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Sample records for silicon photon detectors

  1. Advantages of gated silicon single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legré, Matthieu; Lunghi, Tommaso; Stucki, Damien; Zbinden, Hugo

    2013-05-01

    We present gated silicon single photon detectors based on two commercially available avalanche photodiodes (APDs) and one customised APD from ID Quantique SA. This customised APD is used in a commercially available device called id110. A brief comparison of the two commercial APDs is presented. Then, the charge persistence effect of all of those detectors that occurs just after a strong illumination is shown and discussed.

  2. Silicon photomultiplier as a detector of Cherenkov photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpar, S.; Dolenec, R.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Križan, P.; Mazuka, Y.; Pestotnik, R.; Stanovnik, A.; Yamaoka, M.

    2008-09-01

    A novel photon detector—i.e. the silicon photomultiplier—whose main advantage over conventional photomultiplier tubes is the operation in high magnetic fields, has been tested as a photon detector in a proximity focusing RICH with aerogel radiator. This type of RICH counter is proposed for the upgrade of the Belle detector at the KEK B-factory. Recently produced silicon photomultipliers show less noise and have larger size, which are important issues for a large area photon detector. We measured the single photon pulse height distribution, the timing resolution and the position sensitivity for different silicon photomultipliers (Hamamatsu MPPC HC025, HC050, and HC100). The silicon photomultipliers were then used to detect Cherenkov photons emitted by cosmic ray particles in a proximity focusing aerogel RICH. Various light guides were investigated in order to increase the detection efficiency.

  3. Silicon photomultiplier based photon detector module as a detector of Cherenkov photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpar, Samo; Chagani, Hassan; Dolenec, Rok; Križan, Peter; Pestotnik, Rok; Stanovnik, Aleš

    2010-11-01

    We have constructed and tested a module, consisting of 64 (= 8×8) Hamamatsu MPPC S10362-11-100P silicon photomultipliers, for position sensitive detection of Cherenkov photons. Suitable light concentrators were produced to increase the efficiency and to improve the signal to noise ratio. The results of our measurements indicate that the performance of such a Cherenkov counter with aerogel radiator could meet the requirements of particle identification at the foreseen upgraded Belle detector.

  4. Low-resistivity photon-transparent window attached to photo-sensitive silicon detector

    DOEpatents

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2000-02-15

    The invention comprises a combination of a low resistivity, or electrically conducting, silicon layer that is transparent to long or short wavelength photons and is attached to the backside of a photon-sensitive layer of silicon, such as a silicon wafer or chip. The window is applied to photon sensitive silicon devices such as photodiodes, charge-coupled devices, active pixel sensors, low-energy x-ray sensors and other radiation detectors. The silicon window is applied to the back side of a photosensitive silicon wafer or chip so that photons can illuminate the device from the backside without interference from the circuit printed on the frontside. A voltage sufficient to fully deplete the high-resistivity photosensitive silicon volume of charge carriers is applied between the low-resistivity back window and the front, patterned, side of the device. This allows photon-induced charge created at the backside to reach the front side of the device and to be processed by any circuitry attached to the front side. Using the inventive combination, the photon sensitive silicon layer does not need to be thinned beyond standard fabrication methods in order to achieve full charge-depletion in the silicon volume. In one embodiment, the inventive backside window is applied to high resistivity silicon to allow backside illumination while maintaining charge isolation in CCD pixels.

  5. Module of silicon photomultipliers as a detector of individual Cherenkov photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestotnik, Rok; Dolenec, Rok; Korpar, Samo; Križan, Peter; Stanovnik, Aleš

    2011-05-01

    We have studied the possibility of using silicon photomultipliers as single photon detectors in a proximity focusing RICH with aerogel radiator. Such a counter is considered for the upgrade of the Belle detector. The main advantage of silicon over conventional photomultiplier tubes is their operation in high magnetic fields. Their disadvantage is the relatively high dark noise count rate (≈MHz/mm2) which can be overcome by using a narrow time window in the data acquisition. A module, consisting of 64 (8×8) Hamamatsu MPPC S10362-11-100P silicon photomultipliers, has been designed, constructed and tested with Cherenkov photons emitted in an aerogel radiator by 120 GeV/ c pions from the CERN T4-H6 beam. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio, i.e. to increase the effective surface on which light is detected, light concentrators have been employed.

  6. Energy-resolved CT imaging with a photon-counting silicon-strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, Mats; Huber, Ben; Karlsson, Staffan; Liu, Xuejin; Chen, Han; Xu, Cheng; Yveborg, Moa; Bornefalk, Hans; Danielsson, Mats

    2014-11-01

    Photon-counting detectors are promising candidates for use in the next generation of x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners. Among the foreseen benefits are higher spatial resolution, better trade-off between noise and dose and energy discriminating capabilities. Silicon is an attractive detector material because of its low cost, mature manufacturing process and high hole mobility. However, it is sometimes overlooked for CT applications because of its low absorption efficiency and high fraction of Compton scatter. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that silicon is a feasible material for CT detectors by showing energy-resolved CT images acquired with an 80 kVp x-ray tube spectrum using a photon-counting silicon-strip detector with eight energy thresholds developed in our group. We use a single detector module, consisting of a linear array of 50 0.5 × 0.4 mm detector elements, to image a phantom in a table-top lab setup. The phantom consists of a plastic cylinder with circular inserts containing water, fat and aqueous solutions of calcium, iodine and gadolinium, in different concentrations. By using basis material decomposition we obtain water, calcium, iodine and gadolinium basis images and demonstrate that these basis images can be used to separate the different materials in the inserts. We also show results showing that the detector has potential for quantitative measurements of substance concentrations.

  7. Photon-counting CT with silicon detectors: feasibility for pediatric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yveborg, Moa; Xu, Cheng; Fredenberg, Erik; Danielsson, Mats

    2009-02-01

    X-ray detectors made of crystalline silicon have several advantages including low dark currents, fast charge collection and high energy resolution. For high-energy x-rays, however, silicon suffers from its low atomic number, which might result in low detection efficiency, as well as low energy and spatial resolution due to Compton scattering. We have used a monte-carlo model to investigate the feasibility of a detector for pediatric CT with 30 to 40 mm of silicon using x-ray spectra ranging from 80 to 140 kVp. A detection efficiency of 0.74 was found at 80 kVp, provided the noise threshold could be set low. Scattered photons were efficiently blocked by a thin metal shielding between the detector units, and Compton scattering in the detector could be well separated from photo absorption at 80 kVp. Hence, the detector is feasible at low acceleration voltages, which is also suitable for pediatric imaging. We conclude that silicon detectors may be an alternative to other designs for this special case.

  8. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D; Hennessy, John J; Carver, Alexander G; Jones, Todd J; Goodsall, Timothy M; Hamden, Erika T; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100-300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness. PMID:27338399

  9. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D.; Hennessy, John J.; Carver, Alexander G.; Jones, Todd J.; Goodsall, Timothy M.; Hamden, Erika T.; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J.; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F.; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100–300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness. PMID:27338399

  10. Single Photon Counting UV Solar-Blind Detectors Using Silicon and III-Nitride Materials.

    PubMed

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, Michael; Jewell, April D; Hennessy, John J; Carver, Alexander G; Jones, Todd J; Goodsall, Timothy M; Hamden, Erika T; Suvarna, Puneet; Bulmer, J; Shahedipour-Sandvik, F; Charbon, Edoardo; Padmanabhan, Preethi; Hancock, Bruce; Bell, L Douglas

    2016-06-21

    Ultraviolet (UV) studies in astronomy, cosmology, planetary studies, biological and medical applications often require precision detection of faint objects and in many cases require photon-counting detection. We present an overview of two approaches for achieving photon counting in the UV. The first approach involves UV enhancement of photon-counting silicon detectors, including electron multiplying charge-coupled devices and avalanche photodiodes. The approach used here employs molecular beam epitaxy for delta doping and superlattice doping for surface passivation and high UV quantum efficiency. Additional UV enhancements include antireflection (AR) and solar-blind UV bandpass coatings prepared by atomic layer deposition. Quantum efficiency (QE) measurements show QE > 50% in the 100-300 nm range for detectors with simple AR coatings, and QE ≅ 80% at ~206 nm has been shown when more complex AR coatings are used. The second approach is based on avalanche photodiodes in III-nitride materials with high QE and intrinsic solar blindness.

  11. Spiral silicon drift detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.; Longoni, A.; Sampietro, M.; Holl, P.; Lutz, G.; Kemmer, J.; Prechtel, U.; Ziemann, T.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced large area silicon photodiode (and x-ray detector), called Spiral Drift Detector, was designed, produced and tested. The Spiral Detector belongs to the family of silicon drift detectors and is an improvement of the well known Cylindrical Drift Detector. In both detectors, signal electrons created in silicon by fast charged particles or photons are drifting toward a practically point-like collection anode. The capacitance of the anode is therefore kept at the minimum (0.1pF). The concentric rings of the cylindrical detector are replaced by a continuous spiral in the new detector. The spiral geometry detector design leads to a decrease of the detector leakage current. In the spiral detector all electrons generated at the silicon-silicon oxide interface are collected on a guard sink rather than contributing to the detector leakage current. The decrease of the leakage current reduces the parallel noise of the detector. This decrease of the leakage current and the very small capacities of the detector anode with a capacitively matched preamplifier may improve the energy resolution of Spiral Drift Detectors operating at room temperature down to about 50 electrons rms. This resolution is in the range attainable at present only by cooled semiconductor detectors. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Count rate performance of a silicon-strip detector for photon-counting spectral CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Grönberg, F.; Sjölin, M.; Karlsson, S.; Danielsson, M.

    2016-08-01

    A silicon-strip detector is developed for spectral computed tomography. The detector operates in photon-counting mode and allows pulse-height discrimination with 8 adjustable energy bins. In this work, we evaluate the count-rate performance of the detector in a clinical CT environment. The output counts of the detector are measured for x-ray tube currents up to 500 mA at 120 kV tube voltage, which produces a maximum photon flux of 485 Mphotons/s/mm2 for the unattenuated beam. The corresponding maximum count-rate loss of the detector is around 30% and there are no saturation effects. A near linear relationship between the input and output count rates can be observed up to 90 Mcps/mm2, at which point only 3% of the input counts are lost. This means that the loss in the diagnostically relevant count-rate region is negligible. A semi-nonparalyzable dead-time model is used to describe the count-rate performance of the detector, which shows a good agreement with the measured data. The nonparalyzable dead time τn for 150 evaluated detector elements is estimated to be 20.2±5.2 ns.

  13. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  14. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  15. Fast digitization and discrimination of prompt neutron and photon signals using a novel silicon carbide detector

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon W. Blackburn; James T. Johnson; Scott M. Watson; David L. Chichester; James L. Jones; Frank H. Ruddy; John G. Seidel; Robert W. Flammang

    2007-04-01

    Current requirements of some Homeland Security active interrogation projects for the detection of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) necessitate the development of faster inspection and acquisition capabilities. In order to do so, fast detectors which can operate during and shortly after intense interrogation radiation flashes are being developed. Novel silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor Schottky diodes have been utilized as robust neutron and photon detectors in both pulsed photon and pulsed neutron fields and are being integrated into active inspection environments to allow exploitation of both prompt and delayed emissions. These detectors have demonstrated the capability of detecting both photon and neutron events during intense photon flashes typical of an active inspection environment. Beyond the inherent insensitivity of SiC to gamma radiation, fast digitization and processing has demonstrated that pulse shape discrimination (PSD) in combination with amplitude discrimination can further suppress unwanted gamma signals and extract fast neutron signatures. Usable neutron signals have been extracted from mixed radiation fields where the background has exceeded the signals of interest by >1000:1.

  16. A multilayer edge-on silicon microstrip single photon counting detector for momography mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfelli, F.; Bonvicini, V.; Bravin, A.; Cantatore, G.; Castelli, E.; Fabrizioli, M.; Longo, R.; Olivo, A.; Pani, S.; Pontoni, D.; Poropat, P.; Prest, M.; Rashevsky, A.; Rigon, L.; Tromba, G.; Vacchi, A.; Vallazza, E.

    1999-08-01

    A 3-layer edge-on silicon microstrip detector for the SYRMEP/FRONTRAD project has been designed and realised. The image matrix is made by 764 pixels with dimensions 300 (thickness of the single detectors) × 200 (strip pitch) μm 2. The system has a sensitive area of 50 × 1 mm 2, an inter-layer distance of ≈ 100 μm and an efficiency of ≈ 80% for 20 keV photons. The image is acquired by scanning the object across the beam cross-section and the overall statistics on the single pixel is obtained by summing up the information of corresponding pixels in the three layers, thereby reducing the effect of possible noisy or not functioning pixels. Experimental results obtained at the SYRMEP/FRONTRAD beam line of the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation machine with this innovative detector are presented.

  17. Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    The use of silicon detectors has experienced an exponential growth in accelerator and space based experiments, similar to trends in the semiconductor industry as a whole, usually paraphrased as ``Moore's Law.'' Some of the essentials for this phenomenon will be presented, together with examples of the exciting science results which it enabled. With the establishment of a ``semiconductor culture'' in universities and laboratories around the world, an increased understanding of the sensors results in thinner, faster, more radiation-resistant detectors, spawning an amazing wealth of new technologies and applications, which will be the main subject of the presentation.

  18. A silicon photonic wavelength division multiplex system for high-speed data transmission in detector instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skwierawski, P.; Schneider, M.; Karnick, D.; Eisenblätter, L.; Weber, M.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new silicon photonics-based optical transmission system utilizing wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) . This technology has the possibility of reading out all raw data from a detector even without massive local data reduction. The transmitter in the detector volume consists of multiple integrated Mach-Zehnder modulators monolithically integrated with wavelength (de-)multiplexers. The first demonstrator currently under development aims for a data rate of 160 Gbit/s per fiber, scalable to 5 Tbit/s and beyond. We report on our recently developed Echelle grating WDM multiplexers with up to 45 channels on an area of 0.5 mm2 and electro-optic modulators providing a bandwidth of 18 GHz.

  19. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  20. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  1. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  2. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O'Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  3. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  4. Spectral CT of the extremities with a silicon strip photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Stayman, J. W.; Xu, J.; Taguchi, K.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Photon counting x-ray detectors (PCXDs) are an important emerging technology for spectral imaging and material differentiation with numerous potential applications in diagnostic imaging. We report development of a Si-strip PCXD system originally developed for mammography with potential application to spectral CT of musculoskeletal extremities, including challenges associated with sparse sampling, spectral calibration, and optimization for higher energy x-ray beams. Methods: A bench-top CT system was developed incorporating a Si-strip PCXD, fixed anode x-ray source, and rotational and translational motions to execute complex acquisition trajectories. Trajectories involving rotation and translation combined with iterative reconstruction were investigated, including single and multiple axial scans and longitudinal helical scans. The system was calibrated to provide accurate spectral separation in dual-energy three-material decomposition of soft-tissue, bone, and iodine. Image quality and decomposition accuracy were assessed in experiments using a phantom with pairs of bone and iodine inserts (3, 5, 15 and 20 mm) and an anthropomorphic wrist. Results: The designed trajectories improved the sampling distribution from 56% minimum sampling of voxels to 75%. Use of iterative reconstruction (viz., penalized likelihood with edge preserving regularization) in combination with such trajectories resulted in a very low level of artifacts in images of the wrist. For large bone or iodine inserts (>5 mm diameter), the error in the estimated material concentration was <16% for (50 mg/mL) bone and <8% for (5 mg/mL) iodine with strong regularization. For smaller inserts, errors of 20-40% were observed and motivate improved methods for spectral calibration and optimization of the edge-preserving regularizer. Conclusion: Use of PCXDs for three-material decomposition in joint imaging proved feasible through a combination of rotation-translation acquisition trajectories and

  5. Photon detector system

    DOEpatents

    Ekstrom, Philip A.

    1981-01-01

    A photon detector includes a semiconductor device, such as a Schottky barrier diode, which has an avalanche breakdown characteristic. The diode is cooled to cryogenic temperatures to eliminate thermally generated charge carriers from the device. The diode is then biased to a voltage level exceeding the avalanche breakdown threshold level such that, upon receipt of a photon, avalanche breakdown occurs. This breakdown is detected by appropriate circuitry which thereafter reduces the diode bias potential to a level below the avalanche breakdown threshold level to terminate the avalanche condition. Subsequently, the bias potential is reapplied to the diode in preparation for detection of a subsequently received photon.

  6. Silicon photonic integration in telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Silicon photonics is the guiding of light in a planar arrangement of silicon-based materials to perform various functions. We focus here on the use of silicon photonics to create transmitters and receivers for fiber-optic telecommunications. As the need to squeeze more transmission into a given bandwidth, a given footprint, and a given cost increases, silicon photonics makes more and more economic sense.

  7. Characterization of an Indirect-Detection Amorphous Silicon Detector for Dosimetric Measurement of Intensity Modulated Photon Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Daniel Wayne

    Indirect-detection amorphous silicon electronic imagers show much promise for measurement of radiation dose, particularly for pre-treatment verification of patient-specific intensity modulated radiotherapy plans. These instruments, commonly known as Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs), have high data density, large detecting area, convenient electronic read-out, excellent positional reproducibility, and are quickly becoming standard equipment on today's medical megavoltage linear accelerators. However, because these devices were originally intended to be digital radiograph imagers and not dosimeters, the modeling, calibration, and prediction of their response to dose carries a number of challenges. For instance, EPID dose images exhibit off-axis dose errors of up to 18% with increasing distance from the central axis of the imager (as compared to dose predictions calculated by a commercially available treatment planning system). Furthermore, these off-axis errors are asymmetric, with higher errors in the in-plane direction than in the cross-plane direction. In this work, methods are proposed to account for EPID off-axis effects by precisely calculating off-axis output factors from experimental measurements to increase the accuracy of EPID absolute dose measurement. Using these methods, dose readings acquired over the entire surface of the detector agree to within 2% accuracy as compared to respective EPID dose predictions. Similarly, the percentage of measured dose points that agree with respective calculated dose points (using 3%, 3 mm criteria) improves by as much as 60% for off-axis intensity modulated photon fields. Furthermore, a number of clinical applications of EPID dosimetry are investigated, including pixel response constancy, the effect of data density on a common metric for quantitatively comparing measured vs. calculated dose, and the implementation of an electronic portal dosimetry program for radiotherapy quality assurance.

  8. Edgeless silicon pad detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea Solano, B.; Abreu, M. C.; Avati, V.; Boccali, T.; Boccone, V.; Bozzo, M.; Capra, R.; Casagrande, L.; Chen, W.; Eggert, K.; Heijne, E.; Klauke, S.; Li, Z.; Mäki, T.; Mirabito, L.; Morelli, A.; Niinikoski, T. O.; Oljemark, F.; Palmieri, V. G.; Rato Mendes, P.; Rodrigues, S.; Siegrist, P.; Silvestris, L.; Sousa, P.; Tapprogge, S.; Trocmé, B.

    2006-05-01

    We report measurements in a high-energy pion beam of the sensitivity of the edge region in "edgeless" planar silicon pad diode detectors diced through their contact implants. A large surface current on such an edge prevents the normal reverse biasing of the device, but the current can be sufficiently reduced by the use of a suitable cutting method, followed by edge treatment, and by operating the detector at low temperature. The depth of the dead layer at the diced edge is measured to be (12.5±8 stat..±6 syst.) μm.

  9. SU-F-18C-05: Characterization of a Silicon Strip Photon-Counting Detector in the Presence of Compton Scatter: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemer, B; Ding, H; Cho, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Compton scatter on detection efficiency and charge-sharing for a Si strip photon-counting detector as a function of pixel pitch, slice thickness and total pixel length. Methods: A CT imaging system employing a silicon photon-counting detector was implemented using the GATE Monte Carlo package. A focal spot size of 300 µm, magnification of 1.33, and pixel pitches of 0.1 and 0.5mm were initially investigated. A 60 kVp spectrum with 3 mm Al filter was used and energy spectral degradation based on a prototype detector was simulated. To study charge-sharing, a single pixel was illuminated, and the detector response in neighboring pixels was investigated. A longitudinally semiinfinite detector was simulated to optimize the quantum detection efficiency of the imaging system as a function of pixel pitch, slice thickness and depth of interaction. A 2.5 mm thick tungsten plate with a 0.01 mm by 1.5 mm slit was implemented to calculate the modulation transfer function (MTF) from projection-based images. A threshold of 15 keV was implemented in the detector simulation. The preliminary charge sharing investigation results considered only scattering effects and the detector electronics related factors were neglected. Results: Using a 15 keV threshold, 1% of the pixel charge migrated into neighboring pixels with a pixel size of 0.1×0.1 mm{sup 2}. The quantum detection efficiency was 77%, 84%, 87% and 89% for 15 mm, 22.5 mm, 30 mm, and 45 mm length silicon detector pixels, respectively. For a pixel pitch of 0.1 mm, the spatial frequency at 10% of the maximum MTF was found to be 5.2 lp/mm. This agreed with an experimental MTF measurement of 5.3 lp/mm with a similar detector configuration. Conclusion: Using optimized design parameters, Si strip photon-counting detectors can offer high detection efficiency and spatial resolution even in the presence of Compton scatter.

  10. Photon detectors with gaseous amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1996-08-01

    Gaseous photon detectors, including very large 4{pi}-devices such as those incorporated in SLD and DELPHI, are finally delivering physics after many years of hard work. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photoelectrons. Among detector builders, there is hardly anybody who did not make mistakes in this area, and who does not have a healthy respect for the problems involved. This point is stressed in this paper, and it is suggested that only a very small operating phase space is available for running gaseous photon detectors in a very large system with good efficiency and few problems. In this paper the authors discuss what was done correctly or incorrectly in first generation photon detectors, and what would be their recommendations for second generation detectors. 56 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Looking at single photons using hybrid detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, A.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2015-01-01

    The SLS detector group develops silicon hybrid detectors for X-ray applications used in synchrotron facilities all over the world. Both microstrip and pixel detectors with either single photon counting or charge integrating read out are being developed. Low noise charge integrating detectors can be operated in single photon regime, i.e. with low fluxes and high frame rates in order to detect on average less than one photon per cluster of 2×2 pixels. In this case, the analog signal read out for each single X-ray provides information about the energy of the photon. Moreover the signal from neighboring channels can be correlated in order to overcome or even take advantage of charge sharing. The linear charge collection model describing microstrip detectors and large pixels is unsuitable for the calibration of small pitch pixel detectors due to the large amount of charge sharing occurring also in the corner region. For this reason, the linear charge collection model is extended to the case of small pixels and tested with monochromatic X-ray data acquired using the 25 μm pitch MÖNCH and the 75 μm pitch JUNGFRAU detectors. The successful outcome of the calibration of the MÖNCH detector is proven by the high energy resolution of the spectrum obtained by accumulating the counts from more than 6000 channels after the correction of the gain mismatches using the proposed model.

  12. Silicon active photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitropoulos, Dimitrios

    Active photonic devices utilizing the optical nonlinearities of silicon have emerged in the last 5 years and the effort for commercial photonic devices in the material that has been the workhorse of electronics has been building up since. This dissertation presents the theory for some of these devices. We are concerned herein with CW lasers, amplifiers and wavelength converters that are based on the Raman effect. There have already been cursory experimental demonstrations of these devices and some of their limitations are already apparent. Most of the limitations observed are because of the appearance of effects that are competing with stimulated Raman scattering. Under the high optical powers that are necessary for the Raman effect (tens to hundrends of mW's) the process of optical two-photon (TPA) absorption occurs. The absorption of optical power that it causes itself is weak but in the process electrons and holes are generated which can further absorb light through the free-carrier absorption effect (FCA). The effective "lifetime" that these carriers have determines the magnitude of the FCA loss. We present a model for the carrier lifetime in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) waveguides and numerical simulations to understand how this critical parameter varies and how it can be controlled. A p-i-n junction built along SOI waveguides can help achieve lifetime of the order of 20--100 ps but the price one has to pay is on-chip electrical power consumption on the order of 100's of mWs. We model CW Raman lasers and we find that the carrier lifetime reduces the output power. If the carrier lifetime exceeds a certain "critical" value optical losses become overwhelming and lasing is impossible. As we show, in amplifiers, the nonlinear loss does not only result in diminished gain, but also in a higher noise figure. Finally the effect of Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is examined. The effect is important because with a pump frequency at 1434nm coherent power

  13. Single photon source characterization with a superconducting single photon detector.

    PubMed

    Hadfield, Robert H; Stevens, Martin J; Gruber, Steven S; Miller, Aaron J; Schwall, Robert E; Mirin, Richard P; Nam, Sae Woo

    2005-12-26

    Superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) based on nanopatterned niobium nitride wires offer single photon counting at fast rates, low jitter, and low dark counts, from visible wavelengths well into the infrared. We demonstrate the first use of an SSPD, packaged in a commercial cryocooler, for single photon source characterization. The source is an optically pumped, microcavity-coupled InGaAs quantum dot, emitting single photons at 902 nm. The SSPD replaces the second silicon Avalanche Photodiode (APD) in a Hanbury-Brown Twiss interferometer measurement of the source second-order correlation function, g(2)( ?). The detection efficiency of the superconducting detector system is >2 % (coupling losses included). The SSPD system electronics jitter is 170 ps, versus 550 ps for the APD unit, allowing the source spontaneous emission lifetime to be measured with improved resolution.

  14. The Gamma Ray Imaging Detector of the AGILE satellite: A novel application of silicon trackers for detection of astrophysics high-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappoldi, Andrea; AGILE Collaboration

    2009-10-01

    AGILE is a project of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) Scientific Program dedicated to Gamma ray astrophysics. It is designed to be a very light and compact instrument, capable of photon detections and imaging in both the 30 MeV-50 GeV and 18-60 keV energy ranges, with a large field of view (FOV is ˜3 and ˜1 sr, respectively). The core of the instrument (launched on April 23, 2007 from the Indian Space Research Organization's launch facility) is represented by the Gamma Ray Imaging Detector (GRID), which is a silicon tracker developed by the Italian National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), with a spatial resolution of ˜40 μm. The GRID performances have been studied by means of a GEANT Montecarlo, and tested with a dedicated calibration campaign using the tagged gamma beam available at Beam Test Facility (BTF) of INFN Frascati Laboratory.

  15. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  16. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  17. The UK silicon photonics project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Wright, N.; Mashanovich, G. Z.; Timotijevic, B.; Krauss, T. F.; White, T. P.; O'Faolain, L.; Kelsall, R. W.; Lever, L.; Ikonic, Z.; Valvanis, A.; Leadley, D.; Findlayson, E.; Jenkins, R. M.

    2010-05-01

    The project is a consortium based activity involving researchers from the UK institutions of the Universities of Surrey, St. Andrews, Leeds, Warwick, and Southampton, as well as the commercial research institution QinetiQ. The aims of the project are to progress the state of the art in Silicon Photonics, in the areas of waveguides, modulators, couplers, detectors, Raman processes, and integration with electronics. Thus the field is vast, and impossible to cover comprehensively in one project, nor indeed in one paper. The programme is run on a truly collaborative basis, with members from each institution running one or more work packages within the project, each co-ordinating work from their own plus other institutions. To date, the most well developed work has emerged from the activity on basic waveguides and their characteristics, the modulator activity, optical filters, and work on Raman Amplifiers. This work will be the main focus of this paper, but an attempt will be made to update the audience on the remaining activities within the project. By the nature of the project, much of the work is medium term, and hence some activities are not expected to yield viable results until at least next year, hence the concentration on some activities rather than all activities at this stage.

  18. Silicon photonics: some remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, G. T.; Topley, R.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Thompson, D. J.; Stanković, S.; Reynolds, S.; Chen, X.; Soper, N.; Mitchell, C. J.; Hu, Y.; Shen, L.; Martinez-Jimenez, G.; Healy, N.; Mailis, S.; Peacock, A. C.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Gardes, F. Y.; Soler Penades, J.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Ortega-Monux, A.; Wanguemert-Perez, G.; Molina-Fernandez, I.; Cheben, P.; Mashanovich, G. Z.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses some of the remaining challenges for silicon photonics, and how we at Southampton University have approached some of them. Despite phenomenal advances in the field of Silicon Photonics, there are a number of areas that still require development. For short to medium reach applications, there is a need to improve the power consumption of photonic circuits such that inter-chip, and perhaps intra-chip applications are viable. This means that yet smaller devices are required as well as thermally stable devices, and multiple wavelength channels. In turn this demands smaller, more efficient modulators, athermal circuits, and improved wavelength division multiplexers. The debate continues as to whether on-chip lasers are necessary for all applications, but an efficient low cost laser would benefit many applications. Multi-layer photonics offers the possibility of increasing the complexity and effectiveness of a given area of chip real estate, but it is a demanding challenge. Low cost packaging (in particular, passive alignment of fibre to waveguide), and effective wafer scale testing strategies, are also essential for mass market applications. Whilst solutions to these challenges would enhance most applications, a derivative technology is emerging, that of Mid Infra-Red (MIR) silicon photonics. This field will build on existing developments, but will require key enhancements to facilitate functionality at longer wavelengths. In common with mainstream silicon photonics, significant developments have been made, but there is still much left to do. Here we summarise some of our recent work towards wafer scale testing, passive alignment, multiplexing, and MIR silicon photonics technology.

  19. Simulation study of an energy sensitive photon counting silicon strip detector for computed tomography: identifying strengths and weaknesses and developing work-arounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornefalk, Hans; Xu, Cheng; Svensson, Christer; Danielsson, Mats

    2010-04-01

    We model the effect of signal pile-up on the energy resolution of a photon counting silicon detector designed for high flux spectral CT with sub-millimeter pixel size. Various design parameters, such as bias voltage, lower threshold level for discarding of electronic noise and the entire electronic read out chain are modeled and realistic parameter settings are determined. We explicitly model the currents induced on the collection electrodes of a pixel and superimpose signals emanating from events in neighboring pixels, either due to charge sharing or signals induced during charge collection. Electronic noise is added to the pulse train before feeding it through a model of the read out electronics where the pulse height spectrum is saved to yield the detector energy response function. The main result of this study is that a lower threshold of 5 keV and a rather long time constant of the shaping filter (τ0 = 30 ns) are needed to discard induced pulses from events in neighboring pixels. These induction currents occur even if no charge is being deposited in the analyzed pixel from the event in the neighboring pixel. There is also only a limited gain in energy resolution by increasing the bias voltage to 1000 V from 600 V. We show that with these settings the resulting energy resolution, as measured by the FWHM/E of the photo peak, is 5% at 70 keV.

  20. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Enami, K.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-09-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  1. The CDF silicon detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Azzi, P.

    1998-04-01

    A major silicon upgrade project is under way for the CDFII experiment that will operate during Run II of the Tevatron in the year 2000. The innermost detector, SVXII, will cover the interaction region with three barrels of five layers of double sided microstrip detectors. In the radial gap between the SVXII and the new main tracking chamber (COT) will be located the ISL that consists of two planes of double sided miscrostrip detectors at large pseudorapidity and one in the central region. A description of the project design and its motivation is presented here.

  2. Argon-39 Background in DUNE Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, Gleb; DUNE Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) is a 40-kt liquid argon detector that will be constructed 5000 ft underground in the Sanford Underground Research Facility in order to study neutrino and proton decay physics. Instrumenting liquid argon with photon detectors to record scintillation in addition to the ionization signal can significantly improve time and energy resolution of the experiment. Argon produces light with wavelength of 128 nm. The reference design for the photon detectors includes acrylic bars covered in wavelength shifter, where the scintillation light can be captured and reemitted with longer wavelengths, then detected using silicon photomultipliers. Radiological backgrounds may noticeably deteriorate the photon detection system performance, especially for low-energy interactions. A particularly important background comes from argon-39 decays, because argon-39 is present in natural argon that will be used in DUNE and the background rate increases with the size of the experiment. The effect of the argon-39 background has been studied and is presented in this talk.

  3. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, C.; Guo, X.; Fan, L.; Ma, X.; Poot, M.; Tang, H. X.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips. PMID:26792424

  4. VSiPMT a new photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, F.; Barbarino, G.; Barbato, F. C. T.; Campajola, L.; de Asmundis, R.; De Rosa, G.; Migliozzi, P.; Mollo, C. M.; Vivolo, D.

    2016-04-01

    Photon detection is a key factor to study many physical processes in several areas of fundamental physics research. Focusing the attention on photodetectors for particle astrophysics, the future experiments aimed at the study of very high-energy or extremely rare phenomena (e.g. dark matter, proton decay, neutrinos from astrophysical sources) will require additional improvements in linearity, gain, quantum efficiency and single photon counting capability. To meet the requirements of these class of experiments, we propose a new design for a modern hybrid photodetector: the VSiPMT (Vacuum Silicon PhotoMultiplier Tube). The idea is to replace the classical dynode chain of a PMT with a SiPM, which therefore acts as an electron detector and amplifier. The aim is to match the large sensitive area of a photocathode with the performances of the SiPM technology.

  5. Cryogenic Silicon Detectors with Implanted Contacts for the Detection of Visible Photons Using the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defay, X.; Mondragon, E.; Willers, M.; Langenkämper, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Münster, A.; Zöller, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Steiger, H.; Hitzler, F.; Bruhn, C.; Schönert, S.; Potzel, W.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-07-01

    There is a common need in astroparticle experiments such as direct dark matter detection, double-beta decay without emission of neutrinos [0 ν β β ] and coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments for light detectors with a very low energy threshold. By employing the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect, the thermal signal of particle interactions in a semiconductor absorber operated at cryogenic temperatures can be amplified by drifting the photogenerated electrons and holes in an electric field. This technology is not used in current experiments, in particular because of a reduction of the signal amplitude with time which is due to trapping of the charges within the absorber. We present here the first results of a novel type of Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect light detector with an electric field configuration designed to improve the charge collection within the semiconductor.

  6. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yang, Guan; Sun, Xiaoli; Lu, Wei; Merritt, Scott; Beck, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three novel photon counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride avalanche array made by DRS Inc. 2) a commercial 2880 silicon avalanche photodiode array and 3) a prototype resonant cavity silicon avalanche photodiode array. We will present and compare dark count, photon detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array has photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50 were routinely demonstrated across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70. High resolution pixel-surface spot scans were performed and the junction diameters of the diodes were measured. The junction diameter was decreased from 31 m to 25 m resulting in a 2x increase in e-APD gain from 470 on the 2010 array to 1100 on the array delivered to NASA GSFC. Mean single photon SNRs of over 12 were demonstrated at excess noise factors of 1.2-1.3.The commercial silicon APD array has a fast output with rise times of 300ps and pulse widths of 600ps. Received and filtered signals from the entire array are multiplexed onto this single fast output. The prototype resonant cavity silicon APD array is being developed for use at 1 micron wavelength.

  7. The Heavy Photon Search test detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglieri, M.; Boyarinov, S.; Bueltmann, S.; Burkert, V.; Celentano, A.; Charles, G.; Cooper, W.; Cuevas, C.; Dashyan, N.; DeVita, R.; Desnault, C.; Deur, A.; Egiyan, H.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Essig, R.; Fadeyev, V.; Field, C.; Freyberger, A.; Gershtein, Y.; Gevorgyan, N.; Girod, F.-X.; Graf, N.; Graham, M.; Griffioen, K.; Grillo, A.; Guidal, M.; Haller, G.; Hansson Adrian, P.; Herbst, R.; Holtrop, M.; Jaros, J.; Kaneta, S.; Khandaker, M.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, J.; Moffeit, K.; Moreno, O.; Neal, H.; Nelson, T.; Niccolai, S.; Odian, A.; Oriunno, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Partridge, R.; Phillips, S. K.; Rauly, E.; Raydo, B.; Reichert, J.; Rindel, E.; Rosier, P.; Salgado, C.; Schuster, P.; Sharabian, Y.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Toro, N.; Uemura, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Walz, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2015-03-01

    The Heavy Photon Search (HPS), an experiment to search for a hidden sector photon in fixed target electroproduction, is preparing for installation at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) in the Fall of 2014. As the first stage of this project, the HPS Test Run apparatus was constructed and operated in 2012 to demonstrate the experiment's technical feasibility and to confirm that the trigger rates and occupancies are as expected. This paper describes the HPS Test Run apparatus and readout electronics and its performance. In this setting, a heavy photon can be identified as a narrow peak in the e+e- invariant mass spectrum above the trident background or as a narrow invariant mass peak with a decay vertex displaced from the production target, so charged particle tracking and vertexing are needed for its detection. In the HPS Test Run, charged particles are measured with a compact forward silicon microstrip tracker inside a dipole magnet. Electromagnetic showers are detected in a PbW04 crystal calorimeter situated behind the magnet, and are used to trigger the experiment and identify electrons and positrons. Both detectors are placed close to the beam line and split top-bottom. This arrangement provides sensitivity to low-mass heavy photons, allows clear passage of the unscattered beam, and avoids the spray of degraded electrons coming from the target. The discrimination between prompt and displaced e+e- pairs requires the first layer of silicon sensors be placed only 10 cm downstream of the target. The expected signal is small, and the trident background huge, so the experiment requires very large statistics. Accordingly, the HPS Test Run utilizes high-rate readout and data acquisition electronics and a fast trigger to exploit the essentially 100% duty cycle of the CEBAF accelerator at JLab.

  8. Applications of passivated silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung, Richard; Park, Chan Ho

    2012-03-01

    We can postulate that dark matter are WIMPS, more specifically, Majorana particles called neutralinos floating through space. Upon neutralino-neutralino annihilation, they create a greater burst of other particles into space: these being all kinds of particles including anti-deuterons which are the indications of the existence of dark matter. For the study of the applications of passivated silicon detectors, this paper shows following procedures in two categories. Painting on little pieces of silicon (Polyimid and Boxcar Red) :Took clean paint brush and painted on Polyimid and Boxcar red samples onto little pieces of sample silicon and dried for a certain number of hours in different conditions. Cooling test : usually done in 7 cycles, cool until usually -35 degrees or -40 degrees Celsius with thermoelectric cooler, dry out, evapate the moisture in the fume hood, take pictures with the microscope and check for irregularities every 1, 4 and 7 times. The results show us how the passivated silicon will act in the real experiment--the vacuum chamber and x-rays (from the radioactive source), and different atmospheric pressures simulate what it will be like in space.

  9. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, R. A.; Dugad, S. R. Gopal, A. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Prabhu, S. S.; Garde, C. S.

    2014-02-15

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 − σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper.

  10. Radiation experience with the CDF silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Husemann, Ulrich; /Rochester U.

    2005-11-01

    The silicon detectors of the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider are operated in a harsh radiation environment. The lifetime of the silicon detectors is limited by radiation damage, and beam-related incidents are an additional risk. This article describes the impact of beam-related incidents on detector operation and the effects of radiation damage on electronics noise and the silicon sensors. From measurements of the depletion voltage as a function of the integrated luminosity, estimates of the silicon detector lifetime are derived.

  11. Portable triple silicon detector telescope spectrometer for skin dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Larsen, H. E.; Christensen, P.

    1999-12-01

    The features of a newly developed portable beta telescope spectrometer are described. The detector probe uses three silicon detectors with the thickness: 50μm/150μm/7000μm covered by a 2μm thick titanium window. Rejection of photon contributions from mixed beta/photon exposures is achieved by coincidence requirements between the detector signals. The silicon detectors, together with cooling aggregate, bias supplies, preamplifiers and charge generation for calibration are contained in a handy detector probe. Through a 3- or 10-m cable the detector unit is connected to a compact, portable processing unit including a laptop computer executing control, monitor, histogram and display tasks. The use of digital signal processing at an early stage of the signal chain has facilitated the achievement of a compact, low-weight device. 256 channels are available for each of the three detectors. The LabVIEWTM software distributed by National Instruments was used for all program developments for the spectrometer, comprising also the capability of evaluating the absorbed dose rates from the measured beta spectra. The report describes the capability of the telescope spectrometer to measure beta and photon spectra as well as beta dose rates in mixed beta/photon radiation fields. It also describes the main features of the digital signal-processing electronics.

  12. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  13. Construction of the CDF silicon vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Snider, F.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Gonzales, B.; Hrycyk, M.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T.; Carithers, W.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester, W.; Wong, M.; Amidei, D.; Derwent, P.; Gold, M.; Matthews, J.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Busetto, G.; Castro, A.; Loreti, M.; Pescara, L.; Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell`Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Risotri, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F. |; Bailey, M.; Garfinkel, A.; Shaw, N.; Tipton, P.; Watts, G.

    1992-04-01

    Technical details and methods used in constructing the CDF silicon vertex detector are presented. This description includes a discussion of the foam-carbon fiber composite structure used to silicon microstrip detectors and the procedure for achievement of 5 {mu}m detector alignment. The construction of the beryllium barrel structure, which houses the detector assemblies, is also described. In addition, the 10 {mu}m placement accuracy of the detectors in the barrel structure is discussed and the detector cooling and mounting systems are described. 12 refs.

  14. Comparison at the sub-100 fW optical power level of calibrating a single-photon detector using a high-sensitive, low-noise silicon photodiode and the double attenuator technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porrovecchio, G.; Šmid, M.; López, M.; Hofer, H.; Rodiek, B.; Kück, S.

    2016-08-01

    A comparison down to sub-100-fW optical power level was carried out between a low-noise Silicon photodiode and a low optical flux measurement facility based on a double attenuator technique. The comparison was carried out via a silicon single-photon avalanche diode (Si-SPAD), which acted as transfer standard. The measurements were performed at a wavelength of 770 nm using an attenuated laser as a radiation source at optical power levels between approximately 86 fW and approximately 1325 fW, corresponding to approximately 330 000 photons s-1 and approximately 5.2  ×  106 photons s-1, respectively. The mean relative deviation of the detection efficiencies of the Si-SPAD, determined by the Si-photodiode and the low optical flux measurement facility, i.e. between two completely independent traceability routes, was  <  0.2%, thus well within the combined standard uncertainty of the two measurements. To our knowledge, this is the first comparison for the detection efficiency of a single photon detector using a direct optical flux measurement by a conventional Si-photodiode at such low power levels.

  15. Comparison at the sub-100 fW optical power level of calibrating a single-photon detector using a high-sensitive, low-noise silicon photodiode and the double attenuator technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porrovecchio, G.; Šmid, M.; López, M.; Hofer, H.; Rodiek, B.; Kück, S.

    2016-08-01

    A comparison down to sub-100-fW optical power level was carried out between a low-noise Silicon photodiode and a low optical flux measurement facility based on a double attenuator technique. The comparison was carried out via a silicon single-photon avalanche diode (Si-SPAD), which acted as transfer standard. The measurements were performed at a wavelength of 770 nm using an attenuated laser as a radiation source at optical power levels between approximately 86 fW and approximately 1325 fW, corresponding to approximately 330 000 photons s‑1 and approximately 5.2  ×  106 photons s‑1, respectively. The mean relative deviation of the detection efficiencies of the Si-SPAD, determined by the Si-photodiode and the low optical flux measurement facility, i.e. between two completely independent traceability routes, was  <  0.2%, thus well within the combined standard uncertainty of the two measurements. To our knowledge, this is the first comparison for the detection efficiency of a single photon detector using a direct optical flux measurement by a conventional Si-photodiode at such low power levels.

  16. A complete design flow for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, James; Cone, Chris; Chrostowski, Lukas; Klein, Jackson; Flueckiger, Jonas; Liu, Amy; McGuire, Dylan; Wang, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Broad adoption of silicon photonics technology for photonic integrated circuits requires standardized design flows that are similar to what is available for analog and mixed signal electrical circuit design. We have developed a design flow that combines mature electronic design automation (EDA) software with optical simulation software. An essential component of any design flow, whether electrical or photonic, is the ability to accurately simulate largescale circuits. This is particularly important when the behavior of the circuit is not trivially related to the individual component performance. While this is clearly the case for electronic circuits consisting of hundreds to billions of transistors, it is already becoming important in photonic circuits such as WDM transmitters, where signal cross talk needs to be considered, as well as optical cross-connect switches. In addition, optical routing to connect different components requires the introduction of additional waveguide sections, waveguide bends, and waveguide crossings, which affect the overall circuit performance. Manufacturing variability can also have dramatic circuit-level consequences that need to be simulated. Circuit simulations must rely on compact models that can accurately represent the behavior of each component, and the compact model parameters must be extracted from physical level simulation and experimental results. We show how large scale circuits can be simulated in both the time and frequency domains, including the effects of bidirectional and, where appropriate, multimode and multichannel photonic waveguides. We also show how active, passive and nonlinear individual components such as grating couplers, waveguides, splitters, filters, electro-optical modulators and detectors can be simulated using a combination of electrical and optical algorithms, and good agreement with experimental results can be obtained. We then show how parameters, with inclusion of fabrication process variations, can

  17. Gamma radiation effects on silicon photonic waveguides.

    PubMed

    Grillanda, Stefano; Singh, Vivek; Raghunathan, Vivek; Morichetti, Francesco; Melloni, Andrea; Kimerling, Lionel; Agarwal, Anuradha M

    2016-07-01

    To support the use of integrated photonics in harsh environments, such as outer space, the hardness threshold to high-energy radiation must be established. Here, we investigate the effects of gamma (γ) rays, with energy in the MeV-range, on silicon photonic waveguides. By irradiation of high-quality factor amorphous silicon core resonators, we measure the impact of γ rays on the materials incorporated in our waveguide system, namely amorphous silicon, silicon dioxide, and polymer. While we show the robustness of amorphous silicon and silicon dioxide up to an absorbed dose of 15 Mrad, more than 100× higher than previous reports on crystalline silicon, polymer materials exhibit changes with doses as low as 1 Mrad. PMID:27367099

  18. Hybrid photon detectors for the LHCb RICH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhardt, Stephan

    2006-09-01

    The LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counters use the pixel Hybrid Photon Detector (HPD) as a photo-sensitive device. Photo-electrons are produced in a semi-transparent multi-alkali photo-cathode (S20) and are accelerated by a voltage of 20 kV onto a pixelated silicon anode. The anode is bump-bonded to the LHCBPIX1 pixel readout chip which amplifies and digitises the anode signals at the LHC speed of 40 MHz. Using a demagnification of five, the effective pixel size at the HPD window is 2.5×2.5 mm2. Over the course of 18 months, 550 HPDs will undergo a quality-assurance programme to verify the specifications and to characterise the tubes. The tested parameters include the threshold and noise behaviour of the chip, the response to light emitting diode (LED) light, the demagnification of the electron optics, the leakage current and the depletion of the silicon sensor, the quality of the vacuum, the signal efficiency and the dark count rate. Results of tests of the first nine HPDs of the final design are presented and compared to the specifications.

  19. Integrated silicon and silicon nitride photonic circuits on flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Li, Mo

    2014-06-15

    Flexible integrated photonic devices based on crystalline materials on plastic substrates have a promising potential in many unconventional applications. In this Letter, we demonstrate a fully integrated photonic system including ring resonators and grating couplers, based on both crystalline silicon and silicon nitride, on flexible plastic substrate by using the stamping-transfer method. A high yield has been achieved by a simple, yet reliable transfer method without significant performance degradation.

  20. Novel photon-counting detectors for free-space communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainak, M. A.; Yang, G.; Sun, X.; Lu, W.; Merritt, S.; Beck, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present performance data for novel photon-counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of three types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We present and compare dark count, photon-detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We discuss system wavelength trades and architectures for optimizing overall communication link sensitivity, data rate and cost performance. The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50% across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70%. We performed high-resolution pixel-surface spot scans and measured the junction diameters of its diodes. We found that decreasing the junction diameter from 31 μm to 25 μm doubled the e- APD gain from 470 for an array produced in the year 2010 to a gain of 1100 on an array delivered to NASA GSFC recently. The mean single-photon SNR was over 12 and the excess noise factors measurements were 1.2-1.3. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output.

  1. A photon-counting detector for exoplanet missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, D. F.; Lee, J.; Hanold, B. J.; Aull, B. F.; Gregory, J. A.; Schuette, D. R.

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes progress of a project to develop and advance the maturity of photon-counting detectors for NASA exoplanet missions. The project, funded by NASA ROSES TDEM program, uses a 256×256 pixel silicon Geigermode avalanche photodiode (GM-APD) array, bump-bonded to a silicon readout circuit. Each pixel independently registers the arrival of a photon and can be reset and ready for another photon within 100 ns. The pixel has built-in circuitry for counting photo-generated events. The readout circuit is multiplexed to read out the photon arrival events. The signal chain is inherently digital, allowing for noiseless transmission over long distances. The detector always operates in photon counting mode and is thus not susceptible to excess noise factor that afflicts other technologies. The architecture should be able to operate with shot-noise-limited performance up to extremely high flux levels, >106 photons/second/pixel, and deliver maximum signal-to-noise ratios on the order of thousands for higher fluxes. Its performance is expected to be maintained at a high level throughout mission lifetime in the presence of the expected radiation dose.

  2. Silicon photonics: Energy-efficient communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghari, Mehdi; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V.

    2011-05-01

    Scaling IT infrastructure from microscale processors to macroscale data centres and telecommunications networks requires high-bandwidth technologies that are cheap, low-power and small. Silicon photonics that utilizes scalable CMOS technology may offer a highly integrated photonics transmission platform for such applications.

  3. Energy dispersive photon counting detectors for breast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, William C.; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan; Nygard, Einar; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2013-09-01

    We report on our efforts toward the development of silicon (Si) strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical breast imaging. Typically, x-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a- Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting silicon Si strip detectors. Mammography requires high flux from the x-ray generator, therefore, in order to achieve energy resolved single photon counting, a high output count rate (OCR) for the detector must be achieved at the required spatial resolution and across the required dynamic range for the application. The required performance in terms of the OCR, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view (FOV) for the application thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and scanning techniques. Room temperature semiconductors, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the x-ray energy ranges of the application at the required energy and spatial resolutions. We present our methods and results from the optimization of prototype detectors based on Si strip structures. We describe the detector optimization and the development of ASIC readout electronics that provide the required spatial resolution, low noise, high count rate capabilities and minimal power consumption.

  4. SIS Detectors for Terahertz Photon Counting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezawa, Hajime; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Ukibe, Masahiro; Fujii, Go; Shiki, Shigetomo

    2016-07-01

    An Intensity interferometer with photon counting detector is a candidate to realize a THz interferometer for astronomical observations. We have demonstrated that synthesis imaging is possible even with intensity interferometers. An SIS junction (or STJ) with low leakage current of 1 pA is a suitable device for photon counting detectors. Readout circuit utilizing FETs with low gate leakage, low gate capacitance, and fast response is discussed.

  5. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  6. Silicon as an unconventional detector in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinthorne, Neal; Brzezinski, Karol; Chesi, Enrico; Cochran, Eric; Grkovski, Milan; Grošičar, Borut; Honscheid, Klaus; Huh, Sam; Kagan, Harris; Lacasta, Carlos; Linhart, Vladimir; Mikuž, Marko; Smith, D. Shane; Stankova, Vera; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Žontar, Dejan

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a widely used technique in medical imaging and in studying small animal models of human disease. In the conventional approach, the 511 keV annihilation photons emitted from a patient or small animal are detected by a ring of scintillators such as LYSO read out by arrays of photodetectors. Although this has been successful in achieving ˜5 mm FWHM spatial resolution in human studies and ˜1 mm resolution in dedicated small animal instruments, there is interest in significantly improving these figures. Silicon, although its stopping power is modest for 511 keV photons, offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional approaches including the potential for high intrinsic spatial resolution in 3D. To evaluate silicon in a variety of PET "magnifying glass" configurations, an instrument was constructed that consists of an outer partial-ring of PET scintillation detectors into which various arrangements of silicon detectors are inserted to emulate dual-ring or imaging probe geometries. Measurements using the test instrument demonstrated the capability of clearly resolving point sources of 22Na having a 1.5 mm center-to-center spacing as well as the 1.2 mm rods of a 18F-filled resolution phantom. Although many challenges remain, silicon has potential to become the PET detector of choice when spatial resolution is the primary consideration.

  7. Compton imager using room temperature silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfess, James D.; Novikova, Elena I.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2007-08-01

    We have been developing a multi-layer Compton Gamma Ray Imager using position-sensitive, intrinsic silicon detectors. Advantages of this approach include room temperature operation, reduced Doppler broadening, and use of conventional silicon fabrication technologies. We have obtained results on the imaging performance of a multi-layer instrument where each layer consists of a 2×2 array of double-sided strip detectors. Each detector is 63 mm×63 mm×2 mm thick and has 64 strips providing a strip pitch of approximately 0.9 mm. The detectors were fabricated by SINTEF ICT (Oslo Norway) from 100 mm diameter wafers. The use of large arrays of silicon detectors appears especially advantageous for applications that require excellent sensitivity, spectral resolution and imaging such as gamma ray astrophysics, detection of special nuclear materials, and medical imaging. The multiple Compton interactions (three or more) in the low-Z silicon enable the energy and direction of the incident gamma ray to be determined without full deposition of the incident gamma-ray energy in the detector. The performance of large volume instruments for various applications are presented, including an instrument under consideration for NASA's Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT) mission and applications to Homeland Security. Technology developments that could further extend the sensitivity and performance of silicon Compton Imagers are presented, including the use of low-energy (few hundred keV) electron tracking within novel silicon detectors and the potential for a wafer-bonding approach to produce thicker, position-sensitive silicon detectors with an associated reduction of required electronics and instrument cost.

  8. The L3 silicon microvertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciarri, M.; Adam, A.; Adriani, O.; Ahlen, S.; Alcaraz, J.; Ambrosi, G.; Babucci, E.; Baksay, L.; Baschirotto, A.; Battiston, R.; Baur, W.; Bay, A.; Bencze, Gy. L.; Bertucci, B.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Bobbink, G. J.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bosetti, M.; Brooks, M. L.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Camps, C.; Caria, M.; Castellini, G.; Castello, R.; Checcuccl, B.; Chen, A.; Coan, T. E.; Commichau, V.; DiBitonto, D.; Ding, J.; Duinker, P.; Djambazov, L.; Easo, S.; Extermann, P.; Fiandrini, E.; Gabbanini, A.; Goldstein, J.; Gougas, A.; Hangarter, K.; Hauviller, C.; Herve, A.; Hofer, M.; Hofer, T.; Hou, S.; Josa, M. I.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Kim, D.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirst, H.; Kornis, J.; Krastev, V. R.; Ladron, P.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lecomte, P.; Lee, D. M.; Leiste, R.; Lejeune, E.; Lin, W. T.; Lohmann, W.; Marin, A.; Massetti, R.; Mills, G. B.; Nowak, H.; Okle, M.; Passaleva, G.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perrin, E.; Produit, N.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Richeux, J.-P.; Santocchia, A.; Siedling, R.; Sachwitz, M.; Schmitz, P.; Schöneich, B.; Servoli, L.; Subham, K.; Susinno, G. F.; Terza, G.; Tesi, M.; Thompson, T.; Tonisch, F.; Toth, J.; Trowitzsch, G.; Viertel, G.; Tuchscherer, H.; Vogt, H.; Wang, S.; Waldmeier, S.; Weill, R.; Xu, J.; Yeh, S. C.; Zhou, B.; Zilizi, G.

    1994-12-01

    The design and construction of the silicon strip microvertex detector (SMD) of the L3 experiment at LEP are described. We present the sensors, readout electronics, data acquisition system, mechanical assembly and support, displacement monitoring systems and radiation monitoring system of the recently installed double-sided, double-layered SMD. This detector utilizes novel and sophisticated techniques for its readout.

