino process using EthynylBenziodoXole (EBX) hypervalent iodine reagents in the key step. The proof-of-principle in silico estimation of the synthesized tetracenes' charge transport properties reveals their strong dependence on both the position and nature of the heteroatoms in the ring system. A broad range of mobility is predicted, with some compounds displaying performance potentially comparable to that of state-of-the-art electronic organic materials. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Evaluation of a Genome-Scale In Silico Metabolic Model for Geobacter metallireducens Using Proteomic Data from a Field Biostimulation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yilin; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Lipton, Mary S.; Long, Philip E.

    2012-12-12

    Biomass and shotgun global proteomics data that reflected relative protein abundances from samples collected during the 2008 experiment at the U.S. Department of Energy Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge site in Rifle, Colorado, provided an unprecedented opportunity to validate a genome-scale metabolic model of Geobacter metallireducens and assess its performance with respect to prediction of metal reduction, biomass yield, and growth rate under dynamic field conditions. Reconstructed from annotated genomic sequence, biochemical, and physiological data, the constraint-based in silico model of G. metallireducens relates an annotated genome sequence to the physiological functions with 697 reactions controlled by 747 enzyme-coding genes. Proteomic analysis showed that 180 of the 637 G. metallireducens proteins detected during the 2008 experiment were associated with specific metabolic reactions in the in silico model. When the field-calibrated Fe(III) terminal electron acceptor process reaction in a reactive transport model for the field experiments was replaced with the genome-scale model, the model predicted that the largest metabolic fluxes through the in silico model reactions generally correspond to the highest abundances of proteins that catalyze those reactions. Central metabolism predicted by the model agrees well with protein abundance profiles inferred from proteomic analysis. Model discrepancies with the proteomic data, such as the relatively low fluxes through amino acid transport and metabolism, revealed pathways or flux constraints in the in silico model that could be updated to more accurately predict metabolic processes that occur in the subsurface environment.

  4. Isolation and in silico analysis of Fe-superoxide dismutase in the cyanobacterium Nostoc commune.

    PubMed

    Kesheri, Minu; Kanchan, Swarna; Richa; Sinha, Rajeshwar P

    2014-12-15

    Cyanobacteria are known to endure various stress conditions due to the inbuilt potential for oxidative stress alleviation owing to the presence of an array of antioxidants. The present study shows that Antarctic cyanobacterium Nostoc commune possesses two antioxidative enzymes viz., superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase that jointly cope with environmental stresses prevailing at its natural habitat. Native-PAGE analysis illustrates the presence of a single prominent isoform recognized as Fe-SOD and three distinct isoforms of catalase. The protein sequence of Fe-SOD in N. commune retrieved from NCBI protein sequence database was used for in silico analysis. 3D structure of N. commune was predicted by comparative modeling using MODELLER 9v11. Further, this model was validated for its quality by Ramachandran plot, ERRAT, Verify 3D and ProSA-web which revealed good structure quality of the model. Multiple sequence alignment showed high conservation in N and C-terminal domain regions along with all metal binding positions in Fe-SOD which were also found to be highly conserved in all 28 cyanobacterial species under study, including N. commune. In silico prediction of isoelectric point and molecular weight of Fe-SOD was found to be 5.48 and 22,342.98Da respectively. The phylogenetic tree revealed that among 28 cyanobacterial species, Fe-SOD in N. commune was the closest evolutionary homolog of Fe-SOD in Nostoc punctiforme as evident by strong bootstrap value. Thus, N. commune may serve as a good biological model for studies related to survival of life under extreme conditions prevailing at the Antarctic region. Moreover cyanobacteria may be exploited for biochemical and biotechnological applications of enzymatic antioxidants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Novel PHEX Splice Site Mutations in Patients with Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Christopher; Sampson, Matthew G.; Kher, Vijay; Sethi, Sidharth K.; Otto, Edgar A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is a heterogeneous genetic phosphate wasting disorder. The disease is most commonly caused by mutations in the PHEX gene located on the X-chromosome or by mutations in CLCN5, DMP1, ENPP1, FGF23, and SLC34A3. The aims of this study were to perform molecular diagnostics for four patients with HR of Indian origin (two independent families) and to describe their clinical features. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the affected mother of two boys who also displayed the typical features of HR, including bone malformations and phosphate wasting. B-lymphoblast cell lines were established by EBV transformation and subsequent RT-PCR to investigate an uncommon splice site variant found by WES. An in silico analysis was done to obtain accurate nucleotide frequency occurrences of consensus splice positions other than the canonical sites of all human exons. Additionally, we applied direct Sanger sequencing for all exons and exon/intron boundaries of the PHEX gene for an affected girl from an independent second Indian family. Results WES revealed a novel PHEX splice acceptor mutation in intron 9 (c.1080-3C>A) in a family with 3 affected individuals with HR. The effect on splicing of this mutation was further investigated by RT-PCR using RNA obtained from a patient’s EBV-transformed lymphoblast cell line. RT-PCR revealed an aberrant splice transcript skipping exons 10-14 which was not observed in control samples, confirming the diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemia (XLH). The in silico analysis of all human splice sites adjacent to all 327,293 exons across 81,814 transcripts among 20,345 human genes revealed that cytosine is, with 64.3%, the most frequent nucleobase at the minus 3 splice acceptor position, followed by thymidine with 28.7%, adenine with 6.3%, and guanine with 0.8%. We generated frequency tables and pictograms for the extended donor and acceptor splice consensus regions by analyzing all human

  6. Evaluation of a genome-scale in silico metabolic model for Geobacter metallireducens by using proteomic data from a field biostimulation experiment.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yilin; Wilkins, Michael J; Yabusaki, Steven B; Lipton, Mary S; Long, Philip E

    2012-12-01

    Accurately predicting the interactions between microbial metabolism and the physical subsurface environment is necessary to enhance subsurface energy development, soil and groundwater cleanup, and carbon management. This study was an initial attempt to confirm the metabolic functional roles within an in silico model using environmental proteomic data collected during field experiments. Shotgun global proteomics data collected during a subsurface biostimulation experiment were used to validate a genome-scale metabolic model of Geobacter metallireducens-specifically, the ability of the metabolic model to predict metal reduction, biomass yield, and growth rate under dynamic field conditions. The constraint-based in silico model of G. metallireducens relates an annotated genome sequence to the physiological functions with 697 reactions controlled by 747 enzyme-coding genes. Proteomic analysis showed that 180 of the 637 G. metallireducens proteins detected during the 2008 experiment were associated with specific metabolic reactions in the in silico model. When the field-calibrated Fe(III) terminal electron acceptor process reaction in a reactive transport model for the field experiments was replaced with the genome-scale model, the model predicted that the largest metabolic fluxes through the in silico model reactions generally correspond to the highest abundances of proteins that catalyze those reactions. Central metabolism predicted by the model agrees well with protein abundance profiles inferred from proteomic analysis. Model discrepancies with the proteomic data, such as the relatively low abundances of proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism, revealed pathways or flux constraints in the in silico model that could be updated to more accurately predict metabolic processes that occur in the subsurface environment.

  7. Evaluation of a Genome-Scale In Silico Metabolic Model for Geobacter metallireducens by Using Proteomic Data from a Field Biostimulation Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Lipton, Mary S.; Long, Philip E.

    2012-01-01

    Accurately predicting the interactions between microbial metabolism and the physical subsurface environment is necessary to enhance subsurface energy development, soil and groundwater cleanup, and carbon management. This study was an initial attempt to confirm the metabolic functional roles within an in silico model using environmental proteomic data collected during field experiments. Shotgun global proteomics data collected during a subsurface biostimulation experiment were used to validate a genome-scale metabolic model of Geobacter metallireducens—specifically, the ability of the metabolic model to predict metal reduction, biomass yield, and growth rate under dynamic field conditions. The constraint-based in silico model of G. metallireducens relates an annotated genome sequence to the physiological functions with 697 reactions controlled by 747 enzyme-coding genes. Proteomic analysis showed that 180 of the 637 G. metallireducens proteins detected during the 2008 experiment were associated with specific metabolic reactions in the in silico model. When the field-calibrated Fe(III) terminal electron acceptor process reaction in a reactive transport model for the field experiments was replaced with the genome-scale model, the model predicted that the largest metabolic fluxes through the in silico model reactions generally correspond to the highest abundances of proteins that catalyze those reactions. Central metabolism predicted by the model agrees well with protein abundance profiles inferred from proteomic analysis. Model discrepancies with the proteomic data, such as the relatively low abundances of proteins associated with amino acid transport and metabolism, revealed pathways or flux constraints in the in silico model that could be updated to more accurately predict metabolic processes that occur in the subsurface environment. PMID:23042184

  8. In silico protein fragmentation reveals the importance of critical nuclei on domain reassembly.

    PubMed

    Contreras Martínez, Lydia M; Borrero Quintana, Ernesto E; Escobedo, Fernando A; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2008-03-01

    Protein complementation assays (PCAs) based on split protein fragments have become powerful tools that facilitate the study and engineering of intracellular protein-protein interactions. These assays are based on the observation that a given protein can be split into two inactive fragments and these fragments can reassemble into the original properly folded and functional structure. However, one experimentally observed limitation of PCA systems is that the folding of a protein from its fragments is dramatically slower relative to that of the unsplit parent protein. This is due in part to a poor understanding of how PCA design parameters such as split site position in the primary sequence and size of the resulting fragments contribute to the efficiency of protein reassembly. We used a minimalist on-lattice model to analyze how the dynamics of the reassembly process for two model proteins was affected by the location of the split site. Our results demonstrate that the balanced distribution of the "folding nucleus," a subset of residues that are critical to the formation of the transition state leading to productive folding, between protein fragments is key to their reassembly.

  9. Wound healing revised: A novel reepithelialization mechanism revealed by in vitro and in silico models

    PubMed Central

    Safferling, Kai; Sütterlin, Thomas; Westphal, Kathi; Ernst, Claudia; Breuhahn, Kai; James, Merlin; Jäger, Dirk; Halama, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process in which a tissue’s individual cells have to be orchestrated in an efficient and robust way. We integrated multiplex protein analysis, immunohistochemical analysis, and whole-slide imaging into a novel medium-throughput platform for quantitatively capturing proliferation, differentiation, and migration in large numbers of organotypic skin cultures comprising epidermis and dermis. Using fluorescent time-lag staining, we were able to infer source and final destination of keratinocytes in the healing epidermis. This resulted in a novel extending shield reepithelialization mechanism, which we confirmed by computational multicellular modeling and perturbation of tongue extension. This work provides a consistent experimental and theoretical model for epidermal wound closure in 3D, negating the previously proposed concepts of epidermal tongue extension and highlighting the so far underestimated role of the surrounding tissue. Based on our findings, epidermal wound closure is a process in which cell behavior is orchestrated by a higher level of tissue control that 2D monolayer assays are not able to capture. PMID:24385489

  10. In silico analysis reveals the anti-malarial potential of quinolinyl chalcone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Thillainayagam, Mahalakshmi; Pandian, Lavanya; Murugan, Kumar Kalavathy; Vijayaparthasarathi, Vijayakumar; Sundaramoorthy, Sarveswari; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the correlation between chemical structures and various parameters such as steric effects and electrostatic interactions to the inhibitory activities of quinolinyl chalcone derivatives is derived to identify the key structural elements required in the rational design of potent and novel anti-malarial compounds. The molecular docking simulations and Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) are carried out on 38 chalcones derivatives using Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) as potential target. Surflex-dock is used to determine the probable binding conformations of all the compounds at the active site of pfLDH and to identify the hydrogen bonding interactions which could be used to alter the inhibitory activities. The CoMFA model has provided statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficient (q(2)) of .850 and the non-cross-validated correlation coefficient (r(2)) of .912. Standard error of estimation (SEE) is .280 and the optimum number of component is five. The predictive ability of the resultant model is evaluated using a test set comprising of 13 molecules and the predicted r(2) value is .885. The results provide valuable insight for optimization of quinolinyl chalcone derivatives for better anti-malarial therapy.

  11. Fourier Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Philipp O. J.

    Fourier transformation is a very important tool for signal analysis but also helpful to simplify the solution of differential equations or the calculation of convolution integrals. An important numerical method is the discrete Fourier transformation which can be used for trigonometric interpolation and also as a numerical approximation to the continuous Fourier integral. It can be realized efficiently by Goertzel's algorithm or the family of fast Fourier transformation methods. For real valued even functions the computationally simpler discrete cosine transformation can be applied. Several computer experiments demonstrate the principles of trigonometric interpolation and nonlinear filtering.

  12. 2D-DIGE and MALDI TOF/TOF MS analysis reveal that small GTPase signaling pathways may play an important role in cadmium-induced colon cell malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Zhou, Zhongping; Zheng, Jianzhou; Zhang, Zhuyi; Lu, Rongzhu; Liu, Hanqing; Shi, Haifeng; Tu, Zhigang

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal present in the environment and in industrial materials. Cadmium has demonstrated carcinogenic activity that induces cell transformation, but how this occurs is unclear. We used 2D-DIGE and MALDI TOF/TOF MS combined with bioinformatics and immunoblotting to investigate the molecular mechanism of cadmium transformation. We found that small GTPases were critical for transformation. Additionally, proteins involved in mitochondrial transcription, DNA repair, and translation also had altered expression patterns in cadmium treated cells. Collectively, our results suggest that activation of small GTPases contributes to cadmium-induced transformation of colon cells.

  13. In silico modeling to predict drug-induced phospholipidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sydney S.; Kim, Jae S.; Valerio, Luis G. Sadrieh, Nakissa

    2013-06-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) is a preclinical finding during pharmaceutical drug development that has implications on the course of drug development and regulatory safety review. A principal characteristic of drugs inducing DIPL is known to be a cationic amphiphilic structure. This provides evidence for a structure-based explanation and opportunity to analyze properties and structures of drugs with the histopathologic findings for DIPL. In previous work from the FDA, in silico quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) modeling using machine learning approaches has shown promise with a large dataset of drugs but included unconfirmed data as well. In this study, we report the construction and validation of a battery of complementary in silico QSAR models using the FDA's updated database on phospholipidosis, new algorithms and predictive technologies, and in particular, we address high performance with a high-confidence dataset. The results of our modeling for DIPL include rigorous external validation tests showing 80–81% concordance. Furthermore, the predictive performance characteristics include models with high sensitivity and specificity, in most cases above ≥ 80% leading to desired high negative and positive predictivity. These models are intended to be utilized for regulatory toxicology applied science needs in screening new drugs for DIPL. - Highlights: • New in silico models for predicting drug-induced phospholipidosis (DIPL) are described. • The training set data in the models is derived from the FDA's phospholipidosis database. • We find excellent predictivity values of the models based on external validation. • The models can support drug screening and regulatory decision-making on DIPL.

  14. In silico Models of Alcohol Dependence and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kovatchev, Boris; Breton, Marc; Johnson, Bankole

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we view alcohol dependence and the response to treatment as a recurrent bio-behavioral process developing in time and propose formal models of this process combining behavior and biology in silico. The behavioral components of alcohol dependence and treatment are formally described by a stochastic process of human behavior, which serves as an event generator challenging the metabolic system. The biological component is driven by the biochemistry of alcohol intoxication described by deterministic models of ethanol pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics to enable simulation of drinking addiction in humans. Derived from the known physiology of ethanol and the literature of both ethanol intoxication and ethanol absorption, the different models are distilled into a minimal model (as simple as the complexity of the data allows) that can represent any specific patient. We use these modeling and simulation techniques to explain responses to placebo and ondansetron treatment observed in clinical studies. Specifically, the response to placebo was explained by a reduction of the probability of environmental reinforcement, while the effect of ondansetron was explained by a gradual decline in the degree of ethanol-induced neuromodulation. Further, we use in silico experiments to study critical transitions in blood alcohol levels after specific average number of drinks per day, and propose the existence of two critical thresholds in the human – one at 5 and another at 11 drinks/day – at which the system shifts from stable to critical and to super critical state indicating a state of alcohol addiction. The advantages of such a model-based investigation are that (1) the process of instigation of alcohol dependence and its treatment can be deconstructed into meaningful steps, which allow for individualized treatment tailoring, and (2) physiology and behavior can be quantified in different (animal or human) studies and then the results can be integrated in silico

  15. In Silico Knockout Studies of Xenophagic Capturing of Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Scheidel, Jennifer; Amstein, Leonie; Ackermann, Jörg; Dikic, Ivan; Koch, Ina

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of cytosol-invading pathogens by autophagy, a process known as xenophagy, is an important mechanism of the innate immune system. Inside the host, Salmonella Typhimurium invades epithelial cells and resides within a specialized intracellular compartment, the Salmonella-containing vacuole. A fraction of these bacteria does not persist inside the vacuole and enters the host cytosol. Salmonella Typhimurium that invades the host cytosol becomes a target of the autophagy machinery for degradation. The xenophagy pathway has recently been discovered, and the exact molecular processes are not entirely characterized. Complete kinetic data for each molecular process is not available, so far. We developed a mathematical model of the xenophagy pathway to investigate this key defense mechanism. In this paper, we present a Petri net model of Salmonella xenophagy in epithelial cells. The model is based on functional information derived from literature data. It comprises the molecular mechanism of galectin-8-dependent and ubiquitin-dependent autophagy, including regulatory processes, like nutrient-dependent regulation of autophagy and TBK1-dependent activation of the autophagy receptor, OPTN. To model the activation of TBK1, we proposed a new mechanism of TBK1 activation, suggesting a spatial and temporal regulation of this process. Using standard Petri net analysis techniques, we found basic functional modules, which describe different pathways of the autophagic capture of Salmonella and reflect the basic dynamics of the system. To verify the model, we performed in silico knockout experiments. We introduced a new concept of knockout analysis to systematically compute and visualize the results, using an in silico knockout matrix. The results of the in silico knockout analyses were consistent with published experimental results and provide a basis for future investigations of the Salmonella xenophagy pathway. PMID:27906974

  16. In Silico Prediction of Human Sulfotransferase 1E1 Activity Guided by Pharmacophores from Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Rakers, Christin; Schumacher, Fabian; Meinl, Walter; Glatt, Hansruedi; Kleuser, Burkhard; Wolber, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Acting during phase II metabolism, sulfotransferases (SULTs) serve detoxification by transforming a broad spectrum of compounds from pharmaceutical, nutritional, or environmental sources into more easily excretable metabolites. However, SULT activity has also been shown to promote formation of reactive metabolites that may have genotoxic effects. SULT subtype 1E1 (SULT1E1) was identified as a key player in estrogen homeostasis, which is involved in many physiological processes and the pathogenesis of breast and endometrial cancer. The development of an in silico prediction model for SULT1E1 ligands would therefore support the development of metabolically inert drugs and help to assess health risks related to hormonal imbalances. Here, we report on a novel approach to develop a model that enables prediction of substrates and inhibitors of SULT1E1. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate enzyme flexibility and sample protein conformations. Pharmacophores were developed that served as a cornerstone of the model, and machine learning techniques were applied for prediction refinement. The prediction model was used to screen the DrugBank (a database of experimental and approved drugs): 28% of the predicted hits were reported in literature as ligands of SULT1E1. From the remaining hits, a selection of nine molecules was subjected to biochemical assay validation and experimental results were in accordance with the in silico prediction of SULT1E1 inhibitors and substrates, thus affirming our prediction hypotheses. PMID:26542807

  17. A novel in silico method to quantify primary stability of screws in trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Juri A; Christen, Patrik; Affentranger, Remo; Ferguson, Stephen J; van Lenthe, Gerrit Harry

    2017-02-27

    Insufficient primary stability of screws in bone leads to screw loosening and failure. Unlike conventional continuum finite-element models, micro-CT based finite-element analysis (micro-FE) is capable of capturing the patient-specific bone micro-architecture, providing accurate estimates of bone stiffness. However, such in silico models for screws in bone highly overestimate the apparent stiffness. We hypothesized that a more accurate prediction of primary implant stability of screws in bone is possible by considering insertion-related bone damage. We assessed two different screw types and loading scenarios in 20 trabecular bone specimens extracted from 12 cadaveric human femoral heads (N = 5 for each case). In the micro-FE model, we predicted specimen-specific Young's moduli of the peri-implant bone damage region based on morphometric parameters such that the apparent stiffness of each in silico model matched the experimentally measured stiffness of the corresponding in vitro specimen as closely as possible. The standard micro-FE models assuming perfectly intact peri-implant bone overestimated the stiffness by over 330%. The consideration of insertion related damaged peri-implant bone corrected the mean absolute percentage error down to 11.4% for both loading scenarios and screw types. Cross-validation revealed a mean absolute percentage error of 14.2%. We present the validation of a novel micro-FE modeling technique to quantify the apparent stiffness of screws in trabecular bone. While the standard micro-FE model overestimated the bone-implant stiffness, the consideration of insertion-related bone damage was crucial for an accurate stiffness prediction. This approach provides an important step toward more accurate specimen-specific micro-FE models. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  18. Tubulin bond energies and microtubule biomechanics determined from nanoindentation in silico.

    PubMed

    Kononova, Olga; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Theisen, Kelly E; Marx, Kenneth A; Dima, Ruxandra I; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L; Barsegov, Valeri

    2014-12-10

    Microtubules, the primary components of the chromosome segregation machinery, are stabilized by longitudinal and lateral noncovalent bonds between the tubulin subunits. However, the thermodynamics of these bonds and the microtubule physicochemical properties are poorly understood. Here, we explore the biomechanics of microtubule polymers using multiscale computational modeling and nanoindentations in silico of a contiguous microtubule fragment. A close match between the simulated and experimental force-deformation spectra enabled us to correlate the microtubule biomechanics with dynamic structural transitions at the nanoscale. Our mechanical testing revealed that the compressed MT behaves as a system of rigid elements interconnected through a network of lateral and longitudinal elastic bonds. The initial regime of continuous elastic deformation of the microtubule is followed by the transition regime, during which the microtubule lattice undergoes discrete structural changes, which include first the reversible dissociation of lateral bonds followed by irreversible dissociation of the longitudinal bonds. We have determined the free energies of dissociation of the lateral (6.9 ± 0.4 kcal/mol) and longitudinal (14.9 ± 1.5 kcal/mol) tubulin-tubulin bonds. These values in conjunction with the large flexural rigidity of tubulin protofilaments obtained (18,000-26,000 pN·nm(2)) support the idea that the disassembling microtubule is capable of generating a large mechanical force to move chromosomes during cell division. Our computational modeling offers a comprehensive quantitative platform to link molecular tubulin characteristics with the physiological behavior of microtubules. The developed in silico nanoindentation method provides a powerful tool for the exploration of biomechanical properties of other cytoskeletal and multiprotein assemblies.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of Tachyplesin 1 against Burkholderia pseudomallei: an in vitro and in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lyn-Fay; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many conventional antibiotics. Therefore, alternative antimicrobial agents such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are extensively studied to combat this issue. Our study aims to identify and understand the mode of action of the potential AMP(s) that are effective against B. pseudomallei in both planktonic and biofilm state as well as to predict the possible binding targets on using in vitro and in silico approaches. In the in vitro study, 11 AMPs were tested against 100 B. pseudomallei isolates for planktonic cell susceptibility, where LL-37, and PG1, demonstrated 100.0% susceptibility and TP1 demonstrated 83% susceptibility. Since the B. pseudomallei activity was reported on LL-37 and PG1, TP1 was selected for further investigation. TP1 inhibited B. pseudomallei cells at 61.69 μM, and membrane blebbing was observed using scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, TP1 inhibited B. pseudomallei cell growth, reaching bactericidal endpoint within 2 h post exposure as compared to ceftazidime (CAZ) (8 h). Furthermore, TP1 was shown to suppress the growth of B. pseudomallei cells in biofilm state at concentrations above 221 μM. However, TP1 was cytotoxic to the mammalian cell lines tested. In the in silico study, molecular docking revealed that TP1 demonstrated a strong interaction to the common peptide or inhibitor binding targets for lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli, as well as autolysin, pneumolysin, and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Homology modelled B. pseudomallei PspA protein (YDP) also showed a favourable binding with a strong electrostatic contribution and nine hydrogen bonds. In conclusion, TP1 demonstrated a good potential as an anti-B. pseudomallei agent. PMID:27812400

  20. Schistosoma mansoni histones: from transcription to chromatin regulation; an in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Letícia; Pierce, Raymond J; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a human endoparasite with a complex life cycle that also infects an invertebrate mollusk intermediate host and exhibits many diverse phenotypes. Its complexity is reflected in a large genome and different transcriptome profiles specific to each life cycle stage. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression such as the post-translational modification of histones has a significant impact on phenotypes, and this information storage function resides primarily at histone tails, which results in a varied histone code. Evidence of transcription of the different histone families at all life stages of the parasite was detected by a survey of transcriptome databases; manual curation of each gene prediction at the genome sequence level showed errors in the coding sequences of three of them. The biogenesis of histones is coupled to DNA replication, and a detailed in silico analysis of the specialized machinery of histone mRNA processing in the S. mansoni genome reveals that it is as conserved as in other eukaryotes, consisting in transcription factors and stem-loop binding proteins which recognize the stem loop structure at the histone mRNA 3'UTR. Histone modifying enzymes (HMEs) such as histone acetyltransferases, methyltransferases and deacetylases (HDACs) have been described in S. mansoni, and their potential as new therapeutic targets was evidenced with the apoptotic phenotype that resulted from HDAC inhibition. However, the overall regulation of transcription coupled with gene expression profiles correlated to histone modifications has not yet been characterized. Besides the interaction of HMEs with histones, many factors involved in cellular processes are known to bind to histones, and were identified here by an in silico analysis of the S. mansoni genome. Knowledge of the histone families opens up perspectives for further studies that will lead to a better identification of their post-translational modifications, their gene regulation and to the

  1. Dietary Flaxseed Mitigates Impaired Skeletal Muscle Regeneration: in Vivo, in Vitro and in Silico Studies

    PubMed Central

    Carotenuto, Felicia; Costa, Alessandra; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Rocchi, Marco Bruno Luigi; Rudov, Alexander; Coletti, Dario; Minieri, Marilena; Di Nardo, Paolo; Teodori, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diets enriched with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) have been shown to exert a positive impact on muscle diseases. Flaxseed is one of the richest sources of n-3 PUFA acid α-linolenic acid (ALA). The aim of this study was to assess the effects of flaxseed and ALA in models of skeletal muscle degeneration characterized by high levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF). Methods: The in vivo studies were carried out on dystrophic hamsters affected by muscle damage associated with high TNF plasma levels and fed with a long-term 30% flaxseed-supplemented diet. Differentiating C2C12 myoblasts treated with TNF and challenged with ALA represented the in vitro model. Skeletal muscle morphology was scrutinized by applying the Principal Component Analysis statistical method. Apoptosis, inflammation and myogenesis were analyzed by immunofluorescence. Finally, an in silico analysis was carried out to predict the possible pathways underlying the effects of n-3 PUFAs. Results: The flaxseed-enriched diet protected the dystrophic muscle from apoptosis and preserved muscle myogenesis by increasing the myogenin and alpha myosin heavy chain. Moreover, it restored the normal expression pattern of caveolin-3 thereby allowing protein retention at the sarcolemma. ALA reduced TNF-induced apoptosis in differentiating myoblasts and prevented the TNF-induced inhibition of myogenesis, as demonstrated by the increased expression of myogenin, myosin heavy chain and caveolin-3, while promoting myotube fusion. The in silico investigation revealed that FAK pathways may play a central role in the protective effects of ALA on myogenesis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that flaxseed may exert potent beneficial effects by preserving skeletal muscle regeneration and homeostasis partly through an ALA-mediated action. Thus, dietary flaxseed and ALA may serve as a useful strategy for treating patients with muscle dystrophies. PMID:26941581

  2. In silico target fishing for rationalized ligand discovery exemplified on constituents of Ruta graveolens.

    PubMed

    Rollinger, Judith M; Schuster, Daniela; Danzl, Birgit; Schwaiger, Stefan; Markt, Patrick; Schmidtke, Michaela; Gertsch, Jürg; Raduner, Stefan; Wolber, Gerhard; Langer, Thierry; Stuppner, Hermann

    2009-02-01

    The identification of targets whose interaction is likely to result in the successful treatment of a disease is of growing interest for natural product scientists. In the current study we performed an exemplary application of a virtual parallel screening approach to identify potential targets for 16 secondary metabolites isolated and identified from the aerial parts of the medicinal plant RUTA GRAVEOLENS L. Low energy conformers of the isolated constituents were simultaneously screened against a set of 2208 pharmacophore models generated in-house for the IN SILICO prediction of putative biological targets, i. e., target fishing. Based on the predicted ligand-target interactions, we focused on three biological targets, namely acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the human rhinovirus (HRV) coat protein and the cannabinoid receptor type-2 (CB (2)). For a critical evaluation of the applied parallel screening approach, virtual hits and non-hits were assayed on the respective targets. For AChE the highest scoring virtual hit, arborinine, showed the best inhibitory IN VITRO activity on AChE (IC (50) 34.7 muM). Determination of the anti-HRV-2 effect revealed 6,7,8-trimethoxycoumarin and arborinine to be the most active antiviral constituents with IC (50) values of 11.98 muM and 3.19 muM, respectively. Of these, arborinine was predicted virtually. Of all the molecules subjected to parallel screening, one virtual CB (2) ligand was obtained, i. e., rutamarin. Interestingly, in experimental studies only this compound showed a selective activity to the CB (2) receptor ( Ki of 7.4 muM) by using a radioligand displacement assay. The applied parallel screening paradigm with constituents of R. GRAVEOLENS on three different proteins has shown promise as an IN SILICO tool for rational target fishing and pharmacological profiling of extracts and single chemical entities in natural product research.

  3. Design of efficient computational workflows for in silico drug repurposing.

    PubMed

    Vanhaelen, Quentin; Mamoshina, Polina; Aliper, Alexander M; Artemov, Artem; Lezhnina, Ksenia; Ozerov, Ivan; Labat, Ivan; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current status of in silico repurposing methods by establishing links between current technological trends, data availability and characteristics of the algorithms used in these methods. Using the case of the computational repurposing of fasudil as an alternative autophagy enhancer, we suggest a generic modular organization of a repurposing workflow. We also review 3D structure-based, similarity-based, inference-based and machine learning (ML)-based methods. We summarize the advantages and disadvantages of these methods to emphasize three current technical challenges. We finish by discussing current directions of research, including possibilities offered by new methods, such as deep learning.

  4. In silico panning for a non-competitive peptide inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Yukiko; Terada, Kotaro; Noma, Takahisa; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Sode, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Background Peptide ligands have tremendous therapeutic potential as efficacious drugs. Currently, more than 40 peptides are available in the market for a drug. However, since costly and time-consuming synthesis procedures represent a problem for high-throughput screening, novel procedures to reduce the time and labor involved in screening peptide ligands are required. We propose the novel approach of 'in silico panning' which consists of a two-stage screening, involving affinity selection by docking simulation and evolution of the peptide ligand using genetic algorithms (GAs). In silico panning was successfully applied to the selection of peptide inhibitor for water-soluble quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase (PQQGDH). Results The evolution of peptide ligands for a target enzyme was achieved by combining a docking simulation with evolution of the peptide ligand using genetic algorithms (GAs), which mimic Darwinian evolution. Designation of the target area as next to the substrate-binding site of the enzyme in the docking simulation enabled the selection of a non-competitive inhibitor. In all, four rounds of selection were carried out on the computer; the distribution of the docking energy decreased gradually for each generation and improvements in the docking energy were observed over the four rounds of selection. One of the top three selected peptides with the lowest docking energy, 'SERG' showed an inhibitory effect with Ki value of 20 μM. PQQGDH activity, in terms of the Vmax value, was 3-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme in the presence of this peptide. The mechanism of the SERG blockage of the enzyme was identified as non-competitive inhibition. We confirmed the specific binding of the peptide, and its equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) value was calculated as 60 μM by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis. Conclusion We demonstrate an effective methodology of in silico panning for the selection of a non-competitive peptide inhibitor from

  5. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  6. Reading Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    The parents of students who attend Decatur High School thought that there was little hope of their kids going on to college. After a year or so in Decatur's reading program, their sons and daughters were both transformed and college bound. In this article, the author describes how Decatur was able to successfully transform their students. Seven…

  7. Reading Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    The parents of students who attend Decatur High School thought that there was little hope of their kids going on to college. After a year or so in Decatur's reading program, their sons and daughters were both transformed and college bound. In this article, the author describes how Decatur was able to successfully transform their students. Seven…

  8. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  9. Understanding the lid movements of LolA in Escherichia coli using molecular dynamics simulation and in silico point mutation.

    PubMed

    Murahari, Priyadarshini; Anishetty, Sharmila; Pennathur, Gautam

    2013-12-01

    The Lol system in Escherichia coli is involved in localization of lipoproteins and hence is essential for growth of the organism. LolA is a periplasmic chaperone that binds to outer-membrane specific lipoproteins and transports them from inner membrane to outer membrane through LolB. The hydrophobic lipid-binding cavity of LolA consists of α-helices which act as a lid in regulating the transfer of lipoproteins from LolA to LolB. The current study aims to investigate the structural changes observed in LolA during the transition from open to closed conformation in the absence of lipoprotein. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out for two LolA crystal structures; LolA(R43L), and in silico mutated MsL43R for a simulation time of 50 ns in water environment. We have performed an in silico point mutation of leucine to arginine in MsL43R to evaluate the importance of arginine to induce structural changes and impact the stability of protein structure. A complete dynamic analysis of open to closed conformation reveals the existence of two distinct levels; closing of lid and closing of entrance of hydrophobic cavity. Our analysis reveals that the structural flexibility of LolA is an important factor for its role as a periplasmic chaperone.

