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Sample records for simple sequence repeat-based

  1. Simple sequence repeat-based consensus linkage map of Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xue-Xia; Xub, Shi-Jie; Li, Ming-Hui; Li, Mu-Wang; Huang, Jian-Hua; Dai, Fang-Yin; Marino, Susan W; Mills, David R; Zeng, Peiyu; Mita, Kazuei; Jia, Shi-Hai; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wen-Bin; Xiang, Hui; Guo, Qiu-Hong; Xu, An-Ying; Kong, Xiang-Yin; Lin, Hong-Xuan; Shi, Yao-Zhou; Lu, Gang; Zhang, Xianglin; Huang, Wei; Yasukochi, Yuji; Sugasaki, Toshiyuki; Shimada, Toru; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Xiang, Zhong-Huai; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Goldsmith, Marian R; Lu, Cheng; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Huang, Yong-Ping

    2005-11-08

    We established a genetic linkage map employing 518 simple sequence repeat (SSR, or microsatellite) markers for Bombyx mori (silkworm), the economically and culturally important lepidopteran insect, as part of an international genomics program. A survey of six representative silkworm strains using 2,500 (CA)n- and (CT)n-based SSR markers revealed 17-24% polymorphism, indicating a high degree of homozygosity resulting from a long history of inbreeding. Twenty-nine SSR linkage groups were established in well characterized Dazao and C108 strains based on genotyping of 189 backcross progeny derived from an F(1) male mated with a C108 female. The clustering was further focused to 28 groups by genotyping 22 backcross progeny derived from an F(1) female mated with a C108 male. This set of SSR linkage groups was further assigned to the 28 chromosomes (established linkage groups) of silkworm aided by visible mutations and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence markers developed from previously mapped genes, cDNA sequences, and cloned random amplified polymorphic DNAs. By integrating a visible mutation p (plain, larval marking) and 29 well conserved genes of insects onto this SSR-based linkage map, a second generation consensus silkworm genetic map with a range of 7-40 markers per linkage group and a total map length of approximately 3431.9 cM was constructed and its high efficiency for genotyping and potential application for synteny studies of Lepidoptera and other insects was demonstrated.

  2. Simple sequence repeat-based association analysis of fruit traits in eggplant (Solanum melongena).

    PubMed

    Ge, H Y; Liu, Y; Zhang, J; Han, H Q; Li, H Z; Shao, W T; Chen, H Y

    2013-11-18

    Association mapping based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) provides a promising tool to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in plant resources. A total of 141 eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) accessions were selected to detect simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers associated with nine fruit traits. Population structure analysis was performed with 105 SSR markers, which revealed that two subgroups were present in this population. LD analysis exhibited an extensive long-range LD of approximately 11 cM. A total of 49 marker associations related to eight phenotypic traits were identified to involve 24 different markers, although no association was found with the trait of fruit glossiness. To our knowledge, this is the 1st approach to use a genome-wide association study in eggplant with SSR markers. These results suggest that the association analysis approach could be a useful alternative to traditional linkage mapping to detect putative QTLs in eggplant.

  3. Repeat-based Sequence Typing of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Abdur; El Kheir, Sara M; Back, Alexandre; Mangavel, Cécile; Revol-Junelles, Anne-Marie; Borges, Frédéric

    2016-06-02

    Carnobacterium maltaromaticum is a Lactic Acid Bacterium (LAB) of technological interest for the food industry, especially the dairy as bioprotection and ripening flora. The industrial use of this LAB requires accurate and resolutive typing tools. A new typing method for C. maltaromaticum inspired from MLVA analysis and called Repeat-based Sequence Typing (RST) is described. Rather than electrophoresis analysis, our RST method is based on sequence analysis of multiple loci containing Variable-Number Tandem-Repeats (VNTRs). The method described here for C. maltaromaticum relies on the analysis of three VNTR loci, and was applied to a collection of 24 strains. For each strain, a PCR product corresponding to the amplification of each VNTR loci was sequenced. Sequence analysis allowed delineating 11, 11, and 12 alleles for loci VNTR-A, VNTR-B, and VNTR-C, respectively. Considering the allele combination exhibited by each strain allowed defining 15 genotypes, ending in a discriminatory index of 0.94. Comparison with MLST revealed that both methods were complementary for strain typing in C. maltaromaticum.

  4. Insertion sequence- and tandem repeat-based genotyping techniques for Xanthomonas citri pv. mangiferaeindicae.

    PubMed

    Pruvost, O; Vernière, C; Vital, K; Guérin, F; Jouen, E; Chiroleu, F; Ah-You, N; Gagnevin, L

    2011-07-01

    Molecular fingerprinting techniques that have the potential to identify or subtype bacteria at the strain level are needed for improving diagnosis and understanding of the epidemiology of pathogens such as Xanthomonas citri pv. mangiferaeindicae, which causes mango bacterial canker disease. We developed a ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction targeting the IS1595 insertion sequence as a means to differentiate pv. mangiferaeindicae from the closely related pv. anacardii (responsible for cashew bacterial spot), which has the potential to infect mango but not to cause significant disease. This technique produced weakly polymorphic fingerprints composed of ≈70 amplified fragments per strain for a worldwide collection of X. citri pv. mangiferaeindicae but produced no or very weak amplification for pv. anacardii strains. Together, 12 tandem repeat markers were able to subtype X. citri pv. mangiferaeindicae at the strain level, distinguishing 231 haplotypes from a worldwide collection of 299 strains. Multilocus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA), IS1595-ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction, and amplified fragment length polymorphism showed differences in discriminatory power and were congruent in describing the diversity of this strain collection, suggesting low levels of recombination. The potential of the MLVA scheme for molecular epidemiology studies of X. citri pv. mangiferaeindicae is discussed.

  5. Simple sequence repeat-based assessment of genetic relationships among Prunus rootstocks.

    PubMed

    Turkoglu, Z; Bilgener, S; Ercisli, S; Bakir, M; Koc, A; Akbulut, M; Gercekcioglu, R; Gunes, M; Esitken, A

    2010-11-03

    Ten SSR loci, previously developed for Prunus, were analyzed to examine genetic relationships among 23 rootstock candidates for sweet and sour cherries, of the species P. avium, P. cerasus, P. mahaleb, and P. angustifolia. Five genotypes of P. laurocerasus, not used as rootstock, were included in the molecular analysis. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 8 to 12, with a mean of 9, while the number of microsatellite genotypes varied from 8 to 17, indicating that the SSRs were highly informative. The degree of heterozygosity (0.61) was high. Clustering analysis resulted in two main clusters. The first cluster was divided into two subclusters; the first subcluster consisted of P. avium and P. cerasus, and the second subcluster consisted of P. laurocerasus. The second cluster was divided into two subclusters. The first subcluster consisted of P. mahaleb genotypes and the second consisted of P. angustifolia genotypes. The reference rootstocks also clustered with their associated botanical species. Unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean analysis demonstrated that P. laurocerasus genotypes had less genetic variation and that P. avium genotypes were more closely related to P. cerasus. The SSR-based phylogeny was generally consistent with Prunus taxonomy information, suggesting the applicability of SSR analysis for genotyping and phylogenetic studies in the genus Prunus.

  6. A simple method of accelerating monotonic sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, B.; Bhattacharyya, K.

    1993-03-01

    A converse of the well known Cesaro method has been demonstrated to accelerate successfully various monotonic sequences of practical concern. The method is simple, regular and particular apt for low-order data. Pilot calculations highlighting the workability in varying practical contexts involve atomic lattice constants (cubic), typical nuclear attraction integrals in molecular calculations and critical parameters in phase transitions.

  7. Simple sequence repeats in bryophyte mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao-Xian; Zhu, Rui-Liang; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are thought to be common in plant mitochondrial (mt) genomes, but have yet to be fully described for bryophytes. We screened the mt genomes of two liverworts (Marchantia polymorpha and Pleurozia purpurea), two mosses (Physcomitrella patens and Anomodon rugelii) and two hornworts (Phaeoceros laevis and Nothoceros aenigmaticus), and detected 475 SSRs. Some SSRs are found conserved during the evolution, among which except one exists in both liverworts and mosses, all others are shared only by the two liverworts, mosses or hornworts. SSRs are known as DNA tracts having high mutation rates; however, according to our observations, they still can evolve slowly. The conservativeness of these SSRs suggests that they are under strong selection and could play critical roles in maintaining the gene functions.

  8. Simple sequence repeats in prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Mrázek, Jan; Guo, Xiangxue; Shah, Apurva

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in DNA sequences are composed of tandem iterations of short oligonucleotides and may have functional and/or structural properties that distinguish them from general DNA sequences. They are variable in length because of slip-strand mutations and may also affect local structure of the DNA molecule or the encoded proteins. Long SSRs (LSSRs) are common in eukaryotes but rare in most prokaryotes. In pathogens, SSRs can enhance antigenic variance of the pathogen population in a strategy that counteracts the host immune response. We analyze representations of SSRs in >300 prokaryotic genomes and report significant differences among different prokaryotes as well as among different types of SSRs. LSSRs composed of short oligonucleotides (1–4 bp length, designated LSSR1–4) are often found in host-adapted pathogens with reduced genomes that are not known to readily survive in a natural environment outside the host. In contrast, LSSRs composed of longer oligonucleotides (5–11 bp length, designated LSSR5–11) are found mostly in nonpathogens and opportunistic pathogens with large genomes. Comparisons among SSRs of different lengths suggest that LSSR1–4 are likely maintained by selection. This is consistent with the established role of some LSSR1–4 in enhancing antigenic variance. By contrast, abundance of LSSR5–11 in some genomes may reflect the SSRs' general tendency to expand rather than their specific role in the organisms' physiology. Differences among genomes in terms of SSR representations and their possible interpretations are discussed. PMID:17485665

  9. Genome Wide Characterization of Simple Sequence Repeats in Cucumber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The whole genome sequence of the cucumber cultivar Gy14 was recently sequenced at 15× coverage with the Roche 454 Titanium technology. The microsatellite DNA sequences (simple sequence repeats, SSRs) in the assembled scaffolds were computationally explored and characterized. A total of 112,073 SSRs ...

  10. Nanopore Technology: A Simple, Inexpensive, Futuristic Technology for DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P D

    2016-10-01

    In health care, importance of DNA sequencing has been fully established. Sanger's Capillary Electrophoresis DNA sequencing methodology is time consuming, cumbersome, hence become more expensive. Lately, because of its versatility DNA sequencing became house hold name, and therefore, there is an urgent need of simple, fast, inexpensive, DNA sequencing technology. In the beginning of this century efforts were made, and Nanopore DNA sequencing technology was developed; still it is infancy, nevertheless, it is the futuristic technology.

  11. [Organization of simple sequences in the Drosophilia melanoga ter genome].

    PubMed

    Vashakidze, R P; Mamulashvili, N A; Kalandarishvili, K G; Kolchinskiĭ, A M; Zaalishvili, M M

    1988-01-01

    Fragments of Drosophila melanogaster DNA that intensively hybridize with simple sequences poly[(dG-dT).(dC-dA)], poly[(dA).(dT)] and poly[(dG-dA).(dC-dT)] were cloned. The first two types of simple sequences are organized in these clones as separated stretches of moderate length, repeated many times within 12-15 kb. Each cluster contains only one type of the simple sequences and originates from a unique in the genome. In contrast, poly[(dG-dA).(dC-dT)] occurs in the genome as several isolated motifs.

  12. Highly Informative Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers for Fingerprinting Hazelnut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite markers have many applications in breeding and genetic studies of plants, including fingerprinting of cultivars and investigations of genetic diversity, and therefore provide information for better management of germplasm collections. They are repeatab...

  13. Simple sequence repeat markers that identify Claviceps species and strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Claviceps purpurea is a pathogen that infects most members of the Pooideae subfamily and causes ergot, a floral disease in which the ovary is replaced with a sclerotium. This study was initiated to develop Simple Sequence Repeat (SSRs) markers for rapid identification of C. purpurea. SSRs were desi...

  14. Aircraft stress sequence development: A complex engineering process made simple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, K. H.; Butts, D. G.; Sparks, W. A.

    1994-01-01

    Development of stress sequences for critical aircraft structure requires flight measured usage data, known aircraft loads, and established relationships between aircraft flight loads and structural stresses. Resulting cycle-by-cycle stress sequences can be directly usable for crack growth analysis and coupon spectra tests. Often, an expert in loads and spectra development manipulates the usage data into a typical sequence of representative flight conditions for which loads and stresses are calculated. For a fighter/trainer type aircraft, this effort is repeated many times for each of the fatigue critical locations (FCL) resulting in expenditure of numerous engineering hours. The Aircraft Stress Sequence Computer Program (ACSTRSEQ), developed by Southwest Research Institute under contract to San Antonio Air Logistics Center, presents a unique approach for making complex technical computations in a simple, easy to use method. The program is written in Microsoft Visual Basic for the Microsoft Windows environment.

  15. A blackberry (Rubus L.) expressed sequence tag library for the development of simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A blackberry (Rubus L.) expressed sequence tag (EST) library was produced for developing simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from the tetraploid blackberry cultivar, Merton Thornless, the source of the thornless trait in commercial cultivars. RNA was extracted from young expanding leaves and used f...

  16. Comparison of simple sequence repeats in 19 Archaea.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, S

    2006-12-05

    All organisms that have been studied until now have been found to have differential distribution of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), with more SSRs in intergenic than in coding sequences. SSR distribution was investigated in Archaea genomes where complete chromosome sequences of 19 Archaea were analyzed with the program SPUTNIK to find di- to penta-nucleotide repeats. The number of repeats was determined for the complete chromosome sequences and for the coding and non-coding sequences. Different from what has been found for other groups of organisms, there is an abundance of SSRs in coding regions of the genome of some Archaea. Dinucleotide repeats were rare and CG repeats were found in only two Archaea. In general, trinucleotide repeats are the most abundant SSR motifs; however, pentanucleotide repeats are abundant in some Archaea. Some of the tetranucleotide and pentanucleotide repeat motifs are organism specific. In general, repeats are short and CG-rich repeats are present in Archaea having a CG-rich genome. Among the 19 Archaea, SSR density was not correlated with genome size or with optimum growth temperature. Pentanucleotide density had an inverse correlation with the CG content of the genome.

  17. Finding minimal action sequences with a simple evaluation of actions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashvin; Gurney, Kevin N.

    2014-01-01

    Animals are able to discover the minimal number of actions that achieves an outcome (the minimal action sequence). In most accounts of this, actions are associated with a measure of behavior that is higher for actions that lead to the outcome with a shorter action sequence, and learning mechanisms find the actions associated with the highest measure. In this sense, previous accounts focus on more than the simple binary signal of “was the outcome achieved?”; they focus on “how well was the outcome achieved?” However, such mechanisms may not govern all types of behavioral development. In particular, in the process of action discovery (Redgrave and Gurney, 2006), actions are reinforced if they simply lead to a salient outcome because biological reinforcement signals occur too quickly to evaluate the consequences of an action beyond an indication of the outcome's occurrence. Thus, action discovery mechanisms focus on the simple evaluation of “was the outcome achieved?” and not “how well was the outcome achieved?” Notwithstanding this impoverishment of information, can the process of action discovery find the minimal action sequence? We address this question by implementing computational mechanisms, referred to in this paper as no-cost learning rules, in which each action that leads to the outcome is associated with the same measure of behavior. No-cost rules focus on “was the outcome achieved?” and are consistent with action discovery. No-cost rules discover the minimal action sequence in simulated tasks and execute it for a substantial amount of time. Extensive training, however, results in extraneous actions, suggesting that a separate process (which has been proposed in action discovery) must attenuate learning if no-cost rules participate in behavioral development. We describe how no-cost rules develop behavior, what happens when attenuation is disrupted, and relate the new mechanisms to wider computational and biological context. PMID:25506326

  18. Evolution Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Plant Genome.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Qingmei; Li, Aixian; Hou, Fuyun; Zhang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widespread units on genome sequences, and play many important roles in plants. In order to reveal the evolution of plant genomes, we investigated the evolutionary regularities of SSRs during the evolution of plant species and the plant kingdom by analysis of twelve sequenced plant genome sequences. First, in the twelve studied plant genomes, the main SSRs were those which contain repeats of 1-3 nucleotides combination. Second, in mononucleotide SSRs, the A/T percentage gradually increased along with the evolution of plants (except for P. patens). With the increase of SSRs repeat number the percentage of A/T in C. reinhardtii had no significant change, while the percentage of A/T in terrestrial plants species gradually declined. Third, in dinucleotide SSRs, the percentage of AT/TA increased along with the evolution of plant kingdom and the repeat number increased in terrestrial plants species. This trend was more obvious in dicotyledon than monocotyledon. The percentage of CG/GC showed the opposite pattern to the AT/TA. Forth, in trinucleotide SSRs, the percentages of combinations including two or three A/T were in a rising trend along with the evolution of plant kingdom; meanwhile with the increase of SSRs repeat number in plants species, different species chose different combinations as dominant SSRs. SSRs in C. reinhardtii, P. patens, Z. mays and A. thaliana showed their specific patterns related to evolutionary position or specific changes of genome sequences. The results showed that, SSRs not only had the general pattern in the evolution of plant kingdom, but also were associated with the evolution of the specific genome sequence. The study of the evolutionary regularities of SSRs provided new insights for the analysis of the plant genome evolution.

  19. Molecular identity of ramie germplasms using simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Luan, M B; Chen, B F; Zou, Z Z; Zhu, J J; Wang, X F; Xu, Y; Sun, Z M; Chen, J H

    2015-03-27

    DNA identity is highly effective and efficient for distinguishing crop varieties regardless of their phenotypic similarities. To establish DNA identity in ramie, 21 simple sequence repeat primers were amplified in 108 accessions of domestic and exotic ramie germplasms. Sixty polymorphic bands were obtained, with an average of 2.9 bands per locus and 2-8 band types per primer locus (average of 5.19 band types). The Simpson's diversity index of the 21 simple sequence repeat loci ranged from 0.158 to 0.808 with an average of 0.612. There was large difference in the specific index in the germplasm tested, from 44.082 to 218.163, with an average of 83.620. Based on allele band type, 8 primer pairs were selected for DNA fingerprinting of the 108 genotypes. The combination of the 8 primer pairs were found to be very effective for distinguishing these genotypes, indicating that they can be used in the molecular DNA identity of ramie.

  20. Always look on both sides: Phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily,...

  1. Simple sequence repeat map of the sunflower genome.

    PubMed

    Tang, S.; Yu, J.-K.; Slabaugh, B.; Shintani, K.; Knapp, J.

    2002-12-01

    Several independent molecular genetic linkage maps of varying density and completeness have been constructed for cultivated sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.). Because of the dearth of sequence and probe-specific DNA markers in the public domain, the various genetic maps of sunflower have not been integrated and a single reference map has not emerged. Moreover, comparisons between maps have been confounded by multiple linkage group nomenclatures and the lack of common DNA markers. The goal of the present research was to construct a dense molecular genetic linkage map for sunflower using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. First, 879 SSR markers were developed by identifying 1,093 unique SSR sequences in the DNA sequences of 2,033 clones isolated from genomic DNA libraries enriched for (AC)(n) or (AG)(n) and screening 1,000 SSR primer pairs; 579 of the newly developed SSR markers (65.9% of the total) were polymorphic among four elite inbred lines (RHA280, RHA801, PHA and PHB). The genetic map was constructed using 94 RHA280 x RHA801 F(7) recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and 408 polymorphic SSR markers (462 SSR marker loci segregated in the mapping population). Of the latter, 459 coalesced into 17 linkage groups presumably corresponding to the 17 chromosomes in the haploid sunflower genome ( x = 17). The map was 1,368.3-cM long and had a mean density of 3.1 cM per locus. The SSR markers described herein supply a critical mass of DNA markers for constructing genetic maps of sunflower and create the basis for unifying and cross-referencing the multitude of genetic maps developed for wild and cultivated sunflowers.

  2. Survey of simple sequence repeats in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    PubMed

    Guan, L; Huang, J F; Feng, G Q; Wang, X W; Wang, Y; Chen, B Y; Qiao, Y S

    2013-07-30

    The use of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), or microsatellites, as genetic markers has become popular due to their abundance and variation in length among individuals. In this study, we investigated linkage groups (LGs) in the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and demonstrated variation in the abundances, densities, and relative densities of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were more common than longer repeats in all LGs examined. Perfect SSRs were the predominant SSR type found and their abundance was extremely stable among LGs and chloroplasts. Abundances of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were positively correlated with LG size, whereas those of tetranucleotide and hexanucleotide SSRs were not. Generally, in each LG, the abundance, relative abundance, relative density, and the proportion of each unique SSR all declined rapidly as the repeated unit increased. Furthermore, the lengths and frequencies of SSRs varied among different LGs.

  3. Transcriptome sequencing and simple sequence repeat marker development for three Macaronesian endemic plant species1

    PubMed Central

    White, Oliver W.; Doo, Bethany; Carine, Mark A.; Chapman, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: Oceanic islands offer unparalleled opportunities to investigate evolutionary processes such as adaptation and speciation. However, few genomic resources are available for oceanic island endemics. In this study, we publish transcriptome sequences from three Macaronesian endemic plant species (Argyranthemum broussonetii [Asteraceae], Descurainia bourgaeana [Brassicaceae], and Echium wildpretii [Boraginaceae]) that are representative of lineages that have radiated in the region. In addition, the utility of transcriptome data for marker development is demonstrated. Methods and Results: Transcriptomes from the three plant species were sequenced, assembled, and annotated. Between 1972 and 2282 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified for each taxon. Primers were designed and tested for 30 of the candidate SSRs identified in Argyranthemum, of which 12 amplified well across three species and eight were polymorphic. Conclusions: We demonstrate here that a single transcriptome sequence is sufficient to identify hundreds of polymorphic SSR markers. The SSRs are applicable to a wide range of questions relating to the evolution of island lineages. PMID:27610280

  4. Periodic sequences of simple maps can support chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cánovas, Jose S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the Parrondo's paradox when several dynamically simple maps are combined in a periodic way, producing chaotic dynamics. We show that the paradox is not commutative, that is, it depends on the way that the maps are iterated. We also see that the paradox happens more frequently when the number of maps that we iterate increases.

  5. Menagerie of Viruses: Diverse Chemical Sequences or Simple Electrostatics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, M.

    2008-03-01

    The genome packing in hundreds of viruses is investigated by analyzing the chemical sequences of the genomes and the corresponding capsid proteins, in combination with experimental facts on the structures of the packaged genomes. Based on statistical mechanics arguments and computer simulations, we have derived a universal model, based simply on non-specific electrostatic interactions. Our model is able to predict the essential aspects of genome packing in diversely different viruses, such as the genome size and its density distribution. Our result is in contrast to the long-held view that specific interactions between the sequenced amino acid residues and the nucleotides of the genome control the genome packing. Implications of this finding in the evolution and biotechnology will be discussed.

  6. A Quick and Simple Database for Comparing Toxin Sequence Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-13

    c.C’-IY CLAMSIFCAThON OF T,,S PAGE (JJfoL I REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 7 : ~.001 ,a.REPORT SECURITY CLASSIFICiATION 1b. RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS 2.SZCt 3... Ryden , L Tcxlcon, i972, /,ol 10, pg 405-413 ........ Found text starng with find # 2 , lines 555 to 558 137. Amino ac:d sequence of a presynaptic

  7. Development and characterization of simple sequence repeats for Bipolaris sokiniana and cross transferability to related species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers were developed from a small insert genomic library for Bipolaris sorokiniana, a mitosporic fungal pathogen that causes spot blotch and root rot in switchgrass. About 59% of sequenced clones (n=384) harbored various SSR motifs. After eliminating the redundant seq...

  8. Development of expressed sequence tag and expressed sequence tag–simple sequence repeat marker resources for Musa acuminata

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Marco A. N.; de Oliveira Cruz, Viviane; Emediato, Flavia L.; de Camargo Teixeira, Cristiane; Souza, Manoel T.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Rennó Azevedo, Vânia C.; Ferreira, Claudia F.; Amorim, Edson P.; de Alencar Figueiredo, Lucio Flavio; Martins, Natalia F.; de Jesus Barbosa Cavalcante, Maria; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; da Silva, Orzenil Bonfim; Pappas, Georgios J.; Pignolet, Luc; Abadie, Catherine; Ciampi, Ana Y.; Piffanelli, Pietro; Miller, Robert N. G.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Banana (Musa acuminata) is a crop contributing to global food security. Many varieties lack resistance to biotic stresses, due to sterility and narrow genetic background. The objective of this study was to develop an expressed sequence tag (EST) database of transcripts expressed during compatible and incompatible banana–Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Mf) interactions. Black leaf streak disease (BLSD), caused by Mf, is a destructive disease of banana. Microsatellite markers were developed as a resource for crop improvement. Methodology cDNA libraries were constructed from in vitro-infected leaves from BLSD-resistant M. acuminata ssp. burmaniccoides Calcutta 4 (MAC4) and susceptible M. acuminata cv. Cavendish Grande Naine (MACV). Clones were 5′-end Sanger sequenced, ESTs assembled with TGICL and unigenes annotated using BLAST, Blast2GO and InterProScan. Mreps was used to screen for simple sequence repeats (SSRs), with markers evaluated for polymorphism using 20 diploid (AA) M. acuminata accessions contrasting in resistance to Mycosphaerella leaf spot diseases. Principal results A total of 9333 high-quality ESTs were obtained for MAC4 and 3964 for MACV, which assembled into 3995 unigenes. Of these, 2592 displayed homology to genes encoding proteins with known or putative function, and 266 to genes encoding proteins with unknown function. Gene ontology (GO) classification identified 543 GO terms, 2300 unigenes were assigned to EuKaryotic orthologous group categories and 312 mapped to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. A total of 624 SSR loci were identified, with trinucleotide repeat motifs the most abundant in MAC4 (54.1 %) and MACV (57.6 %). Polymorphism across M. acuminata accessions was observed with 75 markers. Alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 8, totalling 289. The polymorphism information content ranged from 0.08 to 0.81. Conclusions This EST collection offers a resource for studying functional genes, including

  9. Developing expressed sequence tag libraries and the discovery of simple sequence repeat markers for two species of raspberry (Rubus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Due to a relatively high level of codominant inheritance and transferability within and among taxonomic groups, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are important elements in comparative mapping and delineation of genomic regions associated with traits of economic importance. Expressed S...

  10. Sequence determination from overlapping fragments: a simple model of whole-genome shotgun sequencing.

    PubMed

    Derrida, Bernard; Fink, Thomas M A

    2002-02-11

    Assembling fragments randomly sampled from along a sequence is the basis of whole-genome shotgun sequencing, a technique used to map the DNA of the human and other genomes. We calculate the probability that a random sequence can be recovered from a collection of overlapping fragments. We provide an exact solution for an infinite alphabet and in the case of constant overlaps. For the general problem we apply two assembly strategies and give the probability that the assembly puzzle can be solved in the limit of infinitely many fragments.

  11. Sequence Determination from Overlapping Fragments: A Simple Model of Whole-Genome Shotgun Sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrida, Bernard; Fink, Thomas M.

    2002-02-01

    Assembling fragments randomly sampled from along a sequence is the basis of whole-genome shotgun sequencing, a technique used to map the DNA of the human and other genomes. We calculate the probability that a random sequence can be recovered from a collection of overlapping fragments. We provide an exact solution for an infinite alphabet and in the case of constant overlaps. For the general problem we apply two assembly strategies and give the probability that the assembly puzzle can be solved in the limit of infinitely many fragments.

  12. Development of expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers for Chrysanthemum morifolium and closely related species.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Zhang, Q X; Sun, M; Pan, H T; Kong, Z X

    2015-07-13

    With the development of chrysanthemum breeding in recent years, an increasing number of wild species in genera related to Chrysanthemum were introduced to extend the genetic resources and facilitate the genetic improvement of chrysanthemums via hybridization. However, few simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are available for marker-assisted breeding and population genetic studies of chrysanthemum and closely related species. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in public databases and cross-species transferable markers are considered to be a cost-effective means for developing sequence-based markers. In this study, 25 EST-SSRs were successfully developed from Chrysanthemum EST sequences for Chrysanthemum morifolium and closely related species. In total, 4164 unigene sequences were assembled from 7180 ESTs of chrysanthemum in GenBank, which were subsequently used to screen for the presence of microsatellites with the SSRIT software. The screening criteria were 8, 5, 4, and 3 repeating units for di-, tri-, tetra-, and penta- and higher-order nucleotides, respectively. Moreover, 310 SSR loci from 296 sequences were identified, and 198 primer pairs for SSR amplification were designed with the Primer Premier 5.0 software, of which 25 SSR loci showed polymorphic amplification in 52 species and varieties belonging to Chrysanthemum, Ajania, and Opisthopappus. The application of EST-SSR markers to the identification of intergeneric hybrids between Chrysanthemum and Ajania was demonstrated. Therefore, EST-SSRs can be developed for species that lack gene sequences or ESTs by utilizing ESTs of closely related species.

  13. Development of simple sequence repeat markers for the soybean rust fungus, Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We developed 24 simple sequence repeat markers for Phakopsora pachyrhizi, a fungal pathogen of soybean (Glycine max) and other legumes. All 24 of the loci were evaluated on 28 isolates of P. pachyrhizi. Twenty-one loci were polymorphic, with allelic diversity ranging from two to eight alleles, and...

  14. [Data mining of simple sequence repeats in transcriptome sequences of Tibetan medicinal plant Zangyinchen Swertia mussotii].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue; Yue Chun-Jiang; Wang, Yi; Ma, Jia-qiang; Sun, Hong-bo; Luo, Min; Ma, Peng-ju; Zhang, Lin-xia; Ma, Xu; Chen, Chuan-chuan; Li, Hua; Tang, Li

    2015-06-01

    MISA (MicroSAtelite) software was employed to screen SSRs in 68 787 contigs of Swertia mussotii transcriptome sequences. 5 610 SSRs were distributed in 5 099 contigs which accounted for 7.41% of 68 787 contigs. There are 220 kinds of SSR motifs existing in S. mussotii transcriptome. On average, SSRs occurred every 12.60 kb in length. In the SSRs, the tri-nucleotide repeat motif was the most abundant (45.99%), followed by the di-nucleotide (41.62%). AT/TA and AAT/TTA were the main types of motif in di-, tri-nucleotide repeats. The repeat numbers of SSRs which from S. mussotii transcriptome SSRs were mainly from 5 to 10 and motif length of them mostly ranged from 12 bp to 30 bp. A total of 30 651 contigs were annotated, and only 1 447 SSRs were occurred in protein-coding regions. In the six repeat motifs, tri-nucleotide repeats were the most abundant in coding regions (928). There are abundant SSRs in S. mussotii transcriptome with high frequency and various types, indicating their usefulness in theory. This research may lay the foundation for designing the targeted SSR primers and developing SSR molecular markers by mining the information of SSRs loci in S. mussotii transcriptome sequences data.

  15. Assembly of transmembrane helices of simple polytopic membrane proteins from sequence conservation patterns.

    PubMed

    Park, Yungki; Helms, Volkhard

    2006-09-01

    The transmembrane (TM) domains of most membrane proteins consist of helix bundles. The seemingly simple task of TM helix bundle assembly has turned out to be extremely difficult. This is true even for simple TM helix bundle proteins, i.e., those that have the simple form of compact TM helix bundles. Herein, we present a computational method that is capable of generating native-like structural models for simple TM helix bundle proteins having modest numbers of TM helices based on sequence conservation patterns. Thus, the only requirement for our method is the presence of more than 30 homologous sequences for an accurate extraction of sequence conservation patterns. The prediction method first computes a number of representative well-packed conformations for each pair of contacting TM helices, and then a library of tertiary folds is generated by overlaying overlapping TM helices of the representative conformations. This library is scored using sequence conservation patterns, and a subsequent clustering analysis yields five final models. Assuming that neighboring TM helices in the sequence contact each other (but not that TM helices A and G contact each other), the method produced structural models of Calpha atom root-mean-square deviation (CA RMSD) of 3-5 A from corresponding crystal structures for bacteriorhodopsin, halorhodopsin, sensory rhodopsin II, and rhodopsin. In blind predictions, this type of contact knowledge is not available. Mimicking this, predictions were made for the rotor of the V-type Na(+)-adenosine triphosphatase without such knowledge. The CA RMSD between the best model and its crystal structure is only 3.4 A, and its contact accuracy reaches 55%. Furthermore, the model correctly identifies the binding pocket for sodium ion. These results demonstrate that the method can be readily applied to ab initio structure prediction of simple TM helix bundle proteins having modest numbers of TM helices.