  9. Utilization of thermal effects for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Daoxin; Yu, Longhai; Chen, Sitao; Wu, Hao

    2015-08-01

    Thermal effect plays a key role and has been utilized for various photonic devices. For silicon photonics, the thermal effect is usually important because of the large thermo-optical coefficient of silicon material. This paper gives a review for the utilization of thermal effects for silicon photonics. First, the thermal effect is very beneficial to realize energy-efficient silicon photonic devices with tunability/switchability (including switches, variable optical attenuators, etc). Traditionally metal micro-heater sitting on a buried silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanowire is used to introduce a phase shift for thermal tunability by injecting a electrical current. An effective way to improve the energy-efficiency of thermal tuning is reducing the volume of the optical waveguide as well as the micro-heater. Our recent work on silicon nanophotonic waveguides with novel nano-heaters based on metal wires as well as graphene ribbons will be summarized. Second, the thermal resistance effect of the metal strip on a hybrid plasmonic waveguide structure can be utilized to realize an ultra-small on-chip photodetector available for an ultra-broad band of wavelength, which will also be discussed.

  10. Large-scale quantum photonic circuits in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Nicholas C.; Bunandar, Darius; Pant, Mihir; Steinbrecher, Greg R.; Mower, Jacob; Prabhu, Mihika; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    Quantum information science offers inherently more powerful methods for communication, computation, and precision measurement that take advantage of quantum superposition and entanglement. In recent years, theoretical and experimental advances in quantum computing and simulation with photons have spurred great interest in developing large photonic entangled states that challenge today's classical computers. As experiments have increased in complexity, there has been an increasing need to transition bulk optics experiments to integrated photonics platforms to control more spatial modes with higher fidelity and phase stability. The silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanophotonics platform offers new possibilities for quantum optics, including the integration of bright, nonclassical light sources, based on the large third-order nonlinearity (χ(3)) of silicon, alongside quantum state manipulation circuits with thousands of optical elements, all on a single phase-stable chip. How large do these photonic systems need to be? Recent theoretical work on Boson Sampling suggests that even the problem of sampling from e30 identical photons, having passed through an interferometer of hundreds of modes, becomes challenging for classical computers. While experiments of this size are still challenging, the SOI platform has the required component density to enable low-loss and programmable interferometers for manipulating hundreds of spatial modes. Here, we discuss the SOI nanophotonics platform for quantum photonic circuits with hundreds-to-thousands of optical elements and the associated challenges. We compare SOI to competing technologies in terms of requirements for quantum optical systems. We review recent results on large-scale quantum state evolution circuits and strategies for realizing high-fidelity heralded gates with imperfect, practical systems. Next, we review recent results on silicon photonics-based photon-pair sources and device architectures, and we discuss a path towards

  11. The Silicon Pixel Detector for ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fabris, D.; Bombonati, C.; Dima, R.; Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S.; Pepato, A.; Bohus, L. Sajo; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G.; Shen, D.; Turrisi, R.; Viesti, G.; Anelli, G.; Boccardi, A.; Burns, M.; Campbell, M.; Ceresa, S.; Conrad, J.; Kluge, A.; Kral, M.

    2007-10-26

    The Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE experiment is made of position sensitive detectors which have to operate in a region where the track density may be as high as 50 tracks/cm{sup 2}. To handle such densities detectors with high precision and granularity are mandatory. The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD), the innermost part of the ITS, has been designed to provide tracking information close to primary interaction point. The assembly of the entire SPD has been completed.

  12. Silicon radiation detectors: materials and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Haller, E.E.

    1982-10-01

    Silicon nuclear radiation detectors are available today in a large variety of sizes and types. This profusion has been made possible by the ever increasing quality and diameter silicon single crystals, new processing technologies and techniques, and innovative detector design. The salient characteristics of the four basic detector groups, diffused junction, ion implanted, surface barrier, and lithium drift are reviewed along with the silicon crystal requirements. Results of crystal imperfections detected by lithium ion compensation are presented. Processing technologies and techniques are described. Two recent novel position-sensitive detector designs are discussed - one in high-energy particle track reconstruction and the other in x-ray angiography. The unique experimental results obtained with these devices are presented.

  13. Silicon photonic heater-modulator

    DOEpatents

    Zortman, William A.; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-07-14

    Photonic modulators, methods of forming photonic modulators and methods of modulating an input optical signal are provided. A photonic modulator includes a disk resonator having a central axis extending along a thickness direction of the disk resonator. The disk resonator includes a modulator portion and a heater portion. The modulator portion extends in an arc around the central axis. A PN junction of the modulator portion is substantially normal to the central axis.

  14. Novel Photon-Counting Detectors for Free-Space Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, M. A.; Yang, G.; Sun, X.; Lu, W.; Merritt, S.; Beck, J.

    2016-01-01

    We present performance data for novel photon-counting detectors for free space optical communication. NASA GSFC is testing the performance of two types of novel photon-counting detectors 1) a 2x8 mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) avalanche array made by DRS Inc., and a 2) a commercial 2880-element silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) array. We present and compare dark count, photon-detection efficiency, wavelength response and communication performance data for these detectors. We successfully measured real-time communication performance using both the 2 detected-photon threshold and AND-gate coincidence methods. Use of these methods allows mitigation of dark count, after-pulsing and background noise effects. The HgCdTe APD array routinely demonstrated photon detection efficiencies of greater than 50% across 5 arrays, with one array reaching a maximum PDE of 70%. We performed high-resolution pixel-surface spot scans and measured the junction diameters of its diodes. We found that decreasing the junction diameter from 31 micrometers to 25 micrometers doubled the e- APD gain from 470 for an array produced in the year 2010 to a gain of 1100 on an array delivered to NASA GSFC recently. The mean single-photon SNR was over 12 and the excess noise factors measurements were 1.2-1.3. The commercial silicon APD array exhibited a fast output with rise times of 300 ps and pulse widths of 600 ps. On-chip individually filtered signals from the entire array were multiplexed onto a single fast output.

  15. Analog optical computing primitives in silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yunshan; DeVore, Peter T S; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-15

    Optical computing accelerators help alleviate bandwidth and power consumption bottlenecks in electronics. We show an approach to implementing logarithmic-type analog co-processors in silicon photonics and use it to perform the exponentiation operation and the recovery of a signal in the presence of multiplicative distortion. The function is realized by exploiting nonlinear-absorption-enhanced Raman amplification saturation in a silicon waveguide. PMID:26977687

  16. Silicon photonics cloud (SiCloud)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, Peter T. S.; Jiang, Yunshan; Lynch, Michael; Miyatake, Taira; Carmona, Christopher; Chan, Andrew C.; Muniam, Kuhan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-02-01

    We present SiCloud (Silicon Photonics Cloud), the first free, instructional web-based research and education tool for silicon photonics. SiCloud's vision is to provide a host of instructional and research web-based tools. Such interactive learning tools enhance traditional teaching methods by extending access to a very large audience, resulting in very high impact. Interactive tools engage the brain in a way different from merely reading, and so enhance and reinforce the learning experience. Understanding silicon photonics is challenging as the topic involves a wide range of disciplines, including material science, semiconductor physics, electronics and waveguide optics. This web-based calculator is an interactive analysis tool for optical properties of silicon and related material (SiO2, Si3N4, Al2O3, etc.). It is designed to be a one stop resource for students, researchers and design engineers. The first and most basic aspect of Silicon Photonics is the Material Parameters, which provides the foundation for the Device, Sub-System and System levels. SiCloud includes the common dielectrics and semiconductors for waveguide core, cladding, and photodetection, as well as metals for electrical contacts. SiCloud is a work in progress and its capability is being expanded. SiCloud is being developed at UCLA with funding from the National Science Foundation's Center for Integrated Access Networks (CIAN) Engineering Research Center.

  17. EDITORIAL: Special issue on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Graham; Paniccia, Mario; Wada, Kazumi; Mashanovich, Goran

    2008-06-01

    The technology now known as silicon photonics can be traced back to the pioneering work of Soref in the mid-1980s (see, for example, Soref R A and Lorenzo J P 1985 Electron. Lett. 21 953). However, the nature of the research conducted today, whilst it builds upon that early work, is unrecognizable in terms of technology metrics such as device efficiency, device data rate and device dimensions, and even in targeted applications areas. Today silicon photonics is still evolving, and is enjoying a period of unprecedented attention in terms of research focus. This has resulted in orders-of-magnitude improvement in device performance over the last few years to levels many thought were impossible. However, despite the existence of the research field for more than two decades, silicon is still regarded as a 'new' optical material, one that is being manipulated and modified to satisfy the requirements of a range of applications. This is somewhat ironic since silicon is one of the best known and most thoroughly studied materials, thanks to the electronics industry that has made silicon its material of choice. The principal reasons for the lack of study of this 'late developer' are that (i) silicon is an indirect bandgap material and (ii) it does not exhibit a linear electro-optic (Pockels) effect. The former condition means that it is difficult to make a laser in silicon based on the intrinsic performance of the material, and consequently, in recent years, researchers have attempted to modify the material to artificially engineer the conditions for lasing to be viable (see, for example, the review text, Jalali B et al 2008 Silicon Lasers in Silicon Photonics: The State of the Art ed G T Reed (New York: Wiley)). The latter condition means that optical modulators are intrinsically less efficient in silicon than in some other materials, particularly when targeting the popular telecommunications wavelengths around 1.55 μm. Therefore researchers have sought alternative

  18. High quantum-efficiency photon-number-resolving detector for photonic on-chip information processing.

    PubMed

    Calkins, Brice; Mennea, Paolo L; Lita, Adriana E; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Kolthammer, W Steven; Lamas-Linares, Antia; Spring, Justin B; Humphreys, Peter C; Mirin, Richard P; Gates, James C; Smith, Peter G R; Walmsley, Ian A; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo

    2013-09-23

    The integrated optical circuit is a promising architecture for the realization of complex quantum optical states and information networks. One element that is required for many of these applications is a high-efficiency photon detector capable of photon-number discrimination. We present an integrated photonic system in the telecom band at 1550 nm based on UV-written silica-on-silicon waveguides and modified transition-edge sensors capable of number resolution and over 40 % efficiency. Exploiting the mode transmission failure of these devices, we multiplex three detectors in series to demonstrate a combined 79 % ± 2 % detection efficiency with a single pass, and 88 % ± 3 % at the operating wavelength of an on-chip terminal reflection grating. Furthermore, our optical measurements clearly demonstrate no significant unexplained loss in this system due to scattering or reflections. This waveguide and detector design therefore allows the placement of number-resolving single-photon detectors of predictable efficiency at arbitrary locations within a photonic circuit - a capability that offers great potential for many quantum optical applications. PMID:24104153

  19. High spectral purity silicon ring resonator photon-pair source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidle, Jeffrey A.; Fanto, Michael L.; Tison, Christopher C.; Wang, Zihao; Preble, Stefan F.; Alsing, Paul M.

    2015-05-01

    Here we present the experimental demonstration of a Silicon ring resonator photon-pair source. The crystalline Silicon ring resonator (radius of 18.5μm) was designed to realize low dispersion across multiple resonances, which allows for operation with a high quality factor of Q~50k. In turn, the source exhibits very high brightness of >3x105 photons/s/mW2/GHz since the produced photon pairs have a very narrow bandwidth. Furthermore, the waveguidefiber coupling loss was minimized to <1.5dB using an inverse tapered waveguide (tip width of ~150nm over a 300μm length) that is butt-coupled to a high-NA fiber (Nufern UHNA-7). This ensured minimal loss of photon pairs to the detectors, which enabled very high purity photon pairs with minimal noise, as exhibited by a very high Coincidental-Accidental Ratio of >1900. The low coupling loss (3dB fiber-fiber) also allowed for operation with very low off-chip pump power of <200μW. In addition, the zero dispersion of the ring resonator resulted in the production of a photon-pair comb across multiple resonances symmetric about the pump resonance (every ~5nm spanning >20nm), which could be used in future wavelength division multiplexed quantum networks.

  20. Modeling silicon diode energy response factors for use in therapeutic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Karin; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2009-10-21

    Silicon diodes have good spatial resolution, which makes them advantageous over ionization chambers for dosimetry in fields with high dose gradients. However, silicon diodes overrespond to low-energy photons, that are more abundant in scatter which increase with large fields and larger depths. We present a cavity-theory-based model for a general response function for silicon detectors at arbitrary positions within photon fields. The model uses photon and electron spectra calculated from fluence pencil kernels. The incident photons are treated according to their energy through a bipartition of the primary beam photon spectrum into low- and high-energy components. Primary electrons from the high-energy component are treated according to Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Low-energy primary photons together with all scattered photons are treated according to large cavity theory supplemented with an energy-dependent factor K(E) to compensate for energy variations in the electron equilibrium. The depth variation of the response for an unshielded silicon detector has been calculated for 5 x 5 cm(2), 10 x 10 cm(2) and 20 x 20 cm(2) fields in 6 and 15 MV beams and compared with measurements showing that our model calculates response factors with deviations less than 0.6%. An alternative method is also proposed, where we show that one can use a correlation with the scatter factor to determine the detector response of silicon diodes with an error of less than 3% in 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams.

  1. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  2. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  3. High-speed and high-efficiency travelling wave single-photon detectors embedded in nanophotonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Pernice, W.H.P.; Schuck, C.; Minaeva, O.; Li, M.; Goltsman, G.N.; Sergienko, A.V.; Tang, H.X.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast, high-efficiency single-photon detectors are among the most sought-after elements in modern quantum optics and quantum communication. However, imperfect modal matching and finite photon absorption rates have usually limited their maximum attainable detection efficiency. Here we demonstrate superconducting nanowire detectors atop nanophotonic waveguides, which enable a drastic increase of the absorption length for incoming photons. This allows us to achieve high on-chip single-photon detection efficiency up to 91% at telecom wavelengths, repeatable across several fabricated chips. We also observe remarkably low dark count rates without significant compromise of the on-chip detection efficiency. The detectors are fully embedded in scalable silicon photonic circuits and provide ultrashort timing jitter of 18 ps. Exploiting this high temporal resolution, we demonstrate ballistic photon transport in silicon ring resonators. Our direct implementation of a high-performance single-photon detector on chip overcomes a major barrier in integrated quantum photonics. PMID:23271658

  4. Gated Silicon Drift Detector Fabricated from a Low-Cost Silicon Wafer

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Hideharu; Sakurai, Shungo; Oda, Yuya; Fukushima, Shinya; Ishikawa, Shohei; Takeshita, Akinobu; Hidaka, Atsuki

    2015-01-01

    Inexpensive high-resolution silicon (Si) X-ray detectors are required for on-site surveys of traces of hazardous elements in food and soil by measuring the energies and counts of X-ray fluorescence photons radially emitted from these elements. Gated silicon drift detectors (GSDDs) are much cheaper to fabricate than commercial silicon drift detectors (SDDs). However, previous GSDDs were fabricated from 10-kΩ·cm Si wafers, which are more expensive than 2-kΩ·cm Si wafers used in commercial SDDs. To fabricate cheaper portable X-ray fluorescence instruments, we investigate GSDDs formed from 2-kΩ·cm Si wafers. The thicknesses of commercial SDDs are up to 0.5 mm, which can detect photons with energies up to 27 keV, whereas we describe GSDDs that can detect photons with energies of up to 35 keV. We simulate the electric potential distributions in GSDDs with Si thicknesses of 0.5 and 1 mm at a single high reverse bias. GSDDs with one gate pattern using any resistivity Si wafer can work well for changing the reverse bias that is inversely proportional to the resistivity of the Si wafer. PMID:26007742

  5. Dual concentric crystal low energy photon detector

    DOEpatents

    Guilmette, R.A.

    A photon detector for biological samples includes a block of NaI(T1) having a hole containing a thin walled cylinder of CsI(T1). At least three photo multiplier tubes are evenly spaced around the parameter of the block. Biological samples are placed within the hole, and emissions which are sensed by at least two of the photo multipliers from only the NaI(T1) detector are counted.

  6. Upgrade of the Belle Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Belle SVD Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    The Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) was inaugurated in 1999 and has delivered excellent physics results since then, which were, for example, recognized in the Nobel Prize award 2008 to Kobayashi and Masukawa. An overall luminosity of 895 fb -1 has been recorded as of December 2008, and the present system will be running until 1 ab -1 is achieved. After that, a major upgrade is foreseen for both the KEK-B machine and the Belle detector. Already in 2004, the Letter of Intent for KEK Super B Factory was published. Intermediate steps of upgrade were considered for the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), which performs very well but already got close to its limit regarding the occupancy in the innermost layer and dead time. Eventually it was decided to keep the existing SVD2 system until 1 ab -1 and completely replace the silicon detector as well as its readout system for Super-Belle. The future SVD will be composed of double-sided silicon sensors as the present detector, but equipped with faster readout electronics, namely the APV25 chips originally made for CMS at CERN. Moreover, it will be enlarged by two additional layers and equipped with a double layer of DEPFET pixel detectors surrounding the beam pipe. The silicon sensors will be fabricated from 6 in. wafers (compared to the current 4 in. types) and the readout chain will be completely replaced, including front-end, repeaters and the back-end electronics in the counting house.

  7. Superconducting nanowire single photon detector on diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Atikian, Haig A.; Burek, Michael J.; Choy, Jennifer T.; Lončar, Marko; Eftekharian, Amin; Jafari Salim, A.; Hamed Majedi, A.

    2014-03-24

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors are fabricated directly on diamond substrates and their optical and electrical properties are characterized. Dark count performance and photon count rates are measured at varying temperatures for 1310 nm and 632 nm photons. A multi-step diamond surface polishing procedure is reported, involving iterative reactive ion etching and mechanical polishing to create a suitable diamond surface for the deposition and patterning of thin film superconducting layers. Using this approach, diamond substrates with less than 300 pm Root Mean Square surface roughness are obtained.

  8. Status of the CDF silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Grinstein, Sebastian; /Harvard U.

    2006-05-01

    The CDF Run II silicon micro-strip detector is an essential part of the heavy flavor tagging and forward tracking capabilities of the experiment. Since the commissioning period ended in 2002, about 85% of the 730 k readout channels have been consistently provided good data. A summary of the recent improvements in the DAQ system as well as experience of maintaining and operating such a large, complex detector are presented.

  9. Performance of single-photon-counting PILATUS detector modules

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, P.; Bergamaschi, A.; Broennimann, Ch.; Dinapoli, R.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Johnson, I.; Mozzanica, A.; Schlepütz, C. M.; Willmott, P. R.; Schmitt, B.

    2009-01-01

    PILATUS is a silicon hybrid pixel detector system, operating in single-photon-counting mode, that has been developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut for the needs of macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source (SLS). A calibrated PILATUS module has been characterized with monochromatic synchrotron radiation. The influence of charge sharing on the count rate and the overall energy resolution of the detector were investigated. The dead-time of the system was determined using the attenuated direct synchrotron beam. A single module detector was also tested in surface diffraction experiments at the SLS, whereby its performance regarding fluorescence suppression and saturation tolerance were evaluated, and have shown to greatly improve the sensitivity, reliability and speed of surface diffraction data acquisition. PMID:19395800

  10. Single photon detector with high polarization sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qi; Li, Hao; You, LiXing; Zhang, WeiJun; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Zhen; Xie, XiaoMing; Qi, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Polarization is one of the key parameters of light. Most optical detectors are intensity detectors that are insensitive to the polarization of light. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD) is naturally sensitive to polarization due to its nanowire structure. Previous studies focused on producing a polarization-insensitive SNSPD. In this study, by adjusting the width and pitch of the nanowire, we systematically investigate the preparation of an SNSPD with high polarization sensitivity. Subsequently, an SNSPD with a system detection efficiency of 12% and a polarization extinction ratio of 22 was successfully prepared. PMID:25875225

  11. Microtextured Silicon Surfaces for Detectors, Sensors & Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, JE; Mazur, E

    2005-05-19

    With support from this award we studied a novel silicon microtexturing process and its application in silicon-based infrared photodetectors. By irradiating the surface of a silicon wafer with intense femtosecond laser pulses in the presence of certain gases or liquids, the originally shiny, flat surface is transformed into a dark array of microstructures. The resulting microtextured surface has near-unity absorption from near-ultraviolet to infrared wavelengths well below the band gap. The high, broad absorption of microtextured silicon could enable the production of silicon-based photodiodes for use as inexpensive, room-temperature multi-spectral photodetectors. Such detectors would find use in numerous applications including environmental sensors, solar energy, and infrared imaging. The goals of this study were to learn about microtextured surfaces and then develop and test prototype silicon detectors for the visible and infrared. We were extremely successful in achieving our goals. During the first two years of this award, we learned a great deal about how microtextured surfaces form and what leads to their remarkable optical properties. We used this knowledge to build prototype detectors with high sensitivity in both the visible and in the near-infrared. We obtained room-temperature responsivities as high as 100 A/W at 1064 nm, two orders of magnitude higher than standard silicon photodiodes. For wavelengths below the band gap, we obtained responsivities as high as 50 mA/W at 1330 nm and 35 mA/W at 1550 nm, close to the responsivity of InGaAs photodiodes and five orders of magnitude higher than silicon devices in this wavelength region.

  12. Performance characteristics and radiation damage results from the Fermilab E706 silicon microstrip detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, E.; Mani, S.; Orris, D.; Shepard, P. F.; Weerasundara, P. D.; Choudhary, B. C.; Joshi, U.; Kapoor, V.; Shivpuri, R.; Baker, W.; Berg, D.; Carey, D.; Johnstone, C.; Nelson, C.; Bromberg, C.; Brown, D.; Huston, J.; Miller, R.; Nguyen, A.; Benson, R.; Lukens, P.; Ruddick, K.; Alverson, G.; Faissler, W.; Garelick, D.; Glaubman, M.; Kourbanis, I.; Lirakis, C.; Pothier, E.; Sinanidis, A.; Wu, G.-H.; Yasuda, T.; Yosef, C.; Easo, S.; Hartman, K.; Oh, B. Y.; Toothacker, W.; Whitmore, J.; Ballocchi, G.; Debarbaro, L.; Desoi, W.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferbel, T.; Ginther, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lobkowicz, F.; Mansour, J.; Pedeville, G.; Prebys, E.; Skow, D.; Slattery, P.; Varelas, N.; Zielinski, M.

    1989-07-01

    A charged particle spectrometer containing a 7120-channel silicon microstrip detector system, one component of Fermilab experiment E706 to study direct photon production in hadron-hadron collisions, was utilized in a run in which 6 million events were recorded. We describe the silicon system, provide early results of track and vertex reconstruction, and present data on the radiation damage to the silicon wafers resulting from the narrow high intensity beam.

  13. Picosecond response of a photon drag detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmitt, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    The primary use of photon drag detectors has been with CO{sub 2} lasers at 10{mu}m. Cornmercially-available devices are limited to response times of < 0.5-1ns and voltage responsivities of <0.5{mu}V W{sup -1}. This poster paper will describe the first photon drag detector specifically designed for very fast response. Using the free-election laser FELIX at the FOM Institute in the Netherlands, a rise time of <50ps has been demonstrated, using a 5mm{sup 2} area detector with a responsivity of >1{mu}V W{sup -1} over the wavelength range 10-25{mu}m. The figure shows the clear resolution of the micropulse structure of the laser. The actual width of each pulse is a few picosecoods, with a micropulse spacing of Ins. The advantages or photon drag detectors are room-temperature operation, linear response to intensifies greater than 10{sup 6}MW cm{sup -2} and very high damage threshold. These detectors are cheap to manufacture and, using different semiconductors, can be designed for any wavelength from 1 {mu}m-5mm.

  14. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  15. Silicon Detector Letter of Intent

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Burrows, P.; Oreglia, M.

    2010-05-26

    This document presents the current status of SiD's effort to develop an optimized design for an experiment at the International Linear Collider. It presents detailed discussions of each of SiD's various subsystems, an overview of the full GEANT4 description of SiD, the status of newly developed tracking and calorimeter reconstruction algorithms, studies of subsystem performance based on these tools, results of physics benchmarking analyses, an estimate of the cost of the detector, and an assessment of the detector R&D needed to provide the technical basis for an optimised SiD.

  16. Hybrid laser integration for silicon photonics platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuyu

    Silicon photonics has attracted extensive attention in both academia and industry in recent years, as an enabling technology to address the exponentially increasing demands for communication bandwidth. It brings state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processing technology to the field of photonic integration. The high yield and uniformity of silicon devices make it possible to build complex photonic systems-on-chip in large production volumes. Cutting-edge device performance has been demonstrated on this platform, including high-speed modulators, photodetectors, and passive devices such as the Y-junction, waveguide crossing, and arrayed waveguide gratings. As the device library quickly matures, an integrated laser source for a transmitter remains missing from the design kit. I demonstrated hybrid external cavity lasers by integrating reflective optical semiconductor amplifiers and silicon photonics chips. The gain chip and silicon chip can be designed and optimized independently, which is a significant advantage compared to bonding an III-V film on top of the silicon chip. Advanced optoelectronics packaging processes can be leveraged for chip alignment. Tunable C-Band (near 1550 nm) lasers with 10 mW on-chip power and less than 220 kHz bandwidth are demonstrated. O-Band lasers (operating near 1310 nm) as well as successful data transmission at 10 Gb/s and 40 Gb/s using the hybrid laser as the light source are also demonstrated. I designed a single cavity, multi wavelength laser by utilizing a quantum dot SOA, Sagnac loop and micro-ring based silicon photonics half cavity. Four lasing peaks with less than 3 dB power non-uniformity were measured, as well as 4 x 10 Gb/s error free data transmission. In addition to my main focus on RSOA/Silicon external cavity lasers, I propose and demonstrate a novel germanium-assisted grating coupler with low loss on-and-off chip fiber coupling. A coupling efficiency of 76% at 1.55 microm and 40 nm 1 d

  17. Passive silicon photonic devices for microwave photonic signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiayang; Peng, Jizong; Liu, Boyu; Pan, Ting; Zhou, Huanying; Mao, Junming; Yang, Yuxing; Qiu, Ciyuan; Su, Yikai

    2016-08-01

    We present our recent progress on microwave signal processing (MSP) using on-chip passive silicon photonic devices, including tunable microwave notch filtering/millimeter-wave (MMW) signal generation based on self-coupled micro-resonators (SCMRs), and tunable radio-frequency (RF) phase shifting implemented by a micro-disk resonator (MDR). These schemes can provide improved flexibility and performances of MSP. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  18. Silicon Photonic Devices and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying

    Silicon photonics is the study and application of photonic systems, which use silicon as an optical medium. Data is transferred in the systems by optical rays. This technology is seen as the substitutions of electric computer chips in the future and the means to keep tack on the Moore's law. Cavity optomechanics is a rising field of silicon photonics. It focuses on the interaction between light and mechanical objects. Although it is currently at its early stage of growth, this field has attracted rising attention. Here, we present highly sensitive optical detection of acceleration using an optomechanical accelerometer. The core part of this accelerometer is a slot-type photonic crystal cavity with strong optomechanical interactions. We first discuss theoretically the optomechanical coupling in the air-slot mode-gap photonic crystal cavity. The dispersive coupling gom is numerically calculated. Dynamical parametric oscillations for both cooling and amplification, in the resolved and unresolved sideband limit, are examined numerically, along with the displacement spectral density and cooling rates for the various operating parameters. Experimental results also demonstrated that the cavity has a large optomechanical coupling rate. The optically induced spring effect, damping and amplification of the mechanical modes are observed with measurements both in air and in vacuum. Then, we propose and demonstrate our optomechanical accelerometer. It can operate with a resolution of 730 ng/Hz1/2 (or equivalently 40.1 aN/Hz1/2) and with a transduction bandwidth of ≈ 85 kHz. We also demonstrate an integrated photonics device, an on-chip spectroscopy, in the last part of this thesis. This new type of on-chip microspectrometer is based on the Vernier effect of two cascaded micro-ring cavities. It can measure optical spectrum with a bandwidth of 74nm and a resolution of 0.22 nm in a small footprint of 1.5 mm2.

  19. Development of Ultra-High Sensivity Silicon Carbide Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Feng; Xin, Xiao-Bin; Alexandrov, Petre; Stahle, Carl M.; Guan, Bing; Zhao, Jian H.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of silicon carbide (SiC) detectors have been developed to study the sensitivity of SiC ultraviolet (UV) detectors, including Schottky photodiodes, p-i-n photodiodes, avalanche photodiodes (APDs), and single photon-counting APDs. Due to the very wide bandgap and thus extremely low leakage current, Sic photo-detectors showed excellent sensitivity. The specific detectivity, D*, of SiC photodiodes are orders of magnitude higher than that of their competitors, such as Si photodiodes, and comparable to the D* of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). To pursue the ultimate detection sensitivity, SiC APDs and single photon-counting avalanche diodes (SPADs) have also been fabricated. By operating the SiC APDs at a linear mode gain over 10(exp 6), SPADs in UV have been demonstrated. SiC UV detectors have great potential for use in solar blind UV detection and biosensing. Moreover, SiC detectors have excellent radiation hardness and high temperature tolerance which makes them ideal for extreme environment applications such as in space or on the surface of the Moon or Mars.

  20. Practical photon number detection with electric field-modulated silicon avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, O; Yuan, Z L; Shields, A J

    2012-01-01

    Low-noise single-photon detection is a prerequisite for quantum information processing using photonic qubits. In particular, detectors that are able to accurately resolve the number of photons in an incident light pulse will find application in functions such as quantum teleportation and linear optics quantum computing. More generally, such a detector will allow the advantages of quantum light detection to be extended to stronger optical signals, permitting optical measurements limited only by fluctuations in the photon number of the source. Here we demonstrate a practical high-speed device, which allows the signals arising from multiple photon-induced avalanches to be precisely discriminated. We use a type of silicon avalanche photodiode in which the lateral electric field profile is strongly modulated in order to realize a spatially multiplexed detector. Clearly discerned multiphoton signals are obtained by applying sub-nanosecond voltage gates in order to restrict the detector current. PMID:22273682

  1. Advances in solid state photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renker, D.; Lorenz, E.

    2009-04-01

    Semiconductor photodiodes were developed in the early `Forties approximately at the time when the photomultiplier tube became a commercial product (RCA 1939). Only in recent years, with the invention of the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes, have the semiconductor photo detectors reached sensitivity comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes. The evolution started in the `Sixties with the p-i-n (PIN) photodiode, a very successful device, which is still used in many detectors for high energy physics and a large number of other applications like radiation detection and medical imaging. The next step was the development of the avalanche photodiode (APD) leading to a substantial reduction of noise but not yet achieving single photon response. The weakest light flashes that can be detected by the PIN diode need to contain several hundreds of photons. An improvement of the sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude was achieved by the development of the avalanche photodiode, a device with internal gain. At the end of the millennium, the semiconductor detectors evolved with the Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode into highly sensitive devices, which have an internal gain comparable to the gain of photomultiplier tubes and a response to single photons. A review of the semiconductor photo detector design and development, the properties and problems, some applications and a speculative outlook on the future evolution will be presented.

  2. Development of silicon micropattern pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijne, E. H. M.; Antinori, F.; Beker, H.; Batignani, G.; Beusch, W.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Boutonnet, C.; Burger, P.; Campbell, M.; Cantoni, P.; Catanesi, M. G.; Chesi, E.; Claeys, C.; Clemens, J. C.; Cohen Solal, M.; Darbo, G.; Da Via, C.; Debusschere, I.; Delpierre, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Liberto, S.; Dierickx, B.; Enz, C. C.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Gally, Y.; Glaser, M.; Gys, T.; Habrard, M. C.; Hallewell, G.; Hermans, L.; Heuser, J.; Hurst, R.; Inzani, P.; Jæger, J. J.; Jarron, P.; Karttaavi, T.; Kersten, S.; Krummenacher, F.; Leitner, R.; Lemeilleur, F.; Lenti, V.; Letheren, M.; Lokajicek, M.; Loukas, D.; Macdermott, M.; Maggi, G.; Manzari, V.; Martinengo, P.; Meddeler, G.; Meddi, F.; Mekkaoui, A.; Menetrey, A.; Middelkamp, P.; Morando, M.; Munns, A.; Musico, P.; Nava, P.; Navach, F.; Neyer, C.; Pellegrini, F.; Pengg, F.; Perego, R.; Pindo, M.; Pospisil, S.; Potheau, R.; Quercigh, E.; Redaelli, N.; Ridky, J.; Rossi, L.; Sauvage, D.; Segato, G.; Simone, S.; Sopko, B.; Stefanini, G.; Strakos, V.; Tempesta, P.; Tonelli, G.; Vegni, G.; Verweij, H.; Viertel, G. M.; Vrba, V.; Waisbard, J.; CERN RD19 Collaboration

    1994-09-01

    Successive versions of high speed, active silicon pixel detectors with integrated readout electronics have been developed for particle physics experiments using monolithic and hybrid technologies. Various matrices with binary output as well as a linear detector with analog output have been made. The hybrid binary matrix with 1024 cells (dimension 75 μm×500 μm) can capture events at ˜5 MHz and a selected event can then be read out in < 10 μs. In different beam tests at CERN a precision of 25 μm has been achieved and the efficiency was better than 99.2%. Detector thicknesses of 300 μm and 150 μm of silicon have been used. In a test with a 109Cd source a noise level of 170 e - r.m.s. (1.4 keV fwhm) has been measured with a threshold non-uniformity of 750 e - r.m.s. Objectives of the development work are the increase of the size of detecting area without loss of efficiency, the design of an appropriate readout architecture for collider operation, the reduction of material thickness in the detector, understanding of the threshold non-uniformity, study of the sensitivity of the pixel matrices to light and low energy electrons for scintillating fiber detector readout and last but not least, the optimization of cost and yield of the pixel detectors in production.

  3. Dow Corning photonics: the silicon advantage in automotive photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Terry V.; Paquet, Rene; Norris, Ann; Pettersen, Babette

    2005-02-01

    The Automotive Market offers several opportunities for Dow Corning to leverage the power of silicon-based materials. Dow Corning Photonics Solutions has a number of developments that may be attractive for the emergent photonics needs in automobiles, building on 40 years of experience as a leading Automotive supplier with a strong foundation of expertise and an extensive product offering- from encapsulents and highly reliable resins, adhesives, insulating materials and other products, ensuring that the advantage of silicones are already well-embedded in Automotive systems, modules and components. The recent development of LED encapsulants of exceptional clarity and stability has extended the potential for Dow Corning"s strength in Photonics to be deployed "in-car". Demonstration of board-level and back-plane solutions utilising siloxane waveguide technology offers new opportunities for systems designers to integrate optical components at low cost on diverse substrates. Coupled with work on simple waveguide technology for sensors and data communications applications this suite of materials and technology offerings is very potent in this sector. The harsh environment under hood and the very extreme thermal range that materials must sustain in vehicles due to both their engine and the climate is an applications specification that defines the siloxane advantage. For these passive optics applications the siloxanes very high clarity at the data-communications wavelengths coupled with extraordinary stability offers significant design advantage. The future development of Head-Up-Displays for instrumentation and data display will offer yet more opportunities to the siloxanes in Automotive Photonics.

  4. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Peter; Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  5. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, Peter Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  6. Development of a silicon carbide radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, F.H.; Dulloo, A.R.; Seidel, J.G.; Seshadri, S.; Rowland, L.B.

    1998-06-01

    The radiation detection properties of semiconductor detectors made of 4H silicon carbide were evaluated. Both Schottky and p-n junction devices were tested. Exposure to alpha particles from a {sup 238}Pu source led to robust signals from the detectors. The resolution of the Schottky SiC detector was 5.8% (FWHM) at an energy of 294 keV, while that of the p-n junction was 6.6% (FWHM) at 260 keV. No effect of temperature in the range of 22 to 89 C was observed on the characteristics of the {sup 238}Pu alpha-induced signal from the SiC detector. In addition, testing in a gamma field of 10,000 rad-Si h{sup {minus}1} showed that the alpha-induced signal was separable from the gamma signal.

  7. Characterization of Silicon Photomultiplier Detectors using Cosmic Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, Favian; Castro, Juan; Niduaza, Rexavalmar; Wedel, Zachary; Fan, Sewan; Ritt, Stefan; Fatuzzo, Laura

    2014-03-01

    The silicon photomultiplier light detector has gained a lot of attention lately in fields such as particle physics, astrophysics, and medical physics. Its popularity stems from its lower cost, compact size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and its excellent ability to distinguish a quantized number of photons. They are normally operated at room temperature and biased above their breakdown voltages. As such, they may also exhibit properties that may hinder their optimal operation which include a thermally induced high dark count rate, after pulse effects, and cross talk from photons in nearby pixels. At this poster session, we describe our data analysis and our endeavor to characterize the multipixel photon counter (MPPC) detectors from Hamamatsu under different bias voltages and temperature conditions. Particularly, we describe our setup which uses cosmic rays to induce scintillation light delivered to the detector by wavelength shifting optical fibers and the use of a fast 1 GHz waveform sampler, the domino ring sampler (DRS4) digitizer board. Department of Education grant number P031S90007.

  8. Small SRS photon field profile dosimetry performed using a PinPoint air ion chamber, a diamond detector, a novel silicon-diode array (DOSI), and polymer gel dosimetry. Analysis and intercomparison.

    PubMed

    Pappas, E; Maris, T G; Zacharopoulou, F; Papadakis, A; Manolopoulos, S; Green, S; Wojnecki, C

    2008-10-01

    Small photon fields are increasingly used in modern radiotherapy and especially in IMRT and SRS/SRT treatments. The uncertainties related to small field profile measurements can introduce significant systematic errors to the overall treatment process. These measurements are challenging mainly due to the absence of charged particle equilibrium conditions, detector size and composition effects, and positioning problems. In this work four different dosimetric methods have been used to measure the profiles of three small 6 MV circular fields having diameters of 7.5, 15.0, and 30.0 mm: a small sensitive volume air ion chamber, a diamond detector, a novel silicon-diode array (DOSI), and vinyl-pyrrolidone based polymer gel dosimeter. The results of this work support the validity of previous findings, suggesting that (a) air ion chambers are not suitable for small field dosimetry since they result in penumbra broadening and require significant corrections due to severe charged particle transport alterations; (b) diamond detectors provide high resolution and rather accurate small field profile measurements, as long as positioning problems can be addressed and the necessary dose rate corrections are correctly applied; and (c) the novel silicon-diode array (DOSI) used in this study seems to be adequate for small field profile measurements overcoming positioning problems. Polymer gel data were assumed as reference data to which the other measurement data were compared both qualitatively and quantitatively using the gamma-index concept. Polymer gels are both phantom and dosimeter, hence there are no beam perturbation effects. In addition, polymer gels are tissue equivalent and can provide high-spatial density and high-spatial resolution measurements without positioning problems, which makes them useful for small field dosimetry measurements. This work emphasizes the need to perform beam profile measurements of small fields (for acceptance, commissioning, treatment planning

  9. Bright Single Photon Emitter in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, Benjamin; Schroeder, Tim; Mouradian, Sara; Dolde, Florian; Trong Tran, Toan; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Efficient, on-demand, and robust single photon emitters are of central importance to many areas of quantum information processing. Over the past 10 years, color centers in solids have emerged as excellent single photon emitters. Color centers in diamond are among the most intensively studied single photon emitters, but recently silicon carbide (SiC) has also been demonstrated to be an excellent host material. In contrast to diamond, SiC is a technologically important material that is widely used in optoelectronics, high power electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. It is commercially available in sizes up to 6 inches and processes for device engineering are well developed. We report on a visible-spectrum single photon emitter in 4H-SiC. The emitter is photostable at both room and low temperatures, and it enables 2 million photons/second from unpatterned bulk SiC. We observe two classes of orthogonally polarized emitters, each of which has parallel absorption and emission dipole orientations. Low temperature measurements reveal a narrow zero phonon line with linewidth < 0.1 nm that accounts for more than 30% of the total photoluminescence spectrum. To our knowledge, this SiC color emitter is the brightest stable room-temperature single photon emitter ever observed.

  10. Single photon counting pixel detectors for synchrotron radiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyokawa, H.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.; Henrich, B.; Kawase, M.; Kobas, M.; Kraft, P.; Sato, M.; Schmitt, B.; Suzuki, M.; Tanida, H.; Uruga, T.

    2010-11-01

    At the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI an X-ray single photon counting pixel detector (PILATUS) based on the hybrid-pixel detector technology was developed in collaboration with SPring-8. The detection element is a 320 or 450 μm thick silicon sensor forming pixelated pn-diodes with a pitch of 172 μm×172 μm. An array of 2×8 custom CMOS readout chips are indium bump-bonded to the sensor, which leads to 33.5 mm×83.8 mm detective area. Each pixel contains a charge-sensitive amplifier, a single level discriminator and a 20 bit counter. This design realizes a high dynamic range, short readout time of less than 3 ms, a high framing rate of over 200 images per second and an excellent point-spread function. The maximum counting rate achieves more than 2×10 6 X-rays/s/pixel.

  11. Investigation of Self Triggered Cosmic Ray Detectors using Silicon Photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Adrian; Niduaza, Rommel; Hernandez, Victor; Ruiz, Daniel; Ramos, Daniel; Fan, Sewan; Fatuzzo, Laura; Ritt, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a highly sensitive light detector capable of measuring single photons. It costs a fraction of the photomultiplier tube and operates slightly above the breakdown voltage. At this conference we describe our investigation of SiPM, the multipixel photon counters (MPPC) from Hamamatsu as readout detectors for plastic scintillators working for detecting cosmic ray particles. Our setup consists of scintillator sheets embedded with blue to green wavelength shifting fibers optically coupled to MPPCs to detect scintillating light. Four detector assemblies would be constructed and arranged to work in self triggered mode. Using custom matching tee boxes, the amplified MPPC signals are fed to discriminators with threshold set to give a reasonable coincidence count rate. Moreover, the detector waveforms are digitized using a 5 Giga Samples per second waveform digitizer, the DRS4, and triggered with the coincidence logic to capture the MPPC waveforms. Offline analysis of the digitized waveforms is accomplished using the CERN package PAW and results of our experiments and the data analysis would also be discussed. US Department of Education Title V Grant Number PO31S090007.

  12. Novel photon detectors for focusing DIRC prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, C.; Hadig, T.; Jain, M.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Mazaheri, G.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Schwiening, J.; Va'vra, J.

    2004-02-01

    For present BaBar DIRC, the Cherenkov angular resolution is dominated by three contributions—the chromatic error, bar thickness and pixel size. We have designed the Focusing DIRC prototype, which potentially can reduce the chromatic error by a precise timing in the range of 50-100 ps per photon, and the bar thickness by a focusing mirror. This paper describes two novel photon detectors, which are candidates for this type of concept: Hamamatsu 64-channel multi-anode Flat Panel H-8500 PMTs and Burle 64-channel micro-channel plate MCP-PMTs. The detectors were tested with a PiLas laser diode light pulse providing 35 ps FWHM timing resolution. A single-photon timing resolution of (1) σ˜120-140 ps was achieved with the Hamamatsu PMTs, and (2) σ˜55 ps with the Burle MCP-PMTs. To achieve the good timing resolution results, we have developed a new fast amplifier and a constant-fraction discriminator. We have also developed a computer-controlled scanning setup, which allows a detailed study of the relative efficiency response to single photons.

  13. Silicon technologies for arrays of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Francesco; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In order to fulfill the requirements of many applications, we recently developed a new technology aimed at combining the advantages of traditional thin and thick silicon Single Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPAD). In particular we demonstrated single-pixel detectors with a remarkable improvement in the Photon Detection Efficiency in the red/near-infrared spectrum (e.g. 40% at 800nm) while maintaining a timing jitter better than 100ps. In this paper we discuss the limitations of such Red-Enhanced (RE) technology from the point of view of the fabrication of small arrays of SPAD and we propose modifications to the structure aimed at overcoming these issues. We also report the first preliminary experimental results attained on devices fabricated adopting the improved structure. PMID:27761058

  14. Overview of Silicon Detectors in STAR: Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Kabana, Sonia; Collaboration: The SVT, SSD and HFT detector groups of the STAR experiment at RHIC

    2011-12-13

    The STAR experiment at RHIC aims to study the QCD phase transition and the origin of the spin of the proton. Its main detector for charged particle track reconstruction is a Time Projection Chamber, which has been supplemented with a silicon detector involving two different technologies, in particular double-sided silicon strip and silicon drift technology. STAR is preparing now for a new Silicon Vertex Detector, using double-sided silicon strip, single-sided silicon strip-pads, and CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors technology, planned to take data in 2014. We give an overview of the design, calibration and performances of the silicon detectors used by the STAR experiment in the past and the expected performances of the future silicon detector upgrade.

  15. A silicon strip detector dose magnifying glass for IMRT dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J. H. D.; Carolan, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Petasecca, M.; Khanna, S.; Perevertaylo, V. L.; Metcalfe, P.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows the delivery of escalated radiation dose to tumor while sparing adjacent critical organs. In doing so, IMRT plans tend to incorporate steep dose gradients at interfaces between the target and the organs at risk. Current quality assurance (QA) verification tools such as 2D diode arrays, are limited by their spatial resolution and conventional films are nonreal time. In this article, the authors describe a novel silicon strip detector (CMRP DMG) of high spatial resolution (200 {mu}m) suitable for measuring the high dose gradients in an IMRT delivery. Methods: A full characterization of the detector was performed, including dose per pulse effect, percent depth dose comparison with Farmer ion chamber measurements, stem effect, dose linearity, uniformity, energy response, angular response, and penumbra measurements. They also present the application of the CMRP DMG in the dosimetric verification of a clinical IMRT plan. Results: The detector response changed by 23% for a 390-fold change in the dose per pulse. A correction function is derived to correct for this effect. The strip detector depth dose curve agrees with the Farmer ion chamber within 0.8%. The stem effect was negligible (0.2%). The dose linearity was excellent for the dose range of 3-300 cGy. A uniformity correction method is described to correct for variations in the individual detector pixel responses. The detector showed an over-response relative to tissue dose at lower photon energies with the maximum dose response at 75 kVp nominal photon energy. Penumbra studies using a Varian Clinac 21EX at 1.5 and 10.0 cm depths were measured to be 2.77 and 3.94 mm for the secondary collimators, 3.52 and 5.60 mm for the multileaf collimator rounded leaf ends, respectively. Point doses measured with the strip detector were compared to doses measured with EBT film and doses predicted by the Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The differences were 1

  16. Commissioning and operation of the CDF silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. D'Auria

    2002-01-18

    The CDF-II silicon detector has been partially commissioned and used for taking preliminary physics data. This paper is a report on commissioning and initial operations of the 5.8m{sup 2} silicon detector. This experience can be useful to the large silicon systems that are presently under construction.

  17. The response of covered silicon detectors to monoenergetic gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reier, M.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements were made of the efficiency in detecting gamma rays of a 0.3-mm, a 3-mm, and a 5-mm silicon detector covered with different absorbers. Calibrated sources covering the range from 279 KeV to 2.75 MeV were used. The need for the absorbers in order to obtain meaningful results, and their contribution to detector response at electron biases from 50 to 200 KeV, are discussed in detail. It is shown that the results are independent of the atomic number of the absorber. In addition, the role of the absorber in increasing the efficiency with increasing photon energy for low bias setting is demonstrated for the 0.3-mm crystal. Qualitative explanations are given for the shapes of all curves of efficiency versus energy at each bias.

  18. Photon-counting detectors for space-based laser receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Yu, Anthony W.; Yang, Guangning; Li, Steven X.; Sun, Xiaoli

    2010-01-01

    Photon-counting detectors are required for numerous NASA future space-based laser receivers including science instruments and free-space optical communication terminals. Silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) single photon counting modules (SPCMs) are used in the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) launched in 2003, currently in orbit measuring the Earth surface elevation and atmosphere backscattering. To measure cloud and aerosol backscattering, the SPCMs detect the GLAS laser light at 532-nm wavelength, with quantum efficiencies of 60 to 70% and maximum count rates greater than 13 million per second. The performance of the SPCMs has been monitored since ICESat launch on January 12, 2003. There has been no measurable change in the quantum efficiency, linearity or after-pulsing. The detector dark counts rates monitored while the spacecraft was in the dark side of the Earth have increased linearly at about 60 counts/s per day due to space radiation damage. As the ICESat mission nears completion, we have proposed ground-to-space optical and quantum communication experiments to utilize the on-orbit 1-meter optical receiver telescope with multiple SPCMs in the focal plane. NASA is preparing a follow-on mission to ICESat, called ICESat-2, with a launch date of late 2014. The major candidate photon-counting detectors under evaluation for ICESat-2 include 532 nm and 1064 nm wavelength-sensitive photomultiplier tubes and Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode arrays. Key specifications are high maximum count rate, detection efficiency, photon number resolution, radiation tolerance, power consumption, operating temperature and reliability. Future NASA science instruments and free-space laser communication terminals share a number of these requirements.

  19. Microstructured silicon neutron detectors for security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, S.; Fleta, C.; Guardiola, C.; Jumilla, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Rodriguez, J.; Lozano, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we present the design and performance of a perforated thermal neutron silicon detector with a 6LiF neutron converter. This device was manufactured within the REWARD project workplace whose aim is to develop and enhance technologies for the detection of nuclear and radiological materials. The sensor perforated structure results in a higher efficiency than that obtained with an equivalent planar sensor. The detectors were tested in a thermal neutron beam at the nuclear reactor at the Instituto Superior Técnico in Lisbon and the intrinsic detection efficiency for thermal neutrons and the gamma sensitivity were obtained. The Geant4 Monte Carlo code was used to simulate the experimental conditions, i.e. thermal neutron beam and the whole detector geometry. An intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency of 8.6%±0.4% with a discrimination setting of 450 keV was measured.

  20. Study of timing performance of silicon photomultiplier and application for a Cherenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, G. S. M.; Bühler, P.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2011-02-01

    Silicon photomultipliers are very versatile photo-detectors due to their high photon detection efficiency, fast response, single photon counting capability, high amplification, and their insensitivity to magnetic fields. At our institute we are studying the performance of these photo-detectors at various operating conditions. On the basis of the experience in the laboratory we built a prototype of a timing Cherenkov detector consisting of a quartz radiator with two 3×3 mm 2 MPPCs S10362-33-100C from Hamamatsu Photonics as photo-detectors. The MPPC sensors were operated with Peltier cooling to minimize thermal noise and to avoid gain drifts. The test measurements at the DA Φ NE Beam-Test Facility (BTF) at the Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) with pulsed 490 MeV electrons and the results on timing performance with Cherenkov photons are presented.

  1. Waveguide-Coupled Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyer, Andrew D.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Marsili, Francesco; Cohen, Justin D.; Meenehan, Sean M.; Painter, Oskar J.; Shaw, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated WSi-based superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors coupled to SiNx waveguides with integrated ring resonators. This photonics platform enables the implementation of robust and efficient photon-counting detectors with fine spectral resolution near 1550 nm.

  2. Silicon photonic resonator sensors and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrostowski, Lukas; Grist, Samantha; Flueckiger, Jonas; Shi, Wei; Wang, Xu; Ouellet, Eric; Yun, Han; Webb, Mitch; Nie, Ben; Liang, Zhen; Cheung, Karen C.; Schmidt, Shon A.; Ratner, Daniel M.; Jaeger, Nicolas A. F.

    2012-02-01

    Silicon photonic resonators, implemented using silicon-on-insulator substrates, are promising for numerous applications. The most commonly studied resonators are ring/racetrack resonators. We have fabricated these and other resonators including disk resonators, waveguide-grating resonators, ring resonator reflectors, contra-directional grating-coupler ring resonators, and racetrack-based multiplexer/demultiplexers. While numerous resonators have been demonstrated for sensing purposes, it remains unclear as to which structures provide the highest sensitivity and best limit of detection; for example, disc resonators and slot-waveguide-based ring resonators have been conjectured to provide an improved limit of detection. Here, we compare various resonators in terms of sensor metrics for label-free bio-sensing in a micro-fluidic environment. We have integrated resonator arrays with PDMS micro-fluidics for real-time detection of biomolecules in experiments such as antigen-antibody binding reaction experiments using Human Factor IX proteins. Numerous resonators are fabricated on the same wafer and experimentally compared. We identify that, while evanescent-field sensors all operate on the principle that the analyte's refractive index shifts the resonant frequency, there are important differences between implementations that lie in the relationship between the optical field overlap with the analyte and the relative contributions of the various loss mechanisms. The chips were fabricated in the context of the CMC-UBC Silicon Nanophotonics Fabrication course and workshop. This yearlong, design-based, graduate training program is offered to students from across Canada and, over the last four years, has attracted participants from nearly every Canadian university involved in photonics research. The course takes students through a full design cycle of a photonic circuit, including theory, modelling, design, and experimentation.

  3. Radiation damage studies for the D0 silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lehner, F.; /Zurich U.

    2004-01-01

    We report on irradiation studies performed on spare production silicon detector modules for the current D0 silicon detector. The lifetime expectations due to radiation damage effects of the existing silicon detector are reviewed. A new upgrade project was started with the goal of a complete replacement of the existing silicon detector. In that context, several investigations on the radiation hardness of new prototype silicon microstrip detectors were carried out. The irradiation on different detector types was performed with 10 MeV protons up to fluences of 10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2} at the J.R. Mcdonald Laboratory at Kansas State University. The flux calibration was carefully checked using different normalization techniques. As a result, we observe roughly 40-50% less radiation damage in silicon for 10 MeV p exposure than it is expected by the predicted NIEL scaling.

  4. The CDF Run IIb Silicon Detector: Design, preproduction, and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, T.; Aoki, M.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Behari, S.; Benjamin, D.; Bisello, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Burghard, A.; Busetto, G.; Cabrera, S.; Canepa, A.; Cardoso, G.; Chertok, M.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Derylo, G.; Fang, I.; Feng, E. J.; Fernandez, J. P.; Flaugher, B.; Freeman, J.; Galtieri, L.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Gorelov, I.; Haber, C.; Hale, D.; Hara, K.; Harr, R.; Hill, C.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hoff, J.; Holbrook, B.; Hong, S. C.; Hrycyk, M.; Hsiung, T. H.; Incandela, J.; Jeon, E. J.; Joo, K. K.; Junk, T.; Kahkola, H.; Karjalainen, S.; Kim, S.; Kobayashi, K.; Kong, D. J.; Krieger, B.; Kruse, M.; Kuznetsova, N.; Kyre, S.; Lander, R.; Landry, T.; Lauhakangas, R.; Lee, J.; Lu, R.-S.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Mandelli, E.; Manea, C.; Maksimovic, P.; Merkel, P.; Min, S. N.; Moccia, S.; Nakano, I.; Naoumov, D.; Nelson, T.; Nord, B.; Novak, J.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Orlov, Y.; Osterberg, K.; Pantano, D.; Pavlicek, V.; Pellett, D.; Pursley, J.; Riipinen, P.; Schuyler, B.; Seidel, S.; Shenai, A.; Soha, A.; Stuart, D.; Tanaka, R.; Tavi, M.; Von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, Z.; Watje, P.; Weber, Marc; Wester, W.; Yamamoto, K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.; Yao, W.; Yarema, R.; Yun, J. C.; Zetti, F.; Zimmerman, T.; Zimmermann, S.; Zucchelli, S.

    2006-01-01

    A new silicon microstrip detector was designed by the CDF collaboration for the proposed high-luminosity operation of the Tevatron pp¯ collider (Run IIb). The detector is radiation-tolerant and will still be functional after exposure to particle fluences of 1014 1-MeV equivalent neutrons/cm2 and radiation doses of 20 MRad. The detector will maintain or exceed the performance of the current CDF silicon detector throughout Run IIb. It is based on an innovative silicon "supermodule" design. Critical detector components like the custom radiation-hard SVX4 readout chip, the beryllia hybrids and mini-port (repeater) cards, and the silicon sensors fulfill their specifications and were produced with high yields. The design goals and solutions of the CDF Run IIb silicon detector are described, and the performance of preproduction modules is presented in detail. Results relevant for the development of future silicon systems are emphasized.