  10. An evaluation of selected in silico models for the assessment ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Skin sensitization remains an important endpoint for consumers, manufacturers and regulators. Although the development of alternative approaches to assess skin sensitization potential has been extremely active over many years, the implication of regulations such as REACH and the Cosmetics Directive in EU has provided a much stronger impetus to actualize this research into practical tools for decision making. Thus there has been considerable focus on the development, evaluation, and integration of alternative approaches for skin sensitization hazard and risk assessment. This includes in silico approaches such as (Q)SARs and expert systems. This study aimed to evaluate the predictive performance of a selection of in silico models and then to explore whether combining those models led to an improvement in accuracy. A dataset of 473 substances that had been tested in the local lymph node assay (LLNA) was compiled. This comprised 295 sensitizers and 178 non-sensitizers. Four freely available models were identified - 2 statistical models VEGA and MultiCASE model A33 for skin sensitization (MCASE A33) from the Danish National Food Institute and two mechanistic models Toxtree’s Skin sensitization Reaction domains (Toxtree SS Rxn domains) and the OASIS v1.3 protein binding alerts for skin sensitization from the OECD Toolbox (OASIS). VEGA and MCASE A33 aim to predict sensitization as a binary score whereas the mechanistic models identified reaction domains or structura

  11. In silico screening for antibiotic escort molecules to overcome efflux.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Sheikh S; Simovic, Ivana; Gibbons, Simon; Zloh, Mire

    2011-11-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a growing problem worldwide and occurs in part due to the overexpression of efflux pumps responsible for the removal of antibiotics from bacterial cells. The current study examines complex formation between efflux pump substrates and escort molecules as a criterion for an in silico screening method for molecules that are able to potentiate antibiotic activities. Initially, the SUPERDRUG database was queried to select molecules that were similar to known multidrug resistance (MDR) modulators. Molecular interaction fields generated by GRID and the docking module GLUE were used to calculate the interaction energies between the selected molecules and the antibiotic norfloxacin. Ten compounds forming the most stable complexes with favourable changes to the norfloxacin molecular properties were tested for their potentiation ability by efflux pump modulation assays. Encouragingly, two molecules were proven to act as efflux pump modulators, and hence provide evidence that complex formation between a substrate and a drug can be used for in silico screening for novel escort molecules.

  12. Evolutionary Ensemble for In Silico Prediction of Ames Test Mutagenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Yao, Xin

    Driven by new regulations and animal welfare, the need to develop in silico models has increased recently as alternative approaches to safety assessment of chemicals without animal testing. This paper describes a novel machine learning ensemble approach to building an in silico model for the prediction of the Ames test mutagenicity, one of a battery of the most commonly used experimental in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests for safety evaluation of chemicals. Evolutionary random neural ensemble with negative correlation learning (ERNE) [1] was developed based on neural networks and evolutionary algorithms. ERNE combines the method of bootstrap sampling on training data with the method of random subspace feature selection to ensure diversity in creating individuals within an initial ensemble. Furthermore, while evolving individuals within the ensemble, it makes use of the negative correlation learning, enabling individual NNs to be trained as accurate as possible while still manage to maintain them as diverse as possible. Therefore, the resulting individuals in the final ensemble are capable of cooperating collectively to achieve better generalization of prediction. The empirical experiment suggest that ERNE is an effective ensemble approach for predicting the Ames test mutagenicity of chemicals.

  13. [Transformation toughening

    SciTech Connect

    Rafa, M.J.

    1993-04-19

    In NiAl, we have succeeded in determining the complete Ginzburg-Landau strain free energy function necessary to model the cubic to tetragonal martensite transformation in a sample of any size. We believe that this is the first time that the parameters of a Ginzburg-Landau functional and the complete strain spinodal for any three-dimensional displacive transformation were used in simulating the transformation near a crack tip under Mode I loading; the transformation pattern and toughening are different from standard transformation toughening theories. Furthermore, the strain spinodal has an approximately conical shape which can be specified by two material dependent experimentally accessible parameters, rather than the ellipsoidal shape in standard theories. Stress induced martensitic transformation in a polycrystalline sample of NiAl was simulated. In the ZrO[sub 2] system, first principles calculations to determine the semi-empirical potentials for simulating the cubic-tetragonal and tetragonal-monoclinic transformations have been started by doing a more elaborate total energy calculation.In the Al[sub 2]0[sub 3] system, we have discovered that the first principles calculations and semi-empirical potentials have just been completed byanother group in England which we will use instead to base our molecular dynamics simulations on.

  14. Lightweight transformer

    SciTech Connect

    Swallom, D.W.; Enos, G.

    1990-05-01

    The technical effort described in this report relates to the program that was performed to design, fabricate, and test a lightweight transformer for Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) mission requirements. The objectives of this program were two-fold: (1) design and fabricate a lightweight transformer using liquid hydrogen as the coolant; and (2) test the completed transformer assembly with a low voltage, dc power source. Although the full power testing with liquid helium was not completed, the program demonstrated the viability of the design approach. The lightweight transformer was designed and fabricated, and low and moderate power testing was completed. The transformer is a liquid hydrogen cooled air core transformer that uses thin copper for its primary and secondary windings. The winding mass was approximately 12 kg, or 0.03 kg/kW. Further refinements of the design to a partial air core transformer could potentially reduce the winding mass to as low as 4 or 5 kg, or 0.0125 kg/kW. No attempt was made on this program to reduce the mass of the related structural components or cryogenic container. 8 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Interstitial fluid flow in canaliculi as a mechanical stimulus for cancellous bone remodeling: in silico validation.

    PubMed

    Kameo, Yoshitaka; Adachi, Taiji

    2014-08-01

    Cancellous bone has a dynamic 3-dimensional architecture of trabeculae, the arrangement of which is continually reorganized via bone remodeling to adapt to the mechanical environment. Osteocytes are currently believed to be the major mechanosensory cells and to regulate osteoclastic bone resorption and osteoblastic bone formation in response to mechanical stimuli. We previously developed a mathematical model of trabecular bone remodeling incorporating the possible mechanisms of cellular mechanosensing and intercellular communication in which we assumed that interstitial fluid flow activates the osteocytes to regulate bone remodeling. While the proposed model has been validated by the simulation of remodeling of a single trabecula, it remains unclear whether it can successfully represent in silico the functional adaptation of cancellous bone with its multiple trabeculae. In the present study, we demonstrated the response of cancellous bone morphology to uniaxial or bending loads using a combination of our remodeling model with the voxel finite element method. In this simulation, cancellous bone with randomly arranged trabeculae remodeled to form a well-organized architecture oriented parallel to the direction of loading, in agreement with the previous simulation results and experimental findings. These results suggested that our mathematical model for trabecular bone remodeling enables us to predict the reorganization of cancellous bone architecture from cellular activities. Furthermore, our remodeling model can represent the phenomenological law of bone transformation toward a locally uniform state of stress or strain at the trabecular level.

  16. Potential DNA binding and nuclease functions of ComEC domains characterized in silico

    PubMed Central

    Baker, James A.; Simkovic, Felix; Taylor, Helen M.C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial competence, which can be natural or induced, allows the uptake of exogenous double stranded DNA (dsDNA) into a competent bacterium. This process is known as transformation. A multiprotein assembly binds and processes the dsDNA to import one strand and degrade another yet the underlying molecular mechanisms are relatively poorly understood. Here distant relationships of domains in Competence protein EC (ComEC) of Bacillus subtilis (Uniprot: P39695) were characterized. DNA‐protein interactions were investigated in silico by analyzing models for structural conservation, surface electrostatics and structure‐based DNA binding propensity; and by data‐driven macromolecular docking of DNA to models. Our findings suggest that the DUF4131 domain contains a cryptic DNA‐binding OB fold domain and that the β‐lactamase‐like domain is the hitherto cryptic competence nuclease. Proteins 2016; 84:1431–1442. © 2016 The Authors Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27318187

  17. Redesigning pH optimum of Geobacillus sp. TF16 endoxylanase through in silico designed DNA swapping strategy.

    PubMed

    Uzuner, Ugur; Canakci, Sabriye; Bektas, Kadriye Inan; Sapmaz, Merve Tuncel; Belduz, Ali Osman

    2017-06-01

    Thermoalkaliphilic xylanases are highly desired and of great importance due to their vast potential in paper pulp and bleaching processes. Here, we report rapid, cost-effective, and result-oriented combinatorial potential of in silico DNA swapping strategy to engineer the pH optimum of industrially crucial enzymes, particularly engineering of Geobacillus sp. TF16 endoxylanase for alkaline environments. The 3D structures of Geobacillus sp. TF16 and donor Bacillus halodurans C-125 endoxylanases were firstly predicted, analyzed, and compared for their similarities before any in silico design of mutants. Reasonably, to improve its alkaline pH tolerance, the corresponding regions in Geobacillus sp.TF16 endoxylanase were further engineered by swapping with negatively-charged amino acid-rich regions from B. halodurans C-125 endoxylanase. Through only two of four in silico-designed mutants, the optimum pH of GeoTF16 endoxylanase was improved from 8.5 to 10.0. Moreover, as compared to GeoTF16 parental enzyme, both GeoInt3 and GeoInt4 mutants revealed (i) enhanced biobleaching performance, (ii) improved adaptability to alkaline conditions, and (iii) better activity for broader pH range. Unlike GeoTF16 losing activity at pH 11.0 completely, GeoInt4 retained 60% and 40% of its activity at pH 11.0 and 12.0, respectively. Thus, GeoInt4 stands out as a more competent biocatalyst that is suitable for alkaline environments of diverse industrial applications. The current study represents an efficient protein engineering strategy to adapt industrial catalysts to diverse processing conditions. Further comprehensive and fine-tuned research efforts may result in biotechnologically more promising outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  18. Genome-scale metabolic reconstruction and in silico analysis of methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris for strain improvement

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pichia pastoris has been recognized as an effective host for recombinant protein production. A number of studies have been reported for improving this expression system. However, its physiology and cellular metabolism still remained largely uncharacterized. Thus, it is highly desirable to establish a systems biotechnological framework, in which a comprehensive in silico model of P. pastoris can be employed together with high throughput experimental data analysis, for better understanding of the methylotrophic yeast's metabolism. Results A fully compartmentalized metabolic model of P. pastoris (iPP668), composed of 1,361 reactions and 1,177 metabolites, was reconstructed based on its genome annotation and biochemical information. The constraints-based flux analysis was then used to predict achievable growth rate which is consistent with the cellular phenotype of P. pastoris observed during chemostat experiments. Subsequent in silico analysis further explored the effect of various carbon sources on cell growth, revealing sorbitol as a promising candidate for culturing recombinant P. pastoris strains producing heterologous proteins. Interestingly, methanol consumption yields a high regeneration rate of reducing equivalents which is substantial for the synthesis of valuable pharmaceutical precursors. Hence, as a case study, we examined the applicability of P. pastoris system to whole-cell biotransformation and also identified relevant metabolic engineering targets that have been experimentally verified. Conclusion The genome-scale metabolic model characterizes the cellular physiology of P. pastoris, thus allowing us to gain valuable insights into the metabolism of methylotrophic yeast and devise possible strategies for strain improvement through in silico simulations. This computational approach, combined with synthetic biology techniques, potentially forms a basis for rational analysis and design of P. pastoris metabolic network to enhance humanized

  19. Triple transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Farrukh I.; Schinn, Dustin S.

    2013-08-01

    A new business plan that enables policy transformation and resource mobilization at the national and international level, while improving access to resources, will allow the Green Climate Fund to integrate development goals and action on climate change.

  20. Transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Luzinski, Craig

    2011-12-01

    This month, the director of the Magnet Recognition Program® takes an in-depth look at the Magnet® model component transformational leadership. The author examines the expectations for Magnet organizations around this component. What are the qualities that make a nursing leader truly transformational, and what is the best approach to successfully lead a healthcare organization through today's volatile healthcare environment?

  1. Novel Class IIa-Selective Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Discovered Using an in Silico Virtual Screening Approach.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Liu, Chang-Yi; Lin, Tony Eight; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Sung, Tzu-Ying; Tseng, Hui-Ju; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Huang, Wei-Jan

    2017-06-12

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) contain eighteen isoforms that can be divided into four classes. Of these isoform enzymes, class IIa (containing HDAC4, 5, 7 and 9) target unique substrates, some of which are client proteins associated with epigenetic control. Class IIa HDACs are reportedly associated with some neuronal disorders, making HDACs therapeutic targets for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, some reported HDAC inhibitors contain hydroxamate moiety that chelates with zinc ion to become the cofactor of HDAC enzymes. However, the hydroxamate functional group is shown to cause undesirable effects and has poor pharmacokinetic profile. This study used in silico virtual screening methodology to identify several nonhydroxamate compounds, obtained from National Cancer Institute database, which potentially inhibited HDAC4. Comparisons of the enzyme inhibitory activity against a panel of HDAC isoforms revealed these compounds had strong inhibitory activity against class IIa HDACs, but weak inhibitory activity against class I HDACs. Further analysis revealed that a single residue affects the cavity size between class I and class IIa HDACs, thus contributing to the selectivity of HDAC inhibitors discovered in this study. The discovery of these inhibitors presents the possibility of developing new therapeutic treatments that can circumvent the problems seen in traditional hydroxamate-based drugs.

  2. In Silico Analysis of Fatty Acid Desaturase Genes and Proteins in Grasses.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Marina Lucía; Cuppari, Selva; Soresi, Daniela; Carrera, Alicia

    2017-07-28

    Fatty acid desaturases (FADs) catalyze the introduction of a double bond into acyl chains. Two FAD groups have been identified in plants: acyl-acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) and acyl-lipid or membrane-bound FAD. The former catalyze the conversion of 18:0 to 18:1 and to date have only been identified in plants. The latter are found in eukaryotes and bacteria and are responsible for multiple desaturations. In this study, we identified 82 desaturase gene and protein sequences from 10 grass species deposited in GenBank that were analyzed using bioinformatic approaches. Subcellular localization predictions of desaturase family revealed their localization in plasma membranes, chloroplasts, endoplasmic reticula, and mitochondria. The in silico mapping showed multiple chromosomal locations in most species. Furthermore, the presence of the characteristic histidine domains, the predicted motifs, and the finding of transmembrane regions strongly support the protein functionality. The identification of putative regulatory sites in the promotor and the expression profiles revealed the wide range of pathways in which fatty acid desaturases are involved. This study is an updated survey on desaturases of grasses that provides a comprehensive insight into diversity and evolution. This characterization is a necessary first step before considering these genes as candidates for new biotechnological approaches.

  3. Crystallographic and in silico analysis of the sialoside-binding characteristics of the Siglec sialoadhesin.

    PubMed

    Zaccai, Nathan R; May, Andrew P; Robinson, Robert C; Burtnick, Leslie D; Crocker, Paul R; Brossmer, Reinhard; Kelm, Soerge; Jones, E Yvonne

    2007-02-02

    The Siglec family of receptors mediates cell-surface interactions through recognition of sialylated glycoconjugates. Previously reported structures of the N-terminal domain of the Siglec sialoadhesin (SnD1) in complex with various sialic acid analogs revealed the structural template for sialic acid binding. To characterize further the carbohydrate-binding properties, we have determined the crystal structures of SnD1 in the absence of ligand, and in complex with 2-benzyl-Neu5NPro and 2-benzyl-Neu5NAc. These structures reveal that SnD1 undergoes very few structural changes on ligand binding and detail how two novel classes of sialic acid analogs bind, one of which unexpectedly can induce Siglec dimerization. In conjunction with in silico analysis, this set of structures informs us about the design of putative ligands with enhanced binding affinities and specificities to different Siglecs, and provides data with which to test the effectiveness of different computational drug design protocols.

  4. Integration of in silico and in vitro tools for scaffold optimization during drug discovery: predicting P-glycoprotein efflux.

    PubMed

    Desai, Prashant V; Sawada, Geri A; Watson, Ian A; Raub, Thomas J

    2013-04-01

    In silico tools are regularly utilized for designing and prioritizing compounds to address challenges related to drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) during the process of drug discovery. P-Glycoprotein (P-gp) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters with broad substrate specificity that plays a significant role in absorption and distribution of drugs that are P-gp substrates. As a result, screening for P-gp transport has now become routine in the drug discovery process. Typically, bidirectional permeability assays are employed to assess in vitro P-gp efflux. In this article, we use P-gp as an example to illustrate a well-validated methodology to effectively integrate in silico and in vitro tools to identify and resolve key barriers during the early stages of drug discovery. A detailed account of development and application of in silico tools such as simple guidelines based on physicochemical properties and more complex quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models is provided. The tools were developed based on structurally diverse data for more than 2000 compounds generated using a robust P-gp substrate assay over the past several years. Analysis of physicochemical properties revealed a significantly lower proportion (<10%) of P-gp substrates among the compounds with topological polar surface area (TPSA) <60 Å(2) and the most basic cpKa <8. In contrast, this proportion of substrates was greater than 75% for compounds with TPSA >60 Å(2) and the most basic cpKa >8. Among the various QSAR models evaluated to predict P-gp efflux, the Bagging model provided optimum prediction performance for prospective validation based on chronological test sets. Four sequential versions of the model were built with increasing numbers of compounds to train the models as new data became available. Except for the first version with the smallest training set, the QSAR models exhibited robust prediction profiles with positive prediction values (PPV

  5. In silico identification of common epitopes from pathogenic mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    An in silico study was carried out to identify antigens for their possible collective use as vaccine candidates against diseases caused by different classes of pathogenic mycobacteria with significant clinical relevance. The genome sequences of the relevant causative agents were used in order to search for orthologous genes among them. Bioinformatics tools permitted us to identify several conserved sequences with 100% identity with no possibility of cross-reactivity to the normal flora and human proteins. Nine different proteins were characterized using the strain H37Rv as reference and taking into account their functional category, their in vivo expression and subcellular location. T and B cell epitopes were identified in the selected sequences. Theoretical prediction of population coverage was calculated for individual epitopes as well as their combinations. Several identical sequences, belonging to six proteins containing T and B cell epitopes which are not present in selected microorganisms of the normal microbial flora or in human proteins were obtained. PMID:23458668

  6. Bitterness prediction in-silico: A step towards better drugs.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Malkeet Singh; Nissim, Ido; Niv, Masha Y

    2017-03-28

    Bitter taste is innately aversive and thought to protect against consuming poisons. Bitter taste receptors (Tas2Rs) are G-protein coupled receptors, expressed both orally and extra-orally and proposed as novel targets for several indications, including asthma. Many clinical drugs elicit bitter taste, suggesting the possibility of drugs re-purposing. On the other hand, the bitter taste of medicine presents a major compliance problem for pediatric drugs. Thus, efficient tools for predicting, measuring and masking bitterness of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) are required by the pharmaceutical industry. Here we highlight the BitterDB database of bitter compounds and survey the main computational approaches to prediction of bitter taste based on compound's chemical structure. Current in silico bitterness prediction methods provide encouraging results, can be constantly improved using growing experimental data, and present a reliable and efficient addition to the APIs development toolbox. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In silico identification of common epitopes from pathogenic mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    de la Caridad Addine Ramírez, Bárbara; Marrón, Reynel; Calero, Rommel; Mirabal, Mayelin; Ramírez, Juan Carlos; Sarmiento, María E; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Acosta, Armando

    2013-01-01

    An in silico study was carried out to identify antigens for their possible collective use as vaccine candidates against diseases caused by different classes of pathogenic mycobacteria with significant clinical relevance. The genome sequences of the relevant causative agents were used in order to search for orthologous genes among them. Bioinformatics tools permitted us to identify several conserved sequences with 100% identity with no possibility of cross-reactivity to the normal flora and human proteins. Nine different proteins were characterized using the strain H37Rv as reference and taking into account their functional category, their in vivo expression and subcellular location. T and B cell epitopes were identified in the selected sequences. Theoretical prediction of population coverage was calculated for individual epitopes as well as their combinations. Several identical sequences, belonging to six proteins containing T and B cell epitopes which are not present in selected microorganisms of the normal microbial flora or in human proteins were obtained.

  8. Development of in silico models for human liver microsomal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pil H.; Cucurull-Sanchez, Lourdes; Lu, Jing; Du, Yuhua J.

    2007-12-01

    We developed highly predictive classification models for human liver microsomal (HLM) stability using the apparent intrinsic clearance (CLint, app) as the end point. HLM stability has been shown to be an important factor related to the metabolic clearance of a compound. Robust in silico models that predict metabolic clearance are very useful in early drug discovery stages to optimize the compound structure and to select promising leads to avoid costly drug development failures in later stages. Using Random Forest and Bayesian classification methods with MOE, E-state descriptors, ADME Keys, and ECFP_6 fingerprints, various highly predictive models were developed. The best performance of the models shows 80 and 75% prediction accuracy for the test and validation sets, respectively. A detailed analysis of results will be shown, including an assessment of the prediction confidence, the significant descriptors, and the application of these models to drug discovery projects.

  9. GENIUS In Silico Screening Technology for HCV Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vaishali M; Masand, Neeraj; Gupta, Satya P

    2016-01-01

    The various reported in silico screening protocols such as molecular docking are associated with various drawbacks as well as benefits. In molecular docking, on interaction with ligand, the protein or receptor molecule gets activated by adopting conformational changes. These conformational changes cannot be utilized to predict the 3D structure of a protein-ligand complex from unbound protein conformations rigid docking, which necessitates the demand for understanding protein flexibility. Therefore, efficiency and accuracy of docking should be achieved and various available/developed protocols may be adopted. One such protocol is GENIUS induced-fit docking and it is used effectively for the development of anti-HCV NS3-4A serine protease inhibitors. The present review elaborates the GENIUS docking protocol along with its benefits and drawbacks.

  10. Development of Chemical Compound Libraries for In Silico Drug Screening.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Lintuluoto, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Chemical compound libraries are the basic database for virtual (in silico) drug screening, and the number of entries has reached 20 million. Many drug-like compound libraries for virtual drug screening have been developed and released. In this review, the process of constructing a database for virtual screening is reviewed, and several popular databases are introduced. Several kinds of focused libraries have been developed. The author has developed databases for metalloproteases, and the details of the libraries are described. The library for metalloproteases was developed by improving the generation of the dominant-ion forms. For instance, the SH group is treated as S- in this library while all SH groups are protonated in the conventional libraries. In addition, metal complexes were examined as new candidates of drug-like compounds. Finally, a method for generating chemical space is introduced, and the diversity of compound libraries is discussed.

  11. in silico simulation and analysis of microbial metabolism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Sheng; Liang, Shenghua; Tang, Lei-Han

    2007-03-01

    Through evolution living organisms have developed an elaborate network of enzyme-facilitated reactions and transport to process and cycle biochemical compounds for cell growth. A majority of these reactions are uni-directional, yet the network allows an organism to live on a variety of carbon sources and synthesize a diverse set of compounds in varying amounts. We found that biosynthesis of the end products can proceed independently. In the three genome-wide in silico models examined, the optimal yield for simultaneous synthesis of two compounds is only about 3% higher than what is achievable under separate production of individual compounds. In most cases, the residual correlation can be attributed to the requirement of energy, redox potential, or charge balance. These observations quantify, in the context of cellular metabolism, the bow-tie analogy which has been argued to provide a ubiquitous architecture for multi-input/multi-output networks.

  12. In silico solid state perturbation for solubility improvement.

    PubMed

    Briggner, Lars-Erik; Kloo, Lars; Rosdahl, Jan; Svensson, Per H

    2014-04-01

    Solubility is a frequently recurring issue within pharmaceutical industry, and new methods to proactively resolve this are of fundamental importance. Here, a novel methodology is reported for intrinsic solubility improvement, using in silico prediction of crystal structures, by perturbing key interactions in the crystalline solid state. The methodology was evaluated with a set of benzodiazepine molecules, using the two-dimensional molecular structure as the only a priori input. The overall trend in intrinsic solubility was correctly predicted for the entire set of benzodiazepines molecules. The results also indicate that, in drug compound series where the melting point is relatively high (i.e., "brick dust" compounds), the reported methodology should be very suitable for identifying strategically important molecular substitutions to improve solubility. As such, this approach could be a useful predictive tool for rational compound design in the early stages of drug development. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. In silico Exploration of the Conformational Universe of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Espigares, Ismael; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Selent, Jana

    2016-07-01

    The structural plasticity of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) leads to a conformational universe going from inactive to active receptor states with several intermediate states. Many of them have not been captured yet and their role for GPCR activation is not well understood. The study of this conformational space and the transition dynamics between different receptor populations is a major challenge in molecular biophysics. The rational design of effector molecules that target such receptor populations allows fine-tuning receptor signalling with higher specificity to produce drugs with safer therapeutic profiles. In this minireview, we outline highly conserved receptor regions which are considered determinant for the establishment of distinct receptor states. We then discuss in-silico approaches such as dimensionality reduction methods and Markov State Models to explore the GPCR conformational universe and exploit the obtained conformations through structure-based drug design.

  14. In silico tools used for compound selection during target-based drug discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Gary W

    2015-01-01

    The target-based drug discovery process, including target selection, screening, hit-to-lead (H2L) and lead optimization stage gates, is the most common approach used in drug development. The full integration of in vitro and/or in vivo data with in silico tools across the entire process would be beneficial to R&D productivity by developing effective selection criteria and drug-design optimization strategies. This review focuses on understanding the impact and extent in the past 5 years of in silico tools on the various stage gates of the target-based drug discovery approach. There are a large number of in silico tools available for establishing selection criteria and drug-design optimization strategies in the target-based approach. However, the inconsistent use of in vitro and/or in vivo data integrated with predictive in silico multiparameter models throughout the process is contributing to R&D productivity issues. In particular, the lack of reliable in silico tools at the H2L stage gate is contributing to the suboptimal selection of viable lead compounds. It is suggested that further development of in silico multiparameter models and organizing biologists, medicinal and computational chemists into one team with a single accountable objective to expand the utilization of in silico tools in all phases of drug discovery would improve R&D productivity.

  15. In silico prediction of Gallibacterium anatis pan-immunogens.

    PubMed

    Bager, Ragnhild J; Kudirkiene, Egle; da Piedade, Isabelle; Seemann, Torsten; Nielsen, Tine K; Pors, Susanne E; Mattsson, Andreas H; Boyce, John D; Adler, Ben; Bojesen, Anders M

    2014-08-08

    The Gram-negative bacterium Gallibacterium anatis is a major cause of salpingitis and peritonitis in commercial egg-layers, leading to reduced egg production and increased mortality. Unfortunately, widespread multidrug resistance and antigenic diversity makes it difficult to control infections and novel prevention strategies are urgently needed. In this study, a pan-genomic reverse vaccinology (RV) approach was used to identify potential vaccine candidates. Firstly, the genomes of 10 selected Gallibacterium strains were analyzed and proteins selected on the following criteria; predicted surface-exposure or secretion, none or one transmembrane helix (TMH), and presence in six or more of the 10 genomes. In total, 42 proteins were selected. The genes encoding 27 of these proteins were successfully cloned in Escherichia coli and the proteins expressed and purified. To reduce the number of vaccine candidates for in vivo testing, each of the purified recombinant proteins was screened by ELISA for their ability to elicit a significant serological response with serum from chickens that had been infected with G. anatis. Additionally, an in silico prediction of the protective potential was carried out based on a protein property prediction method. Of the 27 proteins, two novel putative immunogens were identified; Gab_1309 and Gab_2312. Moreover, three previously characterized virulence factors; GtxA, FlfA and Gab_2156, were identified. Thus, by combining the pan-genomic RV approach with subsequent in vitro and in silico screening, we have narrowed down the pan-proteome of G. anatis to five vaccine candidates. Importantly, preliminary immunization trials indicated an in vivo protective potential of GtxA-N, FlfA and Gab_1309.

  16. Understanding complexity in neurodegenerative diseases: in silico reconstruction of emergence

    PubMed Central

    Kolodkin, Alexey; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Balling, Rudi; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2012-01-01

    Healthy functioning is an emergent property of the network of interacting biomolecules that comprise an organism. It follows that disease (a network shift that causes malfunction) is also an emergent property, emerging from a perturbation of the network. On the one hand, the biomolecular network of every individual is unique and this is evident when similar disease-producing agents cause different individual pathologies. Consequently, a personalized model and approach for every patient may be required for therapies to become effective across mankind. On the other hand, diverse combinations of internal and external perturbation factors may cause a similar shift in network functioning. We offer this as an explanation for the multi-factorial nature of most diseases: they are “systems biology diseases,” or “network diseases.” Here we use neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson's disease (PD), as an example to show that due to the inherent complexity of these networks, it is difficult to understand multi-factorial diseases with simply our “naked brain.” When describing interactions between biomolecules through mathematical equations and integrating those equations into a mathematical model, we try to reconstruct the emergent properties of the system in silico. The reconstruction of emergence from interactions between huge numbers of macromolecules is one of the aims of systems biology. Systems biology approaches enable us to break through the limitation of the human brain to perceive the extraordinarily large number of interactions, but this also means that we delegate the understanding of reality to the computer. We no longer recognize all those essences in the system's design crucial for important physiological behavior (the so-called “design principles” of the system). In this paper we review evidence that by using more abstract approaches and by experimenting in silico, one may still be able to discover and understand the design principles that

  17. Improved vanillin production in baker's yeast through in silico design

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavouring agents, originally obtained from cured seed pods of the vanilla orchid Vanilla planifolia. Currently vanillin is mostly produced via chemical synthesis. A de novo synthetic pathway for heterologous vanillin production from glucose has recently been implemented in baker's yeast, Saccharamyces cerevisiae. In this study we aimed at engineering this vanillin cell factory towards improved productivity and thereby at developing an attractive alternative to chemical synthesis. Results Expression of a glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana in the vanillin producing S. cerevisiae strain served to decrease product toxicity. An in silico metabolic engineering strategy of this vanillin glucoside producing strain was designed using a set of stoichiometric modelling tools applied to the yeast genome-scale metabolic network. Two targets (PDC1 and GDH1) were selected for experimental verification resulting in four engineered strains. Three of the mutants showed up to 1.5 fold higher vanillin β-D-glucoside yield in batch mode, while continuous culture of the Δpdc1 mutant showed a 2-fold productivity improvement. This mutant presented a 5-fold improvement in free vanillin production compared to the previous work on de novo vanillin biosynthesis in baker's yeast. Conclusion Use of constraints corresponding to different physiological states was found to greatly influence the target predictions given minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA) as biological objective function. In vivo verification of the targets, selected based on their predicted metabolic adjustment, successfully led to overproducing strains. Overall, we propose and demonstrate a framework for in silico design and target selection for improving microbial cell factories. PMID:21059201

  18. In silico prediction of the granzyme B degradome.

    PubMed

    Wee, Lawrence J K; Er, Esmond P S; Ng, Lisa F P; Tong, J C

    2011-11-30

    Granzyme B is a serine protease which cleaves at unique tetrapeptide sequences. It is involved in several signaling cross-talks with caspases and functions as a pivotal mediator in a broad range of cellular processes such as apoptosis and inflammation. The granzyme B degradome constitutes proteins from a myriad of functional classes with many more expected to be discovered. However, the experimental discovery and validation of bona fide granzyme B substrates require time consuming and laborious efforts. As such, computational methods for the prediction of substrates would be immensely helpful. We have compiled a dataset of 580 experimentally verified granzyme B cleavage sites and found distinctive patterns of residue conservation and position-specific residue propensities which could be useful for in silico prediction using machine learning algorithms. We trained a series of support vector machines (SVM) classifiers employing Bayes Feature Extraction to predict cleavage sites using sequence windows of diverse lengths and compositions. The SVM classifiers achieved accuracy and AROC scores between 71.00% to 86.50% and 0.78 to 0.94 respectively on independent test sets. We have applied our prediction method on the Chikungunya viral proteome and identified several regulatory domains of viral proteins to be potential sites of granzyme B cleavage, suggesting direct antiviral activity of granzyme B during host-viral innate immune responses. We have compiled a comprehensive dataset of granzyme B cleavage sites and developed an accurate SVM-based prediction method utilizing Bayes Feature Extraction to identify novel substrates of granzyme B in silico. The prediction server is available online, together with reference datasets and supplementary materials.

  19. Cloud computing and validation of expandable in silico livers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Silico Livers (ISLs) are works in progress. They are used to challenge multilevel, multi-attribute, mechanistic hypotheses about the hepatic disposition of xenobiotics coupled with hepatic responses. To enhance ISL-to-liver mappings, we added discrete time metabolism, biliary elimination, and bolus dosing features to a previously validated ISL and initiated re-validated experiments that required scaling experiments to use more simulated lobules than previously, more than could be achieved using the local cluster technology. Rather than dramatically increasing the size of our local cluster we undertook the re-validation experiments using the Amazon EC2 cloud platform. So doing required demonstrating the efficacy of scaling a simulation to use more cluster nodes and assessing the scientific equivalence of local cluster validation experiments with those executed using the cloud platform. Results The local cluster technology was duplicated in the Amazon EC2 cloud platform. Synthetic modeling protocols were followed to identify a successful parameterization. Experiment sample sizes (number of simulated lobules) on both platforms were 49, 70, 84, and 152 (cloud only). Experimental indistinguishability was demonstrated for ISL outflow profiles of diltiazem using both platforms for experiments consisting of 84 or more samples. The process was analogous to demonstration of results equivalency from two different wet-labs. Conclusions The results provide additional evidence that disposition simulations using ISLs can cover the behavior space of liver experiments in distinct experimental contexts (there is in silico-to-wet-lab phenotype similarity). The scientific value of experimenting with multiscale biomedical models has been limited to research groups with access to computer clusters. The availability of cloud technology coupled with the evidence of scientific equivalency has lowered the barrier and will greatly facilitate model sharing as well as provide

  20. In Silico Analysis Validates Proteomic Findings of Formalin-fixed Paraffin Embedded Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tissue

    PubMed Central

    AZIMI, ALI; L. KAUFMAN, KIMBERLEY; ALI, MARINA; KOSSARD, STEVEN; FERNANDEZ-PENAS, PABLO

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is a common type of skin cancer but there are no comprehensive proteomic studies on this entity. Materials and Methods: We employed liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cSCC material to study the tumor and normal skin tissue proteomes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to interpret the role of altered proteins in cSCC pathophysiology. Results were validated using the Human Protein Atlas and Oncomine database in silico. Results: Of 1,310 unique proteins identified, expression of an average of 144 and 88 proteins were significantly (p<0.05) increased and decreased, respectively, in the tumor samples compared to their normal counterparts. IPA analysis revealed disruptions in proteins associated with cell proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. In silico analysis confirmed that proteins corresponding to 12 antibodies, and genes corresponding to 18 proteins were differentially expressed between the two categories, validating our proteomic measurements. Conclusion: Label-free MS-based proteomics is useful for analyzing FFPE cSCC tissues. PMID:27807068

  1. Sequence characterization, in silico mapping and cytosine methylation analysis of markers linked to apospory in Paspalum notatum

    PubMed Central

    Podio, Maricel; Rodríguez, María P.; Felitti, Silvina; Stein, Juliana; Martínez, Eric J.; Siena, Lorena A.; Quarin, Camilo L.; Pessino, Silvina C.; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    In previous studies we reported the identification of several AFLP, RAPD and RFLP molecular markers linked to apospory in Paspalum notatum. The objective of this work was to sequence these markers, obtain their flanking regions by chromosome walking and perform an in silico mapping analysis in rice and maize. The methylation status of two apospory-related sequences was also assessed using methylation-sensitive RFLP experiments. Fourteen molecular markers were analyzed and several protein-coding sequences were identified. Copy number estimates and RFLP linkage analysis showed that the sequence PnMAI3 displayed 2–4 copies per genome and linkage to apospory. Extension of this marker by chromosome walking revealed an additional protein-coding sequence mapping in silico in the apospory-syntenic regions of rice and maize. Approximately 5 kb corresponding to different markers were characterized through the global sequencing procedure. A more refined analysis based on sequence information indicated synteny with segments of chromosomes 2 and 12 of rice and chromosomes 3 and 5 of maize. Two loci associated with apomixis locus were tested in methylation-sensitive RFLP experiments using genomic DNA extracted from leaves. Although both target sequences were methylated no methylation polymorphisms associated with the mode of reproduction were detected. PMID:23271945

  2. Sequence characterization, in silico mapping and cytosine methylation analysis of markers linked to apospory in Paspalum notatum.