  16. Characterisation data of simple sequence repeats of phages closely related to T7M.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tiao-Yin

    2016-09-01

    Coliphages T7M and T3, Yersinia phage ϕYeO3-12, and Salmonella phage ϕSG-JL2 share high homology in genomic sequences. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are found in their genomes and variations of SSRs among these phages are observed. Analyses on regions of sequences in T7M and T3 genomes that are likely derived from phage recombination, as well as the counterparts in ϕYeO3-12 and ϕSG-JL2, have been discussed by Lin in "Simple sequence repeat variations expedite phage divergence: mechanisms of indels and gene mutations" [1]. These regions are referred to as recombinant regions. The focus here is on SSRs in the whole genome and regions of sequences outside the recombinant regions, referred to as non-recombinant regions. This article provides SSR counts, relative abundance, relative density, and GC contents in the complete genome and non-recombinant regions of these phages. SSR period sizes and motifs in the non-recombinant regions of phage genomes are plotted. Genomic sequence changes between T7M and T3 due to insertions, deletions, and substitutions are also illustrated. SSRs and nearby sequences of T7M in the non-recombinant regions are compared to the sequences of ϕYeO3-12 and ϕSG-JL2 in the corresponding positions. The sequence variations of SSRs due to vertical evolution are classified into four categories and tabulated: (1) insertion/deletion of SSR units, (2) expansion/contraction of SSRs without alteration of genome length, (3) changes of repeat motifs, and (4) generation/loss of repeats.

  17. Shetti, a simple tool to parse, manipulate and search large datasets of sequences

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Parsing and manipulating long and/or multiple protein or gene sequences can be a challenging process for experimental biologists and microbiologists lacking prior knowledge of bioinformatics and programming. Here we present a simple, easy, user-friendly and versatile tool to parse, manipulate and search within large datasets of long and multiple protein or gene sequences. The Shetti tool can be used to search for a sequence, species, protein/gene or pattern/motif. Moreover, it can also be used to construct a universal consensus or molecular signatures for proteins based on their physical characteristics. Shetti is an efficient and fast tool that can deal with large sets of long sequences efficiently. Shetti parses UniProt Knowledgebase and NCBI GenBank flat files and visualizes them as a table. PMID:28348820

  18. A simple method for sequencing small DNAs by introducing precise overlapping ends into restriction digestion fragments.

    PubMed

    Rena, G; Houslay, M D

    1998-08-15

    A method has been devised whereby certain complete restriction digestions can have short overlaps of unique sequence incorporated into the fragments during cloning. Thus one can identify when the DNA fragments are contiguous. Here, this technique is used to produce a contig for a 2.5 kb fragment of genomic DNA. This is a simple approach to ordering digestion fragments without necessarily performing restriction mapping. It is envisaged that this technique will be useful for sequencing cDNAs and small genomic fragments.

  19. Length and sequence dependent accumulation of simple sequence repeats in vertebrates: potential role in genome organization and regulation.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Senthilkumar; Garapati, Hita Sony; Mishra, Rakesh Kumar

    2014-11-10

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are tandemly repeated short DNA sequence motifs found to be abundant in higher eukaryotes. Enrichment of SSRs with increasing genome complexity points to a positive selection and their functional relevance. We analyzed genomes of 24 organisms to find features that may help understand the functional relevance of SSRs. Of the 501 possible SSRs, only 73 show length specific enrichment. We also noticed that ~45 bp is the optimum length for a majority of them particularly in the human genome. Finally, we observed non-random distribution of ACG and CCG, enriched around transcriptional start sites (TSSs) in several species. Taken together, these results suggest that SSRs are functionally relevant with potential regulatory role. We propose that such repeats are evolving under positive selection pressure like any other functional element in the genome.

  20. Comparison and correlation of Simple Sequence Repeats distribution in genomes of Brucella species

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Jangampalli Adi Pradeep; Chakravarthi, Veeraraghavulu Praveen; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Rekha, Somesula Swapna; Kruti, Srinivasan Shanthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2011-01-01

    Computational genomics is one of the important tools to understand the distribution of closely related genomes including simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in an organism, which gives valuable information regarding genetic variations. The central objective of the present study was to screen the SSRs distributed in coding and non-coding regions among different human Brucella species which are involved in a range of pathological disorders. Computational analysis of the SSRs in the Brucella indicates few deviations from expected random models. Statistical analysis also reveals that tri-nucleotide SSRs are overrepresented and tetranucleotide SSRs underrepresented in Brucella genomes. From the data, it can be suggested that over expressed tri-nucleotide SSRs in genomic and coding regions might be responsible in the generation of functional variation of proteins expressed which in turn may lead to different pathogenicity, virulence determinants, stress response genes, transcription regulators and host adaptation proteins of Brucella genomes. Abbreviations SSRs - Simple Sequence Repeats, ORFs - Open Reading Frames. PMID:21738309

  1. In- silico exploration of thirty alphavirus genomes for analysis of the simple sequence repeats

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Chaudhary Mashhood; Singh, Avadhesh Kumar; Sharfuddin, Choudhary; Ali, Safdar

    2014-01-01

    The compilation of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in viruses and its analysis with reference to incidence, distribution and variation would be instrumental in understanding the functional and evolutionary aspects of repeat sequences. Present study encompasses the analysis of SSRs across 30 species of alphaviruses. The full length genome sequences, assessed from NCBI were used for extraction and analysis of repeat sequences using IMEx software. The repeats of different motif sizes (mono- to penta-nucleotide) observed therein exhibited variable incidence across the species. Expectedly, mononucleotide A/T was the most prevalent followed by dinucleotide AG/GA and trinucleotide AAG/GAA in these genomes. The conversion of SSRs to imperfect microsatellite or compound microsatellite (cSSR) is low. cSSR, primarily constituted by variant motifs accounted for up to 12.5% of the SSRs. Interestingly, seven species lacked cSSR in their genomes. However, the SSR and cSSR are predominantly localized to the coding region ORFs for non structural protein and structural proteins. The relative frequencies of different classes of simple and compound microsatellites within and across genomes have been highlighted. PMID:25606453

  2. Genome wide characterization of simple sequence repeats in watermelon genome and their application in comparative mapping and genetic diversity analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR) or microsatellite markers are one of the most informative and versatile DNA-based markers. The use of next-generation sequencing technologies allow whole genome sequencing and make it possible to develop large numbers of SSRs through bioinformatic analysis of genome da...

  3. SeqPig: simple and scalable scripting for large sequencing data sets in Hadoop

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, André; Pireddu, Luca; Niemenmaa, Matti; Kallio, Aleksi; Korpelainen, Eija; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Heljanko, Keijo

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Hadoop MapReduce-based approaches have become increasingly popular due to their scalability in processing large sequencing datasets. However, as these methods typically require in-depth expertise in Hadoop and Java, they are still out of reach of many bioinformaticians. To solve this problem, we have created SeqPig, a library and a collection of tools to manipulate, analyze and query sequencing datasets in a scalable and simple manner. SeqPigscripts use the Hadoop-based distributed scripting engine Apache Pig, which automatically parallelizes and distributes data processing tasks. We demonstrate SeqPig’s scalability over many computing nodes and illustrate its use with example scripts. Availability and Implementation: Available under the open source MIT license at http://sourceforge.net/projects/seqpig/ Contact: andre.schumacher@yahoo.com Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24149054

  4. Poly: a quantitative analysis tool for simple sequence repeat (SSR) tracts in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bizzaro, Jeff W; Marx, Kenneth A

    2003-01-01

    Background Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), microsatellites or polymeric sequences are common in DNA and are important biologically. From mononucleotide to trinucleotide repeats and beyond, they can be found in long (> 6 repeating units) tracts and may be characterized by quantifying the frequencies in which they are found and their tract lengths. However, most of the existing computer programs that find SSR tracts do not include these methods. Results A computer program named Poly has been written not only to find SSR tracts but to analyze the results quantitatively. Conclusions Poly is significant in its use of non-standard, quantitative methods of analysis. And, with its flexible object model and data structure, Poly and its generated data can be used for even more sophisticated analyses. PMID:12791171

  5. Simple Sequence Repeats in Escherichia coli: Abundance, Distribution, Composition, and Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Gur-Arie, Riva; Cohen, Cyril J.; Eitan, Yuval; Shelef, Leora; Hallerman, Eric M.; Kashi, Yechezkel

    2000-01-01

    Computer-based genome-wide screening of the DNA sequence of Escherichia coli strain K12 revealed tens of thousands of tandem simple sequence repeat (SSR) tracts, with motifs ranging from 1 to 6 nucleotides. SSRs were well distributed throughout the genome. Mononucleotide SSRs were over-represented in noncoding regions and under-represented in open reading frames (ORFs). Nucleotide composition of mono- and dinucleotide SSRs, both in ORFs and in noncoding regions, differed from that of the genomic region in which they occurred, with 93% of all mononucleotide SSRs proving to be of A or T. Computer-based analysis of the fine position of every SSR locus in the noncoding portion of the genome relative to downstream ORFs showed SSRs located in areas that could affect gene regulation. DNA sequences at 14 arbitrarily chosen SSR tracts were compared among E. coli strains. Polymorphisms of SSR copy number were observed at four of seven mononucleotide SSR tracts screened, with all polymorphisms occurring in noncoding regions. SSR polymorphism could prove important as a genome-wide source of variation, both for practical applications (including rapid detection, strain identification, and detection of loci affecting key phenotypes) and for evolutionary adaptation of microbes.[The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the GenBank data library under accession numbers AF209020–209030 and AF209508–209518.] PMID:10645951

  6. Cytogenetic Diversity of Simple Sequences Repeats in Morphotypes of Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jin-shuang; Sun, Cheng-zhen; Zhang, Shu-ning; Hou, Xi-lin; Bonnema, Guusje

    2016-01-01

    A significant fraction of the nuclear DNA of all eukaryotes is comprised of simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Although these sequences are widely used for studying genetic variation, linkage mapping and evolution, little attention had been paid to the chromosomal distribution and cytogenetic diversity of these sequences. In this paper, we report the distribution characterization of mono-, di-, and tri-nucleotide SSRs in Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to characterize the cytogenetic diversity of SSRs among morphotypes of B. rapa ssp. chinensis. The proportion of different SSR motifs varied among morphotypes of B. rapa ssp. chinensis, with tri-nucleotide SSRs being more prevalent in the genome of B. rapa ssp. chinensis. We determined the chromosomal locations of mono-, di-, and tri-nucleotide repeat loci. The results showed that the chromosomal distribution of SSRs in the different morphotypes is non-random and motif-dependent, and allowed us to characterize the relative variability in terms of SSR numbers and similar chromosomal distributions in centromeric/peri-centromeric heterochromatin. The differences between SSR repeats with respect to abundance and distribution indicate that SSRs are a driving force in the genomic evolution of B. rapa species. Our results provide a comprehensive view of the SSR sequence distribution and evolution for comparison among morphotypes B. rapa ssp. chinensis. PMID:27507974

  7. Rapid multiplexed genotyping of simple tandem repeats using capture and high-throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Guilmatre, Audrey; Highnam, Gareth; Borel, Christelle; Mittelman, David; Sharp, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Although simple tandem repeats (STRs) comprise ~2% of the human genome and represent an important source of polymorphism, this class of variation remains understudied. We have developed a cost-effective strategy for performing targeted enrichment of STR regions that utilizes capture probes targeting the flanking sequences of STR loci, enabling specific capture of DNA fragments containing STRs for subsequent high-throughput sequencing. Utilizing a capture design targeting 6,243 STR loci <94bp and multiplexing eight individuals in a single Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing lane we were able to call genotypes in at least one individual for 67.5% of the targeted STRs. We observed a strong relationship between (G+C) content and genotyping rate. STRs with moderate (G+C) content were recovered with >90% success rate, while only 12% of STRs with ≥80% (G+C) were genotyped in our assay. Analysis of a parent-offspring trio, complete hydatidiform mole samples, repeat analyses of the same individual, and Sanger sequencing-based validation indicated genotyping error rates between 7.6–12.4%. The majority of such errors were a single repeat unit at mono- or dinucleotide repeats. Altogether, our STR capture assay represents a cost-effective method that enables multiplexed genotyping of thousands of STR loci suitable for large scale population studies. PMID:23696428

  8. Simple sequence repeat marker development and genetic mapping in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.).

    PubMed

    Jarvis, D E; Kopp, O R; Jellen, E N; Mallory, M A; Pattee, J; Bonifacio, A; Coleman, C E; Stevens, M R; Fairbanks, D J; Maughan, P J

    2008-04-01

    Quinoa is a regionally important grain crop in the Andean region of South America. Recently quinoa has gained international attention for its high nutritional value and tolerances of extreme abiotic stresses. DNA markers and linkage maps are important tools for germplasm conservation and crop improvement programmes. Here we report the development of 216 new polymorphic SSR (simple sequence repeats) markers from libraries enriched for GA, CAA and AAT repeats, as well as 6 SSR markers developed from bacterial artificial chromosome-end sequences (BES-SSRs). Heterozygosity (H) values of the SSR markers ranges from 0.12 to 0.90, with an average value of 0.57. A linkage map was constructed for a newly developed recombinant inbred lines (RIL) population using these SSR markers. Additional markers, including amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), two 11S seed storage protein loci, and the nucleolar organizing region (NOR), were also placed on the linkage map. The linkage map presented here is the first SSR-based map in quinoa and contains 275 markers, including 200 SSR. The map consists of 38 linkage groups (LGs) covering 913 cM. Segregation distortion was observed in the mapping population for several marker loci, indicating possible chromosomal regions associated with selection or gametophytic lethality. As this map is based primarily on simple and easily-transferable SSR markers, it will be particularly valuable for research in laboratories in Andean regions of South America.

  9. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in three genomes of Candida species.

    PubMed

    Jia, Dongmei

    2016-06-15

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites, which composed of tandem repeated short units of 1-6 bp, have been paying attention continuously. Here, the distribution, composition and polymorphism of microsatellites and compound microsatellites were analyzed in three available genomes of Candida species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida glabrata and Candida orthopsilosis). The results show that there were 118,047, 66,259 and 61,119 microsatellites in genomes of C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata and C. orthopsilosis, respectively. The SSRs covered more than 1/3 length of genomes in the three species. The microsatellites, which just consist of bases A and (or) T, such as (A)n, (T)n, (AT)n, (TA)n, (AAT)n, (TAA)n, (TTA)n, (ATA)n, (ATT)n and (TAT)n, were predominant in the three genomes. The length of microsatellites was focused on 6 bp and 9 bp either in the three genomes or in its coding sequences. What's more, the relative abundance (19.89/kbp) and relative density (167.87 bp/kbp) of SSRs in sequence of mitochondrion of C. glabrata were significantly great than that in any one of genomes or chromosomes of the three species. In addition, the distance between any two adjacent microsatellites was an important factor to influence the formation of compound microsatellites. The analysis may be helpful for further studying the roles of microsatellites in genomes' origination, organization and evolution of Candida species.

  10. Mating Type and Simple Sequence Repeat Markers Indicate a Clonal Population of Phyllosticta citricarpa in Florida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan-Yi; Zhang, Ke; Huguet-Tapia, Jose C; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Dewdney, Megan M

    2016-11-01

    Phyllosticta citricarpa, the citrus black spot pathogen, was first identified in Florida in March 2010. Subsequently, this pathogen has become established in Florida but can be easily confused with the endemic nonpathogenic citrus endophyte P. capitalensis. In this study, the mating-type (MAT) loci of P. citricarpa and P. capitalensis were identified via draft genome sequencing and were characterized at the structural and sequence levels. P. citricarpa was determined to have an idiomorphic, heterothallic MAT locus structure, whereas P. capitalensis was found to have a single MAT locus consistent with a homothallic mating system. A survey of P. citricarpa isolates from Florida revealed that only the MAT1-2 idiomorph existed in the Floridian population. In contrast, isolates collected from Australia exhibited a 1:1 ratio of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isolates. Development and analysis of simple sequence repeat markers revealed a single multilocus genotype (MLG) in the Floridian population (n = 70) and 11 MLG within the Australian population (n = 24). These results indicate that isolates of P. citricarpa from Florida are likely descendent from a single clonal lineage and are reproducing asexually. The disease management focus in Florida will need to be concentrated on the production and dispersal of pycnidiospores.

  11. Molecular Identification of Sex in Phoenix dactylifera Using Inter Simple Sequence Repeat Markers

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameri, Abdulhafed A.; Al-Qurainy, Fahad; Gaafar, Abdel-Rhman Z.; Khan, Salim; Nadeem, M.

    2016-01-01

    Early sex identification of Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) at seedling stage is an economically desirable objective, which will significantly increase the profits of seed based cultivation. The utilization of molecular markers at this stage for early and rapid identification of sex is important due to the lack of morphological markers. In this study, a total of two hundred Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) primers were screened among male and female Date palm plants to identify putative sex-specific marker, out of which only two primers (IS_A02 and IS_A71) were found to be associated with sex. The primer IS_A02 produced a unique band of size 390 bp and was found clearly in all female plants, while it was absent in all male plants. Contrary to this, the primer IS_A71 produced a unique band of size 380 bp and was clearly found in all male plants, whereas it was absent in all the female plants. Subsequently, these specific fragments were excised, purified, and sequenced for the development of sequence specific markers further in future for the implementation on dioecious Date Palm for sex determination. These markers are efficient, highly reliable, and reproducible for sex identification at the early stage of seedling. PMID:27419132

  12. Genome fingerprinting by simple sequence repeat (SSR)-anchored polymerase chain reaction amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Zietkiewicz, E.; Labuda, D. ); Rafalski, A. )

    1994-03-15

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR), or microsatellites, are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes. Here the authors demonstrate the utility of microsatellite-directed DNA fingerprinting by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the interrepeat region. No sequencing is required to design the oligonucleotide primers. They tested primers anchored at 3[prime] or 5[prime] termini of the (A)[sub n] repeats, extended into the flanking sequence by 2 to 4 nucleotide residues [3[prime]-anchored primers: (CA)[sub 8]RG, (CA)[sub 8]RY, and (CA)[sub 7]RTCY; and 5[prime]-anchored primers: BDB(CA)[sub 7]C, DBDA(CA)[sub 7], VHVG(TG)[sub 7] and HVH(TG)[sub 7]T]. Radioactively labeled amplification products were analyzed by electrophoresis, revealing information on multiple genomic loci in a single gel lane. Complex, species-specific patterns were obtained from a variety of eukaryotic taxa. Intraspecies polymorphisms were also observed and shown to segregate as Mendelian markers. Inter-SSR PCR provides a novel fingerprinting approach applicable for taxonomic and phylogenetic comparisons and as a mapping tool in a wide range of organisms. This application of (CA)[sub n] repeats may be extended to different microsatellites and other common dispersed elements. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Development of simple sequence repeat markers and diversity analysis in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zan; Yan, Hongwei; Fu, Xinnian; Li, Xuehui; Gao, Hongwen

    2013-04-01

    Efficient and robust molecular markers are essential for molecular breeding in plant. Compared to dominant and bi-allelic markers, multiple alleles of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are particularly informative and superior in genetic linkage map and QTL mapping in autotetraploid species like alfalfa. The objective of this study was to enrich SSR markers directly from alfalfa expressed sequence tags (ESTs). A total of 12,371 alfalfa ESTs were retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Total 774 SSR-containing ESTs were identified from 716 ESTs. On average, one SSR was found per 7.7 kb of EST sequences. Tri-nucleotide repeats (48.8 %) was the most abundant motif type, followed by di-(26.1 %), tetra-(11.5 %), penta-(9.7 %), and hexanucleotide (3.9 %). One hundred EST-SSR primer pairs were successfully designed and 29 exhibited polymorphism among 28 alfalfa accessions. The allele number per marker ranged from two to 21 with an average of 6.8. The PIC values ranged from 0.195 to 0.896 with an average of 0.608, indicating a high level of polymorphism of the EST-SSR markers. Based on the 29 EST-SSR markers, assessment of genetic diversity was conducted and found that Medicago sativa ssp. sativa was clearly different from the other subspecies. The high transferability of those EST-SSR markers was also found for relative species.

  14. Genome-wide characterization and selection of expressed sequence tag simple sequence repeat primers for optimized marker distribution and reliability in peach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Expressed sequence tag (EST) simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in Prunus were mined, and flanking primers designed and used for genome-wide characterization and selection of primers to optimize marker distribution and reliability. A total of 12,618 contigs were assembled from 84,727 ESTs, along with 34...

  15. A simple, high-resolution method for establishing DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity.

    PubMed

    Boger, D L; Fink, B E; Brunette, S R; Tse, W C; Hedrick, M P

    2001-06-27

    Full details of the development of a simple, nondestructive, and high-throughput method for establishing DNA binding affinity and sequence selectivity are described. The method is based on the loss of fluorescence derived from the displacement of ethidium bromide or thiazole orange from the DNA of interest or, in selected instances, the change in intrinsic fluorescence of a DNA binding agent itself and is applicable for assessing relative or absolute DNA binding affinities. Enlisting a library of hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides containing all five base pair (512 hairpins) or four base pair (136 hairpins) sequences displayed in a 96-well format, a compound's rank order binding to all possible sequences is generated, resulting in a high-resolution definition of its sequence selectivity using this fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay. As such, the technique complements the use of footprinting or affinity cleavage for the establishment of DNA binding selectivity and provides the information at a higher resolution. The merged bar graphs generated by this rank order binding provide a qualitative way to compare, or profile, DNA binding affinity and selectivity. The 96-well format assay (512 hairpins) can be conducted at a minimal cost (presently ca. $100 for hairpin deoxyoligonucleotides/assay with ethiduim bromide or less with thiazole orange), with a rapid readout using a fluorescent plate reader (15 min), and is adaptable to automation (Tecan Genesis Workstation 100 robotic system). Its use in generating a profile of DNA binding selectivity for several agents including distamycin A, netropsin, DAPI, Hoechst 33258, and berenil is described. Techniques for establishing binding constants from quantitative titrations are compared, and recommendations are made for use of a Scatchard or curve fitting analysis of the titration binding curves as a reliable means to quantitate the binding affinity.

  16. Individual and population variation in invertebrates revealed by Inter-simple Sequence Repeats (ISSRs)

    PubMed Central

    Abbot, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    PCR-based molecular markers are well suited for questions requiring large scale surveys of plant and animal populations. Inter-simple Sequence Repeats or ISSRs are analyzed by a recently developed technique based on the amplification of the regions between inverse-oriented microsatellite loci with oligonucleotides anchored in microsatellites themselves. ISSRs have shown much promise for the study of the population biology of plants, but have not yet been explored for similar studies of animals. The value of ISSRs is demonstrated for the study of animal species with low levels of within-population variation. Sets of primers are identified which reveal variation in two aphid species, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Pemphigus obesinymphae, in the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, and in a rotifer in the genus Philodina. PMID:15455068

  17. Development of simple sequence repeat markers and the analysis of genetic diversity and ploidy level in a centipedegrass collection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the genetic variability of centipedegrass [Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro) Hack] and few genetic tools have been available for this species. In this study, 69 unique Eremochloa sequences were generated by using a compound simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based cloning method. Twenty...

  18. Transcriptome characterisation and simple sequence repeat marker discovery in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica

    PubMed Central

    D’Esposito, D.; Orrù, L.; Dattolo, E.; Bernardo, L.; Lamontara, A.; Orsini, L.; Serra, I.A; Mazzuca, S.; Procaccini, G.

    2016-01-01

    Posidonia oceanica is an endemic seagrass in the Mediterranean Sea, where it provides important ecosystem services and sustains a rich and diverse ecosystem. P. oceanica meadows extend from the surface to 40 meters depth. With the aim of boosting research in this iconic species, we generated a comprehensive RNA-Seq data set for P. oceanica by sequencing specimens collected at two depths and two times during the day. With this approach we attempted to capture the transcriptional diversity associated with change in light and other depth-related environmental factors. Using this extensive data set we generated gene predictions and identified an extensive catalogue of potential Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) markers. The data generated here will open new avenues for the analysis of population genetic features and functional variation in P. oceanica. In total, 79,235 contigs were obtained by the assembly of 70,453,120 paired end reads. 43,711 contigs were successfully annotated. A total of 17,436 SSR were identified within 13,912 contigs. PMID:27996971

  19. A Simple Strategy for Reducing False Negatives in Calling Variants from Single-Cell Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Cong; Miao, Zong; He, Xionglei

    2015-01-01

    Due to the growth of interest in single-cell genomics, computational methods for distinguishing true variants from artifacts are highly desirable. While special attention has been paid to false positives in variant or mutation calling from single-cell sequencing data, an equally important but often neglected issue is that of false negatives derived from allele dropout during the amplification of single cell genomes. In this paper, we propose a simple strategy to reduce the false negatives in single-cell sequencing data analysis. Simulation results show that this method is highly reliable, with an error rate of 4.94×10-5, which is orders of magnitude lower than the expected false negative rate (~34%) estimated from a single-cell exome dataset, though the method is limited by the low SNP density in the human genome. We applied this method to analyze the exome data of a few dozen single tumor cells generated in previous studies, and extracted cell specific mutation information for a small set of sites. Interestingly, we found that there are difficulties in using the classical clonal model of tumor cell growth to explain the mutation patterns observed in some tumor cells. PMID:25876174

  20. A simple strategy for reducing false negatives in calling variants from single-cell sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cong; Miao, Zong; He, Xionglei

    2015-01-01

    Due to the growth of interest in single-cell genomics, computational methods for distinguishing true variants from artifacts are highly desirable. While special attention has been paid to false positives in variant or mutation calling from single-cell sequencing data, an equally important but often neglected issue is that of false negatives derived from allele dropout during the amplification of single cell genomes. In this paper, we propose a simple strategy to reduce the false negatives in single-cell sequencing data analysis. Simulation results show that this method is highly reliable, with an error rate of 4.94×10-5, which is orders of magnitude lower than the expected false negative rate (~34%) estimated from a single-cell exome dataset, though the method is limited by the low SNP density in the human genome. We applied this method to analyze the exome data of a few dozen single tumor cells generated in previous studies, and extracted cell specific mutation information for a small set of sites. Interestingly, we found that there are difficulties in using the classical clonal model of tumor cell growth to explain the mutation patterns observed in some tumor cells.

  1. Polymorphic simple sequence repeat regions in chloroplast genomes: applications to the population genetics of pines.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, W; Morgante, M; McDevitt, R; Vendramin, G G; Rafalski, J A

    1995-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), consisting of tandemly repeated multiple copies of mono-, di-, tri-, or tetranucleotide motifs, are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes and are frequently used as genetic markers, taking advantage of their length polymorphism. We have examined the polymorphism of such sequences in the chloroplast genomes of plants, by using a PCR-based assay. GenBank searches identified the presence of several (dA)n.(dT)n mononucleotide stretches in chloroplast genomes. A chloroplast (cp) SSR was identified in three pine species (Pinus contorta, Pinus sylvestris, and Pinus thunbergii) 312 bp upstream of the psbA gene. DNA amplification of this repeated region from 11 pine species identified nine length variants. The polymorphic amplified fragments were isolated and the DNA sequence was determined, confirming that the length polymorphism was caused by variation in the length of the repeated region. In the pines, the chloroplast genome is transmitted through pollen and this PCR assay may be used to monitor gene flow in this genus. Analysis of 305 individuals from seven populations of Pinus leucodermis Ant. revealed the presence of four variants with intrapopulational diversities ranging from 0.000 to 0.629 and an average of 0.320. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of cpDNA on the same populations previously failed to detect any variation. Population subdivision based on cpSSR was higher (Gst = 0.22, where Gst is coefficient of gene differentiation) than that revealed in a previous isozyme study (Gst = 0.05). We anticipate that SSR loci within the chloroplast genome should provide a highly informative assay for the analysis of the genetic structure of plant populations. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7644491

  2. Characterization of comparative genome-derived simple sequence repeats for acanthopterygian fishes.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Ryo O; Tamate, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Jun; Tamate, Hidetoshi B; Hanzawa, Naoto

    2013-05-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) have become one of the most popular molecular markers for population genetic studies. The application of SSR markers has often been limited to source species because SSR loci are too labile to be maintained in even closely related species. However, a few extremely conserved SSR loci have been reported. Here, we tested for the presence of conserved SSR loci in acanthopterygian fishes, which include over 14 000 species, by comparing the genome sequences of four acanthopterygian fishes. We also examined the comparative genome-derived SSRs (CG-SSRs) for their transferability across acanthopterygian fishes and their applicability to population genetic analysis. Forty-six SSR loci with conserved flanking regions were detected and examined for their transferability among seven nonacanthopterygian and 27 acanthopterygian fishes. The PCR amplification success rate in nonacanthopterygian fishes was low, ranging from 2.2% to 21.7%, except for Lophius litulon (Lophiiformes; 80.4%). Conversely, the rate in most acanthopterygian fishes exceeded 70.0%. Sequencing of these 46 loci revealed the presence of SSRs suitable for scoring while fragment analysis of 20 loci revealed polymorphisms in most of the acanthopterygian fishes. Population genetic analysis of Cottus pollux (Scorpaeniformes) and Sphaeramia orbicularis (Perciformes) using CG-SSRs showed that these populations did not deviate from linkage equilibrium or Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Furthermore, almost no loci showed evidence of null alleles, suggesting that CG-SSRs have strong resolving power for population genetic analysis. Our findings will facilitate the use of these markers in species in which markers remain to be identified.

  3. Identification of Japanese and chinese green tea cultivars by using simple sequence repeat markers to encourage proper labeling.

    PubMed

    Ujihara, Tomomi; Ohta, Ryusuke; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Kohata, Katsunori; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    To identify commercial Japanese monovarietal green tea and imported green tea samples, leading Japanese cultivars were fingerprinted by using six simple sequence repeat markers analyzed by a capillary sequencer. Two well-authenticated imported Chinese monovarietal green tea samples were also fingerprinted by the same markers, one of which, was Fuyun, was a clonally propagated cultivar, and the other, Jiukengzhong, was seed-propagated. At least three markers used in this study identified 16 leading Japanese cultivars and Fuyun. Although Jiukengzhong was a mixed population with diverse genotypes, some individuals had a unique allele in one simple sequence repeat marker that was not detected in the 16 leading Japanese cultivars, an additional 39 cultivars, and Fuyun. This allele was effective as a detection marker for Jiukengzhong. These results support the use of simple sequence repeat markers for the identification of Japanese monovarietal green tea and also of imported green tea made from foreign cultivars.

  4. Simple quantitative PCR approach to reveal naturally occurring and mutation-induced repetitive sequence variation on the Drosophila Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, John C; Maggert, Keith A

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin is a significant component of the human genome and the genomes of most model organisms. Although heterochromatin is thought to be largely non-coding, it is clear that it plays an important role in chromosome structure and gene regulation. Despite a growing awareness of its functional significance, the repetitive sequences underlying some heterochromatin remain relatively uncharacterized. We have developed a real-time quantitative PCR-based method for quantifying simple repetitive satellite sequences and have used this technique to characterize the heterochromatic Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. In this report, we validate the approach, identify previously unknown satellite sequence copy number polymorphisms in Y chromosomes from different geographic sources, and show that a defect in heterochromatin formation can induce similar copy number polymorphisms in a laboratory strain. These findings provide a simple method to investigate the dynamic nature of repetitive sequences and characterize conditions which might give rise to long-lasting alterations in DNA sequence.