  5. Generation and manipulation of entangled photons on silicon chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Takesue, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    Integrated quantum photonics is now seen as one of the promising approaches to realize scalable quantum information systems. With optical waveguides based on silicon photonics technologies, we can realize quantum optical circuits with a higher degree of integration than with silica waveguides. In addition, thanks to the large nonlinearity observed in silicon nanophotonic waveguides, we can implement active components such as entangled photon sources on a chip. In this paper, we report recent progress in integrated quantum photonic circuits based on silicon photonics. We review our work on correlated and entangled photon-pair sources on silicon chips, using nanoscale silicon waveguides and silicon photonic crystal waveguides. We also describe an on-chip quantum buffer realized using the slow-light effect in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide. As an approach to combine the merits of different waveguide platforms, a hybrid quantum circuit that integrates a silicon-based photon-pair source and a silica-based arrayed waveguide grating is also presented.

  6. Raman cooling in silicon photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-Chung; Bahl, Gaurav

    2016-03-01

    Laser cooling of solids can be achieved through various photon up-conversion processes including anti-Stokes photoluminescence and anti-Stokes light scattering. While it has been shown that cooling using photoluminescence-based methods can achieve efficiency comparable to that of thermoelectric cooling, the reliance on specific transitions of the rare-earth dopants limits material choice. Light scattering, on the other hand, occurs in all materials, and has the potential to enable cooling in most materials. We show that by engineering the photonic density of states of a material, one can suppress the Stokes process, and enhance the anti-Stokes radiation. We employ the well-known diamond-structured photonic crystal patterned in crystalline silicon to demonstrate theoretically that when operating within a high transparency regime, the net energy removal rate from phonon annihilation can overcome the optical absorption. The engineered photonic density of states can thus enable simultaneous cooling of all Raman-active phonon modes and the net cooling of the solid.

  7. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  8. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  9. An integrated Micromegas UV-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melai, Joost; Lyashenko, Alexey; Breskin, Amos; van der Graaf, Harry; Timmermans, Jan; Visschers, Jan; Salm, Cora; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-05-01

    Preliminary results of a photon detector combining a Micromegas-like multiplier coated with a UV-sensitive CsI photocathode are described. The multiplier is made in a CMOS compatible InGrid technology, which allows to postprocess it directly on the surface of an imaging IC. This method is aimed at building light-sensitive imaging detectors where all elements are monolithically integrated. We show that the CsI photocathode deposited in the InGrid mesh does not alter the device performance. Maximum gains of ˜6000 were reached in a single-grid element operated in Ar/CH4, with a 2% ion backflow fraction returning to the photocathode.

  10. The CDF Run IIb Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    M. Aoki; N. Bacchetta; S. Behari et al.

    2004-02-25

    Fermilab plans to deliver 5-15 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity to the CDF and D0 experiments. The current inner silicon detectors at CDF (SVXIIa and L00) will not tolerate the radiation dose associated with high luminosity running and will need to be replaced. A new readout chip (SVX4) has been designed in radiation-hard 0.25 {micro}m CMOS technology. Single sided sensors are arranged in a compact structure, called a stave, with integrated readout and cooling systems. This paper describes the general design of the Run IIb system, testing results of prototype electrical components (staves), and prototype silicon sensor performance before and after irradiation.

  11. Performance of the EIGER single photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, G.; Bergamaschi, A.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Johnson, I.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.

    2015-03-01

    EIGER is a single photon counting hybrid pixel detector being developed at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland, for applications at synchrotron light sources in an energy range from a few to 25 keV. EIGER is characterized by a small pixel size (75 × 75 μm2), a frame rate up to 22 kHz and a small dead time between frames (4 μs). An EIGER module is a hybrid detector composed of a ≈ 8 × 4 cm2 monolithic silicon sensor bump bonded to 4 × 2 readout chips, for a total of 500 kpixels. Each pixel has a configurable depth (up to 12 bits) counter and records the number of photons impinging. Custom designed module electronics reads out the bits in the pixel counter and processes the data in the module before transferring them to a PC. A large dynamic range (32 bits) for the pixel counter can be obtained through on-board image summation. Rate corrections can be applied on-board to compensate for inefficiencies when the pixel counting rates approach pile-up levels around a million counts per second. The EIGER modules are the building blocks of large area detectors: a 1.5 and a 9 Mpixel systems are under development for the cSAXS beamline at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) at PSI. The very high frame rate capabilities are equally fast for multi-module systems due to the fully parallel data processing.The module calibration will be discussed, with emphasis on the choice of the optimal operation settings as a function of photon energy. The performance regarding threshold dispersion and minimum achievable threshold will be presented. In addition, the progress towards the production of larger multi-module systems will be discussed.

  12. Development of the ORRUBA Silicon Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, S. D.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, Robert; Johnson, M. S.; Jones, K. L.; Kapler, R.; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Smith, Michael Scott; Thomas, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    High quality radioactive beams have recently made possible the measurement of (d,p) reactions on unstable nuclei in inverse kinematics, which can yield information on the development of single-neutron structure away from stability, and are of astrophysical interest due to the proximity to suggested r-process paths. The Oak Ridge Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) is a new high solid-angular coverage array, composed of two rings of silicon detectors, optimized for measuring (d,p) reactions. A partial implementation has been used to measure (d,p) reactions on nuclei around the N = 82 shell closure.

  13. Characterization of Silicon Detector Readout Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    2015-07-22

    Configuration and calibration of the front-end electronics typical of many silicon detector configurations were investigated in a lab activity based on a pair of strip sensors interfaced with FSSR2 read-out chips and an FPGA. This simple hardware configuration, originally developed for a telescope at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility, was used to measure thresholds and noise on individual readout channels and to study the influence that different configurations of the front-end electronics had on the observed levels of noise in the system. An understanding of the calibration and operation of this small detector system provided an opportunity to explore the architecture of larger systems such as those currently in use at LHC experiments.

  14. Ultra-fast silicon detectors (UFSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Anker, A.; Chen, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Freeman, P.; Galloway, Z.; Gruey, B.; Grabas, H.; John, C.; Liang, Z.; Losakul, R.; Mak, S. N.; Ng, C. W.; Seiden, A.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Baldassarri, B.; Cartiglia, N.; Cenna, F.; Ferrero, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Hidalgo, S.; Baselga, M.; Carulla, M.; Fernandez-Martinez, P.; Flores, D.; Merlos, A.; Quirion, D.; Mikuž, M.; Kramberger, G.; Cindro, V.; Mandić, I.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2016-09-01

    We report on measurements on Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD) which are based on Low-Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD). They are n-on-p sensors with internal charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction, obtained with a highly doped implant. We have performed several beam tests with LGAD of different gain and report the measured timing resolution, comparing it with laser injection and simulations. For the 300 μm thick LGAD, the timing resolution measured at test beams is 120 ps while it is 57 ps for IR laser, in agreement with simulations using Weightfield2. For the development of thin sensors and their readout electronics, we focused on the understanding of the pulse shapes and point out the pivotal role the sensor capacitance plays.

  15. Status and performance of the CDF Run II silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Maki, Tuula; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.

    2006-10-01

    The CDF silicon detector is one of the largest silicon detectors in operation. It has a total of 722,432 electronic channels, and it covers a sensor surface area of 6 m{sup 2}. The detector has been operating reliably for five years, and it has recorded 1.5 fb{sup -1} of data. This article discusses experiences of operating such a large, complex system as well as the longevity of the detector.

  16. The power supply system of the CLEO III silicon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Toerne, E.; Burns, J.; Duboscq, J.; Eckhart, E.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Larsen, D.; Rush, C.; Smith, S.; Thayer, J. B.

    2002-04-01

    The CLEO III detector has recently commenced data taking at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR). One important component of this detector is a four layer double-sided silicon tracker with 93% solid angle coverage. This detector ranges in size and number of readout channels between the LEP and LHC silicon detectors. In order to reach the detector performance goals of signal-to-noise ratios greater than 15 : 1 low noise front-end electronics together with highly regulated low noise power supplies were used. In this paper, we describe the low-noise power supply system and associated monitoring and safety features used by the CLEO III silicon tracker.

  17. Memory effect in silicon time-gated single-photon avalanche diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dalla Mora, A.; Contini, D. Di Sieno, L.; Tosi, A.; Boso, G.; Villa, F.; Pifferi, A.

    2015-03-21

    We present a comprehensive characterization of the memory effect arising in thin-junction silicon Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs) when exposed to strong illumination. This partially unknown afterpulsing-like noise represents the main limiting factor when time-gated acquisitions are exploited to increase the measurement dynamic range of very fast (picosecond scale) and faint (single-photon) optical signals following a strong stray one. We report the dependences of this unwelcome signal-related noise on photon wavelength, detector temperature, and biasing conditions. Our results suggest that this so-called “memory effect” is generated in the deep regions of the detector, well below the depleted region, and its contribution on detector response is visible only when time-gated SPADs are exploited to reject a strong burst of photons.

  18. Fiber-optic links based on silicon photonics for high-speed readout of trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, G.; Garcia-Scivres, M.; Paramonov, A.; Stanek, R.; Underwood, D.

    2014-10-01

    We propose to use silicon photonics technology to build radiation-hard fiber-optic links for high-bandwidth readout of tracking detectors. The CMOS integrated silicon photonics was developed by Luxtera and commercialized by Molex. The commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) fiber-optic links feature moderate radiation tolerance insufficient for trackers. A transceiver contains four RX and four TX channels operating at 10 Gbps each. The next generation will likely operate at 25 Gbps per channel. The approach uses a standard CMOS process and single-mode fibers, providing low power consumption and good scalability and reliability.

  19. On-chip silicon-based active photonic molecules by complete photonic bandgap light confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Bo; Chen, Kunji; Chen, San; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xiangao; Xu, Jun; Huang, Xinfan; Pavesi, Lorenzo; Jiang, Chunping

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate an on-chip silicon-based active photonic molecule (PM) structures formed by two coupled photonic quantum dots with complete photonic bandgap (PBG) light confinement. The photonic quantum dots are grown by conformal deposition of amorphous silicon nitride multilayers on patterned substrates. A fine structure of the coupled optical modes in PMs has been observed which shows similarity to the electronic bonding (BN) and antibonding (ABN) states in a molecule.

  20. Glucose sensing by means of silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockstaele, Ronny; Ryckeboer, Eva; Hattasan, Nannicha; De Koninck, Yannick; Muneeb, Muhammad; Verstuyft, Steven; Delbeke, Danaë; Bogaerts, Wim; Roelkens, Gunther; Baets, Roel

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes is a fast growing metabolic disease, where the patients suffer from disordered glucose blood levels. Monitoring the blood glucose values in combination with extra insulin injection is currently the only therapy to keep the glucose concentration in diabetic patients under control, minimizing the long-term effects of elevated glucose concentrations and improving quality of life of the diabetic patients. Implantable sensors allow continuous glucose monitoring, offering the most reliable data to control the glucose levels. Infrared absorption spectrometers offer a non-chemical measurement method to determine the small glucose concentrations in blood serum. In this work, a spectrometer platform based on silicon photonics is presented, allowing the realization of very small glucose sensors suitable for building implantable sensors. A proof-of-concept of a spectrometer with integrated evanescent sample interface is presented, and the route towards a fully implantable spectrometer is discussed.

  1. Silicon Detector System for Cross Section Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In order to estimate the radiation shielding effectiveness of materials it is necessary to know cosmic ray particles are broken up as they pass though these materials. The breakup of cosmic ray particles is characterized by the nuclear fragmentation cross sections, i.e. an effective geometrical cross section assigned to each target nucleus that represents its apparent size for fragmenting the incident particle. The values of these cross sections depend on the details of nuclear physics and cannot be calculated from first principles owing to the many-body nature of the interactions. The only way to determine them is to measure them. Once a sufficient number of cross sections have been measured, the systematic nature of the interactions allows other cross-sections to be estimated. The number of cross sections that contribute to the estimation of shielding effectiveness is very large 10,000. Fortunately most make minor contributions. These can be estimated from nuclear systematics. Only those who's uncertainties make significant contributions to the error in the shielding effectiveness estimations need to be measured. In the past it has proven difficult to measure light fragment production cross sections from the interactions of heavy cosmic rays owing to the size of the detectors used. We have developed a highly pixilated silicon (Si) detector system that can individually identify these light fragments while making efficient use of costly accelerator time. This system is an outgrowth of detector technology developed under a CDDF and a Code S sponsored cosmic ray experiment.

  2. New Generation of Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltsman, G. N.

    2015-09-01

    We present an overview of recent results for new generation of infrared and optical superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) that has already demonstrated a performance that makes them devices-of-choice for many applications. SNSPDs provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, SNSPDs are also compatible with an integrated optical platform as a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. By embedding SNSPDs in nanophotonic circuits we realize waveguide integrated single photon detectors which unite all desirable detector properties in a single device.

  3. Negative Avalanche Feedback Detectors for Photon-Counting Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Negative Avalanche Feedback photon counting detectors with near-infrared spectral sensitivity offer an alternative to conventional Geiger mode avalanche photodiode or phototube detectors for free space communications links at 1 and 1.55 microns. These devices demonstrate linear mode photon counting without requiring any external reset circuitry and may even be operated at room temperature. We have now characterized the detection efficiency, dark count rate, after-pulsing, and single photon jitter for three variants of this new detector class, as well as operated these uniquely simple to use devices in actual photon starved free space optical communications links.

  4. Graphene Josephson Junction Single Photon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Evan D.; Lee, Gil-Ho; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Heuck, Mikkel; Crossno, Jesse; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Ohki, Thomas A.; Kim, Philip; Englund, Dirk; Fong, Kin Chung

    Single photon detectors (SPDs) have found use across a wide array of applications depending on the wavelength to which they are sensitive. Graphene, because of its linear, gapless dispersion near the Dirac point, has a flat, wide bandwidth absorption that can be enhanced to near 100 % through the use of resonant structures making it a promising candidate for broadband SPDs. Upon absorbing a photon in the optical to mid-infrared range, a small (~10 μm2) sheet of graphene at cryogenic temperatures can experience a significant increase in electronic temperature due to its extremely low heat capacity. At 1550 nm, for example, calculations show that the temperature could rise by as much as 500 %. This temperature increase could be detected with near perfect quantum efficiency by making the graphene the weak link in a Josephson junction (JJ). We present a theoretical model demonstrating that such a graphene JJ SPD could operate at the readily achievable temperature of 3 K with near zero dark count, sub-50 ps timing jitter, and sub-5 ns dead time and report on the progress toward experimentally realizing the device.

  5. Optical manipulation and sensing with silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiyun

    Optical trapping enables the non-contact manipulation of micro and nanoparticles with extremely high precision. Recent research on integrated optical trapping using the evanescent fields of photonic devices has opened up new opportunities for the manipulation of nano- and microparticles in lab-on-a-chip devices. Considerable interest has emerged for the use of optical microcavities as "sensors-on-a-chip", due to the possibility for the label-free detection of nanoparticles and molecules with high sensitivity. This dissertation focuses on the demonstration of an on-chip optical manipulation system with multiple functionalities, including trapping, buffering, sorting, and sensing. We demonstrate the optically trapping of polystyrene particles with diameters from 110 nm to 5.6 microm using silicon microrings and photonic crystal cavities. By integrating multiple microrings with different resonant wavelengths, we show that tuning the laser wavelength to the resonance wavelengths of different rings enables trapped particles to be transferred back and forth between the rings in a controllable manner. We term this functionality "buffering". We furthermore demonstrate an integrated microparticle passive sorting system based on the near-field optical forces exerted by a 3-dB optical power splitter that consists of a slot waveguide and a conventional channel waveguide. In related work, we demonstrate an ultra-compact polarization splitter design leveraging the giant birefringence of silicon-on-insulator slot waveguides to achieve a high extinction ratio over the entire C band. We demonstrate trapping-assisted particle sensing, using the shift in the microcavity resonance induced by the trapped particle. We show that this permits the sensing of proteins via a binding assay approach, in which the presence of green fluorescent protein causes the particles to bind. By detecting the size distribution of particles clusters using the microcavity, we quantitatively detect the GFP

  6. The Dosepix detector—an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector for spectrometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, A.; Anton, G.; Ballabriga, R.; Bisello, F.; Campbell, M.; Celi, J. C.; Fauler, A.; Fiederle, M.; Jensch, M.; Kochanski, N.; Llopart, X.; Michel, N.; Mollenhauer, U.; Ritter, I.; Tennert, F.; Wölfel, S.; Wong, W.; Michel, T.

    2015-04-01

    The Dosepix detector is a hybrid photon-counting pixel detector based on ideas of the Medipix and Timepix detector family. 1 mm thick cadmium telluride and 300 μm thick silicon were used as sensor material. The pixel matrix of the Dosepix consists of 16 x 16 square pixels with 12 rows of (200 μm)2 and 4 rows of (55 μm)2 sensitive area for the silicon sensor layer and 16 rows of pixels with 220 μm pixel pitch for CdTe. Besides digital energy integration and photon-counting mode, a novel concept of energy binning is included in the pixel electronics, allowing energy-resolved measurements in 16 energy bins within one acquisition. The possibilities of this detector concept range from applications in personal dosimetry and energy-resolved imaging to quality assurance of medical X-ray sources by analysis of the emitted photon spectrum. In this contribution the Dosepix detector, its response to X-rays as well as spectrum measurements with Si and CdTe sensor layer are presented. Furthermore, a first evaluation was carried out to use the Dosepix detector as a kVp-meter, that means to determine the applied acceleration voltage from measured X-ray tubes spectra.

  7. Integrated silicon photonic interconnect with surface-normal optical interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zanyun; Huang, Beiju; Zhang, Zan; Cheng, Chuantong; Liu, Hongwei; Li, Hongqiang; Chen, Hongda

    2016-05-01

    An integrated silicon photonic interconnect with surface-normal optical interface is demonstrated by connecting a bidirectional grating based E-O modulator and a germanium waveguide photodetector. To investigate this photonic interconnect, both static and dynamic performance of the discrete devices are characterized respectively. Based on the characterization work, data transmission experiment is carried out for the photonic interconnect. Eye diagram results indicate the photonic interconnect can operate up to 7 Gb/s.

  8. Single Photon Counting Detectors for Low Light Level Imaging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Kimberly

    2015-10-01

    This dissertation presents the current state-of-the-art of semiconductor-based photon counting detector technologies. HgCdTe linear-mode avalanche photodiodes (LM-APDs), silicon Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs), and electron-multiplying CCDs (EMCCDs) are compared via their present and future performance in various astronomy applications. LM-APDs are studied in theory, based on work done at the University of Hawaii. EMCCDs are studied in theory and experimentally, with a device at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab. The emphasis of the research is on GM-APD imaging arrays, developed at MIT Lincoln Laboratory and tested at the RIT Center for Detectors. The GM-APD research includes a theoretical analysis of SNR and various performance metrics, including dark count rate, afterpulsing, photon detection efficiency, and intrapixel sensitivity. The effects of radiation damage on the GM-APD were also characterized by introducing a cumulative dose of 50 krad(Si) via 60 MeV protons. Extensive development of Monte Carlo simulations and practical observation simulations was completed, including simulated astronomical imaging and adaptive optics wavefront sensing. Based on theoretical models and experimental testing, both the current state-of-the-art performance and projected future performance of each detector are compared for various applications. LM-APD performance is currently not competitive with other photon counting technologies, and are left out of the application-based comparisons. In the current state-of-the-art, EMCCDs in photon counting mode out-perform GM-APDs for long exposure scenarios, though GM-APDs are better for short exposure scenarios (fast readout) due to clock-induced-charge (CIC) in EMCCDs. In the long term, small improvements in GM-APD dark current will make them superior in both long and short exposure scenarios for extremely low flux. The efficiency of GM-APDs will likely always be less than EMCCDs, however, which is particularly disadvantageous for

  9. Single-photon-counting detector for increased sensitivity in two-photon laser scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Benninger, Richard K P; Ashby, William J; Ring, Elisabeth A; Piston, David W

    2008-12-15

    We present the use and characterization of a photon-counting detector for increased sensitivity at low signal levels in fluorescence laser scanning microscopy (LSM). Conventional LSM photomultiplier tube detectors utilize analog current integration and thus suffer from excessive noise at low signal levels, introduced during current measurement. In this Letter we describe the implementation of a fast single-photon-counting (SPC) detector on a conventional two-photon laser scanning microscope and detail its use in imaging low fluorescence intensities. We show that for a low photon flux, the SPC detector is shot-noise limited and thus provides increased detection sensitivity compared with analog current integration. PMID:19079484

  10. Submillimeter resolution in one-dimensional position measurements of γ-ray photons by using a CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to a linear array of silicon drift detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, C.; Labanti, C.; Perotti, F.

    2000-08-01

    We present the one-dimensional (1D) position and energy resolution results obtained by a γ-ray detector based on a single CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to a linear array of silicon drift detectors (SDDs). The present prototype has been realized in order to investigate the basic performances of this new architecture in view of the realization of Anger cameras for 2D imaging in nuclear medicine, based on the use of SDDs instead of photomultiplier tubes. The SDD provides a high value of quantum efficiency to the scintillation light, typical of a silicon photodetector, and is moreover characterized by a lower value of electronics noise with respect to conventional silicon photodiodes, thanks to the low value of output capacitance. At 122 keV the present detector shows a position resolution better than 0.5 mm FWHM, and an energy resolution of about 13% FWHM. The experimental setup is described and the most significant experimental results are presented.

  11. Analysis of Silicon Photomultiplier Detector Waveforms from Cosmic Rays using Digital Signal Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Juan; Zavala, Favian; Niduaza, Rexavalmar; Wedel, Zachary; Fan, Sewan; Ritt, Stefan; Fatuzzo, Laura

    2014-03-01

    Silicon photomultiplier detectors exhibit high gain, low operating voltage, are insensitive to magnetic fields, and can detect light at the single photon level, making them very attractive for applications in fields such as particle physics, astrophysics, and medical physics. However, they exhibit effects that may prevent their optimal operation, including thermally induced high dark count rate, after pulse effects, and cross talk produced from photons in nearby pixels. In this presentation, we describe our coincidence setup using two scintillator pads and a Hamamatsu multipixel photon counter (MPPC) to gather cosmic ray produced signal pulses, and our methods of analysis for the detector waveforms. In particular, we discuss our methods of digitization, software implementation of low pass and Gaussian type filters, and the application of a domino ring sampler (DRS4) digitizing board to obtain signal waveforms to determine the operating characteristics for these detectors. Department of Education grant number P031S90007.

  12. Target molecules detection by waveguiding in a photonic silicon membrane

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia; Van Buuren, Anthony; Terminello, Louis

    2004-08-31

    Disclosed herein is a photonic silicon filter capable of binding and detecting biological and chemical target molecules in liquid or gas samples. A photonic waveguiding silicon filter with chemical and/or biological anchors covalently attached to the pore walls selectively bind target molecules. The system uses transmission curve engineering principles to allow measurements to be made in situ and in real time to detect the presence of various target molecules and determine the concentration of bound target.

  13. Small area silicon diffused junction x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Pehl, R.H.; Larsh, A.E.

    1981-10-01

    The low temperature performance of silicon diffused junction detectors in the measurement of low energy x-rays is reported. The detectors have an area of 0.04 cm/sup 2/ and a thickness of 100 ..mu..m. The spectral resolutions of these detectors were found to be in close agreement with expected values indicating that the defects introduced by the high temperature processing required in the device fabrication were not deleteriously affecting the detection of low energy x-rays. Device performance over a temperature range of 77 to 150/sup 0/K is given. These detectors were designed to detect low energy x-rays in the presence of minimum ionizing electrons. The successful application of silicon diffused junction technology to x-ray detector fabrication may facilitate the development of other novel silicon x-ray detector designs.

  14. Nanomanipulation using silicon photonic crystal resonators.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sudeep; Serey, Xavier; Erickson, David

    2010-01-01

    Optical tweezers have enabled a number of microscale processes such as single cell handling, flow-cytometry, directed assembly, and optical chromatography. To extend this functionality to the nanoscale, a number of near-field approaches have been developed that yield much higher optical forces by confining light to subwavelength volumes. At present, these techniques are limited in both the complexity and precision with which handling can be performed. Here, we present a new class of nanoscale optical trap exploiting optical resonance in one-dimensional silicon photonic crystals. The trapping of 48 nm and 62 nm dielectric nanoparticles is demonstrated along with the ability to transport, trap, and manipulate larger nanoparticles by simultaneously exploiting the propagating nature of the light in a coupling waveguide and its stationary nature within the resonator. Field amplification within the resonator is shown to produce a trap several orders of magnitude stronger than conventional tweezers and an order of magnitude stiffer than other near-field techniques. Our approach lays the groundwork for a new class of optical trapping platforms that could eventually enable complex all-optical single molecule manipulation and directed assembly of nanoscale material.

  15. Ultra-low power silicon photonic transceivers for inter/intra-chip interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xuezhe; Cunningham, John E.; Li, Guoliang; Luo, Ying; Thacker, Hiren; Yao, Jin; Ho, Ron; Lexau, Jon; Liu, Frankie; Patil, Dinesh; Amberg, Philip; Pinckney, Nathaniel; Dong, Po; Feng, Dazeng; Asghari, Mehdi; Mekis, Attila; Pinguet, Thierry; Raj, Kannan; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V.

    2010-08-01

    Scaling of high performance, many-core, computing systems calls for disruptive solutions to provide ultra energy efficient and high bandwidth density interconnects at very low cost. Silicon photonics is viewed as a promising solution. For silicon photonics to prevail and penetrate deeper into the computing system interconnection hierarchy, it requires innovative optical devices, novel circuits, and advanced integration. We review our recent progress in key building blocks toward sub pJ/bit optical link for inter/intra-chip applications, ultra-low power silicon photonic transceivers. In particular, compact reverse biased silicon ring modulator was developed with high modulation bandwidth sufficient for 15Gbps modulation, very small junction capacitance of ~50fF, low voltage swing of 2V, high extinction ratio (>7dB) and low optical loss (~2dB at on-state). Integrated with low power CMOS driver circuits using low parasitic microsolder bump technique, we achieved record low power consumption of 320fJ/bit at 5Gbps data rate. Stable operation with biterror- rate better than 10-13 was accomplished with simple thermal management. We further review the first hybrid integrated silicon photonic receiver based on Ge waveguide photo detector using the same integration technique, with which high energy efficiency of 690fJ/bit, and sensitivity of ~18.9dBm at 5Gbps data rate for bit-error-rate of 10-12 were achieved.

  16. Spectral response of multi-element silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Rossington, C.S.; Chapman, K.

    1997-04-01

    Multi-element silicon strip detectors, in conjunction with integrated circuit pulse-processing electronics, offer an attractive alternative to conventional lithium-drifted silicon Si(Li) and high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) for high count rate, low noise synchrotron x-ray fluorescence applications. One of the major differences between the segmented Si detectors and the commercially available single-element Si(Li) or HPGe detectors is that hundreds of elements can be fabricated on a single Si substrate using standard silicon processing technologies. The segmentation of the detector substrate into many small elements results in very low noise performance at or near, room temperature, and the count rate of the detector is increased many-fold due to the multiplication in the total number of detectors. Traditionally, a single channel of detector with electronics can handle {approximately}100 kHz count rates while maintaining good energy resolution; the segmented detectors can operate at greater than MHz count rates merely due to the multiplication in the number of channels. One of the most critical aspects in the development of the segmented detectors is characterizing the charge sharing and charge loss that occur between the individual detector strips, and determining how these affect the spectral response of the detectors.

  17. First test of cold edgeless silicon microstrip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avati, V.; Boccone, V.; Borer, K.; Bozzo, M.; Capra, R.; Casagrande, L.; Eggert, K.; Heijne, E.; Klauke, S.; Li, Z.; Mäki, T.; Morelli, A.; Oljemark, F.; Palmieri, V. G.; Perea-Solano, B.; Tapprogge, S.

    2004-02-01

    Silicon microstrip detectors will provide the forward tracking in the TOTEM experiment at the LHC. To allow efficient tracking closest to the beam (≈1 mm) these detectors should be sensitive up to their physical edge (i.e. edgeless). Edgeless (without guard rings) microstrip planar detectors can be operated at cryogenic temperatures (about 130° K) where leakage currents due to the active edge are drastically reduced. A silicon microstrip prototype, cut perpendicular to the strips, has been tested with a pion beam at CERN to study its efficiency close to the edge by using reference tracks from a simple silicon telescope. Results indicate that the detector measures tracks with good efficiency up to the physical edge of the silicon.

  18. Indium-bump-free antimonide superlattice membrane detectors on a silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamiri, M.; Klein, B.; Schuler, T.; Myers, S.; Cavallo, F.; Krishna, S.

    2016-05-01

    We present an approach to realize antimonide based superlattices on silicon substrates without using conventional Indium-bump hybridization. In this approach, PIN based superlattice detectors are grown on top of a 60 nm Al0.6Ga0.4Sb sacrificial layer on a GaSb host substrate. Following the growth, the individual pixels are transferred using our epitaxiallift off technique, which consists of a wet-etch to undercut the pixels followed by a dry-stamp process to transfer the pixels to a silicon substrate prepared with a gold layer. Structural and optical characterization of the transferred pixels was done using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence. The interface between the transferred pixels and the new substrate was abrupt and no significant degradation in the optical quality was observed. An Indium-bump-free membrane detector was then fabricated using this approach. Spectral response measurements provided a 100% cut-off wavelength of 4.3 μm at 77 K. The performance of the membrane detector was compared to a control detector on the as-grown substrate. The membrane detector was limited by surface leakage current. The proposed approach could pave the way for wafer-level integration of photonic detectors on silicon substrates, which could dramatically reduce the cost of these detectors.

  19. Photon counting detector array algorithms for deep space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Meera; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Farr, William H.; Wong, Andre

    2016-03-01

    For deep-space optical communications systems utilizing an uplink optical beacon, a single-photon-counting detector array on the flight terminal can be used to simultaneously perform uplink tracking and communications as well as accurate downlink pointing at photon-starved (pW=m2) power levels. In this paper, we discuss concepts and algorithms for uplink signal acquisition, tracking, and parameter estimation using a photon-counting camera. Statistical models of detector output data and signal processing algorithms are presented, incorporating realistic effects such as Earth background and detector/readout blocking. Analysis and simulation results are validated against measured laboratory data using state-of-the-art commercial photon-counting detector arrays, demonstrating sub-microradian tracking errors under channel conditions representative of deep space optical links.

  20. Ultra-efficient 10 Gb/s hybrid integrated silicon photonic transmitter and receiver.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuezhe; Patil, Dinesh; Lexau, Jon; Liu, Frankie; Li, Guoliang; Thacker, Hiren; Luo, Ying; Shubin, Ivan; Li, Jieda; Yao, Jin; Dong, Po; Feng, Dazeng; Asghari, Mehdi; Pinguet, Thierry; Mekis, Attila; Amberg, Philip; Dayringer, Michael; Gainsley, Jon; Moghadam, Hesam Fathi; Alon, Elad; Raj, Kannan; Ho, Ron; Cunningham, John E; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok V

    2011-03-14

    Using low parasitic microsolder bumping, we hybrid integrated efficient photonic devices from different platforms with advanced 40 nm CMOS VLSI circuits to build ultra-low power silicon photonic transmitters and receivers for potential applications in high performance inter/intra-chip interconnects. We used a depletion racetrack ring modulator with improved electro-optic efficiency to allow stepper optical photo lithography for reduced fabrication complexity. Integrated with a low power cascode 2 V CMOS driver, the hybrid silicon photonic transmitter achieved better than 7 dB extinction ratio for 10 Gbps operation with a record low power consumption of 1.35 mW. A received power penalty of about 1 dB was measured for a BER of 10(-12) compared to an off-the-shelf lightwave LiNOb3 transmitter, which comes mostly from the non-perfect extinction ratio. Similarly, a Ge waveguide detector fabricated using 130 nm SOI CMOS process was integrated with low power VLSI circuits using hybrid bonding. The all CMOS hybrid silicon photonic receiver achieved sensitivity of -17 dBm for a BER of 10(-12) at 10 Gbps, consuming an ultra-low power of 3.95 mW (or 395 fJ/bit in energy efficiency). The scalable hybrid integration enables continued photonic device improvements by leveraging advanced CMOS technologies with maximum flexibility, which is critical for developing ultra-low power high performance photonic interconnects for future computing systems. PMID:21445153

  1. Review of silicon photonics: history and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Winnie N.; Xiong, Yule

    2013-09-01

    Silicon photonics has attracted tremendous attention and research effort as a promising technology in optoelectronic integration for computing, communications, sensing, and solar harvesting. Mainly due to the combination of its excellent material properties and the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication processing technology, silicon has becoming the material choice for photonic and optoelectronic circuits with low cost, ultra-compact device footprint, and high-density integration. This review paper provides an overview on silicon photonics, by highlighting the early work from the mid-1980s on the fundamental building blocks such as silicon platforms and waveguides, and the main milestones that have been achieved so far in the field. A summary of reported work on functional elements in both passive and active devices, as well as the applications of the technology in interconnect, sensing, and solar cells, is identified.

  2. Single photon avalanche detectors: prospects of new quenching and gain mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David; Liu, Yu-Hsin; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2015-11-01

    While silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPAD) have reached very high detection efficiency and timing resolution, their use in fibre-optic communications, optical free space communications, and infrared sensing and imaging remains limited. III-V compounds including InGaAs and InP are the prevalent materials for 1550 nm light detection. However, even the most sensitive 1550 nm photoreceivers in optical communication have a sensitivity limit of a few hundred photons. Today, the only viable approach to achieve single-photon sensitivity at 1550 nm wavelength from semiconductor devices is to operate the avalanche detectors in Geiger mode, essentially trading dynamic range and speed for sensitivity. As material properties limit the performance of Ge and III-V detectors, new conceptual insight with regard to novel quenching and gain mechanisms could potentially address the performance limitations of III-V SPADs. Novel designs that utilise internal self-quenching and negative feedback can be used to harness the sensitivity of single-photon detectors,while drastically reducing the device complexity and increasing the level of integration. Incorporation of multiple gain mechanisms, together with self-quenching and built-in negative feedback, into a single device also hold promise for a new type of detector with single-photon sensitivity and large dynamic range.

  3. Position sensitive photon detectors for nuclear physics, particle physics and healthcare applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, B.

    2012-01-01

    Modern experiments in hadronic physics require detector systems capable of identifying and reconstructing all final-state particles and their momentum vectors. Imaging Cherenkov counters (RICH and DIRC) are frequently employed in nuclear and particle physics experiments. These detectors require high-rate, single-photon capable light detection system with sufficient granularity and position resolution. Several candidate systems are available, ranging from multi-anode photomultiplier tubes to micro-channel plate systems to silicon photomultipliers. Each of these detection solutions has particular advantages and disadvantages. Detailed studies of rate dependence, cross-talk, time-resolution and position resolution for a range of available photon detection solutions are presented. These properties make these photon detection systems ideal for radionuclide imaging applications. Cherenkov radiation can also be used for medical imaging applications. Two different applications using the Cherenkov effect for radionuclide imaging will be reviewed.

  4. Investigation of the Effect of Temperature and Light Emission from Silicon Photomultiplier Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Castruita, Daniel; Ramos, Daniel; Hernandez, Victor; Niduaza, Rommel; Konx, Adrian; Fan, Sewan; Fatuzzo, Laura; Ritt, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is an extremely sensitive light detector capable of measuring very dim light and operates as a photon-number resolving detector. Its high gain comes from operating at slightly above the breakdown voltage, which is also accompanied by a high dark count rate. At this conference poster session we describe our investigation of using SiPMs, the multipixel photon counters (MPPC) from Hamamatsu, as readout detectors for development in a cosmic ray scintillating detector array. Our research includes implementation of a novel design that automatically adjusts for the bias voltage to the MPPC detectors to compensate for changes in the ambient temperature. Furthermore, we describe our investigations for the MPPC detector characteristics at different bias voltages, temperatures and light emission properties. To measure the faint light emitted from the MPPC we use a photomultiplier tube capable of detecting single photons. Our data acquisition setup consists of a 5 Giga sample/second waveform digitizer, the DRS4, triggered to capture the MPPC detector waveforms. Analysis of the digitized waveforms, using the CERN package PAW, would be discussed and presented. US Department of Education Title V Grant PO31S090007.

  5. Development, prototyping and characterization of double sided silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topkar, Anita; Singh, Arvind; Aggarwal, Bharti; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Arvind; Murali Krishna, L. V.; Das, D.

    2016-10-01

    Double sided DC-coupled silicon strip detectors with geometry of 65 mm×65 mm have been developed in India for nuclear physics experiments. The detectors have 64 P+ strips on the front side and 64 N+ strips on the backside with a pitch of 0.9 mm. These detectors were fabricated using a twelve mask layer process involving double sided wafer processing technology. Semiconductor process and device simulations were carried out in order to theoretically estimate the impact of important design and process parameters on the breakdown voltage of detectors. The performance of the first lot of prototype detectors has been studied using static characterization tests and using an alpha source. The characterization results demonstrate that the detectors have low leakage currents and good uniformity over the detector area of about 40 cm2. Overview of the detector design, fabrication process, simulation results and initial characterization results of the detectors are presented in this paper.

  6. Thick Silicon Double-Sided Strip Detectors for Low-Energy Small-Animal SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhi, Sepideh; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Durko, Heather L.; Fritz, Mark A.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Peterson, Todd E.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents characterization studies of thick silicon double-sided strip detectors for a high-resolution small-animal SPECT. The dimension of these detectors is 60.4 mm × 60.4 mm × 1 mm. There are 1024 strips on each side that give the coordinates of the photon interaction, with each strip processed by a separate ASIC channel. Our measurement shows that intrinsic spatial resolution equivalent to the 59 μm strip pitch is attainable. Good trigger uniformity can be achieved by proper setting of a 4-bit DAC in each ASIC channel to remove trigger threshold variations. This is particularly important for triggering at low energies. The thick silicon DSSD (Double-sided strip detector) shows high potential for small-animal SPECT. PMID:20686626

  7. New-type silicon bipolar-pixel detector with internal amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubenko, A. P.; Karmanov, D. E.; Legotin, S. A.; Mukhamedshin, R. A.; Murashev, V. N.

    2009-12-01

    New-type silicon detector of charged particles and photons with internal amplification is considered. Bipolar npn-transistor pixel placed on a high-purity n-type silicon substrate is the functional element of the detector. The range being sensitive to ionization is a low-doped ( N˜10 cm) n region of the collector with a thickness virtually coinciding with the substrate thickness. A thin base containing one or more n emitters is formed on the surface. The current-amplification gain factor of the emitterbase junction is about 30. Detector prototypes are manufactured in the form of transistor matrices of 3×3 mm and 6×6 mm dimensions with a interpixel spacing of 50 and 100 microns. Results of testing of matrices are presented. The work is supported by the International Science and Technology Center, Project # 3024.

  8. Cosmic ray positron research and silicon track detector development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. Vernon; Wefel, John P.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to conduct research on: (1) position sensing detector systems, particularly those based upon silicon detectors, for use in future balloon and satellite experiments; and (2) positrons, electrons, proton, anti-protons, and helium particles as measured by the NASA NMSU Balloon Magnet Facility.

  9. Status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. Nahn

    2003-04-10

    A snapshot of the status of the CDF Run II Silicon Detector is presented, with a summary of commissioning issues since the start of Run II, current performance of the detector, and the use of the data in both the trigger and offline reconstruction.

  10. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  11. Fabrication of detectors and transistors on high-resistivity silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, S.

    1988-06-01

    A new process for the fabrication of silicon p-i-n diode radiation detectors is described. The utilization of backside gettering in the fabrication process results in the actual physical removal of detrimental impurities from critical device regions. This reduces the sensitivity of detector properties to processing variables while yielding low diode reverse-leakage currents. In addition, gettering permits the use of processing temperatures compatible with integrated-circuit fabrication. P-channel MOSFETs and silicon p-i-n diodes have been fabricated simultaneously on 10 k..cap omega../center dot/cm<100> silicon using conventional integrated-circuit processing techniques. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C.

    1995-02-01

    The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0{degrees}C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0{degrees}C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length.

  13. Indium-bump-free antimonide superlattice membrane detectors on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamiri, M.; Klein, B.; Schuler-Sandy, T.; Myers, S.; Dahiya, V.; Cavallo, F.; Krishna, S.

    2016-02-01

    We present an approach to realize antimonide superlattices on silicon substrates without using conventional Indium-bump hybridization. In this approach, PIN superlattices are grown on top of a 60 nm Al0.6Ga0.4Sb sacrificial layer on a GaSb host substrate. Following the growth, the individual pixels are transferred using our epitaxial-lift off technique, which consists of a wet-etch to undercut the pixels followed by a dry-stamp process to transfer the pixels to a silicon substrate prepared with a gold layer. Structural and optical characterization of the transferred pixels was done using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy, and photoluminescence. The interface between the transferred pixels and the new substrate was abrupt, and no significant degradation in the optical quality was observed. An Indium-bump-free membrane detector was then fabricated using this approach. Spectral response measurements provided a 100% cut-off wavelength of 4.3 μm at 77 K. The performance of the membrane detector was compared to a control detector on the as-grown substrate. The membrane detector was limited by surface leakage current. The proposed approach could pave the way for wafer-level integration of photonic detectors on silicon substrates, which could dramatically reduce the cost of these detectors.

  14. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; Hecke, H. van; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two con- centric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity ({nu}) distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  15. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; van Hecke, H.; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two concentric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity {eta} distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  16. Noise performance of the D0 layer 0 silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    A new inner detector called Layer 0 has been added to the existing silicon detector for the DZero colliding beams experiment. This detector has an all carbon fiber support structure that employs thin copper clad Kapton sheets embedded in the surface of the carbon fiber structure to improve the grounding of the structure and a readout system that fully isolates the local detector ground from the rest of the detector. Initial measurements show efficiencies greater than 90% and 0.3 ADC count common mode contribution to the signal noise.

  17. Photon Detection System for LBNE Liquid Argon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurcic, Zelimir

    2014-03-01

    The LBNE (Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment) is the next generation accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiment planned in US. The experiment will use a new muon-neutrino beam sent from Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and will detect electron-neutrino appearance and muon-neutrino disappearance using a Liquid Argon TPC located at a distance of 1300 km at Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. The primary physics goal of the LBNE is a definitive determination the neutrino mass hierarchy, determination the octant of the neutrino mixing angle theta-23, and precise measurement of CP violation in neutrino oscillation. Neutrino interaction in LAr result in charged particles producing ionization and scintillation light signals. Dedicated photon detection system is under design for use in the LBNE LArTPC far detectors. The baseline design couples wavelength-shifter coated ultraviolet transmitting acrylic to 3 mm2 silicon photomultipliers. By detecting scintillation light we aim to improve event reconstruction capabilities and efficiently separate neutrino events from background. Current status of the system will be described.

  18. Study of silicon photosensor applicability for scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khilya, V. M.; Voronov, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present work is the creation a prototype of anticoincidence system AC for gamma-telescope GAMMA-400. The detectors of AC are developed on the basis of plastic scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. This work is focuses on research of applicability of silicon photomultipliers SiPM by company SensL, type 60000 with BC-408 plastics for the prototype of anticoincidence system detector ACtop. In frame of project the assembly for measuring of the SiPM characteristics such as the linearity, boundary of saturation, the time resolution was developed. The final stage of work was the integration of the prototype of anticoincidence detector.

  19. Advantages of Photon Counting Detectors for Terahertz Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Ezawa, Hajime

    2016-08-01

    For astronomical observation at terahertz frequencies, a variety of cryogenic detector technologies are being developed to achieve background-limited observation from space, where a noise equivalent power (NEP) of less than 10^{-18} W/Hz^{0.5} is often required. When each photon signal is resolved in time, the requirements on NEP are reduced and 1 ns time resolution corresponds to an NEP of approximately 10^{-17} W/Hz^{0.5} at THz frequencies. Furthermore, fast photon counting detectors have a high dynamic range to observe bright terahertz sources such as stars and active galactic nuclei. Applications of photon counting detector are discussed for cosmic microwave background and photon counting terahertz interferometry.

  20. Photon counting modules using RCA silicon avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightstone, Alexander W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Macsween, Darlene E.; Mcintyre, Robert J.; Trottier, Claude; Webb, Paul P.

    1989-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are excellent small area, solid state detectors for photon counting. Performance possibilities include: photon detection efficiency in excess of 50 percent; wavelength response from 400 to 1000 nm; count rate to 10 (exp 7) counts per sec; afterpulsing at negligible levels; timing resolution better than 1 ns. Unfortunately, these performance levels are not simultaneously available in a single detector amplifier configuration. By considering theoretical performance predictions and previous and new measurements of APD performance, the anticipated performance of a range of proposed APD-based photon counting modules is derived.

  1. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector.Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom.Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the receiver

  2. Investigation of energy weighting using an energy discriminating photon counting detector for breast CT

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, Kesava S.; Mahd, Mufeed; Glick, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Breast CT is an emerging imaging technique that can portray the breast in 3D and improve visualization of important diagnostic features. Early clinical studies have suggested that breast CT has sufficient spatial and contrast resolution for accurate detection of masses and microcalcifications in the breast, reducing structural overlap that is often a limiting factor in reading mammographic images. For a number of reasons, image quality in breast CT may be improved by use of an energy resolving photon counting detector. In this study, the authors investigate the improvements in image quality obtained when using energy weighting with an energy resolving photon counting detector as compared to that with a conventional energy integrating detector. Methods: Using computer simulation, realistic CT images of multiple breast phantoms were generated. The simulation modeled a prototype breast CT system using an amorphous silicon (a-Si), CsI based energy integrating detector with different x-ray spectra, and a hypothetical, ideal CZT based photon counting detector with capability of energy discrimination. Three biological signals of interest were modeled as spherical lesions and inserted into breast phantoms; hydroxyapatite (HA) to represent microcalcification, infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), and iodine enhanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IIDC). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of these three lesions was measured from the CT reconstructions. In addition, a psychophysical study was conducted to evaluate observer performance in detecting microcalcifications embedded into a realistic anthropomorphic breast phantom. Results: In the energy range tested, improvements in SNR with a photon counting detector using energy weighting was higher (than the energy integrating detector method) by 30%–63% and 4%–34%, for HA and IDC lesions and 12%–30% (with Al filtration) and 32%–38% (with Ce filtration) for the IIDC lesion, respectively. The average area under the

  3. Interferometric Quantum-Nondemolition Single-Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kok, Peter; Lee, Hwang; Dowling, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Two interferometric quantum-nondemolition (QND) devices have been proposed: (1) a polarization-independent device and (2) a polarization-preserving device. The prolarization-independent device works on an input state of up to two photons, whereas the polarization-preserving device works on a superposition of vacuum and single- photon states. The overall function of the device would be to probabilistically generate a unique detector output only when its input electromagnetic mode was populated by a single photon, in which case its output mode would also be populated by a single photon. Like other QND devices, the proposed devices are potentially useful for a variety of applications, including such areas of NASA interest as quantum computing, quantum communication, detection of gravity waves, as well as pedagogical demonstrations of the quantum nature of light. Many protocols in quantum computation and quantum communication require the possibility of detecting a photon without destroying it. The only prior single- photon-detecting QND device is based on quantum electrodynamics in a resonant cavity and, as such, it depends on the photon frequency. Moreover, the prior device can distinguish only between one photon and no photon. The proposed interferometric QND devices would not depend on frequency and could distinguish between (a) one photon and (b) zero or two photons. The first proposed device is depicted schematically in Figure 1. The input electromagnetic mode would be a superposition of a zero-, a one-, and a two-photon quantum state. The overall function of the device would be to probabilistically generate a unique detector output only when its input electromagnetic mode was populated by a single photon, in which case its output mode also would be populated by a single photon.

  4. Flexible single-crystal silicon nanomembrane photonic crystal cavity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaochuan; Subbaraman, Harish; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Hosseini, Amir; Covey, John; Yu, Yalin; Kwong, David; Zhang, Yang; Lai, Wei-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Lu, Nanshu; Chen, Ray T

    2014-12-23

    Flexible inorganic electronic devices promise numerous applications, especially in fields that could not be covered satisfactorily by conventional rigid devices. Benefits on a similar scale are also foreseeable for silicon photonic components. However, the difficulty in transferring intricate silicon photonic devices has deterred widespread development. In this paper, we demonstrate a flexible single-crystal silicon nanomembrane photonic crystal microcavity through a bonding and substrate removal approach. The transferred cavity shows a quality factor of 2.2×10(4) and could be bent to a curvature of 5 mm radius without deteriorating the performance compared to its counterparts on rigid substrates. A thorough characterization of the device reveals that the resonant wavelength is a linear function of the bending-induced strain. The device also shows a curvature-independent sensitivity to the ambient index variation.

  5. Photon Identification with Segmented Germanium Detectors in Low Radiation Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kroeninger, K.; Liu, J.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.; Stelzer, F.

    2007-03-28

    Effective identification of photon-induced events is essential for a new generation of double beta-decay experiments. One such experiment is the GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, located at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) in Italy. It uses germanium, enriched in 76Ge, as source and detector, and aims at a background level of less than 10-3 counts/(kg {center_dot} keV {center_dot} y) in the region of the Q{beta}{beta}-value. Highly segmented detectors are being developed for this experiment. A detailed GEANT4 Monte Carlo study about the possibilities to identify photon--induced background was published previously. An 18-fold segmented prototype detector was tested and its performance compared with Monte Carlo predictions. The detector performed well and the agreement with the Monte Carlo is excellent.

  6. Target molecules detection by waveguiding in a photonic silicon membrane

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia E.; Van Buuren, Anthony; Terminello, Louis; Hart, Bradley R.

    2006-12-26

    Disclosed herein is a porous silicon filter capable of binding and detecting biological and chemical target molecules in liquid or gas samples. A photonic waveguiding silicon filter with chemical and/or biological anchors covalently attached to the pore walls bind target molecules. The system uses transmission curve engineering principles to allow measurements to be made in situ and in real time to detect the presence of various target molecules and calculate the concentration of bound target.

  7. Silicon Photonics with Applications to Data Center Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguinaldo, Ryan Francis

    In data center applications, fiber-based optical interconnects can be used to provide point-to-point links enabling high-bandwidth, inter-rack, data communications. In order to provide for future network scalability, which must be able to handle ultra-large data flows and bandwidth-intensive requests, optical technologies are increasingly introduced to different levels of the data center architecture to enable a variety of transparent network or all-optical networking schemes. However, the use of bulk optical components, which take up valuable rack-space real estate, can be extremely energy and cost prohibitive, especially when scaled up to the size of industrial warehouse-scale computing and considering that predictions of future data center networks are expected to contain millions of nodes. As such, we study chip-scale, silicon photonic, integrated circuits and their use as the optical hardware in future data center implementations. This work describes aspects of the design and integration of silicon photonic devices, which can be used for high-bandwidth, multi-channel, wavelength division multiplexed, optical communications. Examples of silicon photonic subsystems are discussed, including the realization of an on-chip channelized spectrum monitor and a network-node-on-a-chip. These optical integrated circuits are meant to replace bulk optical components with their functional equivalents on monolithic silicon. This work demonstrates that silicon photonics may be advantageous in meeting the urgent hardware-scaling demands of high-bandwidth, multi-user, communication networks.

  8. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 10{sup 4} with mode volume ∼0.60(λ/n){sup 3} at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ∼10{sup 4} is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  9. Generation of correlated photons in nanoscale silicon waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharping, Jay E.; Lee, Kim F.; Foster, Mark A.; Turner, Amy C.; Schmidt, Bradley S.; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L.; Kumar, Prem

    2006-12-01

    .We experimentally study the generation of correlated pairs of photons through four-wave mixing (FWM) in embedded silicon waveguides. The waveguides, which are designed to exhibit anomalous group-velocity dispersion at wavelengths near 1555 nm, allow phase matched FWM and thus efficient pair-wise generation of non-degenerate signal and idler photons. Photon counting measurements yield a coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) of around 25 for a signal (idler) photon production rate of about 0.05 per pulse. We characterize the variation in CAR as a function of pump power and pump-to-sideband wavelength detuning. These measurements represent a first step towards the development of tools for quantum information processing which are based on CMOS-compatible, silicon-on-insulator technology.

  10. Communication Limits Due to Photon-Detector Jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce E.; Farr, William H.

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study was conducted of the limit imposed by photon-detector jitter on the capacity of a pulse-position-modulated optical communication system in which the receiver operates in a photon-counting (weak-signal) regime. Photon-detector jitter is a random delay between impingement of a photon and generation of an electrical pulse by the detector. In the study, jitter statistics were computed from jitter measurements made on several photon detectors. The probability density of jitter was mathematically modeled by use of a weighted sum of Gaussian functions. Parameters of the model were adjusted to fit histograms representing the measured-jitter statistics. Likelihoods of assigning detector-output pulses to correct pulse time slots in the presence of jitter were derived and used to compute channel capacities and corresponding losses due to jitter. It was found that the loss, expressed as the ratio between the signal power needed to achieve a specified capacity in the presence of jitter and that needed to obtain the same capacity in the absence of jitter, is well approximated as a quadratic function of the standard deviation of the jitter in units of pulse-time-slot duration.

  11. Single-photon emitting diode in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Lohrmann, A; Iwamoto, N; Bodrog, Z; Castelletto, S; Ohshima, T; Karle, T J; Gali, A; Prawer, S; McCallum, J C; Johnson, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electrically driven single-photon emitting devices have immediate applications in quantum cryptography, quantum computation and single-photon metrology. Mature device fabrication protocols and the recent observations of single defect systems with quantum functionalities make silicon carbide an ideal material to build such devices. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of bright single-photon emitting diodes. The electrically driven emitters display fully polarized output, superior photon statistics (with a count rate of >300 kHz) and stability in both continuous and pulsed modes, all at room temperature. The atomic origin of the single-photon source is proposed. These results provide a foundation for the large scale integration of single-photon sources into a broad range of applications, such as quantum cryptography or linear optics quantum computing.

  12. Single-photon emitting diode in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Lohrmann, A; Iwamoto, N; Bodrog, Z; Castelletto, S; Ohshima, T; Karle, T J; Gali, A; Prawer, S; McCallum, J C; Johnson, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electrically driven single-photon emitting devices have immediate applications in quantum cryptography, quantum computation and single-photon metrology. Mature device fabrication protocols and the recent observations of single defect systems with quantum functionalities make silicon carbide an ideal material to build such devices. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of bright single-photon emitting diodes. The electrically driven emitters display fully polarized output, superior photon statistics (with a count rate of >300 kHz) and stability in both continuous and pulsed modes, all at room temperature. The atomic origin of the single-photon source is proposed. These results provide a foundation for the large scale integration of single-photon sources into a broad range of applications, such as quantum cryptography or linear optics quantum computing. PMID:26205309

  13. Calibration of single-photon detectors using quantum statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Mogilevtsev, D.

    2010-08-15

    I show that calibration of the single-photon detector can be performed without knowledge of the signal parameters. Only partial information about the state statistics is sufficient for that. If one knows that the state is the squeezed one or the squeezed one mixed with the incoherent radiation, one can infer both the parameters of the state and the efficiency of the detector. For that one needs only to measure on/off statistics of detector clicks for the number of known absorbers placed before the detector. Thus, I suggest a scheme that performs a tomography of the signal and the measuring apparatus simultaneously.