    PubMed

    Podio, Maricel; Rodríguez, María P; Felitti, Silvina; Stein, Juliana; Martínez, Eric J; Siena, Lorena A; Quarin, Camilo L; Pessino, Silvina C; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A

    2012-12-01

    In previous studies we reported the identification of several AFLP, RAPD and RFLP molecular markers linked to apospory in Paspalum notatum. The objective of this work was to sequence these markers, obtain their flanking regions by chromosome walking and perform an in silico mapping analysis in rice and maize. The methylation status of two apospory-related sequences was also assessed using methylation-sensitive RFLP experiments. Fourteen molecular markers were analyzed and several protein-coding sequences were identified. Copy number estimates and RFLP linkage analysis showed that the sequence PnMAI3 displayed 2-4 copies per genome and linkage to apospory. Extension of this marker by chromosome walking revealed an additional protein-coding sequence mapping in silico in the apospory-syntenic regions of rice and maize. Approximately 5 kb corresponding to different markers were characterized through the global sequencing procedure. A more refined analysis based on sequence information indicated synteny with segments of chromosomes 2 and 12 of rice and chromosomes 3 and 5 of maize. Two loci associated with apomixis locus were tested in methylation-sensitive RFLP experiments using genomic DNA extracted from leaves. Although both target sequences were methylated no methylation polymorphisms associated with the mode of reproduction were detected.

  3. In Silico Preclinical Trials: Methodology and Engineering Guide to Closed-Loop Control in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Patek, Stephen D.; Bequette, B. Wayne; Breton, Marc; Buckingham, Bruce A.; Dassau, Eyal; Doyle, Francis J.; Lum, John; Magni, Lalo; Zisser, Howard

    2009-01-01

    This article sets forth guidelines for in silico (simulation-based) proof-of-concept testing of artificial pancreas control algorithms. The goal was to design a test procedure that can facilitate regulatory approval [e.g., Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption] for General Clinical Research Center experiments without preliminary testing on animals. The methodology is designed around a software package, based on a recent meal simulation model of the glucose–insulin system. Putting a premium on generality, this document starts by specifying a generic, rather abstract, meta-algorithm for control. The meta-algorithm has two main components: (1) patient assessment and tuning of control parameters, i.e., algorithmic processes for collection and processing patient data prior to closed-loop operation, and (2) controller warm-up and run-time operation, i.e., algorithmic processes for initializing controller states and managing blood glucose. The simulation-based testing methodology is designed to reveal the conceptual/mathematical operation of both main components, as applied to a large population of in silico patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:20144358

  4. Alzheimer's Disease and HLA-A2: Linking Neurodegenerative to Immune Processes through an In Silico Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes, Ricardo A.; Murillo-Rojas, Juan

    2014-01-01

    There is a controversial relationship between HLA-A2 and Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been suggested a modifier effect on the risk that depends on genetic loadings. Thus, the aims of this study were to evaluate this relationship and to reveal genes associated with both concepts the HLA-A gene and AD. Consequently, we did first a classical systematic review and a meta-analysis of case-control studies. Next, by means of an in silico approach, we used experimental knowledge of protein-protein interactions to evaluate the top ranked genes shared by both concepts, previously found through text mining. The meta-analysis did not show a significant pooled OR (1.11, 95% CI: 0.98 to 1.24 in Caucasians), in spite of the fact that four of the included studies had a significant OR > 1 and none of them a significant OR < 1. In contrast, the in silico approach retrieved nonrandomly shared genes by both concepts (P = 0.02), which additionally encode truly interacting proteins. The network of proteins encoded by APP, ICAM-1, ITGB2, ITGAL, SELP, SELL, IL2, IL1B, CD4, and CD8A linked immune to neurodegenerative processes and highlighted the potential roles in AD pathogenesis of endothelial regulation, infectious diseases, specific antigen presentation, and HLA-A2 in maintaining synapses. PMID:25197660

  5. Translating and Transforming Care

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Alex; Moore, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how the Disability Living Allowance claim form, used in the United Kingdom to allocate £13 billion of disability benefits, translates and transforms disability and care. Twenty-two people with acquired brain injury and their main informal caregivers (n = 44) were video-recorded filling in the disability claim form. Participants disagreed on 26% of the questions, revealing two types of problems. Translation problems arose as participants struggled to provide categorical responses to ambiguous questions and were unable to report contextual variability in care needs or divergences of perception. Transformation problems arose as participants resisted the way in which the form positioned them, forcing them to conceptualize their relationship in terms of dependency and burden. The disability claim form co-opts claimants to translate care and disability into bureaucratically predefined categories, and it transforms the care relationship that it purports to document. PMID:25792487

  6. Lightweight Transformer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    could be used in any power conditioning circuit, inserted between any power source and load combination. Thus, its applicability is universal and...Typical Current Waveform from the Power Supply with a 5 ß Electrical Load -63- FILTER r—*-. REPRESENTS 16 OTOS IN PARELLEL , TEST / TRANSFORMER

  7. Transformation & Metamorphosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The sculptures of Canadian artist Brian Jungen are a great inspiration for a lesson on creating new forms. Jungen transforms found objects into unique creations without fully concealing their original form or purpose. Frank Stella's sculpture series, including "K.132,2007" made of stainless steel and spray paint, is another great example of…

  8. Transforming Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookson, Peter W., Jr., Ed.; Schneider, Barbara, Ed.

    The authors in this book address the issues that relate to the crisis in American education and review some of the proposed solutions. To transform education, schools must be examined as social systems that are interrelated with families, communities, and the world of work. Following the introduction, section 1, "Conditions for Educational…

  9. Transformation & Metamorphosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Debra

    2009-01-01

    The sculptures of Canadian artist Brian Jungen are a great inspiration for a lesson on creating new forms. Jungen transforms found objects into unique creations without fully concealing their original form or purpose. Frank Stella's sculpture series, including "K.132,2007" made of stainless steel and spray paint, is another great example of…

  10. Transformation Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2007-01-01

    The program for the march by librarians on America's capital for the American Library Association (ALA) conference is predictably loaded with lobbying, legislation, and DC tours. It also abounds with professional opportunity and reflects the impact of Leslie Burger, one of the most activist ALA presidents in recent history. Her "Transformation"…

  11. Transforming Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cookson, Peter W., Jr., Ed.; Schneider, Barbara, Ed.

    The authors in this book address the issues that relate to the crisis in American education and review some of the proposed solutions. To transform education, schools must be examined as social systems that are interrelated with families, communities, and the world of work. Following the introduction, section 1, "Conditions for Educational…

  12. Transformative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popham, W. James

    2008-01-01

    If you're at all skeptical that "formative assessment" is just another buzzword, then here's a book that will change the way you think about the role that formative assessment can play in transforming education into a more powerful and positive process. Renowned expert W. James Popham clarifies what formative assessment really is, why…

  13. Transforming Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, C. H.; Feldman, Phillip

    1994-01-01

    Presents comparisons between the traditional curriculum and the essential learnings curriculum implemented at the Moss Point School District in Moss Point, Mississippi. Describes in detail the curriculum transformation process. Provides insight into the role of technology in the reading/language arts curriculum. (RS)

  14. Transformation Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2007-01-01

    The program for the march by librarians on America's capital for the American Library Association (ALA) conference is predictably loaded with lobbying, legislation, and DC tours. It also abounds with professional opportunity and reflects the impact of Leslie Burger, one of the most activist ALA presidents in recent history. Her "Transformation"…

  15. Revealing the mitigation of intrinsic structure transformation and oxygen evolution in a layered Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 cathode using restricted charging protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ming-Hsien; Cheng, Ju-Hsiang; Huang, Hsin-Fu; Chen, U.-Fo; Huang, Chun-Ming; Hsieh, Han-Wei; Lee, Jenn-Min; Chen, Jin-Ming; Su, Wei-Nien; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2017-08-01

    Li-rich cathode materials have attracted substantial attention because of their high energy density, but they still suffer from structural instability and voltage decay in cycling. Herein, a dynamic observation of the initial structural conversion and transformation is achieved by in situ Raman spectroscopy, and the effect of cut-off voltage on the intrinsic structure transformation is investigated by the using of three strategic charging protocols. The clear peak evolution related to the post-discharge spinel transformation is found that more obvious for the higher cut-off (4.8 V) protocol than for the lower cut-off (4.6 V) one after 300 cycles. In soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy, as demonstrated by the Mn L-edge spectra, more surface spinel-like Li1-xMnO2-δ (Mn3+) structure is formed as the cycle number and cut-off voltage increased, whereas the Ni L-edge spectra exhibited the same features throughout the cycling. The significant variations in the O K-edge also provide evidence distinguishing the structure transformation from the surface to the bulk material and the change in the lower cut-off protocol. Such spectroscopic analysis clearly confirm how the protocol control with an overall restricted charge cut-off voltage of 4.6 V significantly reduces the adverse effects of cycling on the oxygen plateau of the Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 cathode.

  16. Ensuring confidence in predictions: A scheme to assess the scientific validity of in silico models.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Mark; Ellison, Claire M; Cronin, Mark T D; Pastor, Manuel; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Munoz-Muriendas, Jordi; Pognan, Francois; Madden, Judith C

    2015-06-23

    The use of in silico tools within the drug development process to predict a wide range of properties including absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicity has become increasingly important due to changes in legislation and both ethical and economic drivers to reduce animal testing. Whilst in silico tools have been used for decades there remains reluctance to accept predictions based on these methods particularly in regulatory settings. This apprehension arises in part due to lack of confidence in the reliability, robustness and applicability of the models. To address this issue we propose a scheme for the verification of in silico models that enables end users and modellers to assess the scientific validity of models in accordance with the principles of good computer modelling practice. We report here the implementation of the scheme within the Innovative Medicines Initiative project "eTOX" (electronic toxicity) and its application to the in silico models developed within the frame of this project.

  17. DockScreen: A database of in silico biomolecular interactions to support computational toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed DockScreen, a database of in silico biomolecular interactions designed to enable rational molecular toxicological insight within a computational toxicology framework. This database is composed of chemical/target (receptor and enzyme) binding scores calculated by...

  18. In silico design of treatment strategies in wound healing and bone fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Geris, L; Schugart, R; Van Oosterwyck, H

    2010-06-13

    Wound and bone fracture healing are natural repair processes initiated by trauma. Over the last decade, many mathematical models have been established to investigate the healing processes in silico, in addition to ongoing experimental work. In recent days, the focus of the mathematical models has shifted from simulation of the healing process towards simulation of the impaired healing process and the in silico design of treatment strategies. This review describes the most important causes of failure of the wound and bone fracture healing processes and the experimental models and methods used to investigate and treat these impaired healing cases. Furthermore, the mathematical models that are described address these impaired healing cases and investigate various therapeutic scenarios in silico. Examples are provided to illustrate the potential of these in silico experiments. Finally, limitations of the models and the need for and ability of these models to capture patient specificity and variability are discussed.

  19. DockScreen: A database of in silico biomolecular interactions to support computational toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed DockScreen, a database of in silico biomolecular interactions designed to enable rational molecular toxicological insight within a computational toxicology framework. This database is composed of chemical/target (receptor and enzyme) binding scores calculated by...

  20. In Silico Studies of the Toxcast Chemicals Interacting with Biomolecular targets

    EPA Science Inventory

    Molecular docking, a structure-based in silico tool for chemical library pre-screening in drug discovery, can be used to explore the potential toxicity of environmental chemicals acting at specific biomelcular targets.

  1. Ion transport in tumors under electrochemical treatment: in vivo, in vitro and in silico modeling.

    PubMed

    Colombo, L; González, G; Marshall, G; Molina, F V; Soba, A; Suarez, C; Turjanski, P

    2007-11-01

    The electrochemical treatment of cancer (EChT) consists in the passage of a direct electric current through two or more electrodes inserted locally in the tumor tissue. The extreme pH changes induced have been proposed as the main tumor destruction mechanism. Here, we study ion transport during EChT through a combined modeling methodology: in vivo modeling with BALB/c mice bearing a subcutaneous tumor, in vitro modeling with agar and collagen gels, and in silico modeling using the one-dimensional Nernst-Planck and Poisson equations for ion transport in a four-ion electrolyte. This combined modeling approach reveals that, under EChT modeling, an initial condition with almost neutral pH evolves between electrodes into extreme cathodic alkaline and anodic acidic fronts moving towards each other, leaving the possible existence of a biological pH region between them; towards the periphery, the pH decays to its neutral values. pH front tracking unveils a time scaling close to t(1/2), signature of a diffusion-controlled process. These results could have significant implications in EChT optimal operative conditions and dose planning, in particular, in the way in which the evolving EChT pH region covers the active cancer cells spherical casket.

  2. In silico characterisation and chromosomal localisation of human RRH (peropsin) – implications for opsin evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bellingham, James; Wells, Dominic J; Foster, Russell G

    2003-01-01

    Background The vertebrate opsins are proteins which utilise a retinaldehyde chromophore in their photosensory or photoisomerase roles in the visual/irradiance detection cycle. The majority of the opsins, such as rod and cone opsins, have a very highly conserved gene structure suggesting a common lineage. Exceptions to this are RGR-opsin and melanopsin, whose genes have very different intron insertion positions. The gene structure of another opsin, peropsin (retinal pigment epithelium-derived rhodopsin homologue, RRH) is unknown. Results By in silico analysis of the GenBank database we have determined that the human RRH comprises 7 exons spanning approximately 16.5 kb and is localised to chromosome 4q25 in the following gene sequence: cen-EGF-RRH-IF-qter – a position that excludes this gene as a candidate for the RP29 autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa locus. A comparison of opsin gene structures reveals that RRH and RGR share two common intron (introns 1 and 4) insertion positions which may reflect a shared ancestral gene. Conclusion The opsins comprise a diverse group of genes which appear to have arisen from three different lineages. These lineages comprise the "classical opsin superfamily" which includes the rod and cone opsins, pinopsin, VA-opsin, parapinopsin and encephalopsin; the RRH and RGR group; and the melanopsin line. A common lineage for RRH and RGR, together with their sites of expression in the RPE, indicates that peropsin may act as a retinal isomerase. PMID:12542842

  3. In silico identification of transcription factors in Medicago sativa using available transcriptomic resources.

    PubMed

    Postnikova, Olga A; Shao, Jonathan; Nemchinov, Lev G

    2014-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that govern organismal development and response to the environment by regulating gene expression. Information on the amount and diversity of TFs within individual plant species is critical for understanding of their biological roles and evolutionary history across the plant kingdom. Currently, only scattered information on separate TFs is available for alfalfa, the most extensively cultivated forage legume in the world. In the meantime, several large transcriptomic resources that can be used to identify and characterize alfalfa TF genes are freely accessible online. In this study, we have performed an in silico analysis of transcriptome data generated in our laboratory and publicly acquirable from other sources to reveal and systematize alfalfa transcription factors. Transcriptome-wide mining enabled prediction of 983 TFs along with their sequence features and putative phylogenies of the largest families. All data were assembled into a simple open-access database named AlfalfaTFDB ( http://plantpathology.ba.ars.usda.gov/alfalfatfdb.html ). Transcriptomic analysis used in this work represents an effective approach for the identification of TF genes in plants with incomplete genomes, such as alfalfa. Integrated TF repertoires of Medicago sativa will provide an important tool for studying regulation of gene expression in other complex non-model species of agricultural significance.

  4. Combining in silico and in cerebro approaches for virtual screening and pose prediction in SAMPL4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voet, Arnout R. D.; Kumar, Ashutosh; Berenger, Francois; Zhang, Kam Y. J.

    2014-04-01

    The SAMPL challenges provide an ideal opportunity for unbiased evaluation and comparison of different approaches used in computational drug design. During the fourth round of this SAMPL challenge, we participated in the virtual screening and binding pose prediction on inhibitors targeting the HIV-1 integrase enzyme. For virtual screening, we used well known and widely used in silico methods combined with personal in cerebro insights and experience. Regular docking only performed slightly better than random selection, but the performance was significantly improved upon incorporation of additional filters based on pharmacophore queries and electrostatic similarities. The best performance was achieved when logical selection was added. For the pose prediction, we utilized a similar consensus approach that amalgamated the results of the Glide-XP docking with structural knowledge and rescoring. The pose prediction results revealed that docking displayed reasonable performance in predicting the binding poses. However, prediction performance can be improved utilizing scientific experience and rescoring approaches. In both the virtual screening and pose prediction challenges, the top performance was achieved by our approaches. Here we describe the methods and strategies used in our approaches and discuss the rationale of their performances.

  5. In silico characterization and transcriptomic analysis of nif family genes from Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shilpi; Shrivastava, Alok Kumar

    2017-03-14

    In silico approaches in conjunction with morphology, nitrogenase activity, and qRT-PCR explore the impact of selected abiotic stressor such as arsenic, salt, cadmium, copper, and butachlor on nitrogen fixing (nif family) genes of diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. A total of 19 nif genes are present within the Anabaena genome that is involved in the process of nitrogen fixation. Docking studies revealed the interaction between these nif gene-encoded proteins and the selected abiotic stressors which were further validated through decreased heterocyst frequency, fragmentation of filaments, and downregulation of nitrogenase activity under these stresses indicating towards their toxic impact on nitrogen fixation potential of filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Another appealing finding of this study is even though having similar binding energy and similar interacting residues between arsenic/salt and copper/cadmium to nif-encoded proteins, arsenic and cadmium are more toxic than salt and copper for nitrogenase activity of Anabaena which is crucial for growth and yield of rice paddy and soil reclamation.

  6. Drug Target Identification and Elucidation of Natural Inhibitors for Bordetella petrii: An In Silico Study

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Manisha; Pattnaik, Animesh; Pradhan, Sukanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Environmental microbes like Bordetella petrii has been established as a causative agent for various infectious diseases in human. Again, development of drug resistance in B. petrii challenged to combat against the infection. Identification of potential drug target and proposing a novel lead compound against the pathogen has a great aid and value. In this study, bioinformatics tools and technology have been applied to suggest a potential drug target by screening the proteome information of B. petrii DSM 12804 (accession No. PRJNA28135) from genome database of National Centre for Biotechnology information. In this regards, the inhibitory effect of nine natural compounds like ajoene (Allium sativum), allicin (A. sativum), cinnamaldehyde (Cinnamomum cassia), curcumin (Curcuma longa), gallotannin (active component of green tea and red wine), isoorientin (Anthopterus wardii), isovitexin (A. wardii), neral (Melissa officinalis), and vitexin (A. wardii) have been acknowledged with anti-bacterial properties and hence tested against identified drug target of B. petrii by implicating computational approach. The in silico studies revealed the hypothesis that lpxD could be a potential drug target and with recommendation of a strong inhibitory effect of selected natural compounds against infection caused due to B. petrii, would be further validated through in vitro experiments. PMID:28154518

  7. In silico search for modifier genes associated with pancreatic and liver disease in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Génin, Emmanuelle; Férec, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, affecting among other organs, the lung, the pancreas and the liver. Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a monogenic disease, many studies reveal a very complex relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Indeed, the broad phenotypic spectrum observed in Cystic Fibrosis is far from being explained by obvious genotype-phenotype correlations and it is admitted that Cystic Fibrosis disease is the result of multiple factors, including effects of the environment as well as modifier genes. Our objective was to highlight new modifier genes with potential implications in the lung, pancreatic and liver outcomes of the disease. For this purpose we performed a system biology approach which combined, database mining, literature mining, gene expression study and network analysis as well as pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interactions. We found that IFI16, CCNE2 and IGFBP2 are potential modifiers in the altered lung function in Cystic Fibrosis. We also found that EPHX1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, DSP and SLC33A1, GPNMB, NCF2, RASGRP1, LGALS3 and PTPN13, are potential modifiers in pancreas and liver, respectively. Associated pathways indicate that immune system is likely involved and that Ubiquitin C is probably a central node, linking Cystic Fibrosis to liver and pancreatic disease. We highlight here new modifier genes with potential implications in Cystic Fibrosis. Nevertheless, our in silico analysis requires functional analysis to give our results a physiological relevance. PMID:28339466

  8. In silico identification of coffee genome expressed sequences potentially associated with resistance to diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Sequences potentially associated with coffee resistance to diseases were identified by in silico analyses using the database of the Brazilian Coffee Genome Project (BCGP). Keywords corresponding to plant resistance mechanisms to pathogens identified in the literature were used as baits for data mining. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) related to each of these keywords were identified with tools available in the BCGP bioinformatics platform. A total of 11,300 ESTs were mined. These ESTs were clustered and formed 979 EST-contigs with similarities to chitinases, kinases, cytochrome P450 and nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) proteins, as well as with proteins related to disease resistance, pathogenesis, hypersensitivity response (HR) and plant defense responses to diseases. The 140 EST-contigs identified through the keyword NBS-LRR were classified according to function. This classification allowed association of the predicted products of EST-contigs with biological processes, including host defense and apoptosis, and with molecular functions such as nucleotide binding and signal transducer activity. Fisher's exact test was used to examine the significance of differences in contig expression between libraries representing the responses to biotic stress challenges and other libraries from the BCGP. This analysis revealed seven contigs highly similar to catalase, chitinase, protein with a BURP domain and unknown proteins. The involvement of these coffee proteins in plant responses to disease is discussed. PMID:21637594

  9. Quercetin Influences Quorum Sensing in Food Borne Bacteria: In-Vitro and In-Silico Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Gopu, Venkadesaperumal; Meena, Chetan Kumar; Shetty, Prathapkumar Halady

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) plays a vital role in regulating the virulence factor of many food borne pathogens, which causes severe public health risk. Therefore, interrupting the QS signaling pathway may be an attractive strategy to combat microbial infections. In the current study QS inhibitory activity of quercetin and its anti-biofilm property was assessed against food-borne pathogens using a bio-sensor strain. In addition in-silico techniques like molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies were applied to screen the quercetin’s potentiality as QS inhibitor. Quercetin (80μg/ml) showed the significant reduction in QS-dependent phenotypes like violacein production, biofilm formation, exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, motility and alginate production in a concentration-dependent manner. Synergistic activity of conventional antibiotics with quercetin enhanced the susceptibility of all tested pathogens. Furthermore, Molecular docking analysis revealed that quercetin binds more rigidly with LasR receptor protein than the signaling compound with docking score of -9.17Kcal/mol. Molecular dynamics simulation predicted that QS inhibitory activity of quercetin occurs through the conformational changes between the receptor and quercetin complex. Above findings suggest that quercetin can act as a competitive inhibitor for signaling compound towards LasR receptor pathway and can serve as a novel QS-based antibacterial/anti-biofilm drug to manage food-borne pathogens. PMID:26248208

  10. Combining in silico and in cerebro approaches for virtual screening and pose prediction in SAMPL4.

    PubMed

    Voet, Arnout R D; Kumar, Ashutosh; Berenger, Francois; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2014-04-01

    The SAMPL challenges provide an ideal opportunity for unbiased evaluation and comparison of different approaches used in computational drug design. During the fourth round of this SAMPL challenge, we participated in the virtual screening and binding pose prediction on inhibitors targeting the HIV-1 integrase enzyme. For virtual screening, we used well known and widely used in silico methods combined with personal in cerebro insights and experience. Regular docking only performed slightly better than random selection, but the performance was significantly improved upon incorporation of additional filters based on pharmacophore queries and electrostatic similarities. The best performance was achieved when logical selection was added. For the pose prediction, we utilized a similar consensus approach that amalgamated the results of the Glide-XP docking with structural knowledge and rescoring. The pose prediction results revealed that docking displayed reasonable performance in predicting the binding poses. However, prediction performance can be improved utilizing scientific experience and rescoring approaches. In both the virtual screening and pose prediction challenges, the top performance was achieved by our approaches. Here we describe the methods and strategies used in our approaches and discuss the rationale of their performances.

  11. GeneNetWeaver: in silico benchmark generation and performance profiling of network inference methods.

    PubMed

    Schaffter, Thomas; Marbach, Daniel; Floreano, Dario

    2011-08-15

    Over the last decade, numerous methods have been developed for inference of regulatory networks from gene expression data. However, accurate and systematic evaluation of these methods is hampered by the difficulty of constructing adequate benchmarks and the lack of tools for a differentiated analysis of network predictions on such benchmarks. Here, we describe a novel and comprehensive method for in silico benchmark generation and performance profiling of network inference methods available to the community as an open-source software called GeneNetWeaver (GNW). In addition to the generation of detailed dynamical models of gene regulatory networks to be used as benchmarks, GNW provides a network motif analysis that reveals systematic prediction errors, thereby indicating potential ways of improving inference methods. The accuracy of network inference methods is evaluated using standard metrics such as precision-recall and receiver operating characteristic curves. We show how GNW can be used to assess the performance and identify the strengths and weaknesses of six inference methods. Furthermore, we used GNW to provide the international Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods (DREAM) competition with three network inference challenges (DREAM3, DREAM4 and DREAM5). GNW is available at http://gnw.sourceforge.net along with its Java source code, user manual and supporting data. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. dario.floreano@epfl.ch.

  12. An in silico expert system for the identification of eye irritants.

    PubMed

    Verma, R P; Matthews, E J

    2015-01-01

    This report describes development of an in silico, expert rule-based method for the classification of chemicals into irritants or non-irritants to eye, as defined by the Draize test. This method was developed to screen data-poor cosmetic ingredient chemicals for eye irritancy potential, which is based upon exclusion rules of five physicochemical properties - molecular weight (MW), hydrophobicity (log P), number of hydrogen bond donors (HBD), number of hydrogen bond acceptors (HBA) and polarizability (Pol). These rules were developed using the ADMET Predictor software and a dataset of 917 eye irritant chemicals. The dataset was divided into 826 (90%) chemicals used for training set and 91 (10%) chemicals used for external validation set (every 10th chemical sorted by molecular weight). The sensitivity of these rules for the training and validation sets was 72.3% and 71.4%, respectively. These rules were also validated for their specificity using an external validation set of 2011 non-irritant chemicals to the eye. The specificity for this validation set was revealed as 77.3%. This method facilitates rapid screening and prioritization of data poor chemicals that are unlikely to be tested for eye irritancy in the Draize test.

  13. Isolation and in silico evaluation of antidiabetic molecules of Cynodon dactylon (L.).

    PubMed

    Annapurna, Hasthi V; Apoorva, Babu; Ravichandran, Natesan; Arun, Kallur Purushothaman; Brindha, Pemaiah; Swaminathan, Sethuraman; Vijayalakshmi, Mahadevan; Nagarajan, Arumugam

    2013-02-01

    Cynodon dactylon is a potential source of metabolites such as flavanoids, alkaloids, glycosides and β-sitosterol and has been traditionally employed to treat urinary tract and other microbial infections and dysentery. The present work attempts to evaluate the activity of C. dactylon extracts for glycemic control. Aqueous extracts of C. dactylon analyzed by HPLC-ESI MS have identified the presence of apigenin, luteolin, 6-C-pentosyl-8-C-hexosyl apigenin and 6-C-hexosyl-8-C-pentosyl luteolin. Evaluation of hypoglycemic activity through an extensive in silico docking approach with PPARγ (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor), GLUT-4 (glucose transporter-4) and SGLT2 (sodium glucose co-transporter-2) revealed that luteolin, apigenin, 6-C-pentosyl-8-C-hexosyl apigenin, 6-C-hexosyl-8-C-pentosyl luteolin interact with SGLT2. Interactions of these molecules with Gln 295 and Asp 294 residues of SGLT2 have been shown to compare well with that of the phase III drug, dapagliflozin. These residues have been proven to be responsible for sugar sensing and transport. This work establishes C. dactylon extract as a potential SGLT2 inhibitor for diabetic neuropathy thus enabling a possibility of this plant extract as a new alternative to existing diabetic approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. In silico search for modifier genes associated with pancreatic and liver disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Trouvé, Pascal; Génin, Emmanuelle; Férec, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, affecting among other organs, the lung, the pancreas and the liver. Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a monogenic disease, many studies reveal a very complex relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Indeed, the broad phenotypic spectrum observed in Cystic Fibrosis is far from being explained by obvious genotype-phenotype correlations and it is admitted that Cystic Fibrosis disease is the result of multiple factors, including effects of the environment as well as modifier genes. Our objective was to highlight new modifier genes with potential implications in the lung, pancreatic and liver outcomes of the disease. For this purpose we performed a system biology approach which combined, database mining, literature mining, gene expression study and network analysis as well as pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interactions. We found that IFI16, CCNE2 and IGFBP2 are potential modifiers in the altered lung function in Cystic Fibrosis. We also found that EPHX1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, DSP and SLC33A1, GPNMB, NCF2, RASGRP1, LGALS3 and PTPN13, are potential modifiers in pancreas and liver, respectively. Associated pathways indicate that immune system is likely involved and that Ubiquitin C is probably a central node, linking Cystic Fibrosis to liver and pancreatic disease. We highlight here new modifier genes with potential implications in Cystic Fibrosis. Nevertheless, our in silico analysis requires functional analysis to give our results a physiological relevance.

  15. In silico investigation of lactoferrin protein characterizations for the prediction of anti-microbial properties

    PubMed Central

    Sohrabi, Seyyed Mohsen; Niazi, Ali; Chahardoli, Mahmood; Hortamani, Ali; Setoodeh, Payam

    2014-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is an iron-binding multi-functional glycoprotein which has numerous physiological functions such as iron transportation, anti-microbial activity and immune response. In this study, different in silico approaches were exploited to investigate Lf protein properties in a number of mammalian species. Results showed that the iron-binding site, DNA and RNA-binding sites, signal peptides and transferrin motifs in the Lf structure were highly conserved. Examined sequences showed three conserved motifs which were repeated twice in the Lf structure, demonstrating ancient duplication events in its gene. Also, results suggest that the functional domains in mammalian Lf proteins are Zinc finger, Tubulin/FtsZ, GTPase, α/β hydrolase and Zinc knuckle. The potential site for nucleic acid binding and the major DNA and RNA- binding sites in this protein were found in the lactoferricin (Lfc) fragment. Due to its high positive charge, Lf is able to bind a large number of compounds. Our analysis also revealed that the interactions between Lf and ITLN1, LYZ, CSN2, and CD14 proteins played an important role in the protective activities of Lf. Analysis for the prediction of secondary structures indicated that high amounts of α-helix, β-strand and β-sheet were present in Lf. The high degree of conservation among mammalian Lf proteins indicates that there is a close relationship between these proteins, reflecting their important role. PMID:27843978

  16. In silico identification of new ligands for GPR17: a promising therapeutic target for neurodegenerative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberini, Ivano; Daniele, Simona; Parravicini, Chiara; Sensi, Cristina; Trincavelli, Maria L.; Martini, Claudia; Abbracchio, Maria P.

    2011-08-01

    GPR17, a previously orphan receptor responding to both uracil nucleotides and cysteinyl-leukotrienes, has been proposed as a novel promising target for human neurodegenerative diseases. Here, in order to specifically identify novel potent ligands of GPR17, we first modeled in silico the receptor by using a multiple template approach, in which extracellular loops of the receptor, quite complex to treat, were modeled making reference to the most similar parts of all the class-A GPCRs crystallized so far. A high-throughput virtual screening exploration of GPR17 binding site with more than 130,000 lead-like compounds was then applied, followed by the wet functional and pharmacological validation of the top-scoring chemical structures. This approach revealed successful for the proposed aim, and allowed us to identify five agonists or partial agonists with very diverse chemical structure. None of these compounds could have been expected `a priori' to act on a GPCR, and all of them behaved as much more potent ligands than GPR17 endogenous activators.

  17. Prospecting Biotechnologically-Relevant Monooxygenases from Cold Sediment Metagenomes: An In Silico Approach.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Matías A; Lozada, Mariana; Rial, Daniela V; Mac Cormack, Walter P; Jansson, Janet K; Sjöling, Sara; Carroll, JoLynn; Dionisi, Hebe M

    2017-04-09

    The goal of this work was to identify sequences encoding monooxygenase biocatalysts with novel features by in silico mining an assembled metagenomic dataset of polar and subpolar marine sediments. The targeted enzyme sequences were Baeyer-Villiger and bacterial cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP153). These enzymes have wide-ranging applications, from the synthesis of steroids, antibiotics, mycotoxins and pheromones to the synthesis of monomers for polymerization and anticancer precursors, due to their extraordinary enantio-, regio-, and chemo- selectivity that are valuable features for organic synthesis. Phylogenetic analyses were used to select the most divergent sequences affiliated to these enzyme families among the 264 putative monooxygenases recovered from the ~14 million protein-coding sequences in the assembled metagenome dataset. Three-dimensional structure modeling and docking analysis suggested features useful in biotechnological applications in five metagenomic sequences, such as wide substrate range, novel substrate specificity or regioselectivity. Further analysis revealed structural features associated with psychrophilic enzymes, such as broader substrate accessibility, larger catalytic pockets or low domain interactions, suggesting that they could be applied in biooxidations at room or low temperatures, saving costs inherent to energy consumption. This work allowed the identification of putative enzyme candidates with promising features from metagenomes, providing a suitable starting point for further developments.