  5. Simple Quantitative PCR Approach to Reveal Naturally Occurring and Mutation-Induced Repetitive Sequence Variation on the Drosophila Y Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, John C.; Maggert, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Heterochromatin is a significant component of the human genome and the genomes of most model organisms. Although heterochromatin is thought to be largely non-coding, it is clear that it plays an important role in chromosome structure and gene regulation. Despite a growing awareness of its functional significance, the repetitive sequences underlying some heterochromatin remain relatively uncharacterized. We have developed a real-time quantitative PCR-based method for quantifying simple repetitive satellite sequences and have used this technique to characterize the heterochromatic Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. In this report, we validate the approach, identify previously unknown satellite sequence copy number polymorphisms in Y chromosomes from different geographic sources, and show that a defect in heterochromatin formation can induce similar copy number polymorphisms in a laboratory strain. These findings provide a simple method to investigate the dynamic nature of repetitive sequences and characterize conditions which might give rise to long-lasting alterations in DNA sequence. PMID:25285439

  6. Simple sequence repeat variations expedite phage divergence: Mechanisms of indels and gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tiao-Yin

    2016-07-01

    Phages are the most abundant biological entities and influence prokaryotic communities on Earth. Comparing closely related genomes sheds light on molecular events shaping phage evolution. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) variations impart over half of the genomic changes between T7M and T3, indicating an important role of SSRs in accelerating phage genetic divergence. Differences in coding and noncoding regions of phages infecting different hosts, coliphages T7M and T3, Yersinia phage ϕYeO3-12, and Salmonella phage ϕSG-JL2, frequently arise from SSR variations. Such variations modify noncoding and coding regions; the latter efficiently changes multiple amino acids, thereby hastening protein evolution. Four classes of events are found to drive SSR variations: insertion/deletion of SSR units, expansion/contraction of SSRs without alteration of genome length, changes of repeat motifs, and generation/loss of repeats. The categorization demonstrates the ways SSRs mutate in genomes during phage evolution. Indels are common constituents of genome variations and human diseases, yet, how they occur without preexisting repeat sequence is less understood. Non-repeat-unit-based misalignment-elongation (NRUBME) is proposed to be one mechanism for indels without adjacent repeats. NRUBME or consecutive NRUBME may also change repeat motifs or generate new repeats. NRUBME invoking a non-Watson-Crick base pair explains insertions that initiate mononucleotide repeats. Furthermore, NRUBME successfully interprets many inexplicable human di- to tetranucleotide repeat generations. This study provides the first evidence of SSR variations expediting phage divergence, and enables insights into the events and mechanisms of genome evolution. NRUBME allows us to emulate natural evolution to design indels for various applications.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of simple sequence repeats in the model medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Xu, Haibin; Song, Jingyuan; Xu, Jiang; Zhu, Yingjie; Chen, Shilin

    2013-01-10

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are one of the most popular sources of genetic markers and play a significant role in gene function and genome organization. We identified SSRs in the genome of Ganoderma lucidum and analyzed their frequency and distribution in different genomic regions. We also compared the SSRs in G. lucidum with six other Agaricomycetes genomes: Coprinopsis cinerea, Laccaria bicolor, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Postia placenta, Schizophyllum commune and Serpula lacrymans. Based on our search criteria, the total number of SSRs found ranged from 1206 to 6104 and covered from 0.04% to 0.15% of the fungal genomes. The SSR abundance was not correlated with the genome size, and mono- to tri-nucleotide repeats outnumbered other SSR categories in all of the species examined. In G. lucidum, a repertoire of 2674 SSRs was detected, with mono-nucleotides being the most abundant. SSRs were found in all genomic regions and were more abundant in non-coding regions than coding regions. The highest SSR relative abundance was found in introns (108 SSRs/Mb), followed by intergenic regions (84 SSRs/Mb). A total of 684 SSRs were found in the protein-coding sequences (CDSs) of 588 gene models, with 81.4% of them being tri- or hexa-nucleotides. After scanning for InterPro domains, 280 of these genes were successfully annotated, and 215 of them could be assigned to Gene Ontology (GO) terms. SSRs were also identified in 28 bioactive compound synthesis-related gene models, including one 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), three polysaccharide biosynthesis genes and 24 cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs). Primers were designed for the identified SSR loci, providing the basis for the future development of SSR markers of this medicinal fungus.

  8. Genome-wide identification and validation of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shufen; Zhang, Guojun; Li, Xu; Wang, Lianjun; Yuan, Jinhong; Deng, Chuanliang; Gao, Wujun

    2016-06-01

    Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis), an important vegetable cultivated worldwide, can also serve as a model dioecious plant species in the study of sex determination and sex chromosome evolution. However, limited DNA marker resources have been developed and used for this species. To expand these resources, we examined the DNA sequences for simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in 163,406 scaffolds representing approximately 400 Mbp of the A. officinalis genome. A total of 87,576 SSRs were identified in 59,565 scaffolds. The most abundant SSR repeats were trinucleotide and tetranucleotide, accounting for 29.2 and 29.1% of the total SSRs, respectively, followed by di-, penta-, hexa-, hepta-, and octanucleotides. The AG motif was most common among dinucleotides and was also the most frequent motif in the entire A. officinalis genome, representing 14.7% of all SSRs. A total of 41,917 SSR primers pairs were designed to amplify SSRs. Twenty-two genomic SSR markers were tested in 39 asparagus accessions belonging to ten cultivars and one accession of Asparagus setaceus for determination of genetic diversity. The intra-species polymorphism information content (PIC) values of the 22 genomic SSR markers were intermediate, with an average of 0.41. The genetic diversity between the ten A. officinalis cultivars was low, and the UPGMA dendrogram was largely unrelated to cultivars. It is here suggested that the sex of individuals is an important factor influencing the clustering results. The information reported here provides new information about the organization of the microsatellites in A. officinalis genome and lays a foundation for further genetic studies and breeding applications of A. officinalis and related species.

  9. Molecular characterization of cultivated bromeliad accessions with Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) Markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Yaying; Wang, Weiyong; Yu, Xinying; Shen, Xiaolan; Liu, Jianxin; Liu, Xiaojing; Tian, Danqing; Shen, Fuquan; Yu, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Bromeliads are of great economic importance in flower production; however little information is available with respect to genetic characterization of cultivated bromeliads thus far. In the present study, a selection of cultivated bromeliads was characterized via inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers with an emphasis on genetic diversity and population structure. Twelve ISSR primers produced 342 bands, of which 287 (~84%) were polymorphic, with polymorphic bands per primer ranging from 17 to 34. The Jaccard's similarity ranged from 0.08 to 0.89 and averaged ~0.30 for the investigated bromeliads. The Bayesian-based approach, together with the un-weighted paired group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA)-based clustering and the principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), distinctly grouped the bromeliads from Neoregelia, Guzmania, and Vriesea into three separately clusters, well corresponding with their botanical classifications; whereas the bromeliads of Aechmea other than the recently selected hybrids were not well assigned to a cluster. Additionally, ISSR marker was proven efficient for the identification of hybrids and bud sports of cultivated bromeliads. The findings achieved herein will further our knowledge about the genetic variability within cultivated bromeliads and therefore facilitate breeding for new varieties of cultivated bromeliads in future as well.

  10. Characterization and distribution of retrotransposons and simple sequence repeats in the bovine genome

    PubMed Central

    Adelson, David L.; Raison, Joy M.; Edgar, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Interspersed repeat composition and distribution in mammals have been best characterized in the human and mouse genomes. The bovine genome contains typical eutherian mammal repeats, but also has a significant number of long interspersed nuclear element RTE (BovB) elements proposed to have been horizontally transferred from squamata. Our analysis of the BovB repeats has indicated that only a few of them are currently likely to retrotranspose in cattle. However, bovine L1 repeats (L1 BT) have many likely active copies. Comparison of substitution rates for BovB and L1 BT indicates that L1 BT is a younger repeat family than BovB. In contrast to mouse and human, L1 occurrence is not negatively correlated with G+C content. However, BovB, Bov A2, ART2A, and Bov-tA are negatively correlated with G+C, although Bov-tAs correlation is weaker. Also, by performing genome wide correlation analysis of interspersed and simple sequence repeats, we have identified genome territories by repeat content that appear to define ancestral vs. ruminant-specific genomic regions. These ancestral regions, enriched with L2 and MIR repeats, are largely conserved between bovine and human. PMID:19625614

  11. Molecular identification of Aquilaria spp. by using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhari, Hanif; Mohamad, Azhar; Othman, Roohaida

    2015-09-01

    Aquilaria species are very important economic plant for production of resin locally known as gaharu in Malaysia. There are five species that can be found in Malaysia and the most important Aquilaria species for gaharu production is A. malaccensis. Molecular markers for Aquilaria species are still insufficient and require more efficient, robust and reproducible molecular marker. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers are highly polymorphic and have high reproducibility which will be useful in areas of genetic diversity, phylogenetic studies, gene tagging, genome mapping and evolutionary biology in a wide range of crop species. Five selected ISSR primers were used to identify four Aquilaria species commonly found in Malaysia namely A. malaccensis, A. sub-integra, A. crassna and A. hirta. All the primers showed sufficient polymorphism to distinguish between the four species. Hence, the markers derived from ISSR can be used for molecular identification of Aquilaria spp. in ensuring homogenous species for plantation which may improve the quality of resin derived from known and certified materials.

  12. Simple sequence repeat analysis of genetic diversity in primary core collection of peach (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Hong; Li, Yin-Xia; Li, Zi-Chao; Zhang, Hong-Liang; Qi, Yong-Wen; Wang, Tao

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the genetic diversity of 51 cultivars in the primary core collection of peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) was evaluated by using simple sequence repeats (SSRs). The phylogenetic relationships and the evolutionary history among different cultivars were determined on the basis of SSR data. Twenty-two polymorphic SSR primer pairs were selected, and a total of 111 alleles were identified in the 51 cultivars, with an average of 5 alleles per locus. According to traditional Chinese classification of peach cultivars, the 51 cultivars in the peach primary core collection belong to six variety groups. The SSR analysis revealed that the levels of the genetic diversity within each variety group were ranked as Sweet peach > Crisp peach > Flat peach > Nectarine > Honey Peach > Yellow fleshed peach. The genetic diversity among the Chinese cultivars was higher than that among the introduced cultivars. Cluster analysis by the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic averaging (UPGMA) placed the 51 cultivars into five linkage clusters. Cultivar members from the same variety group were distributed in different UPGMA clusters and some members from different variety groups were placed under the same cluster. Different variety groups could not be differentiated in accordance with SSR markers. The SSR analysis revealed rich genetic diversity in the peach primary core collection, representative of genetic resources of peach.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Cultivated Bromeliad Accessions with Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) Markers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Yaying; Wang, Weiyong; Yu, Xinying; Shen, Xiaolan; Liu, Jianxin; Liu, Xiaojing; Tian, Danqing; Shen, Fuquan; Yu, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Bromeliads are of great economic importance in flower production; however little information is available with respect to genetic characterization of cultivated bromeliads thus far. In the present study, a selection of cultivated bromeliads was characterized via inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers with an emphasis on genetic diversity and population structure. Twelve ISSR primers produced 342 bands, of which 287 (~84%) were polymorphic, with polymorphic bands per primer ranging from 17 to 34. The Jaccard’s similarity ranged from 0.08 to 0.89 and averaged ~0.30 for the investigated bromeliads. The Bayesian-based approach, together with the un-weighted paired group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA)-based clustering and the principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), distinctly grouped the bromeliads from Neoregelia, Guzmania, and Vriesea into three separately clusters, well corresponding with their botanical classifications; whereas the bromeliads of Aechmea other than the recently selected hybrids were not well assigned to a cluster. Additionally, ISSR marker was proven efficient for the identification of hybrids and bud sports of cultivated bromeliads. The findings achieved herein will further our knowledge about the genetic variability within cultivated bromeliads and therefore facilitate breeding for new varieties of cultivated bromeliads in future as well. PMID:22754348

  14. Genetic diversity analysis of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) by inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C Y; Zhang, C; Wang, P; Hu, S; Chang, H P; Xiao, W J; Lu, X T; Jiang, S B; Ye, J Z; Guo, X H

    2014-04-25

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) is not only a nutrient-rich vegetable but also an important medicinal herb. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were employed to investigate the genetic diversity and differentiation of 24 okra genotypes. In this study, the PCR products were separated by electrophoresis on 8% nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel and visualized by silver staining. The 22 ISSR primers produced 289 amplified DNA fragments, and 145 (50%) fragments were polymorphic. The 289 markers were used to construct the dendrogram based on the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA) cluster analysis. The dendrogram indicated that 24 okras were clustered into 4 geographically distinct groups. The average polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.531929, which showed that the majority of primers were informative. The high values of allele frequency, genetic diversity, and heterozygosity showed that primer-sample combinations produced measurable fragments. The mean distances ranged from 0.045455 to 0.454545. The dendrogram indicated that the ISSR markers succeeded in distinguishing most of the 24 varieties in relation to their genetic backgrounds and geographical origins.

  15. Characterization of 215 simple sequence repeat markers in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.).

    PubMed

    Kubik, Christine; Honig, Joshua; Bonos, Stacy A

    2011-09-01

    Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) is a versatile, cross-pollinated, temperate and perennial turfgrass species. It occurs naturally in a wide variety of habitats and is also cultivated on golf courses, bowling greens and tennis courts worldwide. Isozymes and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) have been used to determine genetic diversity, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPDs) were used to construct a genetic linkage map of this species. In the current report, we developed and characterized 215 unique genomic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in creeping bentgrass. The SSRs reported here are the first available markers in creeping bentgrass to date. Eight hundred and eighteen alleles were amplified by 215 SSR loci, an average of 3.72 alleles per locus. Fifty-nine per cent of those alleles segregated in a 1:1 Mendelian fashion (P > 0.05). Twenty-two per cent had a distorted segregation ratio (P ≤ 0.05). These SSR markers will be useful for assessing genetic diversity in creeping bentgrass and will be important for the development of genetic linkage maps and identifying quantitative trait loci. These markers could enhance breeding programmes by improving the efficiency of selection techniques.

  16. Estimation of genetic structure of a Mycosphaerella musicola population using inter-simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Peixouto, Y S; Dórea Bragança, C A; Andrade, W B; Ferreira, C F; Haddad, F; Oliveira, S A S; Darosci Brito, F S; Miller, R N G; Amorim, E P

    2015-07-17

    Among the diseases affecting banana (Musa sp), yellow Sigatoka, caused by the fungal pathogen Mycosphaerella musicola Leach, is considered one of the most important in Brazil, causing losses throughout the year. Understanding the genetic structure of pathogen populations will provide insight into the life history of pathogens, including the evolutionary processes occurring in agrosystems. Tools for estimating the possible emergence of pathogen variants with altered pathogenicity, virulence, or aggressiveness, as well as resistance to systemic fungicides, can also be developed from such data. The objective of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity and population genetics of M. musicola in the main banana-producing regions in Brazil. A total of 83 isolates collected from different banana cultivars in the Brazilian states of Bahia, Rio Grande do Norte, and Minas Gerais were evaluated using inter-simple sequence repeat markers. High variability was detected between the isolates, and 85.5% of the haplotypes were singletons in the populations. The highest source of genetic diversity (97.22%) was attributed to variations within populations. Bayesian cluster analysis revealed the presence of 2 probable ancestral groups, however, showed no relationship to population structure in terms of collection site, state of origin, or cultivar. Similarly, we detected noevidence of genetic recombination between individuals within different states, indicating that asexual cycles play a major role in M. musicola reproduction and that long-distance dispersal of the pathogen is the main factor contributing to the lack of population structure in the fungus.

  17. Development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers of sesame (Sesamum indicum) from a genome survey.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Wang, Linhai; Zhang, Yanxin; Qi, Xiaoqiong; Wang, Xiaoling; Ding, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Xiurong

    2014-04-22

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum), an important oil crop, is widely grown in tropical and subtropical regions. It provides part of the daily edible oil allowance for almost half of the world's population. A limited number of co-dominant markers has been developed and applied in sesame genetic diversity and germplasm identity studies. Here we report for the first time a whole genome survey used to develop simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and to detect the genetic diversity of sesame germplasm. From the initial assembled sesame genome, 23,438 SSRs (≥5 repeats) were identified. The most common repeat motif was dinucleotide with a frequency of 84.24%, followed by 13.53% trinucleotide, 1.65% tetranucleotide, 0.3% pentanucleotide and 0.28% hexanucleotide motifs. From 1500 designed and synthesised primer pairs, 218 polymorphic SSRs were developed and used to screen 31 sesame accessions that from 12 countries. STRUCTURE and phylogenetic analyses indicated that all sesame accessions could be divided into two groups: one mainly from China and another from other countries. Cluster analysis classified Chinese major sesame varieties into three groups. These novel SSR markers are a useful tool for genetic linkage map construction, genetic diversity detection, and marker-assisted selective sesame breeding.

  18. Agarose gel electrophoresis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for visualization of simple sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Anderson, James; Wright, Drew; Meksem, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    In the modern age of genetic research there is a constant search for ways to improve the efficiency of plant selection. The most recent technology that can result in a highly efficient means of selection and still be done at a low cost is through plant selection directed by simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites). The molecular markers are used to select for certain desirable plant traits without relying on ambiguous phenotypic data. The best way to detect these is the use of gel electrophoresis. Gel electrophoresis is a common technique in laboratory settings which is used to separate deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) by size. Loading DNA and RNA onto gels allows for visualization of the size of fragments through the separation of DNA and RNA fragments. This is achieved through the use of the charge in the particles. As the fragments separate, they form into distinct bands at set sizes. We describe the ability to visualize SSRs on slab gels of agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  19. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Lonicera japonica Thumb. using inter-simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    He, H Y; Zhang, D; Qing, H; Yang, Y

    2017-01-23

    Inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs) were used to analyze the genetic diversity of 21 accessions obtained from four provinces in China, Shandong, Henan, Hebei, and Sichuan. A total of 272 scored bands were generated using the eight primers previously screened across 21 accessions, of which 267 were polymorphic (98.16%). Genetic similarity coefficients varied from 0.4816 to 0.9118, with an average of 0.6337. The UPGMA dendrogram grouped 21 accessions into two main clusters. Cluster A comprised four Lonicera macranthoides Hand. Mazz. accessions, of which J10 was found to be from Sichuan, and J17, J18, and J19 were found to be from Shandong. Cluster B comprised 17 Lonicera japonica Thumb. accessions, divided into the wild accession J16 and the other 16 cultivars. The results of the principal component analysis were comparable to the cluster analysis. Therefore, the ISSR markers could be effectively used to distinguish interspecific and intraspecific variations, which may facilitate identification of Lonicera japonica cultivars for planting, medicinal use, and germplasm conservation.

  20. Toward a high-resolution Plasmodium falciparum linkage map: Polymorphic markers from hundreds of simple sequence repeats

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xin-Zhuan; Wellems, T.E.

    1996-05-01

    A total of 5.7 simple sequence repeats (SSRs or {open_quotes}microsatellites{close_quotes}) were identified from Plasmodium falciparum sequences in GenBank and from inserts in a genomic DNA library. Oligonucleotide primers from sequences that flank 224 of these SSRs were synthesized and used in PCR assays to test for simple sequence length polymorphisms (SSLPs). Of the 224 SSRs, 188 showed SSLPs were assigned to chromosome linkage groups by physical mapping and by comparing their inheritance patterns against those of restriction fragment length polymorphism markers in a genetic cross (HB3XDd2). The predominant SSLPs in P. falciparum were found to contain [TA]{sub n}, and [TAA]{sub n}, a feature that is reminiscent of plant genomes and is consistent with the proposed algal-like origin of malaria parasites. Since such SSLPs are abundant and readily isolated, they are a powerful resource for genetic analysis of P. falciparum. 38 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Simple sequence repeat markers useful for sorghum downy mildew (Peronosclerospora sorghi) and related species

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Ramasamy; Nimmakayala, Padmavathi; Erattaimuthu, Saradha R; No, Eun-Gyu; Reddy, Umesh K; Prom, Louis K; Odvody, Gary N; Luster, Douglas G; Magill, Clint W

    2008-01-01

    Background A recent outbreak of sorghum downy mildew in Texas has led to the discovery of both metalaxyl resistance and a new pathotype in the causal organism, Peronosclerospora sorghi. These observations and the difficulty in resolving among phylogenetically related downy mildew pathogens dramatically point out the need for simply scored markers in order to differentiate among isolates and species, and to study the population structure within these obligate oomycetes. Here we present the initial results from the use of a biotin capture method to discover, clone and develop PCR primers that permit the use of simple sequence repeats (microsatellites) to detect differences at the DNA level. Results Among the 55 primers pairs designed from clones from pathotype 3 of P. sorghi, 36 flanked microsatellite loci containing simple repeats, including 28 (55%) with dinucleotide repeats and 6 (11%) with trinucleotide repeats. A total of 22 microsatellites with CA/AC or GT/TG repeats were the most abundant (40%) and GA/AG or CT/TC types contribute 15% in our collection. When used to amplify DNA from 19 isolates from P. sorghi, as well as from 5 related species that cause downy mildew on other hosts, the number of different bands detected for each SSR primer pair using a LI-COR- DNA Analyzer ranged from two to eight. Successful cross-amplification for 12 primer pairs studied in detail using DNA from downy mildews that attack maize (P. maydis & P. philippinensis), sugar cane (P. sacchari), pearl millet (Sclerospora graminicola) and rose (Peronospora sparsa) indicate that the flanking regions are conserved in all these species. A total of 15 SSR amplicons unique to P. philippinensis (one of the potential threats to US maize production) were detected, and these have potential for development of diagnostic tests. A total of 260 alleles were obtained using 54 microsatellites primer combinations, with an average of 4.8 polymorphic markers per SSR across 34 Peronosclerospora

  2. Mathematical and Live Meningococcal Models for Simple Sequence Repeat Dynamics – Coherent Predictions and Observations

    PubMed Central

    Alfsnes, Kristian; Raynaud, Xavier; Tønjum, Tone; Ambur, Ole Herman

    2014-01-01

    Evolvability by means of simple sequence repeat (SSR) instability is a feature under the constant influence of opposing selective pressures to expand and compress the repeat tract and is mechanistically influenced by factors that affect genetic instability. In addition to direct selection for protein expression and structural integrity, other factors that influence tract length evolution were studied. The genetic instability of SSRs that switch the expression of antibiotic resistance ON and OFF was modelled mathematically and monitored in a panel of live meningococcal strains. The mathematical model showed that the SSR length of a theoretical locus in an evolving population may be shaped by direct selection of expression status (ON or OFF), tract length dependent (α) and tract length independent factors (β). According to the model an increase in α drives the evolution towards shorter tracts. An increase in β drives the evolution towards a normal distribution of tract lengths given that an upper and a lower limit are set. Insertion and deletion biases were shown to skew allelic distributions in both directions. The meningococcal SSR model was tested in vivo by monitoring the frequency of spectinomycin resistance OFF→ON switching in a designed locus. The instability of a comprehensive panel of the homopolymeric SSRs, constituted of a range of 5–13 guanine nucleotides, was monitored in wildtype and mismatch repair deficient backgrounds. Both the repeat length itself and mismatch repair deficiency were shown to influence the genetic instability of the homopolymeric tracts. A possible insertion bias was observed in tracts ≤G10. Finally, an inverse correlation between the number of tract-encoded amino acids and growth in the presence of ON-selection illustrated a limitation to SSR expansion in an essential gene associated with the designed model locus and the protein function mediating antibiotic resistance. PMID:24999629

  3. Genetic diversity analysis of Bt cotton genotypes in Pakistan using simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Ullah, I; Iram, A; Iqbal, M Z; Nawaz, M; Hasni, S M; Jamil, S

    2012-03-14

    The popularity of genetically modified insect resistant (Bt) cotton has promoted large scale monocultures, which is thought to worsen the problem of crop genetic homogeneity. Information on genetic diversity among Bt cotton varieties is lacking. We evaluated genetic divergence among 19 Bt cotton genotypes using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Thirty-seven of 104 surveyed primers were found informative. Fifty-two primers selected on the basis of reported intra-hirsutum polymorphism in a cotton marker database showed a high degree of polymorphism, 56% compared to 13% for randomly selected primers. A total of 177 loci were amplified, with an average of 1.57 loci per primer, generating 38 markers. The amplicons ranged in size from 98 to 256 bp. The genetic similarities among the 19 genotypes ranged from 0.902 to 0.982, with an average of 0.947, revealing a lack of diversity. Similarities among genotypes from public sector organizations were higher than genotypes developed by private companies. Hybrids were found to be more distant compared to commercial cultivars and advanced breeding lines. Cluster analysis grouped the 19 Bt cotton genotypes into three major clusters and two independent entries. Cultivars IR-3701, Ali Akbar-802 and advanced breeding line VH-259 grouped in subcluster B2, with very narrow genetic distances despite dissimilar parentage. We found a very high level of similarity among Pakistani-bred Bt cotton varieties, which means that genetically diverse recurrent parents should be included to enhance genetic diversity. The intra-hirsutum polymorphic SSRs were found to be highly informative for molecular genetic diversity studies in these cotton varieties.

  4. Analysis of the genetic diversity of beach plums by simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Wang, X M; Wu, W L; Zhang, C H; Zhang, Y P; Li, W L; Huang, T

    2015-08-19

    The purpose of this study was to measure the genetic diversity of wild beach plum and cultivated species, and to determine the species relationships using SSRs markers. An analysis of genetic diversity from ten beach plum germplasms was carried out using 11 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers selected from 35 primers to generate distinct PCR products. From this plant material, 44 allele variations were detected, with 3-5 alleles identified from each primer. The analysis showed that the genetic similarity coefficient varied from 0.721 ± 0.155 to 0.848 ± 0.136 within each of the ten beach plum germplasms and changed within the range of 0.551 ± 0.084 to 0.695 ± 0.073 between any two pairs of germplasms. According to the genetic dissimilarity coefficient matrix, a cluster analysis of SSRs using the unweighted pair group mean average method in the NTSYSpc 2.10 software revealed that the ten germplasms could be divided into two groups at the dissimilarity coefficient of 0.606. Class I included 77.8, 12.5, 30, and 33.3% of MM, MI, NY, and CM, respectively. Class II contains the remaining 9 beach plum germplasms. The markers generated by 11 SSR primers proved very effective in distinguishing the beach plum germplasm resources. It was clear that the geographical distribution did not correspond with the genetic relationships among the different beach plum strains. This result will be of value to beach plum breeding programs.

  5. Investigating genetic diversity in sapucaia using inter simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Borges, R C; Santos, F M G; Maia, M C C; Lima, P S C; Valente, S E S

    2016-08-19

    Sapucaia is a tree species originating from the Brazilian Amazon and is widely distributed in Brazil, especially in the mid-north region (Piauí and Maranhão states). Its seeds are rich in calories and proteins, and possess great potential for commercialization. Little is known about the genetic variability in the germplasm of most Lecythis species. Here, 11 inter-simple sequence repeat primers were used to estimate the genetic variability among 17 accessions, and to determine the levels of genetic variation and the standards of population structure in sapucaia. The accessions were obtained from the active germplasm bank (AGB) of Embrapa Meio-Norte, Teresina, PI, Brazil, and corresponded to four occurrence areas. Ninety-six loci were analyzed among the studied individuals. High variation was found at the species level, where the percentage of polymorphic bands was 94.79%, Nei's genetic diversity (h) was 0.3110, and Shannon's index (I) was 0.4732. In the analyzed populations, the percentage polymorphism ranged from 20.83 to 94.79%, Nei's genetic diversity ranged from 0.0863 to 0.2969, and Shannon's index ranged from 0.1260 to 0.4457. Significant genetic differentiation was detected among the populations (ΦST = 10.66%); however, the greatest genetic differentiation was found within the populations (89.34%), between which there was an intermediate level of gene flow (Nm = 1.10). Accessions BGS 2 and BGS 4 were the most divergent, whereas accessions BGS 14 and BGS 15 were the most similar. Therefore, sapucaia analyzed from the AGB present an elevated level of genetic diversity and may have potential use in genetic breeding programs.

  6. Genetic linkage map of Chinese native variety faba bean (Vicia faba L.) based on simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker is a powerful tool for construction of genetic linkage map which can be applied for locating quantitative trait loci (QTL) and marker-assisted selection (MAS). In this study, a genetic map of faba bean was constructed with SSR markers using a population of 129 F2 ...

  7. Evaluation of genetic diversity and pedigree within crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia spp.) cultivars using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity was estimated for 93 crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia spp.) cultivars (51 L. indica cultivars, 5 L. fauriei cultivars, and 37 interspecific hybrids) using 78 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. SSR loci were highly variable among the cultivars, detecting an average of 6.6 alleles per l...

  8. A high-density simple sequence repeat and single nucleotide polymorphism genetic map of the tetraploid cotton genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton genome complexity was investigated with a saturated molecular genetic map that combined several sets of microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSR) and the first major public set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in cotton genomes (Gossypium spp.), and that was constructed ...

  9. Cultivar identification, pedigree verification, and diversity analysis among Peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) Cultivars based on Simple Sequence Repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genetic relationships and pedigree inferences among peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) accessions and breeding lines used in genetic improvement were evaluated using 15 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. A total of 80 alleles were detected among the 37 peach accessions with an average of 5.53...

  10. Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis of genetic diversity in tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter].

    PubMed

    Assefa, Kebebew; Merker, Arnulf; Tefera, Hailu

    2003-01-01

    The DNA polymorphism among 92 selected tef genotypes belonging to eight origin groups was assessed using eight inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) primers. The objectives were to examine the possibility of using ISSR markers for unravelling genetic diversity in tef, and to assess the extent and pattern of genetic diversity in the test germplasm with respect to origin groups. The eight primers were able to separate or distinguish all of the 92 tef genotypes based on a total of 110 polymorphic bands among the test lines. The Jaccard similarity coefficient among the test genotypes ranged from 0.26 to 0.86, and at about 60 % similarity level the clustering of this matrix using the unweighted pair-group method based on arithmetic average (UPGMA) resulted in the formation of six major clusters of 2 to 37 lines with further eight lines remaining ungrouped. The standardized Nei genetic distance among the eight groups of origin ranged between 0.03 and 0.32. The UPGMA clustering using the standardized genetic distance matrix resulted in the identification of three clusters of the eight groups of origin with bootstrap values ranging from 56 to 97. The overall mean Shannon Weaver diversity index of the test lines was 0.73, indicating better resolution of genetic diversity in tef with ISSR markers than with phenotypic (morphological) traits used in previous studies. This can be attributed mainly to the larger number of loci generated for evaluation with ISSR analysis as compared to the few number of phenotypic traits amenable for assessment and which are further greatly affected by environment and genotype x environment interaction. Analysis of variance of mean Shannon Weaver diversity indices revealed substantial (P < or = 0.05) variation in the level of diversity among the eight groups of origin. In conclusion, our results indicate that ISSR can be useful as DNA-based molecular markers for studying genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships, DNA fingerprinting for the

  11. List of Predicted Simple Sequence Repeats from Sugar Beet GenBank Accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta vulgaris ESTs from GenBank as of January 2005 collapsed into 13,618 unique clusters (4,023 Tentative Consensus sequences, 9,595 singletons), and 35% were contributed via work partially supported through the BSDF. These sequences were parsed through SSR-Primer software for discovering potential...

  12. Research Techniques Made Simple: Bacterial 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequencing in Cutaneous Research.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jay-Hyun; Kennedy, Elizabeth A; Kong, Heidi H

    2016-03-01

    Skin serves as a protective barrier and also harbors numerous microorganisms collectively comprising the skin microbiome. As a result of recent advances in sequencing (next-generation sequencing), our understanding of microbial communities on skin has advanced substantially. In particular, the 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing technique has played an important role in efforts to identify the global communities of bacteria in healthy individuals and patients with various disorders in multiple topographical regions over the skin surface. Here, we describe basic principles, study design, and a workflow of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing methodology, primarily for investigators who are not familiar with this approach. This article will also discuss some applications and challenges of 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing as well as directions for future development.