  14. Characterization of the silicon drift detector for NICER instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigozhin, G.; Gendreau, K.; Foster, R.; Ricker, G.; Villaseñor, J.; Doty, J.; Kenyon, S.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Redus, R.; Huber, A.

    2012-07-01

    We have studied timing properties of the Amptek Silcon Drift Detectors (SDD) using pulsed X-ray source designed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The proposed Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) mission will use 56 of these detectors as X-ray sensors in an attached payload to the International Space Station to study time variability of millisecond X-ray pulsars. Using a rastered pinhole we have measured the delay times for single X-ray photons as a function of the impact position on the detector, as well as signal rise time as a function of impact position. We find that the interdependence of these parameters allows us to determine photon position on the detector by measuring the signal rise time, and, improve the accuracy of the photon arrival time measurement.

  15. Multipixel geiger-mode photon detectors for ultra-weak light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campisi, A.; Cosentino, L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Pappalardo, A.; Musumeci, F.; Privitera, S.; Scordino, A.; Tudisco, S.; Fallica, G.; Sanfilippo, D.; Mazzillo, M.; Condorelli, G.; Piazza, A.; Valvo, G.; Lombardo, S.; Sciacca, E.; Bonanno, G.; Belluso, M.

    2007-02-01

    Arrays of Single Photon Avalanche Detectors (SPAD) are considered today as a possible alternative to PMTs and other semiconductor devices in several applications, like physics research, bioluminescence, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems, etc. We have developed and characterized a first prototype array produced by STMicroelectronics in silicon planar technology and working at low voltage (30-40 V) in Geiger mode operation. The single cell structure (size down to 20 μm) and the geometrical arrangement give rise to appealing intrinsic characteristics of the device, such as photon detection efficiency, dark count map, cross-talk effects, timing and energy resolution. New prototypes are under construction with a higher number of pixels that have a common output signal to obtain a so-called SiPM (Silicon PhotoMultiplier) configuration.

  16. Indistinguishable Photons from Separated Silicon-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipahigil, A.; Jahnke, K. D.; Rogers, L. J.; Teraji, T.; Isoya, J.; Zibrov, A. S.; Jelezko, F.; Lukin, M. D.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate that silicon-vacancy (SiV) centers in diamond can be used to efficiently generate coherent optical photons with excellent spectral properties. We show that these features are due to the inversion symmetry associated with SiV centers. The generation of indistinguishable single photons from separated emitters at 5 K is demonstrated in a Hong-Ou-Mandel interference experiment. Prospects for realizing efficient quantum network nodes using SiV centers are discussed.

  17. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, R. R.; Stolin, A.; Majewski, S.; Proffitt, J.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26×58 array of 1.5×1.5 mm2 LYSO elements (spanning 41×91 mm2) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ~45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (~2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3 T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner.

  18. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module.

    PubMed

    Raylman, Rr; Stolin, A; Majewski, S; Proffitt, J

    2014-01-21

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26 × 58 array of 1.5 × 1.5mm(2) LYSO elements (spanning 41 × 91mm(2)) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ∼45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (∼2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner. PMID:24319305

  19. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module.

    PubMed

    Raylman, Rr; Stolin, A; Majewski, S; Proffitt, J

    2014-01-21

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26 × 58 array of 1.5 × 1.5mm(2) LYSO elements (spanning 41 × 91mm(2)) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ∼45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (∼2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner.

  20. A Photon Interference Detector with Continuous Display.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an apparatus which attempts to give a direct visual impression of the random detection of individual photons coupled with the recognition of the classical intensity distribution as a result of fairly high proton statistics. (Author/GA)

  1. Evaluation of a photon-counting hybrid pixel detector array with a synchrotron X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponchut, C.; Visschers, J. L.; Fornaini, A.; Graafsma, H.; Maiorino, M.; Mettivier, G.; Calvet, D.

    2002-05-01

    A photon-counting hybrid pixel detector (Medipix-1) has been characterized using a synchrotron X-ray source. The detector consists of a readout ASIC with 64×64 independent photon-counting cells of 170×170 μm 2 pitch, bump-bonded to a 300 μm thick silicon sensor, read out by a PCIbus-based electronics, and a graphical user interface (GUI) software. The intensity and the energy tunability of the X-ray source allow characterization of the detector in the time, space, and energy domains. The system can be read out on external trigger at a frame rate of 100 Hz with 3 ms exposure time per frame. The detector response is tested up to more than 7×10 5 detected events/pixel/s. The point-spread response shows <2% crosstalk between neighboring pixels. Fine scanning of the detector surface with a 10 μm beam reveals no loss in sensitivity between adjacent pixels as could result from charge sharing in the silicon sensor. Photons down to 6 keV can be detected after equalization of the thresholds of individual pixels. The obtained results demonstrate the advantages of photon-counting hybrid pixel detectors and particularly of the Medipix-1 chip for a wide range of X-ray imaging applications, including those using synchrotron X-ray beams.

  2. On-chip generation and demultiplexing of quantum correlated photons using a silicon-silica monolithic photonic integration platform.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Karkus, Peter; Nishi, Hidetaka; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Munro, William J; Takesue, Hiroki; Yamada, Koji

    2014-09-22

    We demonstrate the generation and demultiplexing of quantum correlated photons on a monolithic photonic chip composed of silicon and silica-based waveguides. Photon pairs generated in a nonlinear silicon waveguide are successfully separated into two optical channels of an arrayed-waveguide grating fabricated on a silica-based waveguide platform.

  3. Enhancing the heralded single-photon rate from a silicon nanowire by time and wavelength division multiplexing pump pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Jizan, I; He, J; Clark, A S; Choi, D-Y; Chae, C J; Eggleton, B J; Xiong, C

    2015-06-01

    Heralded single photons produced on a silicon chip represent an integrated photon source solution for scalable photonic quantum technologies. The key limitation of such sources is their non-deterministic nature introduced by the stochastic spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) process. Active spatial and temporal multiplexing can improve this by enhancing the single-photon rate without degrading the quantum signal-to-noise ratio. Here, taking advantage of the broad bandwidth of SFWM in a silicon nanowire, we experimentally demonstrate heralded single-photon generation from a silicon nanowire pumped by time and wavelength division multiplexed pulses. We show a 90±5% enhancement on the heralded photon rate at the cost of only 14±2% reduction to the signal-to-noise ratio, close to the performance found using only time division multiplexed pulses. As single-photon events are distributed to multiple wavelength channels, this new scheme overcomes the saturation limit of avalanche single-photon detectors and will improve the ultimate performance of such photon sources. PMID:26030539

  4. Photon-number-resolving detector with 10 bits of resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Leaf A.; Dauler, Eric A.; Chang, Joshua T

    2007-06-15

    A photon-number-resolving detector with single-photon resolution is described and demonstrated. It has 10 bits of resolution, does not require cryogenic cooling, and is sensitive to near ir wavelengths. This performance is achieved by flood illuminating a 32x32 element In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}AsP Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode array that has an integrated counter and digital readout circuit behind each pixel.

  5. Influence of detector motion in entanglement measurements with photons

    SciTech Connect

    Landulfo, Andre G. S.; Matsas, George E. A.; Torres, Adriano C.

    2010-04-15

    We investigate how the polarization correlations of entangled photons described by wave packets are modified when measured by moving detectors. For this purpose, we analyze the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell inequality as a function of the apparatus velocity. Our analysis is motivated by future experiments with entangled photons designed to use satellites. This is a first step toward the implementation of quantum information protocols in a global scale.

  6. Nanoantenna enhancement for telecom-wavelength superconducting single photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Heath, Robert M; Tanner, Michael G; Drysdale, Timothy D; Miki, Shigehito; Giannini, Vincenzo; Maier, Stefan A; Hadfield, Robert H

    2015-02-11

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors are rapidly emerging as a key infrared photon-counting technology. Two front-side-coupled silver dipole nanoantennas, simulated to have resonances at 1480 and 1525 nm, were fabricated in a two-step process. An enhancement of 50 to 130% in the system detection efficiency was observed when illuminating the antennas. This offers a pathway to increasing absorption into superconducting nanowires, creating larger active areas, and achieving more efficient detection at longer wavelengths.

  7. Photon Detector For Inverse Photoemission Spectroscopy With Improved Energy Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Maniraj, M.; D'Souza, S. W.; Barman, S. R.

    2011-07-15

    We present the results from newly designed and fabricated double window photon detector to improve the overall energy resolution for inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES). This simple design allows us to introduce an absorption gas (Krypton) to decrease the band-width of the energy selective photon detector and thus improve the resolution. Resonance absorption line of Kr of wavelength of 123.6 nm was used. By fitting the Fermi edge of the IPES spectrum of silver, we find an overall energy resolution improved by 73 meV. The design is modular and ensures ease and safety of handling.

  8. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-01-01

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 10(5) with a mode-volume of ~ 1.7(λ/n)(3). This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices.

  9. CMOS compatible high-Q photonic crystal nanocavity fabricated with photolithography on silicon photonic platform

    PubMed Central

    Ooka, Yuta; Tetsumoto, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Akihiro; Yoshiki, Wataru; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2015-01-01

    Progress on the fabrication of ultrahigh-Q photonic-crystal nanocavities (PhC-NCs) has revealed the prospect for new applications including silicon Raman lasers that require a strong confinement of light. Among various PhC-NCs, the highest Q has been recorded with silicon. On the other hand, microcavity is one of the basic building blocks in silicon photonics. However, the fusion between PhC-NCs and silicon photonics has yet to be exploited, since PhC-NCs are usually fabricated with electron-beam lithography and require an air-bridge structure. Here we show that a 2D-PhC-NC fabricated with deep-UV photolithography on a silica-clad silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure will exhibit a high-Q of 2.2 × 105 with a mode-volume of ~1.7(λ/n)3. This is the highest Q demonstrated with photolithography. We also show that this device exhibits an efficient thermal diffusion and enables high-speed switching. The demonstration of the photolithographic fabrication of high-Q silica-clad PhC-NCs will open possibility for mass-manufacturing and boost the fusion between silicon photonics and CMOS devices. PMID:26086849

  10. Scaling silicon photonic switch fabrics for data center interconnection networks.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, Dessislava; Rumley, Sébastien; Calhoun, David; Li, Qi; Hendry, Robert; Samadi, Payman; Bergman, Keren

    2015-01-26

    With the rapidly increasing aggregate bandwidth requirements of data centers there is a growing interest in the insertion of optically interconnected networks with high-radix transparent optical switch fabrics. Silicon photonics is a particularly promising and applicable technology due to its small footprint, CMOS compatibility, high bandwidth density, and the potential for nanosecond scale dynamic connectivity. In this paper we analyze the feasibility of building silicon photonic microring based switch fabrics for data center scale optical interconnection networks. We evaluate the scalability of a microring based switch fabric for WDM signals. Critical parameters including crosstalk, insertion loss and switching speed are analyzed, and their sensitivity with respect to device parameters is examined. We show that optimization of physical layer parameters can reduce crosstalk and increase switch fabric scalability. Our analysis indicates that with current state-of-the-art devices, a high radix 128 × 128 silicon photonic single chip switch fabric with tolerable power penalty is feasible. The applicability of silicon photonic microrings for data center switching is further supported via review of microring operations and control demonstrations. The challenges and opportunities for this technology platform are discussed.

  11. High-energy neutron spectroscopy with thick silicon detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinnison, James D.; Maurer, Richard H.; Roth, David R.; Haight, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    The high-energy neutron component of the space radiation environment in thick structures such as the International Space Station contributes to the total radiation dose received by an astronaut. Detector design constraints such as size and mass have limited the energy range of neutron spectrum measurements in orbit to about 12 MeV in Space Shuttle studies. We present a new method for high-energy neutron spectroscopy using small silicon detectors that can extend these measurements to more than 500 MeV. The methodology is based on measurement of the detector response function for high-energy neutrons and inversion of this response function with measured deposition data to deduce neutron energy spectra. We also present the results of an initial shielding study performed with the thick silicon detector system for high-energy neutrons incident on polyethylene.

  12. A Photon Counting Imaging Detector for NASA Exoplanet Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald

    The key objective of the proposed project is to advance the maturity of a 256x256 pixel single-photon optical imaging detector. The detector has zero read noise and is resilient against the harsh effects of radiation in space. We expect that the device will have state-of-the-art performance in other parameters, e.g., high quantum efficiency from UV to 1 #m, low dark current, etc.

  13. Polarization rotator-splitters in standard active silicon photonics platforms.

    PubMed

    Sacher, Wesley D; Barwicz, Tymon; Taylor, Benjamin J F; Poon, Joyce K S

    2014-02-24

    We demonstrate various silicon-on-insulator polarization management structures based on a polarization rotator-splitter that uses a bi-level taper TM0-TE1 mode converter. The designs are fully compatible with standard active silicon photonics platforms with no new levels required and were implemented in the IME baseline and IME-OpSIS silicon photonics processes. We demonstrate a polarization rotator-splitter with polarization crosstalk < -13 dB over a bandwidth of 50 nm. Then, we improve the crosstalk to < -22 dB over a bandwidth of 80 nm by integrating the polarization rotator-splitter with directional coupler polarization filters. Finally, we demonstrate a polarization controller by integrating the polarization rotator-splitters with directional couplers, thermal tuners, and PIN diode phase shifters. PMID:24663698

  14. Hybrid integration of carbon nanotubes into silicon slot photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán Valdeiglesias, E.; Zhang, W.; Hoang, H. C.; Alonso-Ramos, C.; Noury, A.; Serna, S.; Le Roux, X.; Cassan, E.; Izard, N.; Sarti, F.; Torrini, U.; Balestrieri, M.; Keita, A.-S.; Yang, H.; Bezugly, V.; Vinattieri, A.; Cuniberti, G.; Filoramo, A.; Gurioli, M.; Vivien, L.

    2016-03-01

    Silicon photonics, due to its compatibility with the CMOS platform and unprecedented integration capability, has become the preferred solution for the implementation of next generation optical interconnects. However, current Si photonics require on-chip integration of several materials, including III-V for lasing, doped silicon for modulation and Ge for detection. The very different requirements of these materials result in complex fabrication processes that offset the cost-effectiveness of the Si photonics approach. We are developing an alternative route towards the integration of optoelectronic devices in Si photonic, relying on the use of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs can be considered as a Si compatible material able to emit, modulate and detect near-infrared light. Hence, they hold a unique potential to implement all active devices in the Si photonics platform. In addition, solution processed SWNTs can be integrated on Si using spin-coating techniques, obviating the need of complex epitaxial growth or chip bonding approaches. Here, we report on our recent progress in the coupling of SWNTs light emission into optical resonators implemented on the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platform.

  15. Charged particle detectors made from thin layers of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to determine the feasibility of using hydrogenated amorphous silicon (..cap alpha..-Si:H) as solid state thin film charged particle detectors. /sup 241/Am alphas were successfully detected with ..cap alpha..-Si:H devices. The measurements and results of these experiments are presented. The problems encountered and changes in the fabrication of the detectors that may improve the performance are discussed.

  16. Operation of silicon microstrip detectors in a high radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kapustinsky, J.S.; Alde, D.M.; Boissevain, J.G.; Jeppesen, R.G.; Lane, D.W.; Leitch, M.J.; Lillberg, J.W.; Lopez, T.A.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Peng, J.C. ); Brooks, B.M.; Isenhower, L.D.; Sadler, M.E. ); Lederman, L.M.; Schub, M.H. ); Brown, C.N.; Cooper, W.E.; Gounder, K.; Hsiung, Y.B.; Mishra, C.S. (Fermi National

    1990-01-01

    A Silicon Microstrip Spectrometer was recently installed and operated in an 800 GeV proton beamline at Fermilab as a major new component of experiment E789. The detectors received an estimated radiation exposure of up to 7.8 {times} 10{sup 12} minimum ionizing particles per cm{sup 2} over a period of two months. We report on the changes in detector performance that we have observed following preliminary data analysis. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  17. A prototype of very high resolution small animal PET scanner using silicon pad detectors

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-June; Leslie Rogers, W.; Huh, Sam; Kagan, Harris; Honscheid, Klaus; Burdette, Don; Chesi, Enrico; Lacasta, Carlos; Llosa, Gabriela; Mikuz, Marko; Studen, Andrej; Weilhammer, Peter; Clinthorne, Neal H.

    2007-01-01

    A very high resolution small animal positron emission tomograph (PET) which can achieve sub-millimeter spatial resolution is being developed using silicon pad detectors. The prototype PET for a single slice instrument consists of two 1 mm thick silicon pad detectors, each containing a 32 × 16 array of 1.4 mm × 1.4 mm pads read out with four VATAGP3 chips which have 128 channels low-noise self triggering ASIC in each chip, coincidence units, a source turntable and tungsten slice collimator. The silicon detectors were located edgewise on opposite sides of a 4 cm field-of-view to maximize efficiency. Energy resolution is dominated by electronic noise, which is 0.98% (1.38 keV) FWHM at 140.5 keV. Coincidence timing resolution is 82.1 ns FWHM and coincidence efficiency was measured to be 1.04 × 10-3 % from two silicon detectors with annihilation photons of 18F source Image data were acquired and reconstructed using conventional 2-D filtered-back projection (FBP) and a maximum likelihood expectation maximization (ML-EM) method. Image resolution of approximately 1.45 mm FWHM is obtained from 1-D profile of 1.1 mm diameter 18F line source image. Even better resolution can be obtained with smaller detector element sizes. While many challenges remain in scaling up the instrument to useful efficiency including densely packed detectors and significantly improved timing resolution, performance of the test setup in terms of easily achieving submillimeter resolution is compelling. PMID:18084629

  18. Photon detector for MEGA. [53 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, C.A.; Tribble, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    The MEGA photon detector is designed to observe the 52.83-MeV photon produced in a [mu] [yields] e[gamma] decay with an energy resolution of 1.25 MeV, a position resolution of 2 [times] 5 mm[sup 2], a directional resolution of 10[degree], a time resolution of 500 ps, and an efficiency of about 5.4%. It will consist of three independent concentric cylindrical pair spectrometers mounted within a 1.5 T magnetic field produced by a superconducting solenoid magnet. Each pair spectrometer includes two thin Pb foils to convert photons into e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  19. Characterization of silicon detectors through TCT at Delhi University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, G.; Lalwani, K.; Dalal, R.; Bhardwaj, A.; Ranjan, K.

    2016-07-01

    Transient Current Technique (TCT) is one of the important methods to characterize silicon detectors and is based on the time evolution of the charge carriers generated when a laser light is shone on it. For red laser, charge is injected only to a small distance from the surface of the detector. For such a system, one of the charge carriers is collected faster than the readout time of the electronics and therefore, the effective signal at the electrodes is decided by the charge carriers that traverse throughout the active volume of the detector, giving insight to the electric field profile, drift velocity, effective doping density, etc. of the detector. Delhi University is actively involved in the silicon detector R&D and has recently installed a TCT setup consisting of a red laser system, a Faraday cage, a SMU (Source Measuring Unit), a bias tee, and an amplifier. Measurements on a few silicon pad detectors have been performed using the developed system, and the results have been found in good agreement with the CERN setup.

  20. EMC Diagnosis and Corrective Actions for Silicon Strip Tracker Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Arteche, F.; Rivetta, C.; /SLAC

    2006-06-06

    The tracker sub-system is one of the five sub-detectors of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment under construction at CERN for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator. The tracker subdetector is designed to reconstruct tracks of charged sub-atomic particles generated after collisions. The tracker system processes analogue signals from 10 million channels distributed across 14000 silicon micro-strip detectors. It is designed to process signals of a few nA and digitize them at 40 MHz. The overall sub-detector is embedded in a high particle radiation environment and a magnetic field of 4 Tesla. The evaluation of the electromagnetic immunity of the system is very important to optimize the performance of the tracker sub-detector and the whole CMS experiment. This paper presents the EMC diagnosis of the CMS silicon tracker sub-detector. Immunity tests were performed using the final prototype of the Silicon Tracker End-Caps (TEC) system to estimate the sensitivity of the system to conducted noise, evaluate the weakest areas of the system and take corrective actions before the integration of the overall detector. This paper shows the results of one of those tests, that is the measurement and analysis of the immunity to CM external conducted noise perturbations.

  1. Micro-channel plate photon detector studies for the TORCH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Cowie, E. N.; Cussans, D.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Van Dijk, M.

    2015-07-01

    The Time Of internally Reflected Cherenkov light (TORCH) detector is under development. Charged particle tracks passing through a 1 cm plate of quartz will generate the Cherenkov photons, and their arrival will be timed by an array of micro-channel plate photon detectors. As part of the TORCH R&D studies, commercial and custom-made micro-channel plate detectors are being characterized. The final photon detectors for this application are being produced in a three-phase program in collaboration with industry. Custom-made single-channel devices with extended lifetime have been manufactured and their performance is being systematically investigated in the laboratory. Optical studies for the preparation of beam and laboratory tests of a TORCH prototype are also underway.

  2. Photon energy absorption coefficients for nuclear track detectors using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Geant4 Monte Carlo code simulations were used to solve experimental and theoretical complications for calculation of mass energy-absorption coefficients of elements, air, and compounds. The mass energy-absorption coefficients for nuclear track detectors were computed first time using Geant4 Monte Carlo code for energy 1 keV-20 MeV. Very good agreements for simulated results of mass energy-absorption coefficients for carbon, nitrogen, silicon, sodium iodide and nuclear track detectors were observed on comparison with the values reported in the literatures. Kerma relative to air for energy 1 keV-20 MeV and energy absorption buildup factors for energy 50 keV-10 MeV up to 10 mfp penetration depths of the selected nuclear track detectors were also calculated to evaluate the absorption of the gamma photons. Geant4 simulation can be utilized for estimation of mass energy-absorption coefficients in elements and composite materials.

  3. Eiger: a single-photon counting x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, I.; Bergamaschi, A.; Billich, H.; Cartier, S.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Henrich, B.; Jungmann, J.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.

    2014-05-01

    Eiger is a single-photon counting x-ray pixel detector being developed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) for applications at synchrotron light sources. It follows the widely utilized and successful Pilatus detector. The main features of Eiger are a pixel size of 75 × 75 μm2, high frame rate capability of 22 kHz and negligible dead time between frames of 4 μs. This article contains a detailed description of Eiger detector systems, from the 500 kpixel single-module detector to large-area multi-modules systems. The calibration and performance of the first 500 kpixel system that is in routine user operation are also presented. Furthermore, a method of calibrating the energy of single-photon counting detectors along the detector gain axis is introduced. This approach has the advantage that the detector settings can be optimized at all energies for count rate capabilities. Rate capabilities of the system are reported for energies between 6 and 16 keV.

  4. An all-silicon single-photon source by unconventional photon blockade.

    PubMed

    Flayac, Hugo; Gerace, Dario; Savona, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The lack of suitable quantum emitters in silicon and silicon-based materials has prevented the realization of room temperature, compact, stable, and integrated sources of single photons in a scalable on-chip architecture, so far. Current approaches rely on exploiting the enhanced optical nonlinearity of silicon through light confinement or slow-light propagation, and are based on parametric processes that typically require substantial input energy and spatial footprint to reach a reasonable output yield. Here we propose an alternative all-silicon device that employs a different paradigm, namely the interplay between quantum interference and the third-order intrinsic nonlinearity in a system of two coupled optical cavities. This unconventional photon blockade allows to produce antibunched radiation at extremely low input powers. We demonstrate a reliable protocol to operate this mechanism under pulsed optical excitation, as required for device applications, thus implementing a true single-photon source. We finally propose a state-of-art implementation in a standard silicon-based photonic crystal integrated circuit that outperforms existing parametric devices either in input power or footprint area. PMID:26061665

  5. An all-silicon single-photon source by unconventional photon blockade

    PubMed Central

    Flayac, Hugo; Gerace, Dario; Savona, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The lack of suitable quantum emitters in silicon and silicon-based materials has prevented the realization of room temperature, compact, stable, and integrated sources of single photons in a scalable on-chip architecture, so far. Current approaches rely on exploiting the enhanced optical nonlinearity of silicon through light confinement or slow-light propagation, and are based on parametric processes that typically require substantial input energy and spatial footprint to reach a reasonable output yield. Here we propose an alternative all-silicon device that employs a different paradigm, namely the interplay between quantum interference and the third-order intrinsic nonlinearity in a system of two coupled optical cavities. This unconventional photon blockade allows to produce antibunched radiation at extremely low input powers. We demonstrate a reliable protocol to operate this mechanism under pulsed optical excitation, as required for device applications, thus implementing a true single-photon source. We finally propose a state-of-art implementation in a standard silicon-based photonic crystal integrated circuit that outperforms existing parametric devices either in input power or footprint area. PMID:26061665

  6. The Silicon Detector (SiD) And Linear Collider Detector R&D in Asia And North America

    SciTech Connect

    Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Fujii, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-08-11

    In Asia and North America research and development on a linear collider detector has followed complementary paths to that in Europe. Among the developments in the US has been the conception of a detector built around silicon tracking, which relies heavily on a pixel (CCD) vertex detector, and employs a silicon tungsten calorimeter. Since this detector is quite different from the TESLA detector, we describe it here, along with some of the sub-system specific R&D in these regions.

  7. The development of a silicon multiplicity detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Kraner, H.W.; Lissauer, D.; Makowiecki, D.; Polychronakos, V.; Radeka, V.; Sondericker, J.; Stephani, D.; Barrette, J.; Hall, J.; Mark, S.K.; Pruneau, C.A.; Wolfe, D.; Borenstein, S.R.

    1991-12-31

    The physics program and the design criteria for a Silicon Pad Detector at RHIC are reviewed. An end cap double sided readout detector configuration for RHIC is presented. Its performance as an on-line and off-line centrality tagging device is studied by means of simulations with Fritiof as the event generator. The results of an in-beam test of a prototype double-sided Si-detector are presented. Good signal-to-noise ratio are obtained with front junction and the resistive back side readout. Good separation between one and two minimum-ionizing particle signals is achieved.

  8. A 16 x 16 element extrinsic silicon detector array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Two bismuth-doped silicon accumulation-mode charge-injection device (AMCID) infrared detector arrays are studied. The geometry and composition of the arrays, and a description of the cold and warm electronics components of the system are described. Instructions for setting up and operating the array system, plus results of a functional test, are included.

  9. Advanced Silicon Detectors for High Energy Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, George

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the development of silicon detectors for high energy astrophysics missions is presented. The topics include: 1) Background: Motivation for Event-Driven CCD; 2) Report of Grant Activity; 3) Packaged EDCCD; 4) Measured X-ray Energy Resolution of the Gen1 EDCCDs Operated in "Conventional Mode"; and 5) EDCCD Gen 1.5-Lot 1 Planning.

  10. Application of photon detectors in the VIP2 experiment to test the Pauli Exclusion Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, A.; Bartalucci, S.; Bazzi, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, M.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; Curceanu, C.; De Paolis, L.; Di Matteo, S.; D'Ufflzi, A.; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Marton, J.; Milotti, E.; Pietreanu, D.; Piscicchia, K.; Ponta, T.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Sperandio, L.; Vazquez-Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) was introduced by the austrian physicist Wolfgang Pauli in 1925. Since then, several experiments have checked its validity. From 2006 until 2010, the VIP (Violation of the Pauli Principle) experiment took data at the LNGS underground laboratory to test the PEP. This experiment looked for electronic 2p to Is transitions in copper, where 2 electrons are in the Is state before the transition happens. These transitions violate the PEP. The lack of detection of X-ray photons coming from these transitions resulted in a preliminary upper limit for the violation of the PEP of 4.7 × 10-29. Currently, the successor experiment VIP2 is under preparation. The main improvements are, on one side, the use of Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) as X-ray photon detectors. On the other side an active shielding is implemented, which consists of plastic scintillator bars read by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The employment of these detectors will improve the upper limit for the violation of the PEP by around 2 orders of magnitude.

  11. Tests of innovative photon detectors and integrated electronics for the large-area CLAS12 ring-imaging Cherenkov detector

    SciTech Connect

    Contalbrigo, Marco

    2015-07-01

    A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab. Its aim is to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and a densely packed and highly segmented photon detector. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). Extensive tests have been performed on Hamamatsu H8500 and novel flat multi-anode photomultipliers under development and on various types of silicon photomultipliers. A large scale prototype based on 28 H8500 MA-PMTs has been realized and tested with few GeV/c hadron beams at the T9 test-beam facility of CERN. In addition a small prototype was used to study the response of customized SiPM matrices within a temperature interval ranging from 25 down to –25 °C. The preliminary results of the individual photon detector tests and of the prototype performance at the test-beams are here reported.

  12. High performance fiber-coupled NbTiN superconducting nanowire single photon detectors with Gifford-McMahon cryocooler.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shigehito; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen

    2013-04-22

    We present high performance fiber-coupled niobium titanium nitride superconducting nanowire single photon detectors fabricated on thermally oxidized silicon substrates. The best device showed a system detection efficiency (DE) of 74%, dark count rate of 100 c/s, and full width at half maximum timing jitter of 68 ps under a bias current of 18.0 μA with a practical Gifford-McMahon cryocooler system. We also introduced six detectors into the cryocooler and confirmed that the system DE of all detectors was higher than 67% at the dark count rate of 100 c/s.

  13. Porous Silicon-Based Quantum Dot Broad Spectrum Radiation Detector.

    PubMed

    Urdaneta, M; Stepanov, P; Weinberg, I N; Pala, I R; Brock, S

    2011-01-11

    Silicon is a convenient and inexpensive platform for radiation detection, but has low stopping power for x-rays and gamma-rays with high energy (e.g., 100 keV, as used in computed tomography and digital radiography, or 1 MeV, as desired for detection of nuclear materials). We have effectively increased the stopping power of silicon detectors by producing a layer of porous or micro-machined silicon, and infusing this layer with semiconductor quantum dots made of electron-dense materials. Results of prototype detectors show sensitivity to infrared, visible light, and x-rays, with dark current of less than 1 nA/mm(2). PMID:24432047

  14. Solar power conversion efficiency in modulated silicon nanowire photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deinega, Alexei; John, Sajeev

    2012-10-01

    It is suggested that using only 1 μm of silicon, sculpted in the form of a modulated nanowire photonic crystal, solar power conversion efficiency in the range of 15%-20% can be achieved. Choosing a specific modulation profile provides antireflection, light trapping, and back-reflection over broad angles in targeted spectral regions for high efficiency power conversion without solar tracking. Solving both Maxwell's equations in the 3D photonic crystal and the semiconductor drift-diffusion equations in each nanowire, we identify optimal junction and contact geometries and study the influence of the nanowire surface curvature on solar cell efficiency. We demonstrate that suitably modulated nanowires enable 20% efficiency improvement over their straight counterparts made of an equivalent amount of silicon. We also discuss the efficiency of a tandem amorphous and crystalline silicon nanowire photonic crystal solar cell. Opportunities for "hot carrier" collection and up-conversion of infrared light, enhanced by photonic crystal geometry, facilitate further improvements in power efficiency.

  15. The photon detector of the HERMES dual-radiator RICH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschenauer, E. C.; Van der Kerckhove, K.

    1999-08-01

    To provide hadron identification over the full kinematic range (2-20GeV) of the HERMES experiment, the gas threshold Cherenkov counters were replaced by a dual-radiator ring-imaging Cherenkov detectors incorporating for the first time aerogel (SiO2) and C4F10 gas as radiator materials. This combination of radiators requires a photon detector that is sensitive over wavelengths from ultraviolet to 700nm. Commercially available `3/4 in.' photo-multipliers were chosen to form an array of 2000 for each of two photon-detectors. Exhaustive calibration and sorting of the phototubes prior to installation resulted in very low noise hit rates in the LeCroy PCOS4 readout system, with a uniform effective threshold of 0.1 photo-electrons.

  16. A new detector concept for silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadigov, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Ahmadov, G.; Ariffin, A.; Khorev, S.; Sadygov, Z.; Suleymanov, S.; Zerrouk, F.; Madatov, R.

    2016-07-01

    A new design and principle of operation of silicon photomultipliers are presented. The new design comprises a semiconductor substrate and an array of independent micro-phototransistors formed on the substrate. Each micro-phototransistor comprises a photosensitive base operating in Geiger mode and an individual micro-emitter covering a small part of the base layer, thereby creating, together with this latter, a micro-transistor. Both micro-emitters and photosensitive base layers are connected with two respective independent metal grids via their individual micro-resistors. The total value of signal gain in the proposed silicon photomultiplier is a result of both the avalanche gain in the base layer and the corresponding gain in the micro-transistor. The main goals of the new design are: significantly lower both optical crosstalk and after-pulse effects at high signal amplification, improve speed of single photoelectron pulse formation, and significantly reduce the device capacitance.

  17. Selective and reversible ammonia gas detection with nanoporous film functionalized silicon photonic micro-ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Yebo, Nebiyu A; Sree, Sreeprasanth Pulinthanathu; Levrau, Elisabeth; Detavernier, Christophe; Hens, Zeger; Martens, Johan A; Baets, Roel

    2012-05-21

    Portable, low cost and real-time gas sensors have a considerable potential in various biomedical and industrial applications. For such applications, nano-photonic gas sensors based on standard silicon fabrication technology offer attractive opportunities. Deposition of high surface area nano-porous coatings on silicon photonic sensors is a means to achieve selective, highly sensitive and multiplexed gas detection on an optical chip. Here we demonstrate selective and reversible ammonia gas detection with functionalized silicon-on-insulator optical micro-ring resonators. The micro-ring resonators are coated with acidic nano-porous aluminosilicate films for specific ammonia sensing, which results in a reversible response to NH(3)with selectivity relative to CO(2). The ammonia detection limit is estimated at about 5 ppm. The detectors reach a steady response to NH(3) within 30 and return to their base level within 60 to 90 seconds. The work opens perspectives on development of nano-photonic sensors for real-time, non-invasive, low cost and light weight biomedical and industrial sensing applications.

  18. Microwave Photon Detector in Circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ripoll, Juan Jose; Romero, Guillermo; Solano, Enrique

    2009-03-01

    In this work we propose a design for a microwave photodetector based on elements from circuit QED such as the ones used in qubit designs. Our proposal consists on a microwave guide in which we embed circuital elements that can absorb photons and irreversibly change state. These incoherent absorption processes constitute the measurement itself. We first model this design using a general master equation for the propagating photons and the absorbing elements. We find that the detection efficiency for a single absorber is limited to 50%, and that this efficiency can be quickly increased by adding more elements with a moderate separation, obtaining 80% and 90% for two and three absorbers. Our abstract design has at least one possible implementation in which the absorbers are current biased Josephson junction. We demonstrate that the coupling between the guide and the junctions is strong enough, irrespectively of the microwave guide size, and derivate realistic parameters for high fidelity operation with current experiments. Patent pending No. 200802933, Oficina Espanola de Patentes y Marcas, 17/10/2008.

  19. Photon BLOCH oscillations in porous silicon optical superlattices.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, V; del Río, J A; Malpuech, G; Zamfirescu, M; Kavokin, A; Coquillat, D; Scalbert, D; Vladimirova, M; Gil, B

    2004-03-01

    We report the first observation of oscillations of the electromagnetic field in an optical superlattice based on porous silicon. These oscillations are an optical equivalent of well-known electronic Bloch oscillations in crystals. Elementary cells of our structure are composed by microcavities whose coupling gives rise to the extended collective modes forming optical minigaps and minibands. By varying thicknesses of the cavities along the structure axis, we have created an effective electric field for photons. A very high quality factor of the confined optical state of the Wannier-Stark ladder may allow lasing in porous silicon-based superlattices.

  20. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    O’Regan, Bryan J.; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission. PMID:26293111

  1. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Bryan J; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F

    2015-08-21

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

  2. Test results on the silicon pixel detector for the TTF-FEL beam trajectory monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillert, S.; Ischebeck, R.; Müller, U. C.; Roth, S.; Hansen, K.; Holl, P.; Karstensen, S.; Kemmer, J.; Klanner, R.; Lechner, P.; Leenen, M.; Ng, J. S. T.; Schmüser, P.; Strüder, L.

    2001-02-01

    Test measurements on the silicon pixel detector for the beam trajectory monitor at the free-electron laser of the TESLA test facility are presented. To determine the electronic noise of the detector and the read-out electronics and to calibrate the signal amplitude of different pixels, the 6 keV photons of the manganese K α/K β line are used. Two different methods determine the spatial accuracy of the detector: in one setup a laser beam is focused to a straight line and moves across the pixel structure. In the other, the detector is scanned using a low-intensity electron beam of an electron microscope. Both methods show that the symmetry axis of the detector defines a straight line within 0.4 μm. The sensitivity of the detector to low-energy X-rays is measured using a vacuum ultraviolet beam at the synchrotron light source HASYLAB. Additionally, the electron microscope is used to study the radiation hardness of the detector.

  3. 14C autoradiography with an energy-sensitive silicon pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Esposito, M; Mettivier, G; Russo, P

    2011-04-01

    The first performance tests are presented of a carbon-14 ((14)C) beta-particle digital autoradiography system with an energy-sensitive hybrid silicon pixel detector based on the Timepix readout circuit. Timepix was developed by the Medipix2 Collaboration and it is similar to the photon-counting Medipix2 circuit, except for an added time-based synchronization logic which allows derivation of energy information from the time-over-threshold signal. This feature permits direct energy measurements in each pixel of the detector array. Timepix is bump-bonded to a 300 µm thick silicon detector with 256 × 256 pixels of 55 µm pitch. Since an energetic beta-particle could release its kinetic energy in more than one detector pixel as it slows down in the semiconductor detector, an off-line image analysis procedure was adopted in which the single-particle cluster of hit pixels is recognized; its total energy is calculated and the position of interaction on the detector surface is attributed to the centre of the charge cluster. Measurements reported are detector sensitivity, (4.11 ± 0.03) × 10(-3) cps mm(-2) kBq(-1) g, background level, (3.59 ± 0.01) × 10(-5) cps mm(-2), and minimum detectable activity, 0.0077 Bq. The spatial resolution is 76.9 µm full-width at half-maximum. These figures are compared with several digital imaging detectors for (14)C beta-particle digital autoradiography.

  4. Controlling the spectrum of photons generated on a silicon nanophotonic chip

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Ong, Jun Rong; Savanier, Marc; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2014-01-01

    Directly modulated semiconductor lasers are widely used, compact light sources in optical communications. Semiconductors can also be used to generate nonclassical light; in fact, CMOS-compatible silicon chips can be used to generate pairs of single photons at room temperature. Unlike the classical laser, the photon-pair source requires control over a two-dimensional joint spectral intensity (JSI) and it is not possible to process the photons separately, as this could destroy the entanglement. Here we design a photon-pair source, consisting of planar lightwave components fabricated using CMOS-compatible lithography in silicon, which has the capability to vary the JSI. By controlling either the optical pump wavelength, or the temperature of the chip, we demonstrate the ability to select different JSIs, with a large variation in the Schmidt number. Such control can benefit high-dimensional communications where detector-timing constraints can be relaxed by realizing a large Schmidt number in a small frequency range. PMID:25410792

  5. Silicon TSV interposers for photonics and VLSI packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodrahalli, N.; Li, C. Y.; Kosenko, V.

    2011-02-01

    Miniaturization, higher performance, and higher bandwidth needs of the electronic industry continue to drive technology innovations through increased levels of integration. Through Silicon Via (TSV) technology along with flip chip technology provides significant improvements over the traditional technologies for packaging VLSI circuits. Silicon Interposers built using TSVs and embedded capacitors provide solutions to the next generation needs of VLSI Packaging. TSV Si interposers also provide a paltform for integrating photonic elements like the laser diodes and optical fibers for next generation high bandwidth VLSI packaging. The presentation describes (i) the TSV technologies developed, (ii) implementation of Si TSV interposer with embedded capacitors for VLSI packaging, and (iii) development of Si TSV interposer for integration of photonics and VLSI subsystems. Reliability results of interposers with embedded capacitors are also presented.

  6. Dry-film polymer waveguide for silicon photonics chip packaging.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Han; Nakagawa, Shigeru

    2014-09-22

    Polymer waveguide made by dry film process is demonstrated for silicon photonics chip packaging. With 8 μm × 11.5 μm core waveguide, little penalty is observed up to 25 Gbps before or after the light propagate through a 10-km long single-mode fiber (SMF). Coupling loss to SMF is 0.24 dB and 1.31 dB at the polymer waveguide input and output ends, respectively. Alignment tolerance for 0.5 dB loss increase is +/- 1.0 μm along both vertical and horizontal directions for the coupling from the polymer waveguide to SMF. The dry-film polymer waveguide demonstrates promising performance for silicon photonics chip packaging used in next generation optical multi-chip module.

  7. Silicon sensors for HL-LHC tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandić, Igor

    2013-12-01

    It is foreseen to significantly increase the luminosity of the LHC by upgrading towards the HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2021 in order to harvest the maximum physics potential. After the upgrade, unprecedented levels of radiation will require the experiments to upgrade their tracking detectors to withstand hadron fluences equivalent to over 1016 1 MeV neutrons per cm2. Within the RD50 Collaboration, a massive R&D program is underway to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Recent defect characterization and Edge-TCT measurement results improved the understanding of irradiated detector performance. RD50 results show that sensors with n-side readout, easiest made with p-type silicon, have a superior radiation hardness due to the high overlap of electric and weighting field after irradiation, larger contribution of electrons to the total signal and finally due to charge multiplication which may enhance the collected charge at high bias voltages in this type of detector. A further area of activity is the development of advanced sensor types like 3D silicon and thin pixel detectors designed for the extreme radiation levels expected for the inner layers.

  8. Si-strip photon counting detectors for contrast-enhanced spectral mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Buxin; Reiser, Ingrid; Wessel, Jan C.; Malakhov, Nail; Wawrzyniak, Gregor; Hartsough, Neal E.; Gandhi, Thulasi; Chen, Chin-Tu; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Barber, William C.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the development of silicon strip detectors for energy-resolved clinical mammography. Typically, X-ray integrating detectors based on scintillating cesium iodide CsI(Tl) or amorphous selenium (a-Se) are used in most commercial systems. Recently, mammography instrumentation has been introduced based on photon counting Si strip detectors. The required performance for mammography in terms of the output count rate, spatial resolution, and dynamic range must be obtained with sufficient field of view for the application, thus requiring the tiling of pixel arrays and particular scanning techniques. Room temperature Si strip detector, operating as direct conversion x-ray sensors, can provide the required speed when connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) operating at fast peaking times with multiple fixed thresholds per pixel, provided that the sensors are designed for rapid signal formation across the X-ray energy ranges of the application. We present our methods and results from the optimization of Si-strip detectors for contrast enhanced spectral mammography. We describe the method being developed for quantifying iodine contrast using the energy-resolved detector with fixed thresholds. We demonstrate the feasibility of the method by scanning an iodine phantom with clinically relevant contrast levels.

  9. High efficiency neutron sensitive amorphous silicon pixel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mireshghi, A.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1993-11-01

    A multi-layer a-Si:H based thermal neutron detector was designed, fabricated and simulated by Monte Carlo method. The detector consists of two PECVD deposited a-Si:H pin detectors interfaced with coated layers of Gd, as a thermal neutron converter. Simulation results indicate that a detector consisting of 2 Gd films with thicknesses of 2 and 4 {mu}m, sandwiched properly with two layers of sufficiently thick ({approximately}30{mu}m) amorphous silicon diodes, has the optimum parameters. The detectors have an intrinsic efficiency of about 42% at a threshold setting of 7000 electrons, with an expected average signal size of {approximately}12000 electrons which is well above the noise. This efficiency will be further increased to nearly 63%, if we use Gd with 50% enrichment in {sup 157}Gd. We can fabricate position sensitive detectors with spatial resolution of 300 {mu}m with gamma sensitivity of {approximately}1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}. These detectors are highly radiation resistant and are good candidates for use in various application, where high efficiency, high resolution, gamma insensitive position sensitive neutron detectors are needed.

  10. Investigation of Hamamatsu H8500 phototubes as single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, R. A.; Hoek, M.; Lucherini, V.; Mirazita, M.; Orlandi, A.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Pisano, S.; Rossi, P.; Viticchiè, A.; Witchger, A.

    2015-08-01

    We have investigated the response of a significant sample of Hamamatsu H8500 MultiAnode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MAPMTs) as single photon detectors, in view of their use in a ring imaging Cherenkov counter for the CLAS12 spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For this, a laser working at 407.2 nm wavelength was employed. The sample is divided equally into standard window type, with a spectral response in the visible light region, and UV-enhanced window type MAPMTs. The studies confirm the suitability of these MAPMTs for single photon detection in such a Cherenkov imaging application.

  11. Observation of soliton compression in silicon photonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, A.; Husko, C.; Eades, D.; Zhang, Y.; Li, J.; Krauss, T.F.; Eggleton, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Solitons are nonlinear waves present in diverse physical systems including plasmas, water surfaces and optics. In silicon, the presence of two photon absorption and accompanying free carriers strongly perturb the canonical dynamics of optical solitons. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of soliton-effect pulse compression of picosecond pulses in silicon, despite two photon absorption and free carriers. Here we achieve compression of 3.7 ps pulses to 1.6 ps with <10 pJ energy. We demonstrate a ~1-ps free-carrier-induced pulse acceleration and show that picosecond input pulses are critical to these observations. These experiments are enabled by a dispersion-engineered slow-light photonic crystal waveguide and an ultra-sensitive frequency-resolved electrical gating technique to detect the ultralow energies in the nanostructured device. Strong agreement with a nonlinear Schrödinger model confirms the measurements. These results further our understanding of nonlinear waves in silicon and open the way to soliton-based functionalities in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible platforms. PMID:24423977

  12. Detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Single-photon-counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable novel energy-dependent imaging methods. Similar to conventional detectors, optimizing image SPC quality will require systems that produce the highest possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE). This paper builds on the cascaded-systems analysis (CSA) framework to develop a comprehensive description of the DQE of SPC detectors that implement adaptive binning. Methods: The DQE of SPC systems can be described using the CSA approach by propagating the probability density function (PDF) of the number of image-forming quanta through simple quantum processes. New relationships are developed to describe PDF transfer through serial and parallel cascades to accommodate scatter reabsorption. Results are applied to hypothetical silicon and selenium-based flat-panel SPC detectors including the effects of reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons from photoelectric and Compton interactions, stochastic conversion of x-ray energy to secondary quanta, depth-dependent charge collection, and electronic noise. Results are compared with a Monte Carlo study. Results: Depth-dependent collection efficiency can result in substantial broadening of photopeaks that in turn may result in reduced DQE at lower x-ray energies (20–45 keV). Double-counting interaction events caused by reabsorption of characteristic/scatter photons may result in falsely inflated image signal-to-noise ratio and potential overestimation of the DQE. Conclusions: The CSA approach is extended to describe signal and noise propagation through photoelectric and Compton interactions in SPC detectors, including the effects of escape and reabsorption of emission/scatter photons. High-performance SPC systems can be achieved but only for certain combinations of secondary conversion gain, depth-dependent collection efficiency, electronic noise, and reabsorption characteristics.

  13. Inhomogeneous critical current in nanowire superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudio, R. Hoog, K. P. M. op 't; Zhou, Z.; Sahin, D.; Fiore, A.

    2014-12-01

    A superconducting thin film with uniform properties is the key to realize nanowire superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs) with high performance and high yield. To investigate the uniformity of NbN films, we introduce and characterize simple detectors consisting of short nanowires with length ranging from 100 nm to 15 μm. Our nanowires, contrary to meander SSPDs, allow probing the homogeneity of NbN at the nanoscale. Experimental results, endorsed by a microscopic model, show the strongly inhomogeneous nature of NbN films on the sub-100 nm scale.

  14. Silicon-photonics-based optical transceivers for high-speed interconnect applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Dobbelaere, P.; Armijo, G.; Balardeta, J.; Chase, B.; Chi, Y.; Dahl, A.; De Koninck, Y.; Denton, S.; Eker, M.; Fathpour, S.; Foltz, D.; Gholami, F.; Gloeckner, S.; Hon, K. Y.; Hovey, S.; Jackson, S.; Li, W.; Liang, Y.; Mack, M.; Masini, G.; McGee, G.; Mekis, A.; Pang, S.; Peterson, M.; Pinguet, T.; Planchon, L.; Roberson, K.; Sahni, S.; Schramm, J.; Sharp, M.; Sohn, C.; Stechschulte, K.; Sun, P.; Vastola, G.; Wang, S.; Weber, B.; Wong, G.; Yokoyama, K.; Yu, S.; Zhou, R.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we discuss design and characterization of silicon-photonics-based 100 Gbps (4×26 Gbps) transceivers for parallel single mode fiber communication. We also address some key underlying technologies including silicon photonics wafer processing, photonic device libraries, light source integration and packaging technologies.

  15. Characterization of Photon-Counting Detector Responsivity for Non-Linear Two-Photon Absorption Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sburlan, S. E.; Farr, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-band absorption at 1550 nm has been demonstrated and characterized on silicon Geiger mode detectors which normally would be expected to have no response at this wavelength. We compare responsivity measurements to singlephoton absorption for wavelengths slightly above the bandgap wavelength of silicon (approx. 1100 microns). One application for this low efficiency sub-band absorption is in deep space optical communication systems where it is desirable to track a 1030 nm uplink beacon on the same flight terminal detector array that monitors a 1550 nm downlink signal for pointingcontrol. The currently observed absorption at 1550 nm provides 60-70 dB of isolation compared to the response at 1064 nm, which is desirable to avoid saturation of the detector by scattered light from the downlink laser.

  16. A detector head design for small-animal PET with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehrs, Sascha; DelGuerra, Alberto; Herbert, Deborah J.; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2006-03-01

    Small-animal PET systems are now striving for sub-millimetre resolution. Current systems based upon PSPMTs and finely pixellated scintillators can be pushed to higher resolution, but at the expense of other performance parameters and a rapidly escalating cost. Moreover, depth of interaction (DOI) information is usually difficult to assess in such systems, even though this information is highly desirable to reduce the parallax error, which is often the dominant error for such high-resolution systems. In this study we propose a high-resolution detector head for a small-animal PET imaging system with intrinsic DOI information. Instead of a pixellated scintillator, our design is based upon the classic Anger camera principle, i.e. the head is constructed of modular layers each consisting of a continuous slab of scintillator, viewed by a new type of compact silicon photodetector. The photodetector is the recently developed silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) that as well as being very compact has many other attractive properties: high gain at low bias voltage, excellent single-photoelectron resolution and fast timing. A detector head of about 4 × 4 cm2 in area is proposed, constructed from three modular layers of the type described above. We perform a simulation study, using the Monte Carlo simulation package Geant4. The simulation results are used to optimize the geometry of the detector head and characterize its performance. Additionally, hit estimation algorithms are studied to determine the interaction position of annihilation photons correctly over the whole detector surface. The resulting detector has a nearly uniform efficiency for 511 keV photons of ~70% and an intrinsic spatial resolution of less than ~0.4 mm full width at half maximum (fwhm).

  17. Photon-noise limited sensitivity in titanium nitride kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hubmayr, J. Beall, J.; Becker, D.; Cho, H.-M.; Hilton, G. C.; Li, D.; Pappas, D. P.; Van Lanen, J.; Vissers, M. R.; Gao, J.; Devlin, M.; Dober, B.; Groppi, C.; Mauskopf, P.; Irwin, K. D.; Wang, Y.; Wei, L. F.

    2015-02-16

    We demonstrate photon-noise limited performance at sub-millimeter wavelengths in feedhorn-coupled, microwave kinetic inductance detectors made of a TiN/Ti/TiN trilayer superconducting film, tuned to have a transition temperature of 1.4 K. Micro-machining of the silicon-on-insulator wafer backside creates a quarter-wavelength backshort optimized for efficient coupling at 250 μm. Using frequency read out and when viewing a variable temperature blackbody source, we measure device noise consistent with photon noise when the incident optical power is >0.5 pW, corresponding to noise equivalent powers >3×10{sup −17} W/√(Hz). This sensitivity makes these devices suitable for broadband photometric applications at these wavelengths.

  18. Performance characteristics of a silicon photomultiplier based compact radiation detector for Homeland Security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik

    2015-05-01

    A next-generation compact radiation detector was studied for more accurate measurement of radiation and for improvement of detector reliability for the purpose of developing radiation protection technology and military applications. The previously used radiation detector had some limitations due to its bulky size, limited range and its environment for radiation measurement. On the other hand, the compact radiation detector examined in this study utilizes a silicon photomultiplier which appears to be more suitable for this application because of its physical superiority characterized by its small size, high sensitivity, and durability. Accordingly, a SiPM based scintillation detector has been developed as part of this basic study of military radiation detectors. The detector has been tested for its ability to obtain the operating characteristics of a sensor and analyzed with variations of parameter values and for efficiency of detection in accordance with its ability to measure radiation in the environment. Two SiPM based Scintillation detectors with LYSO, BGO and CsI:Tl scintillators were developed and the detectors were analyzed by a number of operating characteristics such as reverse bias, operating temperature and high magnetic field, that depend on environmental changes in radiation measurement. The Photon count rate and spectra were compared for these three scintillators. We found that there were variations in the radiation detection which were characterized by reverse bias, temperature and high magnetic field. It was also found that there was an 11.9% energy resolution for the LYSO, 15.5% for BGO and 13.5% for CsI:Tl using Array SiPM, and 18% for CsI:Tl energy resolution using single SiPM when we measured energy resolution of 511 keV for 22Na. These results demonstrate the potential widespread use of SiPM based compact radiation detectors for Homeland Security applications.

  19. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors: physics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Chandra M.; Tanner, Michael G.; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2012-06-01

    Single-photon detectors based on superconducting nanowires (SSPDs or SNSPDs) have rapidly emerged as a highly promising photon-counting technology for infrared wavelengths. These devices offer high efficiency, low dark counts and excellent timing resolution. In this review, we consider the basic SNSPD operating principle and models of device behaviour. We give an overview of the evolution of SNSPD device design and the improvements in performance which have been achieved. We also evaluate device limitations and noise mechanisms. We survey practical refrigeration technologies and optical coupling schemes for SNSPDs. Finally we summarize promising application areas, ranging from quantum cryptography to remote sensing. Our goal is to capture a detailed snapshot of an emerging superconducting detector technology on the threshold of maturity.