  18. Functional connections and pathways of coenzyme Q10-inducible genes: an in-silico study.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Constance; Lindner, Inka; Vock, Christina; Fujii, Kenji; Döring, Frank

    2007-10-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, ubiquinone) is an essential cofactor in the electron transport chain, serves as a potent antioxidant in mitochondria and lipid membranes, and is often used as a dietary supplement for a number of diseases including cardiovascular diseases. Recently, we obtained evidence that CoQ10 (Kaneka Q10) affects the expression of hundreds of human genes. To decipher the functional and regulatory connections of these genes, a literature search combined with transcription factor binding site analysis was performed using Genomatix BiblioSphere and MatInspector. This in-silico analysis revealed 17 CoQ10-inducible genes which are functionally connected by signalling pathways of G-protein coupled receptors, JAK/STAT, integrin, and beta-arrestin. Promoter analysis of these CoQ10-inducible genes showed one group of NF B-regulated genes, namely IL5, thrombin, vitronectin receptor and C-reactive protein (CRP). Furthermore, a common promoter framework containing binding sites of the transcription factor families EVI1, HOXF, HOXC, and CLOX was identified in the promoters of IL5, CRP, and vitronectin receptor. The identified CoQ10-inducible genes and pathways play an important role in inflammatory response. Since these effects are based on an in-vitro study, the effect of CoQ10 on vascular health in vivo needs to be addressed in further animal and/or human intervention studies.

  19. Molecular cloning and in silico studies of physiologically significant trehalase from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ekta; Thorat, Leena; Bhavnani, Varsha; Bendre, Ameya D; Pal, J K; Nath, B B; Gaikwad, S M

    2016-11-01

    Trehalase, a physiologically important glycosidase is known for its crucial role in insect glycometabolism and stress recovery. The present study describes the molecular cloning of a gene fragment, encoding the catalytically active trehalase from Drosophila melanogaster (DmTre) and its heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. The 1275bp gene was overexpressed in two different vectors viz., pET28a and pCOLD TF and investigated for variable soluble expression, purification and activity of the recombinant enzyme with optimum pH and temperature of enzyme as 6 and 55°C, respectively. The sequence was characterized in silico by subjecting it to homology search, multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree construction revealing its identity to other trehalases which belong to glycoside hydrolase family 37. The deduced amino acid sequence and modeled 3D structure of DmTre possessed all features of trehalase superfamily, including signature motifs and catalytic domain. The active site pocket of recombinant DmTre was compared with the crystal structure of E. coli trehalase identifying Glu424 and Asp226 as the putative catalytic residues. Additionally, enzyme-substrate docking suggests possible involvement of other residues in the catalysis along with Asp226. The present study holds significance in understanding the structural aspects of Drosophila trehalase in spite of unavailabilty of eukaryotic trehalase crystal structure.

  20. An RNAi in silico approach to find an optimal shRNA cocktail against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Ortega, María C; Restrepo, Silvia; Rodríguez-R, Luis M; Pérez, Iván; Mendoza, Juan C; Martínez, Andrés P; Sierra, Roberto; Rey-Benito, Gloria J

    2010-12-20

    HIV-1 can be inhibited by RNA interference in vitro through the expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) that target conserved genome sequences. In silico shRNA design for HIV has lacked a detailed study of virus variability constituting a possible breaking point in a clinical setting. We designed shRNAs against HIV-1 considering the variability observed in naïve and drug-resistant isolates available at public databases. A Bioperl-based algorithm was developed to automatically scan multiple sequence alignments of HIV, while evaluating the possibility of identifying dominant and subdominant viral variants that could be used as efficient silencing molecules. Student t-test and Bonferroni Dunn correction test were used to assess statistical significance of our findings. Our in silico approach identified the most common viral variants within highly conserved genome regions, with a calculated free energy of ≥ -6.6 kcal/mol. This is crucial for strand loading to RISC complex and for a predicted silencing efficiency score, which could be used in combination for achieving over 90% silencing. Resistant and naïve isolate variability revealed that the most frequent shRNA per region targets a maximum of 85% of viral sequences. Adding more divergent sequences maintained this percentage. Specific sequence features that have been found to be related with higher silencing efficiency were hardly accomplished in conserved regions, even when lower entropy values correlated with better scores. We identified a conserved region among most HIV-1 genomes, which meets as many sequence features for efficient silencing. HIV-1 variability is an obstacle to achieving absolute silencing using shRNAs designed against a consensus sequence, mainly because there are many functional viral variants. Our shRNA cocktail could be truly effective at silencing dominant and subdominant naïve viral variants. Additionally, resistant isolates might be targeted under specific antiretroviral selective

  1. An RNAi in silico approach to find an optimal shRNA cocktail against HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background HIV-1 can be inhibited by RNA interference in vitro through the expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) that target conserved genome sequences. In silico shRNA design for HIV has lacked a detailed study of virus variability constituting a possible breaking point in a clinical setting. We designed shRNAs against HIV-1 considering the variability observed in naïve and drug-resistant isolates available at public databases. Methods A Bioperl-based algorithm was developed to automatically scan multiple sequence alignments of HIV, while evaluating the possibility of identifying dominant and subdominant viral variants that could be used as efficient silencing molecules. Student t-test and Bonferroni Dunn correction test were used to assess statistical significance of our findings. Results Our in silico approach identified the most common viral variants within highly conserved genome regions, with a calculated free energy of ≥ -6.6 kcal/mol. This is crucial for strand loading to RISC complex and for a predicted silencing efficiency score, which could be used in combination for achieving over 90% silencing. Resistant and naïve isolate variability revealed that the most frequent shRNA per region targets a maximum of 85% of viral sequences. Adding more divergent sequences maintained this percentage. Specific sequence features that have been found to be related with higher silencing efficiency were hardly accomplished in conserved regions, even when lower entropy values correlated with better scores. We identified a conserved region among most HIV-1 genomes, which meets as many sequence features for efficient silencing. Conclusions HIV-1 variability is an obstacle to achieving absolute silencing using shRNAs designed against a consensus sequence, mainly because there are many functional viral variants. Our shRNA cocktail could be truly effective at silencing dominant and subdominant naïve viral variants. Additionally, resistant isolates might be targeted

  2. In-silico Investigation of Antitrypanosomal Phytochemicals from Nigerian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Setzer, William N.; Ogungbe, Ifedayo V.

    2012-01-01

    Background Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), a parasitic protozoal disease, is caused primarily by two subspecies of Trypanosoma brucei. HAT is a re-emerging disease and currently threatens millions of people in sub-Saharan Africa. Many affected people live in remote areas with limited access to health services and, therefore, rely on traditional herbal medicines for treatment. Methods A molecular docking study has been carried out on phytochemical agents that have been previously isolated and characterized from Nigerian medicinal plants, either known to be used ethnopharmacologically to treat parasitic infections or known to have in-vitro antitrypanosomal activity. A total of 386 compounds from 19 species of medicinal plants were investigated using in-silico molecular docking with validated Trypanosoma brucei protein targets that were available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB): Adenosine kinase (TbAK), pteridine reductase 1 (TbPTR1), dihydrofolate reductase (TbDHFR), trypanothione reductase (TbTR), cathepsin B (TbCatB), heat shock protein 90 (TbHSP90), sterol 14α-demethylase (TbCYP51), nucleoside hydrolase (TbNH), triose phosphate isomerase (TbTIM), nucleoside 2-deoxyribosyltransferase (TbNDRT), UDP-galactose 4′ epimerase (TbUDPGE), and ornithine decarboxylase (TbODC). Results This study revealed that triterpenoid and steroid ligands were largely selective for sterol 14α-demethylase; anthraquinones, xanthones, and berberine alkaloids docked strongly to pteridine reductase 1 (TbPTR1); chromenes, pyrazole and pyridine alkaloids preferred docking to triose phosphate isomerase (TbTIM); and numerous indole alkaloids showed notable docking energies with UDP-galactose 4′ epimerase (TbUDPGE). Polyphenolic compounds such as flavonoid gallates or flavonoid glycosides tended to be promiscuous docking agents, giving strong docking energies with most proteins. Conclusions This in-silico molecular docking study has identified potential biomolecular targets of

  3. The Use of Transformations in Solving Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libeskind, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Many workshops and meetings with the US high school mathematics teachers revealed a lack of familiarity with the use of transformations in solving equations and problems related to the roots of polynomials. This note describes two transformational approaches to the derivation of the quadratic formula as well as transformational approaches to…

  4. STEM Career Changers' Transformation into Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Catherine; Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Paska, Lawrence M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the transformation (professional growth) of career-changing women scientists who decided to become teachers. Drawing upon Mezirow's Transformative Learning Theory, we tracked their transformation for 3 years. Our findings revealed multiple identities, disorientation, a perceived sense of meaninglessness, loss and eventual…

  5. The Use of Transformations in Solving Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libeskind, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Many workshops and meetings with the US high school mathematics teachers revealed a lack of familiarity with the use of transformations in solving equations and problems related to the roots of polynomials. This note describes two transformational approaches to the derivation of the quadratic formula as well as transformational approaches to…

  6. STEM Career Changers' Transformation into Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Catherine; Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Paska, Lawrence M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the transformation (professional growth) of career-changing women scientists who decided to become teachers. Drawing upon Mezirow's Transformative Learning Theory, we tracked their transformation for 3 years. Our findings revealed multiple identities, disorientation, a perceived sense of meaninglessness, loss and eventual…

  7. In Silico Ocular Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Delivery of Topical FK962 to Retina.

    PubMed

    Mori, Ayumi; Yabuta, Chiho; Kishimoto, Yayoi; Kozai, Seiko; Ohtori, Akira; Shearer, Thomas R; Azuma, Mitsuyoshi

    2017-09-01

    To establish the in silico ocular pharmacokinetic modeling for eye drops, and to simulate the dose regimen for FK962 in human choroid/retinal diseases. Pharmacokinetics for FK962 in vivo was performed by a single instillation of drops containing 0.1% (14)C-FK962 in rabbit eyes. Permeation of FK962 across the cornea, sclera, and choroid/retina was measured in vitro. Neurite elongation by FK962 was measured in cultured rat retinal ganglion cells. Parameters from the experimental data were used in an improved in silico model of ocular pharmacokinetics of FK962 in man. The mean concentration of FK962 in ocular tissues predicted by in silico modeling was consistent with in vivo results, validating the in silico model. FK962 rapidly penetrated into the anterior and posterior segments of the eye and then diffused into the vitreous body. The in silico pharmacokinetic modeling also predicted that a dose regimen of 0.0054% FK962 twice per day would produce biologically effective concentrations of FK962 in the choroid/retina, where FK962 facilitates rat neurite elongation. Our in silico model for ocular pharmacokinetics is useful (1) for predicting drug concentrations in specific ocular tissues after topical instillation, and (2) for suggesting the optimal dose regimens for eye drops. The pharmacodynamics for FK962 produced by this model may be useful for clinical trials against retinal neuropathy.

  8. Correlation between compactibility values and excipient cluster size using an in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Lizbeth; Betz, Gabriele; Villalobos, Rafael; Melgoza, Luz; Young, Paul M

    2013-02-01

    In silico simulation and percolation theory are important tools in the study of physical and mechanical behavior of pharmaceutical compacts. The aim was to generate a new in silico simulation program that describes the mechanical structure of binary compacts formed from an excipient with excellent compactibility and a drug with null compactibility. Paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose powders were compressed under different pressures. Values for the indentation hardness and tensile strength were measured and fitted to the Leuenberger's model. On the other hand, compacts with different composition were in silico simulated. In each system, the biggest excipient cluster was identified and quantified using the Hoshen-Kopelman algorithm. Then, the size of the biggest in silico cluster was correlated with experimental compactibility values. The Leuenberger's model resulted in good fit to the experimental data for all formulations over 40% of excipient load. Formulations with high drug load (≥0.8) had reduced range for forming compacts and gave low compactibility values. The excipient percolation threshold for the simulated system was 0.3395, indicating that over this excipient fraction, a compact with defined mechanical properties will be formed. The compactibility values presented a change in the range of 0.3-0.4 of excipient fraction load, just where the in silico excipient percolation threshold was found. Physical measurements of the binary compacts showed good agreement with computational measurements. Subsequently, this in silico approach may be used for the optimization of pharmaceutical powder formulations used in tablet compression.

  9. RF transformer

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Helenberg, Harold W.; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.

    1979-01-01

    There is provided an improved RF transformer having a single-turn secondary of cylindrical shape and a coiled encapsulated primary contained within the secondary. The coil is tapered so that the narrowest separation between the primary and the secondary is at one end of the coil. The encapsulated primary is removable from the secondary so that a variety of different capacity primaries can be utilized with one secondary.

  10. Transformation plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadic, Muamer; Guenneau, Sébastien; Enoch, Stefan; Huidobro, Paloma A.; Martín-Moreno, Luis; García-Vidal, Francisco J.; Renger, Jan; Quidant, Romain

    2012-07-01

    Surface plasmons polaritons (SPPs) at metal/dielectric interfaces have raised lots of expectations in the on-going quest towards scaling down optical devices. SPP optics offers a powerful and flexible platform for real two-dimensional integrated optics, capable of supporting both light and electrons. Yet, a full exploitation of the features of SPPs is conditioned by an accurate control of their flow. Most efforts have so far focused on the extrapolation of concepts borrowed from guided optics. This strategy has already led to many important breakthroughs but a fully deterministic control of SPP modes remains a challenge. Recently, the field of optics was stimulated by a novel paradigm, transformation optics, which offers the capability to control light flow in any desired fashion. While it has already significantly contributed to the design of metamaterials with unprecedented optical properties, its versatility offers new opportunities towards a fully deterministic control of SPPs and the design of a new class of plasmonic functionalities. Here, we review recent progress in the application of transformation optics to SPPs. We first briefly describe the theoretical formalism of transformation plasmonics, focusing on its specificities over its three-dimensional optical counterpart. Numerical simulations are then used to illustrate its capability to tame SPP flows at a metal interface patterned with a dielectric load. Finally, we review recent experimental implementations leading to unique SPP functionalities at optical frequencies.

  11. The Formation Process of Silico-Ferrite of Calcium (SFC) from Binary Calcium Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiang; Guo, Xing-Min

    2014-08-01

    Silico-ferrite of calcium (SFC) is a significant equilibrium crystalline phase in the Fe2O3-CaO-SiO2 (FCS) ternary system and a key bonding phase in the sintering process of fine iron ore. In this work, the formation process of SFC from binary calcium ferrite has been determined by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Experiments were carried out under air at 1473 K (1200 °C) by adding SiO2 and Fe2O3 into CaO·Fe2O3 (CF). It was found that the formation of SFC is dominated by solid-state reactions in the FCS ternary system, in which Fe2O3 reacts with CaO·Fe2O3 to form the binary calcium ferrite phase. The chemical composition of binary calcium ferrite is Ca2.5Fe15.5O25 and approximately Ca2Fe12O20 (CaO·3Fe2O3). Then Si4+ and Ca2+ ions take the place of Fe3+ ion in preference located on the octahedral layers which belongs to (0 0 18) plane of binary calcium ferrite. The crystal structure of binary calcium ferrite gradually transforms from orthorhombic to triclinic, and the grain is refined with the addition of silica due to the smaller radius of Si4+ ion. A solid solution SFC forms completely when the content of SiO2 reaches approximately 3.37 wt pct at 1473 K (1200 °C).

  12. A guide to in silico vaccine discovery for eukaryotic pathogens.

    PubMed

    Goodswen, Stephen J; Kennedy, Paul J; Ellis, John T

    2013-11-01

    In this article, a framework for an in silico pipeline is presented as a guide to high-throughput vaccine candidate discovery for eukaryotic pathogens, such as helminths and protozoa. Eukaryotic pathogens are mostly parasitic and cause some of the most damaging and difficult to treat diseases in humans and livestock. Consequently, these parasitic pathogens have a significant impact on economy and human health. The pipeline is based on the principle of reverse vaccinology and is constructed from freely available bioinformatics programs. There are several successful applications of reverse vaccinology to the discovery of subunit vaccines against prokaryotic pathogens but not yet against eukaryotic pathogens. The overriding aim of the pipeline, which focuses on eukaryotic pathogens, is to generate through computational processes of elimination and evidence gathering a ranked list of proteins based on a scoring system. These proteins are either surface components of the target pathogen or are secreted by the pathogen and are of a type known to be antigenic. No perfect predictive method is yet available; therefore, the highest-scoring proteins from the list require laboratory validation.

  13. In silico structural and functional analysis of Mesorhizobium ACC deaminase.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Krishnendu; Soren, Tithi; Mitra, Soumik; Maiti, Tushar Kanti

    2017-02-11

    Nodulation is one of the very important processes of legume plants as it is the initiating event of fixing nitrogen. Although ethylene has essential role in normal plant metabolism but it has also negative impact on plants particularly in nodule formation in legume plants. It is also produced due to a variety of biotic or abiotic stresses. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase is a rhizobial enzyme which cleaves ACC (immediate precursor of ethylene) into α-ketobutyrate and ammonia. As a result, the level of ethylene from the plant cells is decreased and the negative impact of ethylene on nodule formation is reduced. ACC deaminase is widely studied in several plant growth promoting rhizobacterial (PGPR) strains including many legume nodulating bacteria like Mesorhizobium sp. It is an important symbiotic nitrogen fixer belonging to the class - alphaproteobacteria under the order Rhizobiales. ACC deaminase has positive role in Legume-rhizobium symbiosis. Rhizobial ACC deaminase has the potentiality to reduce the adverse effects of ethylene, thereby triggering the nodulation process. The present study describes an in silico comparative structural (secondary structure prediction, homology modeling) and functional analysis of ACC deaminase from Mesorhizobium spp. to explore physico-chemical properties using a number of bio-computational tools. M. loti was selected as a representative species of Mesorhizobium genera for 3D modelling of ACC deaminase protein. Correlation by the phylogenetic relatedness on the basis of both ACC deaminase enzymes and respective acdS genes of different strains of Mesorhizobium has also studied.

  14. SUSY in silico: Numerical D-brane bound state spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anous, Tarek

    2016-11-01

    We numerically construct the supersymmetric and non-supersymmetric wave functions of an N =4 quiver quantum mechanics with two Abelian nodes and a single arrow. This model captures the dynamics of a pair of wrapped D-branes interacting via a single light string mode. A dimensionless parameter ν , which is inversely proportional to the Fayet-Iliopoulos parameter, controls whether the bulk of the wave functions are supported on the Higgs branch or the Coulomb branch. We demonstrate how the supersymmetric and excited states morph as ν is tuned. We also numerically compute the energy gap between the ground state and the first excited states as a function of ν . An expression for the gap, computed on the Coulomb branch, matches nicely with our numerics at large ν but deviates at small ν where the Higgs branch becomes the relevant description of the physics. In the appendix, we provide the Schrödinger equations fully reduced via symmetries which, in principle, allow for the numerical determination of the entire spectrum at any point in moduli space. For the ground states, this numerical determination of the spectrum can be thought of as the first in silico check of various Witten index calculations.

  15. In silico-based vaccine design against Ebola virus glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Raju; Das, Rasel; Junaid, Md; Akash, Md Forhad Chowdhury; Islam, Ashekul; Hosen, SM Zahid

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is one of the lethal viruses, causing more than 24 epidemic outbreaks to date. Despite having available molecular knowledge of this virus, no definite vaccine or other remedial agents have been developed yet for the management and avoidance of EBOV infections in humans. Disclosing this, the present study described an epitope-based peptide vaccine against EBOV, using a combination of B-cell and T-cell epitope predictions, followed by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation approach. Here, protein sequences of all glycoproteins of EBOV were collected and examined via in silico methods to determine the most immunogenic protein. From the identified antigenic protein, the peptide region ranging from 186 to 220 and the sequence HKEGAFFLY from the positions of 154–162 were considered the most potential B-cell and T-cell epitopes, correspondingly. Moreover, this peptide (HKEGAFFLY) interacted with HLA-A*32:15 with the highest binding energy and stability, and also a good conservancy of 83.85% with maximum population coverage. The results imply that the designed epitopes could manifest vigorous enduring defensive immunity against EBOV. PMID:28356762

  16. in silico Surveillance: evaluating outbreak detection with simulation models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Detecting outbreaks is a crucial task for public health officials, yet gaps remain in the systematic evaluation of outbreak detection protocols. The authors’ objectives were to design, implement, and test a flexible methodology for generating detailed synthetic surveillance data that provides realistic geographical and temporal clustering of cases and use to evaluate outbreak detection protocols. Methods A detailed representation of the Boston area was constructed, based on data about individuals, locations, and activity patterns. Influenza-like illness (ILI) transmission was simulated, producing 100 years of in silico ILI data. Six different surveillance systems were designed and developed using gathered cases from the simulated disease data. Performance was measured by inserting test outbreaks into the surveillance streams and analyzing the likelihood and timeliness of detection. Results Detection of outbreaks varied from 21% to 95%. Increased coverage did not linearly improve detection probability for all surveillance systems. Relaxing the decision threshold for signaling outbreaks greatly increased false-positives, improved outbreak detection slightly, and led to earlier outbreak detection. Conclusions Geographical distribution can be more important than coverage level. Detailed simulations of infectious disease transmission can be configured to represent nearly any conceivable scenario. They are a powerful tool for evaluating the performance of surveillance systems and methods used for outbreak detection. PMID:23343523

  17. Pharmacokinetic properties and in silico ADME modeling in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Honório, Kathia M; Moda, Tiago L; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2013-03-01

    The discovery and development of a new drug are time-consuming, difficult and expensive. This complex process has evolved from classical methods into an integration of modern technologies and innovative strategies addressed to the design of new chemical entities to treat a variety of diseases. The development of new drug candidates is often limited by initial compounds lacking reasonable chemical and biological properties for further lead optimization. Huge libraries of compounds are frequently selected for biological screening using a variety of techniques and standard models to assess potency, affinity and selectivity. In this context, it is very important to study the pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds under investigation. Recent advances have been made in the collection of data and the development of models to assess and predict pharmacokinetic properties (ADME--absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) of bioactive compounds in the early stages of drug discovery projects. This paper provides a brief perspective on the evolution of in silico ADME tools, addressing challenges, limitations, and opportunities in medicinal chemistry.

  18. In Silico Dynamics: computer simulation in a Virtual Embryo ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Abstract: Utilizing cell biological information to predict higher order biological processes is a significant challenge in predictive toxicology. This is especially true for highly dynamical systems such as the embryo where morphogenesis, growth and differentiation require precisely orchestrated interactions between diverse cell populations. In patterning the embryo, genetic signals setup spatial information that cells then translate into a coordinated biological response. This can be modeled as ‘biowiring diagrams’ representing genetic signals and responses. Because the hallmark of multicellular organization resides in the ability of cells to interact with one another via well-conserved signaling pathways, multiscale computational (in silico) models that enable these interactions provide a platform to translate cellular-molecular lesions perturbations into higher order predictions. Just as ‘the Cell’ is the fundamental unit of biology so too should it be the computational unit (‘Agent’) for modeling embryogenesis. As such, we constructed multicellular agent-based models (ABM) with ‘CompuCell3D’ (www.compucell3d.org) to simulate kinematics of complex cell signaling networks and enable critical tissue events for use in predictive toxicology. Seeding the ABMs with HTS/HCS data from ToxCast demonstrated the potential to predict, quantitatively, the higher order impacts of chemical disruption at the cellular or biochemical level. This is demonstrate

  19. Integrating In Silico Resources to Map a Signaling Network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hanqing; Beck, Tim N.; Golemis, Erica A.; Serebriiskii, Ilya G.

    2013-01-01

    The abundance of publicly available life science databases offer a wealth of information that can support interpretation of experimentally derived data and greatly enhance hypothesis generation. Protein interaction and functional networks are not simply new renditions of existing data: they provide the opportunity to gain insights into the specific physical and functional role a protein plays as part of the biological system. In this chapter, we describe different in silico tools that can quickly and conveniently retrieve data from existing data repositories and discuss how the available tools are best utilized for different purposes. While emphasizing protein-protein interaction databases (e.g., BioGrid and IntAct), we also introduce metasearch platforms such as STRING and GeneMANIA, pathway databases (e.g., BioCarta and Pathway Commons), text mining approaches (e.g., PubMed and Chilibot), and resources for drug-protein interactions, genetic information for model organisms and gene expression information based on microarray data mining. Furthermore, we provide a simple step-by-step protocol to building customized protein-protein interaction networks in Cytoscape, a powerful network assembly and visualization program, integrating data retrieved from these various databases. As we illustrate, generation of composite interaction networks enables investigators to extract significantly more information about a given biological system than utilization of a single database or sole reliance on primary literature. PMID:24233784

  20. In silico ionomics segregates parasitic from free-living eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Greganova, Eva; Steinmann, Michael; Mäser, Pascal; Fankhauser, Niklaus

    2013-01-01

    Ion transporters are fundamental to life. Due to their ancient origin and conservation in sequence, ion transporters are also particularly well suited for comparative genomics of distantly related species. Here, we perform genome-wide ion transporter profiling as a basis for comparative genomics of eukaryotes. From a given predicted proteome, we identify all bona fide ion channels, ion porters, and ion pumps. Concentrating on unicellular eukaryotes (n = 37), we demonstrate that clustering of species according to their repertoire of ion transporters segregates obligate endoparasites (n = 23) on the one hand, from free-living species and facultative parasites (n = 14) on the other hand. This surprising finding indicates strong convergent evolution of the parasites regarding the acquisition and homeostasis of inorganic ions. Random forest classification identifies transporters of ammonia, plus transporters of iron and other transition metals, as the most informative for distinguishing the obligate parasites. Thus, in silico ionomics further underscores the importance of iron in infection biology and suggests access to host sources of nitrogen and transition metals to be selective forces in the evolution of parasitism. This finding is in agreement with the phenomenon of iron withholding as a primordial antimicrobial strategy of infected mammals.

  1. In Silico Reconstitution of Listeria Propulsion Exhibits Nano-Saltation

    PubMed Central

    Odell, Garrett M

    2004-01-01

    To understand how the actin-polymerization-mediated movements in cells emerge from myriad individual protein–protein interactions, we developed a computational model of Listeria monocytogenes propulsion that explicitly simulates a large number of monomer-scale biochemical and mechanical interactions. The literature on actin networks and L. monocytogenes motility provides the foundation for a realistic mathematical/computer simulation, because most of the key rate constants governing actin network dynamics have been measured. We use a cluster of 80 Linux processors and our own suite of simulation and analysis software to characterize salient features of bacterial motion. Our “in silico reconstitution” produces qualitatively realistic bacterial motion with regard to speed and persistence of motion and actin tail morphology. The model also produces smaller scale emergent behavior; we demonstrate how the observed nano-saltatory motion of L. monocytogenes, in which runs punctuate pauses, can emerge from a cooperative binding and breaking of attachments between actin filaments and the bacterium. We describe our modeling methodology in detail, as it is likely to be useful for understanding any subcellular system in which the dynamics of many simple interactions lead to complex emergent behavior, e.g., lamellipodia and filopodia extension, cellular organization, and cytokinesis. PMID:15562315

  2. In silico comparative analysis of SSR markers in plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The adverse environmental conditions impose extreme limitation to growth and plant development, restricting the genetic potential and reflecting on plant yield losses. The progress obtained by classic plant breeding methods aiming at increasing abiotic stress tolerances have not been enough to cope with increasing food demands. New target genes need to be identified to reach this goal, which requires extensive studies of the related biological mechanisms. Comparative analyses in ancestral plant groups can help to elucidate yet unclear biological processes. Results In this study, we surveyed the occurrence patterns of expressed sequence tag-derived microsatellite markers for model plants. A total of 13,133 SSR markers were discovered using the SSRLocator software in non-redundant EST databases made for all eleven species chosen for this study. The dimer motifs are more frequent in lower plant species, such as green algae and mosses, and the trimer motifs are more frequent for the majority of higher plant groups, such as monocots and dicots. With this in silico study we confirm several microsatellite plant survey results made with available bioinformatics tools. Conclusions The comparative studies of EST-SSR markers among all plant lineages is well suited for plant evolution studies as well as for future studies of transferability of molecular markers. PMID:21247422

  3. In silico evolution of oscillatory dynamics in biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md Zulfikar; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2015-03-01

    We are studying in silico evolution of complex, oscillatory network dynamics within the framework of a minimal mutational model of protein-protein interactions. In our model we consider two different types of proteins, kinase (activator) and phosphatase(inhibitor). In our model. each protein can either be phosphorylated(active) or unphospphorylated (inactive), represented by binary strings. Active proteins can modify their target based on the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of chemical equation. Reaction rate constants are directly related to sequence dependent protein-protein interaction energies. This model can be stuided for non-trivial behavior e.g. oscillations, chaos, multiple stable states. We focus here on biochemical oscillators; some questions we will address within our framework include how the oscillatory dynamics depends on number of protein species, connectivity of the network, whether evolution can readily converge on a stable oscillator if we start with random intitial parameters, neutral evolution with additional protein components and general questions of robustness and evolavability.

  4. In silico Mapping of Protein Unfolding Mutations for Inherited Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, Caitlyn L.; Sergeev, Yuri V.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of disease-causing missense mutations on protein folding is difficult to evaluate. To understand this relationship, we developed the unfolding mutation screen (UMS) for in silico evaluation of the severity of genetic perturbations at the atomic level of protein structure. The program takes into account the protein-unfolding curve and generates propensities using calculated free energy changes for every possible missense mutation at once. These results are presented in a series of unfolding heat maps and a colored protein 3D structure to show the residues critical to the protein folding and are available for quick reference. UMS was tested with 16 crystal structures to evaluate the unfolding for 1391 mutations from the ProTherm database. Our results showed that the computational accuracy of the unfolding calculations was similar to the accuracy of previously published free energy changes but provided a better scale. Our residue identity control helps to improve protein homology models. The unfolding predictions for proteins involved in age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and Leber’s congenital amaurosis matched well with data from previous studies. These results suggest that UMS could be a useful tool in the analysis of genotype-to-phenotype associations and next-generation sequencing data for inherited diseases. PMID:27905547

  5. Toward Fully in Silico Melting Point Prediction Using Molecular Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Maginn, EJ

    2013-03-01

    Melting point is one of the most fundamental and practically important properties of a compound. Molecular computation of melting points. However, all of these methods simulation methods have been developed for the accurate need an experimental crystal structure as input, which means that such calculations are not really predictive since the melting point can be measured easily in experiments once a crystal structure is known. On the other hand, crystal structure prediction (CSP) has become an active field and significant progress has been made, although challenges still exist. One of the main challenges is the existence of many crystal structures (polymorphs) that are very close in energy. Thermal effects and kinetic factors make the situation even more complicated, such that it is still not trivial to predict experimental crystal structures. In this work, we exploit the fact that free energy differences are often small between crystal structures. We show that accurate melting point predictions can be made by using a reasonable crystal structure from CSP as a starting point for a free energy-based melting point calculation. The key is that most crystal structures predicted by CSP have free energies that are close to that of the experimental structure. The proposed method was tested on two rigid molecules and the results suggest that a fully in silico melting point prediction method is possible.

  6. Toward Fully in Silico Melting Point Prediction Using Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Maginn, Edward J

    2013-03-12

    Melting point is one of the most fundamental and practically important properties of a compound. Molecular simulation methods have been developed for the accurate computation of melting points. However, all of these methods need an experimental crystal structure as input, which means that such calculations are not really predictive since the melting point can be measured easily in experiments once a crystal structure is known. On the other hand, crystal structure prediction (CSP) has become an active field and significant progress has been made, although challenges still exist. One of the main challenges is the existence of many crystal structures (polymorphs) that are very close in energy. Thermal effects and kinetic factors make the situation even more complicated, such that it is still not trivial to predict experimental crystal structures. In this work, we exploit the fact that free energy differences are often small between crystal structures. We show that accurate melting point predictions can be made by using a reasonable crystal structure from CSP as a starting point for a free energy-based melting point calculation. The key is that most crystal structures predicted by CSP have free energies that are close to that of the experimental structure. The proposed method was tested on two rigid molecules and the results suggest that a fully in silico melting point prediction method is possible.