  13. Quantum repeater based on cavity QED evolutions and coherent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonţa, Denis; van Loock, Peter

    2016-05-01

    In the framework of cavity QED, we propose a quantum repeater scheme that uses coherent light and chains of atoms coupled to optical cavities. In contrast to conventional repeater schemes, in our scheme there is no need for an explicit use of two-qubit quantum logical gates by exploiting solely the cavity QED evolution. In our previous work (Gonta and van Loock in Phys Rev A 88:052308, 2013), we already proposed a quantum repeater in which the entanglement between two neighboring repeater nodes was distributed using controlled displacements of input coherent light, while the produced low-fidelity entangled pairs were purified using ancillary (four-partite) entangled states. In the present work, the entanglement distribution is realized using a sequence of controlled phase shifts and displacements of input coherent light. Compared to previous coherent-state-based distribution schemes for two-qubit entanglement, our scheme here relies only upon a simple discrimination of two coherent states with opposite signs, which can be performed in a quantum mechanically optimal fashion via a beam splitter and two on-off detectors. For the entanglement purification, we employ a method that avoids the use of extra entangled ancilla states. Our repeater scheme exhibits reasonable fidelities and repeater rates providing an attractive platform for long-distance quantum communication.

  14. Mining and validation of pyrosequenced simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.).

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Senalik, D; McCown, B H; Zeldin, E L; Speers, J; Hyman, J; Bassil, N; Hummer, K; Simon, P W; Zalapa, J E

    2012-01-01

    The American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) is a major commercial fruit crop in North America, but limited genetic resources have been developed for the species. Furthermore, the paucity of codominant DNA markers has hampered the advance of genetic research in cranberry and the Ericaceae family in general. Therefore, we used Roche 454 sequencing technology to perform low-coverage whole genome shotgun sequencing of the cranberry cultivar 'HyRed'. After de novo assembly, the obtained sequence covered 266.3 Mb of the estimated 540-590 Mb in cranberry genome. A total of 107,244 SSR loci were detected with an overall density across the genome of 403 SSR/Mb. The AG repeat was the most frequent motif in cranberry accounting for 35% of all SSRs and together with AAG and AAAT accounted for 46% of all loci discovered. To validate the SSR loci, we designed 96 primer-pairs using contig sequence data containing perfect SSR repeats, and studied the genetic diversity of 25 cranberry genotypes. We identified 48 polymorphic SSR loci with 2-15 alleles per locus for a total of 323 alleles in the 25 cranberry genotypes. Genetic clustering by principal coordinates and genetic structure analyzes confirmed the heterogeneous nature of cranberries. The parentage composition of several hybrid cultivars was evident from the structure analyzes. Whole genome shotgun 454 sequencing was a cost-effective and efficient way to identify numerous SSR repeats in the cranberry sequence for marker development.

  15. Linkage of congenital isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency to the corticotropin releasing hormone locus using simple sequence repeat polymorphisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kyllo, J.H.; Collins, M.M.; Vetter, K.L.

    1996-03-29

    Genetic screening techniques using simple sequence repeat polymorphisms were applied to investigate the molecular nature of congenital isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency. We hypothesize that this rare cause of hypocortisolism shared by a brother and sister with two unaffected sibs and unaffected parents is inherited as an autosomal recessive single gene mutation. Genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis controlling cortisol sufficiency were investigated for a causal role in this disorder. Southern blotting showed no detectable mutations of the gene encoding pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), the ACTH precursor. Other candidate genes subsequently considered were those encoding neuroendocrine convertase-1, and neuroendocrine convertase-2 (NEC-1, NEC-2), and corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Tests for linkage were performed using polymorphic di- and tetranucleotide simple sequence repeat markers flanking the reported map locations for POMC, NEC-1, NEC-2, and CRH. The chromosomal haplotypes determined by the markers flanking the loci for POMC, NEC-1, and NEC-2 were not compatible with linkage. However, 22 individual markers defining the chromosomal haplotypes flanking CRH were compatible with linkage of the disorder to the immediate area of this gene of chromosome 8. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the ACTH deficiency in this family is due to an abnormality of CRH gene structure or expression. These results illustrate the useful application of high density genetic maps constructed with simple sequence repeat markers for inclusion/exclusion studies of candidate genes in even very small nuclear families segregating for unusual phenotypes. 25 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Isolation and characterization of Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) Markers from the moss genus Orthotrichum using a small throughput pyrosequencing machine.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Jakub; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szczecińska, Monika; Chwiałkowska, Karolina; Milewicz, Monika; Plášek, Vítězslav

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report the results of next-generation sequencing on the GS Junior system to identify a large number of microsatellites from the epiphytic moss Orthotrichum speciosum. Using a combination of a total (non-enrichment) genomic library and small-scale 454 pyrosequencing, we determined 5382 contigs whose length ranged from 103 to 5445 bp. In this dataset we identified 92 SSR (simple sequence repeats) motifs in 89 contigs. Forty-six of these had flanking regions suitable for primer design. We tested PCR amplification, reproducibility, and the level of polymorphism of 46 primer pairs for Orthotrichum speciosum using 40 individuals from two populations. As a result, the designed primers revealed 35 polymorphic loci with more than two alleles detected. This method is cost- and time-effective in comparison with traditional approaches involving cloning and sequencing.

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) Markers from the Moss Genus Orthotrichum Using a Small Throughput Pyrosequencing Machine

    PubMed Central

    Sawicki, Jakub; Kwaśniewski, Mirosław; Szczecińska, Monika; Chwiałkowska, Karolina; Milewicz, Monika; Plášek, Vítězslav

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report the results of next-generation sequencing on the GS Junior system to identify a large number of microsatellites from the epiphytic moss Orthotrichum speciosum. Using a combination of a total (non-enrichment) genomic library and small-scale 454 pyrosequencing, we determined 5382 contigs whose length ranged from 103 to 5445 bp. In this dataset we identified 92 SSR (simple sequence repeats) motifs in 89 contigs. Forty-six of these had flanking regions suitable for primer design. We tested PCR amplification, reproducibility, and the level of polymorphism of 46 primer pairs for Orthotrichum speciosum using 40 individuals from two populations. As a result, the designed primers revealed 35 polymorphic loci with more than two alleles detected. This method is cost- and time-effective in comparison with traditional approaches involving cloning and sequencing. PMID:22837714

  18. A simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide hybridization probes from heterologous gene sequences and probes.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, E S; Sarge, K D

    1988-11-30

    We describe a simple and rapid method for the preparation of homologous DNA oligonucleotide probes for hybridization analysis and/or cDNA/genomic library screening. With this method, a synthetic DNA oligonucleotide derived from a known heterologous DNA/RNA/protein sequence is annealed to an RNA preparation containing the gene transcript of interest. Any unpaired 3'-terminal oligonucleotides of the heterologous DNA primer are then removed using the 3' exonuclease activity of the DNA Polymerase I Klenow fragment before primer extension/dideoxynucleotide sequencing of the annealed RNA species with AMV reverse transcriptase. From the determined RNA sequence, a completely homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe is then prepared. This approach has been used to prepare a homologous DNA oligonucleotide probe for the successful library screening of the yeast hybRNA gene starting with a heterologous mouse hybRNA DNA oligonucleotide probe.

  19. Simple sequence repeat markers useful for sorghum downy mildew (Peronosclerospora sorghi) and related species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among the 55 primers pairs designed from clones from pathotype 3 of P. sorghi, 36 flanked microsatellite loci containing simple repeats, including 28 (55%) with dinucleotide repeats and 6 (11%) with trinucleotide repeats. A total of 22 microsatellites with CA/AC or GT/TG repeats were the most abund...

  20. Complex Sequencing Rules of Birdsong Can be Explained by Simple Hidden Markov Processes

    PubMed Central

    Katahira, Kentaro; Suzuki, Kenta; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Complex sequencing rules observed in birdsongs provide an opportunity to investigate the neural mechanism for generating complex sequential behaviors. To relate the findings from studying birdsongs to other sequential behaviors such as human speech and musical performance, it is crucial to characterize the statistical properties of the sequencing rules in birdsongs. However, the properties of the sequencing rules in birdsongs have not yet been fully addressed. In this study, we investigate the statistical properties of the complex birdsong of the Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata var. domestica). Based on manual-annotated syllable labeles, we first show that there are significant higher-order context dependencies in Bengalese finch songs, that is, which syllable appears next depends on more than one previous syllable. We then analyze acoustic features of the song and show that higher-order context dependencies can be explained using first-order hidden state transition dynamics with redundant hidden states. This model corresponds to hidden Markov models (HMMs), well known statistical models with a large range of application for time series modeling. The song annotation with these models with first-order hidden state dynamics agreed well with manual annotation, the score was comparable to that of a second-order HMM, and surpassed the zeroth-order model (the Gaussian mixture model; GMM), which does not use context information. Our results imply that the hierarchical representation with hidden state dynamics may underlie the neural implementation for generating complex behavioral sequences with higher-order dependencies. PMID:21915345

  1. Complex sequencing rules of birdsong can be explained by simple hidden Markov processes.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Kentaro; Suzuki, Kenta; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okada, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Complex sequencing rules observed in birdsongs provide an opportunity to investigate the neural mechanism for generating complex sequential behaviors. To relate the findings from studying birdsongs to other sequential behaviors such as human speech and musical performance, it is crucial to characterize the statistical properties of the sequencing rules in birdsongs. However, the properties of the sequencing rules in birdsongs have not yet been fully addressed. In this study, we investigate the statistical properties of the complex birdsong of the Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata var. domestica). Based on manual-annotated syllable labeles, we first show that there are significant higher-order context dependencies in Bengalese finch songs, that is, which syllable appears next depends on more than one previous syllable. We then analyze acoustic features of the song and show that higher-order context dependencies can be explained using first-order hidden state transition dynamics with redundant hidden states. This model corresponds to hidden Markov models (HMMs), well known statistical models with a large range of application for time series modeling. The song annotation with these models with first-order hidden state dynamics agreed well with manual annotation, the score was comparable to that of a second-order HMM, and surpassed the zeroth-order model (the Gaussian mixture model; GMM), which does not use context information. Our results imply that the hierarchical representation with hidden state dynamics may underlie the neural implementation for generating complex behavioral sequences with higher-order dependencies.

  2. Rapid and simple determination of T1 relaxation times in time-domain NMR by Continuous Wave Free Precession sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, Tiago Bueno; Monaretto, Tatiana; Colnago, Luiz Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Longitudinal (T1) and transverse (T2) relaxation times have been widely used in time-domain NMR (TD-NMR) to determine several physicochemical properties of petroleum, polymers, and food products. The measurement of T2 through the CPMG pulse sequence has been used in most of these applications because it denotes a rapid, robust method. On the other hand, T1 has been occasionally used in TD-NMR due to the long measurement time required to collect multiple points along the T1 relaxation curve. Recently, several rapid methods to measure T1 have been proposed. Those methods based upon single shot, known as Continuous Wave Free Precession (CWFP) pulse sequences, have been employed in the simultaneous measurement of T1 and T2 in a rapid fashion. However, these sequences can be used exclusively in instrument featuring short dead time because the magnitude of the signal at thermal equilibrium is required. In this paper, we demonstrate that a special CWFP sequence with a low flip angle can be a simple and rapid method to measure T1 regardless of instruments dead time. Experimental results confirmed that the method called CWFP-T1 may be used to measure both single T1 value and T1 distribution in heterogeneous samples. Therefore, CWFP-T1 sequence can be a feasible alternative to CPMG in the determination of physicochemical properties, particularly in processes where fast protocols are requested such as industrial applications.

  3. Expressed Sequence Tags Analysis and Design of Simple Sequence Repeats Markers from a Full-Length cDNA Library in Perilla frutescens (L.)

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Eun Soo; Yoo, Ji Hye; Choi, Jae Hoo; Kim, Chang Heum; Jeon, Mi Ran; Kang, Byeong Ju; Lee, Jae Geun; Choi, Seon Kang; Ghimire, Bimal Kumar; Yu, Chang Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Perilla frutescens is valuable as a medicinal plant as well as a natural medicine and functional food. However, comparative genomics analyses of P. frutescens are limited due to a lack of gene annotations and characterization. A full-length cDNA library from P. frutescens leaves was constructed to identify functional gene clusters and probable EST-SSR markers via analysis of 1,056 expressed sequence tags. Unigene assembly was performed using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) homology searches and annotated Gene Ontology (GO). A total of 18 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were designed as primer pairs. This study is the first to report comparative genomics and EST-SSR markers from P. frutescens will help gene discovery and provide an important source for functional genomics and molecular genetic research in this interesting medicinal plant. PMID:26664999

  4. Molecular characterization and similarity relationships among apricot ( Prunus armeniaca L.) genotypes using simple sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Hormaza, J.I.

    2002-02-01

    A collection of 48 apricot genotypes, originated from diverse geographic areas, have been screened with 37 SSR primer pairs developed in different species of Prunus in order to identify and characterize the genotypes and establish their genetic relations. Thirty one of those primer pairs resulted in correct amplifications and 20 produced polymorphic repeatable amplification patterns with the 48 genotypes studied. A total of 82 alleles were detected for the 20 loci. All the genotypes studied could be unequivocally distinguished with the combination of SSRs used. The results obtained evidence for the cross-species transportability of microsatellite sequences, allowing the discrimination among different genotypes of a given fruit-tree species with sequences developed in other species. UPGMA cluster analysis of the similarity data grouped the genotypes studied according to their geographic origin and/or their pedigree information.

  5. The simple fool's guide to population genomics via RNA-Seq: an introduction to high-throughput sequencing data analysis.

    PubMed

    De Wit, Pierre; Pespeni, Melissa H; Ladner, Jason T; Barshis, Daniel J; Seneca, François; Jaris, Hannah; Therkildsen, Nina Overgaard; Morikawa, Megan; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2012-11-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies are currently revolutionizing the field of biology and medicine, yet bioinformatic challenges in analysing very large data sets have slowed the adoption of these technologies by the community of population biologists. We introduce the 'Simple Fool's Guide to Population Genomics via RNA-seq' (SFG), a document intended to serve as an easy-to-follow protocol, walking a user through one example of high-throughput sequencing data analysis of nonmodel organisms. It is by no means an exhaustive protocol, but rather serves as an introduction to the bioinformatic methods used in population genomics, enabling a user to gain familiarity with basic analysis steps. The SFG consists of two parts. This document summarizes the steps needed and lays out the basic themes for each and a simple approach to follow. The second document is the full SFG, publicly available at http://sfg.stanford.edu, that includes detailed protocols for data processing and analysis, along with a repository of custom-made scripts and sample files. Steps included in the SFG range from tissue collection to de novo assembly, blast annotation, alignment, gene expression, functional enrichment, SNP detection, principal components and F(ST) outlier analyses. Although the technical aspects of population genomics are changing very quickly, our hope is that this document will help population biologists with little to no background in high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics to more quickly adopt these new techniques.

  6. Mercator: a fast and simple web server for genome scale functional annotation of plant sequence data.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Marc; Nagel, Axel; Herter, Thomas; May, Patrick; Schroda, Michael; Zrenner, Rita; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark; Usadel, Björn

    2014-05-01

    Next-generation technologies generate an overwhelming amount of gene sequence data. Efficient annotation tools are required to make these data amenable to functional genomics analyses. The Mercator pipeline automatically assigns functional terms to protein or nucleotide sequences. It uses the MapMan 'BIN' ontology, which is tailored for functional annotation of plant 'omics' data. The classification procedure performs parallel sequence searches against reference databases, compiles the results and computes the most likely MapMan BINs for each query. In the current version, the pipeline relies on manually curated reference classifications originating from the three reference organisms (Arabidopsis, Chlamydomonas, rice), various other plant species that have a reviewed SwissProt annotation, and more than 2000 protein domain and family profiles at InterPro, CDD and KOG. Functional annotations predicted by Mercator achieve accuracies above 90% when benchmarked against manual annotation. In addition to mapping files for direct use in the visualization software MapMan, Mercator provides graphical overview charts, detailed annotation information in a convenient web browser interface and a MapMan-to-GO translation table to export results as GO terms. Mercator is available free of charge via http://mapman.gabipd.org/web/guest/app/Mercator.

  7. Exploiting expressed sequence tag databases for the development and characterization of gene-derived simple sequence repeat markers in the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) for forensic applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Jin, Gang Nam; Lee, Kyung Lyong; Han, Myun Soo; Lee, Yang Han; Yang, Moon Sik

    2011-09-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) were identified from an expressed sequence tag (EST) database comprised of 20,340 sequences. In total, 2780 SSR-containing sequences were identified. The most frequent microsatellite had an AT/TA motif (37%). Twenty-two opium poppy EST-SSR markers were presently developed and polymorphisms of six markers (psom 2, 4, 12, 13, 17, and 22) were utilized in 135 individuals under narcotic control investigation. An average of three alleles per locus (range: 2-5 alleles) with a mean heterozygosity of 0.167 was detected. Six loci identified 29 unique profiles in 135 individuals. The EST-SSR markers exhibited small degrees of genetic differentiation (fixation index = 0.727, p < 0.001). Other variable markers will be needed to facilitate the forensic identification of the opium poppy for future cases. To determine the potential for cross-species amplification, six markers were tested in five Papaver genera species and two Eschscholzia genera. The psom 4 and psom 17 primer pair was transferable. This is the first study to report SSR markers of the opium poppy.

  8. The Goldilocks effect: human infants allocate attention to visual sequences that are neither too simple nor too complex.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Celeste; Piantadosi, Steven T; Aslin, Richard N

    2012-01-01

    Human infants, like immature members of any species, must be highly selective in sampling information from their environment to learn efficiently. Failure to be selective would waste precious computational resources on material that is already known (too simple) or unknowable (too complex). In two experiments with 7- and 8-month-olds, we measure infants' visual attention to sequences of events varying in complexity, as determined by an ideal learner model. Infants' probability of looking away was greatest on stimulus items whose complexity (negative log probability) according to the model was either very low or very high. These results suggest a principle of infant attention that may have broad applicability: infants implicitly seek to maintain intermediate rates of information absorption and avoid wasting cognitive resources on overly simple or overly complex events.

  9. The Goldilocks Effect: Human Infants Allocate Attention to Visual Sequences That Are Neither Too Simple Nor Too Complex

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Celeste; Piantadosi, Steven T.; Aslin, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    Human infants, like immature members of any species, must be highly selective in sampling information from their environment to learn efficiently. Failure to be selective would waste precious computational resources on material that is already known (too simple) or unknowable (too complex). In two experiments with 7- and 8-month-olds, we measure infants’ visual attention to sequences of events varying in complexity, as determined by an ideal learner model. Infants’ probability of looking away was greatest on stimulus items whose complexity (negative log probability) according to the model was either very low or very high. These results suggest a principle of infant attention that may have broad applicability: infants implicitly seek to maintain intermediate rates of information absorption and avoid wasting cognitive resources on overly simple or overly complex events. PMID:22649492

  10. Neural representations and mechanisms for the performance of simple speech sequences

    PubMed Central

    Bohland, Jason W.; Bullock, Daniel; Guenther, Frank H.

    2010-01-01

    Speakers plan the phonological content of their utterances prior to their release as speech motor acts. Using a finite alphabet of learned phonemes and a relatively small number of syllable structures, speakers are able to rapidly plan and produce arbitrary syllable sequences that fall within the rules of their language. The class of computational models of sequence planning and performance termed competitive queuing (CQ) models have followed Lashley (1951) in assuming that inherently parallel neural representations underlie serial action, and this idea is increasingly supported by experimental evidence. In this paper we develop a neural model that extends the existing DIVA model of speech production in two complementary ways. The new model includes paired structure and content subsystems (cf. MacNeilage, 1998) that provide parallel representations of a forthcoming speech plan, as well as mechanisms for interfacing these phonological planning representations with learned sensorimotor programs to enable stepping through multi-syllabic speech plans. On the basis of previous reports, the model’s components are hypothesized to be localized to specific cortical and subcortical structures, including the left inferior frontal sulcus, the medial premotor cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus. The new model, called GODIVA (Gradient Order DIVA), thus fills a void in current speech research by providing formal mechanistic hypotheses about both phonological and phonetic processes that are grounded by neuroanatomy and physiology. This framework also generates predictions that can be tested in future neuroimaging and clinical case studies. PMID:19583476

  11. a Simple Symmetric Algorithm Using a Likeness with Introns Behavior in RNA Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regoli, Massimo

    2009-02-01

    The RNA-Crypto System (shortly RCS) is a symmetric key algorithm to cipher data. The idea for this new algorithm starts from the observation of nature. In particular from the observation of RNA behavior and some of its properties. The RNA sequences has some sections called Introns. Introns, derived from the term "intragenic regions", are non-coding sections of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) or other RNAs, that are removed (spliced out of the RNA) before the mature RNA is formed. Once the introns have been spliced out of a pre-mRNA, the resulting mRNA sequence is ready to be translated into a protein. The corresponding parts of a gene are known as introns as well. The nature and the role of Introns in the pre-mRNA is not clear and it is under ponderous researches by Biologists but, in our case, we will use the presence of Introns in the RNA-Crypto System output as a strong method to add chaotic non coding information and an unnecessary behaviour in the access to the secret key to code the messages. In the RNA-Crypto System algoritnm the introns are sections of the ciphered message with non-coding information as well as in the precursor mRNA.

  12. Diversity analysis in Cannabis sativa based on large-scale development of expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunsheng; Xin, Pengfei; Cheng, Chaohua; Tang, Qing; Chen, Ping; Wang, Changbiao; Zang, Gonggu; Zhao, Lining

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis sativa L. is an important economic plant for the production of food, fiber, oils, and intoxicants. However, lack of sufficient simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers has limited the development of cannabis genetic research. Here, large-scale development of expressed sequence tag simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers was performed to obtain more informative genetic markers, and to assess genetic diversity in cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.). Based on the cannabis transcriptome, 4,577 SSRs were identified from 3,624 ESTs. From there, a total of 3,442 complementary primer pairs were designed as SSR markers. Among these markers, trinucleotide repeat motifs (50.99%) were the most abundant, followed by hexanucleotide (25.13%), dinucleotide (16.34%), tetranucloetide (3.8%), and pentanucleotide (3.74%) repeat motifs, respectively. The AAG/CTT trinucleotide repeat (17.96%) was the most abundant motif detected in the SSRs. One hundred and seventeen EST-SSR markers were randomly selected to evaluate primer quality in 24 cannabis varieties. Among these 117 markers, 108 (92.31%) were successfully amplified and 87 (74.36%) were polymorphic. Forty-five polymorphic primer pairs were selected to evaluate genetic diversity and relatedness among the 115 cannabis genotypes. The results showed that 115 varieties could be divided into 4 groups primarily based on geography: Northern China, Europe, Central China, and Southern China. Moreover, the coefficient of similarity when comparing cannabis from Northern China with the European group cannabis was higher than that when comparing with cannabis from the other two groups, owing to a similar climate. This study outlines the first large-scale development of SSR markers for cannabis. These data may serve as a foundation for the development of genetic linkage, quantitative trait loci mapping, and marker-assisted breeding of cannabis.

  13. Neural representations and mechanisms for the performance of simple speech sequences.

    PubMed

    Bohland, Jason W; Bullock, Daniel; Guenther, Frank H

    2010-07-01

    Speakers plan the phonological content of their utterances before their release as speech motor acts. Using a finite alphabet of learned phonemes and a relatively small number of syllable structures, speakers are able to rapidly plan and produce arbitrary syllable sequences that fall within the rules of their language. The class of computational models of sequence planning and performance termed competitive queuing models have followed K. S. Lashley [The problem of serial order in behavior. In L. A. Jeffress (Ed.), Cerebral mechanisms in behavior (pp. 112-136). New York: Wiley, 1951] in assuming that inherently parallel neural representations underlie serial action, and this idea is increasingly supported by experimental evidence. In this article, we developed a neural model that extends the existing DIVA model of speech production in two complementary ways. The new model includes paired structure and content subsystems [cf. MacNeilage, P. F. The frame/content theory of evolution of speech production. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 21, 499-511, 1998 ] that provide parallel representations of a forthcoming speech plan as well as mechanisms for interfacing these phonological planning representations with learned sensorimotor programs to enable stepping through multisyllabic speech plans. On the basis of previous reports, the model's components are hypothesized to be localized to specific cortical and subcortical structures, including the left inferior frontal sulcus, the medial premotor cortex, the basal ganglia, and the thalamus. The new model, called gradient order DIVA, thus fills a void in current speech research by providing formal mechanistic hypotheses about both phonological and phonetic processes that are grounded by neuroanatomy and physiology. This framework also generates predictions that can be tested in future neuroimaging and clinical case studies.

  14. Transcriptome analysis reveals ginsenosides biosynthetic genes, microRNAs and simple sequence repeats in Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer is one of the most widely used medicinal plants. Complete genome information for this species remains unavailable due to its large genome size. At present, analysis of expressed sequence tags is still the most powerful tool for large-scale gene discovery. The global expressed sequence tags from P. ginseng tissues, especially those isolated from stems, leaves and flowers, are still limited, hindering in-depth study of P. ginseng. Results Two 454 pyrosequencing runs generated a total of 2,423,076 reads from P. ginseng roots, stems, leaves and flowers. The high-quality reads from each of the tissues were independently assembled into separate and shared contigs. In the separately assembled database, 45,849, 6,172, 4,041 and 3,273 unigenes were only found in the roots, stems, leaves and flowers database, respectively. In the jointly assembled database, 178,145 unigenes were observed, including 86,609 contigs and 91,536 singletons. Among the 178,145 unigenes, 105,522 were identified for the first time, of which 65.6% were identified in the stem, leaf or flower cDNA libraries of P. ginseng. After annotation, we discovered 223 unigenes involved in ginsenoside backbone biosynthesis. Additionally, a total of 326 potential cytochrome P450 and 129 potential UDP-glycosyltransferase sequences were predicted based on the annotation results, some of which may encode enzymes responsible for ginsenoside backbone modification. A BLAST search of the obtained high-quality reads identified 14 potential microRNAs in P. ginseng, which were estimated to target 100 protein-coding genes, including transcription factors, transporters and DNA binding proteins, among others. In addition, a total of 13,044 simple sequence repeats were identified from the 178,145 unigenes. Conclusions This study provides global expressed sequence tags for P. ginseng, which will contribute significantly to further genome-wide research and analyses in this species. The novel

  15. In silico mining for simple sequence repeat loci in a pineapple expressed sequence tag database and cross-species amplification of EST-SSR markers across Bromeliaceae.

    PubMed

    Wöhrmann, Tina; Weising, Kurt

    2011-08-01

    A collection of 5,659 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from pineapple [Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.] was screened for simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) with motif lengths between 1 and 6 bp. Lower thresholds of 15, 7 and 5 repeat units were used to define microsatellites of the mono-, di-, and tri- to hexanucleotide repeat type, respectively. Based on these criteria, 696 SSRs were identified among 3,389 EST unigenes, together representing 2,840 kb. This corresponds to an average density of one SSR every 4.1 kb of non-redundant EST sequences. Dinucleotide repeats were most abundant (38.4% of all SSRs) followed by trinucleotide repeats (38.1%). Flanking primer pairs were designed for 537 EST-SSR loci, and 49 of these were screened for their functionality in 12 accessions of A. comosus, 14 accessions of 5 additional Ananas species and 1 species of Pseudananas. Distinct PCR products of the expected size range were obtained with 36 primer pairs. Eighteen loci analyzed in more detail were all polymorphic in pineapple, and primer pairs flanking these loci also generated PCR products from a wide range of genera and species from six subfamilies of the Bromeliaceae. The potential to reveal polymorphism in a heterologous target species was demonstrated in Deuterocohnia brevifolia (subfamily Pitcairnioideae).

  16. Genetic diversity in Arabidopsis thaliana L. Heynh. investigated by cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Barth, S; Melchinger, A E; Lübberstedt, Th

    2002-03-01

    In this study, we investigated genetic diversity among 37 accessions in Arabidopsis thaliana from Eurasia, North Africa and North America using morphological traits and two polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based marker systems: cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS) and inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR). Cluster analysis based on genetic similarities calculated from CAPS data grouped the accessions roughly according to their geographical origin: one large group contained accessions from Western, Northern and Southern Europe as well as North Africa, a second group consisted of Eastern European and Asian continental accessions. North American accessions were interspersed into these groups. Contrary to the CAPS analysis, the dendrogram obtained from the ISSR data did not reflect the geographical origin of the accessions, and the calculated genetic distances did not match the CAPS results. This could be attributable to an uneven genomic distribution of ISSR markers as substantiated by a database search for ISSR binding sites in A. thaliana genomic DNA sequence files, or to the ISSR's different mode of evolution. We recommend CAPS markers for diversity analysis in A. thaliana because a careful selection of markers can ascertain an even representation of the entire genome.

  17. Optimizing the efficiency of the touchdown technique for detecting inter-simple sequence repeat markers in corn (Zea mays).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, E C; Amaral Júnior, A T; Gonçalves, L S A; Pena, G F; Freitas Júnior, S P; Ribeiro, R M; Pereira, M G

    2010-05-04

    We evaluated the efficiency of the touchdown method to determine the ideal PCR conditions for distinct inter-simple sequence repeat primers for processing DNA from common corn, popcorn, sweet corn, and a Tripsacum-maize hybrid. Genomic DNA was extracted from eight accessions of corn: two of the dent type, one Tripsacum-maize hybrid, one sweet corn, one flint-type corn, and three popcorn. Fifteen inter-simple sequence repeat primers were used: (CT)(8)RC, (CT)(8)TG, (GA)(8)T, (GA)(8)YC, (CTC)(5)RC, (GTC)(6), (GA)(6)CC, (GT)(6)CC, (CAC)(3)GC, (AG)(8)YT, (AC)(8)T, (AC)(8)YG, (CT)(8)RG, (GGAT)(3)GA, and (GAA)(6)AA. The annealing temperature and the melting temperature for each primer were estimated using a formula for RW Genes products, or we used the temperatures indicated by the manufacturer (Invitrogen). The touchdown method was then applied to each primer, varying the number of final cycles (10 or 12) and the decrease in temperature (0.5 degrees or 1.0 degrees C intervals). The gels were compared, considering the revelation quality, band sharpness and the number of bands visualized. The touchdown-PCR method was more efficient for band amplification for most of the primers, especially at higher annealing temperatures. This type of system is useful for reducing the resources, time and effort needed for optimizing temperature conditions for a group of representative primers.