  20. Beam tests of ATLAS SCT silicon strip detector modules

    SciTech Connect

    Campabadal, F.; Fleta, C.; Key, M.; Lozano, M.; Martinez, C.; Pellegrini, G.; Rafi, J.M.; Ullan, M.; Johansen, L.; Pommeresche, B.; Stugu, B.; Ciocio, A.; Fadeyev, V.; Gilchriese, M.; Haber, C.; Siegrist,J.; Spieler, H.; Vu, C.; Bell, P.J.; Charlton, D.G.; Dowell, J.D.; Gallop, B.J.; Homer, R.J.; Jovanovic, P.; Mahout, G.; McMahon, T.J.; Wilson, J.A.; Barr, A.J.; Carter, J.R.; Fromant, B.P.; Goodrick, M.J.; Hill, J.C.; Lester, C.G.; Palmer, M.J.; Parker, M.A.; Robinson, D.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Shaw, R.J.; Anghinolfi, F.; Chesi, E.; Chouridou, S.; Fortin, R.; Grosse-Knetter, M.; Gruwe, M.; Ferrari, P.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Macpherson, A.; Niinikoski, T.; Pernegger, H.; Roe, S.; Rudge, A.; Ruggiero, G.; Wallny, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Bialas, W.; Dabrowski, W.; Grybos, P.; Koperny, S.; Blocki, J.; Bruckman, P.; Gadomski, S.; Godlewski, J.; Gornicki, E.; Malecki, P.; Moszczynski, A.; Stanecka, E.; Stodulski, M.; Szczygiel, R.; Turala, M.; Wolter, M.; Ahmad, A.; Benes, J.; Carpentieri, C.; Feld, L.; Ketterer, C.; Ludwig,J.; Meinhardt, J.; Runge, K.; Mikulec, B.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; D'Onofrio,M.; Donega, M.; Moed, S.; Sfyrla, A.; Ferrere, D.; Clark, A.G.; Perrin,E.; Weber, M.; Bates, R.L.; Cheplakov, A.; Saxon, D.H.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, K.M.; Iwata, Y.; Ohsugi, T.; Kohriki, T.; Kondo, T.; Terada, S.; Ujiie, N.; Ikegami, Y.; Unno, Y.; Takashima, R.; Brodbeck, T.; Chilingarov, A.; Hughes, G.; Ratoff, P.; Sloan, T.; Allport, P.P.; Casse,G.-L.; Greenall, A.; Jackson, J.N.; Jones, T.J.; King, B.T.; Maxfield,S.J.; Smith, N.A.; Sutcliffe, P.; Vossebeld, J.; Beck, G.A.; Carter,A.A.; Lloyd, S.L.; Martin, A.J.; Morris, J.; Morin, J.; Nagai, K.; Pritchard, T.W.; Anderson, B.E.; Butterworth, J.M.; Fraser, T.J.; Jones,T.W.; Lane, J.B.; Postranecky, M.; Warren, M.R.M.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandic, I.; Mikuz, M.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Freestone, J.; Foster, J.M.; Ibbotson, M.; Loebinger, F.K.; Pater, J.; Snow, S.W.; Thompson, R.J.; Atkinson, T.M.; et al.

    2004-08-18

    The design and technology of the silicon strip detector modules for the Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) of the ATLAS experiment have been finalized in the last several years. Integral to this process has been the measurement and verification of the tracking performance of the different module types in test beams at the CERN SPS and the KEK PS. Tests have been performed to explore the module performance under various operating conditions including detector bias voltage, magnetic field, incidence angle, and state of irradiation up to 3 1014 protons per square centimeter. A particular emphasis has been the understanding of the operational consequences of the binary readout scheme.

  1. Detectors based on silicon photomultiplier arrays for medical imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Llosa, G.; Barrio, J.; Cabello, J.; Lacasta, C.; Oliver, J. F.; Stankova, V.; Solaz, C.

    2011-07-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have experienced a fast development and are now employed in different research fields. The availability of 2D arrays that provide information of the interaction position in the detector has had a high interest for medical imaging. Continuous crystals combined with segmented photodetectors can provide higher efficiency than pixellated crystals and very high spatial resolution. The IRIS group at IFIC is working on the development of detector heads based on continuous crystals coupled to SiPM arrays for different applications, including a small animal PET scanner in collaboration with the Univ. of Pisa and INFN Pisa, and a Compton telescope for dose monitoring in hadron therapy. (authors)

  2. Initial experience with the CDF layer 00 silicon detector

    SciTech Connect

    C. Hill

    2003-03-17

    We report on initial experience with the CDF Layer 00 Detector. Layer 00 is an innovative, low-mass, silicon detector installed in CDF during the upgrade for Run 2A of the Tevatron. Noise pickup present during operation at CDF is discussed. An event-by-event pedestal correction implemented by CDF is presented. This off-line solution prevents L00 from being used in the current incarnation of the on-line displaced track trigger. Preliminary performance of Layer 00 is described.

  3. Ultraviolet /UV/ sensitive phosphors for silicon imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Cowens, M. W.; Butner, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The fluorescence properties of UV sensitive organic phosphors and the radiometric properties of phosphor coated silicon detectors in the VUV, UV, and visible wavelengths are described. With evaporated films of coronene and liumogen, effective quantum efficiencies of up to 20% have been achieved on silicon photodiodes in the vacuum UV. With thin films of methylmethacrylate (acrylic), which are doped with organic laser dyes and deposited from solution, detector quantum efficiencies of the order of 15% for wavelengths of 120-165 nm and of 40% for wavelengths above 190 nm have been obtained. The phosphor coatings also act as antireflection coatings and thereby enhance the response of coated devices throughout the visible and near IR.

  4. Comparison of TPB and bis-MSB as VUV waveshifters in prototype LBNE photon detector paddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, B.; Mufson, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) Project is expected to provide facilities that will enable a program in neutrino physics that can measure fundamental physical parameters, explore physics beyond the Standard Model and better elucidate the nature of matter and anti-matter. The LBNE Photon Detection subsystem is primarily designed to detect the scintillation photons produced at 128 nm as ionizing particles traverse the liquid argon. The LBNE reference design for the photon detector subsystem uses adiabatic light guides consisting of cast acrylic bars whose surface is embedded with waveshifter to convert the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) 128 nm photons into the optical bandpass of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). In this investigation, we describe comparative studies of two VUV waveshifters — TPB and bis-MSB. We find that bis-MSB is more efficient than TPB at 128 nm. We also find that the efficiency of converting VUV photons into the optical for both waveshifters rises from 170-200 nm. Studies of the long wavelength behavior of the waveshifters supports the result that the efficiency is rising.

  5. Electron Transport in Silicon Nanocrystal Devices: From Memory Applications to Silicon Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Gerald M.

    The push to integrate the realms of microelectronics and photonics on the silicon platform is currently lacking an efficient, electrically pumped silicon light source. One promising material system for photonics on the silicon platform is erbium-doped silicon nanoclusters (Er:Si-nc), which uses silicon nanoclusters to sensitize erbium ions in a SiO2 matrix. This medium can be pumped electrically, and this thesis focuses primarily on the electrical properties of Er:Si-nc films and their possible development as a silicon light source in the erbium emission band around 1.5 micrometers. Silicon nanocrystals can also be used as the floating gate in a flash memory device, and work is also presented examining charge transport in novel systems for flash memory applications. To explore silicon nanocrystals as a potential replacement for metallic floating gates in flash memory, the charging dynamics in silicon nanocrystal films are first studied using UHV-AFM. This approach uses a non-contact AFM tip to locally charge a layer of nanocrystals. Subsequent imaging allows the injected charge to be observed in real time as it moves through the layer. Simulation of this interaction allows the quantication of the charge in the layer, where we find that each nanocrystal is only singly charged after injection, while holes are retained in the film for hours. Work towards developing a dielectric stack with a voltage-tunable barrier is presented, with applications for flash memory and hyperspectral imaging. For hyperspectral imaging applications, film stacks containing various dielectrics are studied using I-V, TEM, and internal photoemission, with barrier tunability demonstrated in the Sc2O3/SiO2 system. To study Er:Si-nc as a potential lasing medium for silicon photonics, a theoretical approach is presented where Er:Si-nc is the gain medium in a silicon slot waveguide. By accounting for the local density of optical states effect on the emitters, and carrier absorption due to

  6. PIN silicon diode fast neutron detector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunzhi; Zhao, Jianxing; Xiao, Wuyun

    2005-01-01

    Two batches of diodes, with different structural ratios (the ratio of area and thickness), were made using different manufacturing processes. The energy response of the first batch to 15 kinds of monoenergetic neutrons ranging from 180 keV to 17.56 MeV was tested, and the neutron source response of both batches to 239Pu-Be neutron source was measured. The energy deposition in the diodes irradiated by 1 keV to 20 MeV monoenergetic neutrons was calculated with simulation procedure. The response curve of the experimental results showed an approximately similar trend to that of theoretical computation. Based on the results of the neutron source response experiments, it was concluded that the response of fast neutron varied linearly with the structural ratio of the detectors. PMID:15972359

  7. (Test, calibrate, and prepare a BGO photon detector system)

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, T.C.

    1990-10-19

    The traveler spent the year at CERN primarily to test, calibrate, and prepare a BGO photon detector system for use in the August 1990 run of WA80 with sulfur beams and for use in future planned runs with an expanded BGO detector. The BGO was used in test-beam runs in December 1989 and April--May 1990 and in the August data-taking run. The Midrapidity Calorimeters (MIRAC) were also prepared in a new geometry for the August run with a new transverse energy trigger. The traveler also continued to refine and carry out simulations of photon detector systems in present and future planned photon detection experiments. The traveler participated in several WA80 collaboration meetings, which were held at CERN throughout the period of stay. Invited talks were presented at the Workshop on High Resolution Electromagnetic Calorimetry in Stockholm, Sweden, November 9--11, 1989, and at the International Workshop on Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence, and Expert Systems for High-Energy and Nuclear Physics at Lyon, France, March 19--24, 1990. The traveler participated in an experiment to measure particle--particle correlations at 30-MeV/nucleon incident energies at the SARA facility in Grenoble from November 11--24, 1989.

  8. Flexible amorphous silicon PIN diode x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, Michael; Bawolek, Edward; Smith, Joseph T.; Raupp, Gregory B.; Morton, David

    2013-05-01

    A low temperature amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film transistor (TFT) and amorphous silicon PIN photodiode technology for flexible passive pixel detector arrays has been developed using active matrix display technology. The flexible detector arrays can be conformed to non-planar surfaces with the potential to detect x-rays or other radiation with an appropriate conversion layer. The thin, lightweight, and robust backplanes may enable the use of highly portable x-ray detectors for use in the battlefield or in remote locations. We have fabricated detector arrays up to 200 millimeters along the diagonal on a Gen II (370 mm x 470 mm rectangular substrate) using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) a-Si as the active layer and PECVD silicon nitride (SiN) as the gate dielectric and passivation. The a-Si based TFTs exhibited an effective saturation mobility of 0.7 cm2/V-s, which is adequate for most sensing applications. The PIN diode material was fabricated using a low stress amorphous silicon (a-Si) PECVD process. The PIN diode dark current was 1.7 pA/mm2, the diode ideality factor was 1.36, and the diode fill factor was 0.73. We report on the critical steps in the evolution of the backplane process from qualification of the low temperature (180°C) TFT and PIN diode process on the 150 mm pilot line, the transfer of the process to flexible plastic substrates, and finally a discussion and demonstration of the scale-up to the Gen II (370 x 470 mm) panel scale pilot line.

  9. Silicon Photo Multipliers Characterization:. Recent Achievements and Latest Results. Investigation of SiPM for Photon Counting Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmill, V.; Caccia, M.; Cappellini, C.; Risigo, F.; Jastrzab, M.

    2008-06-01

    Within RAPSODI (European founded project - coop 32993) a novel type of Silicon Photo-Multiplier (SiPM) from different suppliers was investigated. The main parameters: dark count rate, amplification, dynamic range, quantum detection efficiency and optical cross talk have been studied for qualifying of the detectors. Results demonstrate the possibility to apply this detection technology for intense photon fluxes detection as well as for low plurality ones.

  10. Efficiently heralded silicon ring resonator photon-pair source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidle, Jeffrey A.; Fanto, Michael L.; Tison, Christopher C.; Wang, Zihao; Alsing, Paul M.; Preble, Stefan F.

    2016-05-01

    Presented here are results on a silicon ring resonator photon pair source with a high heralding efficiency. Previous ring resonator sources suffered from an effective 50% loss because, in order to generate the photons, the pump must be able to couple into the resonator which is an effective loss channel. However, in practice the optical loss of the pump can be traded off for a dramatic increase in heralding efficiency. This research found theoretically that the heralding efficiency should increase by a factor of ~ 3:75 with a factor of 10 increase in the required pump power. This was demonstrated experimentally by varying the separation (gap) between the input waveguide and the ring while maintaining a constant drop port gap. The ring (R = 18:5μm, W = 500nm, and H = 220nm) was pumped by a tunable laser (λ ≍ 1550nm). The non-degenerate photons, produced via spontaneous four wave mixing, exited the ring and were coupled to fiber upon which they were filtered symmetrically about the pump. Coincidence counts were collected for all possible photon path combinations (through and drop port) and the ratio of the drop port coincidences to the sum of the drop port and cross term coincidences (one photon from the drop port and one from the through port) was calculated. With a 350nm pump waveguide gap (2:33 times larger than the drop port gap) we confirmed our theoretical predictions, with an observed improvement in heralding efficiency by a factor of ~ 2:61 (96:7% of correlated photons coupled out of the drop port). These results will enable increased photon flux integrated photon sources which can be utilized for high performance quantum computing and communication systems.

  11. CDF Run IIb Silicon Vertex Detector DAQ Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    S. Behari et al.

    2003-12-18

    The CDF particle detector operates in the beamline of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, Batavia, IL. The Tevatron is expected to undergo luminosity upgrades (Run IIb) in the future, resulting in a higher number of interactions per beam crossing. To operate in this dense radiation environment, an upgrade of CDF's silicon vertex detector (SVX) subsystem and a corresponding upgrade of its VME-based DAQ system has been explored. Prototypes of all the Run IIb SVX DAQ components have been constructed, assembled into a test stand and operated successfully using an adapted version of CDF's network-capable DAQ software. In addition, a PCI-based DAQ system has been developed as a fast and inexpensive tool for silicon detector and DAQ component testing in the production phase. In this paper they present an overview of the Run IIb silicon DAQ upgrade, emphasizing the new features and improvements incorporated into the constituent VME boards, and discuss a PCI-based DAQ system developed to facilitate production tests.

  12. Cross two photon absorption in a silicon photonic crystal waveguide fiber taper coupler with a physical junction

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkissian, Raymond O'Brien, John

    2015-01-21

    Cross two photon absorption in silicon is characterized using a tapered fiber photonic crystal silicon waveguide coupler. There is a physical junction between the tapered fiber and the waveguide constituting a stand-alone device. This device is used to obtain the spectrum for cross two photon absorption coefficient per unit volume of interaction between photons of nondegenerate energy. The corresponding Kerr coefficient per unit volume of interaction is also experimentally extracted. The thermal resistance of the device is also experimentally determined and the response time of the device is estimated for on-chip all-optical signal processing and data transfer between optical signals of different photon energies.

  13. OPC for curved designs in application to photonics on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Bastien; Farys, Vincent; Schneider, Loïc.; Cremer, Sébastien; Postnikov, Sergei V.; Millequant, Matthieu; Dirrenberger, Mathieu; Tiphine, Charles; Bayle, Sébastian; Tranquillin, Céline; Schiavone, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Today's design for photonics devices on silicon relies on non-Manhattan features such as curves and a wide variety of angles with minimum feature size below 100nm. Industrial manufacturing of such devices requires optimized process window with 193nm lithography. Therefore, Resolution Enhancement Techniques (RET) that are commonly used for CMOS manufacturing are required. However, most RET algorithms are based on Manhattan fragmentation (0°, 45° and 90°) which can generate large CD dispersion on masks for photonic designs. Industrial implementation of RET solutions to photonic designs is challenging as most currently available OPC tools are CMOS-oriented. Discrepancy from design to final results induced by RET techniques can lead to lower photonic device performance. We propose a novel sizing algorithm allowing adjustment of design edge fragments while preserving the topology of the original structures. The results of the algorithm implementation in the rule based sizing, SRAF placement and model based correction will be discussed in this paper. Corrections based on this novel algorithm were applied and characterized on real photonics devices. The obtained results demonstrate the validity of the proposed correction method integrated in Inscale software of Aselta Nanographics.

  14. High resolution micro-CT of low attenuating organic materials using large area photon-counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumpová, I.; Vavřík, D.; Fíla, T.; Koudelka, P.; Jandejsek, I.; Jakůbek, J.; Kytýř, D.; Zlámal, P.; Vopálenský, M.; Gantar, A.

    2016-02-01

    To overcome certain limitations of contemporary materials used for bone tissue engineering, such as inflammatory response after implantation, a whole new class of materials based on polysaccharide compounds is being developed. Here, nanoparticulate bioactive glass reinforced gelan-gum (GG-BAG) has recently been proposed for the production of bone scaffolds. This material offers promising biocompatibility properties, including bioactivity and biodegradability, with the possibility of producing scaffolds with directly controlled microgeometry. However, to utilize such a scaffold with application-optimized properties, large sets of complex numerical simulations using the real microgeometry of the material have to be carried out during the development process. Because the GG-BAG is a material with intrinsically very low attenuation to X-rays, its radiographical imaging, including tomographical scanning and reconstructions, with resolution required by numerical simulations might be a very challenging task. In this paper, we present a study on X-ray imaging of GG-BAG samples. High-resolution volumetric images of investigated specimens were generated on the basis of micro-CT measurements using a large area flat-panel detector and a large area photon-counting detector. The photon-counting detector was composed of a 010× 1 matrix of Timepix edgeless silicon pixelated detectors with tiling based on overlaying rows (i.e. assembled so that no gap is present between individual rows of detectors). We compare the results from both detectors with the scanning electron microscopy on selected slices in transversal plane. It has been shown that the photon counting detector can provide approx. 3× better resolution of the details in low-attenuating materials than the integrating flat panel detectors. We demonstrate that employment of a large area photon counting detector is a good choice for imaging of low attenuating materials with the resolution sufficient for numerical simulations.

  15. Design Fabrication and Characterization of High Density Silicon Photonic Components

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Our burgeoning appetite for data relentlessly demands exponential scaling of computing and communications resources leading to an overbearing and ever-present drive to improve e ciency while reducing on-chip area even as photonic components expand to ll application spaces no longer satis ed by their electronic counterparts. With a high index contrast, low optical loss, and compatibility with the CMOS fabrication infrastructure, silicon-on-insulator technology delivers a mechanism by which e cient, sub-micron waveguides can be fabricated while enabling monolithic integration of photonic components and their associated electronic infrastructure. The result is a solution leveraging the superior bandwidth of optical signaling on a platform capable of delivering the optical analogue to Moore's Law scaling of transistor density. Device size is expected to end Moore's Law scaling in photonics as Maxwell's equations limit the extent to which this parameter may be reduced. The focus of the work presented here surrounds photonic device miniaturization and the development of 3D optical interconnects as approaches to optimize performance in densely integrated optical interconnects. In this dissertation, several technological barriers inhibiting widespread adoption of photonics in data communications and telecommunications are explored. First, examination of loss and crosstalk performance in silicon nitride over SOI waveguide crossings yields insight into the feasibility of 3D optical interconnects with the rst experimental analysis of such a structure presented herein. A novel measurement platform utilizing a modi ed racetrack resonator is then presented enabling extraction of insertion loss data for highly e cient structures while requiring minimal on-chip area. Finally, pioneering work in understanding the statistical nature of doublet formation in microphotonic resonators is delivered with the resulting impact on resonant device design detailed.

  16. Design, fabrication, and characterization of high density silicon photonic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Adam Michael

    Our burgeoning appetite for data relentlessly demands exponential scaling of computing and communications resources leading to an overbearing and ever-present drive to improve eciency while reducing on-chip area even as photonic components expand to ll application spaces no longer satised by their electronic counterparts. With a high index contrast, low optical loss, and compatibility with the CMOS fabrication infrastructure, silicon-on-insulator technology delivers a mechanism by which ecient, sub-micron waveguides can be fabricated while enabling monolithic integration of photonic components and their associated electronic infrastructure. The result is a solution leveraging the superior bandwidth of optical signaling on a platform capable of delivering the optical analogue to Moore's Law scaling of transistor density. Device size is expected to end Moore's Law scaling in photonics as Maxwell's equations limit the extent to which this parameter may be reduced. The focus of the work presented here surrounds photonic device miniaturization and the development of 3D optical interconnects as approaches to optimize performance in densely integrated optical interconnects. In this dissertation, several technological barriers inhibiting widespread adoption of photonics in data communications and telecommunications are explored. First, examination of loss and crosstalk performance in silicon nitride over SOI waveguide crossings yields insight into the feasibility of 3D optical interconnects with the rst experimental analysis of such a structure presented herein. A novel measurement platform utilizing a modied racetrack resonator is then presented enabling extraction of insertion loss data for highly ecient structures while requiring minimal on-chip area. Finally, pioneering work in understanding the statistical nature of doublet formation in microphotonic resonators is delivered with the resulting impact on resonant device design detailed.

  17. A multi-functional superconductor single-photon detector at telecommunication wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Labao; Gu, Min; Jia, Tao; Qiu, Jian; Kang, Lin; Sun, Guozhu; Chen, Jian; Jin, Biaobin; Xu, Weiwei; Wu, Peiheng

    2014-06-01

    A multi-functional single-photon detector was demonstrated to resolve photon states by multiple superconductor single photon detectors (SSPDs) system with improved readout settings. The photon number and space distribution were resolved simultaneously by the presented system, which inherits the merits of SSPD, such as wide-response band, high repetition rate and working stability. Experimentally, four photons were resolved and the photon distribution over three pixels was figured out according to the amplitudes of output pulses at the telecommunication wavelength. The extension of this proposal to incorporate more elements for resolving more photons and revealing photons spatial distribution over larger scale is also discussed.

  18. Estimation of mammary gland composition using CdTe series detector developed for photon-counting mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihori, Akiko; Okamoto, Chizuru; Yamakawa, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Shuichiro; Okada, Masahiro; Nakajima, Ai; Kato, Misa; Kodera, Yoshie

    2016-03-01

    Energy resolved photon-counting mammography is a new technology, which counts the number of photons that passes through an object, and presents it as a pixel value in an image of the object. Silicon semiconductor detectors are currently used in commercial mammography. However, the disadvantage of silicon is the low absorption efficiency for high X-ray energies. A cadmium telluride (CdTe) series detector has a high absorption efficiency over a wide energy range. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate the composition of the mammary gland using a CdTe series detector as a photon-counting detector. The fact that the detection rate of breast cancer in mammography is affected by mammary gland composition is now widely accepted. Assessment of composition of the mammary gland has important implications. An important advantage of our proposed technique is its ability to discriminate photons using three energy bins. We designed the CdTe series detector system using the MATLAB simulation software. The phantom contains nine regions with the ratio of glandular tissue and adipose varying in increments of 10%. The attenuation coefficient for each bin's energy was calculated from the number of input and output photons possessed by each. The evaluation results obtained by plotting the attenuation coefficient μ in a three-dimensional (3D) scatter plot show that the plots had a regular composition order congruent with that of the mammary gland. Consequently, we believe that our proposed method can be used to estimate the composition of the mammary gland.

  19. A Proposal to Upgrade the Silicon Strip Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Matis, Howard; Michael, LeVine; Jonathan, Bouchet; Stephane, Bouvier; Artemios, Geromitsos; Gerard, Guilloux; Sonia, Kabana; Christophe, Renard; Howard, Matis; Jim, Thomas; Vi Nham, Tram

    2007-11-05

    The STAR Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) was built by a collaboration of Nantes, Strasbourg and Warsaw collaborators. It is a beautiful detector; it can provide 500 mu m scale pointing resolution at the vertex when working in combination with the TPC. It was first used in Run 4, when half the SSD was installed in an engineering run. The full detector was installed for Run 5 (the Cu-Cu run) and the operation and performance of the detector was very successful. However, in preparation for Run 6, two noisy ladders (out of 20) were replaced and this required that the SSD be removed from the STAR detector. The re-installation of the SSD was not fully successful and so for the next two Runs, 6 and 7, the SSD suffered a cooling system failure that allowed a large fraction of the ladders to overheat and become noisy, or fail. (The cause of the SSD cooling failure was rather trivial but the SSD could not be removed betweens Runs 6 and 7 due to the inability of the STAR detector to roll along its tracks at that time.)

  20. Design and simulation of silicon photonic schematics and layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrostowski, Lukas; Lu, Zeqin; Flueckiger, Jonas; Wang, Xu; Klein, Jackson; Liu, Amy; Jhoja, Jaspreet; Pond, James

    2016-05-01

    Electronic circuit designers commonly start their design process with a schematic, namely an abstract representation of the physical circuit. In integrated photonics on the other hand, it is common for the design to begin at the physical component level, and create a layout by connecting components with interconnects. In this paper, we discuss how to create a schematic from the physical layout via netlist extraction, which enables circuit simulations. Post-layout extraction can also be used to predict how fabrication variability and non-uniformity will impact circuit performance. This is based on the component position information, compact models that are parameterized for dimensional variations, and manufacturing variability models such as a simulated wafer thickness map. This final step is critical in understanding how real-world silicon photonic circuits will behave. We present an example based on treating the ring resonator as a circuit. A silicon photonics design kit, as described here, is available for download at http://github.com/lukasc-ubc/SiEPIC_EBeam_PDK.

  1. Silicon photon-counting avalanche diodes for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Michalet, Xavier; Ingargiola, Antonino; Colyer, Ryan A; Scalia, Giuseppe; Weiss, Shimon; Maccagnani, Piera; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool with applications in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. The basic feature of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume and work in a low concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single molecule. Detecting photon bursts is a challenging task: the small number of emitted photons in each burst calls for high detector sensitivity. Bursts are very brief, requiring detectors with fast response time and capable of sustaining high count rates. Finally, many bursts need to be accumulated to achieve proper statistical accuracy, resulting in long measurement time unless parallelization strategies are implemented to speed up data acquisition. In this paper we will show that silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) best meet the needs of single-molecule detection. We will review the key SPAD parameters and highlight the issues to be addressed in their design, fabrication and operation. After surveying the state-of-the-art SPAD technologies, we will describe our recent progress towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. The potential of this approach is illustrated with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements.

  2. Silicon photon-counting avalanche diodes for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Michalet, Xavier; Ingargiola, Antonino; Colyer, Ryan A.; Scalia, Giuseppe; Weiss, Shimon; Maccagnani, Piera; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Ghioni, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Solution-based single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool with applications in cell biology, biochemistry and biophysics. The basic feature of this technique is to excite and collect light from a very small volume and work in a low concentration regime resulting in rare burst-like events corresponding to the transit of a single molecule. Detecting photon bursts is a challenging task: the small number of emitted photons in each burst calls for high detector sensitivity. Bursts are very brief, requiring detectors with fast response time and capable of sustaining high count rates. Finally, many bursts need to be accumulated to achieve proper statistical accuracy, resulting in long measurement time unless parallelization strategies are implemented to speed up data acquisition. In this paper we will show that silicon single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) best meet the needs of single-molecule detection. We will review the key SPAD parameters and highlight the issues to be addressed in their design, fabrication and operation. After surveying the state-of-the-art SPAD technologies, we will describe our recent progress towards increasing the throughput of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy in solution using parallel arrays of SPADs. The potential of this approach is illustrated with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer measurements. PMID:25309114

  3. Possibility of gated silicon drift detector detecting hard x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hideharu; Fukushima, Shinya; Sakurai, Shungo; Ishikawa, Shohei; Takeshita, Akinobu; Hidaka, Atsuki

    2015-08-01

    One of the authors has proposed a simple-structure silicon X-ray detector (gated silicon drift detector: GSDD), whose structure is much simpler than commercial silicon drift detectors (SDDs). SDDs contain multiple built-in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) or implanted resistors, whose fabrication processes lower the yield rate of detectors, and also require at least two high-voltage sources. On the other hand, GSDDs do not contain built-in MOSFETs or implanted resistors. Moreover, GSDDs require only one high-voltage source. Therefore, GSDDs greatly reduce the cost of the X-ray detection system. We fabricated prototype GSDDs that contained 0.625-mm-thick Si substrates with an active area of 18 mm2, operated by Peltier cooling and a single voltage source. Its energy resolution at 5.9 keV from an 55Fe source was 145 eV at -38°C and -90°V. Thicker Si substrates are required to enhance its absorption of X-rays. To detect X-ray photons with energies up to 77 keV for X-ray absorbance higher than 15%, we simulate the electric potential distribution in GSDDs with Si thicknesses from 0.625 to 3.0 mm. We obtain an adequate electric potential distribution in the thicknesses of up to 3.0 mm, and the capacitance of the GSDD remains small and its X-ray count rate remain high. The high reverse bias required in the 3-mm-thick GSDD was a third of that in a 3-mm-thick pin diode.

  4. New techniques for imaging photon-counting and particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapington, Jonathan Stephen

    Since the advent of space-based astronomy in the early 1960's, there has been a need for space-qualified detectors with sufficient sensitivity and resolution to detect and image single photons, ions or electrons. This thesis describes a research programme to develop detectors that fulfil these requirements. I begin by describing the role of detectors in space astronomy and follow with a review of detector technologies, with particular emphasis on imaging techniques. Conductive charge division image readouts offer high performance, simplicity, and flexibility and their potential is investigated in both theory and practice. I introduce the basic design concept and discuss the fundamental factors limiting performance in relation to physical design and to underlying physical processes. Readout manufacturing techniques are reviewed and a novel method presented. I describe specific space and ground-based readout applications which proved valuable in teaching lessons and raising questions. These questions initiated an experimental programme, whose goals were to understand limiting physical processes and find techniques to overcome them. Results are presented, and the innovation of the progressive geometry readout technique, which this programme also spawned, is described. Progressive geometry readout devices, such as the Vernier anode, offer dramatically improved performance and have been successfully flight-proven. I describe the development of a Vernier readout for the J-PEX sounding rocket experiment, and discuss the instrument calibration and the flight programme. First investigations into a next generation of charge division readout design are presented. These devices will use charge comparison instead of amplitude measurement to further enhance resolution and count rate capability. In conclusion, I summarize the advances made during the course of this research, and discuss ongoing technological developments and further work which will enable MCP detectors to

  5. Stress induced long wavelength photoconductivity in doped silicon infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The long wavelength cutoff of a Si:P detector was extended to 34 microns by the application of a uniaxial stress. An unstressed Si:P photoconductive detector responds to photons of up to 28 microns wavelength. By applying a uniaxial stress to a detector along the /100/ crystal axis, the response was extended to approximately 34 microns. The /100/ axis was chosen as the stress direction because theoretical calculations predicted that such a stress extends the wavelength response more than one along the /110/ axis. These theoretical calculations were based upon fits to experimental data obtained at stresses of up to approximately kbar, and indicated that the extension in wavelength response continues to increase at much larger stresses.

  6. Laser erasable implanted gratings for integrated silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Loiacono, Renzo; Reed, Graham T; Mashanovich, Goran Z; Gwilliam, Russell; Henley, Simon J; Hu, Youfang; Feldesh, Ran; Jones, Richard

    2011-05-23

    In this work we experimentally demonstrate laser erasable germanium implanted Bragg gratings in SOI. Bragg gratings are formed in a silicon waveguide by ion implantation induced amorphization, and are subsequently erased by a contained laser thermal treatment process. An extinction ratio up to 24dB has been demonstrated in transmission for the fabricated implanted Bragg gratings with lengths up to 1000µm. Results are also presented, demonstrating that the gratings can be selectively removed by UV pulsed laser annealing, enabling a new concept of laser erasable devices for integrated photonics.

  7. Photonic porous silicon as a pH sensor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds do not heal within 3 months, and during the lengthy healing process, the wound is invariably exposed to bacteria, which can colonize the wound bed and form biofilms. This alters the wound metabolism and brings about a change of pH. In this work, porous silicon photonic films were coated with the pH-responsive polymer poly(2-diethylaminoethyl acrylate). We demonstrated that the pH-responsive polymer deposited on the surface of the photonic film acts as a barrier to prevent water from penetrating inside the porous matrix at neutral pH. Moreover, the device demonstrated optical pH sensing capability visible by the unaided eye. PMID:25177227

  8. Silicon photonic crystal resonators for label free biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sana, Amrita Kumar; Honzawa, Keita; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Yokoyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a two-dimensional (2D) silicon photonic crystal biosensor consisting of waveguides and cavity-type and defect-type resonators for enhancing the interactions between light and biomaterials. Sensitivity was measured using sucrose solution and the sensor showed the highest sensitivity [1570 nm/RIU (refractive index unit)] ever reported. We also investigated cavity size effects on resonance wavelength shift, and we observed that a large cavity exhibits a greater resonance wavelength shift. The fabricated sensor has shown a high Q of ∼105 in water and a device figure of merit of 1.2 × 105, which represent the improvements of the device performance over other photonic-crystal-based sensors.

  9. Experimental demonstration of reservoir computing on a silicon photonics chip.

    PubMed

    Vandoorne, Kristof; Mechet, Pauline; Van Vaerenbergh, Thomas; Fiers, Martin; Morthier, Geert; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Dambre, Joni; Bienstman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In today's age, companies employ machine learning to extract information from large quantities of data. One of those techniques, reservoir computing (RC), is a decade old and has achieved state-of-the-art performance for processing sequential data. Dedicated hardware realizations of RC could enable speed gains and power savings. Here we propose the first integrated passive silicon photonics reservoir. We demonstrate experimentally and through simulations that, thanks to the RC paradigm, this generic chip can be used to perform arbitrary Boolean logic operations with memory as well as 5-bit header recognition up to 12.5 Gbit s(-1), without power consumption in the reservoir. It can also perform isolated spoken digit recognition. Our realization exploits optical phase for computing. It is scalable to larger networks and much higher bitrates, up to speeds >100 Gbit s(-1). These results pave the way for the application of integrated photonic RC for a wide range of applications.

  10. Photonic porous silicon as a pH sensor.

    PubMed

    Pace, Stephanie; Vasani, Roshan B; Zhao, Wei; Perrier, Sébastien; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds do not heal within 3 months, and during the lengthy healing process, the wound is invariably exposed to bacteria, which can colonize the wound bed and form biofilms. This alters the wound metabolism and brings about a change of pH. In this work, porous silicon photonic films were coated with the pH-responsive polymer poly(2-diethylaminoethyl acrylate). We demonstrated that the pH-responsive polymer deposited on the surface of the photonic film acts as a barrier to prevent water from penetrating inside the porous matrix at neutral pH. Moreover, the device demonstrated optical pH sensing capability visible by the unaided eye.

  11. Quantum detector tomography of a time-multiplexed superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at telecom wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Chandra M; Zhang, Lijian; Coldenstrodt-Ronge, Hendrik; Donati, Gaia; Dorenbos, Sander N; Zwiller, Val; Walmsley, Ian A; Hadfield, Robert H

    2013-01-14

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are widely used in telecom wavelength optical quantum information science applications. Quantum detector tomography allows the positive-operator-valued measure (POVM) of a single-photon detector to be determined. We use an all-fiber telecom wavelength detector tomography test bed to measure detector characteristics with respect to photon flux and polarization, and hence determine the POVM. We study the SNSPD both as a binary detector and in an 8-bin, fiber based, Time-Multiplexed (TM) configuration at repetition rates up to 4 MHz. The corresponding POVMs provide an accurate picture of the photon number resolving capability of the TM-SNSPD. PMID:23388983

  12. Strip interpolation in silicon and germanium strip detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Wulf, E. A.; Phlips, B. F.; Johnson, W. N.; Kurfess, J. D.; Lister, C. J.; Kondev, F.; Physics; Naval Research Lab.

    2004-01-01

    The position resolution of double-sided strip detectors is limited by the strip pitch and a reduction in strip pitch necessitates more electronics. Improved position resolution would improve the imaging capabilities of Compton telescopes and PET detectors. Digitizing the preamplifier waveform yields more information than can be extracted with regular shaping electronics. In addition to the energy, depth of interaction, and which strip was hit, the digitized preamplifier signals can locate the interaction position to less than the strip pitch of the detector by looking at induced signals in neighboring strips. This allows the position of the interaction to be interpolated in three dimensions and improve the imaging capabilities of the system. In a 2 mm thick silicon strip detector with a strip pitch of 0.891 mm, strip interpolation located the interaction of 356 keV gamma rays to 0.3 mm FWHM. In a 2 cm thick germanium detector with a strip pitch of 5 mm, strip interpolation of 356 keV gamma rays yielded a position resolution of 1.5 mm FWHM.

  13. Laminated Amorphous Silicon Neutron Detector (pre-print)

    SciTech Connect

    Harry McHugh, Howard Branz, Paul Stradins, and Yueqin Xu

    2009-01-29

    An internal R&D project was conducted at the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) of National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), to determine the feasibility of developing a multi-layer boron-10 based thermal neutron detector using the amorphous silicon (AS) technology currently employed in the manufacture of liquid crystal displays. The boron-10 neutron reaction produces an alpha that can be readily detected. A single layer detector, limited to an approximately 2-micron-thick layer of boron, has a theoretical sensitivity of about 3%; hence a thin multi-layer device with high sensitivity can theoretically be manufactured from single layer detectors. Working with National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), an AS PiN diode alpha detector was developed and tested. The PiN diode was deposited on a boron-10 coated substrate. Testing confirmed that the neutron sensitivity was nearly equal to the theoretical value of 3%. However, adhesion problems with the boron-10 coating prevented successful development of a prototype detector. Future efforts will include boron deposition work and development of integrated AS signal processing circuitry.

  14. Fast integrated gaseous detector with single-photon resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Sarvestani, Amir; Besch, Hans-Juergen; Walenta, Albert H.

    1999-10-01

    Gaseous detectors are excellent candidates for x-ray imaging devices which are suitable in the energy range between 5 and 90 kV. Especially the extreme low inherent noise floor which in principle is limited by the read out electronics only in combination with the high flexibility in the choice of gases and the geometry result in high detective quantum efficiency values (DQE). A DQE close to one is valuable especially in medical imaging applications where in general the image quality is dose limited. Moreover, recent developments in gas amplification structures such as the Micro-CAT allow fast imaging with a single photon precision also for integrating devices resulting in high DQE values even for low photon flux applications.

  15. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Michael G; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H

    2014-03-24

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack. PMID:24664022

  16. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Michael G; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H

    2014-03-24

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  17. Optimised quantum hacking of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Michael G.; Makarov, Vadim; Hadfield, Robert H.

    2014-03-01

    We explore bright-light control of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) in the shunted configuration (a practical measure to avoid latching). In an experiment, we simulate an illumination pattern the SNSPD would receive in a typical quantum key distribution system under hacking attack. We show that it effectively blinds and controls the SNSPD. The transient blinding illumination lasts for a fraction of a microsecond and produces several deterministic fake clicks during this time. This attack does not lead to elevated timing jitter in the spoofed output pulse, and hence does not introduce significant errors. Five different SNSPD chip designs were tested. We consider possible countermeasures to this attack.

  18. Detection mechanism of superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, A.; Renema, J. J.; Il'in, K.; Semenov, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we intend to give a comprehensive description of the current understanding of the detection mechanism in superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors. We will review key experimental results related to the detection mechanism, e.g. the variations of the detection probability as a function of bias current, temperature or magnetic field. Commonly used detection models will be introduced and we will analyze their predictions in view of the experimental observations. Although none of the proposed detection models is able to describe all experimental data, it is becoming increasingly clear that vortices are essential for the formation of the initial normal-conducting domain that triggers a detection event.

  19. Photon counting photodiode array detector for far ultraviolet (FUV) astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartig, G. F.; Moos, H. W.; Pembroke, R.; Bowers, C.

    1982-01-01

    A compact, stable, single-stage intensified photodiode array detector designed for photon-counting, far ultraviolet astronomy applications employs a saturable, 'C'-type MCP (Galileo S. MCP 25-25) to produce high gain pulses with a narrowly peaked pulse height distribution. The P-20 output phosphor exhibits a very short decay time, due to the high current density of the electron pulses. This intensifier is being coupled to a self-scanning linear photodiode array which has a fiber optic input window which allows direct, rigid mechanical coupling with minimal light loss. The array was scanned at a 250 KHz pixel rate. The detector exhibits more than adequate signal-to-noise ratio for pulse counting and event location. Previously announced in STAR as N82-19118

  20. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-07-01

    The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment, structured in a lantern shape, consists of four layers of ladders, fabricated from two to five silicon sensors. The APV25 readout ASIC chips are mounted on one side of the ladder to minimize the signal path for reducing the capacitive noise; signals from the sensor backside are transmitted to the chip by bent flexible fan-out circuits. The ladder is assembled using several dedicated jigs. Sensor motion on the jig is minimized by vacuum chucking. The gluing procedure provides such a rigid foundation that later leads to the desired wire bonding performance. The full ladder with electrically functional sensors is consistently completed with a fully developed assembly procedure, and its sensor offsets from the design values are found to be less than 200 μm. The potential functionality of the ladder is also demonstrated by the radioactive source test.

  1. Silicon photodiode as the two-color detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, D. B.; Zakharenko, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes a silicon photodiode as the two-color photodetector. The work of one photodiode in two spectral ranges is achieved due to the changes of the spectral sensitivity of the photodiodes in the transition from photodiode mode for photovoltaic in the short circuit mode. On the basis of silicon photodiode FD-256 the layout of the spectral ratio pyrometer was assembled and the results of theoretical calculations was confirmed experimentally. The calculated dependences of the coefficient of error of the spectral ratio pyrometer from temperature reverse voltage 10 and 100 V was presented. The calculated dependence of the instrumental error and the assessment of methodological errors of the proposed photodetector spectral ratio was done. According to the results of the presented research was set the task of development photodiode detectors which change the spectral sensitivity depending on the applied voltage.

  2. Discrimination of binary coherent states using a homodyne detector and a photon number resolving detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wittmann, Christoffer; Sych, Denis; Leuchs, Gerd; Takeoka, Masahiro

    2010-06-15

    We investigate quantum measurement strategies capable of discriminating two coherent states probabilistically with significantly smaller error probabilities than can be obtained using nonprobabilistic state discrimination. We apply a postselection strategy to the measurement data of a homodyne detector as well as a photon number resolving detector in order to lower the error probability. We compare the two different receivers with an optimal intermediate measurement scheme where the error rate is minimized for a fixed rate of inconclusive results. The photon number resolving (PNR) receiver is experimentally demonstrated and compared to an experimental realization of a homodyne receiver with postselection. In the comparison, it becomes clear that the performance of the PNR receiver surpasses the performance of the homodyne receiver, which we prove to be optimal within any Gaussian operations and conditional dynamics.

  3. Photon-counting-intensified CID detector for space astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, Patrick F.; Norton, Timothy J.; Kimble, Randy A.

    1998-08-01

    We are developing a novel solar blind, high resolution, photon counting detector for applications in space UV astronomy. Our concept is to utilize a charge injection device (CID) as the readout stage behind a microchannel plate (MCP) intensifier. This detector will take advantage of the flexible readout options afforded by the addressable CID architecture to provide high local frame rates around bright features in an image. In this concept, the detector bandwidth can be used most efficiently, reading pixels around a bright star more frequently than those in a nearby dim cloud of gas, for example. The demonstration apparatus described in this paper incorporates a 25 mm diameter intensifier tube fiber optically coupled to a commercially available 30 frame-s(superscript -1), 512 X 512 pixel, progressive-scan CID2250 camera. The 10 MHz analog video from this camera is digitized and processed by a centroider module that calculates the position of each event in real time with subpixel precision, thus providing high spatial resolution limited by the MCPs. The pore-resolved images presented in this paper validate the intensified CID concept. We plan to incorporates custom driving electronics and an experimental CID with on-chip address decoders for high speed random access of detector subarrays of arbitrary size and location. Our goal is to demonstrate a solar-blind UV photon counter with 200-300 counts-s(superscript -1) point source and 3 X 10(superscript 5) counts-s(superscript -1) global rate capability with up to 4000 by 4000 elements.

  4. Readout of silicon strip detectors with position and timing information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Irmler, C.; Pernicka, M.

    2009-01-01

    Low-noise front-end amplifiers for silicon strip detectors are already available for decades, providing excellent signal-to-noise ratio and thus very precise spatial resolution, but at the cost of a long shaping time in the microsecond range. Due to occupancy and pile-up issues, modern experiments need much faster electronics. With submicron ASICs, adequate readout and data processing, it is possible to obtain not only spatial hit data, but also accurate timing information—a feature which is rarely exploited so far. We present the concept of a silicon vertex detector readout system intended for an upgrade of the Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan). The APV25 front-end chip, originally developed for CMS at CERN, is used in a way where it delivers multiple samples along the shaped waveform, such that not only the analog pulse height, but also the timing of each particle hit can be determined. We developed a complete readout system including an FADC +Processor VME module which performs zero-suppression in FPGAs. The hit time measurement is also planned on the same module. As fast amplifiers are inherently more susceptible to noise, which largely depends on the load capacitance, the front-end chips should be located as close to the detector as possible. On the other hand, the material budget, especially in a low-energy electron-positron machine such as Belle, should be minimized. We tried to merge those demands with a fully functional "Flex_Module", where thinned APV25 readout chips are mounted on the silicon sensor.

  5. Tuning of superconducting nanowire single-photon detector parameters for VLSI circuit testing using time-resolved emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahgat Shehata, A.; Stellari, F.

    2015-01-01

    Time-Resolved Emission (TRE) is a truly non-invasive technique based on the detection of intrinsic light emitted by integrated circuits that is used for the detection of timing related faults from the backside of flip-chip VLSI circuits. Single-photon detectors with extended sensitivity in the Near Infrared (NIR) are used to perform time-correlated single-photon counting measurements and retrieve the temporal distribution of the emitted photons, thus identifying gates switching events. The noise, efficiency and jitter performance of the detector are crucial to enable ultra-low voltage waveform sensitivity. For this reason, cryogenically cooled Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors (SNSPDs) offer superior performance compared to state-of-the-art Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs). In this paper we will discuss how detector front-end electronics parameters, such as bias current, RF attenuation and comparator threshold, can be tailored to optimize the measurement Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), defined as the ratio between the switching emission peak amplitude and the standard deviation of the noise in the time interval in which there are no photons emitted from the circuit. For example, reducing the attenuation and the threshold of the comparator used to detect switching events may lead to an improvement of the jitter, due to the better discrimination of the detector firing, but also a higher sensitivity to external electric noise disturbances. Similarly, by increasing the bias current, both the detection efficiency and the jitter improve, but the noise increases as well. For these reasons an optimization of the SNR is necessary. For this work, TRE waveforms were acquired from a 32 nm Silicon On Insulator (SOI) chip operating down to 0.4 V using different generations of SNSPD systems.

  6. Maximizing Photoluminescence Extraction in Silicon Photonic Crystal Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Ali; Sarau, George; Xavier, Jolly; Paraïso, Taofiq K.; Christiansen, Silke; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Photonic crystal modes can be tailored for increasing light matter interactions and light extraction efficiencies. These PhC properties have been explored for improving the device performance of LEDs, solar cells and precision biosensors. Tuning the extended band structure of 2D PhC provides a means for increasing light extraction throughout a planar device. This requires careful design and fabrication of PhC with a desirable mode structure overlapping with the spectral region of emission. We show a method for predicting and maximizing light extraction from 2D photonic crystal slabs, exemplified by maximizing silicon photoluminescence (PL). Systematically varying the lattice constant and filling factor, we predict the increases in PL intensity from band structure calculations and confirm predictions in micro-PL experiments. With the near optimal design parameters of PhC, we demonstrate more than 500-fold increase in PL intensity, measured near band edge of silicon at room temperature, an enhancement by an order of magnitude more than what has been reported.

  7. Maximizing Photoluminescence Extraction in Silicon Photonic Crystal Slabs

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Ali; Sarau, George; Xavier, Jolly; Paraïso, Taofiq K.; Christiansen, Silke; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal modes can be tailored for increasing light matter interactions and light extraction efficiencies. These PhC properties have been explored for improving the device performance of LEDs, solar cells and precision biosensors. Tuning the extended band structure of 2D PhC provides a means for increasing light extraction throughout a planar device. This requires careful design and fabrication of PhC with a desirable mode structure overlapping with the spectral region of emission. We show a method for predicting and maximizing light extraction from 2D photonic crystal slabs, exemplified by maximizing silicon photoluminescence (PL). Systematically varying the lattice constant and filling factor, we predict the increases in PL intensity from band structure calculations and confirm predictions in micro-PL experiments. With the near optimal design parameters of PhC, we demonstrate more than 500-fold increase in PL intensity, measured near band edge of silicon at room temperature, an enhancement by an order of magnitude more than what has been reported. PMID:27113674

  8. Label-free virus detection using silicon photonic microring resonators.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Melinda S; Domier, Leslie L; Bailey, Ryan C

    2012-01-15

    Viruses represent a continual threat to humans through a number of mechanisms, which include disease, bioterrorism, and destruction of both plant and animal food resources. Many contemporary techniques used for the detection of viruses and viral infections suffer from limitations such as the need for extensive sample preparation or the lengthy window between infection and measurable immune response, for serological methods. In order to develop a method that is fast, cost-effective, and features reduced sample preparation compared to many other virus detection methods, we report the application of silicon photonic microring resonators for the direct, label-free detection of intact viruses in both purified samples as well as in a complex, real-world analytical matrix. As a model system, we demonstrate the quantitative detection of Bean pod mottle virus, a pathogen of great agricultural importance, with a limit of detection of 10 ng/mL. By simply grinding a small amount of leaf sample in buffer with a mortar and pestle, infected leaves can be identified over a healthy control with a total analysis time of less than 45 min. Given the inherent scalability and multiplexing capability of the semiconductor-based technology, we feel that silicon photonic microring resonators are well-positioned as a promising analytical tool for a number of viral detection applications. PMID:22138465

  9. Maximizing Photoluminescence Extraction in Silicon Photonic Crystal Slabs.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Ali; Sarau, George; Xavier, Jolly; Paraïso, Taofiq K; Christiansen, Silke; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Photonic crystal modes can be tailored for increasing light matter interactions and light extraction efficiencies. These PhC properties have been explored for improving the device performance of LEDs, solar cells and precision biosensors. Tuning the extended band structure of 2D PhC provides a means for increasing light extraction throughout a planar device. This requires careful design and fabrication of PhC with a desirable mode structure overlapping with the spectral region of emission. We show a method for predicting and maximizing light extraction from 2D photonic crystal slabs, exemplified by maximizing silicon photoluminescence (PL). Systematically varying the lattice constant and filling factor, we predict the increases in PL intensity from band structure calculations and confirm predictions in micro-PL experiments. With the near optimal design parameters of PhC, we demonstrate more than 500-fold increase in PL intensity, measured near band edge of silicon at room temperature, an enhancement by an order of magnitude more than what has been reported. PMID:27113674

  10. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: New test and analysis of position-sensitive-silicon-detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lang; Ge, Yu-Cheng; Wang, He; Fan, Feng-Ying; Qiao, Rui; Lu, Fei; Song, Yu-Shou; Zheng, Tao; Ye, Yan-Lin

    2009-01-01

    We have tested and analyzed the properties of two-dimensional Position-Sensitive-silicon-Detector (PSD) with new integrated preamplifiers. The test demonstrates that the best position resolution for 5.5 MeV α particles is 1.7 mm (FWHM), and the best energy resolution is 2.1%, which are notably better than the previously reported results. A scaling formula is introduced to make the absolute position calibration.

  11. The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector readout chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Bergauer, T.; Frankenberger, A.; Gfall, I.; Irmler, C.; Valentan, M.

    2013-02-01

    The Silicon Vertex Detector of the future Belle II experiment at KEK (Japan) will consist of 6'' double-sided strip sensors. Those are read out by APV25 chips (originally developed for CMS) which are powered by DC/DC converters with low voltages tied to the sensor bias potentials. The signals are transmitted by cable links of about 12 meters. In the back-end, the data are digitized and processed by FADC modules with powerful FPGAs, which are also capable of precisely measuring the hit time of each particle in order to discard off-time background.

  12. High-fidelity frequency down-conversion of visible entangled photon pairs with superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, Rikizo; Kato, Hiroshi; Kusaka, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Miki, Shigehito; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide; Koashi, Masato

    2014-12-04

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-fidelity visible-to-telecommunicationwavelength conversion of a photon by using a solid-state-based difference frequency generation. In the experiment, one half of a pico-second visible entangled photon pair at 780 nm is converted to a 1522-nm photon. Using superconducting single-photon detectors with low dark count rates and small timing jitters, we observed a fidelity of 0.93±0.04 after the wavelength conversion.

  13. Improving the neutron-to-photon discrimination capability of detectors used for neutron dosimetry in high energy photon beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Terrón, J A; Bedogni, R; Pola, A; Lorenzoli, M; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Gómez, F; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-09-01

    The increasing interest of the medical community to radioinduced second malignancies due to photoneutrons in patients undergoing high-energy radiotherapy, has stimulated in recent years the study of peripheral doses, including the development of some dedicated active detectors. Although these devices are designed to respond to neutrons only, their parasitic photon response is usually not identically zero and anisotropic. The impact of these facts on measurement accuracy can be important, especially in points close to the photon field-edge. A simple method to estimate the photon contribution to detector readings is to cover it with a thermal neutron absorber with reduced secondary photon emission, such as a borated rubber. This technique was applied to the TNRD (Thermal Neutron Rate Detector), recently validated for thermal neutron measurements in high-energy photon radiotherapy. The positive results, together with the accessibility of the method, encourage its application to other detectors and different clinical scenarios.

  14. Improving the neutron-to-photon discrimination capability of detectors used for neutron dosimetry in high energy photon beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Irazola, L; Terrón, J A; Bedogni, R; Pola, A; Lorenzoli, M; Sánchez-Nieto, B; Gómez, F; Sánchez-Doblado, F

    2016-09-01

    The increasing interest of the medical community to radioinduced second malignancies due to photoneutrons in patients undergoing high-energy radiotherapy, has stimulated in recent years the study of peripheral doses, including the development of some dedicated active detectors. Although these devices are designed to respond to neutrons only, their parasitic photon response is usually not identically zero and anisotropic. The impact of these facts on measurement accuracy can be important, especially in points close to the photon field-edge. A simple method to estimate the photon contribution to detector readings is to cover it with a thermal neutron absorber with reduced secondary photon emission, such as a borated rubber. This technique was applied to the TNRD (Thermal Neutron Rate Detector), recently validated for thermal neutron measurements in high-energy photon radiotherapy. The positive results, together with the accessibility of the method, encourage its application to other detectors and different clinical scenarios. PMID:27337649

  15. SVX II a silicon vertex detector for run II of the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bortoletto, D.

    1994-11-01

    A microstrip silicon detector SVX II has been proposed for the upgrade of the vertex detector of the CDF experiment to be installed for run II of the Tevatron in 1998. Three barrels of four layers of double sided detectors will cover the interaction region. The requirement of the silicon tracker and the specification of the sensors are discussed together with the proposed R&D to verify the performance of the prototypes detectors produced by Sintef, Micron and Hamamatsu.

  16. Porous silicon photonic crystals for detection of infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, B.; Guan, B.; Reece, P. J.; Gooding, J. J.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the possibility of modifying porous silicon (PSi) particles with surface chemistry and immobilizing a biopolymer, gelatin for the detection of protease enzymes in solution. A rugate filter, a one-dimensional photonic crystal, is fabricated that exhibits a high-reflectivity optical resonance that is sensitive to small changes in the refractive index. To immobilize gelatin in the pores of the particles, the hydrogen-terminated silicon surface was first modified with an alkyne, 1,8-nonadiyne via hydrosilylation to protect the silicon surfaces from oxidation. This modification allows for further functionality to be added such as the coupling of gelatin. Exposure of the gelatin modified particles to the protease subtilisin in solution causes a change in the refractive index, resulting in a shift of the resonance to shorter wavelengths, indicating cleavage of organic material within the pores. The ability to monitor the spectroscopic properties of microparticles, and shifts in the optical signature due to changes in the refractive index of the material within the pore space, is demonstrated.