  7. 20170312 - In Silico Dynamics: computer simulation in a ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Abstract: Utilizing cell biological information to predict higher order biological processes is a significant challenge in predictive toxicology. This is especially true for highly dynamical systems such as the embryo where morphogenesis, growth and differentiation require precisely orchestrated interactions between diverse cell populations. In patterning the embryo, genetic signals setup spatial information that cells then translate into a coordinated biological response. This can be modeled as ‘biowiring diagrams’ representing genetic signals and responses. Because the hallmark of multicellular organization resides in the ability of cells to interact with one another via well-conserved signaling pathways, multiscale computational (in silico) models that enable these interactions provide a platform to translate cellular-molecular lesions perturbations into higher order predictions. Just as ‘the Cell’ is the fundamental unit of biology so too should it be the computational unit (‘Agent’) for modeling embryogenesis. As such, we constructed multicellular agent-based models (ABM) with ‘CompuCell3D’ (www.compucell3d.org) to simulate kinematics of complex cell signaling networks and enable critical tissue events for use in predictive toxicology. Seeding the ABMs with HTS/HCS data from ToxCast demonstrated the potential to predict, quantitatively, the higher order impacts of chemical disruption at the cellular or bioche

  8. Complementing in vitro screening assays with in silico ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    High-throughput in vitro assays offer a rapid, cost-efficient means to screen thousands of chemicals across hundreds of pathway-based toxicity endpoints. However, one main concern involved with the use of in vitro assays is the erroneous omission of chemicals that are inactive under assay conditions but that can generate active metabolites under in vivo conditions. To address this potential issue, a case study will be presented to demonstrate the use of in silico tools to identify inactive parents with the ability to generate active metabolites. This case study used the results from an orthogonal assay designed to improve confidence in the identification of active chemicals tested across eighteen estrogen receptor (ER)-related in vitro assays by accounting for technological limitations inherent within each individual assay. From the 1,812 chemicals tested within the orthogonal assay, 1,398 were considered inactive. These inactive chemicals were analyzed using Chemaxon Metabolizer software to predict the first and second generation metabolites. From the nearly 1,400 inactive chemicals, over 2,200 first-generation (i.e., primary) metabolites and over 5,500 second-generation (i.e., secondary) metabolites were predicted. Nearly 70% of primary metabolites were immediately detoxified or converted to other metabolites, while over 70% of secondary metabolites remained stable. Among these predicted metabolites, those that are most likely to be produced and remain

  9. A web portal for in-silico action potential predictions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geoff; Mirams, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multiple cardiac ion channels are prone to block by pharmaceutical compounds, and this can have large implications for cardiac safety. The effect of a compound on individual ion currents can now be measured in automated patch clamp screening assays. In-silico action potential models are proposed as one way of predicting the integrated compound effects on whole-cell electrophysiology, to provide an improved indication of pro-arrhythmic risk. Methods We have developed open source software to run cardiac electrophysiology simulations to predict the overall effect of compounds that block IKr, ICaL, INa, IKs, IK1 and Ito to varying degrees, using a choice of mathematical electrophysiology models. To enable safety pharmacology teams to run and evaluate these simulations easily, we have also developed an open source web portal interface to this simulator. Results The web portal can be found at https://chaste.cs.ox.ac.uk/ActionPotential. Users can enter details of compound affinities for ion channels in the form of IC50 or pIC50 values, run simulations, store the results for later retrieval, view summary graphs of the results, and export data to a spreadsheet format. Discussion This web portal provides a simple interface to reference versions of mathematical models, and well-tested state-of-the-art equation solvers. It provides safety teams easy access to the emerging technology of cardiac electrophysiology simulations for use in the drug-discovery process. PMID:25963830

  10. CLEVER: pipeline for designing in silico chemical libraries.

    PubMed

    Song, Chun Meng; Bernardo, Paul H; Chai, Christina L L; Tong, Joo Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Advances in virtual screening have created new channels for expediting the process of discovering novel drugs. Of particular relevance and interest are in silico techniques that enable the enumeration of combinatorial chemical libraries, generation of 3D coordinates and assessment of their propensity for drug-likeness. In a bid to provide an integrated pipeline that encompasses the common components functional for designing, managing and analyzing combinatorial chemical libraries, we describe a platform-independent, standalone Java application entitled CLEVER (Chemical Library Editing, Visualizing and Enumerating Resource). CLEVER supports chemical library creation and manipulation, combinatorial chemical library enumeration using user-specified chemical components, chemical format conversion and visualization, as well as chemical compounds analysis and filtration with respect to drug-likeness, lead-likeness and fragment-likeness based on the physicochemical properties computed from the derived molecules. Also provided is an integrated property-based graphing component that visually depicts the diversity, coverage and distribution of selected compound collections. When deployed in conjunction with large-scale virtual screening campaigns, CLEVER can offer insights into what chemical compounds to synthesize, and more importantly, what not to synthesize. The software is available at http://datam.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/clever/.

  11. In silico reconstitution of Listeria propulsion exhibits nano-saltation.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Jonathan B; Odell, Garrett M

    2004-12-01

    To understand how the actin-polymerization-mediated movements in cells emerge from myriad individual protein-protein interactions, we developed a computational model of Listeria monocytogenes propulsion that explicitly simulates a large number of monomer-scale biochemical and mechanical interactions. The literature on actin networks and L. monocytogenes motility provides the foundation for a realistic mathematical/computer simulation, because most of the key rate constants governing actin network dynamics have been measured. We use a cluster of 80 Linux processors and our own suite of simulation and analysis software to characterize salient features of bacterial motion. Our "in silico reconstitution" produces qualitatively realistic bacterial motion with regard to speed and persistence of motion and actin tail morphology. The model also produces smaller scale emergent behavior; we demonstrate how the observed nano-saltatory motion of L. monocytogenes,in which runs punctuate pauses, can emerge from a cooperative binding and breaking of attachments between actin filaments and the bacterium. We describe our modeling methodology in detail, as it is likely to be useful for understanding any subcellular system in which the dynamics of many simple interactions lead to complex emergent behavior, e.g., lamellipodia and filopodia extension, cellular organization, and cytokinesis.

  12. In Silico Ionomics Segregates Parasitic from Free-Living Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Greganova, Eva; Steinmann, Michael; Mäser, Pascal; Fankhauser, Niklaus

    2013-01-01

    Ion transporters are fundamental to life. Due to their ancient origin and conservation in sequence, ion transporters are also particularly well suited for comparative genomics of distantly related species. Here, we perform genome-wide ion transporter profiling as a basis for comparative genomics of eukaryotes. From a given predicted proteome, we identify all bona fide ion channels, ion porters, and ion pumps. Concentrating on unicellular eukaryotes (n = 37), we demonstrate that clustering of species according to their repertoire of ion transporters segregates obligate endoparasites (n = 23) on the one hand, from free-living species and facultative parasites (n = 14) on the other hand. This surprising finding indicates strong convergent evolution of the parasites regarding the acquisition and homeostasis of inorganic ions. Random forest classification identifies transporters of ammonia, plus transporters of iron and other transition metals, as the most informative for distinguishing the obligate parasites. Thus, in silico ionomics further underscores the importance of iron in infection biology and suggests access to host sources of nitrogen and transition metals to be selective forces in the evolution of parasitism. This finding is in agreement with the phenomenon of iron withholding as a primordial antimicrobial strategy of infected mammals. PMID:24048281

  13. Time-Dependent Inhibition of CYP2C19 by Isoquinoline Alkaloids: In Vitro and In Silico Analysis.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Kaisa A; Rahnasto-Rilla, Minna; Väänänen, Raija; Imming, Peter; Meyer, Achim; Horling, Aline; Poso, Antti; Laitinen, Tuomo; Raunio, Hannu; Lahtela-Kakkonen, Maija

    2015-12-01

    The cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) enzyme plays an important role in the metabolism of many commonly used drugs. Relatively little is known about CYP2C19 inhibitors, including compounds of natural origin, which could inhibit CYP2C19, potentially causing clinically relevant metabolism-based drug interactions. We evaluated a series (N = 49) of structurally related plant isoquinoline alkaloids for their abilities to interact with CYP2C19 enzyme using in vitro and in silico methods. We examined several common active alkaloids found in herbal products such as apomorphine, berberine, noscapine, and papaverine, as well as the previously identified mechanism-based inactivators bulbocapnine, canadine, and protopine. The IC50 values of the alkaloids ranged from 0.11 to 210 µM, and 42 of the alkaloids were confirmed to be time-dependent inhibitors of CYP2C19. Molecular docking and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis revealed key interactions of the potent inhibitors with the enzyme active site. We constructed a comparative molecular field analysis model that was able to predict the inhibitory potency of a series of independent test molecules. This study revealed that many of these isoquinoline alkaloids do have the potential to cause clinically relevant drug interactions. These results highlight the need for studying more profoundly the potential interactions between drugs and herbal products. When further refined, in silico methods can be useful in the high-throughput prediction of P450 inhibitory potential of pharmaceutical compounds.

  14. Genome Wide In silico Analysis of the Mismatch Repair Components of Plasmodium falciparum and Their Comparison with Human Host

    PubMed Central

    Tarique, Mohammed; Ahmad, Moaz; Chauhan, Manish; Tuteja, Renu

    2017-01-01

    Malaria a major parasitic infection globally particularly in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world is responsible for about 198 million cases and estimated deaths due to this disease are about 0.6 million. The emergence of drug resistance in the malaria parasite is alarming and it is necessary to understand its underlying cause and molecular mechanisms. It has been established that drug resistant malaria parasites have defective mismatch repair (MMR) therefore it is essential to study this pathway and its components in detail. Recently a number of non-synonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms have been reported in genes involved in MMR pathways. PfMLH is an endonuclease essential to restore the MMR in drug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Considering all these facts about the role of MMR in emergence of drug resistant parasite, in this manuscript we report a genome wide analysis of the components of the MMR pathway such as MLH, Pms1, MSH2-1, MSH2-2, MSH6, and UvrD using in silico bioinformatics based approaches. The phylogenetic analysis revealed evolutionary closeness with the MMR components of various organisms. It is noteworthy that P. falciparum contains two homologs of MSH2, which are located on different chromosomes. The structural modeling of these components showed their similarity with the human/yeast MMR components. The docking studies reveal that PfUvrD and PfMLH interact with each other. The in silico identification of interacting partners of the major MMR components identified numerous P. falciparum specific proteins. In line with our previous studies the present study will also contribute significantly to understand the MMR pathway of malaria parasite. PMID:28232818

  15. In Silico Study and Bioprospection of the Antibacterial and Antioxidant Effects of Flavone and Its Hydroxylated Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Camila de Albuquerque; Gonçalves, Gregório Fernandes; Oliveira Filho, Abrahão Alves de; Lira, Andressa Brito; Cassiano, Thays Thyara Mendes; Lima, Natanael Teles Ramos de; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Diniz, Margareth de Fátima Formiga Melo; Pessôa, Hilzeth Luna Freire

    2017-05-24

    Flavonoid compounds are widely used as natural protective species, which can act as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticoagulant, antihypertensive and antitumor agents. This study set out to investigate the probable pharmacological activities, along with the antibacterial and antioxidant effects, of flavone and its hydroxy derivatives: 3-hydroxyflavone, 5-hydroxyflavone and 6-hydroxyflavone. To do so, we investigated their pharmacological characteristics, using in silico tests that indicate likelihood of activity or inactivity, with the PASS online software, and the antimicrobial potential against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria was also analyzed, including bacteria of clinical importance. We also tested for oxidant and antioxidant potential in these molecules in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phenylhydrazine (Ph). The results revealed the following characteristics: pharmacological activities for the flavonoids as agonists of cell membrane integrity and as permeability inhibitors, as antagonists of anaphylatoxin receptors, as inhibitors of both kinase and peroxidase, and as having both antimutagenic capacity and vaso-protective potential. All of the flavonoids exhibited moderate antibacterial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative strains, with the flavones being bactericidal at 200 μg/mL for the strains of P. aeruginosa ATCC 8027, S. aureus ATCC 25619 and E. coli 104; the other flavonoids revealed bacteriostatic action. The substances did not promote erythrocyte oxidation and behaved as sequestrators and antioxidants of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and phenylhydrazine (Ph). It was concluded that the analyzed compounds have various pharmacological activities in accordance with the predictions of PASS online, as their antibacterial and antioxidant activities were confirmed. The study also helps to consolidate the use of computational chemistry in silico tools to guide new drug search and discovery protocols.

  16. METABOLISM AND METABOLIC ACTIVATION OF CHEMICALS: IN-SILICO SIMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of metabolism in prioritizing chemicals according to their potential adverse health effects is extremely important because innocuous parents can be transformed into toxic metabolites. This work presents the TIssue MEtabolism Simulator (TIMES) platform for simulating met...

  17. Genetic analysis, in silico prediction, and family segregation in long QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riuró, Helena; Campuzano, Oscar; Berne, Paola; Arbelo, Elena; Iglesias, Anna; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Coll-Vidal, Mònica; Partemi, Sara; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Picó, Ferran; Allegue, Catarina; Oliva, Antonio; Gerstenfeld, Edward; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Castro-Urda, Víctor; Fernández-Lozano, Ignacio; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep; Scornik, Fabiana S; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The heritable cardiovascular disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiogram, carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. We sought to add new data to the existing knowledge of genetic mutations contributing to LQTS to both expand our understanding of its genetic basis and assess the value of genetic testing in clinical decision-making. Direct sequencing of the five major contributing genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2, was performed in a cohort of 115 non-related LQTS patients. Pathogenicity of the variants was analyzed using family segregation, allele frequency from public databases, conservation analysis, and Condel and Provean in silico predictors. Phenotype-genotype correlations were analyzed statistically. Sequencing identified 36 previously described and 18 novel mutations. In 51.3% of the index cases, mutations were found, mostly in KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A; 5.2% of cases had multiple mutations. Pathogenicity analysis revealed 39 mutations as likely pathogenic, 12 as VUS, and 3 as non-pathogenic. Clinical analysis revealed that 75.6% of patients with QTc≥500 ms were genetically confirmed. Our results support the use of genetic testing of KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A as part of the diagnosis of LQTS and to help identify relatives at risk of SCD. Further, the genetic tools appear more valuable as disease severity increases. However, the identification of genetic variations in the clinical investigation of single patients using bioinformatic tools can produce erroneous conclusions regarding pathogenicity. Therefore segregation studies are key to determining causality.

  18. In silico analysis of polymorphisms in microRNAs that target genes affecting aerobic glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Thejaswini; Tsutsumi, Rie

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer cells preferentially metabolize glucose through aerobic glycolysis, an observation known as the Warburg effect. Recently, studies have deciphered the role of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in regulating the Warburg effect. Furthermore, mutations in glycolytic enzymes identified in various cancers highlight the importance of the Warburg effect at the molecular and cellular level. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate gene expression and are dysregulated in the pathogenesis of various types of human cancers. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA genes may affect miRNA biogenesis, processing, function, and stability and provide additional complexity in the pathogenesis of cancer. Moreover, mutations in miRNA target sequences in target mRNAs can affect expression. Methods In silico analysis and cataloguing polymorphisms in miRNA genes that target genes directly or indirectly controlling aerobic glycolysis was carried out using different publically available databases. Results miRNA SNP2.0 database revealed several SNPs in miR-126 and miR-25 in the upstream and downstream pre-miRNA flanking regions respectively should be inserted after flanking regions and miR-504 and miR-451 had the fewest. These miRNAs target genes that control aerobic glycolysis indirectly. SNPs in premiRNA genes were found in miR-96, miR-155, miR-25 and miR34a by miRNASNP. Dragon database of polymorphic regulation of miRNA genes (dPORE-miRNA) database revealed several SNPs that modify transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) or creating new TFBS in promoter regions of selected miRNA genes as analyzed by dPORE-miRNA. Conclusions Our results raise the possibility that integration of SNP analysis in miRNA genes with studies of metabolic adaptations in cancer cells could provide greater understanding of oncogenic mechanisms. PMID:27004216

  19. Genetic analysis, in silico prediction, and family segregation in long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Riuró, Helena; Campuzano, Oscar; Berne, Paola; Arbelo, Elena; Iglesias, Anna; Pérez-Serra, Alexandra; Coll-Vidal, Mònica; Partemi, Sara; Mademont-Soler, Irene; Picó, Ferran; Allegue, Catarina; Oliva, Antonio; Gerstenfeld, Edward; Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Castro-Urda, Víctor; Fernández-Lozano, Ignacio; Mont, Lluís; Brugada, Josep; Scornik, Fabiana S; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    The heritable cardiovascular disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS), characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiogram, carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. We sought to add new data to the existing knowledge of genetic mutations contributing to LQTS to both expand our understanding of its genetic basis and assess the value of genetic testing in clinical decision-making. Direct sequencing of the five major contributing genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2, was performed in a cohort of 115 non-related LQTS patients. Pathogenicity of the variants was analyzed using family segregation, allele frequency from public databases, conservation analysis, and Condel and Provean in silico predictors. Phenotype-genotype correlations were analyzed statistically. Sequencing identified 36 previously described and 18 novel mutations. In 51.3% of the index cases, mutations were found, mostly in KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A; 5.2% of cases had multiple mutations. Pathogenicity analysis revealed 39 mutations as likely pathogenic, 12 as VUS, and 3 as non-pathogenic. Clinical analysis revealed that 75.6% of patients with QTc≥500 ms were genetically confirmed. Our results support the use of genetic testing of KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A as part of the diagnosis of LQTS and to help identify relatives at risk of SCD. Further, the genetic tools appear more valuable as disease severity increases. However, the identification of genetic variations in the clinical investigation of single patients using bioinformatic tools can produce erroneous conclusions regarding pathogenicity. Therefore segregation studies are key to determining causality. PMID:24667783

  20. Functional Studies and In Silico Analyses to Evaluate Non-Coding Variants in Inherited Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Frisso, Giulia; Detta, Nicola; Coppola, Pamela; Mazzaccara, Cristina; Pricolo, Maria Rosaria; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Raffaele; Salvatore, Francesco

    2016-11-10

    Point mutations are the most common cause of inherited diseases. Bioinformatics tools can help to predict the pathogenicity of mutations found during genetic screening, but they may work less well in determining the effect of point mutations in non-coding regions. In silico analysis of intronic variants can reveal their impact on the splicing process, but the consequence of a given substitution is generally not predictable. The aim of this study was to functionally test five intronic variants (MYBPC3-c.506-2A>C, MYBPC3-c.906-7G>T, MYBPC3-c.2308+3G>C, SCN5A-c.393-5C>A, and ACTC1-c.617-7T>C) found in five patients affected by inherited cardiomyopathies in the attempt to verify their pathogenic role. Analysis of the MYBPC3-c.506-2A>C mutation in mRNA from the peripheral blood of one of the patients affected by hypertrophic cardiac myopathy revealed the loss of the canonical splice site and the use of an alternative splicing site, which caused the loss of the first seven nucleotides of exon 5 (MYBPC3-G169AfsX14). In the other four patients, we generated minigene constructs and transfected them in HEK-293 cells. This minigene approach showed that MYBPC3-c.2308+3G>C and SCN5A-c.393-5C>A altered pre-mRNA processing, thus resulting in the skipping of one exon. No alterations were found in either MYBPC3-c.906-7G>T or ACTC1-c.617-7T>C. In conclusion, functional in vitro analysis of the effects of potential splicing mutations can confirm or otherwise the putative pathogenicity of non-coding mutations, and thus help to guide the patient's clinical management and improve genetic counseling in affected families.

  1. In silico analysis of stomach lineage specific gene set expression pattern in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandi, Narayanan Sathiya Suganya, Sivagurunathan; Rajendran, Suriliyandi

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Identified stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type gastric cancer. •In silico pathway scanning identified estrogen-α signaling is a putative regulator of SLSGS in gastric cancer. •Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. -- Abstract: Stomach lineage specific gene products act as a protective barrier in the normal stomach and their expression maintains the normal physiological processes, cellular integrity and morphology of the gastric wall. However, the regulation of stomach lineage specific genes in gastric cancer (GC) is far less clear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and regulation of stomach lineage specific gene set (SLSGS) in GC. SLSGS was identified by comparing the mRNA expression profiles of normal stomach tissue with other organ tissue. The obtained SLSGS was found to be under expressed in gastric tumors. Functional annotation analysis revealed that the SLSGS was enriched for digestive function and gastric epithelial maintenance. Employing a single sample prediction method across GC mRNA expression profiles identified the under expression of SLSGS in proliferative type and invasive type gastric tumors compared to the metabolic type gastric tumors. Integrative pathway activation prediction analysis revealed a close association between estrogen-α signaling and SLSGS expression pattern in GC. Elevated expression of SLSGS in GC is associated with an overall increase in the survival of GC patients. In conclusion, our results highlight that estrogen mediated regulation of SLSGS in gastric tumor is a molecular predictor of metabolic type GC and prognostic factor in GC.

  2. Functional Studies and In Silico Analyses to Evaluate Non-Coding Variants in Inherited Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Frisso, Giulia; Detta, Nicola; Coppola, Pamela; Mazzaccara, Cristina; Pricolo, Maria Rosaria; D’Onofrio, Antonio; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Raffaele; Salvatore, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Point mutations are the most common cause of inherited diseases. Bioinformatics tools can help to predict the pathogenicity of mutations found during genetic screening, but they may work less well in determining the effect of point mutations in non-coding regions. In silico analysis of intronic variants can reveal their impact on the splicing process, but the consequence of a given substitution is generally not predictable. The aim of this study was to functionally test five intronic variants (MYBPC3-c.506-2A>C, MYBPC3-c.906-7G>T, MYBPC3-c.2308+3G>C, SCN5A-c.393-5C>A, and ACTC1-c.617-7T>C) found in five patients affected by inherited cardiomyopathies in the attempt to verify their pathogenic role. Analysis of the MYBPC3-c.506-2A>C mutation in mRNA from the peripheral blood of one of the patients affected by hypertrophic cardiac myopathy revealed the loss of the canonical splice site and the use of an alternative splicing site, which caused the loss of the first seven nucleotides of exon 5 (MYBPC3-G169AfsX14). In the other four patients, we generated minigene constructs and transfected them in HEK-293 cells. This minigene approach showed that MYBPC3-c.2308+3G>C and SCN5A-c.393-5C>A altered pre-mRNA processing, thus resulting in the skipping of one exon. No alterations were found in either MYBPC3-c.906-7G>T or ACTC1-c.617-7T>C. In conclusion, functional in vitro analysis of the effects of potential splicing mutations can confirm or otherwise the putative pathogenicity of non-coding mutations, and thus help to guide the patient's clinical management and improve genetic counseling in affected families. PMID:27834932

  3. An Integrated In Silico Approach to Design Specific Inhibitors Targeting Human Poly(A)-Specific Ribonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Tsiliki, Georgia; Komiotis, Dimitri; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Balatsos, Nikolaos A. A.; Kossida, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN) is an exoribonuclease/deadenylase that degrades 3′-end poly(A) tails in almost all eukaryotic organisms. Much of the biochemical and structural information on PARN comes from the human enzyme. However, the existence of PARN all along the eukaryotic evolutionary ladder requires further and thorough investigation. Although the complete structure of the full-length human PARN, as well as several aspects of the catalytic mechanism still remain elusive, many previous studies indicate that PARN can be used as potent and promising anti-cancer target. In the present study, we attempt to complement the existing structural information on PARN with in-depth bioinformatics analyses, in order to get a hologram of the molecular evolution of PARNs active site. In an effort to draw an outline, which allows specific drug design targeting PARN, an unequivocally specific platform was designed for the development of selective modulators focusing on the unique structural and catalytic features of the enzyme. Extensive phylogenetic analysis based on all the publicly available genomes indicated a broad distribution for PARN across eukaryotic species and revealed structurally important amino acids which could be assigned as potentially strong contributors to the regulation of the catalytic mechanism of PARN. Based on the above, we propose a comprehensive in silico model for the PARN’s catalytic mechanism and moreover, we developed a 3D pharmacophore model, which was subsequently used for the introduction of DNP-poly(A) amphipathic substrate analog as a potential inhibitor of PARN. Indeed, biochemical analysis revealed that DNP-poly(A) inhibits PARN competitively. Our approach provides an efficient integrated platform for the rational design of pharmacophore models as well as novel modulators of PARN with therapeutic potential. PMID:23236441

  4. An integrated in silico approach to design specific inhibitors targeting human poly(a)-specific ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Pavlopoulou, Athanasia; Tsiliki, Georgia; Komiotis, Dimitri; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Balatsos, Nikolaos A A; Kossida, Sophia

    2012-01-01

    Poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN) is an exoribonuclease/deadenylase that degrades 3'-end poly(A) tails in almost all eukaryotic organisms. Much of the biochemical and structural information on PARN comes from the human enzyme. However, the existence of PARN all along the eukaryotic evolutionary ladder requires further and thorough investigation. Although the complete structure of the full-length human PARN, as well as several aspects of the catalytic mechanism still remain elusive, many previous studies indicate that PARN can be used as potent and promising anti-cancer target. In the present study, we attempt to complement the existing structural information on PARN with in-depth bioinformatics analyses, in order to get a hologram of the molecular evolution of PARNs active site. In an effort to draw an outline, which allows specific drug design targeting PARN, an unequivocally specific platform was designed for the development of selective modulators focusing on the unique structural and catalytic features of the enzyme. Extensive phylogenetic analysis based on all the publicly available genomes indicated a broad distribution for PARN across eukaryotic species and revealed structurally important amino acids which could be assigned as potentially strong contributors to the regulation of the catalytic mechanism of PARN. Based on the above, we propose a comprehensive in silico model for the PARN's catalytic mechanism and moreover, we developed a 3D pharmacophore model, which was subsequently used for the introduction of DNP-poly(A) amphipathic substrate analog as a potential inhibitor of PARN. Indeed, biochemical analysis revealed that DNP-poly(A) inhibits PARN competitively. Our approach provides an efficient integrated platform for the rational design of pharmacophore models as well as novel modulators of PARN with therapeutic potential.

  5. Hamlet's Transformation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, P. D.

    1997-12-01

    William Shakespeare's Hamlet has much evidence to suggest that the Bard was aware of the cosmological models of his time, specifically the geocentric bounded Ptolemaic and Tychonic models, and the infinite Diggesian. Moreover, Shakespeare describes how the Ptolemaic model is to be transformed to the Diggesian. Hamlet's "transformation" is the reason that Claudius, who personifies the Ptolemaic model, summons Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, who personify the Tychonic. Pantometria, written by Leonard Digges and his son Thomas in 1571, contains the first technical use of the word "transformation." At age thirty, Thomas Digges went on to propose his Perfit Description, as alluded to in Act Five where Hamlet's age is given as thirty. In Act Five as well, the words "bore" and "arms" refer to Thomas' vocation as muster-master and his scientific interest in ballistics. England's leading astronomer was also the father of the poet whose encomium introduced the First Folio of 1623. His oldest child Dudley became a member of the Virginia Company and facilitated the writing of The Tempest. Taken as a whole, such manifold connections to Thomas Digges support Hotson's contention that Shakespeare knew the Digges family. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern in Hamlet bear Danish names because they personify the Danish model, while the king's name is latinized like that of Claudius Ptolemaeus. The reason Shakespeare anglicized "Amleth" to "Hamlet" was because he saw a parallel between Book Three of Saxo Grammaticus and the eventual triumph of the Diggesian model. But Shakespeare eschewed Book Four, creating this particular ending from an infinity of other possibilities because it "suited his purpose," viz. to celebrate the concept of a boundless universe of stars like the Sun.

  6. TRANSFORMER APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Wolfgang, F.; Nicol, J.

    1962-11-01

    Transformer apparatus is designed for measuring the amount of a paramagnetic substance dissolved or suspended in a diamagnetic liquid. The apparatus consists of a cluster of tubes, some of which are closed and have sealed within the diamagnetic substance without any of the paramagnetic material. The remaining tubes are open to flow of the mix- ture. Primary and secondary conductors are wrapped around the tubes in such a way as to cancel noise components and also to produce a differential signal on the secondaries based upon variations of the content of the paramagnetic material. (AEC)

  7. Rotary Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLyman, Colonel Wm. T.

    1996-01-01

    None given. From first Par: Many spacecraft (S/C) and surface rovers require the transfer of signals and power across rotating interfaces. Science instruments, antennas and solar arrays are elements needing rotary power transfer for certain (S/C) configurations. Delivery of signal and power has mainly been done by using the simplest means, the slip ring approach. This approach, although simple, leaves debris generating noise over a period of time...The rotary transformer is a good alternative to slip rings for signal and power transfer.

  8. Revealing ontological commitments by magic.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Thomas L

    2015-03-01

    Considering the appeal of different magical transformations exposes some systematic asymmetries. For example, it is more interesting to transform a vase into a rose than a rose into a vase. An experiment in which people judged how interesting they found different magic tricks showed that these asymmetries reflect the direction a transformation moves in an ontological hierarchy: transformations in the direction of animacy and intelligence are favored over the opposite. A second and third experiment demonstrated that judgments of the plausibility of machines that perform the same transformations do not show the same asymmetries, but judgments of the interestingness of such machines do. A formal argument relates this sense of interestingness to evidence for an alternative to our current physical theory, with magic tricks being a particularly pure source of such evidence. These results suggest that people's intuitions about magic tricks can reveal the ontological commitments that underlie human cognition.

  9. Role of ADME characteristics in drug discovery and their in silico evaluation: in silico screening of chemicals for their metabolic stability.

    PubMed

    Gombar, Vijay K; Silver, Ivin S; Zhao, Zhiyang

    2003-01-01

    Drug discovery is a long, arduous process broadly grouped into disease target identification, target validation, high-throughput identification of "hits" and "leads", lead optimization, and pre-clinical and clinical evaluation. Each area is a vast discipline in itself. However, all but the first two stages involve, to varying degrees, the characterization of absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, (ADME), and toxicity (T) of the molecules being pursued as potential drug candidates. Clinical failures of about 50% of the Investigational New Drug (IND) filings are attributed to their inadequate ADMET attributes. It is, therefore, no surprise that, in the current climate of social and regulatory pressure on healthcare costs, the pharmaceutical industry is searching for any means to minimize this attrition. Building mathematical models, called in silico screens, to reliably predict ADMET attributes solely from molecular structure is at the heart of this effort in reducing costs as well as development cycle times. This article reviews the emerging field of in silico evaluation of ADME characteristics. For different approaches that have been employed in this area, a critique of the scope and limitations of their descriptors, statistical methods, and reliability are presented. For instance, are geometry-based descriptors absolutely essential or is lower-level structure quantification equally good? What advantages, if any, do we have for methods like artificial neural networks over the least squares optimization methods with rigorous statistical diagnostics? Is any in silico screen worth application, let alone interpretation, if it is not adequately validated? Once deemed acceptable, what good is an in silico screen if it cannot be made available at the workbench of drug discovery teams distributed across the globe throughout multi-national pharmaceutical companies? These are not mere discussion points, rather this article embarks on the stepwise mechanics of

  10. Using proteomic data to assess a genome-scale "in silico" model of metal reducing bacteria in the simulation of field-scale uranium bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabusaki, S.; Fang, Y.; Wilkins, M. J.; Long, P.; Rifle IFRC Science Team

    2011-12-01

    citrate synthase that generates citrate from acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate). Model discrepancies with the proteomic data, such as the prediction of shifts associated with nitrogen limitation, revealed pathways in the in silico code that could be modified to more accurately predict metabolic processes that occur in the subsurface. The potential outcome of this approach is the engineering of electron donor (e.g., acetate), terminal electron acceptor [e.g., U(VI)], and biogeochemical conditions that enhance the desired metabolic pathways of the target microorganism(s) to effect cost-effective uranium bioreduction.

  11. Accelerating quantum chemistry calculations with graphical processing units - toward in high-density (HD) silico drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Ohno, Kazuki; Orita, Masaya; Koga, Ryota; Endo, Toshio; Akiyama, Yutaka; Sekijima, Masakazu

    2013-09-01

    The growing power of central processing units (CPU) has made it possible to use quantum mechanical (QM) calculations for in silico drug discovery. However, limited CPU power makes large-scale in silico screening such as virtual screening with QM calculations a challenge. Recently, general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) has offered an alternative, because of its significantly accelerated computational time over CPU. Here, we review a GPGPU-based supercomputer, TSUBAME2.0, and its promise for next generation in silico drug discovery, in high-density (HD) silico drug discovery.

  12. In silico analysis of nanomaterials hazard and risk.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Yoram; Rallo, Robert; Liu, Rong; Liu, Haoyang Haven

    2013-03-19

    Because a variety of human-related activities, engineer-ed nanoparticles (ENMs) may be released to various environmental media and may cross environmental boundaries, and thus will be found in most media. Therefore, the potential environmental impacts of ENMs must be assessed from a multimedia perspective and with an integrated risk management approach that considers rapid developments and increasing use of new nanomaterials. Accordingly, this Account presents a rational process for the integration of in silico ENM toxicity and fate and transport analyses for environmental impact assessment. This approach requires knowledge of ENM toxicity and environmental exposure concentrations. Considering the large number of current different types of ENMs and that those numbers are likely to increase, there is an urgent need to accelerate the evaluation of their toxicity and the assessment of their potential distribution in the environment. Developments in high throughput screening (HTS) are now enabling the rapid generation of large data sets for ENM toxicity assessment. However, these analyses require the establishment of reliable toxicity metrics, especially when HTS includes data from multiple assays, cell lines, or organisms. Establishing toxicity metrics with HTS data requires advanced data processing techniques in order to clearly identify significant biological effects associated with exposure to ENMs. HTS data can form the basis for developing and validating in silico toxicity models (e.g., quantitative structure-activity relationships) and for generating data-driven hypotheses to aid in establishing and/or validating possible toxicity mechanisms. To correlate the toxicity of ENMs with their physicochemical properties, researchers will need to develop quantitative structure-activity relationships for nanomaterials (i.e., nano-SARs). However, as nano-SARs are applied in regulatory applications, researchers must consider their applicability and the acceptance level of

  13. In vitro and in silico modeling of chromosomal instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri; Krasavin, Eugene; Govorun, Raisa; Koshlan, Igor; Pyatenko, Valentina; Korovchuk, Olga; Khvostunov, Igor; Sevankaev, Alexander

    Exposure to ionizing radiation increases cancer risk in human population. Cancer is thought to originate from an altered expression of certain number of specific genes. It is widely recognized that chromosome aberrations (CA) are involved in stable change in expression of genes by gain or loss of their functions. Thus CA can contribute to initiation or progression of cancer. Radiation induces CA immediately after exposure (in first cell cycle) and results in formation of delayed CA in descendants of irradiated cells, or chromosomal instability phenotype (CI). Therefore quantification of CI is a prerequisite of any mechanistic model of radiation induced cancer risks. To quantify CI we designed a set of in vitr o and in silico experiments. Two experimental models for study of CI in vitro, CHO-K1 wild-type and V79 HPRT-mutant cells, were exploited. Chromosome and chromatid type aberrations (Giemsa staining) were scored following exposure to gamma-radiation and accelerated ions (protons, LET=0.22 keV/µm, 7 Li3+ , LET=20 keV/µm, 14 7+ N , LET=77 keV/µm). The obtained results suggested that slowly growing colonies of HPRT mutant cells originating from lowand high-LET irradiated wt V79 cells were formed. After 14 N7+ ions irradiation about 50-100% of colonies had the decreased growth rate and CI phenotype was observed mainly in slowly growing colonies. High, compared to control, level of unstable CA (dicentrics) was observed in the progeny of gamma-irradiated CHO-K1 cells at different time points up to 30 cell generations. CA frequency, the number of cells with aberrations and the shape of a CA-vs-time curve were found to be dependent on the cell culture state (stationary or logarithmic phase) in which they were irradiated. Inhibition of replication and repair DNA synthesis by ara-C and hydroxyurea resulted in small modification of CA dynamics for stat-phase cells. For log-phase cell culture, in contrast, DNA synthesis inhibitors drastically impacted CA dynamics. In

  14. An in silico DNA cloning experiment for the biochemistry laboratory.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces students to concepts in recombinant DNA technology while accommodating a major semester project in protein purification, structure, and function in a biochemistry laboratory for junior- and senior-level undergraduate students. It is also suitable for forensic science courses focused in DNA biology and advanced high school biology classes. Students begin by examining a plasmid map with the goal of identifying which restriction enzymes may be used to clone a piece of foreign DNA containing a gene of interest into the vector. From the National Center for Biotechnology Initiative website, students are instructed to retrieve a protein sequence and use Expasy's Reverse Translate program to reverse translate the protein to cDNA. Students then use Integrated DNA Technologies' OligoAnalyzer to predict the complementary DNA strand and obtain DNA recognition sequences for the desired restriction enzymes from New England Biolabs' website. Students add the appropriate DNA restriction sequences to the double-stranded foreign DNA for cloning into the plasmid and infecting Escherichia coli cells. Students are introduced to computational biology tools, molecular biology terminology and the process of DNA cloning in this valuable single session, in silico experiment. This project develops students' understanding of the cloning process as a whole and contrasts with other laboratory and internship experiences in which the students may be involved in only a piece of the cloning process/techniques. Students interested in pursuing postgraduate study and research or employment in an academic biochemistry or molecular biology laboratory or industry will benefit most from this experience.