  18. Genome sequence of the Fleming strain of Micrococcus luteus, a simple free-living actinobacterium.

    PubMed

    Young, Michael; Artsatbanov, Vladislav; Beller, Harry R; Chandra, Govind; Chater, Keith F; Dover, Lynn G; Goh, Ee-Been; Kahan, Tamar; Kaprelyants, Arseny S; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lapidus, Alla; Lowry, Stephen R; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mahillon, Jacques; Markowitz, Victor; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mukamolova, Galina V; Oren, Aharon; Rokem, J Stefan; Smith, Margaret C M; Young, Danielle I; Greenblatt, Charles L

    2010-02-01

    Micrococcus luteus (NCTC2665, "Fleming strain") has one of the smallest genomes of free-living actinobacteria sequenced to date, comprising a single circular chromosome of 2,501,097 bp (G+C content, 73%) predicted to encode 2,403 proteins. The genome shows extensive synteny with that of the closely related organism, Kocuria rhizophila, from which it was taxonomically separated relatively recently. Despite its small size, the genome harbors 73 insertion sequence (IS) elements, almost all of which are closely related to elements found in other actinobacteria. An IS element is inserted into the rrs gene of one of only two rrn operons found in M. luteus. The genome encodes only four sigma factors and 14 response regulators, a finding indicative of adaptation to a rather strict ecological niche (mammalian skin). The high sensitivity of M. luteus to beta-lactam antibiotics may result from the presence of a reduced set of penicillin-binding proteins and the absence of a wblC gene, which plays an important role in the antibiotic resistance in other actinobacteria. Consistent with the restricted range of compounds it can use as a sole source of carbon for energy and growth, M. luteus has a minimal complement of genes concerned with carbohydrate transport and metabolism and its inability to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source may be due to the apparent absence of a gene encoding glucokinase. Uniquely among characterized bacteria, M. luteus appears to be able to metabolize glycogen only via trehalose and to make trehalose only via glycogen. It has very few genes associated with secondary metabolism. In contrast to most other actinobacteria, M. luteus encodes only one resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) required for emergence from dormancy, and its complement of other dormancy-related proteins is also much reduced. M. luteus is capable of long-chain alkene biosynthesis, which is of interest for advanced biofuel production; a three-gene cluster essential for this

  19. A simple ABO genotyping by PCR using sequence-specific primers with mismatched nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Taki, Takashi; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    In forensics, the specific ABO blood group is often determined by analyzing the ABO gene. Among various methods used, PCR employing sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) is simpler than other methods for ABO typing. When performing the PCR-SSP, the pseudo-positive signals often lead to errors in ABO typing. We introduced mismatched nucleotides at the second and the third positions from the 3'-end of the primers for the PCR-SSP method and examined whether reliable typing could be achieved by suppressing pseudo-positive signals. Genomic DNA was extracted from nail clippings of 27 volunteers, and the ABO gene was examined with PCR-SSP employing primers with and without mismatched nucleotides. The ABO blood group of the nail clippings was also analyzed serologically, and these results were compared with those obtained using PCR-SSP. When mismatched primers were employed for amplification, the results of the ABO typing matched with those obtained by the serological method. When primers without mismatched nucleotides were used for PCR-SSP, pseudo-positive signals were observed. Thus our method may be used for achieving more reliable ABO typing.

  20. Genome sequence of the Fleming strain of Micrococcus luteus, a simple free- living actinobacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Michael; Artsatbanov, Vladislav; Beller, Harry R.; Chandra, Govind; Chater, Keith F.; Dover, Lynn G.; Goh, Ee-Been; Kahan, Tamar; Kaprelyants, Arseny S.; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lapidus, Alla; Lowry, Stephen R.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mahillon, Jacques; Markowitz, Viktor; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mukamolova, Galina V.; Oren, Aharon; Rokem, J. Stefan; Smith, Margaret C. M.; Young, Danielle I.; Greenblatt, Charles L.

    2009-11-01

    Micrococcus luteus (NCTC2665, Fleming strain) has one of the smallest genomes of free living actinobacteria sequenced to date, comprising a single circular chromosome of 2,501,097 bp (G+C content 73%) predicted to encode 2403 proteins. The genome shows extensive synteny with that of the closely related organism, Kocuria rhizophila, from which it was taxonomically separated relatively recently. Despite its small size, the genome harbors 73 IS elements, almost all of which are closely related to elements found in other actinobacteria. An IS element is inserted into the rrs gene of one of only two rrn operons found in M. luteus. The genome encodes only four sigma factors and fourteen response regulators, indicative of adaptation to a rather strict ecological niche (mammalian skin). The high sensitivity of M. luteus to {Beta}-lactam antibiotics may result from the presence of a reduced set of penicillin binding proteins and the absence of a wblC gene, which plays an important role in antibiotic resistance in other actinobacteria. Consistent with the restricted range of compounds it can use as a sole source of carbon for energy and growth, M. luteus has a minimal complement of genes concerned with carbohydrate transport and metabolism and its inability to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source may be due to the apparent absence of a gene encoding glucokinase. Uniquely among characterized bacteria, M. luteus appears to be able to metabolize glycogen only via trehalose, and to make trehalose only via glycogen. It has very few genes associated with secondary metabolism. In contrast to other actinobacteria, M. luteus encodes only one resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) required for emergence from dormancy and its complement of other dormancy-related proteins is also much reduced. M. luteus is capable of long-chain alkene biosynthesis, which is of interest for advanced biofuel production; a three gene cluster essential for this metabolism has been identified in the genome.

  1. Construction of an integrated high density simple sequence repeat linkage map in cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) and its applicability.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Sachiko N; Hirakawa, Hideki; Sato, Shusei; Maeda, Fumi; Ishikawa, Masami; Mori, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Shirasawa, Kenta; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Fukami, Masanobu; Hashizume, Fujio; Tsuji, Tomoko; Sasamoto, Shigemi; Kato, Midori; Nanri, Keiko; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Minami, Chiharu; Takahashi, Chika; Wada, Tsuyuko; Ono, Akiko; Kawashima, Kumiko; Nakazaki, Naomi; Kishida, Yoshie; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Nakayama, Shinobu; Yamada, Manabu; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Watanabe, Akiko; Tabata, Satoshi

    2013-02-01

    The cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is an octoploid (2n = 8x = 56) of the Rosaceae family whose genomic architecture is still controversial. Several recent studies support the AAA'A'BBB'B' model, but its complexity has hindered genetic and genomic analysis of this important crop. To overcome this difficulty and to assist genome-wide analysis of F. × ananassa, we constructed an integrated linkage map by organizing a total of 4474 of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers collected from published Fragaria sequences, including 3746 SSR markers [Fragaria vesca expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived SSR markers] derived from F. vesca ESTs, 603 markers (F. × ananassa EST-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa ESTs, and 125 markers (F. × ananassa transcriptome-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa transcripts. Along with the previously published SSR markers, these markers were mapped onto five parent-specific linkage maps derived from three mapping populations, which were then assembled into an integrated linkage map. The constructed map consists of 1856 loci in 28 linkage groups (LGs) that total 2364.1 cM in length. Macrosynteny at the chromosome level was observed between the LGs of F. × ananassa and the genome of F. vesca. Variety distinction on 129 F. × ananassa lines was demonstrated using 45 selected SSR markers.

  2. AFSM sequencing approach: a simple and rapid method for genome-wide SNP and methylation site discovery and genetic mapping

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhiqiang; Zou, Meiling; Zhang, Shengkui; Feng, Binxiao; Wang, Wenquan

    2014-01-01

    We describe methods for the assessment of amplified-fragment single nucleotide polymorphism and methylation (AFSM) sites using a quick and simple molecular marker-assisted breeding strategy based on the use of two restriction enzyme pairs (EcoRI-MspI and EcoRI-HpaII) and a next-generation sequencing platform. Two sets of 85 adapter pairs were developed to concurrently identify SNPs, indels and methylation sites for 85 lines of cassava population in this study. In addition to SNPs and indels, the simplicity of the AFSM protocol makes it particularly suitable for high-throughput full methylation and hemi-methylation analyses. To further demonstrate the ease of this approach, a cassava genetic linkage map was constructed. This approach should be widely applicable for genetic mapping in a variety of organisms and will improve the application of crop genomics in assisted breeding. PMID:25466435

  3. Detection and quantification of in vitro-culture induced chimerism using simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis in Theobroma cacao (L.).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez López, Carlos M; Wetten, Andrew C; Wilkinson, Michael J

    2004-12-01

    Mutation rates are often elevated in plants regenerated from in vitro culture, giving rise to so-called 'somaclonal variation'. Detailed characterisation of mutation profiles that arise during culture should improve our understanding of processes influencing mutation and allow the selection of protocols yielding the fewest/least severe changes. Somatic mutations will usually produce genetic chimeras where unchanged alleles are retained by some cells. Such chimeras are difficult to detect but likely to form a significant proportion of any regenerant population. We present a simple protocol that enables the provisional diagnosis of both homogenous and chimeric mutants among large regenerant populations, together with a semi-quantitative means of estimating the proportion of mutant cells. The assay exploits consistent differential amplification of alternate simple sequence repeat alleles at heterozygous loci. Calibration of the relative amplification of alleles from two genotypes-and the synthetic chimeras created from them-revealed a strong linear relationship between 'peak heights' representing alternate alleles following capillary electrophoresis. The assay predicts chimeric composition to a reasonable level of confidence (+/-5%) so long as the infrequent allele exceeds 15% of the template. The system was applied to 233 regenerants of cocoa somatic embryogenesis and identified 72 (31%) putative chimeric mutants for slippage mutation or allele loss across two loci.

  4. Genome-Wide Characterization of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Loci in Chinese Jujube and Jujube SSR Primer Transferability

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jing; Zhao, Jin; Liu, Mengjun; Liu, Ping; Dai, Li; Zhao, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba), an economically important species in the Rhamnaceae family, is a popular fruit tree in Asia. Here, we surveyed and characterized simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in the jujube genome. A total of 436,676 SSR loci were identified, with an average distance of 0.93 Kb between the loci. A large proportion of the SSRs included mononucleotide, dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeat motifs, which accounted for 64.87%, 24.40%, and 8.74% of all repeats, respectively. Among the mononucleotide repeats, A/T was the most common, whereas AT/TA was the most common dinucleotide repeat. A total of 30,565 primer pairs were successfully designed and screened using a series of criteria. Moreover, 725 of 1,000 randomly selected primer pairs were effective among 6 cultivars, and 511 of these primer pairs were polymorphic. Sequencing the amplicons of two SSRs across three jujube cultivars revealed variations in the repeats. The transferability of jujube SSR primers proved that 35/64 SSRs could be transferred across family boundary. Using jujube SSR primers, clustering analysis results from 15 species were highly consistent with the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (APGIII) System. The genome-wide characterization of SSRs in Chinese jujube is very valuable for whole-genome characterization and marker-assisted selection in jujube breeding. In addition, the transferability of jujube SSR primers could provide a solid foundation for their further utilization. PMID:26000739

  5. A comprehensive characterization of simple sequence repeats in pepper genomes provides valuable resources for marker development in Capsicum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jiaowen; Zhao, Zicheng; Li, Bo; Qin, Cheng; Wu, Zhiming; Trejo-Saavedra, Diana L.; Luo, Xirong; Cui, Junjie; Rivera-Bustamante, Rafael F.; Li, Shuaicheng; Hu, Kailin

    2016-01-01

    The sequences of the full set of pepper genomes including nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast are now available for use. However, the overall of simple sequence repeats (SSR) distribution in these genomes and their practical implications for molecular marker development in Capsicum have not yet been described. Here, an average of 868,047.50, 45.50 and 30.00 SSR loci were identified in the nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes of pepper, respectively. Subsequently, systematic comparisons of various species, genome types, motif lengths, repeat numbers and classified types were executed and discussed. In addition, a local database composed of 113,500 in silico unique SSR primer pairs was built using a homemade bioinformatics workflow. As a pilot study, 65 polymorphic markers were validated among a wide collection of 21 Capsicum genotypes with allele number and polymorphic information content value per marker raging from 2 to 6 and 0.05 to 0.64, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the clustering results with those of a previous study indicated the usability of the newly developed SSR markers. In summary, this first report on the comprehensive characterization of SSR motifs in pepper genomes and the very large set of SSR primer pairs will benefit various genetic studies in Capsicum. PMID:26739748

  6. A Simple and Rapid Procedure for the Detection of Genes Encoding Shiga Toxins and Other Specific DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    A novel procedure for the detection of specific DNA sequences has been developed. This procedure is based on the already known method employing PCR with appropriate primers and a sequence-specific DNA probe labeled with the fluorescent agent 6-carboxylfluorescein (FAM) at the 5′ end and the fluorescence quencher BHQ-1 (black hole quencher) at the 3′ end. However, instead of the detection of the fluorescence signal with the use of real-time PCR cyclers, fluorescence/luminescence spectrometers or fluorescence polarization readers, as in all previously-reported procedures, we propose visual observation of the fluorescence under UV light directly in the reaction tube. An example for the specific detection of the Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains, by detecting Shiga toxin genes, is demonstrated. This method appears to be specific, simple, rapid and cost effective. It may be suitable for use in research laboratories, as well as in diagnostic units of medical institutions, even those equipped only with a thermocycler and a UV transilluminator, particularly if rapid identification of a pathogen is required. PMID:26580652

  7. A simple and rapid procedure for the detection of genes encoding Shiga toxins and other specific DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Januszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2015-11-13

    A novel procedure for the detection of specific DNA sequences has been developed. This procedure is based on the already known method employing PCR with appropriate primers and a sequence-specific DNA probe labeled with the fluorescent agent 6-carboxylfluorescein (FAM) at the 5' end and the fluorescence quencher BHQ-1 (black hole quencher) at the 3' end. However, instead of the detection of the fluorescence signal with the use of real-time PCR cyclers, fluorescence/luminescence spectrometers or fluorescence polarization readers, as in all previously-reported procedures, we propose visual observation of the fluorescence under UV light directly in the reaction tube. An example for the specific detection of the Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains, by detecting Shiga toxin genes, is demonstrated. This method appears to be specific, simple, rapid and cost effective. It may be suitable for use in research laboratories, as well as in diagnostic units of medical institutions, even those equipped only with a thermocycler and a UV transilluminator, particularly if rapid identification of a pathogen is required.

  8. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Ustilaginoidea virens genome and the development of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mina; Yu, Junjie; Li, Huanhuan; Wang, Yahui; Yin, Xiaole; Bo, Huiwen; Ding, Hui; Zhou, Yuxin; Liu, Yongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Ustilaginoidea virens is the causal agent of rice false smut, causing quantitative and qualitative losses in rice industry. However, the development and application of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for genetic diversity studies in U. virens were limited. This study is the first to perform large-scale development of SSR markers of this pathogen at the genome level, to (1) compare these SSR markers with those of other fungi, (2) analyze the pattern of the SSRs, and (3) obtain more informative genetic markers. U. virens is rich in SSRs, and 13,778 SSRs were identified with a relative abundance of 349.7SSRs/Mb. The most common motifs in the genome or in noncoding regions were mononucleotides, whereas trinucleotides in coding sequences. A total of 6 out of 127 primers were randomly selected to be used to analyze 115 isolates, and these 6 primers showed high polymorphism in U. virens. This study may serve as an important resource for molecular genetic studies in U. virens.

  9. Organelle Simple Sequence Repeat Markers Help to Distinguish Carpelloid Stamen and Normal Cytoplasmic Male Sterile Sources in Broccoli.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jinshuai; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Zhang, Lili; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong; Lv, Honghao

    2015-01-01

    We previously discovered carpelloid stamens when breeding cytoplasmic male sterile lines in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica). In this study, hybrids and multiple backcrosses were produced from different cytoplasmic male sterile carpelloid stamen sources and maintainer lines. Carpelloid stamens caused dysplasia of the flower structure and led to hooked or coiled siliques with poor seed setting, which were inherited in a maternal fashion. Using four distinct carpelloid stamens and twelve distinct normal stamens from cytoplasmic male sterile sources and one maintainer, we used 21 mitochondrial simple sequence repeat (mtSSR) primers and 32 chloroplast SSR primers to identify a mitochondrial marker, mtSSR2, that can differentiate between the cytoplasm of carpelloid and normal stamens. Thereafter, mtSSR2 was used to identify another 34 broccoli accessions, with an accuracy rate of 100%. Analysis of the polymorphic sequences revealed that the mtSSR2 open reading frame of carpelloid stamen sterile sources had a deletion of 51 bases (encoding 18 amino acids) compared with normal stamen materials. The open reading frame is located in the coding region of orf125 and orf108 of the mitochondrial genomes in Brassica crops and had the highest similarity with Raphanus sativus and Brassica carinata. The current study has not only identified a useful molecular marker to detect the cytoplasm of carpelloid stamens during broccoli breeding, but it also provides evidence that the mitochondrial genome is maternally inherited and provides a basis for studying the effect of the cytoplasm on flower organ development in plants.

  10. A comprehensive characterization of simple sequence repeats in pepper genomes provides valuable resources for marker development in Capsicum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiaowen; Zhao, Zicheng; Li, Bo; Qin, Cheng; Wu, Zhiming; Trejo-Saavedra, Diana L; Luo, Xirong; Cui, Junjie; Rivera-Bustamante, Rafael F; Li, Shuaicheng; Hu, Kailin

    2016-01-07

    The sequences of the full set of pepper genomes including nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast are now available for use. However, the overall of simple sequence repeats (SSR) distribution in these genomes and their practical implications for molecular marker development in Capsicum have not yet been described. Here, an average of 868,047.50, 45.50 and 30.00 SSR loci were identified in the nuclear, mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes of pepper, respectively. Subsequently, systematic comparisons of various species, genome types, motif lengths, repeat numbers and classified types were executed and discussed. In addition, a local database composed of 113,500 in silico unique SSR primer pairs was built using a homemade bioinformatics workflow. As a pilot study, 65 polymorphic markers were validated among a wide collection of 21 Capsicum genotypes with allele number and polymorphic information content value per marker raging from 2 to 6 and 0.05 to 0.64, respectively. Finally, a comparison of the clustering results with those of a previous study indicated the usability of the newly developed SSR markers. In summary, this first report on the comprehensive characterization of SSR motifs in pepper genomes and the very large set of SSR primer pairs will benefit various genetic studies in Capsicum.

  11. ChloroSSRdb: a repository of perfect and imperfect chloroplastic simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs) of green plants

    PubMed Central

    Kapil, Aditi; Rai, Piyush Kant; Shanker, Asheesh

    2014-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are regions in DNA sequence that contain repeating motifs of length 1–6 nucleotides. These repeats are ubiquitously present and are found in both coding and non-coding regions of genome. A total of 534 complete chloroplast genome sequences (as on 18 September 2014) of Viridiplantae are available at NCBI organelle genome resource. It provides opportunity to mine these genomes for the detection of SSRs and store them in the form of a database. In an attempt to properly manage and retrieve chloroplastic SSRs, we designed ChloroSSRdb which is a relational database developed using SQL server 2008 and accessed through ASP.NET. It provides information of all the three types (perfect, imperfect and compound) of SSRs. At present, ChloroSSRdb contains 124 430 mined SSRs, with majority lying in non-coding region. Out of these, PCR primers were designed for 118 249 SSRs. Tetranucleotide repeats (47 079) were found to be the most frequent repeat type, whereas hexanucleotide repeats (6414) being the least abundant. Additionally, in each species statistical analyses were performed to calculate relative frequency, correlation coefficient and chi-square statistics of perfect and imperfect SSRs. In accordance with the growing interest in SSR studies, ChloroSSRdb will prove to be a useful resource in developing genetic markers, phylogenetic analysis, genetic mapping, etc. Moreover, it will serve as a ready reference for mined SSRs in available chloroplast genomes of green plants. Database URL: www.compubio.in/chlorossrdb/ PMID:25380781

  12. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Laccaria bicolor genome, with development of microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Labbe, Jessy L; Murat, Claude; Morin, Emmanuelle; Le Tacon, F; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming clear that simple sequence repeats (SSRs) play a significant role in fungal genome organization, and they are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. We identified SSRs in the Laccaria bicolor genome by in silico survey and analyzed their distribution in the different genomic regions. We also compared the abundance and distribution of SSRs in L. bicolor with those of the following fungal genomes: Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Coprinopsis cinerea, Ustilago maydis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus nidulans, Magnaporthe grisea, Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using the MISA computer program, we detected 277,062 SSRs in the L. bicolor genome representing 8% of the assembled genomic sequence. Among the analyzed basidiomycetes, L. bicolor exhibited the highest SSR density although no correlation between relative abundance and the genome sizes was observed. In most genomes the short motifs (mono- to trinucleotides) were more abundant than the longer repeated SSRs. Generally, in each organism, the occurrence, relative abundance, and relative density of SSRs decreased as the repeat unit increased. Furthermore, each organism had its own common and longest SSRs. In the L. bicolor genome, most of the SSRs were located in intergenic regions (73.3%) and the highest SSR density was observed in transposable elements (TEs; 6,706 SSRs/Mb). However, 81% of the protein-coding genes contained SSRs in their exons, suggesting that SSR polymorphism may alter gene phenotypes. Within a L. bicolor offspring, sequence polymorphism of 78 SSRs was mainly detected in non-TE intergenic regions. Unlike previously developed microsatellite markers, these new ones are spread throughout the genome; these markers could have immediate applications in population genetics.

  13. Simple Sequence Repeats Together with Mismatch Repair Deficiency Can Bias Mutagenic Pathways in Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Chronic Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyano, Alejandro J.; Feliziani, Sofía; Di Rienzo, Julio A.; Smania, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that chronically infects the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and undergoes a process of genetic adaptation based on mutagenesis. We evaluated the role of mononucleotide G:C and A:T simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in this adaptive process. An in silico survey of the genome sequences of 7 P. aeruginosa strains showed that mononucleotide G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were greatly under-represented in coding regions, suggesting a strong counterselection process for G:C SSRs with lengths >5 bp but not for A:T SSRs. A meta-analysis of published whole genome sequence data for a P. aeruginosa strain from a CF patient with chronic airway infection showed that G:C SSRs but not A:T SSRs were frequently mutated during the infection process through the insertion or deletion of one or more SSR subunits. The mutation tendency of G:C SSRs was length-dependent and increased exponentially as a function of SSR length. When this strain naturally became a stable Mismatch Repair System (MRS)-deficient mutator, the degree of increase of G:C SSRs mutations (5-fold) was much higher than that of other types of mutation (2.2-fold or less). Sequence analysis of several mutated genes reported for two different collections, both containing mutator and non-mutator strains of P. aeruginosa from CF chronic infections, showed that the proportion of G:C SSR mutations was significantly higher in mutators than in non-mutators, whereas no such difference was observed for A:T SSR mutations. Our findings, taken together, provide genome-scale evidences that under a MRS-deficient background, long G:C SSRs are able to stochastically bias mutagenic pathways by making the genes in which they are harbored more prone to mutation. The combination of MRS deficiency and virulence-related genes that contain long G:C SSRs is therefore a matter of concern in P. aeruginosa CF chronic infection. PMID:24278287

  14. Organelle Simple Sequence Repeat Markers Help to Distinguish Carpelloid Stamen and Normal Cytoplasmic Male Sterile Sources in Broccoli

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Jinshuai; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Zhang, Lili; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong; Lv, Honghao

    2015-01-01

    We previously discovered carpelloid stamens when breeding cytoplasmic male sterile lines in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica). In this study, hybrids and multiple backcrosses were produced from different cytoplasmic male sterile carpelloid stamen sources and maintainer lines. Carpelloid stamens caused dysplasia of the flower structure and led to hooked or coiled siliques with poor seed setting, which were inherited in a maternal fashion. Using four distinct carpelloid stamens and twelve distinct normal stamens from cytoplasmic male sterile sources and one maintainer, we used 21 mitochondrial simple sequence repeat (mtSSR) primers and 32 chloroplast SSR primers to identify a mitochondrial marker, mtSSR2, that can differentiate between the cytoplasm of carpelloid and normal stamens. Thereafter, mtSSR2 was used to identify another 34 broccoli accessions, with an accuracy rate of 100%. Analysis of the polymorphic sequences revealed that the mtSSR2 open reading frame of carpelloid stamen sterile sources had a deletion of 51 bases (encoding 18 amino acids) compared with normal stamen materials. The open reading frame is located in the coding region of orf125 and orf108 of the mitochondrial genomes in Brassica crops and had the highest similarity with Raphanus sativus and Brassica carinata. The current study has not only identified a useful molecular marker to detect the cytoplasm of carpelloid stamens during broccoli breeding, but it also provides evidence that the mitochondrial genome is maternally inherited and provides a basis for studying the effect of the cytoplasm on flower organ development in plants. PMID:26407159

  15. Distinct patterns of simple sequence repeats and GC distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of primate genomes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wen-Hua; Yan, Chao-Chao; Li, Wu-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Li, Guang-Zhou; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Li, Jing; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-09-16

    As the first systematic examination of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and guanine-cytosine (GC) distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of ten primates, our study showed that SSRs and GC displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation. Our results suggest that the majority of SSRs are distributed in non-coding regions, such as the introns, TEs, and intergenic regions. In these primates, trinucleotide perfect (P) SSRs were the most abundant repeats type in the 5'UTRs and CDSs, whereas, mononucleotide P-SSRs were the most in the intron, 3'UTRs, TEs, and intergenic regions. The GC-contents varied greatly among different intragenic and intergenic regions: 5'UTRs > CDSs > 3'UTRs > TEs > introns > intergenic regions, and high GC-content was frequently distributed in exon-rich regions. Our results also showed that in the same intragenic and intergenic regions, the distribution of GC-contents were great similarity in the different primates. Tri- and hexanucleotide P-SSRs had the most GC-contents in the 5'UTRs and CDSs, whereas mononucleotide P-SSRs had the least GC-contents in the six genomic regions of these primates. The most frequent motifs for different length varied obviously with the different genomic regions.

  16. Distinct patterns of simple sequence repeats and GC distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of primate genomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wu-Jiao; Jiang, Xue-Mei; Li, Guang-Zhou; Zhang, Xiu-Yue; Hu, Ting-Zhang; Li, Jing; Yue, Bi-Song

    2016-01-01

    As the first systematic examination of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and guanine-cytosine (GC) distribution in intragenic and intergenic regions of ten primates, our study showed that SSRs and GC displayed nonrandom distribution for both intragenic and intergenic regions, suggesting that they have potential roles in transcriptional or translational regulation. Our results suggest that the majority of SSRs are distributed in non-coding regions, such as the introns, TEs, and intergenic regions. In these primates, trinucleotide perfect (P) SSRs were the most abundant repeats type in the 5′UTRs and CDSs, whereas, mononucleotide P-SSRs were the most in the intron, 3′UTRs, TEs, and intergenic regions. The GC-contents varied greatly among different intragenic and intergenic regions: 5′UTRs > CDSs > 3′UTRs > TEs > introns > intergenic regions, and high GC-content was frequently distributed in exon-rich regions. Our results also showed that in the same intragenic and intergenic regions, the distribution of GC-contents were great similarity in the different primates. Tri- and hexanucleotide P-SSRs had the most GC-contents in the 5′UTRs and CDSs, whereas mononucleotide P-SSRs had the least GC-contents in the six genomic regions of these primates. The most frequent motifs for different length varied obviously with the different genomic regions. PMID:27644032

  17. Development of simple sequence repeat markers in persimmon (Diospyros L.) and their potential use in related species.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Jing, Z B; Ruan, X F; Cheng, J M

    2015-01-30

    Persimmon (Diospyros L.) is an economically important fruit in the world, and it has been recognized as a healthy nutrient supply for human consumption. In this study, 14 microsatellite markers were developed from an AG/TC and AC/TG-enriched genomic library of Chinese persimmon Mopanshi. Twelve polymorphic markers were selected in 4 related species; these markers showed transferability to the 4 related persimmon species. In addition, 10 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were used to detect the genetic diversity among 51 persimmon accessions from China, Japan, and Korea. A total of 57 polymorphic bands with an average of 5.7 bands per primer pair were observed. According to cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis, all persimmon accessions could be divided into 4 groups. A close relationship existed between D. kaki and D. oleifera, and D. glaucifolia and D. lotus. Jinzaoshi could be considered a separate species of persimmon. These new SSR markers provide tools for evaluating genetic relatedness among different persimmon species.

  18. Diversity and genetic stability in banana genotypes in a breeding program using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Silva, A V C; Nascimento, A L S; Vitória, M F; Rabbani, A R C; Soares, A N R; Lédo, A S

    2017-02-23

    Banana (Musa spp) is a fruit species frequently cultivated and consumed worldwide. Molecular markers are important for estimating genetic diversity in germplasm and between genotypes in breeding programs. The objective of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity of 21 banana genotypes (FHIA 23, PA42-44, Maçã, Pacovan Ken, Bucaneiro, YB42-47, Grand Naine, Tropical, FHIA 18, PA94-01, YB42-17, Enxerto, Japira, Pacovã, Prata-Anã, Maravilha, PV79-34, Caipira, Princesa, Garantida, and Thap Maeo), by using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Material was generated from the banana breeding program of Embrapa Cassava & Fruits and evaluated at Embrapa Coastal Tablelands. The 12 primers used in this study generated 97.5% polymorphism. Four clusters were identified among the different genotypes studied, and the sum of the first two principal components was 48.91%. From the Unweighted Pair Group Method using Arithmetic averages (UPGMA) dendrogram, it was possible to identify two main clusters and subclusters. Two genotypes (Garantida and Thap Maeo) remained isolated from the others, both in the UPGMA clustering and in the principal cordinate analysis (PCoA). Using ISSR markers, we could analyze the genetic diversity of the studied material and state that these markers were efficient at detecting sufficient polymorphism to estimate the genetic variability in banana genotypes.

  19. Genetic diversity of wild Prunus cerasifera Ehrhart (wild cherry plum) in China revealed by simple-sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Li, Y; Liu, Y; Yang, Y F

    2015-07-28

    Simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers were employed to assess the genetic diversity of wild Prunus cerasifera Ehrhart (wild cherry plum) in China. Fourteen SSR primer pairs generated a total of 94 alleles (90 were polymorphic, accounting for 95.74%), with a mean of 6.71 alleles per locus. The number of alleles detected at each locus ranged from 2 at BPPCT 028 to 13 at BPPCT 002, with an average of 6.71 alleles per locus. Nei's genetic diversity ranged from 0.0938 to 0.4951 and Shannon's information index ranged from 0.1706 to 0.6882, with averages of 0.3295 and 0.4899, respectively. The SSR data indicated moderate genetic diversity of P. cerasifera in China. In the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean phylogenetic tree, the 40 forms of P. cerasifera were divided into 3 genetic clusters. However, the 3 clades determined using SSR data were not consistent with the classification based on morphological characters, such as fruit color. Because of the endangered status and the moderate genetic diversity of P. cerasifera in China, both in situ and ex situ conservation strategies should be adopted.

  20. Regeneration and assessment of genetic fidelity of the endangered tree Moringa peregrina (Forsk.) Fiori using Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR).

    PubMed

    Al Khateeb, Wesam; Bahar, Eman; Lahham, Jamil; Schroeder, Dana; Hussein, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Moringa peregrinais an endangered species of Moringaceae.M. peregrinais a multipurpose tree with a wide variety of potential uses including its medicinal activity. In our study, a rapid and efficient micropropagation protocol for M. peregrina has been established. In vitro germinated seedlings were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with different levels of either 6-benzyladenine (BA) or kinetin (Kin). The maximum shoot proliferation of 6.5 shoots per explant with 100 % shoot proliferation rate was observed on MS medium supplemented with 1.0 mg/l BA. On the other hand, MS medium supplemented with 1 mg/l indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) resulted in the maximum number of roots. Micropropagated plants were successfully acclimatized. Genetic stability of micropropagated plants was assessed using Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR). The amplification products were monomorphic in all in vitro grown plants. No polymorphism was detected indicating the genetic integrity of in vitro propagated plants. This micropropagation protocol could be useful for raising genetically uniform plants for plant propagation and commercial cultivation.

  1. Analysis of simple sequence repeat markers linked with blast disease resistance genes in a segregating population of rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Ashkani, S; Rafii, M Y; Sariah, M; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Rusli, I; Abdul Rahim, H; Latif, M A

    2011-07-06

    Among 120 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, 23 polymorphic markers were used to identify the segregation ratio in 320 individuals of an F(2) rice population derived from Pongsu Seribu 2, a resistant variety, and Mahsuri, a susceptible rice cultivar. For phenotypic study, the most virulent blast (Magnaporthe oryzae) pathotype, P7.2, was used in screening of F(2) population in order to understand the inheritance of blast resistance as well as linkage with SSR markers. Only 11 markers showed a good fit to the expected segregation ratio (1:2:1) for the single gene model (d.f. = 1.0, P < 0.05) in chi-square (χ(2)) analyses. In the phenotypic data analysis, the F(2) population segregated in a 3:1 (R:S) ratio for resistant and susceptible plants, respectively. Therefore, resistance to blast pathotype P7.2 in Pongsu Seribu 2 is most likely controlled by a single nuclear gene. The plants from F(2) lines that showed resistance to blast pathotype P7.2 were linked to six alleles of SSR markers, RM168 (116 bp), RM8225 (221 bp), RM1233 (175 bp), RM6836 (240 bp), RM5961 (129 bp), and RM413 (79 bp). These diagnostic markers could be used in marker assisted selection programs to develop a durable blast resistant variety.