  17. An organophosphonate strategy for functionalizing silicon photonic biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing; Cheng, Fang; Dubey, Manish; Kaplan, Justin M.; Rawal, Meghana; Jiang, Xi; Newburg, David S.; Sullivan, Philip A.; Andrade, Rodrigo B.; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon photonic microring resonators have established their potential for label-free and low-cost biosensing applications. However, the long-term performance of this optical sensing platform requires robust surface modification and biofunctionalization. Herein, we demonstrate a conjugation strategy based on an organophosphonate surface coating and vinyl sulfone linker to biofunctionalize silicon resonators for biomolecular sensing. To validate this method, a series of glycans, including carbohydrates and glycoconjugates, were immobilized on divinyl sulfone (DVS)/organophosphonate-modified microrings and used to characterize carbohydrate-protein and norovirus particle interactions. This biofunctional platform was able to orthogonally detect multiple specific carbohydrate-protein interactions simultaneously. Additionally, the platform was capable of reproducible binding after multiple regenerations by high-salt, high-pH or low-pH solutions and after 1-month storage in ambient conditions. This remarkable stability and durability of the organophosphonate immobilization strategy will facilitate the application of silicon microring resonators in various sensing conditions, prolong their lifetime, and minimize the cost for storage and delivery; these characteristics are requisite for developing biosensors for point-of-care and distributed diagnostics and other biomedical applications. In addition, the platform demonstrated its ability to characterize carbohydrate-mediated host-virus interactions, providing a facile method for discovering new anti-viral agents to prevent infectious disease. PMID:22220731

  18. Silicon Vertex Tracker for PHENIX Upgrade at RICH: Capabilities and Detector Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouicer, R.

    From the wealth of data obtained from the first three years of RHIC operation, the four RHIC experiments, BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS and STAR, have concluded that a high density partonic matter is formed at central Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The research focus now shifts from initial discovery to a detailed exploration of partonic matter. Particles carrying heavy flavor, i.e. charm or beauty quarks, are powerful tool for study the properties of the hot and dense medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions at RHIC. At the relatively low transverse momentum region, the collective motion of the heavy flavor will be a sensitive signal for the thermalization of light flavors. They also allow to probe the spin structure of the proton in a new and precise way. An upgrade of RHIC (RHIC-II) is intended for the second half of the decade, with a luminosity increase to about 20-40 times the design value of 8 × 10^26 cm-2 s-1 for Au+Au, and 2 × 10^32 cm-2 s-1 for polarized proton beams. The PHENIX collaboration plans to upgrade its experiment to exploit with an enhanced detector new physics then in reach. For this purpose, we are constructing the Silicon Vertex Tracker (VTX). The VTX detector will provide us the tool to measure new physics observables that are not accessible at the present RHIC or available only with very limited accuracy. These include a precise determination of the charm production cross section, transverse momentum spectra at high-pT region for particles carrying beauty quarks as well the detection of recoil jets in direct photon production. The VTX detector consists of four layers of barrel detectors located in the region of pseudorapidity |η| < 1.2 and covers almost 2π azimuthal angle. The pseudorapidity, η, is defined as η = -ln[tan(θ/2)], where θ is the emission angle relative to the beam axis. The inner two silicon barrels consists of silicon pixel sensors and their technology is the ALICE1LHCb sensor-readout hybrid, which was developed

  19. Photon-Noise Limited Direct Detector Based on Disorder-Controlled Electron Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, B.; McGrath, W.; Gershenson, M.; Sergeev, A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a new concept for a hot-electron direct detector (HEDD) capable of counting single millimeter-wave photons. The detector is based on a transition edge sensor (1-meu size bridge) made form a disordered superconducting film.

  20. Timing Measurements of Scintillator Bars with Silicon Phtotomultiplier Light Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelor, Mark; Elizondo, Leonardo; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To track and analyze cosmic rays via precise measurements of muon and similarly penetrating particle's airshower axes directions, we constructed a prototype consisting of two 1-meter long scintillator bars. Each bar is embedded with green wavelength shifting fibers to increase detection rate of two silicon photomultiplier, SiPM, light detectors to record light produced by cosmic rays via scintillation. The focus of the experiment was to determine the performance of these devices. Evaluation was performed for two makes of SiPM models - from AdvanSiD and Hamamatsu. Timing measurements of the apparatus were performed under several trigger conditions to filter out noise such as coincidence trigger with 2 photomultiplier detectors, as well as SiPM detectors in self-triggered mode. The SiPM detector waveforms were digitized using a 4-channel fast waveform sampler, the DRS4 digitizer. Signals were analyzed with the CERN PAW package. From our results, we deduced the speed of light in the scintillator using the SiPM modules to be about 66% of the speed of light in a vacuum which is in accordance with the specifications of the index of refraction for the fibers given by the manufacturer's specifications. The results of our timing measurements would be presented. Dept. of Ed. Title V Grant PO31S090007.

  1. Broadband illumination of superconducting pair breaking photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guruswamy, T.; Goldie, D. J.; Withington, S.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the detailed behaviour of superconducting pair breaking photon detectors such as Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) requires knowledge of the nonequilibrium quasiparticle energy distributions. We have previously calculated the steady state distributions resulting from uniform absorption of monochromatic sub gap and above gap frequency radiation by thin films. In this work, we use the same methods to calculate the effect of illumination by broadband sources, such as thermal radiation from astrophysical phenomena or from the readout system. Absorption of photons at multiple above gap frequencies is shown to leave unchanged the structure of the quasiparticle energy distribution close to the superconducting gap. Hence for typical absorbed powers, we find the effects of absorption of broadband pair breaking radiation can simply be considered as the sum of the effects of absorption of many monochromatic sources. Distribution averaged quantities, like quasiparticle generation efficiency η, match exactly a weighted average over the bandwidth of the source of calculations assuming a monochromatic source. For sub gap frequencies, however, distributing the absorbed power across multiple frequencies does change the low energy quasiparticle distribution. For moderate and high absorbed powers, this results in a significantly larger η-a higher number of excess quasiparticles for a broadband source compared to a monochromatic source of equal total absorbed power. Typically in KIDs the microwave power absorbed has a very narrow bandwidth, but in devices with broad resonance characteristics (low quality factors), this increase in η may be measurable.

  2. A two dimensional silicon-based photonic crystal microcavity biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mindy; Fauchet, Philippe M.

    2006-08-01

    The optical properties of photonic bandgap (PBG) structures are highly sensitive to environmental variation. PBG structures thus are an attractive platform for biosensing applications. We experimentally demonstrate a label-free biosensor based on a two-dimensional (2-D) photonic crystal microcavity slab. The microcavity is fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator substrate and integrated with tapered ridge waveguides for light coupling. The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method is used to model the sensor. The resonance of the microcavity is designed to be around 1.58 μm. In order to capture the target biological materials, the internal surface of the photonic crystal is first functionalized. Binding of the targets is monitored by observing a red shift of the transmission resonance. The magnitude of the shift depends on the amount of material captured by the internal surface. Compared to 1-D PBG biosensors, 2-D devices require a smaller amount of target material and can accommodate larger targets. Experimental results are compared with the predictions obtained from the FDTD simulations.

  3. Rise time of voltage pulses in NbN superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, K. V.; Divochiy, A. V.; Vakhtomin, Yu. B.; Sidorova, M. V.; Karpova, U. V.; Morozov, P. V.; Seleznev, V. A.; Zotova, A. N.; Vodolazov, D. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    We have found experimentally that the rise time of voltage pulse in NbN superconducting single photon detectors increases nonlinearly with increasing the length of the detector L. The effect is connected with dependence of resistance of the detector Rn, which appears after photon absorption, on its kinetic inductance Lk and, hence, on the length of the detector. This conclusion is confirmed by our calculations in the framework of two temperature model.

  4. High bit rate germanium single photon detectors for 1310nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2008-04-01

    There is increasing interest in development of high speed, low noise and readily fieldable near infrared (NIR) single photon detectors. InGaAs/InP Avalanche photodiodes (APD) operated in Geiger mode (GM) are a leading choice for NIR due to their preeminence in optical networking. After-pulsing is, however, a primary challenge to operating InGaAs/InP single photon detectors at high frequencies1. After-pulsing is the effect of charge being released from traps that trigger false ("dark") counts. To overcome this problem, hold-off times between detection windows are used to allow the traps to discharge to suppress after-pulsing. The hold-off time represents, however, an upper limit on detection frequency that shows degradation beginning at frequencies of ~100 kHz in InGaAs/InP. Alternatively, germanium (Ge) single photon avalanche photodiodes (SPAD) have been reported to have more than an order of magnitude smaller charge trap densities than InGaAs/InP SPADs2, which allowed them to be successfully operated with passive quenching2 (i.e., no gated hold off times necessary), which is not possible with InGaAs/InP SPADs, indicating a much weaker dark count dependence on hold-off time consistent with fewer charge traps. Despite these encouraging results suggesting a possible higher operating frequency limit for Ge SPADs, little has been reported on Ge SPAD performance at high frequencies presumably because previous work with Ge SPADs has been discouraged by a strong demand to work at 1550 nm. NIR SPADs require cooling, which in the case of Ge SPADs dramatically reduces the quantum efficiency of the Ge at 1550 nm. Recently, however, advantages to working at 1310 nm have been suggested which combined with a need to increase quantum bit rates for quantum key distribution (QKD) motivates examination of Ge detectors performance at very high detection rates where InGaAs/InP does not perform as well. Presented in this paper are measurements of a commercially available Ge APD

  5. Resistivity measurements on the neutron irradiated detector grade silicon materials

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zheng

    1993-11-01

    Resistivity measurements under the condition of no or low electrical field (electrical neutral bulk or ENB condition) have been made on various device configurations on detector grade silicon materials after neutron irradiation. Results of the measurements have shown that the ENB resistivity increases with neutron fluence ({Phi}{sub n}) at low {phi}{sub n} (<10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}) and saturates at a value between 300 and 400 k{Omega}-cm at {phi}{sub n} {approximately}10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}. Meanwhile, the effective doping concentration N{sub eff} in the space charge region (SCR) obtained from the C-V measurements of fully depleted p{sup +}/n silicon junction detectors has been found to increase nearly linearly with {phi}{sub n} at high fluences ({phi}{sub n} > 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}). The experimental results are explained by the deep levels crossing the Fermi level in the SCR and near perfect compensation in the ENB by all deep levels, resulting in N{sub eff} (SCR) {ne} n or p (free carrier concentrations in the ENB).

  6. Application of PHOTON simulation software on calibration of HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolic, J.; Puzovic, J.; Todorovic, D.; Rajacic, M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the major difficulties in gamma spectrometry of voluminous environmental samples is the efficiency calibration of the detectors used for the measurement. The direct measurement of different calibration sources, containing isolated γ-ray emitters within the energy range of interest, and subsequent fitting to a parametric function, is the most accurate and at the same time most complicated and time consuming method of efficiency calibration. Many other methods are developed in time, some of them using Monte Carlo simulation. One of such methods is a dedicated and user-friendly program PHOTON, developed to simulate the passage of photons through different media with different geometries. This program was used for efficiency calibration of three HPGe detectors, readily used in Laboratory for Environment and Radiation Protection of the Institute for Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade, Serbia. The simulation produced the spectral response of the detectors for fixed energy and for different sample geometries and matrices. Thus obtained efficiencies were compared to the values obtained by the measurement of the secondary reference materials and to the results obtained by GEANT4 simulation, in order to establish whether the simulated values agree with the experimental ones. To further analyze the results, a realistic measurement of the materials provided by the IAEA within different interlaboratory proficiency tests, was performed. The activities obtained using simulated efficiencies were compared to the reference values provided by the organizer. A good agreement in the mid energy section of the spectrum was obtained, while for low energies the lack of some parameters in the simulation libraries proved to produce unacceptable discrepancies.

  7. An ion-to-photon conversion detector for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, F.; Knochenmuss, R.; Zenobi, R.

    1997-12-01

    An ion-to-photon conversion detector (IPD) for time-of-flight mass spectrometry was studied and tested with ions produced by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization. The detector consisted of a conversion surface located at the end of the drift tube of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and, behind it, a head-on photomultiplier tube. Fluorescent organic scintillator materials like Bu-PBD [2-(4-t-buthylphenyl)-5-(4-biphenylyl)-1,3,4-oxidiazole] were found to be the most efficient converters of those materials tested. Similar mass resolutions were found with the ion-to-photo detector and standard microchannel plates in a linear time-of-flight instrument. The background noise of the IPD was more intense than with microchannel plates. Slow unfocused ions are suspected to contribute to this noise. Test analytes as large as 70 000 Da could be measured with the IPD. Even with no secondary particle conversion surface in front of the IPD, masses up to approximately 20 000 Da may be more efficiently detected with the IPD than the MCP. For higher masses, a conversion dynode should be considered for increased signal.

  8. Anamorphic preclinical SPECT imaging with high-resolution silicon double-sided strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durko, Heather L.

    Preclinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an essential tool for studying progression, response to treatment, and physiological changes in small animal models of human disease. The wide range of imaging applications is often limited by the static design of many preclinical SPECT systems. We have developed a prototype imaging system that replaces the standard static pinhole aperture with two sets of movable, keel-edged copper-tungsten blades configured as crossed (skewed) slits. These apertures can be positioned independently between the object and detector, producing an anamorphic image in which the axial and transaxial magnications are not constrained to be equal. We incorporated a 60 mm x 60 mm, millimeter-thick megapixel silicon double-sided strip detector that permits ultrahigh-resolution imaging. While the stopping power of silicon is low for many common clinical radioisotopes, its performance is sufficient in the range of 20-60 keV to allow practical imaging experiments. The low-energy emissions of 125I fall within this energy window, and the 60-day half life provides an advantage for longitudinal studies. The flexible nature of this system allows the future application of adaptive imaging techniques. We have demonstrated ˜225-mum axial and ˜175-mum transaxial resolution across a 2.65 cm3 cylindrical field of view, as well as the capability for simultaneous multi-isotope acquisitions. We describe the key advancements that have made this system operational, including bringing up a new detector readout ASIC, development of detector control software and data-processing algorithms, and characterization of operating characteristics. We describe design and fabrication of the adjustable slit aperture platform, as well as the development of an accurate imaging forward model and its application in a novel geometric calibration technique and a GPU-based ultrahigh-resolution reconstruction code.

  9. Comprehensive simulation of the response of a silicon strip detector for position-sensitive measurements of X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2005-10-01

    The paper describes a comprehensive simulation method to evaluate X-ray imaging response of a silicon strip detector with particular emphasis on the charge-sharing effects. The simulation steps include: generation of the initial charge distribution in the detector volume, transport of generated charge in the detector volume, calculation of charges induced in the readout strips, discrimination of noisy electronic signals, and finally determination of the count efficiency vs. photon position as a function of the discrimination threshold. The developed simulation tools are useful for optimising the designs and operating parameters of silicon strip detectors used as 1-D position sensitive devices in experimental techniques like X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray high-resolution diffraction and small angle X-ray scattering, using laboratory X-ray sources. The response of the detector as a function of the detector bias and discrimination threshold has been investigated for two measurement configurations: irradiation from the strip-side and from the back-side.

  10. Photonic drop splitters based on silicon photonic crystal cascaded self-collimation ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan-Yuan; Chen, Xi-Yao; Jiang, Jun-Zhen; Fu, Ping; Chen, Biao; Yang, Li-Hui; Liu, Jing-Ping; Lin, Bao-Cheng

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the 1×5 optical splitters (OSs) based on 2D rod-type silicon photonic crystal embed cascaded self-collimation (SC) ring resonators (CSCRR) was proposed. The 1×5 OSs consist of eight beam splitters, which are formed by varying the radii of the rod. With self-collimation effect, we can manipulate the light's propagation in the OSs. Here we consider TM modes. Utilizing multiple-beam interference theory, the theoretical transmission spectra at different outputs were analysed. These transmission spectra can help us to set the radii of eight slitters properly, for we can control the light coming out from five ports with the light-intensity ratio we need. Meanwhile these outputs' transmission spectra were investigated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The simulative results have an agreement with the theoretical prediction. The 1×5 OSs will have practical applications in photonic integrated circuits.

  11. Optical nonreciprocal transmission in an asymmetric silicon photonic crystal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zheng; Chen, Juguang; Ji, Mengxi; Huang, Qingzhong; Xia, Jinsong; Wu, Ying; Wang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    An optical nonreciprocal transmission (ONT) is realized by employing the nonlinear effects in a compact asymmetric direct-coupled nanocavity-waveguide silicon photonic crystal structure with a high loaded quality factor (QL) of 42 360 and large extinction ratio exceeding 30 dB. Applying a single step lithography and successive etching, the device can realize the ONT in an individual nanocavity, alleviating the requirement to accurately control the resonance of the cavities. A maximum nonreciprocal transmission ratio of 21.1 dB as well as a working bandwidth of 280 pm in the telecommunication band are obtained at a low input power of 76.7 μW. The calculated results by employing a nonlinear coupled-mode model are in good agreement with the experiment.

  12. Optical nonreciprocal transmission in an asymmetric silicon photonic crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zheng; Chen, Juguang; Ji, Mengxi; Huang, Qingzhong; Xia, Jinsong; Wang, Yi E-mail: ywangwnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn; Wu, Ying E-mail: ywangwnlo@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2015-11-30

    An optical nonreciprocal transmission (ONT) is realized by employing the nonlinear effects in a compact asymmetric direct-coupled nanocavity-waveguide silicon photonic crystal structure with a high loaded quality factor (Q{sub L}) of 42 360 and large extinction ratio exceeding 30 dB. Applying a single step lithography and successive etching, the device can realize the ONT in an individual nanocavity, alleviating the requirement to accurately control the resonance of the cavities. A maximum nonreciprocal transmission ratio of 21.1 dB as well as a working bandwidth of 280 pm in the telecommunication band are obtained at a low input power of 76.7 μW. The calculated results by employing a nonlinear coupled-mode model are in good agreement with the experiment.

  13. Deterministic Integration of Single Photon Sources in Silicon Based Photonic Circuits.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, Iman Esmaeil; Elshaari, Ali W; Jöns, Klaus D; Fognini, Andreas; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J; Reimer, Michael E; Zwiller, Val

    2016-04-13

    A major step toward fully integrated quantum optics is the deterministic incorporation of high quality single photon sources in on-chip optical circuits. We show a novel hybrid approach in which preselected III-V single quantum dots in nanowires are transferred and integrated in silicon based photonic circuits. The quantum emitters maintain their high optical quality after integration as verified by measuring a low multiphoton probability of 0.07 ± 0.07 and emission line width as narrow as 3.45 ± 0.48 GHz. Our approach allows for optimum alignment of the quantum dot light emission to the fundamental waveguide mode resulting in very high coupling efficiencies. We estimate a coupling efficiency of 24.3 ± 1.7% from the studied single-photon source to the photonic channel and further show by finite-difference time-domain simulations that for an optimized choice of material and design the efficiency can exceed 90%. PMID:26954298

  14. Superlattice-doped silicon detectors: progress and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoenk, Michael E.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Carver, Alexander G.; Jones, Todd J.; Hennessy, John; Jewell, April D.; Sgro, Joseph; Tsur, Shraga; McClish, Mickel; Farrell, Richard

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we review the physics and performance of silicon detectors passivated with wafer-scale molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and atomic layer deposition (ALD). MBE growth of a two-dimensional (2D) doping superlattice on backside-illuminated (BSI) detectors provides nearly perfect protection from interface traps, even at trap densities in excess of 1014 cm-2. Superlattice-doped, BSI CMOS imaging detectors show no measurable degradation of quantum efficiency or dark current from long-term exposure to pulsed DUV lasers. Wafer-scale superlattice-doping has been used to passivate CMOS and CCD imaging arrays, fully-depleted CCDs and photodiodes, and large-area avalanche photodiodes. Superlattice-doped CCDs with ALD-grown antireflection coatings achieved world record quantum efficiency at deep and far ultraviolet wavelengths (100-300nm). Recently we have demonstrated solar-blind, superlattice doped avalanche photodiodes using integrated metal-dielectric coatings to achieve selective detection of ultraviolet light in the 200-250 nm spectral range with high out-of-band rejection.

  15. Contrast cancellation technique applied to digital x-ray imaging using silicon strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, C.; Lopez, J.; Sanabria, J. C.; Baldazzi, G.; Bollini, D.; Gombia, M.; Cabal, A.E.; Ceballos, C.; Diaz Garcia, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Taibi, A.; Sarnelli, A.; Tuffanelli, A.; Giubellino, P.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Prino, F.; Tomassi, E.; Grybos, P.; Idzik, M.; Swientek, K.

    2005-12-15

    Dual-energy mammographic imaging experimental tests have been performed using a compact dichromatic imaging system based on a conventional x-ray tube, a mosaic crystal, and a 384-strip silicon detector equipped with full-custom electronics with single photon counting capability. For simulating mammal tissue, a three-component phantom, made of Plexiglass, polyethylene, and water, has been used. Images have been collected with three different pairs of x-ray energies: 16-32 keV, 18-36 keV, and 20-40 keV. A Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment has also been carried out using the MCNP-4C transport code. The Alvarez-Macovski algorithm has been applied both to experimental and simulated data to remove the contrast between two of the phantom materials so as to enhance the visibility of the third one.

  16. Sub-Wavelength Silicon Photonic Devices for Optical Interconnect Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Eric F.

    As our demand for information grows, so too does the demand for networks capable of handling this flood of data. Conventional on-chip electrical networks are approaching their limits in terms of latency, power consumption and data rates and will need to be replaced with new technology in the near future. Photonic networks promise great improvements over electrical networks, but several key challenges still hinder their widespread deployment. This thesis focuses on addressing the problem of encoding and routing data inside integrated optical communication networks. This is accomplished through electrically driven optical switches or modulators that are able to produce a binary optical data stream from a binary electrical input signal. The primary metrics used to evaluate the performance of these devices are spatial footprint, modulation/switching speed, operating voltage and power consumption per bit. Secondary concerns are device bandwidth, CMOS compatibility, tolerance to fabrication errors and device losses. In this thesis, we present a theoretical design for an electrically driven optical switch utilizing hybrid silicon-insulator-metal waveguides with a 30 square micrometer footprint, 57 Gbit/s switching speed, 2.6 fJ/bit power consumption and 1V operation. We also present experimental confirmation of the optical properties of hybrid silicon-insulator-metal waveguides which form the basis of this design.

  17. Silicon-based one-dimensional photonic crystal microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, San; Qian, Bo; Chen, Kunji; Xu, Jun; Li, Wei; Huang, Xinfan

    2004-12-01

    The layer-by-layer method is employed to prepare a-SiNx:H microcavity structure in a Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) chamber. Measurements of transmittance spectrum of as-grown samples show that the transmittance resonant peak of a cavity mode at 750 nm is introduced into the band gap of one-dimensional photonic crystal distributed Bragg reflectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride. Also the PL measurements of a-SiNx:H microcavities are performed. There is a well agreement between the transmittance spectra and the PL of microcavity samples. In order to clarify the microcavity effects on the bulk a-SiNx:H, the PL of a λ/2-thick layer of bulk a-SiNx:H obtained under the same experimental conditions is presented. By comparison, a dramatic narrowing of emission linewidth and enhancement of PL intensity is observed. The wide emission band with 208 nm is strongly narrowed to 17 nm, and the resonant enhancement of the peak PL intensity is about two orders of magnitude with respect to the emission of the λ/2-thick layer of bulk a-SiNx:H. A linewidth of Δλ=17 nm and a quality factor of Q=50 are achieved in our one-dimensional a-SiNx photonic crystal microcavities.

  18. Experimental demonstration of reservoir computing on a silicon photonics chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandoorne, Kristof; Mechet, Pauline; van Vaerenbergh, Thomas; Fiers, Martin; Morthier, Geert; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Dambre, Joni; Bienstman, Peter

    2014-03-01

    In today’s age, companies employ machine learning to extract information from large quantities of data. One of those techniques, reservoir computing (RC), is a decade old and has achieved state-of-the-art performance for processing sequential data. Dedicated hardware realizations of RC could enable speed gains and power savings. Here we propose the first integrated passive silicon photonics reservoir. We demonstrate experimentally and through simulations that, thanks to the RC paradigm, this generic chip can be used to perform arbitrary Boolean logic operations with memory as well as 5-bit header recognition up to 12.5 Gbit s-1, without power consumption in the reservoir. It can also perform isolated spoken digit recognition. Our realization exploits optical phase for computing. It is scalable to larger networks and much higher bitrates, up to speeds >100 Gbit s-1. These results pave the way for the application of integrated photonic RC for a wide range of applications.

  19. Nanowire superconducting single-photon detectors on GaAs for integrated quantum photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, A.; Nejad, S. Jahanmiri; Marsili, F.; Mattioli, F.; Leoni, R.; Bitauld, D.; Sahin, D.; Hamhuis, G. J.; Nötzel, R.; Sanjines, R.; Fiore, A.

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate efficient nanowire superconducting single photon detectors (SSPDs) based on NbN thin films grown on GaAs. NbN films ranging from 3 to 5 nm in thickness have been deposited by dc magnetron sputtering on GaAs substrates at 350 °C. These films show superconducting properties comparable to similar films grown on sapphire and MgO. In order to demonstrate the potential for monolithic integration, SSPDs were fabricated and measured on GaAs/AlAs Bragg mirrors, showing a clear cavity enhancement, with a peak quantum efficiency of 18.3% at λ =1300 nm and T=4.2 K.

  20. A four-pixel single-photon pulse-position array fabricated from WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, V. B. Horansky, R.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R. P.; Nam, S. W.; Marsili, F.; Stern, J. A.; Shaw, M. D.

    2014-02-03

    We demonstrate a scalable readout scheme for an infrared single-photon pulse-position camera consisting of WSi superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors. For an N × N array, only 2 × N wires are required to obtain the position of a detection event. As a proof-of-principle, we show results from a 2 × 2 array.

  1. Testing of the KRI-developed Silicon PIN Radioxenon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, Michael P.; McIntyre, Justin I.

    2015-01-23

    Radioxenon detectors are used for the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) in a network of detectors throughout the world called the International Monitoring System (IMS). The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) has tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with testing a V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and Lares Ltd-developed Silicon PIN detector for radioxenon detection. PNNL measured radioxenon with the silicon PIN detector and determined its potential compared to current plastic scintillator beta cells. While the PNNL tested Si detector experienced noise issues, a second detector was tested in Russia at Lares Ltd, which did not exhibit the noise issues. Without the noise issues, the Si detector produces much better energy resolution and isomer peak separation than a conventional plastic scintillator cell used in the SAUNA systems in the IMS. Under the assumption of 1 cm3 of Xe in laboratory-like conditions, 24-hr count time (12-hr count time for the SAUNA), with the respective shielding the minimum detectable concentrations for the Si detector tested by Lares Ltd (and a conventional SAUNA system) were calculated to be: 131mXe – 0.12 mBq/m3 (0.12 mBq/m3); 133Xe – 0.18 mBq/m3 (0.21 mBq/m3); 133mXe – 0.07 mBq/m3 (0.15 mBq/m3); 135Xe – 0.45 mBq/m3 (0.67 mBq/m3). Detection limits, which are one of the important factors in choosing the best detection technique for radioxenon in field conditions, are significantly better than for SAUNA-like detection systems for 131mXe and 133mXe, but similar for 133Xe and 135Xe. Another important factor is the amount of “memory effect” or carry over signal from one radioxenon measurement to the subsequent sample. The memory effect is

  2. Performance of a double sided silicon strip detector as a transmission detector for heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian-Long; Ma, Jun-Bing; Cao, Xi-Guang; Wang, Qi; Wang, Jian-Song; Yang, Yan-Yun; Ma, Peng; Huang, Mei-Rong; Jin, Shi-Lun; Rong, Xin-Juan; Bai, Zhen; Fu, Fen; Hu, Qiang; Chen, Ruo-Fu; Xu, Shi-Wei; Chen, Jiang-Bo; Jin, Lei; Li, Yong; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2014-05-01

    The performance of a double sided silicon strip detector (DSSSD), which is used for the position and energy detection of heavy ions, is reported. The analysis shows that although the incomplete charge collection (ICC) and charge sharing (CS) effects of the DSSSD give rise to a loss of energy resolution, the position information is recorded without ambiguity. Representations of ICC/CS events in the energy spectra are shown and their origins are confirmed by correlation analysis of the spectra from both the junction side and ohmic side of the DSSSD.

  3. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Tomohiro Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  4. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tomohiro; Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-01

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  5. CDF Run-II Silicon Detector: Operations and Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Michelle; /Fermilab

    2011-09-10

    The CDF Run-II silicon microstrip detector has seen almost 12 fb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions over the last 10 years. It has shown remarkable performance, with 80% of its channels still operating error-free, and only one of its eight layers approaching the operational limits for full depletion. The measured depletion voltage and signal-to-noise ratio of these sensors give unique information about the behavior of sensors irradiated slowly over a long period of time. Data from heavily irradiated, double-sided sensors excludes a monotonic electric field inside the sensor and is instead consistent with a doubly-peaked field that is lower in the center of the sensor and higher at the edges.

  6. Efficient data transmission from silicon wafer strip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, B.J.; Lackner, K.S.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Sharp, D.H.; Winter, L.; Ziock, H.J.

    1991-12-31

    An architecture for on-wafer processing is proposed for central silicon-strip tracker systems as they are currently designed for high energy physics experiments at the SSC, and for heavy ion experiments at RHIC. The data compression achievable with on-wafer processing would make it possible to transmit all data generated to the outside of the detector system. A set of data which completely describes the state of the wafer for low occupancy events and which contains important statistical information for more complex events can be transmitted immediately. This information could be used in early trigger decisions. Additional data packages which complete the description of the state of the wafer vary in size and are sent through a second channel. By buffering this channel the required bandwidth can be kept far below the peak data rates which occur in rate but interesting events. 18 refs.

  7. System software design for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tkaczyk, S.; Bailey, M.

    1991-11-01

    An automated system for testing and performance evaluation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) data acquisition electronics is described. The SVX data acquisition chain includes the Fastbus Sequencer and the Rabbit Crate Controller and Digitizers. The Sequencer is a programmable device for which we developed a high level assembly language. Diagnostic, calibration and data acquisition programs have been developed. A distributed software package was developed in order to operate the modules. The package includes programs written in assembly and Fortran languages that are executed concurrently on the SVX Sequencer modules and either a microvax or an SSP. Test software was included to assist technical personnel during the production and maintenance of the modules. Details of the design of different components of the package are reported.

  8. Silicon photonics: Design, fabrication, and characterization of on-chip optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, I.-Wei

    In recent years, the research field of silicon photonics has been developing rapidly from a concept to a demonstrated technology, and has gathered much attention from both academia and industry communities. Its many potential applications in long-haul telecommunication, mid-range data-communication, on-chip optical interconnection networks, and nano-scale sensing as well as its compatibility with electronic integrated circuits have driven much effort in realizing silicon photonics both as a disruptive technology for existing markets and as an enabling technology for new ones. Despite the promising future of silicon photonics, many fundamental issues still remain to be understood---both in the linear- and nonlinear-optical regimes. There are also many engineering challenges to make silicon photonics the gold standard in photonic integrated circuits. In this thesis, we focus on the design, fabrication, and characterization of active and passive silicon-on-insulator (SOI) photonic devices. The SOI material system differs from most conventional optical material platforms because of its high-refractive-index-contrast, which enables engineers to design very compact integrated photonic networks with sub-micron transverse waveguide dimensions and sharp bends. On the other hand, because most analytical formulas for designing waveguide devices are valid only in low-index-contrast cases, SOI photonic devices need to be analyzed numerically for accurate results. The second chapter of this thesis describes some common numerical methods such as Beam Propagation Method (BPM) and Finite Element Method (FEM) for waveguide-design simulations, and presents two design studies based on these methods. The compatibility of silicon photonic integrated circuits with conventional CMOS fabrication technology is another important aspect that distinguishes silicon photonics from others such as III-V materials and lithium niobate. However, the requirements for fabricating silicon photonic

  9. Uncooled infrared photon detector and multicolor infrared detection using microoptomechanical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G.; Rajic, Solobodan; Datskou, Irene C.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for infrared detection are described. An optomechanical photon detector includes a semiconductor material and is based on measurement of a photoinduced lattice strain. A multicolor infrared sensor includes a stack of frequency specific optomechanical detectors. The stack can include one, or more, of the optomechanical photon detectors that function based on the measurement of photoinduced lattice strain. The systems and methods provide advantages in that rapid, sensitive multicolor infrared imaging can be performed without the need for a cooling subsystem.

  10. Test beam results of Silicon Drift Detector prototypes for the ALICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouais, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Busso, L.; Cerello, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gregorio, A.; Hernández-Ontoya, R.; Idzik, M.; Kolojvari, A.; Mazza, G.; Montano, L. M.; Nilsen, B. S.; Petta, C.; Randazzo, N.; Rashevsky, A.; Reito, S.; Rivetti, A.; Tosello, F.; Trzaska, W. H.; Vacchi, A.; Alice Collaboration

    1999-08-01

    We report preliminary beam test results of linear Silicon Draft Detector prototypes for the ALICE experiment. Linearity, resolution, charge transport and collection, and efficiency have been studied using a minimum ionizing particle beam for a very large area detector prototype read out with the OLA preamplifier/shaper and for another detector read out using a new transimpedance amplifier with a non linear response.

  11. Calibration of photon counting imaging microchannel plate detectors for EUV astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Jelinsky, P.

    1986-01-01

    The calibration of photon counting imaging detectors for satellite based EUV astronomy is a complex process designed to ensure the validity of the data received 'in orbit'. The methods developed to accomplish calibration of microchannel plate detectors for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer are described and illustrated. The characterization of these detectors can be subdivided into three categories: stabilization, performance tests, and environmental tests.

  12. Fabrication and Characterization of Superconducting NbN Nanowire Single Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jeffrey A.; Farr, William H.

    2006-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of high-speed, single photon detectors using superconducting NbN nanowires at a wavelength of 1064 nm. A 15 by 15 micron detector with a detector efficiency of 40% has been measured. Due to kinetic inductance, the recovery time of such large area detectors is longer than that of smaller or single wire detectors. The recovery time of our detectors (50 ns) has been characterized by measuring the inter-arrival time statistics of our detector.

  13. A new generation of ultra-dense optical I/O for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodawski, Mitchell S.; Kopp, Victor I.; Park, Jongchul; Singer, Jonathan; Hubner, Eric E.; Neugroschl, Daniel; Chao, Norman; Genack, Azriel Z.

    2014-03-01

    In response to the optical packaging needs of a rapidly growing silicon photonics market, Chiral Photonics, Inc. (CPI) has developed a new generation of ultra-dense-channel, bi-directional, all-optical, input/output (I/O) couplers that bridge the data transport gap between standard optical fibers and photonic integrated circuits. These couplers, called Pitch Reducing Optical Fiber Arrays (PROFAs), provide a means to simultaneously match both the mode field and channel spacing (i.e. pitch) between an optical fiber array and a photonic integrated circuit (PIC). Both primary methods for optically interfacing with PICs, via vertical grating couplers (VGCs) and edge couplers, can be addressed with PROFAs. PROFAs bring the signal-carrying cores, either multimode or singlemode, of many optical fibers into close proximity within an all-glass device that can provide low loss coupling to on-chip components, including waveguides, gratings, detectors and emitters. Two-dimensional (2D) PROFAs offer more than an order of magnitude enhancement in channel density compared to conventional one-dimensional (1D) fiber arrays. PROFAs can also be used with low vertical profile solutions that simplify optoelectronic packaging while reducing PIC I/O real estate usage requirements. PROFA technology is based on a scalable production process for microforming glass preform assemblies as they are pulled through a small oven. An innovative fiber design, called the "vanishing core," enables tailoring the mode field along the length of the PROFA to meet the coupling needs of disparate waveguide technologies, such as fiber and onchip. Examples of single- and multi-channel couplers fabricated using this technology will be presented.

  14. On-chip hybrid photonic-plasmonic light concentrator for nanofocusing in an integrated silicon photonics platform.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ye; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Apuzzo, Aniello; Salas-Montiel, Rafael; Nguyen, Kim Ngoc; Blaize, Sylvain; Adibi, Ali

    2015-02-11

    The enhancement and confinement of electromagnetic radiation to nanometer scale have improved the performances and decreased the dimensions of optical sources and detectors for several applications including spectroscopy, medical applications, and quantum information. Realization of on-chip nanofocusing devices compatible with silicon photonics platform adds a key functionality and provides opportunities for sensing, trapping, on-chip signal processing, and communications. Here, we discuss the design, fabrication, and experimental demonstration of light nanofocusing in a hybrid plasmonic-photonic nanotaper structure. We discuss the physical mechanisms behind the operation of this device, the coupling mechanisms, and how to engineer the energy transfer from a propagating guided mode to a trapped plasmonic mode at the apex of the plasmonic nanotaper with minimal radiation loss. Optical near-field measurements and Fourier modal analysis carried out using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) show a tight nanofocusing of light in this structure to an extremely small spot of 0.00563(λ/(2n(rmax)))(3) confined in 3D and an exquisite power input conversion of 92%. Our experiments also verify the mode selectivity of the device (low transmission of a TM-like input mode and high transmission of a TE-like input mode). A large field concentration factor (FCF) of about 4.9 is estimated from our NSOM measurement with a radius of curvature of about 20 nm at the apex of the nanotaper. The agreement between our theory and experimental results reveals helpful insights about the operation mechanism of the device, the interplay of the modes, and the gradual power transfer to the nanotaper apex.

  15. Non-Geiger mode single photon detector with multiple amplification and gain control mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nawar Rahman, Samia Hall, David; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2014-05-07

    A new type of single photon detector, Multiple Amplification Gain with Internal Control (MAGIC), is proposed and analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations based on a physical model of the device. The MAGIC detector has two coupled amplification mechanisms, avalanche multiplication and bipolar gain, and the net gain is regulated by a built-in feedback mechanism. Compared to conventional Geiger mode single photon avalanche detectors (SPADs), the MAGIC detector produces a much greater single photon detection efficiency of nearly 100%, low bit-error-ratio for single photon signals, and a large dynamic range. All these properties are highly desirable for applications that require single photon sensitivity and are absent for conventional Geiger-mode SPADs.

  16. An ultra-fast superconducting Nb nanowire single-photon detector for soft x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Inderbitzin, K.; Engel, A.; Schilling, A.; Il'in, K.; Siegel, M.

    2012-10-15

    Although superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are well studied regarding the detection of infrared/optical photons and keV-molecules, no studies on continuous x-ray photon counting by thick-film detectors have been reported so far. We fabricated a 100 nm thick niobium x-ray SNSPD (an X-SNSPD) and studied its detection capability of photons with keV-energies in continuous mode. The detector is capable to detect photons even at reduced bias currents of 0.4%, which is in sharp contrast to optical thin-film SNSPDs. No dark counts were recorded in extended measurement periods. Strikingly, the signal amplitude distribution depends significantly on the photon energy spectrum.

  17. Reconfigurable radio-frequency arbitrary waveforms synthesized in a silicon photonic chip

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Shen, Hao; Fan, Li; Wu, Rui; Niu, Ben; Varghese, Leo T.; Xuan, Yi; Leaird, Daniel E.; Wang, Xi; Gan, Fuwan; Weiner, Andrew M.; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    Photonic methods of radio-frequency waveform generation and processing can provide performance advantages and flexibility over electronic methods due to the ultrawide bandwidth offered by the optical carriers. However, bulk optics implementations suffer from the lack of integration and slow reconfiguration speed. Here we propose an architecture of integrated photonic radio-frequency generation and processing and implement it on a silicon chip fabricated in a semiconductor manufacturing foundry. Our device can generate programmable radio-frequency bursts or continuous waveforms with only the light source, electrical drives/controls and detectors being off-chip. It modulates an individual pulse in a radio-frequency burst within 4 ns, achieving a reconfiguration speed three orders of magnitude faster than thermal tuning. The on-chip optical delay elements offer an integrated approach to accurately manipulating individual radio-frequency waveform features without constraints set by the speed and timing jitter of electronics, and should find applications ranging from high-speed wireless to defence electronics. PMID:25581847

  18. Reconfigurable radio-frequency arbitrary waveforms synthesized in a silicon photonic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Shen, Hao; Fan, Li; Wu, Rui; Niu, Ben; Varghese, Leo T.; Xuan, Yi; Leaird, Daniel E.; Wang, Xi; Gan, Fuwan; Weiner, Andrew M.; Qi, Minghao

    2015-01-01

    Photonic methods of radio-frequency waveform generation and processing can provide performance advantages and flexibility over electronic methods due to the ultrawide bandwidth offered by the optical carriers. However, bulk optics implementations suffer from the lack of integration and slow reconfiguration speed. Here we propose an architecture of integrated photonic radio-frequency generation and processing and implement it on a silicon chip fabricated in a semiconductor manufacturing foundry. Our device can generate programmable radio-frequency bursts or continuous waveforms with only the light source, electrical drives/controls and detectors being off-chip. It modulates an individual pulse in a radio-frequency burst within 4 ns, achieving a reconfiguration speed three orders of magnitude faster than thermal tuning. The on-chip optical delay elements offer an integrated approach to accurately manipulating individual radio-frequency waveform features without constraints set by the speed and timing jitter of electronics, and should find applications ranging from high-speed wireless to defence electronics.

  19. A Silicon UCN Detector With Large Area and With Analysis of UCN Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lasakov, M.; Serebrov, A.; Khusainov, A.; Pustovoit, A.; Borisov, Yu.; Fomin, A.; Geltenbort, P.; Kon’kov, O.; Kotina, I.; Shablii, A.; Solovei, V.; Vasiliev, A.

    2005-01-01

    A silicon ultracold neutron (UCN) detector with an area of 45 cm2 and with a 6LiF converter is developed at St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI). The spectral efficiency of the silicon UCN detector was measured by means of a gravitational spectrometer at Institut Max von Laue – Paul Langevin (ILL). The sandwich-type detector from two silicon plates with a 6LiF converter placed between them was also studied. Using this type of technology the UCN detector with analysis of polarization was developed and tested. The analyzing power of this detector assembly reaches up 75 % for the main part of UCN spectrum. This UCN detector with analysis of UCN polarization can be used in the new electric dipole moment (EDM) spectrometer. PMID:27308138

  20. Experimental test of theories of the detection mechanism in a nanowire superconducting single photon detector.

    PubMed

    Renema, J J; Gaudio, R; Wang, Q; Zhou, Z; Gaggero, A; Mattioli, F; Leoni, R; Sahin, D; de Dood, M J A; Fiore, A; van Exter, M P

    2014-03-21

    We report an experimental test of the photodetection mechanism in a nanowire superconducting single photon detector. Detector tomography allows us to explore the 0.8-8 eV energy range via multiphoton excitations. High accuracy results enable a detailed comparison of the experimental data with theories for the mechanism of photon detection. We show that the temperature dependence of the efficiency of the superconducting single photon detector is determined not by the critical current but by the current associated with vortex unbinding. We find that both quasiparticle diffusion and vortices play a role in the detection event.

  1. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors integrated with waveguide circuits for quantum information science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggero, A.; Sahin, D.; Mattioli, F.; Leoni, R.; Frucci, G.; Jahanmirinejad, S.; Sprengers, J. P.; Beetz, J.; Lermer, M.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Fiore, A.

    2013-05-01

    We present our progress in the development of an integrated technology suitable for the photonic quantum information processing, showing the first autocorrelator based on two separated detectors integrated on top of the same ridge waveguide. An efficiency of ~1% at 1300 nm for both detectors and independent of the polarization of the incoming photons, is reported. This ultracompact device enables the on-chip measurement of the second-order correlation function g(2)(τ) . We will further discuss ongoing work on the integration of detectors with single-photon sources.

  2. Fabrication and Characterization of Superconducting NbN Nanowire Single Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Jeffrey A.; Farr, William H.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the fabrication of large area superconducting Niobium Nitride nanowire single photon detectors. The topics include: 1) Introduction and Motivation; 2) Operation of SNSPD Detectors; 3) NbTiN Deposition; 4) Fabrication Details; 5) Backside Coupled SNSPD; 6) Measurement Apparatus; 7) Electrical Response of a 15x15 micrometer SNSPD to 1064nm radiation; 8) Detector Efficiency vs Bias Current; 9) Interarrival Time Plot; 10) Detector Linearity; and 11) Conclusion.

  3. Rotational MEMS mirror with latching arm for silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brière, Jonathan; Beaulieu, Philippe-Olivier; Saidani, Menouer; Nabki, Frederic; Menard, Michaël.

    2015-02-01

    We present an innovative rotational MEMS mirror that can control the direction of propagation of light beams inside of planar waveguides implemented in silicon photonics. Potential applications include but are not limited to optical telecommunications, medical imaging, scan and spectrometry. The mirror has a half-cylinder shape with a radius of 300 μm that provides low and constant optical losses over the full angular displacement range. A circular comb drive structure is anchored such that it allows free or latched rotation experimentally demonstrated over 8.5° (X-Y planar rotational movement) using 290V electrostatic actuation. The entire MEMS structure was implemented using the MEMSCAP SOIMUMPs process. The center of the anchor beam is designed to be the approximate rotation point of the circular comb drive to counter the rotation offset of the mirror displacement. A mechanical characterization of the MEMS mirror is presented. The latching mechanism provides up to 20 different angular locking positions allowing the mirror to counter any resonance or vibration effects and it is actuated with an electrostatic linear comb drive. An innovative gap closing structure was designed to reduce optical propagation losses due to beam divergence in the interstitial space between the mirror and the planar waveguide. The gap closing structure is also electrostatically actuated and includes two side stoppers to prevent stiction.

  4. Tailoring the optical constants in single-crystal silicon with embedded silver nanostructures for advanced silicon photonics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, Perveen; Huang, Mengbing Spratt, William; Kadakia, Nirag; Amir, Faisal

    2015-03-28

    Plasmonic effects associated with metal nanostructures are expected to hold the key to tailoring light emission/propagation and harvesting solar energy in materials including single crystal silicon which remains the backbone in the microelectronics and photovoltaics industries but unfortunately, lacks many functionalities needed for construction of advanced photonic and optoelectronics devices. Currently, silicon plasmonic structures are practically possible only in the configuration with metal nanoparticles or thin film arrays on a silicon surface. This does not enable one to exploit the full potential of plasmonics for optical engineering in silicon, because the plasmonic effects are dominant over a length of ∼50 nm, and the active device region typically lies below the surface much beyond this range. Here, we report on a novel method for the formation of silver nanoparticles embedded within a silicon crystal through metal gettering from a silver thin film deposited at the surface to nanocavities within the Si created by hydrogen ion implantation. The refractive index of the Ag-nanostructured layer is found to be 3–10% lower or higher than that of silicon for wavelengths below or beyond ∼815–900 nm, respectively. Around this wavelength range, the optical extinction values increase by a factor of 10–100 as opposed to the pure silicon case. Increasing the amount of gettered silver leads to an increased extinction as well as a redshift in wavelength position for the resonance. This resonance is attributed to the surface plasmon excitation of the resultant silver nanoparticles in silicon. Additionally, we show that the profiles for optical constants in silicon can be tailored by varying the position and number of nanocavity layers. Such silicon crystals with embedded metal nanostructures would offer novel functional base structures for applications in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and plasmonics.

  5. Study of the signal response of the MÖNCH 25μm pitch hybrid pixel detector at different photon absorption depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartier, S.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Greiffenberg, D.; Johnson, I.; Jungmann-Smith, J. H.; Mezza, D.; Mozzanica, A.; Shi, X.; Tinti, G.; Schmitt, B.; Stampanoni, M.

    2015-03-01

    MÖNCH is a 25 μm pitch hybrid silicon pixel detector with a charge integrating analog read-out front-end in each pixel. The small pixel size brings new challenges in bump-bonding, power consumption and chip design. The MÖNCH02 prototype ASIC, manufactured in UMC 110 nm technology with a field of view of 4×4 mm2 and 160×160 pixels, has been characterized in the single photon regime, i.e. with less than one photon acquired per frame on average on a 3×3 pixel cluster. The low noise and small pixel size allow spatial interpolation with high resolution. Understanding charge sharing as a function of the photon absorption depth and sensor bias is a key for optimal processing of single photon data for high resolution imaging. To characterize the charge collection of the detector, the sensor was illuminated with a 20 keV photon beam in edge-on configuration at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra. By slicing the beam by means of a 5 μm slit and scanning through the 320 μm silicon sensor depth, the charge collection is characterized as a function of the photon absorption depth for different sensor bias voltages.

  6. HEPS-BPIX, a single photon counting pixel detector with a high frame rate for the HEPS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Ning, Zhe; Lu, Yunpeng; Fan, Lei; Li, Huaishen; Jiang, Xiaoshan; Lan, Allan K.; Ouyang, Qun; Wang, Zheng; Zhu, Kejun; Chen, Yuanbo; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    China's next generation light source, named the High Energy Photon Source (HEPS), is currently under construction. HEPS-BPIX (HEPS-Beijing PIXel) is a dedicated pixel readout chip that operates in single photon counting mode for X-ray applications in HEPS. Designed using CMOS 0.13 μm technology, the chip contains a matrix of 104×72 pixels. Each pixel measures 150 μm×150 μm and has a counting depth of 20 bits. A bump-bonded prototyping detector module with a 300-μm thick silicon sensor was tested in the beamline of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. A fast stream of X-ray images was demonstrated, and a frame rate of 1.2 kHz was proven, with a negligible dead time. The test results showed an equivalent noise charge of 115 e- rms after bump bonding and a threshold dispersion of 55 e- rms after calibration.

  7. Narrow bandgap semiconducting silicides: Intrinsic infrared detectors on a silicon chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahan, John E.

    1990-01-01

    Work done during the final report period is presented. The main technical objective was to achieve epitaxial growth on silicon of two semiconducting silicides, ReSi2 and CrSi2. ReSi2 thin films were grown on (001) silicon wafers by vacuum evaporation of rhenium onto hot substrates in ultrahigh vacuum. The preferred epitaxial relationship was found to be ReSi2(100)/Si(001) with ReSi2(010) parallel to Si(110). The lattice matching consists of a common unit mesh of 120 A(sup 2) area, and a mismatch of 1.8 percent. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the existence of rotation twins corresponding to two distinct but equivalent azimuthal orientations of the common unit mesh. MeV He(+) backscattering spectrometry revealed a minimum channeling yield of 2 percent for an approximately 1,500 A thick film grown at 650 C. Although the lateral dimension of the twins is on the order of 100 A, there is a very high degree of alignment between the ReSi2(100) and the Si(001) planes. Highly oriented films of CrSi2 were grown on (111) silicon substrates, with the matching crystallographic faces being CrSi2(001)/Si(111). The reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns of the films consist of sharp streaks, symmetrically arranged. The predominant azimuthal orientation of the films was determined to be CrSi2(210) parallel to Si(110). This highly desirable heteroepitaxial relationship has been obtained previously by others; it may be described with a common unit mesh of 51 A(sup 2) and mismatch of 0.3 percent. RHEED also revealed the presence of limited film regions of a competing azimuthal orientation, CrSi2(110) parallel to Si(110). A channeling effect for MeV He(+) ions was not found for this material. Potential commercial applications of this research may be found in silicon-integrated infrared detector arrays. Optical characterizations showed that semiconducting ReSi2 is a strong absorber of infrared radiation, with the adsorption constant increasing above 2 x

  8. Nano-optical observation of cascade switching in a parallel superconducting nanowire single photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Robert M. Tanner, Michael G.; Casaburi, Alessandro; Hadfield, Robert H.; Webster, Mark G.; San Emeterio Alvarez, Lara; Jiang, Weitao; Barber, Zoe H.; Warburton, Richard J.

    2014-02-10

    The device physics of parallel-wire superconducting nanowire single photon detectors is based on a cascade process. Using nano-optical techniques and a parallel wire device with spatially separate pixels, we explicitly demonstrate the single- and multi-photon triggering regimes. We develop a model for describing efficiency of a detector operating in the arm-trigger regime. We investigate the timing response of the detector when illuminating a single pixel and two pixels. We see a change in the active area of the detector between the two regimes and find the two-pixel trigger regime to have a faster timing response than the one-pixel regime.

  9. Cherenkov detectors for spatial imaging applications using discrete-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Paul B.; Erickson, Anna S.

    2016-08-01

    Cherenkov detectors can offer a significant advantage in spatial imaging applications when excellent timing response, low noise and cross talk, large area coverage, and the ability to operate in magnetic fields are required. We show that an array of Cherenkov detectors with crude energy resolution coupled with monochromatic photons resulting from a low-energy nuclear reaction can be used to produce a sharp image of material while providing large and inexpensive detector coverage. The analysis of the detector response to relative transmission of photons with various energies allows for reconstruction of material's effective atomic number further aiding in high-Z material identification.

  10. Stacked silicide/silicon mid- to long-wavelength infrared detector

    DOEpatents

    Maserjian, Joseph

    1990-03-13

    The use of stacked Schottky barriers (16) with epitaxially grown thin silicides (10) combined with selective doping (22) of the barriers provides high quantum efficiency infrared detectors (30) at longer wavelengths that is compatible with existing silicon VLSI technology.

  11. Fine Grained Silicon-Tungsten Calorimetry for a Linear Collider Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, D.; Frey, R.; Breidenbach, M.; Freytag, D.; Graf, N.; Haller, G.; Milgrome, O.; Radeka, V.; /Brookhaven

    2006-02-08

    A fine grained silicon-tungsten calorimeter is ideal for use as the electromagnetic calorimeter in a linear collider detector optimized for particle-flow reconstruction. We are designing a calorimeter that is based on readout chips which are bump bonded to the silicon wafers that serve as the active medium in the calorimeter. By using integrated electronics we plan to demonstrate that fine granularity can be achieved at a reasonable price. Our design minimizes the gap between tungsten layers leading to a small Moliere radius, an important figure of merit for particle-flow detectors. Tests of the silicon detectors to be used in a test beam prototype as well as timing measurements based on similar silicon detectors are discussed.

  12. Development of a large-area silicon α-particle detector.

    PubMed

    Tran, Linh T; Prokopovich, Dale A; Lerch, Michael L F; Petasecca, Marco; Siegele, Rainer; Reinhard, Mark I; Perevertaylo, Vladimir; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

    2014-09-01

    Circular ion-implanted silicon detector of α-particles with a large, 5-cm(2), sensitive area has been developed. An advantage of the detector is that the detector surface is easily cleanable with chemicals. The hardened surface of the detector shows no signs of deterioration of the spectroscopic and electrical characteristics upon repeated cleaning. The energy resolution along the diameters of the detector was (1.0±0.1)% for the 5.486-MeV α-particles. Detailed tests of the charge collection efficiency and uniformity of the detector entrance window were also performed with a 5.5-MeV He(2+) microbeam.

  13. Photon detectors with high quantum efficiency at NUV range using a confinement of wavelength-shifted signals and optical couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Hadaway, J.; Pakhomov, A.; Takizawa, Y.

    Near-UV wavelengths 300 - 400 nm have been in a death-valley for photon detectors due to very low quantum efficiencies QE in this range Conventional bi-alkali photocathodes of PMTs do not have QE better than 20-26 Much better photo-cathodes like GaAsP GaN and similar give better efficiencies but only at wavelengths 400nm and are severely plagued by very short lifetimes Avalanche Photo-diodes perform better at low temperatures but no better than 35 QE in the NUV region Silicon Photo-multipliers at Geiger mode SiPM with micro-pixels have high QEs 90 like CCD and CMOS as bare silicon but are severely plagued by very poor geometrical fill-factors 30 and their overallQMis limited to no better than 20 at NUV regime An optical interference-filter works as a half-mirror passing more than 90 of NUV lights 300-400 nm and reflect more than 90 of longer wavelength lights 400 nm UV photons after converted into blue-green lights by wavelength-shifter are reflected back and confined without much loss back into space A specific dichroic interference mirror with WLS was made by RIKEN Japan H Shimizu Y Takahashi Y Takizawa Patent pending 2000-399940 for this optical principle It also allows a better use of limited photo-sensitive micro-cells of SiPM overcoming the past serious problem of its very poor fill-factor As a result Half-mirror SiPM yields high final efficiency for NUV photons This new detector TRAPPER with optical couplers for SiPM or by GaAsP PMTs could be used for photon-hungry space experiments at NUV range TRAPPER

  14. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant

  15. A novel self-biased linear silicon drift detector

    SciTech Connect

    Corsi, F.; Gramegna, G.; Marzocca, C.; De Venuto, D.; Vacchi, A.; Bonvicini, V.; Rashevsky, A.; Zampa, N.; Burger, P.