  15. Solitons and protein folding: An In Silico experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ilieva, N.; Dai, J.; Sieradzan, A.; Niemi, A.

    2015-10-28

    Protein folding [1] is the process of formation of a functional 3D structure from a random coil — the shape in which amino-acid chains leave the ribosome. Anfinsen’s dogma states that the native 3D shape of a protein is completely determined by protein’s amino acid sequence. Despite the progress in understanding the process rate and the success in folding prediction for some small proteins, with presently available physics-based methods it is not yet possible to reliably deduce the shape of a biologically active protein from its amino acid sequence. The protein-folding problem endures as one of the most important unresolved problems in science; it addresses the origin of life itself. Furthermore, a wrong fold is a common cause for a protein to lose its function or even endanger the living organism. Soliton solutions of a generalized discrete non-linear Schrödinger equation (GDNLSE) obtained from the energy function in terms of bond and torsion angles κ and τ provide a constructive theoretical framework for describing protein folds and folding patterns [2]. Here we study the dynamics of this process by means of molecular-dynamics simulations. The soliton manifestation is the pattern helix–loop–helix in the secondary structure of the protein, which explains the importance of understanding loop formation in helical proteins. We performed in silico experiments for unfolding one subunit of the core structure of gp41 from the HIV envelope glycoprotein (PDB ID: 1AIK [3]) by molecular-dynamics simulations with the MD package GROMACS. We analyzed 80 ns trajectories, obtained with one united-atom and two different all-atom force fields, to justify the side-chain orientation quantification scheme adopted in the studies and to eliminate force-field based artifacts. Our results are compatible with the soliton model of protein folding and provide first insight into soliton-formation dynamics.

  16. In silico identification of novel hevein-like peptide precursors.

    PubMed

    Porto, William F; Souza, Valéria A; Nolasco, Diego O; Franco, Octávio L

    2012-11-01

    Lectins are proteins with ability to bind reversibly and non-enzymatically to a specific carbohydrate. They are involved in numerous biological processes and show enormous biotechnological potential. Among plant lectins, the hevein domain is extremely common, being observed in several kinds of lectins. Moreover, this domain is also observed in an important class of antimicrobial peptides named hevein-like peptides. Due to higher cysteine residues conservation, hevein-like peptides could be mined among the sequence databases. By using the pattern CX(4,5)CC[GS]X(2)GXCGX[GST]X(2,3)[FWY]C[GS]X[AGS] novel hevein-like peptide precursors were found from three different plants: Oryza sativa, Vitis vinifera and Selaginella moellendorffii. In addition, an hevein-like peptide precursor from the phytopathogenic fungus Phaeosphaeria nodorum was also identified. The molecular models indicate that they have the same scaffold as others, composed of an antiparallel β-sheet and short helices. Nonetheless, the fungal hevein-like peptide probably has a different disulfide bond pattern. Despite this difference, the complexes between peptide and N,N,N-triacetylglucosamine are stable, according to molecular dynamics simulations. This is the first report of an hevein-like peptide from an organism outside the plant kingdom. The exact role of an hevein-like peptide in the fungal biology must be clarified, while in plants they are clearly involved in plant defense. In summary, data here reported clear shows that an in silico strategy could lead to the identification of novel hevein-like peptides that could be used as biotechnological tools in the fields of health and agribusiness.

  17. Solitons and protein folding: An In Silico experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilieva, N.; Dai, J.; Sieradzan, A.; Niemi, A.

    2015-10-01

    Protein folding [1] is the process of formation of a functional 3D structure from a random coil — the shape in which amino-acid chains leave the ribosome. Anfinsen's dogma states that the native 3D shape of a protein is completely determined by protein's amino acid sequence. Despite the progress in understanding the process rate and the success in folding prediction for some small proteins, with presently available physics-based methods it is not yet possible to reliably deduce the shape of a biologically active protein from its amino acid sequence. The protein-folding problem endures as one of the most important unresolved problems in science; it addresses the origin of life itself. Furthermore, a wrong fold is a common cause for a protein to lose its function or even endanger the living organism. Soliton solutions of a generalized discrete non-linear Schrödinger equation (GDNLSE) obtained from the energy function in terms of bond and torsion angles κ and τ provide a constructive theoretical framework for describing protein folds and folding patterns [2]. Here we study the dynamics of this process by means of molecular-dynamics simulations. The soliton manifestation is the pattern helix-loop-helix in the secondary structure of the protein, which explains the importance of understanding loop formation in helical proteins. We performed in silico experiments for unfolding one subunit of the core structure of gp41 from the HIV envelope glycoprotein (PDB ID: 1AIK [3]) by molecular-dynamics simulations with the MD package GROMACS. We analyzed 80 ns trajectories, obtained with one united-atom and two different all-atom force fields, to justify the side-chain orientation quantification scheme adopted in the studies and to eliminate force-field based artifacts. Our results are compatible with the soliton model of protein folding and provide first insight into soliton-formation dynamics.

  18. In silico comparative genomic analysis of GABAA receptor transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Christopher J

    2007-06-30

    Subtypes of the GABAA receptor subunit exhibit diverse temporal and spatial expression patterns. In silico comparative analysis was used to predict transcriptional regulatory features in individual mammalian GABAA receptor subunit genes, and to identify potential transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of the GABAA receptor gene clusters. Previously unreported putative promoters were identified for the beta2, gamma1, gamma3, epsilon, theta and pi subunit genes. Putative core elements and proximal transcriptional factors were identified within these predicted promoters, and within the experimentally determined promoters of other subunit genes. Conserved intergenic regions of sequence in the mammalian GABAA receptor gene cluster comprising the alpha1, beta2, gamma2 and alpha6 subunits were identified as potential long range transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of these genes. A region of predicted DNase I hypersensitive sites within the cluster may contain transcriptional regulatory features coordinating gene expression. A novel model is proposed for the coordinate control of the gene cluster and parallel expression of the alpha1 and beta2 subunits, based upon the selective action of putative Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions (S/MARs). The putative regulatory features identified by genomic analysis of GABAA receptor genes were substantiated by cross-species comparative analysis and now require experimental verification. The proposed model for the coordinate regulation of genes in the cluster accounts for the head-to-head orientation and parallel expression of the alpha1 and beta2 subunit genes, and for the disruption of transcription caused by insertion of a neomycin gene in the close vicinity of the alpha6 gene, which is proximal to a putative critical S/MAR.

  19. Important amino acid residues of hexachlorocyclohexane dehydrochlorinases (LinA) for enantioselective transformation of hexachlorocyclohexane isomers.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Nidhi; Macwan, Ankit S; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Kumar, Ashwani

    2017-03-01

    LinA-type1 and LinA-type2 are two well-characterized variants of the enzyme 'hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH)-dehydrochlorinase'. They differ from each other at ten amino acid positions and exhibit differing enantioselectivity for the transformation of the (-) and (+) enantiomers of α-HCH. Amino acids responsible for this enantioselectivity, however, are not known. An in silico docking analysis identified four amino acids (K20, L96, A131, and T133) in LinA-type1 that could be involved in selective binding of the substrates. Experimental studies with constructed mutant enzymes revealed that a combined presence of three amino acid changes in LinA-type1, i.e. K20Q, L96C, and A131G, caused a reversal in its preference from the (-) to the (+) enantiomer of α-HCH. This preference was enhanced by the additional amino acid change T133 M. Presence of these four changes also caused the reversal of enantioselectivity of LinA-type1 for δ-HCH, and β-, γ-, and δ-pentachlorocyclohexens. Thus, the residues K20, L96, A131, and T133 in LinA-type1 and the residues Q20, C96, G131, and M133 in LinA-type 2 appear to be important determinants for the enantioselectivity of LinA enzymes.

  20. A Method for Accurate in silico modeling of Ultrasound Transducer Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, Drake A.; Walker, William F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to improve the in silico modeling of ultrasound transducer arrays. While current simulation tools accurately predict the theoretical element spatio-temporal pressure response, transducers do not always behave as theorized. In practice, using the probe's physical dimensions and published specifications in silico, often results in unsatisfactory agreement between simulation and experiment. We describe a general optimization procedure used to maximize the correlation between the observed and simulated spatio-temporal response of a pulsed single element in a commercial ultrasound probe. A linear systems approach is employed to model element angular sensitivity, lens effects, and diffraction phenomena. A numerical deconvolution method is described to characterize the intrinsic electro-mechanical impulse response of the element. Once the response of the element and optimal element characteristics are known, prediction of the pressure response for arbitrary apertures and excitation signals is performed through direct convolution using available tools. We achieve a correlation of 0.846 between the experimental emitted waveform and simulated waveform when using the probe's physical specifications in silico. A far superior correlation of 0.988 is achieved when using the optimized in silico model. Electronic noise appears to be the main effect preventing the realization of higher correlation coefficients. More accurate in silico modeling will improve the evaluation and design of ultrasound transducers as well as aid in the development of sophisticated beamforming strategies. PMID:19041997

  1. In silico pharmacology for drug discovery: applications to targets and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, S; Mestres, J; Testa, B

    2007-01-01

    Computational (in silico) methods have been developed and widely applied to pharmacology hypothesis development and testing. These in silico methods include databases, quantitative structure-activity relationships, similarity searching, pharmacophores, homology models and other molecular modeling, machine learning, data mining, network analysis tools and data analysis tools that use a computer. Such methods have seen frequent use in the discovery and optimization of novel molecules with affinity to a target, the clarification of absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity properties as well as physicochemical characterization. The first part of this review discussed the methods that have been used for virtual ligand and target-based screening and profiling to predict biological activity. The aim of this second part of the review is to illustrate some of the varied applications of in silico methods for pharmacology in terms of the targets addressed. We will also discuss some of the advantages and disadvantages of in silico methods with respect to in vitro and in vivo methods for pharmacology research. Our conclusion is that the in silico pharmacology paradigm is ongoing and presents a rich array of opportunities that will assist in expediating the discovery of new targets, and ultimately lead to compounds with predicted biological activity for these novel targets. PMID:17549046

  2. In silico toxicology models and databases as FDA Critical Path Initiative toolkits.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Luis G

    2011-03-01

    In silico toxicology methods are practical, evidence-based and high throughput, with varying accuracy. In silico approaches are of keen interest, not only to scientists in the private sector and to academic researchers worldwide, but also to the public. They are being increasingly evaluated and applied by regulators. Although there are foreseeable beneficial aspects--including maximising use of prior test data and the potential for minimising animal use for future toxicity testing--the primary use of in silico toxicology methods in the pharmaceutical sciences are as decision support information. It is possible for in silico toxicology methods to complement and strengthen the evidence for certain regulatory review processes, and to enhance risk management by supporting a more informed decision regarding priority setting for additional toxicological testing in research and product development. There are also several challenges with these continually evolving methods which clearly must be considered. This mini-review describes in silico methods that have been researched as Critical Path Initiative toolkits for predicting toxicities early in drug development based on prior knowledge derived from preclinical and clinical data at the US Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

  3. The Consultancy Activity on In Silico Models for Genotoxic Prediction of Pharmaceutical Impurities.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Manuela; Kovarich, Simona; Bassan, Arianna; Broccardo, Lorenza; Yang, Chihae; Fioravanzo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicological assessment of DNA-reactive/mutagenic or clastogenic impurities plays an important role in the regulatory process for pharmaceuticals; in this context, in silico structure-based approaches are applied as primary tools for the evaluation of the mutagenic potential of the drug impurities. The general recommendations regarding such use of in silico methods are provided in the recent ICH M7 guideline stating that computational (in silico) toxicology assessment should be performed using two (Q)SAR prediction methodologies complementing each other: a statistical-based method and an expert rule-based method.Based on our consultant experience, we describe here a framework for in silico assessment of mutagenic potential of drug impurities. Two main applications of in silico methods are presented: (1) support and optimization of drug synthesis processes by providing early indication of potential genotoxic impurities and (2) regulatory evaluation of genotoxic potential of impurities in compliance with the ICH M7 guideline. Some critical case studies are also discussed.

  4. Genome-wide in silico screening for microRNA genetic variability in livestock species.

    PubMed

    Jevsinek Skok, D; Godnic, I; Zorc, M; Horvat, S; Dovc, P; Kovac, M; Kunej, T

    2013-12-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate target gene expression. Previous studies have shown that microRNA gene variability can interfere with its function, resulting in phenotypic variation. Polymorphisms within microRNA genes present a source of novel biomarkers for phenotypic traits in animal breeding. However, little is known about microRNA genetic variability in livestock species, which is also due to incomplete data in genomic resource databases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to perform a genome-wide in silico screening of genomic sources and determine the genetic variability of microRNA genes in livestock species using mirna sniper 3.0 (http://www.integratomics-time.com/miRNA-SNiPer/), a new version of our previously developed tool. By examining Ensembl and miRBase genome builds, it was possible to design a tool-based generated search of 16 genomes including four livestock species: pig, horse, cattle and chicken. The analysis revealed 65 polymorphisms located within mature microRNA regions in these four species, including 28% within the seed region in cattle and chicken. Polymorphic microRNA genes in cattle and chicken were further examined for mapping to quantitative trait loci regions associated with production and health traits. The developed bioinformatics tool enables the analysis of polymorphic microRNA genes and prioritization of potential regulatory polymorphisms and therefore contributes to the development of microRNA-based biomarkers in livestock species. The assembled catalog and the developed tool can serve the animal science community to efficiently select microRNA SNPs for further quantitative and molecular genetic evaluations of their phenotypic effects and causal associations with livestock production traits.

  5. In silico characterization of a RNA binding protein of cattle filarial parasite Setaria digitata.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, Nirupa; Karunanayake, Eric Hamilton; Tennekoon, Kamani Hemamala; Samarakoon, Sameera Ranganath; Mayan, Karthika

    2014-01-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (HLF) is a neglected tropical disease which threatens nearly 1.4 billion people in 73 countries worldwide. Wuchereria bancrofti is the major causative agent of HLF and it closely resembles cattle filarial parasite Setaria digitata. Due to difficulties in procuring W. bancrofti parasite material, S. digitata cDNA library has been constructed to identify novel drug targets against HLF and many of the cDNA sequences are yet to be assigned structure and function. In this study, a 549 bp long cDNA (sdrbp) has been sequenced and characterized in silico. The shortest ORF of 249 bp from the isolated cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 82 amino acids and shows an amino acid identity of 54% with the RRM domain of human cleavage stimulation factor-64 kDa subunit (CstF-64). Structure of the protein (sdRBP) obtained by homology modelling using RRM of CstF-64 as template adopts classical RRM topology (β1α1β2β3α2β4). sdRBP model built was validated by superimposition tools and Ramachandran plot analysis. CstF-64 plays an important role in pre-mRNA polyadenylation by interacting with specific GU-rich downstream sequence element. Molecular docking studies of sdRBP with different RNA molecules revealed that sdRBP has greater binding affinity to GU-rich RNA and comparable results were obtained upon similar docking of RRM of CstF-64 with the same RNA molecules. Therefore, sdRBP is likely to perform homologous function in S. digitata. This study brings new dimensions to the functional analysis of RNA binding proteins of S. digitata and their evaluation as new drug targets against HLF.

  6. An integrated molecular modeling approach for in silico design of new tetracyclic derivatives as ALK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Peddi, Saikiran Reddy; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2016-10-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a promising therapeutic target for treatment of human cancers, is a receptor tyrosine kinase that instigates the activation of several signal transduction pathways. In the present study, in silico methods have been employed in order to explore the structural features and functionalities of a series of tetracyclic derivatives displaying potent inhibitory activity toward ALK. Initially docking was performed using GLIDE 5.6 to probe the bioactive conformation of all the compounds and to understand the binding modes of inhibitors. The docking results revealed that ligand interaction with Met 1199 plays a crucial role in binding of inhibitors to ALK. Further to establish a robust 3D-QSAR model using CoMFA and CoMSIA methods, the whole dataset was divided into three splits. Model obtained from Split 3 showed high accuracy ([Formula: see text] of 0.700 and 0.682, [Formula: see text] of 0.971 and 0.974, [Formula: see text] of 0.673 and 0.811, respectively for CoMFA and CoMSIA). The key structural requirements for enhancing the inhibitory activity were derived from CoMFA and CoMSIA contours in combination with site map analysis. Substituting small electronegative groups at Position 8 by replacing either morpholine or piperidine rings and maintaining hydrophobic character at Position 9 in tetracyclic derivatives can enhance the inhibitory potential. Finally, we performed molecular dynamics simulations in order to investigate the stability of protein ligand interactions and MM/GBSA calculations to compare binding free energies of co-crystal ligand and newly designed molecule N1. Based on the coherence of outcome of various molecular modeling studies, a set of 11 new molecules having potential predicted inhibitory activity were designed.

  7. In silico characterization of a RNA binding protein of cattle filarial parasite Setaria digitata

    PubMed Central

    Nagaratnam, Nirupa; Karunanayake, Eric Hamilton; Tennekoon, Kamani Hemamala; Samarakoon, Sameera Ranganath; Mayan, Karthika

    2014-01-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (HLF) is a neglected tropical disease which threatens nearly 1.4 billion people in 73 countries worldwide. Wuchereria bancrofti is the major causative agent of HLF and it closely resembles cattle filarial parasite Setaria digitata. Due to difficulties in procuring W. bancrofti parasite material, S. digitata cDNA library has been constructed to identify novel drug targets against HLF and many of the cDNA sequences are yet to be assigned structure and function. In this study, a 549 bp long cDNA (sdrbp) has been sequenced and characterized in silico. The shortest ORF of 249 bp from the isolated cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 82 amino acids and shows an amino acid identity of 54% with the RRM domain of human cleavage stimulation factor-64 kDa subunit (CstF-64). Structure of the protein (sdRBP) obtained by homology modelling using RRM of CstF-64 as template adopts classical RRM topology (β1α1β2β3α2β4). sdRBP model built was validated by superimposition tools and Ramachandran plot analysis. CstF-64 plays an important role in pre-mRNA polyadenylation by interacting with specific GU-rich downstream sequence element. Molecular docking studies of sdRBP with different RNA molecules revealed that sdRBP has greater binding affinity to GU-rich RNA and comparable results were obtained upon similar docking of RRM of CstF-64 with the same RNA molecules. Therefore, sdRBP is likely to perform homologous function in S. digitata. This study brings new dimensions to the functional analysis of RNA binding proteins of S. digitata and their evaluation as new drug targets against HLF. PMID:25258487

  8. Cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism: Association with uterine leiomyoma risk and in silico analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salimi, Saeedeh; Shahrakipour, Mahnaz; Hajizadeh, Azam; Mokhtari, Mojgan; Mousavi, Mahdieh; Teimoori, Batool; Yaghmaei, Minoo

    2017-01-01

    Uterine leiomyoma (UL) is the most common benign tumor causing considerable morbidity during the reproductive years in women. Cyclin D1 (CCND1) is a cell cycle regulatory protein that is required for the G1 phase, and increased expression levels of this protein may affect tumorigenesis. The present study aimed to assess the possible effect of the CCND1 G870A polymorphism on UL susceptibility. A total of 154 women with UL and 197 healthy women who were age-, body mass index (BMI)- and ethnicity-matched were genotyped for the CCND1 G870A (rs9344) polymorphism using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The effects of G870A transition on the structure of mRNA and proteins of CCND1 was evaluated using bioinformatics tools. The frequency of the CCND1 870AA genotype was significantly higher in women with UL compared with the control subjects, and the risk of UL was 1.4-fold higher in women with the AA genotype when compared with the GG genotype before and after adjusting for age, BMI, and ethnicity [odds ratio (OR), 1.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1–2 (P=0.02)]. The frequency of CCND1 870GA genotype was not significantly different between the two groups. The frequency of the CCND1 870A allele was significantly higher in the women with UL when compared with the control subjects (57 vs. 48%; P=0.02). The in silico analysis revealed that the G870A transition may fundamentally alter the structure of the CCND1-mRNA. Thus, the CCND1 870AA genotype was associated with UL susceptibility in a sample of women from the southeast of Iran. PMID:28357079

  9. In silico analysis of the regulation of the photosynthetic electron transport chain in C3 plants.

    PubMed

    Morales, Alejandro; Yin, Xinyou; Harbinson, Jeremy; Driever, Steven Michiel; Molenaar, Jaap; Kramer, David M; Struik, Paul

    2017-09-18

    We present a new simulation model of the reactions in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of C3 species. We show that including recent insights about the regulation of the thylakoid proton motive force, ATP/NADPH balancing mechanisms (cyclic and non-cyclic alternative electron transport), and regulation of Rubisco activity, leads to emergent behaviors that may affect the operation and regulation of photosynthesis under different dynamic environmental conditions. The model was parameterized with experimental results in the literature, with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana. A dataset was constructed from multiple sources, including measurements of steady-state and dynamic gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy under different light intensities and CO2. This dataset was used to test predictions of the model under different experimental conditions. Simulations suggested that there are strong interactions between cyclic and non-cyclic alternative electron transport and that an excess capacity for alternative electron transport is required to ensure adequate redox state and lumen pH. Furthermore, the model predicted that, under specific conditions, reduction of ferredoxin by plastoquinol was possible, especially after a rapid increase in light intensity. Further analysis also revealed that the relationship between ATP synthesis and proton motive force was highly regulated by the concentrations of ATP and ADP, and this facilitated an increase in non-photochemical quenching under conditions where metabolism was limiting, such as low CO2 or high light intensity. The model may be used as an in silico platform for future research on the regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. {copyright, serif} 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. Discovery in silico and characterization in vitro of novel genes exclusively expressed in the mouse epididymis.

    PubMed

    Penttinen, Jenni; Pujianto, Dwi Ari; Sipila, Petra; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Poutanen, Matti

    2003-11-01

    Epididymal proteins interact with sperm during their passage through the epididymis and thus contribute to the maturation and fertilizing capacity of the spermatozoa. In the present study we have discovered five novel epididymis-specific genes through in silico analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) at the UniGene library collection. The strategy used is a powerful way to discover novel epididymis-specific genes. The full-length cDNA sequences were determined, and computational tools were used to characterize the genomic structures and to predict putative functions for the encoded proteins. In vitro analyses revealed that all five genes characterized were highly expressed in the defined areas of the epididymis, and they were not expressed at significant levels in any other tissue. Three of the genes were named on the basis of their putative functions: Spint4 (serine protease inhibitor, Kunitz type 4), and Rnase9 and Rnase10 (ribonuclease, Rnase A family 9 and 10), while for the ESTs AV381130 and AV381126 no putative functions could be predicted. The expression of Spint4, Rnase9, and AV381130 was found to be under a direct or indirect regulation by androgens, while the expression of Rnase10 is regulated by a testicular factor(s) other than androgen. None of the genes were expressed in the immature epididymis, while mRNAs were detected from d 17 onward, at the time of maturation of epididymal epithelium. However, the expression of AV381130 was not detected until d 30 after birth, indicating a close connection between gene expression and puberty.

  11. Structural Investigation for Optimization of Anthranilic Acid Derivatives as Partial FXR Agonists by in Silico Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meimei; Yang, Xuemei; Lai, Xinmei; Kang, Jie; Gan, Huijuan; Gao, Yuxing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a three level in silico approach was applied to investigate some important structural and physicochemical aspects of a series of anthranilic acid derivatives (AAD) newly identified as potent partial farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists. Initially, both two and three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (2D- and 3D-QSAR) studies were performed based on such AAD by a stepwise technology combined with multiple linear regression and comparative molecular field analysis. The obtained 2D-QSAR model gave a high predictive ability (R2train = 0.935, R2test = 0.902, Q2LOO = 0.899). It also uncovered that number of rotatable single bonds (b_rotN), relative negative partial charges (RPC−), oprea's lead-like (opr_leadlike), subdivided van der Waal’s surface area (SlogP_VSA2) and accessible surface area (ASA) were important features in defining activity. Additionally, the derived3D-QSAR model presented a higher predictive ability (R2train = 0.944, R2test = 0.892, Q2LOO = 0.802). Meanwhile, the derived contour maps from the 3D-QSAR model revealed the significant structural features (steric and electronic effects) required for improving FXR agonist activity. Finally, nine newly designed AAD with higher predicted EC50 values than the known template compound were docked into the FXR active site. The excellent molecular binding patterns of these molecules also suggested that they can be robust and potent partial FXR agonists in agreement with the QSAR results. Overall, these derived models may help to identify and design novel AAD with better FXR agonist activity. PMID:27070594

  12. Biomarker discovery in heterogeneous tissue samples -taking the in-silico deconfounding approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background For heterogeneous tissues, such as blood, measurements of gene expression are confounded by relative proportions of cell types involved. Conclusions have to rely on estimation of gene expression signals for homogeneous cell populations, e.g. by applying micro-dissection, fluorescence activated cell sorting, or in-silico deconfounding. We studied feasibility and validity of a non-negative matrix decomposition algorithm using experimental gene expression data for blood and sorted cells from the same donor samples. Our objective was to optimize the algorithm regarding detection of differentially expressed genes and to enable its use for classification in the difficult scenario of reversely regulated genes. This would be of importance for the identification of candidate biomarkers in heterogeneous tissues. Results Experimental data and simulation studies involving noise parameters estimated from these data revealed that for valid detection of differential gene expression, quantile normalization and use of non-log data are optimal. We demonstrate the feasibility of predicting proportions of constituting cell types from gene expression data of single samples, as a prerequisite for a deconfounding-based classification approach. Classification cross-validation errors with and without using deconfounding results are reported as well as sample-size dependencies. Implementation of the algorithm, simulation and analysis scripts are available. Conclusions The deconfounding algorithm without decorrelation using quantile normalization on non-log data is proposed for biomarkers that are difficult to detect, and for cases where confounding by varying proportions of cell types is the suspected reason. In this case, a deconfounding ranking approach can be used as a powerful alternative to, or complement of, other statistical learning approaches to define candidate biomarkers for molecular diagnosis and prediction in biomedicine, in realistically noisy conditions and with

  13. In Silico Analysis of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Tumor Cell Response to Withanolides

    PubMed Central

    Efferth, Thomas; Greten, Henry Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal (Indian ginseng, winter cherry, Solanaceae) is widely used in traditional medicine. Roots are either chewed or used to prepare beverages (aqueous decocts). The major secondary metabolites of Withania somnifera are the withanolides, which are C-28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withania somnifera extracts exert chemopreventive and anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The aims of the present in silico study were, firstly, to investigate whether tumor cells develop cross-resistance between standard anticancer drugs and withanolides and, secondly, to elucidate the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells towards withanolides. Using IC50 concentrations of eight different withanolides (withaferin A, withaferin A diacetate, 3-azerininylwithaferin A, withafastuosin D diacetate, 4-B-hydroxy-withanolide E, isowithanololide E, withafastuosin E, and withaperuvin) and 19 established anticancer drugs, we analyzed the cross-resistance profile of 60 tumor cell lines. The cell lines revealed cross-resistance between the eight withanolides. Consistent cross-resistance between withanolides and nitrosoureas (carmustin, lomustin, and semimustin) was also observed. Then, we performed transcriptomic microarray-based COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of mRNA expression to identify mRNA expression profiles predicting sensitivity or resistance towards withanolides. Genes from diverse functional groups were significantly associated with response of tumor cells to withaferin A diacetate, e.g. genes functioning in DNA damage and repair, stress response, cell growth regulation, extracellular matrix components, cell adhesion and cell migration, constituents of the ribosome, cytoskeletal organization and regulation, signal transduction, transcription factors, and others. PMID:27605335

  14. In silico prediction of drug therapy in catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei‐Chi; Moreno, Jonathan D.; Miyake, Christina Y.; Vaughn‐Behrens, Steven B.; Jeng, Mao‐Tsuen; Grandi, Eleonora; Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Noskov, Sergei Y.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The mechanism of therapeutic efficacy of flecainide for catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is unclear.Model predictions suggest that Na+ channel effects are insufficient to explain flecainide efficacy in CPVT.This study represents a first step toward predicting therapeutic mechanisms of drug efficacy in the setting of CPVT and then using these mechanisms to guide modelling and simulation to predict alternative drug therapies. Abstract Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an inherited arrhythmia syndrome characterized by fatal ventricular arrhythmias in structurally normal hearts during β‐adrenergic stimulation. Current treatment strategies include β‐blockade, flecainide and ICD implementation – none of which is fully effective and each comes with associated risk. Recently, flecainide has gained considerable interest in CPVT treatment, but its mechanism of action for therapeutic efficacy is unclear. In this study, we performed in silico mutagenesis to construct a CPVT model and then used a computational modelling and simulation approach to make predictions of drug mechanisms and efficacy in the setting of CPVT. Experiments were carried out to validate model results. Our simulations revealed that Na+ channel effects are insufficient to explain flecainide efficacy in CPVT. The pure Na+ channel blocker lidocaine and the antianginal ranolazine were additionally tested and also found to be ineffective. When we tested lower dose combination therapy with flecainide, β‐blockade and CaMKII inhibition, our model predicted superior therapeutic efficacy than with flecainide monotherapy. Simulations indicate a polytherapeutic approach may mitigate side‐effects and proarrhythmic potential plaguing CPVT pharmacological management today. Importantly, our prediction of a novel polytherapy for CPVT was confirmed experimentally. Our simulations suggest that flecainide therapeutic efficacy in CPVT is unlikely

  15. Fuller Revealed

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-16

    MESSENGER's low-altitude campaign has enabled imaging of Fuller crater (named after American architect Buckminster Fuller) in greater detail than previously possible. The top left panel shows an image of Fuller, with the crater rim outlined in pink and the edge of a low-altitude broadband MDIS image in green. The large panel applies a different stretch to the same MDIS broadband image in the first panel, revealing details of the shadowed surface inside Fuller! In particular, as highlighted with yellow arrows in the bottom left panel, the image reveals a region inside Fuller that is lower in reflectance. The edge of the low-reflectance region has a sharp and well-defined boundary, even when imaged at 46 m/pixel, suggesting that the low-reflectance material is sufficiently young to have preserved a sharp boundary against lateral mixing by impact cratering. Models for surface and near-surface temperature within Fuller crater predict a region that is sufficiently cold to host long-lived water ice beneath the surface but too hot to support water ice at the surface. The low-reflectance region revealed in the images matches the thermal characteristics expected for a lag deposit of volatile, organic-rich material that overlies the water ice. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19244

  16. EDITORIAL: Transformation optics Transformation optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaev, Vladimir M.; Pendry, John

    2011-02-01

    Metamaterials are artificial materials with versatile properties that can be tailored to fit almost any practical need and thus go well beyond what can be obtained with `natural' materials. Recent progress in developing optical metamaterials allows unprecedented extreme control over the flow of light at both the nano- and macroscopic scales. The innovative field of transformation optics, which is enabled by metamaterials, inspired researchers to take a fresh look at the very foundations of optics and helped to create a new paradigm for the science of light. Similar to general relativity, where time and space are curved, transformation optics shows that the space for light can also be bent in an almost arbitrary way. Most importantly, the optical space can be designed and engineered, opening up the fascinating possibility of controlling the flow of light with nanometer spatial precision. This new paradigm enables a number of novel optical devices guiding how, using metamaterials, the space for light can be curved in a pre-designed and well-controlled way. Metamaterials which incorporate the innovative theories of transformation optics are pertinent to the important areas of optical cloaking, optical black holes, super-resolution imaging, and other sci-fi-like devices. One such exciting device is an electromagnetic cloak that can bend light around itself, similar to the flow of water around a stone, making invisible both the cloak and the object hidden inside. Another important application is a flat hyperlens that can magnify the nanometer-scale features of an object that cannot be resolved with conventional optics. This could revolutionize the field of optical imaging, for instance, because such a meta-lens could become a standard add-on tool for microscopes. By enabling nanoscale resolution in optical microscopy, metamaterial-based transformation optics could allow one to literally see extremely small objects with the eye, including biological cells, viruses, and

  17. In vitro and in silico toxicity evaluation of bioactive 4'-aminochalcone derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Patrícia Albano; Pereira, Danillo Baptista; Santi, Gustavo; de Souza, Raul Oliveira; Faoro, Débora; de Oliveira, Luís Flávio Souza; Machado, Michel Mansur; Paula, Fávero Reisdorfer

    2016-01-01

    The 4'-aminochalcones compounds are open-chain flavonoids structures which have shown a known array of pharmacological activities, such as antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects. There is little toxicological information available about these compounds in the literature. Therefore, the investigation of toxic effects of three 4'-aminochalcone derivatives was performed using in silico and in vitro assays. In silico provided results that indicated the occurrence of mutagenic and genotoxic effects. In vitro tests, using Cellular Proliferation and Viability, Micronucleus, and DNA damage by Comet assay, showed that the compounds studied also present mutagenic and genotoxic effects, which confirm the result determined by the in silico analysis. The use of experimental and computational models is complementary to each other and the results determined for 4'-aminochalones suggest that the chalcones should also be carefully considered since they show some risks to cause toxic effects to human cells.