  2. Genetic diversity and variance of Stentor coeruleus (Ciliophora: Heterotrichea) inferred from inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Jing; Lin, Yuan-Shao; Cao, Wen-Qing; Yang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    We used inter-simple sequence repeat fingerprinting to analyze the genetic structure of 16 populations of Stentor coeruleus from three lakes and three ponds in China. Using 14 polymorphic primers, a total of 99 discernible DNA fragments were detected, among which 76 (76.77%) were polymorphic, indicating median genetic diversity in these populations. Further, both Nei's gene diversity (h) and Shannon's information index (I) between the different populations revealed a median genetic diversity. At the same time, gene flow was interpreted to be low. The main factors responsible for the median level of diversity and low gene flow within populations are probably due to a low frequency of sexual recombinations. Analysis of molecular variance showed that there was high genetic differentiation among the five water bodies. Both cluster analysis and a nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis suggested that genotypes isolated from the same locations displayed a higher genetic similarity than those from different ones, separating populations into subgroups according to their geographical locations. However, there is a weak positive correlation between the genetic distance and geographical distance.

  3. Genetic Diversity of Arabica Coffee (Coffea arabica L.) in Nicaragua as Estimated by Simple Sequence Repeat Markers

    PubMed Central

    Geleta, Mulatu; Herrera, Isabel; Monzón, Arnulfo; Bryngelsson, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    Coffea arabica L. (arabica coffee), the only tetraploid species in the genus Coffea, represents the majority of the world's coffee production and has a significant contribution to Nicaragua's economy. The present paper was conducted to determine the genetic diversity of arabica coffee in Nicaragua for its conservation and breeding values. Twenty-six populations that represent eight varieties in Nicaragua were investigated using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. A total of 24 alleles were obtained from the 12 loci investigated across 260 individual plants. The total Nei's gene diversity (HT) and the within-population gene diversity (HS) were 0.35 and 0.29, respectively, which is comparable with that previously reported from other countries and regions. Among the varieties, the highest diversity was recorded in the variety Catimor. Analysis of variance (AMOVA) revealed that about 87% of the total genetic variation was found within populations and the remaining 13% differentiate the populations (FST = 0.13; P < 0.001). The variation among the varieties was also significant. The genetic variation in Nicaraguan coffee is significant enough to be used in the breeding programs, and most of this variation can be conserved through ex situ conservation of a low number of populations from each variety. PMID:22701376

  4. Genetic diversity of an Azorean endemic and endangered plant species inferred from inter-simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Maria S; Mendonça, Duarte; Bettencourt, Sílvia X; Borba, Ana R; Melo, Catarina; Baptista, Cláudio; da Câmara Machado, Artur

    2014-06-26

    Knowledge of the levels and distribution of genetic diversity is important for designing conservation strategies for threatened and endangered species so as to guarantee sustainable survival of populations and to preserve their evolutionary potential. Picconia azorica is a valuable Azorean endemic species recently classified as endangered. To contribute with information useful for the establishment of conservation programmes, the genetic variability and differentiation among 230 samples from 11 populations collected in three Azorean islands was accessed with eight inter-simple sequence repeat markers. A total of 64 polymorphic loci were detected. The majority of genetic variability was found within populations and no genetic structure was detected between populations and between islands. Also the coefficient of genetic differentiation and the level of gene flow indicate that geographical distances do not act as barriers for gene flow. In order to ensure the survival of populations in situ and ex situ management practices should be considered, including artificial propagation through the use of plant tissue culture techniques, not only for the restoration of habitat but also for the sustainable use of its valuable wood.

  5. Transferability of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed in guava (Psidium guajava L.) to four Myrtaceae species.

    PubMed

    Rai, Manoj K; Phulwaria, Mahendra; Shekhawat, N S

    2013-08-01

    Present study demonstrated the cross-genera transferability of 23 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs developed for guava (Psidium guajava L.) to four new targets, two species of eucalypts (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus camaldulensis), bottlebrush (Callistemon lanceolatus) and clove (Syzygium aromaticum), belonging to the family Myrtaceae and subfamily Myrtoideae. Off the 23 SSR loci assayed, 18 (78.2%) gave cross-amplification in E. citriodora, 14 (60.8%) in E. camaldulensis and 17-17 (73.9%) in C. lanceolatus and S. aromaticum. Eight primer pairs were found to be transferable to all four species. The number of alleles detected at each locus ranged from one to nine, with an average of 4.8, 2.6, 4.5 and 4.6 alleles in E. citriodora, E. camaldulensis, C. lanceolatus and S. aromaticum, respectively. The high levels of cross-genera transferability of guava SSRs may be applicable for the analysis of intra- and inter specific genetic diversity of target species, especially in E. citriodora, C. lanceolatus and S. aromaticum, for which till date no information about EST-derived as well as genomic SSR is available.

  6. Analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici genome and the development of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Feng, Yanxia; Sun, Haiyan; Deng, Yuanyu; Yu, Hanshou; Chen, Huaigu

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the genetic structure of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici is essential for the establishment of efficient disease control strategies. It is becoming clear that microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs), play an important role in genome organization and phenotypic diversity, and are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. In this study, we examined the G. graminis var. tritici genome (1) to analyze its pattern of SSRs, (2) to compare it with other plant pathogenic filamentous fungi, such as Magnaporthe oryzae and M. poae, and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for genetic diversity. The G. graminis var. tritici genome was rich in SSRs; a total 13,650 SSRs have been identified with mononucleotides being the most common motifs. In coding regions, the densities of tri- and hexanucleotides were significantly higher than in noncoding regions. The di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotide repeats in the G. graminis var. tritici genome were more abundant than the same repeats in M. oryzae and M. poae. From 115 devised primers, 39 SSRs are polymorphic with G. graminis var. tritici isolates, and 8 primers were randomly selected to analyze 116 isolates from China. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 7 and the expected heterozygosity (He) from 0.499 to 0.837. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic, and our analysis indicated that G. graminis var. tritici is a species with high genetic diversity. The results provide a pioneering report for several applications, such as the assessment of population structure and genetic diversity of G. graminis var. tritici.

  7. Simple Sequence Repeat and S-locus Genotyping to Explore Genetic Variability in Polyploid Prunus spinosa and P. insititia.

    PubMed

    Halász, Júlia; Makovics-Zsohár, Noémi; Szőke, Ferenc; Ercisli, Sezai; Hegedűs, Attila

    2017-02-01

    Polyploid Prunus spinosa (2n = 4×) and P. insititia (2n = 6×) represent enormous genetic potential in Central Europe, which can be exploited in breeding programmes. In Hungary, 17 cultivar candidates were selected from wild-growing populations including 10 P. spinosa, 4 P. insititia and three P. spinosa × P. domestica hybrids (2n = 5×). Their taxonomic classification was based on their phenotypic characteristics. Six simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and the multiallelic S-locus genotyping were used to characterize genetic variability and reliable identification of the tested accessions. A total of 98 SSR alleles were identified, which presents 19.5 average allele number per locus, and each of the 17 genotypes could be discriminated based on unique SSR fingerprints. A total of 23 S-RNase alleles were identified. The complete and partial S-genotype was determined for 8 and 9 accessions, respectively. The identification of a cross-incompatible pair of cultivar candidates and several semi-compatible combinations help maximize fruit set in commercial orchards. Our results indicate that the S-allele pools of wild-growing P. spinosa and P. insititia are overlapping in Hungary. A phylogenetic and principal component analysis confirmed the high level of diversity and genetic differentiation present within the analysed genotypes and helped clarify doubtful taxonomic identities. Our data confirm that S-locus genotyping is suitable for diversity studies in polyploid Prunus species. The analysed accessions represent huge genetic potential that can be exploited in commercial cultivation.

  8. Genetic variation in Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Kemunting) populations from Malaysia as revealed by inter-simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Hue, T S; Abdullah, T L; Abdullah, N A P; Sinniah, U R

    2015-12-14

    Kemunting (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) from the Myrtaceae family, is native to Malaysia. It is widely used in traditional medicine to treat various illnesses and possesses significant antibacterial properties. In addition, it has great potential as ornamental in landscape design. Genetic variability studies are important for the rational management and conservation of genetic material. In the present study, inter-simple sequence repeat markers were used to assess the genetic diversity of 18 R. tomentosa populations collected from ten states of Peninsular Malaysia. The 11 primers selected generated 173 bands that ranged in size from 1.6 kb to 130 bp, which corresponded to an average of 15.73 bands per primer. Of these bands, 97.69% (169 in total) were polymorphic. High genetic diversity was documented at the species level (H(T) = 0.2705; I = 0.3973; PPB = 97.69%) but there was a low diversity at population level (H(S) = 0.0073; I = 0 .1085; PPB = 20.14%). The high level of genetic differentiation revealed by G(ST) (73%) and analysis of molecular variance (63%), together with the limited gene flow among population (N(m) = 0.1851), suggests that the populations examined are isolated. Results from an unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram and principal coordinate analysis clearly grouped the populations into two geographic groups. This clear grouping can also be demonstrated by the significant Mantel test (r = 0.581, P = 0.001). We recommend that all the R. tomentosa populations be preserved in conservation program.

  9. Genetic characterization of red-colored heartwood genotypes of Chinese fir using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Duan, H J; Hu, R Y; Wu, B; Chen, D X; Huang, K Y; Dai, J; Chen, Q; Wei, Z C; Cao, S; Sun, Y H; Li, Y

    2015-12-29

    The present study investigated the genetic characterization of red-colored heartwood Chinese fir [Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook.] in Guangxi using 21 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and analyzes of the genetic variation (N = 149) in samples obtained from five sites in Guangxi Province, China. The number of different alleles and the Shannon's information index per locus ranged from 3 to 12 and from 0.398 to 2.258 with average values of 6 and 1.211, respectively, indicating moderate levels of genetic diversity within this germplasm collection. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.199 to 0.827 and from 0.198 to 0.878 with an average of 0.562 and 0.584, respectively. Although, the mean fixation index was 0.044, indicative of a low level of genetic differentiation among germplasms, analysis of molecular variance revealed considerable differentiation (99%) within the samples. The neighbor-joining dendrogram revealed that the majority of red-colored Chinese fir genotypes were apparently not associated with their geographic origins. Further analysis by STRUCTURE showed that this Guangxi germplasm collection could be divided into three genetic groups comprising 76, 37, and 36 members, respectively; these were classified into mixed groups with no obvious population structure. These results were consistent with those of the cluster analysis. On the whole, our data provide a starting point for the management and conservation of the current Guangxi germplasm collection as well as for their efficient use in Chinese fir-breeding programs.

  10. Development of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism markers in Theobroma cacao and comparison to Simple Sequence Repeat markers for genotyping of Cameroon clones.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers are increasingly being used in crop breeding programs, slowly replacing Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) and other markers. SNPs provide many benefits over SSRs, including ease of analysis and unambiguous results across various platforms. We have identifie...

  11. Genetic diversity of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ isolates in the United States and Mexico reveled by simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ is associated with the Zebra Chip disorder of potatoes. A panel of eight simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers was developed and used to genetically characterize ‘Ca. L. solanacearum’ strains obtained from ZC-affected potato plants in the United States and Mexi...

  12. THE USE OF INTER SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEATS (ISSR) IN DISTINGUISHING NEIGHBORING DOUGLAS-FIR TREES AS A MEANS TO IDENTIFYING TREE ROOTS WITH ABOVE-GROUND BIOMASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are attempting to identify specific root fragments from soil cores with individual trees. We successfully used Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR) to distinguish neighboring old-growth Douglas-fir trees from one another, while maintaining identity among each tree's parts. W...

  13. Metavisitor, a Suite of Galaxy Tools for Simple and Rapid Detection and Discovery of Viruses in Deep Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Vernick, Kenneth D.

    2017-01-01

    Metavisitor is a software package that allows biologists and clinicians without specialized bioinformatics expertise to detect and assemble viral genomes from deep sequence datasets. The package is composed of a set of modular bioinformatic tools and workflows that are implemented in the Galaxy framework. Using the graphical Galaxy workflow editor, users with minimal computational skills can use existing Metavisitor workflows or adapt them to suit specific needs by adding or modifying analysis modules. Metavisitor works with DNA, RNA or small RNA sequencing data over a range of read lengths and can use a combination of de novo and guided approaches to assemble genomes from sequencing reads. We show that the software has the potential for quick diagnosis as well as discovery of viruses from a vast array of organisms. Importantly, we provide here executable Metavisitor use cases, which increase the accessibility and transparency of the software, ultimately enabling biologists or clinicians to focus on biological or medical questions. PMID:28045932

  14. A simple ligation-based method to increase the information density in sequencing reactions used to deconvolute nucleic acid selections

    PubMed Central

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2008-01-01

    Herein, a method is described to increase the information density of sequencing experiments used to deconvolute nucleic acid selections. The method is facile and should be applicable to any selection experiment. A critical feature of this method is the use of biotinylated primers to amplify and encode a BamHI restriction site on both ends of a PCR product. After amplification, the PCR reaction is captured onto streptavidin resin, washed, and digested directly on the resin. Resin-based digestion affords clean product that is devoid of partially digested products and unincorporated PCR primers. The product's complementary ends are annealed and ligated together with T4 DNA ligase. Analysis of ligation products shows formation of concatemers of different length and little detectable monomer. Sequencing results produced data that routinely contained three to four copies of the library. This method allows for more efficient formulation of structure-activity relationships since multiple active sequences are identified from a single clone. PMID:18065718

  15. A simple and fast approach to prediction of protein secondary structure from multiply aligned sequences with accuracy above 70%.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, P. K.; Heringa, J.; Argos, P.

    1995-01-01

    To improve secondary structure predictions in protein sequences, the information residing in multiple sequence alignments of substituted but structurally related proteins is exploited. A database comprised of 70 protein families and a total of 2,500 sequences, some of which were aligned by tertiary structural superpositions, was used to calculate residue exchange weight matrices within alpha-helical, beta-strand, and coil substructures, respectively. Secondary structure predictions were made based on the observed residue substitutions in local regions of the multiple alignments and the largest possible associated exchange weights in each of the three matrix types. Comparison of the observed and predicted secondary structure on a per-residue basis yielded a mean accuracy of 72.2%. Individual alpha-helix, beta-strand, and coil states were respectively predicted at 66.7, and 75.8% correctness, representing a well-balanced three-state prediction. The accuracy level, verified by cross-validation through jack-knife tests on all protein families, dropped, on average, to only 70.9%, indicating the rigor of the prediction procedure. On the basis of robustness, conceptual clarity, accuracy, and executable efficiency, the method has considerable advantage, especially with its sole reliance on amino acid substitutions within structurally related proteins. PMID:8580842

  16. Identification and characterisation of functional expressed sequence tags-derived simple sequence repeat (eSSR) markers for genetic linkage mapping of Schistosoma mansoni juvenile resistance and susceptibility loci in Biomphalaria glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Miller, André; Su, Xin-zhuan; Mu, Jianbing; Bhusudsawang, Ganlayarat; Ukoskit, Kitipat; Knight, Matty

    2013-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata susceptibility to Schistosoma mansoni has a strong genetic component, offering the possibility for investigating host–parasite interactions at the molecular level, perhaps leading to novel control approaches. The identification, mapping and molecular characterisation of genes that influence the outcome of parasitic infection in the intermediate snail host is, therefore, seen as fundamental to the control of schistosomiasis. To better understand the evolutionary processes driving disease resistance/susceptibility phenotypes, we previously identified polymorphic random amplification of polymorphic DNA and genomic simple sequence repeats from B. glabrata. In the present study we identified and characterised polymorphic expressed simple sequence repeats markers (Bg-eSSR) from existing B. glabrata expressed sequence tags. Using these markers, and with previously identified genomic simple sequence repeats, genetic linkage mapping for parasite refractory and susceptibility phenotypes, the first known for B. glabrata, was initiated. Data mining of 54,309 expressed sequence tag, produced 660 expressed simple sequence repeats of which dinucleotide motifs (TA)n were the most common (37.88%), followed by trinucleotide (29.55%), mononucleotide (18.64%) and tetranucleotide (10.15%). Penta- and hexanucleotide motifs represented <3% of the Bg-eSSRs identified. While the majority (71%) of Bg-eSSRs were monomorphic between resistant and susceptible snails, several were, however, useful for the construction of a genetic linkage map based on their inheritance in segregating F2 progeny snails derived from crossing juvenile BS-90 and NMRI snails. Polymorphic Bg-eSSRs assorted into six linkage groups at a logarithm of odds score of 3. Interestingly, the heritability of four markers (Prim1_910, Prim1_771, Prim6_1024 and Prim7_823) with juvenile snail resistance were, by t-test, significant (P < 0.05) while an allelic marker, Prim24_524, showed linkage with the

  17. Simple Real-Time PCR and Amplicon Sequencing Method for Identification of Plasmodium Species in Human Whole Blood.

    PubMed

    Lefterova, Martina I; Budvytiene, Indre; Sandlund, Johanna; Färnert, Anna; Banaei, Niaz

    2015-07-01

    Malaria is the leading identifiable cause of fever in returning travelers. Accurate Plasmodium species identification has therapy implications for P. vivax and P. ovale, which have dormant liver stages requiring primaquine. Compared to microscopy, nucleic acid tests have improved specificity for species identification and higher sensitivity for mixed infections. Here, we describe a SYBR green-based real-time PCR assay for Plasmodium species identification from whole blood, which uses a panel of reactions to detect species-specific non-18S rRNA gene targets. A pan-Plasmodium 18S rRNA target is also amplified to allow species identification or confirmation by sequencing if necessary. An evaluation of assay accuracy, performed on 76 clinical samples (56 positives using thin smear microscopy as the reference method and 20 negatives), demonstrated clinical sensitivities of 95.2% for P. falciparum (20/21 positives detected) and 100% for the Plasmodium genus (52/52), P. vivax (20/20), P. ovale (9/9), and P. malariae (6/6). The sensitivity of the P. knowlesi-specific PCR was evaluated using spiked whole blood samples (100% [10/10 detected]). The specificities of the real-time PCR primers were 94.2% for P. vivax (49/52) and 100% for P. falciparum (51/51), P. ovale (62/62), P. malariae (69/69), and P. knowlesi (52/52). Thirty-three specimens were used to test species identification by sequencing the pan-Plasmodium 18S rRNA PCR product, with correct identification in all cases. The real-time PCR assay also identified two samples with mixed P. falciparum and P. ovale infection, which was confirmed by sequencing. The assay described here can be integrated into a malaria testing algorithm in low-prevalence areas, allowing definitive Plasmodium species identification shortly after malaria diagnosis by microscopy.

  18. Touch imprint cytology with massively parallel sequencing (TIC-seq): a simple and rapid method to snapshot genetic alterations in tumors.

    PubMed

    Amemiya, Kenji; Hirotsu, Yosuke; Goto, Taichiro; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Oyama, Toshio; Omata, Masao

    2016-12-01

    Identifying genetic alterations in tumors is critical for molecular targeting of therapy. In the clinical setting, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is usually employed for genetic analysis. However, DNA extracted from FFPE tissue is often not suitable for analysis because of its low levels and poor quality. Additionally, FFPE sample preparation is time-consuming. To provide early treatment for cancer patients, a more rapid and robust method is required for precision medicine. We present a simple method for genetic analysis, called touch imprint cytology combined with massively paralleled sequencing (touch imprint cytology [TIC]-seq), to detect somatic mutations in tumors. We prepared FFPE tissues and TIC specimens from tumors in nine lung cancer patients and one patient with breast cancer. We found that the quality and quantity of TIC DNA was higher than that of FFPE DNA, which requires microdissection to enrich DNA from target tissues. Targeted sequencing using a next-generation sequencer obtained sufficient sequence data using TIC DNA. Most (92%) somatic mutations in lung primary tumors were found to be consistent between TIC and FFPE DNA. We also applied TIC DNA to primary and metastatic tumor tissues to analyze tumor heterogeneity in a breast cancer patient, and showed that common and distinct mutations among primary and metastatic sites could be classified into two distinct histological subtypes. TIC-seq is an alternative and feasible method to analyze genomic alterations in tumors by simply touching the cut surface of specimens to slides.

  19. Phylogeny of prokaryotes and chloroplasts revealed by a simple composition approach on all protein sequences from complete genomes without sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Z G; Zhou, L Q; Anh, V V; Chu, K H; Long, S C; Deng, J Q

    2005-04-01

    The complete genomes of living organisms have provided much information on their phylogenetic relationships. Similarly, the complete genomes of chloroplasts have helped to resolve the evolution of this organelle in photosynthetic eukaryotes. In this paper we propose an alternative method of phylogenetic analysis using compositional statistics for all protein sequences from complete genomes. This new method is conceptually simpler than and computationally as fast as the one proposed by Qi et al. (2004b) and Chu et al. (2004). The same data sets used in Qi et al. (2004b) and Chu et al. (2004) are analyzed using the new method. Our distance-based phylogenic tree of the 109 prokaryotes and eukaryotes agrees with the biologists "tree of life" based on 16S rRNA comparison in a predominant majority of basic branching and most lower taxa. Our phylogenetic analysis also shows that the chloroplast genomes are separated to two major clades corresponding to chlorophytes s.l. and rhodophytes s.l. The interrelationships among the chloroplasts are largely in agreement with the current understanding on chloroplast evolution.

  20. A simple double quantum coherence ESR sequence that minimizes nuclear modulations in Cu2+-ion based distance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruthstein, Sharon; Ji, Ming; Shin, Byong-kyu; Saxena, Sunil

    2015-08-01

    Double quantum coherence (DQC) ESR is a sensitive method to measure magnetic dipolar interactions between spin labels. However, the DQC experiment on Cu2+ centers presents a challenge at X-band. The Cu2+ centers are usually coordinated to histidine residues in proteins. The electron-nuclear interaction between the Cu2+ ion and the remote nitrogen in the imidazole ring can interfere with the electron-electron dipolar interaction. Herein, we report on a modified DQC experiment that has the advantage of reduced contributions from electron-nuclear interactions, which enhances the resolution of the DQC signal to the electron-electron dipolar modulations. The modified pulse-sequence is verified on Cu2+-NO system in a polyalanine-based peptide and on a coupled Cu2+ system in a polyproline-based peptide. The modified DQC data were compared with the DEER data and good agreement was found.

  1. Genetic Diversity of Pinus nigra Arn. Populations in Southern Spain and Northern Morocco Revealed By Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat Profiles †

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Candel-Perez, David; Lucas-Borja, Manuel E.; Tiscar, Pedro A.; Viñegla, Benjamin; Linares, Juan C.; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes; Ahrazem, Oussama

    2012-01-01

    Eight Pinus nigra Arn. populations from Southern Spain and Northern Morocco were examined using inter-simple sequence repeat markers to characterize the genetic variability amongst populations. Pair-wise population genetic distance ranged from 0.031 to 0.283, with a mean of 0.150 between populations. The highest inter-population average distance was between PaCU from Cuenca and YeCA from Cazorla, while the lowest distance was between TaMO from Morocco and MA Sierra Mágina populations. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and Nei’s genetic diversity analyses revealed higher genetic variation within the same population than among different populations. Genetic differentiation (Gst) was 0.233. Cuenca showed the highest Nei’s genetic diversity followed by the Moroccan region, Sierra Mágina, and Cazorla region. However, clustering of populations was not in accordance with their geographical locations. Principal component analysis showed the presence of two major groups—Group 1 contained all populations from Cuenca while Group 2 contained populations from Cazorla, Sierra Mágina and Morocco—while Bayesian analysis revealed the presence of three clusters. The low genetic diversity observed in PaCU and YeCA is probably a consequence of inappropriate management since no estimation of genetic variability was performed before the silvicultural treatments. Data indicates that the inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) method is sufficiently informative and powerful to assess genetic variability among populations of P. nigra. PMID:22754321

  2. Genetic diversity of Pinus nigra Arn. populations in Southern Spain and Northern Morocco revealed by inter-simple sequence repeat profiles.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Moraga, Angela; Candel-Perez, David; Lucas-Borja, Manuel E; Tiscar, Pedro A; Viñegla, Benjamin; Linares, Juan C; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes; Ahrazem, Oussama

    2012-01-01

    Eight Pinus nigra Arn. populations from Southern Spain and Northern Morocco were examined using inter-simple sequence repeat markers to characterize the genetic variability amongst populations. Pair-wise population genetic distance ranged from 0.031 to 0.283, with a mean of 0.150 between populations. The highest inter-population average distance was between PaCU from Cuenca and YeCA from Cazorla, while the lowest distance was between TaMO from Morocco and MA Sierra Mágina populations. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and Nei's genetic diversity analyses revealed higher genetic variation within the same population than among different populations. Genetic differentiation (Gst) was 0.233. Cuenca showed the highest Nei's genetic diversity followed by the Moroccan region, Sierra Mágina, and Cazorla region. However, clustering of populations was not in accordance with their geographical locations. Principal component analysis showed the presence of two major groups-Group 1 contained all populations from Cuenca while Group 2 contained populations from Cazorla, Sierra Mágina and Morocco-while Bayesian analysis revealed the presence of three clusters. The low genetic diversity observed in PaCU and YeCA is probably a consequence of inappropriate management since no estimation of genetic variability was performed before the silvicultural treatments. Data indicates that the inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) method is sufficiently informative and powerful to assess genetic variability among populations of P. nigra.

  3. Genome Sequence of the Fleming Strain of Micrococcus luteus, a Simple Free-Living Actinobacterium▿ †‡

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael; Artsatbanov, Vladislav; Beller, Harry R.; Chandra, Govind; Chater, Keith F.; Dover, Lynn G.; Goh, Ee-Been; Kahan, Tamar; Kaprelyants, Arseny S.; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lapidus, Alla; Lowry, Stephen R.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mahillon, Jacques; Markowitz, Victor; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mukamolova, Galina V.; Oren, Aharon; Rokem, J. Stefan; Smith, Margaret C. M.; Young, Danielle I.; Greenblatt, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Micrococcus luteus (NCTC2665, “Fleming strain”) has one of the smallest genomes of free-living actinobacteria sequenced to date, comprising a single circular chromosome of 2,501,097 bp (G+C content, 73%) predicted to encode 2,403 proteins. The genome shows extensive synteny with that of the closely related organism, Kocuria rhizophila, from which it was taxonomically separated relatively recently. Despite its small size, the genome harbors 73 insertion sequence (IS) elements, almost all of which are closely related to elements found in other actinobacteria. An IS element is inserted into the rrs gene of one of only two rrn operons found in M. luteus. The genome encodes only four sigma factors and 14 response regulators, a finding indicative of adaptation to a rather strict ecological niche (mammalian skin). The high sensitivity of M. luteus to β-lactam antibiotics may result from the presence of a reduced set of penicillin-binding proteins and the absence of a wblC gene, which plays an important role in the antibiotic resistance in other actinobacteria. Consistent with the restricted range of compounds it can use as a sole source of carbon for energy and growth, M. luteus has a minimal complement of genes concerned with carbohydrate transport and metabolism and its inability to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source may be due to the apparent absence of a gene encoding glucokinase. Uniquely among characterized bacteria, M. luteus appears to be able to metabolize glycogen only via trehalose and to make trehalose only via glycogen. It has very few genes associated with secondary metabolism. In contrast to most other actinobacteria, M. luteus encodes only one resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) required for emergence from dormancy, and its complement of other dormancy-related proteins is also much reduced. M. luteus is capable of long-chain alkene biosynthesis, which is of interest for advanced biofuel production; a three-gene cluster essential for this

  4. A review of the prevalence, utility, and caveats of using chloroplast simple sequence repeats for studies of plant biology1

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Gregory L.; Dorman, Hanna E.; Buchanan, Alenda; Challagundla, Lavanya; Wallace, Lisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Microsatellites occur in all plant genomes and provide useful markers for studies of genetic diversity and structure. Chloroplast microsatellites (cpSSRs) are frequently targeted because they are more easily isolated than nuclear microsatellites. Here, we quantified the frequency and uses of cpSSRs based on a literature review of over 400 studies published 1995–2013. These markers are an important and economical tool for plant biologists and continue to be used alongside modern genomics approaches to study genetic diversity and structure, evolutionary history, and hybridization in native and agricultural species. Studies using species-specific primers reported a greater number of polymorphic loci than those employing universal primers. A major disadvantage to cpSSRs is fragment size homoplasy; therefore, we documented its occurrence at several cpSSR loci within and between species of Acmispon (Fabaceae). Based on our empirical data set, we recommend targeted sequencing of a subset of samples combined with fragment genotyping as a cost-efficient, data-rich approach to the use of cpSSRs and as a test of homoplasy. The availability of genomic resources for plants aids in the development of primers for new study systems, thereby enhancing the utility of cpSSRs across plant biology. PMID:25506520

  5. The LITAF/SIMPLE I92V sequence variant results in an earlier age of onset of CMT1A/HNPP diseases.

    PubMed

    Sinkiewicz-Darol, Elena; Lacerda, Andressa Ferreira; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Potulska-Chromik, Anna; Sokołowska, Beata; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Brunetti, Craig R; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena; Kochański, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) represent the most common heritable neuromuscular disorders. Molecular diagnostics of CMT1A/HNPP diseases confirm clinical diagnosis, but their value is limited to the clinical course and prognosis. However, no biomarkers of CMT1A/HNPP have been identified. We decided to explore if the LITAF/SIMPLE gene shared a functional link to the PMP22 gene, whose duplication or deletion results in CMT1A and HNPP, respectively. By studying a large cohort of CMT1A/HNPP-affected patients, we found that the LITAF I92V sequence variant predisposes patients to an earlier age of onset of both the CMT1A and HNPP diseases. Using cell transfection experiments, we showed that the LITAF I92V sequence variant partially mislocalizes to the mitochondria in contrast to wild-type LITAF which localizes to the late endosome/lysosomes and is associated with a tendency for PMP22 to accumulate in the cells. Overall, this study shows that the I92V LITAF sequence variant would be a good candidate for a biomarker in the case of the CMT1A/HNPP disorders.

  6. A Simple Method for the Extraction, PCR-amplification, Cloning, and Sequencing of Pasteuria 16S rDNA from Small Numbers of Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Atibalentja, N.; Noel, G. R.; Ciancio, A.

    2004-01-01

    For many years the taxonomy of the genus Pasteuria has been marred with confusion because the bacterium could not be cultured in vitro and, therefore, descriptions were based solely on morphological, developmental, and pathological characteristics. The current study sought to devise a simple method for PCR-amplification, cloning, and sequencing of Pasteuria 16S rDNA from small numbers of endospores, with no need for prior DNA purification. Results show that DNA extracts from plain glass bead-beating of crude suspensions containing 10,000 endospores at 0.2 × 10⁶ endospores ml-1 were sufficient for PCR-amplification of Pasteuria 16S rDNA, when used in conjunction with specific primers. These results imply that for P. penetrans and P. nishizawae only one parasitized female of Meloidogyne spp. and Heterodera glycines, respectively, should be sufficient, and as few as eight cadavers of Belonolaimus longicaudatus with an average number of 1,250 endospores of "Candidatus Pasteuria usgae" are needed for PCR-amplification of Pasteuria 16S rDNA. The method described in this paper should facilitate the sequencing of the 16S rDNA of the many Pasteuria isolates that have been reported on nematodes and, consequently, expedite the classification of those isolates through comparative sequence analysis. PMID:19262793

  7. Simple Machines Made Simple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Andre, Ralph E.

    Simple machines have become a lost point of study in elementary schools as teachers continue to have more material to cover. This manual provides hands-on, cooperative learning activities for grades three through eight concerning the six simple machines: wheel and axle, inclined plane, screw, pulley, wedge, and lever. Most activities can be…

  8. Two-step identification of taro (Colocasia esculenta cv. Xinmaoyu) using specific psbE-petL and simple sequence repeat-sequence characterized amplified regions (SSR-SCAR) markers.