    1999-02-01

    A novel linear silicon drift detector (SDD) is proposed in which the proper potential profile is established by the voltage drop along a unique p{sup +} cathode implanted across the surfaces. This p{sup +} implant, arranged in a zigzag shape, acts at the same time as voltage divider and field cathode and allows one to increase the sensitive area, improving also the uniformity of the thermal distribution and thus minimizing the fluctuation of the electron mobility on the sensitive zone of the SDD. The perturbations of the drift field due to the asymmetry of the strips constituting the zigzag cathode have been evaluated by solving analytically Poisson`s equation for a simplified model of the structure. Three-dimensional numerical simulations have been carried out to prove the negligible amount of the perturbation and the effectiveness of the proposed structure. Based on this principle, a prototype has been manufactured at Canberra Semiconductor Company. Dynamic measurements of the time-of-flight of an injected charge prove that the linearity of the prototype and the drift uniformity in the anode direction are very high.

  16. High-Q silicon-on-insulator slot photonic crystal cavity infiltrated by a liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Caër, Charles; Le Roux, Xavier; Cassan, Eric

    2013-12-16

    We report the experimental realization of a high-Q slot photonic crystal cavity in Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) configuration infiltrated by a liquid. Loaded Q-factor of 23 000 is measured at telecom wavelength. The intrinsic quality factor inferred from the transmission spectrum is higher than 200 000, which represents a record value for slot photonic crystal cavities on SOI, whereas the maximum of intensity of the cavity is roughly equal to 20% of the light transmitted in the waveguide. This result makes filled slot photonic crystal cavities very promising for silicon-based light emission and ultrafast nonlinear optics.

  17. Photon detector configured to employ the Gunn effect and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Cich, Michael J

    2015-03-17

    Embodiments disclosed herein relate to photon detectors configured to employ the Gunn effect for detecting high-energy photons (e.g., x-rays and gamma rays) and methods of use. In an embodiment, a photon detector for detecting high-energy photons is disclosed. The photon detector includes a p-i-n semiconductor diode having a p-type semiconductor region, an n-type semiconductor region, and a compensated i-region disposed between the p-type semiconductor region and the n-type semiconductor region. The compensated i-region and has a width of about 100 .mu.m to about 400 .mu.m and is configured to exhibit the Gunn effect when the p-i-n semiconductor diode is forward biased a sufficient amount. The compensated i-region is doped to include a free carrier concentration of less than about 10.sup.10 cm.sup.-3.

  18. Effects of irradiation of energetic heavy ions on digital pulse shape analysis with silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlini, S.; Carboni, S.; Bardelli, L.; Le Neindre, N.; Bini, M.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Casini, G.; Edelbruck, P.; Olmi, A.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Rivet, M. F.; Stefanini, A. A.; Baiocco, G.; Berjillos, R.; Bonnet, E.; Bruno, M.; Chbihi, A.; Cruceru, I.; Degerlier, M.; Dueñas, J. A.; Galichet, E.; Gramegna, F.; Kordyasz, A.; Kozik, T.; Kravchuk, V. L.; Lopez, O.; Marchi, T.; Martel, I.; Morelli, L.; Parlog, M.; Piantelli, S.; Petrascu, H.; Rosato, E.; Seredov, V.; Vient, E.; Vigilante, M.; Fazia Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The next generation of 4π detector arrays for heavy ion studies will largely use Pulse Shape Analysis to push the performance of silicon detectors with respect to ion identification. Energy resolution and pulse shape identification capabilities of silicon detectors under prolonged irradiation by energetic heavy ions have thus become a major issue. In this framework, we have studied the effects of irradiation by energetic heavy ions on the response of neutron transmutation doped (nTD) silicon detectors. Sizeable effects on the amplitude and the risetime of the charge signal have been found for detectors irradiated with large fluences of stopped heavy ions, while much weaker effects were observed by punching-through ions. The robustness of ion identification based on digital pulse shape techniques has been evaluated.

  19. Enhanced wavelength conversion and photon pair generation using slow light effects and electronic carrier sweepout in silicon photonics devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savanier, Marc; Kumar, Ranjeet; Mookherjea, Shayan

    2015-03-01

    Silicon photonics has drawn a lot of attention over the last decades, mainly in telecom-related application fields where the nonlinear optical properties of silicon are ignored or minimized. However, silicon's high χ(3) Kerr optical nonlinearity in sub-micron-scale high-confinement waveguides can enable significant improvements in traditional nonlinear devices, such as for wavelength conversion, and also enable some device applications in quantum optics or for quantum key distribution. In order to establish the viability of silicon photonics in practical applications, some big challenges are to improve the optical performance (e.g., optimize nonlinearity or minimize loss) and integration of optics with microelectronics. In this context, we discuss how electronic PIN diodes improve the performance of wavelength conversion in a microring resonator based four-wave mixing device, which achieves a continuous-wave four-wave mixing conversion efficiency of -21.3 dB at 100 mW pump power, with enough bandwidth for the wavelength conversion of a 10 Gbps signal. In the regime of quantum optics, we describe a coupled microring device that can serve as a tunable source of entangled photon pairs at telecommunications wavelengths, operating at room temperature with a low pump power requirement. By controlling either the optical pump wavelength, or the chip temperature, we show that the output bi-photon spectrum can be varied, with implications on the degree of frequency correlation of the generated quantum state.

  20. Resolution limitation in superconducting transition edge photon detectors due to downconversion phonon noise

    SciTech Connect

    Kozorezov, A. G.; Wigmore, J. K.; Martin, D.; Verhoeve, P.; Peacock, A.

    2006-11-27

    The authors have identified an important source of line broadening in transition edge sensors used as optical photon detectors. It arises through the loss of high energy phonons into the substrate during the initial photon energy downconversion stage. Because of the relatively small number of phonons involved, the loss rate is subjected to large fluctuations due to the statistical nature of the energy exchange processes. They show that the resulting noise may represent a significant limitation to the resolving power of current detectors.

  1. Investigation of epitaxial silicon layers as a material for radiation hardened silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Eremin, V.; Ilyashenko, I.; Ivanov, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; CERN RD-48 ROSE Collaboration

    1997-12-01

    Epitaxial grown thick layers ({ge} 100 micrometers) of high resistivity silicon (Epi-Si) have been investigated as a possible candidate of radiation hardened material for detectors for high-energy physics. As grown Epi-Si layers contain high concentration (up to 2 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3}) of deep levels compared with that in standard high resistivity bulk Si. After irradiation of test diodes by protons (E{sub p} = 24 GeV) with a fluence of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2}, no additional radiation induced deep traps have been detected. A reasonable explanation is that there is a sink of primary radiation induced defects (interstitial and vacancies), possibly by as-grown defects, in epitaxial layers. The ``sinking`` process, however, becomes non-effective at high radiation fluences (10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2}) due to saturation of epitaxial defects by high concentration of radiation induced ones. As a result, at neutron fluence of 1 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} the deep level spectrum corresponds to well-known spectrum of radiation induced defects in high resistivity bulk Si. The net effective concentration in the space charge region equals to 3 {times} 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}3} after 3 months of room temperature storage and reveals similar annealing behavior for epitaxial as compared to bulk silicon.

  2. Combination of current-integrating/photon-counting detector modules for spectral CT.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jiyang; Cong, Wenxiang; Li, Liang; Wang, Ge

    2013-10-01

    Inspired by compressive sensing theory and spectral detection technology, here we propose a novel design of a CT detector array that uses current-integrating/photon-counting modules in an interlacing fashion so that strengths of each detector type can be synergistically combined. For geometrical symmetry, an evenly alternating pattern is initially assumed for these detector modules to form a hybrid detector array. While grayscale detector modules acquire regular raw data in a large dynamic range cost-effectively, spectral detector modules simultaneously sense energy-discriminative data in multiple energy bins. A split Bregman iterative algorithm is developed for spectral CT reconstruction from projection data of an object collected with the hybrid detector array. With mathematical phantoms, an optimal ratio of the number of the spectral elements over the number of grayscale elements is determined based on classic image quality evaluation. This hybrid detector array is capable of delivering a performance comparable with that of a full spectral detector array.

  3. Bias-free true random number generation using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuhao; Zhang, Weijun; Zhou, Hui; You, Lixing; Lv, Chaolin; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Junjie; Chen, Sijing; Ren, Min; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a bias-free true random number generator (TRNG) based on single photon detection using superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs). By comparing the photon detection signals of two consecutive laser pulses and extracting the random bits by the von Neumann correction method, we achieved a random number generation efficiency of 25% (a generation rate of 3.75 Mbit s-1 at a system clock rate of 15 MHz). Using a multi-channel superconducting nanowire single photon detector system with controllable pulse signal amplitudes, we detected the single photons with photon number resolution and positional sensitivity, which could further increase the random number generation efficiency. In a three-channel SNSPD system, the random number bit generation efficiency was improved to 75%, corresponding to a generation rate of 7.5 Mbit s-1 with a 10 MHz system clock rate. All of the generated random numbers successfully passed the statistical test suite.

  4. Bias-free true random number generation using superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuhao; Zhang, Weijun; Zhou, Hui; You, Lixing; Lv, Chaolin; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Junjie; Chen, Sijing; Ren, Min; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a bias-free true random number generator (TRNG) based on single photon detection using superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SNSPDs). By comparing the photon detection signals of two consecutive laser pulses and extracting the random bits by the von Neumann correction method, we achieved a random number generation efficiency of 25% (a generation rate of 3.75 Mbit s‑1 at a system clock rate of 15 MHz). Using a multi-channel superconducting nanowire single photon detector system with controllable pulse signal amplitudes, we detected the single photons with photon number resolution and positional sensitivity, which could further increase the random number generation efficiency. In a three-channel SNSPD system, the random number bit generation efficiency was improved to 75%, corresponding to a generation rate of 7.5 Mbit s‑1 with a 10 MHz system clock rate. All of the generated random numbers successfully passed the statistical test suite.

  5. 3D simulations and modeling of new low capacitance silicon pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Li, Yu Yun; Li, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    With signal to noise ratio (S/N) being a key parameter of a high performance detector, reducing the detector noise has been one of the main tasks in detector development. A new low capacitance silicon pixel detector is proposed, which is based on a new electrode geometry with reduced effective electrode area while keeping the sensitive volume unchanged. Detector electrical characteristics including electrostatic potential, electric field, full depletion voltage, and capacitance have been simulated in detail using a 3D TCAD tool. From these simulations and calculations, we confirm that the new detector structure has a much reduced capacitance (by a factor of 3) as compared to the traditional pixel detectors with the same sensitive volume. This reduction in detector capacitance can certainly improve the detector signal to noise ratio. However, the full depletion voltage for the new structure is larger than that of the traditional one due to the small electrode effect.

  6. Power detectors for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qun Jane; Li, James C.; Tang, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes and compares three different types of detectors, including CMOS power detectors, bipolar power detectors, and super-regenerative detectors, deployed in the literature for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging systems in mainstream silicon technologies. Each detector has unique working mechanism and demonstrates different behavior with respects to bias conditions, input signal power, as well as bandwidth responses. Two Figure-of-Merits for both wideband and narrowband imaging have been defined to quantify the detector performance comparison. CMOS and Bipolar detectors are good for passive imaging, while super regenerative detectors are superior for active imaging. The analytical results have been verified by both simulation and measurement results. These analyses intend to provide design insights and guidance for integrated microwave/mm-wave imaging power detectors.

  7. Development of a high-frequency electronic integrator for photon-number resolving detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Kristina; Wayne, Michael; Kwiat, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Efficient photon-number-resolving single-photon detectors are a critical resource for optical quantum information processing, e.g., for realizing deterministic single-photon production. Previously, we have developed Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs) that can detect single photons with high quantum efficiency. The detector configuration allows photons to initiate multiple electron avalanches simultaneously, creating a signal with a charge proportional to the number of photons detected. One current obstacle is the extraction of the total charge of each pulse at frequencies ranging from 200 MHz to 20 GHz. The charge of each pulse is proportional to the area under the input signal and so we are currently developing an electronic integrator that, with appropriate signal amplification, will produce an output signal of pulses with heights equal to the integral of the VLPC pulse, thereby fully realizing the photon-number resolving capabilities of these detectors. Finally, we are also studying the use of optical annealing to reduce the detector's dark counts.

  8. High-efficiency quantum-nondemolition single-photon-number-resolving detector

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, W.J.; Nemoto, Kae; Beausoleil, R.G.; Spiller, T.P.

    2005-03-01

    We discuss an approach to the problem of creating a photon-number-resolving detector using the giant Kerr nonlinearities available in electromagnetically induced transparency. Our scheme can implement a photon-number quantum-nondemolition measurement with high efficiency ({approx}99%) using fewer than 1600 atoms embedded in a dielectric waveguide.

  9. Technology of silicon charged-particle detectors developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegrzecka, Iwona; Panas, Andrzej; Bar, Jan; Budzyński, Tadeusz; Grabiec, Piotr; Kozłowski, Roman; Sarnecki, Jerzy; Słysz, Wojciech; Szmigiel, Dariusz; Wegrzecki, Maciej; Zaborowski, Michał

    2013-07-01

    The paper discusses the technology of silicon charged-particle detectors developed at the Institute of Electron Technology (ITE). The developed technology enables the fabrication of both planar and epiplanar p+-ν-n+ detector structures with an active area of up to 50 cm2. The starting material for epiplanar structures are silicon wafers with a high-resistivity n-type epitaxial layer ( ν layer - ρ < 3 kΩcm) deposited on a highly doped n+-type substrate (ρ< 0,02Ωcm) developed and fabricated at the Institute of Electronic Materials Technology. Active layer thickness of the epiplanar detectors (νlayer) may range from 10 μm to 150 μm. Imported silicon with min. 5 kΩcm resistivity is used to fabricate planar detectors. Active layer thickness of the planar detectors (ν) layer) may range from 200 μm to 1 mm. This technology enables the fabrication of both discrete and multi-junction detectors (monolithic detector arrays), such as single-sided strip detectors (epiplanar and planar) and double-sided strip detectors (planar). Examples of process diagrams for fabrication of the epiplanar and planar detectors are presented in the paper, and selected technological processes are discussed.

  10. Beam test results for the BTeV silicon pixel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel, G. Chiodini et al.

    2000-09-28

    The authors report the results of the BTeV silicon pixel detector tests carried out in the MTest beam at Fermilab in 1999--2000. The pixel detector spatial resolution has been studied as a function of track inclination, sensor bias, and readout threshold.

  11. Reactions induced by {sup 7}Li beam and optimization of silicon detector telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Uroic, M.; Milin, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Martel, I.; Miljanic, D.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Prepolec, L.; Sanchez Benitez, A. M.; Scuderi, V.; Soic, N.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.

    2012-10-20

    Focus of this article is put on a method of compensating for non-uniformity of 50{mu}m thin silicon detectors, rather than measurement results. The same high sensitivity of particle identification on thin-detector thickness enables to accurately model thickness variation using the measurement data, rather than measuring the thickness separately.

  12. SPY: A monitoring system for the silicon vertex detector of CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeschi, F.; Galeotti, S.; Gherarducci, F.; Mariotti, M.; Morsani, F.; Passuello, D.; Tartarelli, F.; Grieco, G.M.; Nelson, C.; Tkaczyk, S.; Harber, C.; Ristori, L.; Bailey, M.; Sciacca, G.F.; Turini, N.; Cei, M.

    1993-12-01

    The authors describe the basic principles and the fundamentals of the design of the system of monitoring the CDF silicon vertex detector. Also described are some results and possible future developments of this promising way of checking complex detectors with high amount of channels.

  13. High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of High Quantum Efficiency Back-Illuminated Photon Counting, Far UV, UV, and Visible Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh; Hoenk, M. E.; Carver, A. G.; Jones, T. J.; Greer, F.; Hamden, E.; Goodsall, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the high throughput end-to-end post fabrication processing of high performance delta-doped and superlattice-doped silicon imagers for UV, visible, and NIR applications. As an example, we present our results on far ultraviolet and ultraviolet quantum efficiency (QE) in a photon counting, detector array. We have improved the QE by nearly an order of magnitude over microchannel plates (MCPs) that are the state-of-the-art UV detectors for many NASA space missions as well as defense applications. These achievements are made possible by precision interface band engineering of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  14. Nonlinear optical effects of ultrahigh-Q silicon photonic nanocavities immersed in superfluid helium

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiankai; Zhang, Xufeng; Schuck, Carsten; Tang, Hong X.

    2013-01-01

    Photonic nanocavities are a key component in many applications because of their capability of trapping and storing photons and enhancing interactions of light with various functional materials and structures. The maximal number of photons that can be stored in silicon photonic cavities is limited by the free-carrier and thermo-optic effects at room temperature. To reduce such effects, we performed the first experimental study of optical nonlinearities in ultrahigh-Q silicon disk nanocavities at cryogenic temperatures in a superfluid helium environment. At elevated input power, the cavity transmission spectra exhibit distinct blue-shifted bistability behavior when temperature crosses the liquid helium lambda point. At even lower temperatures, the spectra restore to symmetric Lorentzian shapes. Under this condition, we obtain a large intracavity photon number of about 40,000, which is limited ultimately by the local helium phase transition. These new discoveries are explained by theoretical calculations and numerical simulations. PMID:23486445

  15. Discrete Frequency Entangled Photon Pair Generation Based on Silicon Micro-ring Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Jing; Zhang, Wei; Dong, Shuai; Huang, Yidong; Peng, Jiangde

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a scheme to generate discrete frequency entangled photon pairs based on a silicon micro-ring resonator. The resonator is placed in a Sagnac fiber loop. Stimulated by two pump lights at two different resonance wavelengths of the resonator, photon pairs at another two resonance wavelengths are generated along two opposite directions in the fiber loop, by the nondegenerate spontaneous four wave mixing in the resonator. Their states are superposed and interfered at the output ports of the fiber loop to generate frequency entangled photon pairs. On the other hand, since the pump lights come from two continuous wave lasers, energy-time entanglement is an intrinsic property of the generated photon pairs. The entanglements on frequency and energy-time are demonstrated experimentally by the experiments of spatial quantum beating and Franson-type interference, respectively, showing that the silicon micro-ring resonators are ideal candidates to realize complex photonic quantum state generation.

  16. Photon Counting Detectors for the 1.0 - 2.0 Micron Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe results on the development of greater than 200 micron diameter, single-element photon-counting detectors for the 1-2 micron wavelength range. The technical goals include quantum efficiency in the range 10-70%; detector diameter greater than 200 microns; dark count rate below 100 kilo counts-per-second (cps), and maximum count rate above 10 Mcps.

  17. Position-Dependent Local Detection Efficiency in a Nanowire Superconducting Single-Photon Detector.

    PubMed

    Renema, J J; Wang, Q; Gaudio, R; Komen, I; op 't Hoog, K; Sahin, D; Schilling, A; van Exter, M P; Fiore, A; Engel, A; de Dood, M J A

    2015-07-01

    We probe the local detection efficiency in a nanowire superconducting single-photon detector along the cross-section of the wire with a far subwavelength resolution. We experimentally find a strong variation in the local detection efficiency of the device. We demonstrate that this effect explains previously observed variations in NbN detector efficiency as a function of device geometry. PMID:26087352

  18. Demonstration of two-dimensional photonic crystals based on silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Song, Bong-Shik; Yamada, Shota; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate two-dimensional photonic crystals of silicon carbide (SiC)-a wide bandgap semiconductor and one of the hardest materials-at near-infrared wavelengths. Although the refractive index of SiC is lower than that of a conventional semiconductor such as GaAs or Si, we show theoretically that a wide photonic bandgap, a broadband waveguide, and a high-quality nanocavity comparable to those of previous photonic crystals can be obtained in SiC photonic crystals. We also develop a process for fabricating SiC-based photonic crystals that experimentally show a photonic bandgap of 200 nm, a waveguide with a 40-nm bandwidth, and a nanocavity with a high quality factor of 4,500. This demonstration should stimulate further development of resilient and stable photonics at high power and high temperature analogous to SiC power electronics.

  19. Long term instability in the defect assembly in irradiated high resistivity silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, V.; Ivanov, A.; Verbitskaya, E.; Li, Z.; Schmidt, B.

    1996-05-01

    Different kinetic behavior has been revealed for the two types of irradiated high resistivity silicon detectors in the reactions of the interstitial carbon (C{sub i}) annealing and the formation of the C{sub i}-O{sub i} complex. In the detectors with an increased oxygen contents prolonged growth of the C{sub i}-O{sub i} complex concentration obeyed the second order reaction due to an additional source of C{sub i} atoms which were not detected by DLTS measurements. Transformation of carbon related defects has been analyzed concerning the long term instability of irradiated silicon detectors. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Self-biased silicon detectors with a built-in field for measuring heavy charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Kim, C.; Ohkawa, S.; Husimi, K.; Shiraishi, F.; Osada, S.; Abe, T.; Sakai, T.

    1986-02-01

    Self-biased silicon detectors with a good carrier collection and a high speed response have been produced by using a wafer with high resistive epitaxial layer grown on a low resistive silicon substrate and also a wafer with the graded impurity distribution formed diffusion technique. The build-in field induced by a large difference of impurity concentration is expected to be effective for sweeping away the high density charge plasma to electrodes before recombination. Energy spectra of fission fragments from /sup 252/C/sub F/ are measured by using the detectors. The results show that the detector will be promising for measurement of heavy charged particles.

  1. Performance of a Commercial Silicon Drift Detector for X-ray Microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, Edward A

    2008-01-01

    Silicon drift detectors (SDDs) are rapidly becoming the energy dispersive spectrometer of choice especially for scanning electron microscopy applications. The complementary features of large active areas (i.e., collection angle) and high count rate capability of these detector contribute to their popularity, as well as the absence of liquid nitrogen cooling of the detector. The performance of an EDAX Apollo 40 SDD on a JEOL 6500F SEM will be discussed.

  2. A simple method for afterpulse probability measurement in high-speed single-photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junliang; Li, Yongfu; Ding, Lei; Zhang, Chunfang; Fang, Jiaxiong

    2016-07-01

    A simple statistical method is proposed for afterpulse probability measurement in high-speed single-photon detectors. The method is based on in-laser-period counting without the support of time-correlated information or delay adjustment, and is readily implemented with commercially available logic devices. We present comparisons among the proposed method and commonly used methods which use the time-correlated single-photon counter or the gated counter, based on a 1.25-GHz gated infrared single-photon detector. Results show that this in-laser-period counting method has similar accuracy to the commonly used methods with extra simplicity, robustness, and faster measuring speed.

  3. Electronic-state-controlled reset operation in quantum dot resonant-tunneling single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Q. C.; Zhu, Z. Q.; An, Z. H.; Song, J. D.; Choi, W. J.

    2014-02-03

    The authors present a systematic study of an introduced reset operation on quantum dot (QD) single photon detectors operating at 77 K. The detectors are based on an AlAs/GaAs/AlAs double-barrier resonant tunneling diode with an adjacent layer of self-assembled InAs QDs. Sensitive single-photon detection in high (dI)/(dV) region with suppressed current fluctuations is achieved. The dynamic detection range is extended up to at least 10{sup 4} photons/s for sensitive imaging applications by keeping the device far from saturation by employing an appropriate reset frequency.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy with a time- and space-resolved single-photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalet, X.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Jelinsky, P.; Pinaud, F. F.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.

    2006-10-01

    We have recently developed a wide-field photon-counting detector (the H33D detector) having high-temporal and highspatial resolutions and capable of recording up to 500,000 photons per sec. Its temporal performance has been previously characterized using solutions of fluorescent materials with different lifetimes, and its spatial resolution using sub-diffraction objects (beads and quantum dots). Here we show its application to fluorescence lifetime imaging of live cells and compare its performance to a scanning confocal TCSPC approach. With the expected improvements in photocathode sensitivity and increase in detector throughput, this technology appears as a promising alternative to the current lifetime imaging solutions.

  5. Design and testing of an innovative slim-edge termination for silicon radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povoli, M.; Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Giacomini, G.; Mattedi, F.; Mendicino, R.; Zorzi, N.

    2013-11-01

    Silicon detectors with reduced or no dead volume along the edges have been attracting a lot of interest in the past few years in many different fields. High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are demanding this feature to ease the assembly of the innermost tracking layers, where space and material budget are usually a concern. At the same time, other applications like X-Ray imaging, are starting to use matrixes of silicon detectors to cover increasingly larger areas and, in order to do so in a seamless way, minimum edge extension is required. In this paper we report on the design and testing of a new edge termination for silicon 3D detectors able to reduce the edge extension to about 50 μm without increasing the fabrication complexity. In addition, the same edge termination can also be applied to planar detectors with little additional process complexity.

  6. Bulk damage effects in irradiated silicon detectors due to clustered divacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, K.; Hall, G.; MacEvoy, B.

    1997-07-01

    High resistivity silicon particle detectors will be used extensively in experiments at the future CERN Large Hadron Collider. The detectors will be exposed to particle fluences equivalent to ˜1014 (1 MeV neutrons)/cm2, causing significant atomic displacement damage. A model has been developed to estimate the evolution of defect concentrations and the electrical behavior of irradiated silicon detectors using Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) semiconductor statistics. The observed increases in leakage current and doping concentration changes can be described well after 60Co-gamma irradiation but less well after fast neutron irradiation. A possible non-SRH mechanism is considered, based on the hypothesis of charge transfer between clustered divacancy defects in neutron damaged silicon detectors. This leads to a large enhancement over the SRH prediction for V2 acceptor state occupancy and carrier generation rate which may resolve the discrepancy between the model and neutron damage data.

  7. Liquid-nitrogen cooled, free-running single-photon sensitive detector at telecommunication wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covi, M.; Pressl, B.; Günthner, T.; Laiho, K.; Krapick, S.; Silberhorn, C.; Weihs, G.

    2015-03-01

    The measurement of light characteristics at the single- and few photon level plays a key role in many quantum optics applications. Often photodetection is preceded with the transmission of quantum light over long distances in optical fibers with their low loss window near 1550 nm. Nonetheless, the detection of the photonic states at telecommunication wavelengths via avalanche photodetectors has long been facing severe restrictions. Only recently, demonstrations of the first free-running detector techniques in the telecommunication band have lifted the demand of synchronizing the signal with the detector. Moreover, moderate cooling is required to gain single-photon sensitivity with these detectors. Here, we implement a liquid-nitrogen cooled negative-feedback avalanche diode (NFAD) at telecommunication wavelengths and investigate the properties of this highly flexible, free-running single-photon sensitive detector. Our realization of cooling provides a large range of stable operating temperatures and has advantages over the relatively bulky commercial refrigerators that have been used before. We determine the region of NFAD working parameters most suitable for single-photon sensitive detection enabling a direct plug-in of our detector to a true photon-counting task.

  8. The effect of magnetic field on the intrinsic detection efficiency of superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Renema, J. J.; Rengelink, R. J.; Komen, I.; Wang, Q.; Kes, P.; Aarts, J.; Exter, M. P. van; Dood, M. J. A. de; Gaudio, R.; Hoog, K. P. M. op 't; Zhou, Z.; Fiore, A.; Sahin, D.; Driessen, E. F. C.

    2015-03-02

    We experimentally investigate the effect of a magnetic field on photon detection in superconducting single-photon detectors (SSPDs). At low fields, the effect of a magnetic field is through the direct modification of the quasiparticle density of states of the superconductor, and magnetic field and bias current are interchangeable, as is expected for homogeneous dirty-limit superconductors. At the field where a first vortex enters the detector, the effect of the magnetic field is reduced, up until the point where the critical current of the detector starts to be determined by flux flow. From this field on, increasing the magnetic field does not alter the detection of photons anymore, whereas it does still change the rate of dark counts. This result points at an intrinsic difference in dark and photon counts, and also shows that no enhancement of the intrinsic detection efficiency of a straight SSPD wire is achievable in a magnetic field.

  9. High-photon-yield scintillation detector with Ar/CF4 and glass gas electron multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Takeshi; Mitsuya, Yuki; Yanagida, Takayuki; Saito, Takumi; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The glass made gas electron multiplier (GEM) and Ar/CF4-gas-based gaseous detector is developed as a scintillation detector and ultra high photon yield is demonstrated. The light yield of a glass GEM (G-GEM)-based gaseous detector is estimated to be 85,000 photons/keV, which is three orders of magnitude brighter than inorganic scintillators. The radioluminescence spectrum peak appeared at around 620 nm, which matches the spectral response of commonly used photosensors such as photomultiplier tubes, photodiodes, CMOSs, CCDs, and other photo-sensors. In X-ray spectroscopy, the light yield showed excellent proportionality and the device was successfully operated as a gas proportional scintillation counter. With this design, we obtained a high photon yield of the G-GEM, which has the further advantage of being much more sensitive to low-energy radiation than solid-scintillator-based detectors.

  10. SiPMs characterization and selection for the DUNE far detector photon detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Maricic, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) together with the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) hosted at the Fermilab will provide a unique, world-leading program for the exploration of key questions at the forefront of neutrino physics and astrophysics. CP violation in neutrino flavor mixing is one of its most important potential discoveries. Additionally, the experiment will determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and precisely measure the neutrino mixing parameters which may potentially reveal new fundamental symmetries of nature. Moreover, the DUNE is also designed for the observation of nucleon decay and supernova burst neutrinos. The photon detection (PD) system in the DUNE far detector provides trigger for cosmic backgrounds, enhances supernova burst trigger efficiency and improves the energy resolution of the detector. The DUNE adopts the technology of liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) that requires the PD sensors, silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), to be carefully chosen to not only work properly in LAr temperature, but also meet certain specifications for the life of the experiment. A comprehensive testing of SiPMs in cryostat is necessary since the datasheet provided by the manufactures in the market does not cover this temperature regime. This paper gives the detailed characterization results of SenSL C-Series 60035 SiPMs, including gain, dark count rate (DCR), cross-talk and after-pulse rate. Characteristic studies on SiPMs from other vendors are also discussed in order to avoid any potential problems associated with using a single source. Moreover, the results of the ongoing mechanical durability tests are shown for the current candidate, SenSL B/C-Series 60035 SiPMs.

  11. Robust hybrid quantum dot laser for integrated silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Kurczveil, Géza; Liang, Di; Fiorentino, Marco; Beausoleil, Raymond G

    2016-07-11

    We demonstrate the first quantum dot (QD) laser on a silicon substrate with efficient coupling of light to a silicon waveguide under the QD gain region. Continuous wave operation up to 100 °C and multiwavelength operation are demonstrated, paving the way towards highly efficient CMOS-compatible, uncooled, WDM sources. PMID:27410883

  12. Silicon Photomultipliers, A New Device For Low Light Level Photon Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Hans-Guenther

    2006-10-27

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) are novel detectors for low level light detection based on arrays of avalanche photodiodes operating in Geiger mode. Offering good characteristics (fast response, high gain, photon counting capability, insensitivity to magnetic fields, low voltage operation) they have the potential to replace classical photomultipliers (PMT) in many applications. Drawbacks are dark rate and optical cross talk. Though their quantum efficiency is already comparable or better than that of bialkali PMT it is still limited by the structures on the light sensitive front surface. A new concept, presently developed at the Max-Planck semiconductor laboratory, allows boosting the efficiency to almost 100%. Using a fully depleted substrate the light enters through the unstructured backside. A drift diode structure collects the electrons on a small 'point like' avalanche structure for multiplication. Engineering the thin entrance window at the backside using antireflective layers a high efficiency can be achieved in a wide wavelength range (300-1000nm). The paper will summarize the status of front illuminated SiPMs and report on the development of the backside illuminated devices.

  13. Spectroscopic micro-tomography of metallic-organic composites by means of photon-counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichotka, M.; Jakubek, J.; Vavrik, D.

    2015-12-01

    The presumed capabilities of photon counting detectors have aroused major expectations in several fields of research. In the field of nuclear imaging ample benefits over standard detectors are to be expected from photon counting devices. First of all a very high contrast, as has by now been verified in numerous experiments. The spectroscopic capabilities of photon counting detectors further allow material decomposition in computed tomography and therefore inherently adequate beam hardening correction. For these reasons measurement setups featuring standard X-ray tubes combined with photon counting detectors constitute a possible replacement of the much more cost intensive tomographic setups at synchrotron light-sources. The actual application of photon counting detectors in radiographic setups in recent years has been impeded by a number of practical issues, above all by restrictions in the detectors size. Currently two tomographic setups in Czech Republic feature photon counting large-area detectors (LAD) fabricated in Prague. The employed large area hybrid pixel-detector assemblies [1] consisting of 10×10/10×5 Timepix devices have a surface area of 143×143 mm2 / 143×71,5 mm2 respectively, suitable for micro-tomographic applications. In the near future LAD devices featuring the Medipix3 readout chip as well as heavy sensors (CdTe, GaAs) will become available. Data analysis is obtained by a number of in house software tools including iterative multi-energy volume reconstruction.In this paper tomographic analysis of of metallic-organic composites is employed to illustrate the capabilities of our technology. Other than successful material decomposition by spectroscopic tomography we present a method to suppress metal artefacts under certain conditions.

  14. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  15. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, B P; Molloi, S

    2014-12-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for x-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm(2) in detection area. The angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded x-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of x-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic x-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the x-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory.

  16. Boron imaging with a microstrip silicon detector for applications in BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattera, A.; Basilico, F.; Bolognini, D.; Borasio, P.; Cappelletti, P.; Chiari, P.; Conti, V.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Giannini, G.; Hasan, S.; Mascagna, V.; Mauri, P.; Monti, A. F.; Mozzanica, A.; Ostinelli, A.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S.; Vallazza, E.; Zanini, A.

    2009-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapic technique exploiting the α particles produced after the irradiation of the isotope 10 of boron with thermal neutrons in the capture reaction B(n,α)710Li. It is used to treat tumours that for their features (radioresistance, extension, localization near vital organs) cannot be treated through conventional photon-beams radiotherapy. One of the main limitations of this technique is the lack of specificity (i.e. the ability of localizing in tumour cells, saving the healthy tissues) of the compounds used to carry the 10B isotope in the organs to be treated. This work, developed in the framework of the INFN PhoNeS project, describes the possibility of boron imaging performed exploiting the neutrons photoproduced by a linac (the Clinac 2100C/D of the S. Anna Hospital Radiotherapy Unit in Como, Italy) and detecting the α s with a non-depleted microstrip silicon detector: the result is a 1D scan of the boron concentration. Several boron doped samples have been analysed, from solutions of H3BO3 (reaching a minimum detectable amount of 25 ng of 10B) to biological samples of urine containing BPA and BSH (the two molecules currently used for the clinical trials in BNCT) in order to build kinetic curves (showing the absolute 10B concentration as a function of time). Further measurements are under way to test the imaging system with 10BPA-Fructose complex perfused human lung samples.

  17. Spectral X-Ray Diffraction using a 6 Megapixel Photon Counting Array Detector

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Ryan D.; Pogranichniy, Nicholas R.; Muir, J. Lewis; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Toth, Scott J.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2016-01-01

    Pixel-array array detectors allow single-photon counting to be performed on a massively parallel scale, with several million counting circuits and detectors in the array. Because the number of photoelectrons produced at the detector surface depends on the photon energy, these detectors offer the possibility of spectral imaging. In this work, a statistical model of the instrument response is used to calibrate the detector on a per-pixel basis. In turn, the calibrated sensor was used to perform separation of dual-energy diffraction measurements into two monochromatic images. Targeting applications include multi-wavelength diffraction to aid in protein structure determination and X-ray diffraction imaging. PMID:27041789

  18. Hybrid single quantum well InP/Si nanobeam lasers for silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Fegadolli, William S; Kim, Se-Heon; Postigo, Pablo Aitor; Scherer, Axel

    2013-11-15

    We report on a hybrid InP/Si photonic crystal nanobeam laser emitting at 1578 nm with a low threshold power of ~14.7 μW. Laser gain is provided from a single InAsP quantum well embedded in a 155 nm InP layer bonded on a standard silicon-on-insulator wafer. This miniaturized nanolaser, with an extremely small modal volume of 0.375(λ/n)(3), is a promising and efficient light source for silicon photonics.

  19. Non-degenerate two-photon absorption in silicon waveguides. Analytical and experimental study

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Yanbing; Husko, Chad; Lefrancois, Simon; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Schröder, Jochen; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2015-06-22

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the nonlinear evolution of two optical pulses in a silicon waveguide. We provide an analytic solution for the weak probe wave undergoing non-degenerate two-photon absorption (TPA) from the strong pump. At larger pump intensities, we employ a numerical solution to study the interplay between TPA and photo-generated free carriers. We develop a simple and powerful approach to extract and separate out the distinct loss contributions of TPA and free-carrier absorption from readily available experimental data. Our analysis accounts accurately for experimental results in silicon photonic crystal waveguides.

  20. Controlling an actively-quenched single photon detector with bright light.

    PubMed

    Sauge, Sebastien; Lydersen, Lars; Anisimov, Andrey; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim

    2011-11-01

    We control using bright light an actively-quenched avalanche single-photon detector. Actively-quenched detectors are commonly used for quantum key distribution (QKD) in the visible and near-infrared range. This study shows that these detectors are controllable by the same attack used to hack passively-quenched and gated detectors. This demonstrates the generality of our attack and its possible applicability to eavsdropping the full secret key of all QKD systems using avalanche photodiodes (APDs). Moreover, the commercial detector model we tested (PerkinElmer SPCM-AQR) exhibits two new blinding mechanisms in addition to the previously observed thermal blinding of the APD, namely: malfunctioning of the bias voltage control circuit, and overload of the DC/DC converter biasing the APD. These two new technical loopholes found just in one detector model suggest that this problem must be solved in general, by incorporating generally imperfect detectors into the security proof for QKD.

  1. Effect of temperature on superconducting nanowire single-photon detector noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahgat Shehata, A.; Ruggeri, A.; Stellari, F.; Weger, Alan J.; Song, P.; Sunter, K.; Najafi, F.; Berggren, Karl K.; Anant, Vikas

    2015-08-01

    Today Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors (SNSPDs) are commonly used in different photon-starved applications, including testing and diagnostics of VLSI circuits. Detecting very faint signals in the near-infrared wavelength range requires not only good detection efficiency, but also very low Dark Count Rate (DCR) and jitter. For example, low noise is crucial to enable ultra-low voltage optical testing of integrated circuits. The effect of detector temperature and background thermal radiation on the noise of superconducting single-photon detectors made of NbN meanders is studied in this paper. It is shown that two different regimes can be identified in the DCR vs. bias current characteristics. At high bias, the dark count rate is dominated by the intrinsic noise of the detector, while at low bias current it is dominated by the detection of stray photons that get onto the SNSPD. Changing the detector temperature changes its switching current and only affects the high bias branch of the characteristics: a reduction of the DCR can be achieved by lowering the SNSPD base temperature. On the other hand, changing the temperature of the single-photon light source (e.g. the VLSI circuit under test) only affects the low bias regime: a lower target temperature leads to a smaller DCR.

  2. A Laser Testing Facility for the Characterization of Silicon Strip Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Sarah

    2011-04-01

    Silicon strip detectors are used for high-precision tracking systems in particle physics experiments. During the 12 GeV upgrade to the accelerator at Jefferson Lab, a new spectrometer, CLAS12, will be built in Hall B. The University of New Hampshire is part of the collaboration designing and building CLAS12. Among the detector systems being developed for CLAS12 is a silicon vertex tracker that will be placed close to the target, providing excellent position resolution for vertex determination. It is vital to have the ability to perform quality assurance tests and to evaluate the performance of the individual silicon strip detectors before installation in CLAS12. UNH is designing and building a laser testing facility to perform this task. The design consists of an infrared laser system and a precision computer-controlled positioning system that scans the laser light on the detector. The detector signals are read out by a data acquisition system for analysis. The facility includes a cleanroom area and a dry storage containment system. The facility allows the characterization of the large number of detectors before the final assembly of the silicon vertex tracker.

  3. Coherent supercontinuum generation in a silicon photonic wire in the telecommunication wavelength range.

    PubMed

    Leo, François; Gorza, Simon-Pierre; Coen, Stéphane; Kuyken, Bart; Roelkens, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a fully coherent supercontinuum spectrum spanning 500 nm from a silicon-on-insulator photonic wire waveguide pumped at 1575 nm wavelength. An excellent agreement with numerical simulations is reported. The simulations also show that a high level of two-photon absorption can essentially enforce the coherence of the spectral broadening process irrespective of the pump pulse duration.

  4. Two-photon excitation of porphyrin-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Secret, Emilie; Maynadier, Marie; Gallud, Audrey; Chaix, Arnaud; Bouffard, Elise; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Marcotte, Nathalie; Mongin, Olivier; El Cheikh, Khaled; Hugues, Vincent; Auffan, Mélanie; Frochot, Céline; Morère, Alain; Maillard, Philippe; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Sailor, Michael J; Garcia, Marcel; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Cunin, Frédérique

    2014-12-01

    Porous silicon nanoparticles (pSiNPs) act as a sensitizer for the 2-photon excitation of a pendant porphyrin using NIR laser light, for imaging and photodynamic therapy. Mannose-functionalized pSiNPs can be vectorized to MCF-7 human breast cancer cells through a mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism to provide a 3-fold enhancement of the 2-photon PDT effect.

  5. SU-E-J-91: Novel Epitaxial Silicon Array for Quality Assurance in Photon and Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Talamonti, C; Zani, M; Scaringella, M; Bruzzi, M; Bucciolini, M; Menichelli, D; Friedl, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: to demonstrate suitability of a novel silicon array for measuring the dose properties of highly conformal photon and proton beams. Methods: prototype under test is a 24cm long linear array prototype, although the underlying technology is suitable to construct 2D arrays as well. It is based on a 64pixels monolithic sensor with 1mm pixel pitch, made of epitaxial ptype silicon. Thanks to design modularity, more sensors can be placed side by side without breaking pixel pitch. Flattened and unflattened photon beams, as well as proton radiation from a cyclotron in pencil beam scanning mode, were considered. Measurements of beam characteristics as percentage depth doses, dose profiles, output factors and energy response, which are necessary to deliver radiation with high precision and reliability, were performed. Results: Dose rate independence with photons was verified in the dose per pulse range 0.03 to 2mGy. Results clearly indicate nondependence of the detector sensitivity both for flattened and unflattened beams, with a variation of at most 0.5percentage. OFs were obtained for field with a lateral size ranging from 0.8cm to 16cm and the results are in good agreement with ion chamber A1SL, max difference less than 1.5percentage. Field sizes and beam penumbra were measured and compared to EBT film results. Concerning proton beams, sensitivity independence on dose rate was verified by changing the beam current in the interval 2-130Gy/s. Field sizes and beam penumbra measurements are in agreement with data taken with a scintillating 2D array with 0.5mm resolution IBA Lynx, and a better penumbra definition than an array of ionization chambers IBA MatriXX is reached. Conclusion: The device is a novel and valuable tool for QA both for photon and proton dose delivery. All measurements demonstrated its capability to measure with high spatial resolution many crucial properties of the RT beam.

  6. Monolithic silicon photonics in a sub-100nm SOI CMOS microprocessor foundry: progress from devices to systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Miloš A.; Wade, Mark T.; Orcutt, Jason S.; Shainline, Jeffrey M.; Sun, Chen; Georgas, Michael; Moss, Benjamin; Kumar, Rajesh; Alloatti, Luca; Pavanello, Fabio; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Nammari, Kareem; Notaros, Jelena; Atabaki, Amir; Leu, Jonathan; Stojanović, Vladimir; Ram, Rajeev J.

    2015-02-01

    We review recent progress of an effort led by the Stojanović (UC Berkeley), Ram (MIT) and Popović (CU Boulder) research groups to enable the design of photonic devices, and complete on-chip electro-optic systems and interfaces, directly in standard microelectronics CMOS processes in a microprocessor foundry, with no in-foundry process modifications. This approach allows tight and large-scale monolithic integration of silicon photonics with state-of-the-art (sub-100nm-node) microelectronics, here a 45nm SOI CMOS process. It enables natural scale-up to manufacturing, and rapid advances in device design due to process repeatability. The initial driver application was addressing the processor-to-memory communication energy bottleneck. Device results include 5Gbps modulators based on an interleaved junction that take advantage of the high resolution of the sub-100nm CMOS process. We demonstrate operation at 5fJ/bit with 1.5dB insertion loss and 8dB extinction ratio. We also demonstrate the first infrared detectors in a zero-change CMOS process, using absorption in transistor source/drain SiGe stressors. Subsystems described include the first monolithically integrated electronic-photonic transmitter on chip (modulator+driver) with 20-70fJ/bit wall plug energy/bit (2-3.5Gbps), to our knowledge the lowest transmitter energy demonstrated to date. We also demonstrate native-process infrared receivers at 220fJ/bit (5Gbps). These are encouraging signs for the prospects of monolithic electronics-photonics integration. Beyond processor-to-memory interconnects, our approach to photonics as a "More-than- Moore" technology inside advanced CMOS promises to enable VLSI electronic-photonic chip platforms tailored to a vast array of emerging applications, from optical and acoustic sensing, high-speed signal processing, RF and optical metrology and clocks, through to analog computation and quantum technology.

  7. Development and testing of novel stripixel detectors for the silicon vertex tracker at PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haegemann, C.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Fields, D. E.; Zimmerman, A.; Turner, J.; Malik, M.; Edans, L.

    2005-12-01

    As a part of the upgrades for the PHENIX detector at RHIC,a silicon vertex tracking detector is planned. This detector will consist of two pixel layers followed by two strip-pixel layers in the barrel region,an d four mini-strip layers in the endcap region. As a part of the development phase of the vertex detector, we have set up three sensor testing facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory, at State University of New York, Stonybrook, and at University of New Mexico to characterize the preproduction sensors, and develop our testing and quality assurance plans. Preliminary results from these test are presented here.

  8. Development of a silicon micro-strip detector for tracking high intensity secondary beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, R.; Asano, H.; Hasegawa, S.; Honda, R.; Ichikawa, Y.; Imai, K.; Joo, C. W.; Nakazawa, K.; Sako, H.; Sato, S.; Shirotori, K.; Sugimura, H.; Tanida, K.; Watabe, T.

    2014-11-01

    A single-sided silicon micro-strip detector (SSD) has been developed as a tracking detector for hadron experiments at J-PARC where secondary meson beams with intensities of up to 108 Hz are available. The performance of the detector has been investigated and verified in a series of test beam experiments in the years 2009-2011. The hole mobility was deduced from the analysis of cluster events. The beam rate dependence was measured in terms of timing resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, and hit efficiency. This paper describes the detector with its read-out system, details of the test experiments, and discusses the performance achieved.

  9. Review of amorphous silicon based particle detectors: the quest for single particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrsch, N.; Ballif, C.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is attractive for radiation detectors because of its radiation resistance and processability over large areas with mature Si microfabrication techniques. While the use of a-Si:H for medical imaging has been very successful, the development of detectors for particle tracking and minimum-ionizing-particle detection has lagged, with almost no practical implementation. This paper reviews the development of various types of a-Si:H-based detectors and discusses their respective achievements and limitations. It also presents more recent developments of detectors that could potentially achieve single particle detection and be integrated in a monolithic fashion into a variety of applications.

  10. Study of aging of nuclear detector based on n-silicon/copper phthalocyanine heterojunction

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, A.; Gupta, S. K.

    2013-02-05

    Nuclear detectors based on n-silicon/copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) heterojunction were fabricated using thermally evaporated CuPc thin film. These detectors exhibited stable electrical and {alpha}-particle characteristics for prolonged periods of time under ordinary laboratory conditions and also exposing to {alpha}- particles (during {alpha}- spectroscopic measurements). The electrical and alpha particle characteristics of these detectors were studied after a long gap of 3 - 5 years and the best result obtained from one detector (five year old) is reported here. Degradation in electrical and alpha particle characteristics were not found to be very significant over the period.

  11. Electrical production testing of the D0 Silicon microstrip tracker detector modules

    SciTech Connect

    D0, SMT Production Testing Group; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    The D0 Silicon Microstrip Tracker (SMT) is the innermost system of the D0 detector in Run 2. It consists of 912 detector units, corresponding to 5 different types of assemblies, which add up to a system with 792,576 readout channels. The task entrusted to the Production Testing group was to thoroughly debug, test and grade each detector module before its installation in the tracker. This note describes the production testing sequence and the procedures by which the detector modules were electrically tested and characterized at the various stages of their assembly.

  12. Design of wide-field submillimeter-wave camera using SIS photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Ariyoshi, Seiichiro; Otani, Chiko; Ezawa, Hajime; Kobayashi, Jun; Mori, Yuko; Nagata, Hirohisa; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Fujiwara, Mikio; Akiba, Makoto; Hosako, Iwao

    2004-10-01

    SIS photon detectors are niobium-based superconducting direct detectors for submillimeter-wave that show superior performance when compared with bolometric detectors for ground-based observations. We present the design and development of the SIS photon detectors together with optical and cryogenic components for wide field continuum observation system on Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). Using antenna coupled distributed junctions, SIS photon detectors give wide band response in a 650-GHz atmospheric window as well as high current sensitivity, shot noise limited operation, fast response and high dynamic range. Optical noise equivalent power (NEP) was measured to be 1.6x10-16 W/Hz0.5 that is less than the background photon fluctuation limit for ground based submillimeter-wave observations. Fabrication of focal plane array with 9 detector pixels is underway to install in ASTE. Readout electronics with Si-JFETs operating at about 100 K will be used for this array. Development of readout electronics for larger array is based on GaAs-JFETs operating at 0.3 K. For the purpose of installing 100 element array of SIS photon detectors, we have developed remotely operable low-vibration cryostat, which now cools bolometers for 350, 450, 850-µm observations down to 0.34 K. GM-type 4-K cooler and He3/He4 sorption cooler is used, which can be remotely recycled to keep detectors at 0.34 K. Since we have large optical window for this cryostat, sapphire cryogenic window is used to block infrared radiation. The sapphire window is ante-reflection coated with SiO2 by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The transmittance of the cryogenic window at 650 GHz is more than 95%.

  13. Photon-statistics-based classical ghost imaging with one single detector.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Simone; Hartmann, Sébastien; Elsäßer, Wolfgang

    2016-06-15

    We demonstrate a novel ghost imaging (GI) scheme based on one single-photon-counting detector with subsequent photon statistics analysis. The key idea is that instead of measuring correlations between the object and reference beams such as in standard GI schemes, the light of the two beams is superimposed. The photon statistics analysis of this mixed light allows us to determine the photon number distribution as well as to calculate the central second-order correlation coefficient. The image information is obtained as a function of the spatial resolution of the reference beam. The performance of this photon-statistics-based GI system with one single detector (PS-GI) is investigated in terms of visibility and resolution. Finally, the knowledge of the complete photon statistics allows easy access to higher correlation coefficients such that we are able to perform here third- and fourth-order GI. The PS-GI concept can be seen as a complement to already existing GI technologies thus enabling a broader dissemination of GI as a superior metrology technique, paving the road for new applications in particular with advanced photon counting detectors.

  14. Use of single photon counting detector arrays in combined PET/MR: Characterization of LYSO-SiPM detector modules and comparison with a LSO-APD detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudaki, V. C.; Mann, A. B.; Otte, A. N.; Konorov, I.; Torres-Espallardo, I.; Paul, S.; Ziegler, S. I.

    2007-12-01

    We propose in this study a novel PET detector concept as insert for simultaneous PET/MR imaging, using arrays of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) as photodetectors, read out by a data acquisition system based on sampling ADCs. A 2 × 2 LSO-SiPM detector array and four single channel LYSO-SiPM detectors have been evaluated and compared to a LSO-APD detector. A 17.9% energy resolution and a 1.4 ns time resolution have been measured. No degradation of these values could be detected when simultaneous MR acquisitions were performed. The non-linear detector behaviour due to the limited dynamic range and recovery time effects has been studied. In addition, the contribution of dark counts and optical crosstalk for PET applications was also addressed. The feasibility for position localization of the incident light to a SiPM array using Anger logic has been investigated.

  15. Silicon radiation detectors with oxide charge state compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.T.; Goulding, F.S.

    1986-10-01

    This paper discusses the use of boron implantation on high resistivity P-type silicon before oxide growth to compensate for the presence of charge states in the oxide and oxide/silicon interface. The presence of these charge states on high resistivity P-type silicon produces an inversion layer which causes high leakage currents on N/sup +/P junctions and high surface conductance. Compensating the surface region by boron implantation is shown to result in oxide passivated N/sup +/P junctions with very low leakage currents and with low surface conductance.

  16. Characterizing the influence of detector density on dosimeter response in non-equilibrium small photon fields.

    PubMed

    Scott, Alison J D; Kumar, Sudhir; Nahum, Alan E; Fenwick, John D

    2012-07-21

    The impact of density and atomic composition on the dosimetric response of various detectors in small photon radiation fields is characterized using a 'density-correction' factor, F(detector), defined as the ratio of Monte Carlo calculated doses delivered to water and detector voxels located on-axis, 5 cm deep in a water phantom with a SSD of 100 cm. The variation of F(detector) with field size has been computed for detector voxels of various materials and densities. For ion chambers and solid-state detectors, the well-known variation of F(detector) at small field sizes is shown to be due to differences between the densities of detector active volumes and water, rather than differences in atomic number. However, associated changes in the measured shapes of small-field profiles offset these variations in F(detector), so that integral doses measured using the different detectors are quite similar, at least for slit fields. Since changes in F(detector) with field size arise primarily from differences between the densities of the detector materials and water, ideal small-field relative dosimeters should have small active volumes and water-like density. PMID:22722374

  17. Detection of low energy antiproton annihilations in a segmented silicon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghion, S.; Ahlén, O.; Belov, A. S.; Bonomi, G.; Bräunig, P.; Bremer, J.; Brusa, R. S.; Burghart, G.; Cabaret, L.; Caccia, M.; Canali, C.; Caravita, R.; Castelli, F.; Cerchiari, G.; Cialdi, S.; Comparat, D.; Consolati, G.; Derking, J. H.; Di Domizio, S.; Di Noto, L.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Ferragut, R.; Fontana, A.; Genova, P.; Giammarchi, M.; Gligorova, A.; Gninenko, S. N.; Haider, S.; Harasimowicz, J.; Huse, T.; Jordan, E.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kaltenbacher, T.; Kellerbauer, A.; Knecht, A.; Krasnický, D.; Lagomarsino, V.; Magnani, A.; Mariazzi, S.; Matveev, V. A.; Moia, F.; Nebbia, G.; Nédélec, P.; Pacifico, N.; Petráček, V.; Prelz, F.; Prevedelli, M.; Regenfus, C.; Riccardi, C.; Røhne, O.; Rotondi, A.; Sandaker, H.; Sosa, A.; Subieta Vasquez, M. A.; Špaček, M.; Testera, G.; Welsch, C. P.; Zavatarelli, S.