  18. In vitro/in silico investigation of failure criteria to predict flexural strength of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Mehdawi, Idris Mohamed; Sakai, Takahiko; Abe, Tomohiro; Inoue, Sayuri; Imazato, Satoshi

    2017-09-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate a failure criterion to predict flexural strengths of composite resins (CR) by three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA). Models of flexural strength for test specimens of CR and rods comprising a three-point loading were designed. Calculation of Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios of CR were conducted using a modified McGee-McCullough model. Using the experimental CR, flexural strengths were measured by three-point bending tests with crosshead speed 1.0 mm/min and compared with the values determined by in silico analysis. The flexural strengths of experimental CR calculated using the maximum principal strain significantly correlated with those obtained in silico amongst the four types of failure criteria applied. The in silico analytical model established in this study was found to be effective to predict the flexural strengths of CR incorporating various silica filler contents by maximum principal strain.

  19. In silico imaging clinical trials for regulatory evaluation: initial considerations for VICTRE, a demonstration study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badano, Aldo; Badal, Andreu; Glick, Stephen; Graff, Christian G.; Samuelson, Frank; Sharma, Diksha; Zeng, Rongping

    2017-03-01

    Expensive and lengthy clinical trials can delay regulatory evaluation and add significant burden that stifles innovation affecting patient access to novel, high-quality imaging technologies. In silico imaging holds promise for evaluating the safety and effectiveness of imaging technologies with much less burden than clinical trials. We define in silico imaging as a computer simulation of an entire imaging system (including source, object, task, and observer components) used for research, development, optimization, technology assessment, and regulatory evaluation of new technology. In this work we describe VICTRE (our study of virtual imaging clinical trials for regulatory evaluation) and the considerations for building an entire imaging pipeline in silico including device (physics), patient (anatomy, disease), and image interpretation models for regulatory evaluation using open-source tools.

  20. Network analysis and in silico prediction of protein-protein interactions with applications in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoichi; Tripathi, Lokesh P; Prathipati, Philip; Mizuguchi, Kenji

    2017-03-29

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are vital to maintaining cellular homeostasis. Several PPI dysregulations have been implicated in the etiology of various diseases and hence PPIs have emerged as promising targets for drug discovery. Surface residues and hotspot residues at the interface of PPIs form the core regions, which play a key role in modulating cellular processes such as signal transduction and are used as starting points for drug design. In this review, we briefly discuss how PPI networks (PPINs) inferred from experimentally characterized PPI data have been utilized for knowledge discovery and how in silico approaches to PPI characterization can contribute to PPIN-based biological research. Next, we describe the principles of in silico PPI prediction and survey the existing PPI and PPI site prediction servers that are useful for drug discovery. Finally, we discuss the potential of in silico PPI prediction in drug discovery.

  1. HAMMER: automated operation of mass frontier to construct in silico mass spectral fragmentation libraries

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiarui; Weber, Ralf J. M.; Allwood, J. William; Mistrik, Robert; Zhu, Zexuan; Ji, Zhen; Chen, Siping; Dunn, Warwick B.; He, Shan; Viant, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Experimental MSn mass spectral libraries currently do not adequately cover chemical space. This limits the robust annotation of metabolites in metabolomics studies of complex biological samples. In silico fragmentation libraries would improve the identification of compounds from experimental multistage fragmentation data when experimental reference data are unavailable. Here, we present a freely available software package to automatically control Mass Frontier software to construct in silico mass spectral libraries and to perform spectral matching. Based on two case studies, we have demonstrated that high-throughput automation of Mass Frontier allows researchers to generate in silico mass spectral libraries in an automated and high-throughput fashion with little or no human intervention required. Availability and implementation: Documentation, examples, results and source code are available at http://www.biosciences-labs.bham.ac.uk/viant/hammer/. Contact: m.viant@bham.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24336413

  2. In silico study of nanoparticles in soft matter environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranatunga, R. J. K. Udayana

    that solvent plays in these systems. The feasibility of using multiparticle collision dynamics in equilibrium simulations is studied to develop more efficient ways to treat the problem of simulating solvent dynamics, which otherwise accounts for a majority of computational cost. Nanoparticles hold immense promise in nanoscience, however a better knowledge of their behavior is essential to realize this promise. Much like in vivo and in vitro research, in silico studies can contribute to expand our knowledge of these unique materials.

  3. The in situ observation of the temperature and pressure stability of recombinant Aspergillus aculeatus pectin methylesterase with Fourier transform IR spectroscopy reveals an unusual pressure stability of β-helices

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The stability of recombinant Aspergillus aculeatus PME (pectin methylesterase), an enzyme with high β-helix content, was studied as a function of pressure and temperature. The conformational stability was monitored using FTIR (Fourier transform IR) spectroscopy whereas the functional enzyme stability was monitored by inactivation studies. Protein unfolding followed by amorphous aggregation, which makes the process irreversible, was observed at temperatures above 50 °C. This could be correlated to the irreversible enzyme inactivation observed at that temperature. Hydrostatic pressure greater than 1 GPa was necessary to induce changes in the enzyme's secondary structure. No enzyme inactivation was observed at up to 700 MPa. Pressure increased PME stability towards thermal denaturation. At 200 MPa, temperatures above 60 °C were necessary to cause significant PME unfolding and loss of activity. These results may be relevant for an understanding of the extreme stability of amyloid fibrils for which β-helices have been proposed as a structural element. PMID:16050809

  4. The acceptance of in silico models for REACH: Requirements, barriers, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In silico models have prompted considerable interest and debate because of their potential value in predicting the properties of chemical substances for regulatory purposes. The European REACH legislation promotes innovation and encourages the use of alternative methods, but in practice the use of in silico models is still very limited. There are many stakeholders influencing the regulatory trajectory of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) models, including regulators, industry, model developers and consultants. Here we outline some of the issues and challenges involved in the acceptance of these methods for regulatory purposes. PMID:21982269

  5. PK/DB: database for pharmacokinetic properties and predictive in silico ADME models.

    PubMed

    Moda, Tiago L; Torres, Leonardo G; Carrara, Alexandre E; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2008-10-01

    The study of pharmacokinetic properties (PK) is of great importance in drug discovery and development. In the present work, PK/DB (a new freely available database for PK) was designed with the aim of creating robust databases for pharmacokinetic studies and in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) prediction. Comprehensive, web-based and easy to access, PK/DB manages 1203 compounds which represent 2973 pharmacokinetic measurements, including five models for in silico ADME prediction (human intestinal absorption, human oral bioavailability, plasma protein binding, blood-brain barrier and water solubility). http://www.pkdb.ifsc.usp.br

  6. Safranal, a Crocus sativus L constituent suppresses the growth of K-562 cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia. In silico and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Geromichalos, George D; Papadopoulos, Theophanis; Sahpazidou, Despina; Sinakos, Zacharias

    2014-12-01

    Crocin, a main constituent of Crocus sativus L (saffron), has been found to inhibit the growth of K-562 human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells expressing Bcr-Abl protein tyrosine kinase activity. The aim of our study is to investigate the ability of the bioactive saffron's constituents, crocin (CRC) and safranal (SFR), to inhibit the Bcr-Abl protein activity employing an in silico approach, as well as the in vitro effect of these compounds on K-562 growth and gene expression of Bcr-Abl. In silico molecular docking studies revealed that mostly SFR can be attached to Bcr-Abl protein, positioned inside the protein's binding cavity at the same place with the drug used in the treatment of CML, imatinib mesylate (IM). The predicted polar interactions and hydrophobic contacts constructing a hydrophobic cavity inside the active site, explain the observed inhibitory activity. Cytotoxicity experiments showed that SFR and CRC mediate cytotoxic response to K562 cells. In vitro studies on the expression of Bcr-Abl gene revealed that SFR and in a lesser degree IM inhibited the expression of the gene, while in contrast CRC induced an increase. The ultimate goal was to evaluate the existence of a potential antitumor activity of saffron's constituents SFR and CRC.

  7. Transforming giants.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  8. AllerTOP--a server for in silico prediction of allergens.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Ivan; Flower, Darren R; Doytchinova, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Allergy is a form of hypersensitivity to normally innocuous substances, such as dust, pollen, foods or drugs. Allergens are small antigens that commonly provoke an IgE antibody response. There are two types of bioinformatics-based allergen prediction. The first approach follows FAO/WHO Codex alimentarius guidelines and searches for sequence similarity. The second approach is based on identifying conserved allergenicity-related linear motifs. Both approaches assume that allergenicity is a linearly coded property. In the present study, we applied ACC pre-processing to sets of known allergens, developing alignment-independent models for allergen recognition based on the main chemical properties of amino acid sequences. A set of 684 food, 1,156 inhalant and 555 toxin allergens was collected from several databases. A set of non-allergens from the same species were selected to mirror the allergen set. The amino acids in the protein sequences were described by three z-descriptors (z1, z2 and z3) and by auto- and cross-covariance (ACC) transformation were converted into uniform vectors. Each protein was presented as a vector of 45 variables. Five machine learning methods for classification were applied in the study to derive models for allergen prediction. The methods were: discriminant analysis by partial least squares (DA-PLS), logistic regression (LR), decision tree (DT), naïve Bayes (NB) and k nearest neighbours (kNN). The best performing model was derived by kNN at k = 3. It was optimized, cross-validated and implemented in a server named AllerTOP, freely accessible at http://www.pharmfac.net/allertop. AllerTOP also predicts the most probable route of exposure. In comparison to other servers for allergen prediction, AllerTOP outperforms them with 94% sensitivity. AllerTOP is the first alignment-free server for in silico prediction of allergens based on the main physicochemical properties of proteins. Significantly, as well allergenicity AllerTOP is able to predict

  9. Is Increased Susceptibility to Balkan Endemic Nephropathy in Carriers of Common GSTA1 (*A/*B) Polymorphism Linked with the Catalytic Role of GSTA1 in Ochratoxin A Biotransformation? Serbian Case Control Study and In Silico Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reljic, Zorica; Zlatovic, Mario; Savic-Radojevic, Ana; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Djukanovic, Ljubica; Matic, Marija; Pljesa-Ercegovac, Marija; Mimic-Oka, Jasmina; Opsenica, Dejan; Simic, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Although recent data suggest aristolochic acid as a putative cause of Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN), evidence also exists in favor of ochratoxin A (OTA) exposure as risk factor for the disease. The potential role of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as the glutathione transferases (GSTs), in OTA biotransformation is based on OTA glutathione adducts (OTHQ-SG and OTB-SG) in blood and urine of BEN patients. We aimed to analyze the association between common GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 polymorphisms and BEN susceptibility, and thereafter performed an in silico simulation of particular GST enzymes potentially involved in OTA transformations. GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genotypes were determined in 207 BEN patients and 138 non-BEN healthy individuals from endemic regions by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Molecular modeling in silico was performed for GSTA1 protein. Among the GST polymorphisms tested, only GSTA1 was significantly associated with a higher risk of BEN. Namely, carriers of the GSTA1*B gene variant, associated with lower transcriptional activation, were at a 1.6-fold higher BEN risk than those carrying the homozygous GSTA1*A/*A genotype (OR = 1.6; p = 0.037). In in silico modeling, we found four structures, two OTB-SG and two OTHQ-SG, bound in a GSTA1 monomer. We found that GSTA1 polymorphism was associated with increased risk of BEN, and suggested, according to the in silico simulation, that GSTA1-1 might be involved in catalyzing the formation of OTHQ-SG and OTB-SG conjugates. PMID:25111321

  10. Is increased susceptibility to Balkan endemic nephropathy in carriers of common GSTA1 (*A/*B) polymorphism linked with the catalytic role of GSTA1 in ochratoxin a biotransformation? Serbian case control study and in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Reljic, Zorica; Zlatovic, Mario; Savic-Radojevic, Ana; Pekmezovic, Tatjana; Djukanovic, Ljubica; Matic, Marija; Pljesa-Ercegovac, Marija; Mimic-Oka, Jasmina; Opsenica, Dejan; Simic, Tatjana

    2014-08-08

    Although recent data suggest aristolochic acid as a putative cause of Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN), evidence also exists in favor of ochratoxin A (OTA) exposure as risk factor for the disease. The potential role of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as the glutathione transferases (GSTs), in OTA biotransformation is based on OTA glutathione adducts (OTHQ-SG and OTB-SG) in blood and urine of BEN patients. We aimed to analyze the association between common GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 polymorphisms and BEN susceptibility, and thereafter performed an in silico simulation of particular GST enzymes potentially involved in OTA transformations. GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genotypes were determined in 207 BEN patients and 138 non-BEN healthy individuals from endemic regions by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Molecular modeling in silico was performed for GSTA1 protein. Among the GST polymorphisms tested, only GSTA1 was significantly associated with a higher risk of BEN. Namely, carriers of the GSTA1*B gene variant, associated with lower transcriptional activation, were at a 1.6-fold higher BEN risk than those carrying the homozygous GSTA1*A/*A genotype (OR = 1.6; p = 0.037). In in silico modeling, we found four structures, two OTB-SG and two OTHQ-SG, bound in a GSTA1 monomer. We found that GSTA1 polymorphism was associated with increased risk of BEN, and suggested, according to the in silico simulation, that GSTA1-1 might be involved in catalyzing the formation of OTHQ-SG and OTB-SG conjugates.

  11. Purely in silico BCS classification: science based quality standards for the world's drugs.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Arik; Wolk, Omri; Kim, Young Hoon; Ramachandran, Chandrasekharan; Crippen, Gordon M; Takagi, Toshihide; Bermejo, Marival; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-11-04

    BCS classification is a vital tool in the development of both generic and innovative drug products. The purpose of this work was to provisionally classify the world's top selling oral drugs according to the BCS, using in silico methods. Three different in silico methods were examined: the well-established group contribution (CLogP) and atom contribution (ALogP) methods, and a new method based solely on the molecular formula and element contribution (KLogP). Metoprolol was used as the benchmark for the low/high permeability class boundary. Solubility was estimated in silico using a thermodynamic equation that relies on the partition coefficient and melting point. The validity of each method was affirmed by comparison to reference data and literature. We then used each method to provisionally classify the orally administered, IR drug products found in the WHO Model list of Essential Medicines, and the top-selling oral drug products in the United States (US), Great Britain (GB), Spain (ES), Israel (IL), Japan (JP), and South Korea (KR). A combined list of 363 drugs was compiled from the various lists, and 257 drugs were classified using the different in silico permeability methods and literature solubility data, as well as BDDCS classification. Lastly, we calculated the solubility values for 185 drugs from the combined set using in silico approach. Permeability classification with the different in silico methods was correct for 69-72.4% of the 29 reference drugs with known human jejunal permeability, and for 84.6-92.9% of the 14 FDA reference drugs in the set. The correlations (r(2)) between experimental log P values of 154 drugs and their CLogP, ALogP and KLogP were 0.97, 0.82 and 0.71, respectively. The different in silico permeability methods produced comparable results: 30-34% of the US, GB, ES and IL top selling drugs were class 1, 27-36.4% were class 2, 22-25.5% were class 3, and 5.46-14% were class 4 drugs, while ∼8% could not be classified. The WHO list

  12. C-Phycocyanin inhibits 2-acetylaminofluorene-induced expression of MDR1 in mouse macrophage cells: ROS mediated pathway determined via combination of experimental and In silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Karnati R; Arunasree, Kalle M; Dhoot, Amit; Aparna, Rachamallu; Reddy, Gorla Venkateswara; Vali, Shireen; Reddanna, Pallu

    2007-03-15

    We studied the effects of C-Phycocyanin (C-PC), a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis on the 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)-induced expression of MDR1, encoded by the multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene, in mouse macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7). Our experimental and In silico studies revealed a significant inhibition of 2-AAF-induced expression of MDR1 protein in C-PC treated mouse macrophage cell line. MDR1 induction by 2-AAF was dependent on ROS (reactive oxygen species)-Akt (protein kinase B)-NF-kappaB (Nuclear factor kappa B) signaling pathway. Generation of ROS, phosphorylation of Akt and corresponding nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB, the events that play a major role in the induction of MDR1 expression, were decreased significantly in C-PC treated cells. NADPH oxidase inhibitor, DPI (Diphenyl iodide), and pharmacological inhibitor of Akt, Akt inhibitor IV, also showed a reduction in MDR1 expression, although not to the same extent as C-PC mediated inhibition of MDR1 expression. To further understand the mechanism, we created a computational model of the detailed ROS-Akt-NF-kappaB pathway. C-PC was modeled purely as a ROS scavenger and this representation matched the experimental trends accurately. Also the ROS levels determined through In silico investigation showed that C-PC was more effective in reduction of MDR1 expression than inhibitors of NADPH oxidase and Akt. Our experimental and In silico studies collectively suggest that 2-AAF induces MDR1 by ROS dependent pathway and C-PC is a potential negative regulator of MDR1 expression. This down regulation of MDR1 expression, induced by xenobiotics such as 2-AAF, suggests C-PC's usefulness in overcoming the drug resistance in cellular systems.

  13. In silico polymorphism analysis for the development of simple sequence repeat and transposon markers and construction of linkage map in cultivated peanut

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is an autogamous allotetraploid legume (2n = 4x = 40) that is widely cultivated as a food and oil crop. More than 6,000 DNA markers have been developed in Arachis spp., but high-density linkage maps useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding have not been constructed due to extremely low genetic diversity. Polymorphic marker loci are useful for the construction of such high-density linkage maps. The present study used in silico analysis to develop simple sequence repeat-based and transposon-based markers. Results The use of in silico analysis increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development by more than 3-fold. In total, 926 (34.2%) of 2,702 markers showed polymorphisms between parental lines of the mapping population. Linkage analysis of the 926 markers along with 253 polymorphic markers selected from 4,449 published markers generated 21 linkage groups covering 2,166.4 cM with 1,114 loci. Based on the map thus produced, 23 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for 15 agronomical traits were detected. Another linkage map with 326 loci was also constructed and revealed a relationship between the genotypes of the FAD2 genes and the ratio of oleic/linoleic acid in peanut seed. Conclusions In silico analysis of polymorphisms increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development, and contributed to the construction of high-density linkage maps in cultivated peanut. The resultant maps were applicable to QTL analysis. Marker subsets and linkage maps developed in this study should be useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding in Arachis. The data are available at the Kazusa DNA Marker Database (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). PMID:22672714

  14. MTHFR-Ala222Val and male infertility: a study in Iranian men, an updated meta-analysis and an in silico-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Hossein; Karimian, Mohammad; Sareban, Kobra; Khoshsokhan, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt

    2015-11-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) functions as a main regulatory enzyme in folate metabolism. The association of MTHFR gene Ala222Val polymorphism with male infertility in an Iranian population was investigated by undertaking a meta-analysis and in-silico approach. A genetic association study included 497 men; 242 had unexplained infertility and 255 were healthy controls. Polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism was used for genotyping MTHFR-Ala222Val. OpenMeta[Analyst] software was used to conduct the analysis; 22 studies were identified by searching PubMed and the currently reported genetic association study. A novel in-silico approach was used to analyse the effects of Ala222Val substitution on the structure of mRNA and protein. Genetic association study revealed a significant association of MTHFR-222Val/Val genotype with oligozoospermia (OR 2.32; 95% CI, 1.12 to 4.78; P = 0.0451) and azoospermia (OR 2.59; 95% CI 1.09 to 6.17; P = 0.0314). Meta-analysis for allelic, dominant and codominant models showed a significant association between Ala222Val polymorphism and the risk of male infertility (P < 0.001). In silico-analysis showed MTHFR-Ala222Val affects enzyme structure and could also change the mRNA properties (P = 0.1641; P < 0.2 is significant). The meta-analysis suggested significant association of MTHFR-Ala222Val with risk of male infertility, especially in Asian populations.

  15. Hough transform from the radon transform.

    PubMed

    Deans, S R

    1981-02-01

    An appropriate special case of a transform developed by J. Radon in 1917 is shown to have the major properties of the Hough transform which is useful for finding line segments in digital pictures. Such an observation may be useful in further efforts to generalize the Hough transform. Techniques for applying the Radon transform to lines and pixels are developed through examples, and the appropriate generalization to arbitrary curves is discussed.

  16. VIRTUAL LIVER: AN IN SILICO FRAMEWORK FOR ANALYZING CHEMICAL-INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA Virtual Liver (v-LiverTM) is an in silico framework for the dose-dependent perturbation of normal hepatic functions by chemicals using in vitro data. The framework consists of a computable knowledge-base (KB) to infer putative pathways in hepatotoxicity and a cellular...

  17. Towards a Run-to-Run Adaptive Artificial Pancreas: In Silico Results.

    PubMed

    Toffanin, Chiara; Visentin, Roberto; Messori, Mirko; Di Palma, Federico; Magni, Lalo; Cobelli, Claudio

    2017-01-11

    Contemporary and future outpatient long-term artificial pancreas (AP) studies need to cope with the well-known large intra- and inter-day glucose variability occurring in type 1 diabetic (T1D) subjects. Here we propose an adaptive Model Predictive Control (MPC) strategy to account for it and test it in silico.

  18. In silico risk assessment for skin sensitization using artificial neural network analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsujita-Inoue, Kyoko; Atobe, Tomomi; Hirota, Morihiko; Ashikaga, Takao; Kouzuki, Hirokazu

    2015-04-01

    The sensitizing potential of chemicals is usually identified and characterized using in vivo methods such as the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). Due to regulatory constraints and ethical concerns, alternatives to animal testing are needed to predict the skin sensitization potential of chemicals. For this purpose, an integrated evaluation system employing multiple in vitro and in silico parameters that reflect different aspects of the sensitization process seems promising. We previously reported that LLNA thresholds could be well predicted by using an artificial neural network (ANN) model, designated iSENS ver. 2 (integrating in vitro sensitization tests version 2), to analyze data obtained from in vitro tests focused on different aspects of skin sensitization. Here, we examined whether LLNA thresholds could be predicted by ANN using in silico-calculated descriptors of the three-dimensional structures of chemicals. We obtained a good correlation between predicted LLNA thresholds and reported values. Furthermore, combining the results of the in vitro (iSENS ver. 2) and in silico models reduced the number of chemicals for which the potency category was under-estimated. In conclusion, the ANN model using in silico parameters was shown to be have useful predictive performance. Further, our results indicate that the combination of this model with a predictive model using in vitro data represents a promising approach for integrated risk assessment of skin sensitization potential of chemicals.

  19. In silico toxicology: computational methods for the prediction of chemical toxicity.

    PubMed

    Raies, Arwa B; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2016-03-01

    Determining the toxicity of chemicals is necessary to identify their harmful effects on humans, animals, plants, or the environment. It is also one of the main steps in drug design. Animal models have been used for a long time for toxicity testing. However, in vivo animal tests are constrained by time, ethical considerations, and financial burden. Therefore, computational methods for estimating the toxicity of chemicals are considered useful. In silico toxicology is one type of toxicity assessment that uses computational methods to analyze, simulate, visualize, or predict the toxicity of chemicals. In silico toxicology aims to complement existing toxicity tests to predict toxicity, prioritize chemicals, guide toxicity tests, and minimize late-stage failures in drugs design. There are various methods for generating models to predict toxicity endpoints. We provide a comprehensive overview, explain, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of the existing modeling methods and algorithms for toxicity prediction with a particular (but not exclusive) emphasis on computational tools that can implement these methods and refer to expert systems that deploy the prediction models. Finally, we briefly review a number of new research directions in in silico toxicology and provide recommendations for designing in silico models. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2016, 6:147-172. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1240 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  20. In silico ADMET prediction: recent advances, current challenges and future trends.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Tang, Yun

    2013-01-01

    There are numerous small molecular compounds around us to affect our health, such as drugs, pesticides, food additives, industrial chemicals, and environmental pollutants. Over decades, properties related to absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) have become one of the most important issues to assess the effects or risks of these compounds on human body. Recent high-rate drug withdrawals increase the pressure on regulators and pharmaceutical industry to improve preclinical safety testing. Since in vivo and in vitro evaluations are costly and laborious, in silico techniques have been widely used to estimate these properties. In this review, we would briefly describe the recent advances of in silico ADMET prediction, with emphasis on substructure pattern recognition method that we developed recently. Challenges and limitations in the area of in silico ADMET prediction were further discussed, such as application domain of models, models validation techniques, and global versus local models. At last, several new promising research directions were provided, such as computational systems toxicology (toxicogenomics), data-integration and meta-decision making systems, which could be used for systemic in silico ADMET prediction in drug discovery and hazard risk assessment.

  1. VIRTUAL LIVER: AN IN SILICO FRAMEWORK FOR ANALYZING CHEMICAL-INDUCED HEPATOTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA Virtual Liver (v-LiverTM) is an in silico framework for the dose-dependent perturbation of normal hepatic functions by chemicals using in vitro data. The framework consists of a computable knowledge-base (KB) to infer putative pathways in hepatotoxicity and a cellular...

  2. The Escherichia coli MG1655 in silico metabolic genotype: Its definition, characteristics, and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, J. S.; Palsson, B. O.

    2000-05-01

    The Escherichia coli MG1655 genome has been completely sequenced. The annotated sequence, biochemical information, and other information were used to reconstruct the E. coli metabolic map. The stoichiometric coefficients for each metabolic enzyme in the E. coli metabolic map were assembled to construct a genome-specific stoichiometric matrix. The E. coli stoichiometric matrix was used to define the system's characteristics and the capabilities of E. coli metabolism. The effects of gene deletions in the central metabolic pathways on the ability of the in silico metabolic network to support growth were assessed, and the in silico predictions were compared with experimental observations. It was shown that based on stoichiometric and capacity constraints the in silico analysis was able to qualitatively predict the growth potential of mutant strains in 86% of the cases examined. Herein, it is demonstrated that the synthesis of in silico metabolic genotypes based on genomic, biochemical, and strain-specific information is possible, and that systems analysis methods are available to analyze and interpret the metabolic phenotype.

  3. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PHARMACEUTICALS USING AN IN SILICO DOSIMETRY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present an in silico dosimetry model which can be used for inhalation toxicology (risk assessment of inhaled air pollutants) and aerosol therapy ( targeted delivery of inhaled drugs). This work presents scientific and clinical advances beyond the development of the original in...

  4. In silico analysis of 454 data yields the complete American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) plastid genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The complete plastid genome sequence of the cranberry cultivar “HyRed” was reconstructed using next generation sequencing (NGS) data by in silico procedures. We used previously generated “HyRed” 454 shotgun sequence data to isolate plastid data via homology comparisons with complete sequences from s...

  5. Applicability of in silico genotoxicity models on food and feed ingredients.

    PubMed

    Vuorinen, Anna; Bellion, Phillip; Beilstein, Paul

    2017-09-28

    Evaluation of the genotoxic potential of food and feed ingredients is required in the development of new substances and for their registration. In addition to in vitro and in vivo assays, in silico tools such as expert alert-based and statistical models can be used for data generation. These in silico models are commonly used among the pharmaceutical industry, whereas the food industry has not widely adopted them. In this study, the applicability of in silico tools for predicting genotoxicity was evaluated, with a focus on bacterial mutagenicity, in vitro and in vivo chromosome damage assays. For this purpose, a test set of 27 food and feed ingredients including vitamins, carotenoids, and nutraceuticals with experimental genotoxicity data was constructed from proprietary data. This dataset was run through multiple models and the model applicability was analyzed. The compounds were generally within the applicability domain of the models and the models predicted the compounds correctly in most of the cases. Although the regulatory acceptance of in silico tools as single data source is still limited, the models are applicable and can be used in the safety evaluation of food and feed ingredients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. AN IN SILICO INVESTIGATION OF THE ENANTIOSELECTIVE METABOLISM RATES OF TRIAZOLE FUGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work is to use in silico methods such as ab initio quantum and classical force-field methods to explore and develop an understanding for the enantioselective metabolism rates experimentally observed in the triazole fungicide bromuconazole. This directed stud...

  7. IN SILICO METHODOLOGIES FOR PREDICTIVE EVALUATION OF TOXICITY BASED ON INTEGRATION OF DATABASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In silico methodologies for predictive evaluation of toxicity based on integration of databases

    Chihae Yang1 and Ann M. Richard2, 1LeadScope, Inc. 1245 Kinnear Rd. Columbus, OH. 43212 2National Health & Environmental Effects Research Lab, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, ...

  8. In-silico Screening using Flexible Ligand Binding Pockets: A Molecular Dynamics-based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanesan, Dakshanamurthy; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V.; Doherty, Jason; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan

    2005-04-01

    In-silico screening of flexible ligands against flexible ligand binding pockets (LBP) is an emerging approach in structure-based drug discovery. Here, we describe a molecular dynamics (MD) based docking approach to investigate the influence on the high-throughput in-silico screening of small molecules against flexible ligand binding pockets. In our approach, an ensemble of 51 energetically favorable structures of the LBP of human estrogen receptor α (hERα) were collected from 3 ns MD simulations. In-silico screening of 3500 endocrine disrupting compounds against these flexible ligand binding pockets resulted in thousands of ER-ligand complexes of which 582 compounds were unique. Detailed analysis of MD generated structures showed that only 17 of the LBP residues significantly contribute to the overall binding pocket flexibility. Using the flexible LBP conformations generated, we have identified 32 compounds that bind better to the flexible ligand-binding pockets compared to the crystal structure. These compounds, though chemically divergent, are structurally similar to the natural hormone. Our MD-based approach in conjunction with grid-based distributed computing could be applied routinely for in-silico screening of large databases against any given target.

  9. Large Dataset of Acute Oral Toxicity Data Created for Testing in Silico Models (ASCCT meeting)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute toxicity data is a common requirement for substance registration in the US. Currently only data derived from animal tests are accepted by regulatory agencies, and the standard in vivo tests use lethality as the endpoint. Non-animal alternatives such as in silico models are ...

  10. AN IN SILICO INVESTIGATION OF THE ENANTIOSELECTIVE METABOLISM RATES OF TRIAZOLE FUGICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work is to use in silico methods such as ab initio quantum and classical force-field methods to explore and develop an understanding for the enantioselective metabolism rates experimentally observed in the triazole fungicide bromuconazole. This directed stud...

  11. IN SILICO METHODOLOGIES FOR PREDICTIVE EVALUATION OF TOXICITY BASED ON INTEGRATION OF DATABASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In silico methodologies for predictive evaluation of toxicity based on integration of databases

    Chihae Yang1 and Ann M. Richard2, 1LeadScope, Inc. 1245 Kinnear Rd. Columbus, OH. 43212 2National Health & Environmental Effects Research Lab, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, ...

  12. "How much realism is needed?" - the wrong question in silico imagers have been asking.

    PubMed

    Badano, Aldo

    2017-05-01

    To discuss the use of realism as a first approximation for assessing computational imaging methods. Although in silico methods are increasingly becoming promising surrogates to physical experimentation for various stages of device development, their acceptance remains challenging. Realism is often considered as a first approximation for assessing computational imaging methods. However, realism is subjective and does not always ensure that key features of the methodologies reflect relevant aspects of devices of interest to imaging scientists, regulators, and medical practitioners. Moreover, in some cases (e.g., in computerized image analysis applications where human interpretation is not needed) how realistic in silico images are is irrelevant and perhaps misleading. I emphasize a divergence from this methodology by providing a rationale for evaluating in silico imaging methods and tools in an objective and measurable manner. Improved approaches for in silico imaging will lead to the rapid advancement and acceptance of computational techniques in medical imaging primarily but not limited to the regulatory evaluation of new imaging products. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. The Escherichia coli MG1655 in silico metabolic genotype: Its definition, characteristics, and capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. S.; Palsson, B. O.

    2000-01-01

    The Escherichia coli MG1655 genome has been completely sequenced. The annotated sequence, biochemical information, and other information were used to reconstruct the E. coli metabolic map. The stoichiometric coefficients for each metabolic enzyme in the E. coli metabolic map were assembled to construct a genome-specific stoichiometric matrix. The E. coli stoichiometric matrix was used to define the system's characteristics and the capabilities of E. coli metabolism. The effects of gene deletions in the central metabolic pathways on the ability of the in silico metabolic network to support growth were assessed, and the in silico predictions were compared with experimental observations. It was shown that based on stoichiometric and capacity constraints the in silico analysis was able to qualitatively predict the growth potential of mutant strains in 86% of the cases examined. Herein, it is demonstrated that the synthesis of in silico metabolic genotypes based on genomic, biochemical, and strain-specific information is possible, and that systems analysis methods are available to analyze and interpret the metabolic phenotype. PMID:10805808

  14. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PHARMACEUTICALS USING AN IN SILICO DOSIMETRY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present an in silico dosimetry model which can be used for inhalation toxicology (risk assessment of inhaled air pollutants) and aerosol therapy ( targeted delivery of inhaled drugs). This work presents scientific and clinical advances beyond the development of the original in...

  15. IN SILICO APPROACHES TO MECHANISTIC AND PREDICTIVE TOXICOLOGY: AN INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS FOR TOXICOLOGISTS. (R827402)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Bioinformatics, or in silico biology, is a rapidly growing field that encompasses the theory and application of computational approaches to model, predict, and explain biological function at the molecular level. This information rich field requires new ...

  16. IN SILICO APPROACHES TO MECHANISTIC AND PREDICTIVE TOXICOLOGY: AN INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS FOR TOXICOLOGISTS. (R827402)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Bioinformatics, or in silico biology, is a rapidly growing field that encompasses the theory and application of computational approaches to model, predict, and explain biological function at the molecular level. This information rich field requires new ...

  17. Revealing Rembrandt

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our results emphasized the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt's portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings. PMID:24795552

  18. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A by acetoxylated analogues of resveratrol in in vitro and in silico models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basheer, Loai; Schultz, Keren; Kerem, Zohar

    2016-08-01

    Many dietary compounds, including resveratrol, are potent inhibitors of CYP3A4. Here we examined the potential to predict inhibition capacity of dietary polyphenolics using an in silico and in vitro approaches and synthetic model compounds. Mono, di, and tri-acetoxy resveratrol were synthesized, a cell line of human intestine origin and microsomes from rat liver served to determine their in vitro inhibition of CYP3A4, and compared to that of resveratrol. Docking simulation served to predict the affinity of the synthetic model compounds to the enzyme. Modelling of the enzyme’s binding site revealed three types of interaction: hydrophobic, electrostatic and H-bonding. The simulation revealed that each of the examined acetylations of resveratrol led to the loss of important interactions of all types. Tri-acetoxy resveratrol was the weakest inhibitor in vitro despite being the more lipophilic and having the highest affinity for the binding site. The simulation demonstrated exclusion of all interactions between tri-acetoxy resveratrol and the heme due to distal binding, highlighting the complexity of the CYP3A4 binding site, which may allow simultaneous accommodation of two molecules. Finally, the use of computational modelling may serve as a quick predictive tool to identify potential harmful interactions between dietary compounds and prescribed drugs.