    PubMed

    Dai, H J; Zhang, Y M; Sun, X Q; Xue, J Y; Li, M M; Cao, M X; Shen, X L; Hang, Y Y

    2016-08-05

    Colocasia esculenta cv. Xinmaoyu is an eddoe-type taro cultivar local to Taicang, Jiangsu Province, China; it is characterized by its pure flavor, glutinous texture, and high nutritional value. Due to its excellent qualities, the Trademark Office of the State Administration for Industry and Commerce of the People's Republic of China awarded Xinmaoyu, a geographical indication certification in 2014. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop an efficient molecular marker for the specific identification of this cultivar, which would greatly facilitate the conservation and utilization of this unique germplasm resource. In the present study, amplifying the psbE-petL fragment from two dasheen-type and seven eddoe-type taro cultivars revealed three conserved insertions/deletions among sequences from the two taro types. Based on these sequence differences, a pair of site-specific primers was designed targeting the psbE-petL sequence from the dasheen-type taro, which specifically amplified a DNA band in all individuals from cultivars of this type, but not in those from the seven eddoe-type cultivars. To discriminate Xinmaoyu from the other eddoe-type taro cultivars, a pair of simple sequence repeat-sequence characterized amplified region (SSR-SCAR) primers was further developed to specifically amplify a DNA band from all Xinmaoyu individuals, but not from individuals of other eddoe-type taro cultivars. In conclusion, through a two-step-screening procedure using psbE-petL and SSR-SCAR markers, we developed a pair of primers that could specifically discriminate Xinmaoyu from nine taro cultivars commonly cultivated in Jiangsu Province and Fujian Province.

  9. Development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and construction of an SSR-based linkage map in Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.).

    PubMed

    Hirata, Mariko; Cai, Hongwei; Inoue, Maiko; Yuyama, Nana; Miura, Yuichi; Komatsu, Toshinori; Takamizo, Tadashi; Fujimori, Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    In order to develop simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers in Italian ryegrass, we constructed a genomic library enriched for (CA)n-containing SSR repeats. A total of 1,544 clones were sequenced, of which 1,044 (67.6%) contained SSR motifs, and 395 unique clones were chosen for primer design. Three hundred and fifty-seven of these clones amplified products of the expected size in both parents of a two-way pseudo-testcross F(1) mapping population, and 260 primer pairs detected genetic polymorphism in the F(1) population. Genetic loci detected by a total of 218 primer pairs were assigned to locations on seven linkage groups, representing the seven chromosomes of the haploid Italian ryegrass karyotype. The SSR markers covered 887.8 cM of the female map and 795.8 cM of the male map. The average distance between two flanking SSR markers was 3.2 cM. The SSR markers developed in this study will be useful in cultivar discrimination, linkage analysis, and marker-assisted selection of Italian ryegrass and closely related species.

  10. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) from China and Malaysia based on species-specific simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L X; Xiao, Y; Xia, W; Yang, Y D

    2015-12-08

    Genetic diversity and patterns of population structure of the 94 oil palm lines were investigated using species-specific simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. We designed primers for 63 SSR loci based on their flanking sequences and conducted amplification in 94 oil palm DNA samples. The amplification result showed that a relatively high level of genetic diversity was observed between oil palm individuals according a set of 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci. The observed heterozygosity (Ho) was 0.3683 and 0.4035, with an average of 0.3859. The Ho value was a reliable determinant of the discriminatory power of the SSR primer combinations. The principal component analysis and unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averaging cluster analysis showed the 94 oil palm lines were grouped into one cluster. These results demonstrated that the oil palm in Hainan Province of China and the germplasm introduced from Malaysia may be from the same source. The SSR protocol was effective and reliable for assessing the genetic diversity of oil palm. Knowledge of the genetic diversity and population structure will be crucial for establishing appropriate management stocks for this species.

  11. Discovery and mapping of a new expressed sequence tag-single nucleotide polymorphism and simple sequence repeat panel for large-scale genetic studies and breeding of Theobroma cacao L.

    PubMed

    Allegre, Mathilde; Argout, Xavier; Boccara, Michel; Fouet, Olivier; Roguet, Yolande; Bérard, Aurélie; Thévenin, Jean Marc; Chauveau, Aurélie; Rivallan, Ronan; Clement, Didier; Courtois, Brigitte; Gramacho, Karina; Boland-Augé, Anne; Tahi, Mathias; Umaharan, Pathmanathan; Brunel, Dominique; Lanaud, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Theobroma cacao is an economically important tree of several tropical countries. Its genetic improvement is essential to provide protection against major diseases and improve chocolate quality. We discovered and mapped new expressed sequence tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (EST-SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and constructed a high-density genetic map. By screening 149 650 ESTs, 5246 SNPs were detected in silico, of which 1536 corresponded to genes with a putative function, while 851 had a clear polymorphic pattern across a collection of genetic resources. In addition, 409 new SSR markers were detected on the Criollo genome. Lastly, 681 new EST-SNPs and 163 new SSRs were added to the pre-existing 418 co-dominant markers to construct a large consensus genetic map. This high-density map and the set of new genetic markers identified in this study are a milestone in cocoa genomics and for marker-assisted breeding. The data are available at http://tropgenedb.cirad.fr.

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats and Efficient Development of Polymorphic SSR Markers Based on Whole Genome Re-Sequencing of Multiple Isolates of the Wheat Stripe Rust Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huaiyong; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhan, Gangming; Wei, Guorong; Zhou, Xinli; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    The biotrophic parasitic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) causes stripe rust, a devastating disease of wheat, endangering global food security. Because the Pst population is highly dynamic, it is difficult to develop wheat cultivars with durable and highly effective resistance. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widely used as molecular markers in genetic studies to determine population structure in many organisms. However, only a small number of SSR markers have been developed for Pst. In this study, a total of 4,792 SSR loci were identified using the whole genome sequences of six isolates from different regions of the world, with a marker density of one SSR per 22.95 kb. The majority of the SSRs were di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. A database containing 1,113 SSR markers were established. Through in silico comparison, the previously reported SSR markers were found mainly in exons, whereas the SSR markers in the database were mostly in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 105 polymorphic SSR markers were confirmed in silico by their identical positions and nucleotide variations with INDELs identified among the six isolates. When 104 in silico polymorphic SSR markers were used to genotype 21 Pst isolates, 84 produced the target bands, and 82 of them were polymorphic and revealed the genetic relationships among the isolates. The results show that whole genome re-sequencing of multiple isolates provides an ideal resource for developing SSR markers, and the newly developed SSR markers are useful for genetic and population studies of the wheat stripe rust fungus. PMID:26068192

  13. Anisakis simplex complex: ecological significance of recombinant genotypes in an allopatric area of the Adriatic Sea inferred by genome-derived simple sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Mladineo, Ivona; Trumbić, Željka; Radonić, Ivana; Vrbatović, Anamarija; Hrabar, Jerko; Bušelić, Ivana

    2017-03-01

    The genus Anisakis includes nine species which, due to close morphological resemblance even in the adult stage, have previously caused many issues in their correct identification. Recently observed interspecific hybridisation in sympatric areas of two closely related species, Anisakis simplex sensu stricto (s.s.) and Anisakis pegreffii, has raised concerns whether a F1 hybrid generation is capable of overriding the breeding barrier, potentially giving rise to more resistant/pathogenic strains infecting humans. To assess the ecological significance of anisakid genotypes in the Adriatic Sea, an allopatric area for the two above-mentioned species, we analysed data from PCR-RFLP genotyping of the ITS region and the sequence of the cytochrome oxidase 2 (cox2) mtDNA locus to discern the parental genotype and maternal haplotype of the individuals. Furthermore, using in silico genome-wide screening of the A. simplex database for polymorphic simple sequence repeats or microsatellites in non-coding regions, we randomly selected potentially informative loci that were tested and optimised for multiplex PCR. The first panel of microsatellites developed for Anisakis was shown to be highly polymorphic, sensitive and amplified in both A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii. It was used to inspect genetic differentiation of individuals showing mito-nuclear mosaicism which is characteristic for both species. The observed low level of intergroup heterozygosity suggests that existing mosaicism is likely a retention of an ancestral polymorphism rather than a recent recombination event. This is also supported by allopatry of pure A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii in the geographical area under study.

  14. Use of simple sequence repeat markers for DNA fingerprinting and diversity analysis of sugarcane (Saccharum spp) cultivars resistant and susceptible to red rot.

    PubMed

    Hameed, U; Pan, Y-B; Muhammad, K; Afghan, S; Iqbal, J

    2012-05-08

    Red rod is an economically important disease of sugarcane caused by the fungus Colletotrichum falcatum. We used a simple sequence repeat (SSR)-based marker system to identify and analyze genetic relationships of red rot resistant and susceptible sugarcane cultivars grown in Pakistan. Twenty-one highly polymorphic SSR markers were used for DNA fingerprinting and genetic diversity analysis of 20 sugarcane cultivars. These SSR markers were found to be highly robust; we identified 144 alleles, with 3-11 alleles per marker and a mean of 6.8. Three SSR markers were able to identify all 20 cultivars. DNAMAN(®)-generated homology tree was used to analyze genetic diversity among these cultivars; all cultivars shared 58% or more similarity. We correlated polymorphism information content and resolving power values with marker effectiveness in the process of sugarcane cultivar identification. We concluded that a small number of SSR-derived DNA markers will allow breeders to identify red rot resistant and susceptible cultivars.

  15. Evaluation of amplified fragment length polymorphism and simple sequence repeats for tomato germplasm fingerprinting: utility for grouping closely related traditional cultivars.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, Santiago; Andreani, Lorella; Garcia-Gusano, Marta; Geuna, Filippo; Ruiz, Juan J

    2006-06-01

    Cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) germplasm shows limited genetic variation. Many DNA marker systems have been used for genetic diversity studies in wild and cultivated tomatoes, but their usefulness for characterizing phenotypic differences among very closely related cultivars remains uncertain. We have used 19 selected simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and 7 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) primer combinations to characterize 48 cultivars of tomato, mainly traditional cultivars from the south-east of Spain. The main types were Solanum lycopersicum L. 'Muchamiel', 'De la pera', and 'Moruno'. The robustness of the dendrograms and the discrimination power reached with each marker type were similar. Unique fingerprinting even of the most closely related tomato cultivars could be obtained using a combination of some SSR and AFLP markers. A better grouping of the 'Muchamiel' cultivars was observed with SSR markers, whereas the grouping of cultivars of 'De la pera' type was best achieved with AFLPs. However, both types of markers adequately grouped cultivars of the main types, confirming the utility of SSR and AFLP markers for the identification of traditional cultivars of tomato.

  16. Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat Data Reveals High Genetic Diversity in Wild Populations of the Narrowly Distributed Endemic Lilium regale in the Minjiang River Valley of China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhu-hua; Shi, Jisen; Xi, Meng-li; Jiang, Fu-xing; Deng, Ming-wen; Dayanandan, Selvadurai

    2015-01-01

    Lilium regale E.H. Wilson is endemic to a narrow geographic area in the Minjiang River valley in southwestern China, and is considered an important germplasm for breeding commercially valuable lily varieties, due to its vigorous growth, resistance to diseases and tolerance for low moisture. We analyzed the genetic diversity of eight populations of L. regale sampled across the entire natural distribution range of the species using Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat markers. The genetic diversity (expected heterozygosity= 0.3356) was higher than those reported for other narrowly distributed endemic plants. The levels of inbreeding (Fst = 0.1897) were low, and most of the genetic variability was found to be within (80.91%) than amongpopulations (19.09%). An indirect estimate of historical levels of gene flow (Nm =1.0678) indicated high levels of gene flow among populations. The eight analyzed populations clustered into three genetically distinct groups. Based on these results, we recommend conservation of large populations representing these three genetically distinct groups. PMID:25799495

  17. Heterozygosities and genetic relationship of tea cultivars revealed by simple sequence repeat markers and implications for breeding and genetic mapping programs.

    PubMed

    Tan, L Q; Zhang, C C; Qi, G N; Wang, L Y; Wei, K; Chen, S X; Zou, Y; Wu, L Y; Cheng, H

    2015-03-06

    Genetic maps are essential tools for quantitative trait locus analysis and marker-assisted selection breeding. In order to select parents that are highly heterozygous for genetic mapping, the heterozygosity (HS) of 24 tea cultivars (Camellia sinensis) was analyzed with 72 simple sequence repeat markers. In total, 359 alleles were obtained with an average of 4.99 per marker. The HS varied greatly from 37.5 to 71.0% with an average of 51.3%. On average, tea cultivars from Fujian Province showed a higher level of heterozygosity (59.8%) than those from Zhejiang (48.5%) and Yunnan (44.5%), and the 12 national tea cultivars were generally more heterozygous than the 12 provincial cultivars. Unweighted pair-group analysis using the arithmetic average grouping divided the 24 cultivars into 2 groups that are consistent with the morphological classification. All dual combinations of the 24 cultivars were studied to calculate the percentage of mappable markers when using pseudo-testcross mapping strategy, and results showed that this value also varied greatly from 51.4 to 90.3%. The genetic relationships and HS differences among different cultivars were discussed, and tea cultivars with high HS were recommended as cross parents for genetic mapping programs.

  18. Genetic variability and geographic differentiation in Thymus daenensis subsp. daenensis, an endangered medicinal plant, as revealed by inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Rahimmalek, Mehdi; Bahreininejad, Babak; Khorrami, Mojtaba; Tabatabaei, Badraldin Ebrahim Sayed

    2009-12-01

    Thymus daenensis is an aromatic medicinal plant endemic to Iran. We used inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers to detect genetic polymorphism in this herb using 17 T. daenensis accessions collected from different geographic regions in Iran. The 15 primers chosen for analysis revealed 256 bands, of which 228 (88.9%) were polymorphic. Jaccard's similarity indices based on ISSR profiles were subjected to UPGMA cluster analysis. The generated dendrogram revealed two major groups. The Tc group included the accessions collected from the center of the Zagros Mountains, and the Te group was collected from the extremes of the Zagros range. A principal coordinate analysis confirmed the results of clustering. The results showed that the divergence of accessions based on the Zagros Mountains is more logical in comparison with classification on the basis of provincial borders. Gene diversity and expected heterozygosity were greater in the Tc group than in the Te group, suggesting that the germplasm collected from the center of the Zagros Mountains is more variable.

  19. Effects of genotoxicity and its consequences at the population level in sexual and asexual Artemia assessed by analysis of inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR).

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, Sandhya; Grant, Alastair

    2013-09-18

    There is considerable evidence that genetic damage in organisms occurs in the environment as a result of exposure to genotoxins and ionising radiation, but we have limited understanding of the extent to which this results in adverse consequences at a population level. We used inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers to quantify genotoxic effects of the mutagen ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) on a sexual (Artemia franciscana) and an asexual (Artemia parthenogenetica) species of brine shrimp. The method provides information similar to that obtained with assessment of RAPD (random amplification of polymorphic DNA) but is more robust. Genetic damage was transmitted to the F1 generation in both Artemia species, but the sexual species showed a greater degree of recovery, as shown by higher values of genomic template stability. There was a strong correlation between DNA damage and effects on individual fitness parameters: size, survival, reproduction and population growth. These effects persisted into the F2 generation in A. parthenogenetica, but in the sexual A. franciscana only effects on fecundity continued beyond the exposed generation, even though there were substantial alterations in ISSR patterns in the F1 generation. Genetic biomarkers can thus be indicative of effects at the population level, but sexually reproducing species have a considerable assimilative capacity for the effects of genotoxins.

  20. CONSTRUCTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A TENTATIVE AMPLIFIED FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM-SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEAT LINKAGE MAP OF LAMINARIA (LAMINARIALES, PHAEOPHYTA)(1).

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanpin; Sun, Ying; Shi, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Linan; Guo, Shanshan; Li, Bingjun; Li, Xiaojie; Li, Zhiling; Cong, Yizhou; Zhao, Yushan; Wang, Wenquan

    2009-08-01

    A tentative amplified fragment length polymorphism-simple sequence repeat (AFLP-SSR) linkage map of Laminaria was constructed using a haploid population of 40 gametophyte clones isolated from an individual of Dongfang No. 2, the first commercially cultured hybrid of a female gametophyte clone of L. japonica Aresch. [=Saccharina japonica (Aresch.) C. E. Lane, C. Mayes et G. W. Saunders] and a male one of L. longissima Miyabe [=Saccharina longissima (Miyabe) C. E. Lane, C. Mayes et G. W. Saunders]. To the map, 263 markers (255 AFLP, seven SSR, and the gametophyte sex) were assigned. The map consisted of 25 linkage groups (LGs) with ≥ four markers, five triplets, and 15 doublets, which is 1,629.0 centiMorgans (cM) in length, covering 66% of Laminaria genome. The maximum space between loci is 24.63 cM. A putative sex-determining region was identified in LG2 , which was characterized by a dense marker distribution around the gametophyte sex locus. The linkage map itself and the methodology associated with its construction will facilitate the genetic study and further trials of the linkage map construction of Laminaria.

  1. Genetic diversity in domesticated soybean (Glycine max) and its wild progenitor (Glycine soja) for simple sequence repeat and single-nucleotide polymorphism loci.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Hui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Yang, Liang; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Gaut, Brandon S; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2010-10-01

    • The study of genetic diversity between a crop and its wild relatives may yield fundamental insights into evolutionary history and the process of domestication. • In this study, we genotyped a sample of 303 accessions of domesticated soybean (Glycine max) and its wild progenitor Glycine soja with 99 microsatellite markers and 554 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. • The simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci averaged 21.5 alleles per locus and overall Nei's gene diversity of 0.77. The SNPs had substantially lower genetic diversity (0.35) than SSRs. A SSR analyses indicated that G. soja exhibited higher diversity than G. max, but SNPs provided a slightly different snapshot of diversity between the two taxa. For both marker types, the primary division of genetic diversity was between the wild and domesticated accessions. Within taxa, G. max consisted of four geographic regions in China. G. soja formed six subgroups. Genealogical analyses indicated that cultivated soybean tended to form a monophyletic clade with respect to G. soja. • G. soja and G. max represent distinct germplasm pools. Limited evidence of admixture was discovered between these two species. Overall, our analyses are consistent with the origin of G. max from regions along the Yellow River of China.

  2. Development of chloroplast simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs) for the intraspecific study of Gracilaria tenuistipitata (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta) from different populations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gracilaria tenuistipitata is an agarophyte with substantial economic potential because of its high growth rate and tolerance to a wide range of environment factors. This red seaweed is intensively cultured in China for the production of agar and fodder for abalone. Microsatellite markers were developed from the chloroplast genome of G. tenuistipitata var. liui to differentiate G. tenuistipitata obtained from six different localities: four from Peninsular Malaysia, one from Thailand and one from Vietnam. Eighty G. tenuistipitata specimens were analyzed using eight simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer-pairs that we developed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Findings Five mononucleotide primer-pairs and one trinucleotide primer-pair exhibited monomorphic alleles, whereas the other two primer-pairs separated the G. tenuistipitata specimens into two main clades. G. tenuistipitata from Thailand and Vietnam were grouped into one clade, and the populations from Batu Laut, Middle Banks and Kuah (Malaysia) were grouped into another clade. The combined dataset of these two primer-pairs separated G. tenuistipitata obtained from Kelantan, Malaysia from that obtained from other localities. Conclusions Based on the variations in repeated nucleotides of microsatellite markers, our results suggested that the populations of G. tenuistipitata were distributed into two main geographical regions: (i) populations in the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia and (ii) populations facing the South China Sea. The correct identification of G. tenuistipitata strains with traits of high economic potential will be advantageous for the mass cultivation of seaweeds. PMID:24490797

  3. Evaluation of fire recurrence effect on genetic diversity in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) stands using Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat profiles.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Borja, M E; Ahrazem, O; Candel-Pérez, D; Moya, D; Fonseca, T; Hernández Tecles, E; De Las Heras, J; Gómez-Gómez, L

    2016-12-01

    The management of maritime pine in fire-prone habitats is a challenging task and fine-scale population genetic analyses are necessary to check if different fire recurrences affect genetic variability. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of fire recurrence on maritime pine genetic diversity using inter-simple sequence repeat markers (ISSR). Three maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.) populations from Northern Portugal were chosen to characterize the genetic variability among populations. In relation to fire recurrence, Seirós population was affected by fire both in 1990 and 2005 whereas Vila Seca-2 population was affected by fire just in 2005. The Vila Seca-1 population has been never affected by fire. Our results showed the highest Nei's genetic diversity (He=0.320), Shannon information index (I=0.474) and polymorphic loci (PPL=87.79%) among samples from twice burned populations (Seirós site). Thus, fire regime plays an important role affecting genetic diversity in the short-term, although not generating maritime pine genetic erosion.

  4. Genetic variation in safflower (Carthamus tinctorious L.) for seed quality-related traits and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Golkar, Pooran; Arzani, Ahmad; Rezaei, Abdolmajid M

    2011-01-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorious L.) is an oilseed crop that is valued as a source of high quality vegetable oil. The genetic diversity of 16 safflower genotypes originated from different geographical regions of Iran and some with exotic origin were evaluated. Eight different seed quality-related traits including fatty acid composition of seed oil (stearic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid), the contents of, oil, protein, fiber and ash in its seeds, as well as 20 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) polymorphic primers were used in this study. Analysis of variance showed significant variation in genotypes for the seed quality-related traits. Based on ISSR markers, a total of 204 bands were amplified and 149 bands (about 70%) of these were polymorphic. Cluster analysis based on either biochemical or molecular markers classified the genotypes into four groups, showing some similarities between molecular and biochemical markers for evaluated genotypes. A logical similarity between the genotype clusters based on molecular data with their geographical origins was observed.

  5. Development of a tandem repeat-based multilocus typing system distinguishing Babesia bovis geographic isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mini and microsatellite sequences have proven to be excellent tools for the differentiation of strains and populations in several protozoan parasites due to their high variability. In the present work we have searched the genome of the tick-transmitted bovine hemoprotozoon Babesia bovis for tandem r...

  6. Oligoribonucleotide (ORN) interference-PCR (ORNi-PCR): a simple method for suppressing PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences using ORNs.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Naoki; Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of multiple templates using common primers is used in a wide variety of molecular biological techniques. However, abundant templates sometimes obscure the amplification of minor species containing the same primer sequences. To overcome this challenge, we used oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) to inhibit amplification of undesired template sequences without affecting amplification of control sequences lacking complementarity to the ORNs. ORNs were effective at very low concentrations, with IC50 values for ORN-mediated suppression on the order of 10 nM. DNA polymerases that retain 3'-5' exonuclease activity, such as KOD and Pfu polymerases, but not those that retain 5'-3' exonuclease activity, such as Taq polymerase, could be used for ORN-mediated suppression. ORN interference-PCR (ORNi-PCR) technology should be a useful tool for both molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis.

  7. An easy, simple inexpensive test for the specific detection of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum based on sequence analysis of the pmrA gene

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The species Pectobacterium carotovorum includes a diverse subspecies of bacteria that cause disease on a wide variety of plants. In Morocco, approximately 95% of the P. carotovorum isolates from potato plants with tuber soft rot are P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. However, identification of this pathogen is not always related to visual disease symptoms. This is especially true when different pathogen cause similar diseases on potato, citing as an example, P. carotovorum, P. atrosepticum and P. wasabiae. Numerous conventional methods were used to characterize Pectobacterium spp., including biochemical assays, specific PCR-based tests, and construction of phylogenetic trees by using gene sequences. In this study, an alternative method is presented using a gene linked to pathogenicity, in order to allow accuracy at subspecies level. The pmrA gene (response regulator) has been used for identification and analysis of the relationships among twenty nine Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and other Pectobacterium subspecies. Results Phylogenetic analyses of pmrA sequences compared to ERIC-PCR and 16S rDNA sequencing, demonstrated that there is considerable genetic diversity in P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum strains, which can be divided into two distinct groups within the same clade. Conclusions pmrA sequence analysis is likely to be a reliable tool to identify the subspecies Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and estimate their genetic diversity. PMID:23890050

  8. Construction of simple and efficient siRNA validation systems for screening and identification of effective RNAi-targeted sequences from mammalian genes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Hui; Chang, Wen-Tsan

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of gene silencing induced by double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs). Among the widely used dsRNAs, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and short hairpin RNAs have evolved as extremely powerful and the most popular gene silencing reagents. The key challenge to achieving efficient gene silencing especially for the purpose of therapeutics is mainly dependent on the effectiveness and specificity of the selected RNAi-targeted sequences. Practically, only a small number of dsRNAs are capable of inducing highly effective and sequence-specific gene silencing via RNAi mechanism. In addition, the efficiency of gene silencing induced by dsRNAs can only be experimentally examined based on inhibition of the target gene expression. Therefore, it is essential to develop a fully robust and comparative validation system for measuring the efficacy of designed dsRNAs. In this chapter, we focus our discussion on a reliable and quantitative reporter-based siRNA validation system that has been previously established in our laboratory. The system consists of a short synthetic DNA fragment containing an RNAi-targeted sequence of interest and two expression vectors for targeting reporter and triggering siRNA expressions. The efficiency of siRNAs is determined by their abilities to inhibit expression of the targeting reporters with easily quantified readouts including enhanced green fluorescence protein and firefly luciferase. Since only a readily available short synthetic DNA fragment is needed for constructing this reliable and efficient reporter-based siRNA validation system, this system not only provides a powerful strategy for screening highly effective RNAi-targeted sequences from mammalian genes but also implicates the use of RNAi-based dsRNA reagents for reverse functional genomics and molecular therapeutics.

  9. Clear & Simple

    MedlinePlus

    ... the audience themselves. It is important to get direct audience involvement at some point to test the ... words are defined clearly. Sentences are simple, specific, direct, and written in the active voice. Each idea ...

  10. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters using parametric down-conversion source

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Wu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Guo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Quantum repeater is the key element in quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We design the compact quantum circuits for nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification, and discuss the feasibility of our protocols with current experimental technology. In our scheme, we use a parametric down-conversion source instead of ideal single-photon sources to realize the heralded quantum repeater. Moreover, our protocols can turn faulty events into the detection of photon polarization, and the fidelity can reach 100% in principle. Our scheme is attractive and scalable, since it can be realized with artificial solid-state quantum systems. With developed experimental technique on controlling emitter-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in long-distance quantum communication. PMID:27350159

  11. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Zhang, Mei; Ai, Qing; Yang, Guo-Jian; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hobiny, Aatef; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2017-03-01

    We propose a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We show the details by implementing nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification modules with atoms in waveguides, and discuss the feasibility of the repeater with currently achievable technology. In our scheme, the faulty events can be discarded by detecting the polarization of the photons. That is, our protocols are accomplished with a fidelity of 100% in principle, which is advantageous for implementing realistic long-distance quantum communication. Moreover, additional atomic qubits are not required, but only a single-photon medium. Our scheme is scalable and attractive since it can be realized in solid-state quantum systems. With the great progress on controlling atom-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in quantum information processing in the future.

  12. Genetic differentiation induced by spaceflight treatment of Cistanche deserticola and identification of inter-simple sequence repeat markers associated with its medicinal constituent contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Yang, D. Y.; Tu, P. F.; Tian, Y. Z.; Guo, Y. H.; Wang, X. M.; Li, X. B.

    2011-02-01

    The dried, fleshy stems of Cistanche deserticola (Orobanchaceae) are popular tonics in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat the inability of kidney in expelling extra fluid in the body, causing fluid retention, and reform reproductive system. However, the wild plants of C. deserticola have become endangered due to habitat downsizing and over-harvesting for its medicinal usages. The present research was carried out for the following purposes: (1) promoting the space-breeding research; (2) providing molecular evidence for agricultural selective breeding; and (3) protecting this endangered herbal medicine and conserving its genetic resources.In this study, plants were cultivated from seeds specifically treated in spaceflight for seven days, and sampled to screen positive mutants and identify ISSR markers associated with their medicinal constituents. As a result, nine out of the 94 ISSR primers were showed high polymorphism, and a total of 118 bands were generated, of which 80 were polymorphic, ranging from 250 to 2600 bp. The spaceflight mutants were found to have lower coefficient of gene differentiation (Gst = 0.0269), and higher gene flow (Nm = 18.0740) than those of the controls (Gst = 0.2067 and Nm = 1.9185). The results demonstrated that most of the genetic variation were harnessed within populations (>97%). The Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) revealed high genetic variation within populations (88.03%) and low genetic differentiation among regions (-18.83%) and populations (30.79%), respectively. The results also indicated a profound difference between spaceflight condition and that on the earth. The unique vacuum environment of spaceflight was suggested to induce DNA mutation and various variations of C. deserticola. In addition, six particular ISSR markers were identified, cloned and sequenced; one of them, CA41939-934, was found positively correlated with acteoside with correlation coefficient values of 0.264 (P < 0.05). Our work may provide a

  13. Development of novel simple sequence repeat markers in bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) through enriched genomic libraries and their utilization in analysis of genetic diversity and cross-species transferability.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Swati; Singh, Archana; Archak, Sunil; Behera, Tushar K; John, Joseph K; Meshram, Sudhir U; Gaikwad, Ambika B

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are the preferred markers for genetic analyses of crop plants. The availability of a limited number of such markers in bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) necessitates the development and characterization of more SSR markers. These were developed from genomic libraries enriched for three dinucleotide, five trinucleotide, and two tetranucleotide core repeat motifs. Employing the strategy of polymerase chain reaction-based screening, the number of clones to be sequenced was reduced by 81 % and 93.7 % of the sequenced clones contained in microsatellite repeats. Unique primer-pairs were designed for 160 microsatellite loci, and amplicons of expected length were obtained for 151 loci (94.4 %). Evaluation of diversity in 54 bitter gourd accessions at 51 loci indicated that 20 % of the loci were polymorphic with the polymorphic information content values ranging from 0.13 to 0.77. Fifteen Indian varieties were clearly distinguished indicative of the usefulness of the developed markers. Markers at 40 loci (78.4 %) were transferable to six species, viz. Momordica cymbalaria, Momordica subangulata subsp. renigera, Momordica balsamina, Momordica dioca, Momordica cochinchinesis, and Momordica sahyadrica. The microsatellite markers reported will be useful in various genetic and molecular genetic studies in bitter gourd, a cucurbit of immense nutritive, medicinal, and economic importance.

  14. Simple Saucers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2008-01-01

    With standardized English Language Arts exams on the horizon, the author thought a game of Antonyms would provide not only a quick language arts activity for her sixth graders, but also a nice segue to an art lesson in contrast. In this article, she describes a project, a simple saucer on a pedestal base, which required students to demonstrate…

  15. Simple suppression of radiation damping.

    PubMed

    Khitrin, A K; Jerschow, Alexej

    2012-12-01

    Radiation damping is known to cause line-broadening and frequency shifts of strong resonances in NMR spectra. While several techniques exist for the suppression of these effects, many require specialized hardware, or are only compatible with the presence of few strong resonances. We describe a simple pulse sequence for radiation damping suppression in spectra with many strong resonances. The sequence can be used as-is to generate simple spectra or as a signal excitation part in more advanced experiments.

  16. Simple, Low-Cost Detection of Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates and Molecular Fingerprinting of Candida orthopsilosis Strains in Kuwait by ITS Region Sequencing and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis.