    2014-06-01

    The goal of the AEbar gIS experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN, is to measure directly the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antimatter by measuring the free fall of a pulsed, cold antihydrogen beam. The final position of the falling antihydrogen will be detected by a position sensitive detector. This detector will consist of an active silicon part, where the annihilations take place, followed by an emulsion part. Together, they allow to achieve 1% precision on the measurement of bar g with about 600 reconstructed and time tagged annihilations. We present here the prospects for the development of the AEbar gIS silicon position sentive detector and the results from the first beam tests on a monolithic silicon pixel sensor, along with a comparison to Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. A positron-sensitive photon detector for the UV or X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zutavern, F. J.; Schnatterly, S. E.; Källne, E.; Franck, C. P.; Aton, T.; Rife, J.

    1980-05-01

    This paper describes the conversion of a light sensitive self-scanning silicon photodiode array into a soft X-ray detector. We combine a photodiode array, a UHV compatible soft X-ray sensitive phosphor and read out electronics. The detector has been tested in the soft X-ray and UV regions. The results indicate a high quantum efficiency in the soft X-ray region.

  19. Study of silicon strip waveguides with diffraction gratings and photonic crystals tuned to a wavelength of 1.5 µm

    SciTech Connect

    Barabanenkov, M. Yu. Vyatkin, A. F.; Volkov, V. T.; Gruzintsev, A. N.; Il’in, A. I.; Trofimov, O. V.

    2015-12-15

    Single-mode submicrometer-thick strip waveguides on silicon-on-insulator substrates, fabricated by silicon-planar-technology methods are considered. To solve the problem of 1.5-µm wavelength radiation input-output and its frequency filtering, strip diffraction gratings and two-dimensional photonic crystals are integrated into waveguides. The reflection and transmission spectra of gratings and photonic crystals are calculated. The waveguide-mode-attenuation coefficient for a polycrystalline silicon waveguide is experimentally estimated.

  20. Silicon photonic receiver and transmitter operating up to 36 Gb/s for λ~1550 nm.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jiho; Jang, Ki-Seok; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, In Gyoo; Oh, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Sun Ae; Jeong, Gyu-Seob; Kim, Yoonsoo; Park, Jun-Eun; Kim, Sungwoo; Chi, Hankyu; Jeong, Deog-Kyoon; Kim, Gyungock

    2015-05-01

    We present the hybrid-integrated silicon photonic receiver and transmitter based on silicon photonic devices and 65 nm bulk CMOS interface circuits operating over 30 Gb/s with a 10(-12) bit error rate (BER) for λ ~1550nm. The silicon photonic receiver, operating up to 36 Gb/s, is based on a vertical-illumination type Ge-on-Si photodetector (Ge PD) hybrid-integrated with a CMOS receiver front-end circuit (CMOS Rx IC), and exhibits high sensitivities of -11 dBm, -8 dBm, and -2 dBm for data rates of 25 Gb/s, 30 Gb/s and 36 Gb/s, respectively, at a BER of 10(-12). The measured energy efficiency of the Si-photonic receiver is 2.6 pJ/bit at 25 Gb/s with an optical input power of -11 dBm, and 2.1 pJ/bit at 36 Gb/s with an optical power of -2 dBm. The hybrid-integrated silicon photonic transmitter, comprised of a depletion-type Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM) and a CMOS driver circuit (CMOS Tx IC), shows better than 5.7 dB extinction ratio (ER) for 25 Gb/s, and 3 dB ER for 36 Gb/s. The silicon photonic transmitter achieves the data transmission with less than 10(-15) BER at 25 Gb/s, 10(-14) BER at 28 Gb/s, and 6 x 10(-13) BER with the energy efficiency of ~6 pJ/bit at 30 Gb/s. PMID:25969309

  1. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors. PMID:24517746

  2. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  3. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qin; Skaar, Johannes; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-15

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  4. A universal setup for active control of a single-photon detector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Lamas-Linares, Antía; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim; Gerhardt, Ilja

    2014-01-01

    The influence of bright light on a single-photon detector has been described in a number of recent publications. The impact on quantum key distribution (QKD) is important, and several hacking experiments have been tailored to fully control single-photon detectors. Special attention has been given to avoid introducing further errors into a QKD system. We describe the design and technical details of an apparatus which allows to attack a quantum-cryptographic connection. This device is capable of controlling free-space and fiber-based systems and of minimizing unwanted clicks in the system. With different control diagrams, we are able to achieve a different level of control. The control was initially targeted to the systems using BB84 protocol, with polarization encoding and basis switching using beamsplitters, but could be extended to other types of systems. We further outline how to characterize the quality of active control of single-photon detectors.

  5. Cryogenic detectors based on superconducting transition-edge sensors for time-energy-resolved single-photon counters and for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, B.; Clarke, R.; Miller, A.; Nam, S. W.; Romani, R.; Saab, T.; Young, B.

    2000-05-01

    We present the recent progress using transition-edge sensors (TES) for cryogenic particle detectors. First, by directly absorbing photons in tungsten TES devices, an instrument has been made which time stamps (0.1μs) and energy resolves (0.15 eV FWHM) each photon at rates up to 10 kHz. Observations of the Crab pulsar are the first broad spectrum infrared through full optical and time resolved on any astronomical object. Second, in the CDMS (cryogenic dark matter search) experiment looking for WIMPs, large crystals of silicon and germanium are instrumented with QET (quasiparticle-trap-assisted electrothermal-feedback transition-edge sensors) phonon sensors which provide the recoil energy and location in /x,y and /z for each event. Together with an ionization readout, these detectors provide powerful discrimination capabilities against known backgrounds and they are now probing new regions for WIMP dark matter.

  6. Electrical control of silicon photonic crystal cavity by graphene.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arka; Kim, Jonghwan; Vuckovic, Jelena; Wang, Feng

    2013-02-13

    The efficient conversion of an electrical signal to an optical signal in nanophotonics enables solid state integration of electronics and photonics. The combination of graphene with photonic crystals is promising for electro-optic modulation. In this paper, we demonstrate that by electrostatic gating a single layer of graphene on top of a photonic crystal cavity, the cavity resonance can be changed significantly. A ~2 nm change in the cavity resonance line width and almost 400% (6 dB) change in resonance reflectivity is observed. In addition, our analysis shows that a graphene-photonic crystal device can potentially be useful for a high speed and low power absorptive and refractive modulator, while maintaining a small physical footprint.

  7. Resonant second harmonic generation in a gallium nitride two-dimensional photonic crystal on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y.; Roland, I.; Checoury, X.; Han, Z.; El Kurdi, M.; Sauvage, S.; Gayral, B.; Brimont, C.; Guillet, T.; Mexis, M.; Semond, F.; Boucaud, P.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate second harmonic generation in a gallium nitride photonic crystal cavity embedded in a two-dimensional free-standing photonic crystal platform on silicon. The photonic crystal nanocavity is optically pumped with a continuous-wave laser at telecom wavelengths in the transparency window of the nitride material. The harmonic generation is evidenced by the spectral range of the emitted signal, the quadratic power dependence vs. input power, and the spectral dependence of second harmonic signal. The harmonic emission pattern is correlated to the harmonic polarization generated by the second-order nonlinear susceptibilities χzxx (2 ), χzyy (2 ) and the electric fields of the fundamental cavity mode.

  8. A transputer-based list mode parallel system for digital radiography with 2D silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M.; Russo, P.; Scarlatella, A. . Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche and INFN); Del Guerra, A. . Dipt. di Fisica and INFN); Mazzeo, A.; Mazzocca, N.; Russo, S. . Dipt. di Informatica e Sistemistica)

    1993-08-01

    The authors believe that a dedicated parallel computer system can represent an effective and flexible approach to the problem of list mode acquisition and reconstruction of digital radiographic images obtained with a double-sided silicon microstrip detector. They present a Transputer-based implementation of a parallel system for the data acquisition and image reconstruction from a silicon crystal with 200[mu]m read-out pitch. They are currently developing a prototype of the system connected to a detector with a 10mm[sup 2] sensitive area.

  9. Detecting small debris using a ground-based photon counting detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Baron, M.H.

    1993-05-01

    We describe a sensitive technique for detecting small space debris that exploits a fast photon-counting imager. Microchannel plate detectors using crossed delay-line readout can achieve a resolution of 2048 {times} 2048 spatial pixels and a maximum count rate of about 10{sup 6} photons per second. A baseline debris-tracking system might couple this detector to a 16-cm aperture telescope. The detector yields x, y, and time information for each detected photon. When visualized in (x, y, t) space, photons from a fast-moving orbital object appear on a straight line. They can be distinguished from diffuse background photons, randomly scattered in the space, and star photons, which fall on a line with sidereal velocity. By searching for this unique signature, we can detect and track small debris objects. At dawn and dusk, a spherical object of 1.3 cm diameter at 400 km will reflect sunlight for an apparent magnitude of V {approx} 16. The baseline system would detect about 16 photons from this object as it crosses a 1 degree field of view in about 1 second. The Ene in (x, y, t) space will be significant in a diffuse background of {approximately} 10{sup 6} photons. We discuss the data processing scheme and line detection algorithm. The advantages of this technique are that one can (1) detect cm-size debris objects with a small telescope, and (2) detect debris moving with any direction and velocity. In this paper, we describe the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system, the preparation for a field test for such a system, and the development and optimization of the data analysis algorithm. Detection sensitivity would currently be constrained by the capability of the data acquisition and the data processing systems, but further improvements could alleviate these bottlenecks.

  10. Detecting small debris using a ground-based photon counting detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.; Priedhorsky, W.C.; Baron, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    We describe a sensitive technique for detecting small space debris that exploits a fast photon-counting imager. Microchannel plate detectors using crossed delay-line readout can achieve a resolution of 2048 [times] 2048 spatial pixels and a maximum count rate of about 10[sup 6] photons per second. A baseline debris-tracking system might couple this detector to a 16-cm aperture telescope. The detector yields x, y, and time information for each detected photon. When visualized in (x, y, t) space, photons from a fast-moving orbital object appear on a straight line. They can be distinguished from diffuse background photons, randomly scattered in the space, and star photons, which fall on a line with sidereal velocity. By searching for this unique signature, we can detect and track small debris objects. At dawn and dusk, a spherical object of 1.3 cm diameter at 400 km will reflect sunlight for an apparent magnitude of V [approx] 16. The baseline system would detect about 16 photons from this object as it crosses a 1 degree field of view in about 1 second. The Ene in (x, y, t) space will be significant in a diffuse background of [approximately] 10[sup 6] photons. We discuss the data processing scheme and line detection algorithm. The advantages of this technique are that one can (1) detect cm-size debris objects with a small telescope, and (2) detect debris moving with any direction and velocity. In this paper, we describe the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system, the preparation for a field test for such a system, and the development and optimization of the data analysis algorithm. Detection sensitivity would currently be constrained by the capability of the data acquisition and the data processing systems, but further improvements could alleviate these bottlenecks.

  11. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    SciTech Connect

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2014-01-27

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  12. In-depth study of single photon time resolution for the Philips digital silicon photomultiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Gundacker, S.; Pizzichemi, M.; Ghezzi, A.; Auffray, E.; Lecoq, P.; Paganoni, M.

    2016-06-01

    The digital silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) has been commercialised by Philips as an innovative technology compared to analog silicon photomultiplier devices. The Philips digital SiPM, has a pair of time to digital converters (TDCs) connected to 12800 single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs). Detailed measurements were performed to understand the low photon time response of the Philips digital SiPM. The single photon time resolution (SPTR) of every single SPAD in a pixel consisting of 3200 SPADs was measured and an average value of 85 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) was observed. Each SPAD sends the signal to the TDC with different signal propagation time, resulting in a so called trigger network skew. This distribution of the trigger network skew for a pixel (3200 SPADs) has been measured and a variation of 50 ps FWHM was extracted. The SPTR of the whole pixel is the combination of SPAD jitter, trigger network skew, and the SPAD non-uniformity. The SPTR of a complete pixel was 103 ps FWHM at 3.3 V above breakdown voltage. Further, the effect of the crosstalk at a low photon level has been studied, with the two photon time resolution degrading if the events are a combination of detected (true) photons and crosstalk events. Finally, the time response to multiple photons was investigated.

  13. Quantum detector tomography of a single-photon frequency upconversion detection system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianhui; Chen, Xiuliang; Hu, Huiqin; Pan, Haifeng; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally presented a full quantum detector tomography of a synchronously pumped infrared single-photon frequency upconversion detector. A maximum detection efficiency of 37.6% was achieved at the telecom wavelength of 1558 nm with a background noise about 1.0 × 10-3 counts/pulse. The corresponding internal quantum conversion efficiency reached as high as 84.4%. The detector was then systematically characterized at different pump powers to investigate the quantum decoherence behavior. Here the reconstructed positive operator valued measure elements were equivalently illustrated with the Wigner function formalism, where the quantum feature of the detector is manifested by the presence of negative values of the Wigner function. In our experiment, pronounced negativities were attained due to the high detection efficiency and low background noise, explicitly showing the quantum feature of the detector. Such quantum detector could be useful in optical quantum state engineering, quantum information processing and communication. PMID:27607700

  14. Quantum detector tomography of a single-photon frequency upconversion detection system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianhui; Chen, Xiuliang; Hu, Huiqin; Pan, Haifeng; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally presented a full quantum detector tomography of a synchronously pumped infrared single-photon frequency upconversion detector. A maximum detection efficiency of 37.6% was achieved at the telecom wavelength of 1558 nm with a background noise about 1.0 × 10-3 counts/pulse. The corresponding internal quantum conversion efficiency reached as high as 84.4%. The detector was then systematically characterized at different pump powers to investigate the quantum decoherence behavior. Here the reconstructed positive operator valued measure elements were equivalently illustrated with the Wigner function formalism, where the quantum feature of the detector is manifested by the presence of negative values of the Wigner function. In our experiment, pronounced negativities were attained due to the high detection efficiency and low background noise, explicitly showing the quantum feature of the detector. Such quantum detector could be useful in optical quantum state engineering, quantum information processing and communication.

  15. Application of neural networks to digital pulse shape analysis for an array of silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. L.; Martel, I.; Jiménez, R.; Galán, J.; Salmerón, P.

    2016-09-01

    The new generation of nuclear physics detectors that used to study nuclear reactions is considering the use of digital pulse shape analysis techniques (DPSA) to obtain the (A,Z) values of the reaction products impinging in solid state detectors. This technique can be an important tool for selecting the relevant reaction channels at the HYDE (HYbrid DEtector ball array) silicon array foreseen for the Low Energy Branch of the FAIR facility (Darmstadt, Germany). In this work we study the feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for particle identification with silicon detectors. Multilayer Perceptron networks were trained and tested with recent experimental data, showing excellent identification capabilities with signals of several isotopes ranging from 12C up to 84Kr, yielding higher discrimination rates than any other previously reported.

  16. A space- and time-resolved single photon counting detector for fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalet, X.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Jelinsky, P.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.

    2006-02-01

    We have recently developed a wide-field photon-counting detector having high-temporal and high-spatial resolutions and capable of high-throughput (the H33D detector). Its design is based on a 25 mm diameter multi-alkali photocathode producing one photo electron per detected photon, which are then multiplied up to 10 7 times by a 3-microchannel plate stack. The resulting electron cloud is proximity focused on a cross delay line anode, which allows determining the incident photon position with high accuracy. The imaging and fluorescence lifetime measurement performances of the H33D detector installed on a standard epifluorescence microscope will be presented. We compare them to those of standard single-molecule detectors such as single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) or electron-multiplying camera using model samples (fluorescent beads, quantum dots and live cells). Finally, we discuss the design and applications of future generation of H33D detectors for single-molecule imaging and high-throughput study of biomolecular interactions.

  17. Quantum efficiency of a double quantum dot microwave photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Clement; Vavilov, Maxim

    Motivated by recent interest in implementing circuit quantum electrodynamics with semiconducting quantum dots, we study charge transfer through a double quantum dot (DQD) capacitively coupled to a superconducting cavity subject to a microwave field. We analyze the DQD current response using input-output theory and determine the optimal parameter regime for complete absorption of radiation and efficient conversion of microwave photons to electric current. For experimentally available DQD systems, we show that the cavity-coupled DQD operates as a photon-to-charge converter with quantum efficiencies up to 80% C.W. acknowledges support by the Intelligence Community Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program.

  18. Two- and three-photon absorption and frequency upconverted emission of silicon quantum dots.

    PubMed

    He, Guang S; Zheng, Qingdong; Yong, Ken-Tye; Erogbogbo, Folarin; Swihart, Mark T; Prasad, Paras N

    2008-09-01

    In this communication, we present the experimental results of two- and three-photon excitation studies on silicon quantum dots (QDs) in chloroform (as well as in water) by using femtosecond laser pulses with wavelengths of 778 and 1,335 nm and a pulse duration approximately 160 fs. The photoluminescence spectral distributions are nearly the same upon one-, two-, and three-photon excitation. With one- and two-photon excitation, the temporal relaxation measurements of photoluminescence emission manifest the same multiexponential decay behavior in the time range from 0.05 ns to 15 micros, characterized by three successive decay constants: 0.75 ns, 300 ns, and 5 micros, respectively. Finally, the two-photon absorption spectrum in the spectral range of 650-900 nm and the three-photon absorption spectrum in the spectral range of 1,150-1,400 nm have been measured.

  19. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, Bedabrata; Norton, Timothy J.; Haas, J. Patrick; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest of by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  20. A High-Speed, Event-Driven, Active Pixel Sensor Readout for Photon-Counting Microchannel Plate Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Pain, B.; Norton, T. J.; Haas, P.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon array readouts for microchannel plate intensifiers offer several attractive features. In this class of detector, the electron cloud output of the MCP intensifier is converted to visible light by a phosphor; that light is then fiber-optically coupled to the silicon array. In photon-counting mode, the resulting light splashes on the silicon array are recognized and centroided to fractional pixel accuracy by off-chip electronics. This process can result in very high (MCP-limited) spatial resolution for the readout while operating at a modest MCP gain (desirable for dynamic range and long term stability). The principal limitation of intensified CCD systems of this type is their severely limited local dynamic range, as accurate photon counting is achieved only if there are not overlapping event splashes within the frame time of the device. This problem can be ameliorated somewhat by processing events only in pre-selected windows of interest or by using an addressable charge injection device (CID) for the readout array. We are currently pursuing the development of an intriguing alternative readout concept based on using an event-driven CMOS Active Pixel Sensor. APS technology permits the incorporation of discriminator circuitry within each pixel. When coupled with suitable CMOS logic outside the array area, the discriminator circuitry can be used to trigger the readout of small sub-array windows only when and where an event splash has been detected, completely eliminating the local dynamic range problem, while achieving a high global count rate capability and maintaining high spatial resolution. We elaborate on this concept and present our progress toward implementing an event-driven APS readout.

  1. Silicon/PVDF integrated double detector: application to obstacle detection in automotive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonne, Jean-Jacques; Pham, Vui V.; Esteve, Daniel; Alaoui-Amine, Mohammed; Bousbiat, Essaid

    1991-02-01

    The design of an integrated sensing system including a Silicon photodiode and a thermal pyroelectric detector is presented. The influence of a thermal insulator between both detectors to provide a good sensitivity to the structure is discussed through a simple model accounting for heat absorption and heat loss characteristics of the structure. An experimental set up is finally descnbed and investigated to be transposed and adapted in a car to obstacle detection. I .

  2. Evaluation of the efficiency curve of a Cadmiun Telluride detector for low-energy photon spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Correia, Amanda Ribeiro; Iwahara, Akira; da Cruz, Paulo Alberto Lima; da Silva, Carlos José; Tauhata, Luiz; Poledna, Roberto; da Silva, Ronaldo Lins; de Queiroz Filho, Pedro Pacheco; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu

    2016-10-01

    The performance of a Cadmiun Telluride (CdTe) detector for low energy photon spectrometry was evaluated. Collected data were analyzed using the basic software package available with the CdTe detector system and the COLEGRAM code developed for photopeak deconvolution at LNHB/France. Several calibrated point sources were used to determine the energy versus efficiency curve. The efficiency curve was used in the determination of main X-ray intensities of (153)Sm and (177)Lu.

  3. Evaluation of the efficiency curve of a Cadmiun Telluride detector for low-energy photon spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Correia, Amanda Ribeiro; Iwahara, Akira; da Cruz, Paulo Alberto Lima; da Silva, Carlos José; Tauhata, Luiz; Poledna, Roberto; da Silva, Ronaldo Lins; de Queiroz Filho, Pedro Pacheco; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu

    2016-10-01

    The performance of a Cadmiun Telluride (CdTe) detector for low energy photon spectrometry was evaluated. Collected data were analyzed using the basic software package available with the CdTe detector system and the COLEGRAM code developed for photopeak deconvolution at LNHB/France. Several calibrated point sources were used to determine the energy versus efficiency curve. The efficiency curve was used in the determination of main X-ray intensities of (153)Sm and (177)Lu. PMID:27544313

  4. MicroCT with energy-resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Meier, D; Mikkelsen, S; Maehlum, G E; Wagenaar, D J; Tsui, BMW; Patt, B E; Frey, E C

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to investigate the benefits that could be realistically achieved on a microCT imaging system with an energy-resolved photon-counting x-ray detector. To this end, we built and evaluated a prototype microCT system based on such a detector. The detector is based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) radiation sensors and application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) readouts. Each detector pixel can simultaneously count x-ray photons above six energy thresholds, providing the capability for energy-selective x-ray imaging. We tested the spectroscopic performance of the system using polychromatic x-ray radiation and various filtering materials with Kabsorption edges. Tomographic images were then acquired of a cylindrical PMMA phantom containing holes filled with various materials. Results were also compared with those acquired using an intensity-integrating x-ray detector and single-energy (i.e. non-energy-selective) CT. This paper describes the functionality and performance of the system, and presents preliminary spectroscopic and tomographic results. The spectroscopic experiments showed that the energy-resolved photon-counting detector was capable of measuring energy spectra from polychromatic sources like a standard x-ray tube, and resolving absorption edges present in the energy range used for imaging. However, the spectral quality was degraded by spectral distortions resulting from degrading factors, including finite energy resolution and charge sharing. We developed a simple charge-sharing model to reproduce these distortions. The tomographic experiments showed that the availability of multiple energy thresholds in the photon-counting detector allowed us to simultaneously measure target-to-background contrasts in different energy ranges. Compared with single-energy CT with an integrating detector, this feature was especially useful to improve differentiation of materials with different attenuation coefficient energy dependences. PMID:21464527

  5. UVSiPM: A light detector instrument based on a SiPM sensor working in single photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sottile, G.; Russo, F.; Agnetta, G.; Belluso, M.; Billotta, S.; Biondo, B.; Bonanno, G.; Catalano, O.; Giarrusso, S.; Grillo, A.; Impiombato, D.; La Rosa, G.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mangano, A.; Marano, D.; Mineo, T.; Segreto, A.; Strazzeri, E.; Timpanaro, M. C.

    2013-06-01

    UVSiPM is a light detector designed to measure the intensity of electromagnetic radiation in the 320-900 nm wavelength range. It has been developed in the framework of the ASTRI project whose main goal is the design and construction of an end-to-end Small Size class Telescope prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. The UVSiPM instrument is composed by a multipixel Silicon Photo-Multiplier detector unit coupled to an electronic chain working in single photon counting mode with 10 nanosecond double pulse resolution, and by a disk emulator interface card for computer connection. The detector unit of UVSiPM is of the same kind as the ones forming the camera at the focal plane of the ASTRI prototype. Eventually, the UVSiPM instrument can be equipped with a collimator to regulate its angular aperture. UVSiPM, with its peculiar characteristics, will permit to perform several measurements both in lab and on field, allowing the absolute calibration of the ASTRI prototype.

  6. IIIV/Si Nanoscale Lasers and Their Integration with Silicon Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Olesya

    The rapidly evolving global information infrastructure requires ever faster data transfer within computer networks and stations. Integrated chip scale photonics can pave the way to accelerated signal manipulation and boost bandwidth capacity of optical interconnects in a compact and ergonomic arrangement. A key building block for integrated photonic circuits is an on-chip laser. In this dissertation we explore ways to reduce the physical footprint of semiconductor lasers and make them suitable for high density integration on silicon, a standard material platform for today's integrated circuits. We demonstrated the first room temperature metalo-dielectric nanolaser, sub-wavelength in all three dimensions. Next, we demonstrated a nanolaser on silicon, showing the feasibility of its integration with this platform. We also designed and realized an ultracompact feedback laser with edge-emitting structure, amenable for in-plane coupling with a standard silicon waveguide. Finally, we discuss the challenges and propose solutions for improvement of the device performance and practicality.

  7. Optimization of metallic microheaters for high-speed reconfigurable silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Atabaki, A H; Shah Hosseini, E; Eftekhar, A A; Yegnanarayanan, S; Adibi, A

    2010-08-16

    The strong thermooptic effect in silicon enables low-power and low-loss reconfiguration of large-scale silicon photonics. Thermal reconfiguration through the integration of metallic microheaters has been one of the more widely used reconfiguration techniques in silicon photonics. In this paper, structural and material optimizations are carried out through heat transport modeling to improve the reconfiguration speed of such devices, and the results are experimentally verified. Around 4 micros reconfiguration time are shown for the optimized structures. Moreover, sub-microsecond reconfiguration time is experimentally demonstrated through the pulsed excitation of the microheaters. The limitation of this pulsed excitation scheme is also discussed through an accurate system-level model developed for the microheater response.

  8. An Infrared Laser Testing Facility for the Characterization of the CLAS12 Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Sarah

    2011-04-01

    During the 12 GeV upgrade to the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, a new spectrometer, CLAS12, will be built in Hall B. The Nuclear Physics Group at the University of New Hampshire is part of the collaboration working to design and build this new detector system. Among the new detector systems being developed for CLAS12 is a silicon vertex tracker that will be placed close to the target, providing excellent position resolution for vertex determination. It is essential to have the ability to perform quality assurance tests and to evaluate the performance of the individual silicon strip detectors before their installation in the full detector system. The UNH Nuclear Physics Group is designing and building a laser testing facility at UNH to perform this task. The design for the testing facility consists of a 1064 nm infrared laser system and a precision positioning mechanism to scan the laser light on the detector by a computer controlled system designed to efficiently test the large number of detectors prior to installation. The detector signals are read out by a computer data acquisition system for analysis. The facility also includes a cleanroom area to house the test stand, and a dry storage containment system for the storage of the detectors.

  9. Spatio-energetic cross-talks in photon counting detectors: detector model and correlated Poisson data generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Polster, Christoph; Lee, Okkyun; Kappler, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    An x-ray photon interacts with photon counting detectors (PCDs) and generates an electron charge cloud or multiple clouds. The clouds (thus, the photon energy) may be split between two adjacent PCD pixels when the interaction occurs near pixel boundaries, producing a count at both of the two pixels. This is called double-counting with charge sharing. The output of individual PCD pixel is Poisson distributed integer counts; however, the outputs of adjacent pixels are correlated due to double-counting. Major problems are the lack of detector noise model for the spatio-energetic crosstalk and the lack of an efficient simulation tool. Monte Carlo simulation can accurately simulate these phenomena and produce noisy data; however, it is not computationally efficient. In this study, we developed a new detector model and implemented into an efficient software simulator which uses a Poisson random number generator to produce correlated noisy integer counts. The detector model takes the following effects into account effects: (1) detection efficiency and incomplete charge collection; (2) photoelectric effect with total absorption; (3) photoelectric effect with fluorescence x-ray emission and re-absorption; (4) photoelectric effect with fluorescence x-ray emission which leaves PCD completely; and (5) electric noise. The model produced total detector spectrum similar to previous MC simulation data. The model can be used to predict spectrum and correlation with various different settings. The simulated noisy data demonstrated the expected performance: (a) data were integers; (b) the mean and covariance matrix was close to the target values; (c) noisy data generation was very efficient

  10. Perfect entanglement concentration of an arbitrary four-photon polarization entangled state via quantum nondemolition detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meiyu; Yan, Fengli; Xu, Jingzhou

    2016-08-01

    We show how to concentrate an arbitrary four-photon polarization entangled state into a maximally entangled state based on some quantum nondemolition detectors. The entanglement concentration protocol (ECP) resorts to an ancillary single-photon resource and the conventional projection measurement on photons to assist the concentration, which makes it more economical. Our ECP involves weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities, X homodyne measurement and basic linear-optical elements, which make it feasible in the current experimental technology. Moreover, the ECP considers cyclic utilization to enhance a higher success probability. Thus, our scheme is meaningful in practical applications in quantum communication.

  11. Silicon chip integrated photonic sensors for biological and chemical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Yan, Hai; Tang, Naimei; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate applications of photonic crystal waveguide based devices for on-chip optical absorption spectroscopy for the detection of chemical warfare simulant, triethylphosphate as well as applications with photonic crystal microcavity devices in the detection of biomarkers for pancreatic cancer in patient serum and cadmium metal ions in heavy metal pollution sensing. At mid-infrared wavelengths, we experimentally demonstrate the higher sensitivity of photonic crystal based structures compared to other nanophotonic devices such as strip and slot waveguides with detection down to 10ppm triethylphosphate. We also detected 5ppb (parts per billion) of cadmium metal ions in water at near-infrared wavelengths using established techniques for the detection of specific probe-target biomarker conjugation chemistries.

  12. Resonance-enhanced waveguide-coupled silicon-germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloatti, L.; Ram, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    A photodiode with 0.55 ± 0.1 A/W responsivity at a wavelength of 1176.9 nm has been fabricated in a 45 nm microelectronics silicon-on-insulator foundry process. The resonant waveguide photodetector exploits carrier generation in silicon-germanium within a microring which is compatible with high-performance electronics. A 3 dB bandwidth of 5 GHz at -4 V bias is obtained with a dark current of less than 20 pA.

  13. Silicon Wafer-Scale Substrate for Microshutters and Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Franz, David E.; Ewin, Audrey J.; Jhabvala, Christine; Babu, Sachi; Snodgrass, Stephen; Costen, Nicholas; Zincke, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The silicon substrate carrier was created so that a large-area array (in this case 62,000+ elements of a microshutter array) and a variety of discrete passive and active devices could be mounted on a single board, similar to a printed circuit board. However, the density and number of interconnects far exceeds the capabilities of printed circuit board technology. To overcome this hurdle, a method was developed to fabricate this carrier out of silicon and implement silicon integrated circuit (IC) technology. This method achieves a large number of high-density metal interconnects; a 100-percent yield over a 6-in. (approximately equal to 15-cm) diameter wafer (one unit per wafer); a rigid, thermally compatible structure (all components and operating conditions) to cryogenic temperatures; re-workability and component replaceability, if required; and the ability to precisely cut large-area holes through the substrate. A method that would employ indium bump technology along with wafer-scale integration onto a silicon carrier was also developed. By establishing a silicon-based version of a printed circuit board, the objectives could be met with one solution. The silicon substrate would be 2 mm thick to survive the environmental loads of a launch. More than 2,300 metal traces and over 1,500 individual wire bonds are required. To mate the microshutter array to the silicon substrate, more than 10,000 indium bumps are required. A window was cut in the substrate to allow the light signal to pass through the substrate and reach the microshutter array. The substrate was also the receptacle for multiple unpackaged IC die wire-bonded directly to the substrate (thus conserving space over conventionally packaged die). Unique features of this technology include the implementation of a 2-mmthick silicon wafer to withstand extreme mechanical loads (from a rocket launch); integrated polysilicon resistor heaters directly on the substrate; the precise formation of an open aperture

  14. Single-Photon-Sensitive HgCdTe Avalanche Photodiode Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to develop single-photon-sensitive short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) and mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) avalanche photodiode (APD) receivers based on linear-mode HgCdTe APDs, for application by NASA in light detection and ranging (lidar) sensors. Linear-mode photon-counting APDs are desired for lidar because they have a shorter pixel dead time than Geiger APDs, and can detect sequential pulse returns from multiple objects that are closely spaced in range. Linear-mode APDs can also measure photon number, which Geiger APDs cannot, adding an extra dimension to lidar scene data for multi-photon returns. High-gain APDs with low multiplication noise are required for efficient linear-mode detection of single photons because of APD gain statistics -- a low-excess-noise APD will generate detectible current pulses from single photon input at a much higher rate of occurrence than will a noisy APD operated at the same average gain. MWIR and LWIR electron-avalanche HgCdTe APDs have been shown to operate in linear mode at high average avalanche gain (M > 1000) without excess multiplication noise (F = 1), and are therefore very good candidates for linear-mode photon counting. However, detectors fashioned from these narrow-bandgap alloys require aggressive cooling to control thermal dark current. Wider-bandgap SWIR HgCdTe APDs were investigated in this program as a strategy to reduce detector cooling requirements.

  15. Experimental determination of the lateral dose response functions of detectors to be applied in the measurement of narrow photon-beam dose profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppinga, D.; Meyners, J.; Delfs, B.; Muru, A.; Harder, D.; Poppe, B.; Looe, HK

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at the experimental determination of the detector-specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x) and of its associated rotational symmetric counterpart K(r) for a set of high-resolution detectors presently used in narrow-beam photon dosimetry. A combination of slit-beam, radiochromic film, and deconvolution techniques served to accomplish this task for four detectors with diameters of their sensitive volumes ranging from 1 to 2.2 mm. The particular aim of the experiment was to examine the existence of significant negative portions of some of these response functions predicted by a recent Monte-Carlo-simulation (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). In a 6 MV photon slit beam formed by the Siemens Artiste collimation system and a 0.5 mm wide slit between 10 cm thick lead blocks serving as the tertiary collimator, the true cross-beam dose profile D(x) at 3 cm depth in a large water phantom was measured with radiochromic film EBT3, and the detector-affected cross-beam signal profiles M(x) were recorded with a silicon diode, a synthetic diamond detector, a miniaturized scintillation detector, and a small ionization chamber. For each detector, the deconvolution of the convolution integral M(x)  =  K(x)  ∗  D(x) served to obtain its specific 1D lateral dose response function K(x), and K(r) was calculated from it. Fourier transformations and back transformations were performed using function approximations by weighted sums of Gaussian functions and their analytical transformation. The 1D lateral dose response functions K(x) of the four types of detectors and their associated rotational symmetric counterparts K(r) were obtained. Significant negative curve portions of K(x) and K(r) were observed in the case of the silicon diode and the diamond detector, confirming the Monte-Carlo-based prediction (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-607). They are typical for the perturbation of the secondary electron field by a detector with

  16. 193nm immersion lithography for high-performance silicon photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraja, Shankar K.; Winroth, Gustaf; Locorotondo, Sabrina; Murdoch, Gayle; Milenin, Alexey; Delvaux, Christie; Ong, Patrick; Pathak, Shibnath; Xie, Weiqiang; Sterckx, Gunther; Lepage, Guy; Van Thourhout, Dries; Bogaerts, Wim; Van Campenhout, Joris; Absil, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Large-scale photonics integration has been proposed for many years to support the ever increasing requirements for long and short distance communications as well as package-to-package interconnects. Amongst the various technology options, silicon photonics has imposed itself as a promising candidate, relying on CMOS fabrication processes. While silicon photonics can share the technology platform developed for advanced CMOS devices it has specific dimension control requirements. Though the device dimensions are in the order of the wavelength of light used, the tolerance allowed can be less than 1% for certain devices. Achieving this is a challenging task which requires advanced patterning techniques along with process control. Another challenge is identifying an overlapping process window for diverse pattern densities and orientations on a single layer. In this paper, we present key technology challenges faced when using optical lithography for silicon photonics and advantages of using the 193nm immersion lithography system. We report successful demonstration of a modified 28nm- STI-like patterning platform for silicon photonics in 300mm Silicon-On-Insulator wafer technology. By careful process design, within-wafer CD variation (1sigma) of <1% is achieved for both isolated (waveguides) and dense (grating) patterns in silicon. In addition to dimensional control, low sidewall roughness is a crucial to achieve low scattering loss in the waveguides. With this platform, optical propagation loss as low as ~0.7 dB/cm is achieved for high-confinement single mode waveguides (450x220nm). This is an improvement of >20 % from the best propagation loss reported for this cross-section fabricated using e-beam lithography. By using a single-mode low-confinement waveguide geometry the loss is further reduced to ~0.12 dB/cm. Secondly, we present improvement in within-device phase error in wavelength selective devices, a critical parameter which is a direct measure of line

  17. Photon-counting H33D detector for biological fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalet, X.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J. V.; Jelinsky, P.; Millaud, J. E.; Weiss, S.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a photon-counting High-temporal and High-spatial resolution, High-throughput 3-Dimensional detector (H33D) for biological imaging of fluorescent samples. The design is based on a 25 mm diameter S20 photocathode followed by a 3-microchannel plate stack, and a cross-delay line anode. We describe the bench performance of the H33D detector, as well as preliminary imaging results obtained with fluorescent beads, quantum dots and live cells and discuss applications of future generation detectors for single-molecule imaging and high-throughput study of biomolecular interactions.

  18. Photon-Counting H33D Detector for Biological Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Michalet, X; Siegmund, O H W; Vallerga, J V; Jelinsky, P; Millaud, J E; Weiss, S

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a photon-counting High-temporal and High-spatial resolution, High-throughput 3-Dimensional detector (H33D) for biological imaging of fluorescent samples. The design is based on a 25 mm diameter S20 photocathode followed by a 3-microchannel plate stack, and a cross delay line anode. We describe the bench performance of the H33D detector, as well as preliminary imaging results obtained with fluorescent beads, quantum dots and live cells and discuss applications of future generation detectors for single-molecule imaging and high-throughput study of biomolecular interactions. PMID:20151021

  19. Room temperature single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Comandar, L. C.; Patel, K. A.; Fröhlich, B. Lucamarini, M.; Sharpe, A. W.; Dynes, J. F.; Yuan, Z. L.; Shields, A. J.; Penty, R. V.

    2014-01-13

    We report room temperature operation of telecom wavelength single-photon detectors for high bit rate quantum key distribution (QKD). Room temperature operation is achieved using InGaAs avalanche photodiodes integrated with electronics based on the self-differencing technique that increases avalanche discrimination sensitivity. Despite using room temperature detectors, we demonstrate QKD with record secure bit rates over a range of fiber lengths (e.g., 1.26 Mbit/s over 50 km). Furthermore, our results indicate that operating the detectors at room temperature increases the secure bit rate for short distances.

  20. A monolithically integrated polarization entangled photon pair source on a silicon chip

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Le Jeannic, Hanna; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Tsuchizawa, Tai; Munro, William John; Shimizu, Kaoru; Yamada, Koji; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Takesue, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    Integrated photonic circuits are one of the most promising platforms for large-scale photonic quantum information systems due to their small physical size and stable interferometers with near-perfect lateral-mode overlaps. Since many quantum information protocols are based on qubits defined by the polarization of photons, we must develop integrated building blocks to generate, manipulate, and measure the polarization-encoded quantum state on a chip. The generation unit is particularly important. Here we show the first integrated polarization-entangled photon pair source on a chip. We have implemented the source as a simple and stable silicon-on-insulator photonic circuit that generates an entangled state with 91 ± 2% fidelity. The source is equipped with versatile interfaces for silica-on-silicon or other types of waveguide platforms that accommodate the polarization manipulation and projection devices as well as pump light sources. Therefore, we are ready for the full-scale implementation of photonic quantum information systems on a chip. PMID:23150781

  1. Full characterization of laser-accelerated ion beams using Faraday cup, silicon carbide, and single-crystal diamond detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Margarone, D.; Prokupek, J.; Rus, B.; Krasa, J.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Torrisi, L.; Picciotto, A.; Nowak, T.; Musumeci, P.; Mocek, T.; Ullschmied, J.

    2011-05-15

    Multi-MeV beams of light ions have been produced using the 300 picosecond, kJ-class iodine laser, operating at the Prague Asterix Laser System facility in Prague. Real-time ion diagnostics have been performed by the use of various time-of-flight (TOF) detectors: ion collectors (ICs) with and without absorber thin films, new prototypes of single-crystal diamond and silicon carbide detectors, and an electrostatic ion mass spectrometer (IEA). In order to suppress the long photopeak induced by soft X-rays and to avoid the overlap with the signal from ultrafast particles, the ICs have been shielded with Al foil filters. The application of large-bandgap semiconductor detectors (>3 eV) ensured cutting of the plasma-emitted visible and soft-UV radiation and enhancing the sensitivity to the very fast proton/ion beams. Employing the IEA spectrometer, various ion species and charge states in the expanding laser-plasma have been determined. Processing of the experimental data based on the TOF technique, including estimation of the plasma fast proton maximum and peak energy, ion beam currents and total charge, total number of fast protons, as well as deconvolution processes, ion stopping power, and ion/photon transmission calculations for the different metallic filters used, are reported.

  2. Characterization of a PET detector head based on continuous LYSO crystals and monolithic, 64-pixel silicon photomultiplier matrices.

    PubMed

    Llosá, G; Barrio, J; Lacasta, C; Bisogni, M G; Del Guerra, A; Marcatili, S; Barrillon, P; Bondil-Blin, S; de la Taille, C; Piemonte, C

    2010-12-01

    The characterization of a PET detector head based on continuous LYSO crystals and silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays as photodetectors has been carried out for its use in the development of a small animal PET prototype. The detector heads are composed of a continuous crystal and a SiPM matrix with 64 pixels in a common substrate, fabricated specifically for this project. Three crystals of 12 mm × 12 mm × 5 mm size with different types of painting have been tested: white, black and black on the sides but white on the back of the crystal. The best energy resolution, obtained with the white crystal, is 16% FWHM. The detector response is linear up to 1275 keV. Tests with different position determination algorithms have been carried out with the three crystals. The spatial resolution obtained with the center of gravity algorithm is around 0.9 mm FWHM for the three crystals. As expected, the use of this algorithm results in the displacement of the reconstructed position toward the center of the crystal, more pronounced in the case of the white crystal. A maximum likelihood algorithm has been tested that can reconstruct correctly the interaction position of the photons also in the case of the white crystal.

  3. Development of Thin-Window Silicon Drift Detector for X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Carini, G.A.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Gaskin, J.A.; Keister, J.W.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Rehak, P.; Siddons, D.P.

    2009-10-01

    A new set of thin-window silicon drift detectors composed of an array of hexagonal shaped detectors has been designed, constructed and tested for X-ray spectroscopy. Each individual ThinWinSDD has a thin entrance window on one side and a spiral shaped hexagonal cathode around a center anode on the other side. To produce the thin entrance window a 10 keV implantation of boron through a 500 A silicon dioxide was used. The implantation was followed by an annealing at 700 C for 30 min and a reactive ion etching step to ensure the removal of silicon dioxide from the smallest feature (5 mum). An aluminum layer is coated in the same vacuum system after back-sputtering. This step involves removing the native oxide that has formed on the top of the silicon substrate and then sputtering a 1100 A thick layer of aluminum onto the X-ray entrance window. The aluminum layer must be thick enough to block visible light, but thin enough to be transparent to soft X-rays down to 280 eV. We discuss first test results that include detector leakage current measurements and the response for multiple detectors exposed to the National Synchrotron Light Source's UV beam line U3C located at Brookhaven National Laboratory for X-ray energies as low as 280 eV.

  4. Development of a thermal neutron detector based on scintillating fibers and silicon photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Barbagallo, Massimo; Greco, Giuseppe; Scire, Carlotta; Scire, Sergio; Cosentino, Luigi; Pappalardo, Alfio; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Montereali, Rosa Maria; Vincenti, Maria Aurora

    2010-09-15

    We propose a technique for thermal neutron detection, based on a {sup 6}Li converter placed in front of scintillating fibers readout by means of silicon photomultipliers. Such a technique allows building cheap and compact detectors and dosimeters, thus possibly opening new perspectives in terms of granular monitoring of neutron fluxes as well as space-resolved neutron detection.

  5. Evidence of Dopant Type-Inversion and Other Radiation Damage Effects of the CDF Silicon Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Ballarin, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this document is to study the effect of radiation damage on the silicon sensors. The reflection of the effect of radiation can be observed in two fundamental parameters of the detector: the bias current and the bias voltage. The leakage current directly affects the noise, while the bias voltage is required to collect the maximum signal deposited by the charged particle.

  6. Spherical silicon photonic microcavities: From amorphous to polycrystalline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenollosa, R.; Garín, M.; Meseguer, F.

    2016-06-01

    Shaping silicon as a spherical object is not an obvious task, especially when the object size is in the micrometer range. This has the important consequence of transforming bare silicon material in a microcavity, so it is able to confine light efficiently. Here, we have explored the inside volume of such microcavities, both in their amorphous and in their polycrystalline versions. The synthesis method, which is based on chemical vapor deposition, causes amorphous microspheres to have a high content of hydrogen that produces an onionlike distributed porous core when the microspheres are crystallized by a fast annealing regime. This substantially influences the resonant modes. However, a slow crystallization regime does not yield pores, and produces higher-quality-factor resonances that could be fitted to the Mie theory. This allows the establishment of a procedure for obtaining size calibration standards with relative errors of the order of 0.1%.

  7. A near-infrared 64-pixel superconducting nanowire single photon detector array with integrated multiplexed readout

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, M. S. Verma, V. B.; Stevens, M.; Gerrits, T.; Horansky, R. D.; Lita, A. E.; Mirin, R.; Nam, S. W.; Marsili, F.; Beyer, A.; Shaw, M. D.; Kumor, D.

    2015-05-11

    We demonstrate a 64-pixel free-space-coupled array of superconducting nanowire single photon detectors optimized for high detection efficiency in the near-infrared range. An integrated, readily scalable, multiplexed readout scheme is employed to reduce the number of readout lines to 16. The cryogenic, optical, and electronic packaging to read out the array as well as characterization measurements are discussed.

  8. Near-infrared Single-photon-counting Detectors for Free-space Laser Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William; Wu, Stewart; Waczynski, Augustyn; Miko, Laddawan

    2007-01-01

    We compare several photon-counting detector technologies for use as near-infrared timeresolved laser receivers in science instrument, communication and navigation systems. The key technologies are InGaAs(P) photocathode hybrid photomultiplier tubes and InGaAs(P) and HgCdTe avalanche photodiodes. We discuss recent experimental results and application.

  9. A new inner layer silicon micro-strip detector for D0

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Michael S.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The D{O} experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron is building a new inner layer detector (Layer-0) to be installed inside the existing D{O} Silicon Micro-strip Tracker (SMT). The Layer-0 detector is based on R&D performed for the RunIIb silicon upgrade, which was canceled in the fall of 2003. Layer-0 will be installed between the bean pipe and the the 2.2cm radius opening available in the SMT support structure. The radius of the first sampling will be reduced from 2.7cm to 1.6cm. Layer-0 will be radiation harder than the current SMT, thus ensuring that the silicon tracker remains viable through Tevatron RunII.

  10. Hybrid analog/digital, large format, photon counting detectors for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocker, J.; Rafal, M.; Denman, B.; Paresce, F.; Hiltner, A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a new microchannel plate photon-counting detector with an analog readout method based on a resistive anode is reported. This detector exhibits extremely high, stable electron gains of 10 to the 8th. At this gain, the spatial resolution is no longer primarily limited by the noise of the resistive anode, so that digital methods of readout, such as discrete conductors, lose their advantage. These detectors can be readily scaled to 40 mm and 70 mm formats to match plate scales of 2-m (and larger) telescopes. New, high speed digital electronics fully exploit the high spatial and time resolution made possible by gains of this level. Analysis of the theoretical performance of this detector shows that the major limitation to the spatial resolution is the proximity focus of the photocathode and the first microchannel plate. The detector has been mated to an echelle spectrograph developed.

  11. Statistical strength of experiments to reject local realism with photon pairs and inefficient detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanbao; Knill, Emanuel; Glancy, Scott

    2010-03-15

    Because of the fundamental importance of Bell's theorem, a loophole-free demonstration of a violation of local realism (LR) is highly desirable. Here, we study violations of LR involving photon pairs. We quantify the experimental evidence against LR by using measures of statistical strength related to the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence, as suggested by van Dam et al.[W. van Dam, R. D. Gill, and P. D. Grunwald, IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory. 51, 2812 (2005)]. Specifically, we analyze a test of LR with entangled states created from two independent polarized photons passing through a polarizing beam splitter. We numerically study the detection efficiency required to achieve a specified statistical strength for the rejection of LR depending on whether photon counters or detectors are used. Based on our results, we find that a test of LR free of the detection loophole requires photon counters with efficiencies of at least 89.71%, or photon detectors with efficiencies of at least 91.11%. For comparison, we also perform this analysis with ideal unbalanced Bell states, which are known to allow rejection of LR with detector efficiencies above 2/3.

  12. 18k Channels single photon counting readout circuit for hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, P.; Grybos, P.; Szczygiel, R.; Zoladz, M.; Sakumura, T.; Tsuji, Y.

    2013-01-01

    We have performed measurements of an integrated circuit named PXD18k designed for hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors used in X-ray imaging applications. The PXD18k integrated circuit, fabricated in CMOS 180 nm technology, has dimensions of 9.64 mm×20 mm and contains approximately 26 million transistors. The core of the IC is a matrix of 96×192 pixels with 100 μm×100 μm pixel size. Each pixel works in a single photon counting mode. A single pixel contains two charge sensitive amplifiers with Krummenacher feedback scheme, two shapers, two discriminators (with independent thresholds A and B) and two 16-bit ripple counters. The data are read out via eight low voltage differential signaling (LVDS) outputs with 100 Mbps rate. The power consumption is dominated by analog blocks and it is about 23 μW/pixel. The effective peaking time at the discriminator input is 30 ns and is mainly determined by the time constants of the charge sensitive amplifier (CSA). The gain is equal to 42.5 μV/e- and the equivalent noise charge is 168 e- rms (with bump-bonded silicon pixel detector). Thanks to the use of trim DACs in each pixel, the effective threshold spread at the discriminator input is only 1.79 mV. The dead time of the front end electronics for a standard setting is 172 ns (paralyzable model). In the standard readout mode (when the data collection time is separated from the time necessary to readout data from the chip) the PXD18k IC works with two energy thresholds per pixel. The PXD18k can also be operated in the continuous readout mode (with a zero dead time) where one can select the number of bits readout from each pixel to optimize the PXD18k frame rate. For example, for reading out 16 bits/pixel the frame rate is 2.7 kHz and for 4 bits/pixel it rises to 7.1 kHz.

  13. Ultrahigh Q whispering gallery mode electro-optic resonators on a silicon photonic chip.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Schlafer, John; Ryan, Colm; Maleki, Lute

    2016-09-15

    Crystalline whispering gallery mode (WGM) electro-optic resonators made of LiNbO3 and LiTaO3 are critical for a wide range of applications in nonlinear and quantum optics, as well as RF photonics, due to their remarkably ultrahigh Q(>108) and large electro-optic coefficient. Achieving efficient coupling of these resonators to planar on-chip optical waveguides is essential for any high-yield and robust practical applications. However, it has been very challenging to demonstrate such coupling while preserving the ultrahigh Q properties of the resonators. Here, we show how the silicon photonic platform can overcome this long-standing challenge. Silicon waveguides with appropriate designs enable efficient and strong coupling to these WGM electro-optic resonators. We discuss various integration architectures of these resonators onto a silicon chip and experimentally demonstrate critical coupling of a planar Si waveguide and an ultrahigh QLiTaO3 resonator (Q∼108). Our results show a promising path for widespread and practical applications of these resonators on a silicon photonic platform. PMID:27628401

  14. Ultrahigh Q whispering gallery mode electro-optic resonators on a silicon photonic chip.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Mohammad; Ilchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Schlafer, John; Ryan, Colm; Maleki, Lute

    2016-09-15

    Crystalline whispering gallery mode (WGM) electro-optic resonators made of LiNbO3 and LiTaO3 are critical for a wide range of applications in nonlinear and quantum optics, as well as RF photonics, due to their remarkably ultrahigh Q(>108) and large electro-optic coefficient. Achieving efficient coupling of these resonators to planar on-chip optical waveguides is essential for any high-yield and robust practical applications. However, it has been very challenging to demonstrate such coupling while preserving the ultrahigh Q properties of the resonators. Here, we show how the silicon photonic platform can overcome this long-standing challenge. Silicon waveguides with appropriate designs enable efficient and strong coupling to these WGM electro-optic resonators. We discuss various integration architectures of these resonators onto a silicon chip and experimentally demonstrate critical coupling of a planar Si waveguide and an ultrahigh QLiTaO3 resonator (Q∼108). Our results show a promising path for widespread and practical applications of these resonators on a silicon photonic platform.

  15. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  16. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  17. Waveguide integrated superconducting single-photon detectors with high internal quantum efficiency at telecom wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Oliver; Ferrari, Simone; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Goltsman, Gregory N.; Korneev, Alexander; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, compatibility with an integrated optical platform is a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. Here we present SNSPDs embedded in nanophotonic integrated circuits which achieve internal quantum efficiencies close to unity at 1550 nm wavelength. This allows for the SNSPDs to be operated at bias currents far below the critical current where unwanted dark count events reach milli-Hz levels while on-chip detection efficiencies above 70% are maintained. The measured dark count rates correspond to noise-equivalent powers in the 10−19 W/Hz−1/2 range and the timing jitter is as low as 35 ps. Our detectors are fully scalable and interface directly with waveguide-based optical platforms. PMID:26061283

  18. Large format MBE HgCdTe on silicon detector development for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanold, Brandon J.; Figer, Donald F.; Lee, Joong; Kolb, Kimberly; Marcuson, Iain; Corrales, Elizabeth; Getty, Jonathan; Mears, Lynn

    2015-08-01

    The Center for Detectors at Rochester Institute of Technology and Raytheon Vision Systems (RVS) are leveraging RVS capabilities to produce large format, short-wave infrared HgCdTe focal plane arrays on silicon (Si) substrate wafers. Molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) grown HgCdTe on Si can reduce detector fabrication costs dramatically, while keeping performance competitive with HgCdTe grown on CdZnTe. Reduction in detector costs will alleviate a dominant expense for observational astrophysics telescopes. This paper presents the characterization of 2.5μm cutoff MBE HgCdTe/Si detectors including pre- and post-thinning performance. Detector characteristics presented include dark current, read noise, spectral response, persistence, linearity, crosstalk probability, and analysis of material defects.

  19. Evaluating the Performance of a Commercial Silicon Drift Detector for X-ray Microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, Edward A

    2011-01-01

    Silicon drift detectors (SDDs) are rapidly becoming the energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) of choice, especially for scanning electron microscopy x-ray microanalysis. The complementary features of large active areas (i.e., high collection angle) and high count rate capability of these detector contribute to their popularity, as well as the absence of liquid nitrogen cooling and good energy resolution of these detectors. The performance of an EDAX Apollo 40 SDD on a JEOL 6500F SEM is discussed. The larger detector resulted in an significant increase (~3.5x) in geometric collection efficiency compared to the original 10mm2 Si(Li) detector that it replaced. The SEM can provide high beam currents (up to 200nA in some conditions) at small probe diameters. The high count rate capability of the SDD and the high current capability of the SEM compliment each other and provide excellent EDS analytical capabilities for both single point and spectrum imaging applications.

  20. Silicon strip tracking detector development and prototyping for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, S.

    2016-07-01

    In about ten years from now, the Phase-II upgrade of the LHC will be carried out. Due to increased luminosity, a severe radiation dose and high particle rates will occur for the experiments. In consequence, several detector components will have to be upgraded. In the ATLAS experiment, the current inner detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracking detector with the goal of at least delivering the present detector performance also in the harsh Phase-II LHC conditions. This report presents the current planning and results from first prototype measurements of the upgrade silicon strip tracking detector.