  19. Identification of Lead Molecules in Garcinia mangostana L. Against Pancreatic Cholesterol Esterase Activity: An In Silico Approach.

    PubMed

    Varghese, George Kadakasseril; Abraham, Rini; Chandran, Nisha N; Habtemariam, Solomon

    2017-07-24

    Hypercholesterolemia is one of the major risk factors for the development and progression of atherosclerosis. Hence, inhibitors of cholesterol absorption have been investigated for decades as a strategy to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases associated with hypercholesterolemia. Cholesterol esterase (CEase) in pancreatic juice plays a vital role in the hydrolysis of dietary cholesterol esters to cholesterol and fatty acids. Since inhibition of CEase might lead to a reduction of cholesterol absorption, an attempt is made in this study to identify lead molecules of Garcinia mangostana by the in silico approach. The study employed software applications viz., AutoDock 4.2 and GOLD Suite of Programs 5.2. The study revealed the efficacy of three compounds viz., epicatechin, euxanthone, and 1,3,5,6-tetrahydroxy-xanthone, which exhibited least binding energy in AutoDock and moderate scoring in GOLD. The molecular properties as well as biological activity of these three compounds were predicted by molinspiration prediction tool. The results show the crucial role of polyphenolic compounds to limit the activity of CEase. The drug-likeness prediction revealed the prospects of the identified lead molecules as potential drug candidates.

  20. Inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A by acetoxylated analogues of resveratrol in in vitro and in silico models

    PubMed Central

    Basheer, Loai; Schultz, Keren; Kerem, Zohar

    2016-01-01

    Many dietary compounds, including resveratrol, are potent inhibitors of CYP3A4. Here we examined the potential to predict inhibition capacity of dietary polyphenolics using an in silico and in vitro approaches and synthetic model compounds. Mono, di, and tri-acetoxy resveratrol were synthesized, a cell line of human intestine origin and microsomes from rat liver served to determine their in vitro inhibition of CYP3A4, and compared to that of resveratrol. Docking simulation served to predict the affinity of the synthetic model compounds to the enzyme. Modelling of the enzyme’s binding site revealed three types of interaction: hydrophobic, electrostatic and H-bonding. The simulation revealed that each of the examined acetylations of resveratrol led to the loss of important interactions of all types. Tri-acetoxy resveratrol was the weakest inhibitor in vitro despite being the more lipophilic and having the highest affinity for the binding site. The simulation demonstrated exclusion of all interactions between tri-acetoxy resveratrol and the heme due to distal binding, highlighting the complexity of the CYP3A4 binding site, which may allow simultaneous accommodation of two molecules. Finally, the use of computational modelling may serve as a quick predictive tool to identify potential harmful interactions between dietary compounds and prescribed drugs. PMID:27530542

  1. In silico characterization of 1,2-diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase and lysophospha-tidylcholine acyltransferase genes in Glycine max L. Merrill.

    PubMed

    Sousa, C S; Barros, B A; Barh, D; Ghosh, P; Azevedo, V; Barros, E G; Moreira, M A

    2016-08-26

    The enzymes 1,2-diacylglycerol cholinephosphotrans-ferase (CPT) and lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT) are important in lipid metabolism in soybean seeds. Thus, understand-ing the genes that encode these enzymes may enable their modification and aid the improvement of soybean oil quality. In soybean, the genes encoding these enzymes have not been completely described; there-fore, this study aimed to identify, characterize, and analyze the in silico expression of these genes in soybean. We identified two gene models encoding CPT and two gene models encoding LPCAT, one of which presented an alternative transcript. The sequences were positioned on the physical map of soybean and the promoter regions were analyzed. Cis-elements responsible for seed-specific expression and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses were identified. Virtual expression analysis of the gene models for CPT and LPCAT indicated that these genes are expressed under different stress conditions, in somatic embryos during differentiation, in immature seeds, root tissues, and calli. Putative ami-no acid sequences revealed the presence of transmembrane domains, and analysis of the cellular localization of these enzymes revealed they are located in the endoplasmic reticulum.

  2. Transforming an Institutional Culture: An Appreciative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemann, R.

    2010-01-01

    In 2008 the Ministerial Committee under the leadership of Crain Soudien in 2008 had, amongst other tasks, to investigate the promotion of social cohesion at higher education institutions. Numerous studies revealed that the institutional culture of a university or faculty plays a major role in transformation. In transforming the prevailing culture,…

  3. Global Characteristics of School Transformation in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Jessica; Zhao, Yong; Caldwell, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    In many ways, China's education system is quite different from systems of education in the West. Rich descriptions of school transformation, however, have revealed that the factors that fuelled transformation in schools in China are also evident in schools in Australia, England, Finland, Wales and the United States. This paper draws on an…

  4. The Bargmann transform and canonical transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Blas, Carlos

    2002-05-01

    This paper concerns a relationship between the kernel of the Bargmann transform and the corresponding canonical transformation. We study this fact for a Bargmann transform introduced by Thomas and Wassell [J. Math. Phys. 36, 5480-5505 (1995)]—when the configuration space is the two-sphere S2 and for a Bargmann transform that we introduce for the three-sphere S3. It is shown that the kernel of the Bargmann transform is a power series in a function which is a generating function of the corresponding canonical transformation (a classical analog of the Bargmann transform). We show in each case that our canonical transformation is a composition of two other canonical transformations involving the complex null quadric in C3 or C4. We also describe quantizations of those two other canonical transformations by dealing with spaces of holomorphic functions on the aforementioned null quadrics. Some of these quantizations have been studied by Bargmann and Todorov [J. Math. Phys. 18, 1141-1148 (1977)] and the other quantizations are related to the work of Guillemin [Integ. Eq. Operator Theory 7, 145-205 (1984)]. Since suitable infinite linear combinations of powers of the generating functions are coherent states for L2(S2) or L2(S3), we show finally that the studied Bargmann transforms are actually coherent states transforms.

  5. An eigenvalue transformation technique for predicting drug-target interaction.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Qifan; Xu, Xin; Li, Rong; Dong, Yongcheng; Li, Yan; Huang, Ziyan; Li, Yizhou; Li, Menglong

    2015-09-09

    The prediction of drug-target interactions is a key step in the drug discovery process, which serves to identify new drugs or novel targets for existing drugs. However, experimental methods for predicting drug-target interactions are expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, the in silico prediction of drug-target interactions has recently attracted increasing attention. In this study, we propose an eigenvalue transformation technique and apply this technique to two representative algorithms, the Regularized Least Squares classifier (RLS) and the semi-supervised link prediction classifier (SLP), that have been used to predict drug-target interaction. The results of computational experiments with these techniques show that algorithms including eigenvalue transformation achieved better performance on drug-target interaction prediction than did the original algorithms. These findings show that eigenvalue transformation is an efficient technique for improving the performance of methods for predicting drug-target interactions. We further show that, in theory, eigenvalue transformation can be viewed as a feature transformation on the kernel matrix. Accordingly, although we only apply this technique to two algorithms in the current study, eigenvalue transformation also has the potential to be applied to other algorithms based on kernels.

  6. Analysis of the enhanced oral bioavailability of fenofibrate lipid formulations in fasted humans using an in vitro-in silico-in vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yang; Kostewicz, Edmund S; Sheu, Ming-Thau; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2013-11-01

    Lipid-based formulations have established a significant role in the formulation of poorly soluble drugs for oral administration. In order to better understand their potential advantages over solid oral dosage forms, we studied the solubility and dissolution/precipitation characteristics of three self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) formulations and one suspension of micronized fenofibrate in lipid excipients, for which pharmacokinetic studies had already been reported in the open literature. The in vitro dispersion/dissolution studies were carried out in biorelevant media using USP II apparatus. These were followed up by in silico simulations using STELLA® software, in which not only dispersion/dissolution, but also the precipitation and re-dissolution of fenofibrate was taken into account. While unformulated drug exhibited poor solubility (0.22 μg/mL in FaSSGF and 4.31 μg/mL in FaSSIF-V2(PO4)) and dissolved less than 2% in dissolution tests, the solubility of fenofibrate in the presence of the lipid excipients increased dramatically (e.g., to 65.44 μg/mL in the presence of the Myritol 318/TPGS/Tween 80 SMEDDS) and there was an attendant increase in the dissolution (over 80% from capsules containing the Myritol 318/TPGS/Tween 80 SMEDDS and about 20% from the dispersion of fenofibrate in lipid excipients). For the four lipid-based fenofibrate formulations studied, combining in vitro data in biorelevant media with in silico simulation resulted in accurate prediction of the in vivo human plasma profiles. The point estimates of C(max) and AUC ratio calculated from the in silico and in vivo plasma profiles fell within the 0.8-1.25 range for the SMEDDS solution and capsule formulations, suggesting an accurate simulation of the in vivo profiles. This similarity was confirmed by calculation of the respective f2 factors. Sensitivity analysis of the simulation profiles revealed that the SMEDDS formulations had virtually removed any dependency of absorption

  7. Alzheimer's disease biomarker discovery using in silico literature mining and clinical validation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is the most widespread form of dementia in the elderly but despite progress made in recent years towards a mechanistic understanding, there is still an urgent need for disease modification therapy and for early diagnostic tests. Substantial international efforts are being made to discover and validate biomarkers for AD using candidate analytes and various data-driven 'omics' approaches. Cerebrospinal fluid is in many ways the tissue of choice for biomarkers of brain disease but is limited by patient and clinician acceptability, and increasing attention is being paid to the search for blood-based biomarkers. The aim of this study was to use a novel in silico approach to discover a set of candidate biomarkers for AD. Methods We used an in silico literature mining approach to identify potential biomarkers by creating a summarized set of assertional metadata derived from relevant legacy information. We then assessed the validity of this approach using direct assays of the identified biomarkers in plasma by immunodetection methods. Results Using this in silico approach, we identified 25 biomarker candidates, at least three of which have subsequently been reported to be altered in blood or CSF from AD patients. Two further candidate biomarkers, indicated from the in silico approach, were choline acetyltransferase and urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor. Using immunodetection, we showed that, in a large sample set, these markers are either altered in disease or correlate with MRI markers of atrophy. Conclusions These data support as a proof of concept the use of data mining and in silico analyses to derive valid biomarker candidates for AD and, by extension, for other disorders. PMID:23113945

  8. In Silico PCR Tools for a Fast Primer, Probe, and Advanced Searching.

    PubMed

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Muterko, Alexandr; Shamekova, Malika; Zhambakin, Kabyl

    2017-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is fundamental to molecular biology and is the most important practical molecular technique for the research laboratory. The principle of this technique has been further used and applied in plenty of other simple or complex nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAAT). In parallel to laboratory "wet bench" experiments for nucleic acid amplification technologies, in silico or virtual (bioinformatics) approaches have been developed, among which in silico PCR analysis. In silico NAAT analysis is a useful and efficient complementary method to ensure the specificity of primers or probes for an extensive range of PCR applications from homology gene discovery, molecular diagnosis, DNA fingerprinting, and repeat searching. Predicting sensitivity and specificity of primers and probes requires a search to determine whether they match a database with an optimal number of mismatches, similarity, and stability. In the development of in silico bioinformatics tools for nucleic acid amplification technologies, the prospects for the development of new NAAT or similar approaches should be taken into account, including forward-looking and comprehensive analysis that is not limited to only one PCR technique variant. The software FastPCR and the online Java web tool are integrated tools for in silico PCR of linear and circular DNA, multiple primer or probe searches in large or small databases and for advanced search. These tools are suitable for processing of batch files that are essential for automation when working with large amounts of data. The FastPCR software is available for download at http://primerdigital.com/fastpcr.html and the online Java version at http://primerdigital.com/tools/pcr.html .

  9. FASTQSim: platform-independent data characterization and in silico read generation for NGS datasets.

    PubMed

    Shcherbina, Anna

    2014-08-15

    High-throughput next generation sequencing technologies have enabled rapid characterization of clinical and environmental samples. Consequently, the largest bottleneck to actionable data has become sample processing and bioinformatics analysis, creating a need for accurate and rapid algorithms to process genetic data. Perfectly characterized in silico datasets are a useful tool for evaluating the performance of such algorithms. Background contaminating organisms are observed in sequenced mixtures of organisms. In silico samples provide exact truth. To create the best value for evaluating algorithms, in silico data should mimic actual sequencer data as closely as possible. FASTQSim is a tool that provides the dual functionality of NGS dataset characterization and metagenomic data generation. FASTQSim is sequencing platform-independent, and computes distributions of read length, quality scores, indel rates, single point mutation rates, indel size, and similar statistics for any sequencing platform. To create training or testing datasets, FASTQSim has the ability to convert target sequences into in silico reads with specific error profiles obtained in the characterization step. FASTQSim enables users to assess the quality of NGS datasets. The tool provides information about read length, read quality, repetitive and non-repetitive indel profiles, and single base pair substitutions. FASTQSim allows the user to simulate individual read datasets that can be used as standardized test scenarios for planning sequencing projects or for benchmarking metagenomic software. In this regard, in silico datasets generated with the FASTQsim tool hold several advantages over natural datasets: they are sequencing platform independent, extremely well characterized, and less expensive to generate. Such datasets are valuable in a number of applications, including the training of assemblers for multiple platforms, benchmarking bioinformatics algorithm performance, and creating challenge

  10. The challenges involved in modeling toxicity data in silico: a review.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, M Paul; Modi, Sandeep; Bender, Andreas; Robinson, Richard L Marchese; Kirchmair, Johannes; Promkatkaew, Malinee; Hannongbua, Supa; Glen, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    The percentage of failures in late pharmaceutical development due to toxicity has increased dramatically over the last decade or so, resulting in increased demand for new methods to rapidly and reliably predict the toxicity of compounds. In this review we discuss the challenges involved in both the building of in silico models on toxicology endpoints and their practical use in decision making. In particular, we will reflect upon the predictive strength of a number of different in silico models for a range of different endpoints, different approaches used to generate the models or rules, and limitations of the methods and the data used in model generation. Given that there exists no unique definition of a 'good' model, we will furthermore highlight the need to balance model complexity/interpretability with predictability, particularly in light of OECD/REACH guidelines. Special emphasis is put on the data and methods used to generate the in silico toxicology models, and their strengths and weaknesses are discussed. Switching to the applied side, we next review a number of toxicity endpoints, discussing the methods available to predict them and their general level of predictability (which very much depends on the endpoint considered). We conclude that, while in silico toxicology is a valuable tool to drug discovery scientists, much still needs to be done to, firstly, understand more completely the biological mechanisms for toxicity and, secondly, to generate more rapid in vitro models to screen compounds. With this biological understanding, and additional data available, our ability to generate more predictive in silico models should significantly improve in the future.

  11. In-silico analysis and expression profiling implicate diverse role of EPSPS family genes in regulating developmental and metabolic processes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The EPSPS, EC 2.5.1.19 (5-enolpyruvylshikimate −3-phosphate synthase) is considered as one of the crucial enzyme in the shikimate pathway for the biosynthesis of essential aromatic amino acids and secondary metabolites in plants, fungi along with microorganisms. It is also proved as a specific target of broad spectrum herbicide glyphosate. Results On the basis of structure analysis, this EPSPS gene family comprises the presence of EPSPS I domain, which is highly conserved among different plant species. Here, we followed an in-silico approach to identify and characterize the EPSPS genes from different plant species. On the basis of their phylogeny and sequence conservation, we divided them in to two groups. Moreover, the interacting partners and co-expression data of the gene revealed the importance of this gene family in maintaining cellular and metabolic functions in the cell. The present study also highlighted the highest accumulation of EPSPS transcript in mature leaves followed by young leaves, shoot and roots of tobacco. In order to gain the more knowledge about gene family, we searched for the previously reported motifs and studied its structural importance on the basis of homology modelling. Conclusions The results presented here is a first detailed in-silico study to explore the role of EPSPS gene in forefront of different plant species. The results revealed a great deal for the diversification and conservation of EPSPS gene family across different plant species. Moreover, some of the EPSPS from different plant species may have a common evolutionary origin and may contain same conserved motifs with related and important molecular function. Most importantly, overall analysis of EPSPS gene elucidated its pivotal role in immense function within the plant, both in regulating plant growth as well its development throughout the life cycle of plant. Since EPSPS is a direct target of herbicide glyphosate, understanding its mechanism for regulating

  12. Identification of hepta-histidine as a candidate drug for Huntington’s disease by in silico-in vitro- in vivo-integrated screens of chemical libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imamura, Tomomi; Fujita, Kyota; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Ikura, Teikichi; Chen, Xigui; Homma, Hidenori; Tamura, Takuya; Mao, Ying; Taniguchi, Juliana Bosso; Motoki, Kazumi; Nakabayashi, Makoto; Ito, Nobutoshi; Yamada, Kazunori; Tomii, Kentaro; Okano, Hideyuki; Kaye, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steven; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2016-09-01

    We identified drug seeds for treating Huntington’s disease (HD) by combining in vitro single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, in silico molecular docking simulations, and in vivo fly and mouse HD models to screen for inhibitors of abnormal interactions between mutant Htt and physiological Ku70, an essential DNA damage repair protein in neurons whose function is known to be impaired by mutant Htt. From 19,468 and 3,010,321 chemicals in actual and virtual libraries, fifty-six chemicals were selected from combined in vitro-in silico screens; six of these were further confirmed to have an in vivo effect on lifespan in a fly HD model, and two chemicals exerted an in vivo effect on the lifespan, body weight and motor function in a mouse HD model. Two oligopeptides, hepta-histidine (7H) and Angiotensin III, rescued the morphological abnormalities of primary neurons differentiated from iPS cells of human HD patients. For these selected drug seeds, we proposed a possible common structure. Unexpectedly, the selected chemicals enhanced rather than inhibited Htt aggregation, as indicated by dynamic light scattering analysis. Taken together, these integrated screens revealed a new pathway for the molecular targeted therapy of HD.

  13. Identification of hepta-histidine as a candidate drug for Huntington’s disease by in silico-in vitro- in vivo-integrated screens of chemical libraries

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Tomomi; Fujita, Kyota; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Ikura, Teikichi; Chen, Xigui; Homma, Hidenori; Tamura, Takuya; Mao, Ying; Taniguchi, Juliana Bosso; Motoki, Kazumi; Nakabayashi, Makoto; Ito, Nobutoshi; Yamada, Kazunori; Tomii, Kentaro; Okano, Hideyuki; Kaye, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steven; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We identified drug seeds for treating Huntington’s disease (HD) by combining in vitro single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, in silico molecular docking simulations, and in vivo fly and mouse HD models to screen for inhibitors of abnormal interactions between mutant Htt and physiological Ku70, an essential DNA damage repair protein in neurons whose function is known to be impaired by mutant Htt. From 19,468 and 3,010,321 chemicals in actual and virtual libraries, fifty-six chemicals were selected from combined in vitro-in silico screens; six of these were further confirmed to have an in vivo effect on lifespan in a fly HD model, and two chemicals exerted an in vivo effect on the lifespan, body weight and motor function in a mouse HD model. Two oligopeptides, hepta-histidine (7H) and Angiotensin III, rescued the morphological abnormalities of primary neurons differentiated from iPS cells of human HD patients. For these selected drug seeds, we proposed a possible common structure. Unexpectedly, the selected chemicals enhanced rather than inhibited Htt aggregation, as indicated by dynamic light scattering analysis. Taken together, these integrated screens revealed a new pathway for the molecular targeted therapy of HD. PMID:27653664

  14. Repositioning of 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid as a potential anti-inflammatory agent: in silico and pharmaceutical formulation study.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Mohammed A; Shehata, Tamer M; Mohamed, Maged E

    2014-12-18

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D) is a well-known plant auxin which is widely used in plant tissue culture experiments as well as a weed killer and a herbicide. In this study, 2,4-D was rediscovered as a new anti-inflammatory agent through an in silico molecular modeling and docking studies along with drug formulation and in vivo anti-inflammatory inspection. The molecular modeling and docking studies indicated high affinity of 2,4-D toward COX-2 enzyme in a way similar to Ibuprofen, suggesting a higher anti-inflammatory activity. Molecular docking by both MOE 2013.08 and Leadit 2.1.2 revealed excellent binding pattern compared to some of well-known non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. 2,4-D was formulated in different gel bases. In vitro drug release experiments were used to examine the best 2,4-D formula for in vivo studies. In vivo carrageenan-induced hind paw edema inflammatory model in rats was used to test the in silico finding. 2,4-D showed potential in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and significantly reduced the concentration of prostaglandin E2 in hind paw tissues in a way similar to Ibuprofen. These results may open the door to introduce a new anti-inflammatory molecule; especially that 2,4-D is a well-investigated regarding its toxicity and side effect.

  15. Detection of cis- and trans-acting Factors in DNA Structure-Induced Genetic Instability Using In silico and Cellular Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Zhao, Junhua; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    Sequences that can adopt alternative DNA structures (i.e., non-B DNA) are very abundant in mammalian genomes, and recent studies have revealed many important biological functions of non-B DNA structures in chromatin remodeling, DNA replication, transcription, and genetic instability. Here, we provide results from an in silico web-based search engine coupled with cell-based experiments to characterize the roles of non-B DNA conformations in genetic instability in eukaryotes. The purpose of this article is to illustrate strategies that can be used to identify and interrogate the biological roles of non-B DNA structures, particularly on genetic instability. We have included unpublished data using a short H-DNA-forming sequence from the human c-MYC promoter region as an example, and identified two different mechanisms of H-DNA-induced genetic instability in yeast and mammalian cells: a DNA replication-related model of mutagenesis; and a replication-independent cleavage model. Further, we identified candidate proteins involved in H-DNA-induced genetic instability by using a yeast genetic screen. A combination of in silico and cellular methods, as described here, should provide further insight into the contributions of non-B DNA structures in biological functions, genetic evolution, and disease development. PMID:27532010

  16. Angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory activity of hydrolysates from oat (Avena sativa) proteins by in silico and in vitro analyses.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Imelda W Y; Nakayama, Satoko; Hsu, Monica N K; Samaranayaka, Anusha G P; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y

    2009-10-14

    The potential for producing antihypertensive peptides from oat proteins through enzymatic hydrolysis was assessed in silico and confirmed in vitro. Thermolysin (EC 3.4.24.27) was predicted using BIOPEP database as the enzyme that would theoretically produce the most angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from oat. Experimental evidence confirmed that strong ACE-inhibitory activity was produced under various hydrolysis conditions. Hydrolysates produced under high enzyme-to-substrate ratio (3%) short time (20 min) (HEST) and low enzyme-to-substrate ratio (0.1%) long time (120 min) (LELT) conditions had IC(50) values of 30 and 50 microg/mL, respectively. After simulated gastrointestinal digestion, the IC(50) of the HEST hydrolysate was 35 microg/mL whereas the IC(50) of the LELT hydrolysate was higher at 85 microg/mL. Ultrafiltration revealed that potent ACE-inhibitory peptides had molecular weights below 3 kDa. This study demonstrates the usefulness of in silico analysis to select enzymes for hydrolysis of proteins not previously examined as sources of bioactive peptides.

  17. Transformation of tamoxifen and its major metabolites during water chlorination: Identification and in silico toxicity assessment of their disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Negreira, Noelia; Regueiro, Jorge; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià

    2015-11-15

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen is the most commonly used drug for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer. Tamoxifen is considered as a pro-drug since it is known to exert its pharmacological effect through its major active metabolites, 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen and 4-hydroxy-N-desmethyl-tamoxifen, which are mainly excreted in the urine in the days following administration. In the present work, the reactivity of tamoxifen and its major active metabolites in free chlorine-containing water was investigated for the first time. Under the studied chlorination conditions, tamoxifen was fairly stable whereas its metabolites were quickly degraded. A total of thirteen chlorinated byproducts were tentatively identified by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry. Time-course profiles of the identified byproducts were followed in real wastewater samples under conditions that simulate wastewater disinfection. A preliminary assessment of their acute aquatic toxicity at two trophic levels by means of quantitative structure-activity relationship models showed that the identified byproducts were up to 110-fold more toxic than the parent compounds.

  18. Elaborate ligand-based modeling coupled with QSAR analysis and in silico screening reveal new potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuhamdah, Sawsan; Habash, Maha; Taha, Mutasem O.

    2013-12-01

    Inhibition of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been shown to alleviate neurodegenerative diseases prompting several attempts to discover and optimize new AChE inhibitors. In this direction, we explored the pharmacophoric space of 85 AChE inhibitors to identify high quality pharmacophores. Subsequently, we implemented genetic algorithm-based quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling to select optimal combination of pharmacophoric models and 2D physicochemical descriptors capable of explaining bioactivity variation among training compounds ( {{r}}^{ 2}_{ 6 8} = 0. 9 4 , F-statistic = 125.8, {{r}}^{ 2}_{{LOO}} { = 0} . 9 2 , {{r}}^{ 2}_{{PRESS}} against 17 external test inhibitors = 0.84). Two orthogonal pharmacophores emerged in the QSAR equation suggesting the existence of at least two binding modes accessible to ligands within AChE binding pocket. The successful pharmacophores were comparable with crystallographically resolved AChE binding pocket. We employed the pharmacophoric models and associated QSAR equation to screen the national cancer institute list of compounds. Twenty-four low micromolar AChE inhibitors were identified. The most potent gave IC50 value of 1.0 μM.

  19. In Silico Analysis of a Novel Plasmid from the Coral Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus Reveals Two Potential “Ecological Islands”

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Jenny; Hill, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    As virulence often correlates with the presence of plasmid replicons in several Vibrio spp., this study investigated whether non-chromosomal DNA could be found in the coral pathogen, Vibrio coralliilyticus BAA-450. A circular plasmid, 26,631 bp in size, was identified. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the plasmid contained 30 open reading frames, six tRNA genes, 12 inverted repeats, three direct repeats and presented no continuous sequence identity to other replicons within the database. Consequently, these findings indicate that this is a novel, previously unidentified, plasmid. Two putative “ecological islands” were also identified and are predicted to encode for various factors that would facilitate growth and survival under different ecological conditions. In addition, two open reading frames may encode proteins that contribute to the pathogenicity of the organism. Functional cooperativity is also indicated between several plasmid- and chromosomally-encoded proteins, which, in a single instance, would allow a fully functioning nutrient uptake system to be established. PMID:27681896

  20. In silico molecular docking analysis of the human Argonaute 2 PAZ domain reveals insights into RNA interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Kitade, Yukio

    2013-07-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a critical cellular pathway activated by double stranded RNA and regulates the gene expression of target mRNA. During RNAi, the 3' end of siRNA binds with the PAZ domain, followed by release and rebinding in a cyclic manner, which deemed essential for proper gene silencing. Recently, we provided the forces underlying the recognition of small interfering RNA by PAZ in a computational study based on the structure of Drosophila Argonaute 2 (Ago2) PAZ domain. We have now reanalyzed these data within the view of the new available structures from human Argonauts. While the parameters of weak binding are correlated with higher (RNAi) in the Drosophila model, a different profile is predicted with the human Ago2 PAZ domain. On the basis of the human Ago2 PAZ models, the indicators of stronger binding as the total binding energy and the free energy were associated with better RNAi efficacy. This discrepancy might be attributable to differences in the binding site topology and the difference in the conformation of the bound nucleotides.

  1. In silico molecular docking analysis of the human Argonaute 2 PAZ domain reveals insights into RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Kitade, Yukio

    2013-07-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a critical cellular pathway activated by double stranded RNA and regulates the gene expression of target mRNA. During RNAi, the 3' end of siRNA binds with the PAZ domain, followed by release and rebinding in a cyclic manner, which deemed essential for proper gene silencing. Recently, we provided the forces underlying the recognition of small interfering RNA by PAZ in a computational study based on the structure of Drosophila Argonaute 2 (Ago2) PAZ domain. We have now reanalyzed these data within the view of the new available structures from human Argonauts. While the parameters of weak binding are correlated with higher (RNAi) in the Drosophila model, a different profile is predicted with the human Ago2 PAZ domain. On the basis of the human Ago2 PAZ models, the indicators of stronger binding as the total binding energy and the free energy were associated with better RNAi efficacy. This discrepancy might be attributable to differences in the binding site topology and the difference in the conformation of the bound nucleotides.

  2. Fathead Minnow Steroidogenesis: In Silico Analyses Reveals Tradeoffs Between Nominal Target Efficacy and Robustness to Cross-talk

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the formulation and evaluation of a mechanistic mathematical model of fathead minnow ovarian steroidogenesis. The model presented in the present study was adpated from other models developed as part of an integrated, multi-disciplinary computational toxicolog...

  3. Revealing the Functions of Tenascin-C in 3-D Breast Cancer Models Using Cell Biological and In Silico Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Phase 1 trial study of 131I-labeled chimeric 81C6 monoclonal antibody for the treatment of patients with non - Hodgkin lymphoma . Blood 2004;104( 3 ...occurrs in the appropriate 3 -D tissue context. To further investigate loss of b-catenin from the cell membrane, we conducted 2 -D studies using... 3 -D cultures, which will aid us in corroborating the IP studies for E-cadherin/b-catenin interactions. In 2 -D cultures we were already able to show

  4. In silico simulation modeling reveals the importance of the Casparian strip for efficient silicon uptake in rice roots.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Gen; Satake, Akiko; Yamaji, Naoki; Mitani-Ueno, Namiki; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Feugier, François Gabriel; Ma, Jian Feng

    2015-04-01

    Silicon (Si) uptake by the roots is mediated by two different transporters, Lsi1 (passive) and Lsi2 (active), in rice (Oryza sativa). Both transporters are polarly localized in the plasma membranes of exodermal (outer) and endodermal (inner) cells with Casparian strips. However, it is unknown how rice is able to take up large amounts of Si compared with other plants, and why rice Si transporters have a characteristic cellular localization pattern. To answer these questions, we simulated Si uptake by rice roots by developing a mathematical model based on a simple diffusion equation that also accounts for active transport by Lsi2. In this model, we calibrated the model parameters using in vivo experimental data on the Si concentrations in the xylem sap and a Monte Carlo method. In our simulation experiments, we compared the Si uptake between roots with various transporter and Casparian strip locations and estimated the Si transport efficiency of roots with different localization patterns and quantities of the Lsi transporters. We found that the Si uptake by roots that lacked Casparian strips was lower than that of normal roots. This suggests that the double-layer structure of the Casparian strips is an important factor in the high Si uptake by rice. We also found that among various possible localization patterns, the most efficient one was that of the wild-type rice; this may explain the high Si uptake capacity of rice.

  5. Fathead Minnow Steroidogenesis: In Silico Analyses Reveals Tradeoffs Between Nominal Target Efficacy and Robustness to Cross-talk

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the formulation and evaluation of a mechanistic mathematical model of fathead minnow ovarian steroidogenesis. The model presented in the present study was adpated from other models developed as part of an integrated, multi-disciplinary computational toxicolog...

  6. In silico screening of drug-membrane thermodynamics reveals linear relations between bulk partitioning and the potential of mean force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichetti, Roberto; Kanekal, Kiran H.; Kremer, Kurt; Bereau, Tristan

    2017-09-01

    The partitioning of small molecules in cell membranes—a key parameter for pharmaceutical applications—typically relies on experimentally available bulk partitioning coefficients. Computer simulations provide a structural resolution of the insertion thermodynamics via the potential of mean force but require significant sampling at the atomistic level. Here, we introduce high-throughput coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to screen thermodynamic properties. This application of physics-based models in a large-scale study of small molecules establishes linear relationships between partitioning coefficients and key features of the potential of mean force. This allows us to predict the structure of the insertion from bulk experimental measurements for more than 400 000 compounds. The potential of mean force hereby becomes an easily accessible quantity—already recognized for its high predictability of certain properties, e.g., passive permeation. Further, we demonstrate how coarse graining helps reduce the size of chemical space, enabling a hierarchical approach to screening small molecules.

  7. Network modelling reveals the mechanism underlying colitis-associated colon cancer and identifies novel combinatorial anti-cancer targets.

    PubMed

    Lu, Junyan; Zeng, Hanlin; Liang, Zhongjie; Chen, Limin; Zhang, Liyi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Bairong; Huang, Ming; Geng, Meiyu; Spiegel, Sarah; Luo, Cheng

    2015-10-08

    The connection between inflammation and tumourigenesis has been well established. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying inflammation-associated tumourigenesis remains unknown because this process involves a complex interplay between immune microenvironments and epithelial cells. To obtain a more systematic understanding of inflammation-associated tumourigenesis as well as to identify novel therapeutic approaches, we constructed a knowledge-based network describing the development of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) by integrating the extracellular microenvironment and intracellular signalling pathways. Dynamic simulations of the CAC network revealed a core network module, including P53, MDM2, and AKT, that may govern the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells in a pro-tumor inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, in silico mutation studies and experimental validations led to a novel finding that concurrently targeting ceramide and PI3K/AKT pathway by chemical probes or marketed drugs achieves synergistic anti-cancer effects. Overall, our network model can guide further mechanistic studies on CAC and provide new insights into the design of combinatorial cancer therapies in a rational manner.

  8. Network modelling reveals the mechanism underlying colitis-associated colon cancer and identifies novel combinatorial anti-cancer targets

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Junyan; Zeng, Hanlin; Liang, Zhongjie; Chen, Limin; Zhang, Liyi; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Hong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Bairong; Huang, Ming; Geng, Meiyu; Spiegel, Sarah; Luo, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The connection between inflammation and tumourigenesis has been well established. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying inflammation-associated tumourigenesis remains unknown because this process involves a complex interplay between immune microenvironments and epithelial cells. To obtain a more systematic understanding of inflammation-associated tumourigenesis as well as to identify novel therapeutic approaches, we constructed a knowledge-based network describing the development of colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) by integrating the extracellular microenvironment and intracellular signalling pathways. Dynamic simulations of the CAC network revealed a core network module, including P53, MDM2, and AKT, that may govern the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells in a pro-tumor inflammatory microenvironment. Furthermore, in silico mutation studies a