    PubMed

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis has now emerged as the second or third most important cause of healthcare-associated Candida infections. Molecular studies have shown that phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates represent a complex of three species, namely, C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Lodderomyces elongisporus is another species phenotypically closely related to the C. parapsilosis-complex. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, low cost multiplex (m) PCR assay for species-specific identification of C. parapsilosis complex isolates and to study genetic relatedness of C. orthopsilosis isolates in Kuwait. Species-specific amplicons from C. parapsilosis (171 bp), C. orthopsilosis (109 bp), C. metapsilosis (217 bp) and L. elongisporus (258 bp) were obtained in mPCR. Clinical isolates identified as C. parapsilosis (n = 380) by Vitek2 in Kuwait and an international collection of 27 C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates previously characterized by rDNA sequencing were analyzed to evaluate mPCR. Species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA were performed to validate the results of mPCR. Fingerprinting of 19 clinical C. orthopsilosis isolates (including 4 isolates from a previous study) was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates (n = 380) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (n = 361), C. orthopsilosis (n = 15), C. metapsilosis (n = 1) and L. elongisporus (n = 3) by mPCR. The mPCR also accurately detected all epidemiologically unrelated C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates. The 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates obtained from 16 patients were divided into 3 haplotypes based on ITS region sequence data. Seven distinct genotypes were identified among the 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates by AFLP including a dominant genotype (AFLP1) comprising 11 isolates recovered from 10 patients. A

  17. A physical map of the highly heterozygous Populus genome: integration with the genome sequence and genetic map

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Colin; CHIU, Dr. R.; Shin, Dr. H.; Krywinski, Martin; Fjell, Chris; Wilkin, Jennifer; Yin, Tongming; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    As part of a larger project to sequence the Populus genome and generate genomic resources for this emerging model tree, we constructed a physical map of the Populus genome, representing one of the few such maps of an undomesticated, highly heterozygous plant species. The physical map, consisting of 2802 contigs, was constructed from fingerprinted bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. The map represents approximately 9.4-fold coverage of the Populus genome, which has been estimated from the genome sequence assembly to be 485 {+-} 10 Mb in size. BAC ends were sequenced to assist long-range assembly of whole-genome shotgun sequence scaffolds and to anchor the physical map to the genome sequence. Simple sequence repeat-based markers were derived from the end sequences and used to initiate integration of the BAC and genetic maps. A total of 2411 physical map contigs, representing 97% of all clones assigned to contigs, were aligned to the sequence assembly (JGI Populus trichocarpa, version 1.0). These alignments represent a total coverage of 384 Mb (79%) of the entire poplar sequence assembly and 295 Mb (96%) of linkage group sequence assemblies. A striking result of the physical map contig alignments to the sequence assembly was the co-localization of multiple contigs across numerous regions of the 19 linkage groups. Targeted sequencing of BAC clones and genetic analysis in a small number of representative regions showed that these co-aligning contigs represent distinct haplotypes in the heterozygous individual sequenced, and revealed the nature of these haplotype sequence differences.

  18. Simple, Low-Cost Detection of Candida parapsilosis Complex Isolates and Molecular Fingerprinting of Candida orthopsilosis Strains in Kuwait by ITS Region Sequencing and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asadzadeh, Mohammad; Ahmad, Suhail; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques F.; Al-Sweih, Noura; Khan, Ziauddin

    2015-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis has now emerged as the second or third most important cause of healthcare-associated Candida infections. Molecular studies have shown that phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates represent a complex of three species, namely, C. parapsilosis, C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Lodderomyces elongisporus is another species phenotypically closely related to the C. parapsilosis-complex. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, low cost multiplex (m) PCR assay for species-specific identification of C. parapsilosis complex isolates and to study genetic relatedness of C. orthopsilosis isolates in Kuwait. Species-specific amplicons from C. parapsilosis (171 bp), C. orthopsilosis (109 bp), C. metapsilosis (217 bp) and L. elongisporus (258 bp) were obtained in mPCR. Clinical isolates identified as C. parapsilosis (n = 380) by Vitek2 in Kuwait and an international collection of 27 C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates previously characterized by rDNA sequencing were analyzed to evaluate mPCR. Species-specific PCR and DNA sequencing of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA were performed to validate the results of mPCR. Fingerprinting of 19 clinical C. orthopsilosis isolates (including 4 isolates from a previous study) was performed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Phenotypically identified C. parapsilosis isolates (n = 380) were identified as C. parapsilosis sensu stricto (n = 361), C. orthopsilosis (n = 15), C. metapsilosis (n = 1) and L. elongisporus (n = 3) by mPCR. The mPCR also accurately detected all epidemiologically unrelated C. parapsilosis complex and L. elongisporus isolates. The 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates obtained from 16 patients were divided into 3 haplotypes based on ITS region sequence data. Seven distinct genotypes were identified among the 19 C. orthopsilosis isolates by AFLP including a dominant genotype (AFLP1) comprising 11 isolates recovered from 10 patients. A

  19. Recognizing Sequences of Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kiebel, Stefan J.; von Kriegstein, Katharina; Daunizeau, Jean; Friston, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    The brain's decoding of fast sensory streams is currently impossible to emulate, even approximately, with artificial agents. For example, robust speech recognition is relatively easy for humans but exceptionally difficult for artificial speech recognition systems. In this paper, we propose that recognition can be simplified with an internal model of how sensory input is generated, when formulated in a Bayesian framework. We show that a plausible candidate for an internal or generative model is a hierarchy of ‘stable heteroclinic channels’. This model describes continuous dynamics in the environment as a hierarchy of sequences, where slower sequences cause faster sequences. Under this model, online recognition corresponds to the dynamic decoding of causal sequences, giving a representation of the environment with predictive power on several timescales. We illustrate the ensuing decoding or recognition scheme using synthetic sequences of syllables, where syllables are sequences of phonemes and phonemes are sequences of sound-wave modulations. By presenting anomalous stimuli, we find that the resulting recognition dynamics disclose inference at multiple time scales and are reminiscent of neuronal dynamics seen in the real brain. PMID:19680429

  20. Simple Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... How They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Simple Kidney Cysts What are simple kidney cysts? Simple kidney cysts are abnormal, fluid-filled ... that form in the kidneys. What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  1. Simple Elbow Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, April

    2015-11-01

    Simple elbow dislocation refers to those elbow dislocations that do not involve an osseous injury. A complex elbow dislocation refers to an elbow that has dislocated with an osseous injury. Most simple elbow dislocations are treated nonoperatively. Understanding the importance of the soft tissue injury following a simple elbow dislocation is a key to being successful with treatment.

  2. SIMPLE: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endres, Frank L.

    Symbolic Interactive Matrix Processing Language (SIMPLE) is a conversational matrix-oriented source language suited to a batch or a time-sharing environment. The two modes of operation of SIMPLE are conversational mode and programing mode. This program uses a TAURUS time-sharing system and cathode ray terminals or teletypes. SIMPLE performs all…

  3. Dominant simple-shear deformation during peak metamorphism for the lower portion of the Greater Himalayan Sequence in West Nepal: New implications for hybrid channel flow-type mechanisms in the Dolpo region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassi, Chiara

    2015-12-01

    I conducted new vorticity and deformation temperatures studies to test competing models of the exhumation of the mid-crustal rocks exposed in the Dolpo region (West Nepal). My results indicate that the Main Central Thrust is located ∼5 km structurally below the previous mapped locations. Deformation temperature increasing up structural section from ∼450 °C to ∼650 °C and overlap with peak metamorphic temperature indicating that penetrative shearing was responsible for the exhumation of the GHS occurred at "close" to peak metamorphic conditions. I interpreted the telescoping and the inversion of the paleo-isotherms at the base of the GHS as produced mainly by a sub-simple shearing (Wm = 0.88-1) pervasively distributed through the lower portion of the GHS. My results are consistent with hybrid channel flow-type models where the boundary between lower and upper portions of the GHS, broadly corresponding to the tectonometamorphic discontinuity recently documented in west Nepal, represents the limit between buried material, affected by dominant simple shearing, and exhumed material affected by a general flow dominates by pure shearing. This interpretation is consistent with the recent models suggesting the simultaneous operation of channel flow- and critical wedge-type processes at different structural depth.

  4. Simple digital pulse-programing circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langston, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Pulse-sequencing circuit uses only shift register and Exclusive-OR gates. Circuit also serves as date-transition edge detector (for rising or falling edges). It is used in sample-and-hold, analog-to-digital conversion sequence control, multiphase clock logic, precise delay control computer control logic, edge detectors, other timing applications, and provides simple means to generate timing and control signals for data transfer, addressing, or mode control in microprocessors and minicomputers.

  5. A Simple "Tubeless" Telescope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straulino, S.; Bonechi, L.

    2010-01-01

    Two lenses make it possible to create a simple telescope with quite large magnification. The set-up is very simple and can be reproduced in schools, provided the laboratory has a range of lenses with different focal lengths. In this article, the authors adopt the Keplerian configuration, which is composed of two converging lenses. This instrument,…

  6. Simple Machine Junk Cars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2010-01-01

    During the month of May, the author's eighth-grade physical science students study the six simple machines through hands-on activities, reading assignments, videos, and notes. At the end of the month, they can easily identify the six types of simple machine: inclined plane, wheel and axle, pulley, screw, wedge, and lever. To conclude this unit,…

  7. Optimising expression of the recombinant fusion protein biopesticide ω-hexatoxin-Hv1a/GNA in Pichia pastoris: sequence modifications and a simple method for the generation of multi-copy strains.

    PubMed

    Pyati, Prashant; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2014-08-01

    Production of recombinant protein bio-insecticides on a commercial scale can only be cost effective if host strains with very high expression levels are available. A recombinant fusion protein containing an arthropod toxin, ω-hexatoxin-Hv1a, (from funnel web spider Hadronyche versuta) linked to snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) is an effective oral insecticide and candidate biopesticide. However, the fusion protein was vulnerable to proteolysis during production in the yeast Pichia pastoris. To prevent proteolysis, the Hv1a/GNA fusion expression construct was modified by site-directed mutagenesis to remove a potential Kex2 cleavage site at the C-terminus of the Hv1a peptide. To obtain a high expressing clone of P. pastoris to produce recombinant Hv1a/GNA, a straightforward method was used to produce multi-copy expression plasmids, which does not require multiple integrations to give clones of P. pastoris containing high copy numbers of the introduced gene. Removal of the Kex2 site resulted in increased levels of intact fusion protein expressed in wild-type P. pastoris strains, improving levels of intact recombinant protein recoverable. Incorporation of a C-terminal (His)6 tag enabled single step purification of the fusion protein. These modifications did not affect the insecticidal activity of the recombinant toxin towards lepidopteran larvae. Introduction of multiple expression cassettes increased the amount of secreted recombinant fusion protein in a laboratory scale fermentation by almost tenfold on a per litre of culture basis. Simple modifications in the expression construct can be advantageous for the generation of high expressing P. pastoris strains for production of a recombinant protein, without altering its functional properties.

  8. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  9. Preschoolers' Understanding of Simple Object Transformations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelman, Rochel; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The ability of three- and four-year-old children to reason about the components of event sequences involving simple transformations was tested in two experiments. In Experiment I children saw picture "stories" of the form object, instrument, and transformed object, with one item deleted. In Experiment II only the instrument item was…

  10. A Simple Acronym for Doing Calculus: CAL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    An acronym is presented that provides students a potentially useful, unifying view of the major topics covered in an elementary calculus sequence. The acronym (CAL) is based on viewing the calculus procedure for solving a calculus problem P* in three steps: (1) recognizing that the problem cannot be solved using simple (non-calculus) techniques;…

  11. A Simple Raman Spectrometer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blond, J. P.; Boggett, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses some basic physical ideas about light scattering and describes a simple Raman spectrometer, a single prism monochromator and a multiplier detector. This discussion is intended for British undergraduate physics students. (HM)

  12. Fibrosis and Simple Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... caffeine and other stimulants found in coffee, tea, chocolate, and many soft drinks. Studies have not found ... side effects. How do fibrosis and simple cysts affect your risk for breast cancer? Neither fibrosis nor ...

  13. A Simple Water Channel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a simple water channel, for use with an overhead projector. It is run from a water tap and may be used for flow visualization experiments, including the effect of streamlining and elementary building aerodynamics. (MLH)

  14. Early Childhood: Simple Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Clare B.; Shafer, Kathryn E.

    1987-01-01

    Encourages teachers to take advantage of the natural curiosity of young children in enhancing their interest in science. Describes four simple activities involving water, living and non-living things, air pollution, and food. (TW)

  15. Simple Machines Simply Put.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, James J.

    1994-01-01

    Students explore the workings of the lever, wheel and axle, and the inclined plane as they build simple toys--a bulldozer and a road grader. The project takes four weeks. Diagrams and procedures are included. (PR)

  16. Simple Ontology Format (SOFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokine, Alexandre

    2011-10-01

    Simple Ontology Format (SOFT) library and file format specification provides a set of simple tools for developing and maintaining ontologies. The library, implemented as a perl module, supports parsing and verification of the files in SOFt format, operations with ontologies (adding, removing, or filtering of entities), and converting of ontologies into other formats. SOFT allows users to quickly create ontologies using only a basic text editor, verify it, and portray it in a graph layout system using customized styles.

  17. Genome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Verma, Mansi; Kulshrestha, Samarth; Puri, Ayush

    2017-01-01

    Genome sequencing is an important step toward correlating genotypes with phenotypic characters. Sequencing technologies are important in many fields in the life sciences, including functional genomics, transcriptomics, oncology, evolutionary biology, forensic sciences, and many more. The era of sequencing has been divided into three generations. First generation sequencing involved sequencing by synthesis (Sanger sequencing) and sequencing by cleavage (Maxam-Gilbert sequencing). Sanger sequencing led to the completion of various genome sequences (including human) and provided the foundation for development of other sequencing technologies. Since then, various techniques have been developed which can overcome some of the limitations of Sanger sequencing. These techniques are collectively known as "Next-generation sequencing" (NGS), and are further classified into second and third generation technologies. Although NGS methods have many advantages in terms of speed, cost, and parallelism, the accuracy and read length of Sanger sequencing is still superior and has confined the use of NGS mainly to resequencing genomes. Consequently, there is a continuing need to develop improved real time sequencing techniques. This chapter reviews some of the options currently available and provides a generic workflow for sequencing a genome.

  18. Strategy as simple rules.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, K M; Sull, D N

    2001-01-01

    The success of Yahoo!, eBay, Enron, and other companies that have become adept at morphing to meet the demands of changing markets can't be explained using traditional thinking about competitive strategy. These companies have succeeded by pursuing constantly evolving strategies in market spaces that were considered unattractive according to traditional measures. In this article--the third in an HBR series by Kathleen Eisenhardt and Donald Sull on strategy in the new economy--the authors ask, what are the sources of competitive advantage in high-velocity markets? The secret, they say, is strategy as simple rules. The companies know that the greatest opportunities for competitive advantage lie in market confusion, but they recognize the need for a few crucial strategic processes and a few simple rules. In traditional strategy, advantage comes from exploiting resources or stable market positions. In strategy as simple rules, advantage comes from successfully seizing fleeting opportunities. Key strategic processes, such as product innovation, partnering, or spinout creation, place the company where the flow of opportunities is greatest. Simple rules then provide the guidelines within which managers can pursue such opportunities. Simple rules, which grow out of experience, fall into five broad categories: how- to rules, boundary conditions, priority rules, timing rules, and exit rules. Companies with simple-rules strategies must follow the rules religiously and avoid the temptation to change them too frequently. A consistent strategy helps managers sort through opportunities and gain short-term advantage by exploiting the attractive ones. In stable markets, managers rely on complicated strategies built on detailed predictions of the future. But when business is complicated, strategy should be simple.

  19. A Simple Wave Driver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temiz, Burak Kagan; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the…

  20. Simple Magnetometer for Autopilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, H. D.

    1982-01-01

    Simple, low-cost magnetometer is suitable for heading-reference applications in autopilots and other directional control systems. Sensing element utilizes commercially available transformer core; and supporting electronics consist of one transistor, two readily-available integrated-circuit chips, and associated resistors and capacitors.

  1. A Simple Tiltmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dix, M. G.; Harrison, D. R.; Edwards, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    Bubble vial with external aluminum-foil electrodes is sensing element for simple indicating tiltmeter. To measure bubble displacement, bridge circuit detects difference in capacitance between two sensing electrodes and reference electrode. Tiltmeter was developed for experiment on forecasting seismic events by changes in Earth's magnetic field.

  2. Working with Simple Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norbury, John W.

    2006-01-01

    A set of examples is provided that illustrate the use of work as applied to simple machines. The ramp, pulley, lever and hydraulic press are common experiences in the life of a student, and their theoretical analysis therefore makes the abstract concept of work more real. The mechanical advantage of each of these systems is also discussed so that…

  3. Entropy Is Simple, Qualitatively.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Frank L.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that qualitatively, entropy is simple. Entropy increase from a macro viewpoint is a measure of the dispersal of energy from localized to spread out at a temperature T. Fundamentally based on statistical and quantum mechanics, this approach is superior to the non-fundamental "disorder" as a descriptor of entropy change. (MM)

  4. Climate Change Made Simple

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shallcross, Dudley E.; Harrison, Tim G.

    2007-01-01

    The newly revised specifications for GCSE science involve greater consideration of climate change. This topic appears in either the chemistry or biology section, depending on the examination board, and is a good example of "How Science Works." It is therefore timely that students are given an opportunity to conduct some simple climate modelling.…

  5. On Simple Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, K.C.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses San Francisco's Exploratorium, a science teaching center with 500 exhibits focusing on human perception, but extending to everything from the mechanics of voice to the art of illusion, from holograms to harmonics. The Exploratorium emphasizes "simple science" (refractions/resonances, sounds/shadows) to tune in the senses and turn on the…

  6. Simple Lookup Service

    SciTech Connect

    2013-05-01

    Simple Lookup Service (sLS) is a REST/JSON based lookup service that allows users to publish information in the form of key-value pairs and search for the published information. The lookup service supports both pull and push model. This software can be used to create a distributed architecture/cloud.

  7. A Simple Hydrogen Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggen, Per-Odd

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the construction of an inexpensive, robust, and simple hydrogen electrode, as well as the use of this electrode to measure "standard" potentials. In the experiment described here the students can measure the reduction potentials of metal-metal ion pairs directly, without using a secondary reference electrode. Measurements…

  8. Simple sequence repeat diversity in diploid and tetraploid Coffea species.

    PubMed

    Moncada, Pilar; McCouch, Susan

    2004-06-01

    Thirty-four fluorescently labeled microsatellite markers were used to assess genetic diversity in a set of 30 Coffea accessions from the CENICAFE germplasm bank in Colombia. The plant material included one sample per accession of seven East African accessions representing five diploid species and 23 wild and cultivated tetraploid accessions of Coffea arabica from Africa, Indonesia, and South America. More allelic diversity was detected among the five diploid species than among the 23 tetraploid genotypes. The diploid species averaged 3.6 alleles/locus and had an average polymorphism information content (PIC) value of 0.6, whereas the wild tetraploids averaged 2.5 alleles/locus and had an average PIC value of 0.3 and the cultivated tetraploids (C. arabica cultivars) averaged 1.9 alleles/locus and had an average PIC value of 0.22. Fifty-five percent of the alleles found in the wild tetraploids were not shared with cultivated C. arabica genotypes, supporting the idea that the wild tetraploid ancestors from Ethiopia could be used productively as a source of novel genetic variation to expand the gene pool of elite C. arabica germplasm.

  9. Independently segregating simple sequence repeats (SSR) alleles in polyploid sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complex nuclear genomic and flower structures of sugarcane cultivars (Saccharum hybrids spp., 2n = 10x = 100 – 130) render sugarcane a difficult subject for genetics research. Using a capillary electrophoresis- and fluorescence-labeling-based SSR genotyping platform, the segregation of a multi-a...

  10. Simple Waveforms, Simply Described

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Since the first Lazarus Project calculations, it has been frequently noted that binary black hole merger waveforms are 'simple.' In this talk we examine some of the simple features of coalescence and merger waveforms from a variety of binary configurations. We suggest an interpretation of the waveforms in terms of an implicit rotating source. This allows a coherent description, of both the inspiral waveforms, derivable from post-Newtonian(PN) calculations, and the numerically determined merger-ringdown. We focus particularly on similarities in the features of various Multipolar waveform components Generated by various systems. The late-time phase evolution of most L these waveform components are accurately described with a sinple analytic fit. We also discuss apparent relationships among phase and amplitude evolution. Taken together with PN information, the features we describe can provide an approximate analytic description full coalescence wavefoRms. complementary to other analytic waveforns approaches.

  11. Simple Schlieren Light Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, David B.; Franke, John M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1992-01-01

    Simple light-meter circuit used to position knife edge of schlieren optical system to block exactly half light. Enables operator to check quickly position of knife edge between tunnel runs to ascertain whether or not in alignment. Permanent measuring system made part of each schlieren system. If placed in unused area of image plane, or in monitoring beam from mirror knife edge, provides real-time assessment of alignment of schlieren system.

  12. Simple Finite Jordan Pseudoalgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We consider the structure of Jordan H-pseudoalgebras which are linearly finitely generated over a Hopf algebra H. There are two cases under consideration: H = U(h) and H = U(h) # C[Γ], where h is a finite-dimensional Lie algebra over C, Γ is an arbitrary group acting on U(h) by automorphisms. We construct an analogue of the Tits-Kantor-Koecher construction for finite Jordan pseudoalgebras and describe all simple ones.

  13. Simple SAR demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof; Misiurewicz, Jacek; Baranowski, Piotr; Wojdołowicz, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple SAR radar demonstrator build using commercially available (COTS) components. For the microwave analog front end, a standard police radar microwave head has been used. The Motorola DSP processor board, equipped with ADC and DAC, has been used for generating of modulating signal and for signal acquisition. The raw radar signal (I and Q components) have been recorded on 2.5" HDD. The signal processing has been performed on standard PC computer after copying the recorded data. The aim of constructing simple and relatively cheap demonstrator was to provide the students the real-life unclassified radar signals and motivate them to test and develop various kinds of SAR and ISAR algorithms, including image formation, motion compensation and autofocusing. The simple microwave frontend hardware has a lot of non-idealities, so for obtaining nice SAR image it was necessary to develop the number of correction algorithms at the calibration stage. The SAR demonstrator have been tested using car as a moving platform. The flight tests with a small airborne platform are planned for the summer.

  14. Simple Autonomous Chaotic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, Jessica; Sprott, J.

    2010-03-01

    Over the last several decades, numerous electronic circuits exhibiting chaos have been proposed. Non-autonomous circuits with as few as two components have been developed. However, the operation of such circuits relies on the non-ideal behavior of the devices used, and therefore the circuit equations can be quite complex. In this paper, we present two simple autonomous chaotic circuits using only opamps and linear passive components. The circuits each use one opamp as a comparator, to provide a signum nonlinearity. The chaotic behavior is robust, and independent of nonlinearities in the passive components. Moreover, the circuit equations are among the algebraically simplest chaotic systems yet constructed.

  15. Sequencing technologies and genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pareek, Chandra Shekhar; Smoczynski, Rafal; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2011-11-01

    The high-throughput - next generation sequencing (HT-NGS) technologies are currently the hottest topic in the field of human and animals genomics researches, which can produce over 100 times more data compared to the most sophisticated capillary sequencers based on the Sanger method. With the ongoing developments of high throughput sequencing machines and advancement of modern bioinformatics tools at unprecedented pace, the target goal of sequencing individual genomes of living organism at a cost of $1,000 each is seemed to be realistically feasible in the near future. In the relatively short time frame since 2005, the HT-NGS technologies are revolutionizing the human and animal genome researches by analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to DNA microarray (ChIP-chip) or sequencing (ChIP-seq), RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), whole genome genotyping, genome wide structural variation, de novo assembling and re-assembling of genome, mutation detection and carrier screening, detection of inherited disorders and complex human diseases, DNA library preparation, paired ends and genomic captures, sequencing of mitochondrial genome and personal genomics. In this review, we addressed the important features of HT-NGS like, first generation DNA sequencers, birth of HT-NGS, second generation HT-NGS platforms, third generation HT-NGS platforms: including single molecule Heliscope™, SMRT™ and RNAP sequencers, Nanopore, Archon Genomics X PRIZE foundation, comparison of second and third HT-NGS platforms, applications, advances and future perspectives of sequencing technologies on human and animal genome research.

  16. Simple stochastic simulation.

    PubMed

    Schilstra, Maria J; Martin, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    Stochastic simulations may be used to describe changes with time of a reaction system in a way that explicitly accounts for the fact that molecules show a significant degree of randomness in their dynamic behavior. The stochastic approach is almost invariably used when small numbers of molecules or molecular assemblies are involved because this randomness leads to significant deviations from the predictions of the conventional deterministic (or continuous) approach to the simulation of biochemical kinetics. Advances in computational methods over the three decades that have elapsed since the publication of Daniel Gillespie's seminal paper in 1977 (J. Phys. Chem. 81, 2340-2361) have allowed researchers to produce highly sophisticated models of complex biological systems. However, these models are frequently highly specific for the particular application and their description often involves mathematical treatments inaccessible to the nonspecialist. For anyone completely new to the field to apply such techniques in their own work might seem at first sight to be a rather intimidating prospect. However, the fundamental principles underlying the approach are in essence rather simple, and the aim of this article is to provide an entry point to the field for a newcomer. It focuses mainly on these general principles, both kinetic and computational, which tend to be not particularly well covered in specialist literature, and shows that interesting information may even be obtained using very simple operations in a conventional spreadsheet.

  17. A Simple Harmonic Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, Peter W.; Horn, Bart; Kachru, Shamit; Rajendran, Surjeet; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We explore simple but novel bouncing solutions of general relativity that avoid singularities. These solutions require curvature k = +1, and are supported by a negative cosmological term and matter with -1 < w < -1 = 3. In the case of moderate bounces (where the ratio of the maximal scale factor a{sub +} to the minimal scale factor a{sub -} is {Omicron}(1)), the solutions are shown to be classically stable and cycle through an infinite set of bounces. For more extreme cases with large a{sub +} = a{sub -}, the solutions can still oscillate many times before classical instabilities take them out of the regime of validity of our approximations. In this regime, quantum particle production also leads eventually to a departure from the realm of validity of semiclassical general relativity, likely yielding a singular crunch. We briefly discuss possible applications of these models to realistic cosmology.

  18. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  19. Simple wavelength assignment protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryaputra, Stephen; Touch, Joseph D.; Bannister, Joseph A.

    2000-10-01

    IP routers can be coupled with wavelength-selective optical cross- connects to support existing Internet infrastructure in a wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) optical network. Because optical wavelength routing is transparent to IP, packets can bypass traditional forwarding and pass directly through the optical cross-connect, resulting in very high throughput and low delay routing. This approach shares features with label switching, but wavelengths are much more scarce resource than labels. Because optical switches have larger switching times than electronic switches, and wavelength conversions are expensive, wavelength label swapping is not easily done. Wavelength label assignments must consider these limitations to be practical in an optical environment. The performance of an instance of this approach, called Packet over Wavelengths (POW) has been simulated and studied. A new signaling protocol, Simple Wavelength Assignment Protocol (SWAP) is devised to be POW signaling protocol. SWAP takes into account the optical device limitations, and is designed to minimize wavelength conversion, utilize wavelengths with the merging of flows, and reduce the reconfiguration of optical switches. SWAP, to our knowledge, is the first approach to combine signaling and wavelength assignment in an on- line protocol. This paper describes high level SWAP design challenges, decision, and overhead.

  20. Endoscopic simple prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr; Dobruch, Jakub; Fiutowski, Marek; Jaskulski, Jarosław; Słojewski, Marcin; Szydełko, Tomasz; Szymański, Michał; Demkow, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many options exist for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), laser surgery, and open adenomectomy. Recently, endoscopic techniques have been used in the treatment of BPH. Material and methods We reviewed clinical studies in PubMed describing minimally invasive endoscopic procedures for the treatment of BPH. Results Laparoscopic adenomectomy (LA) and robotic–assisted simple prostatectomy (RASP) were introduced in the early 2000s. These operative techniques have been standardized and reproducible, with some individual modifications. Studies analyzing the outcomes of LA and RASP have reported significant improvements in urinary flow and decreases in patient International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). These minimally invasive approaches have resulted in a lower rate of complications, shorter hospital stays, smaller scars, faster recoveries, and an earlier return to work. Conclusions Minimally invasive techniques such as LA and RASP for the treatment BPH are safe, efficacious, and allow faster recovery. These procedures have a short learning curve and offer new options for the surgeon treating BPH. PMID:25667758

  1. A simple wave driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kağan Temiz, Burak; Yavuz, Ahmet

    2015-08-01

    This study was done to develop a simple and inexpensive wave driver that can be used in experiments on string waves. The wave driver was made using a battery-operated toy car, and the apparatus can be used to produce string waves at a fixed frequency. The working principle of the apparatus is as follows: shortly after the car is turned on, the wheel starts to turn at a constant angular speed. A rod that is fixed on the wheel turns at the same constant angular speed, too. A tight string that the wave will be created on is placed at a distance where the rod can touch the string. During each rotation of the wheel, the rod vibrates the string up and down. The vibration frequency of this rod equals the wheel’s rotation frequency, and this frequency value can be measured easily with a small magnet and a bicycle speedometer. In this way, the frequency of the waves formed in the rope can also be measured.

  2. A Simple Accelerometer Calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, R. A.; Islamy, M. R. F.; Munir, M. M.; Latief, H.; Irsyam, M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    High possibility of earthquake could lead to the high number of victims caused by it. It also can cause other hazards such as tsunami, landslide, etc. In that case it requires a system that can examine the earthquake occurrence. Some possible system to detect earthquake is by creating a vibration sensor system using accelerometer. However, the output of the system is usually put in the form of acceleration data. Therefore, a calibrator system for accelerometer to sense the vibration is needed. In this study, a simple accelerometer calibrator has been developed using 12 V DC motor, optocoupler, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and AVR 328 microcontroller as controller system. The system uses the Pulse Wave Modulation (PWM) form microcontroller to control the motor rotational speed as response to vibration frequency. The frequency of vibration was read by optocoupler and then those data was used as feedback to the system. The results show that the systems could control the rotational speed and the vibration frequencies in accordance with the defined PWM.

  3. Simple inflationary quintessential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haro, Jaume; Amorós, Jaume; Pan, Supriya

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker geometry, we present a non-geodesically past complete model of our Universe without the big bang singularity at finite cosmic time, describing its evolution starting from its early inflationary era up to the present accelerating phase. We found that a hydrodynamical fluid with nonlinear equation of state could result in such scenario, which after the end of this inflationary stage, suffers a sudden phase transition and enters into the stiff matter dominated era, and the Universe becomes reheated due to a huge amount of particle production. Finally, it asymptotically enters into the de Sitter phase concluding the present accelerated expansion. Using the reconstruction technique, we also show that this background provides an extremely simple inflationary quintessential potential whose inflationary part is given by the well-known 1-dimensional Higgs potential, i.e., a double well inflationary potential, and the quintessential one by an exponential potential that leads to a deflationary regime after this inflation, and it can depict the current cosmic acceleration at late times. Moreover the Higgs potential leads to a power spectrum of the cosmological perturbations which fit well with the latest Planck estimations. Further, we compared our viable potential with some known inflationary quintessential potential, which shows that our quintessential model, that is, the Higgs potential combined with the exponential one, is an improved version of them because it contains an analytic solution that allows us to perform all analytic calculations. Finally, we have shown that the introduction of a nonzero cosmological constant simplifies the potential considerably with an analytic behavior of the background which again permits us to evaluate all the quantities analytically.

  4. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues.

    PubMed

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N; Becerril, Baltazar

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology.

  5. Simple approach for ranking structure determining residues

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Vidal-Limón, Abraham; Villalba-Velázquez, Miryam I.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Garduño-Juárez, Ramón; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2016-01-01

    Mutating residues has been a common task in order to study structural properties of the protein of interest. Here, we propose and validate a simple method that allows the identification of structural determinants; i.e., residues essential for preservation of the stability of global structure, regardless of the protein topology. This method evaluates all of the residues in a 3D structure of a given globular protein by ranking them according to their connectivity and movement restrictions without topology constraints. Our results matched up with sequence-based predictors that look up for intrinsically disordered segments, suggesting that protein disorder can also be described with the proposed methodology. PMID:27366642

  6. A Simple Model of Nucleosome Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2007-03-01

    It has recently been shown that nucleosomes localize to preferred locations along DNA. This localization is a result of the sequence dependent bending stiffness of dsDNA, which must be wrapped around a histone protein to form a nucleosome. As a simple model of nucleosome localization, we study a one-dimensional hard-core gas in a random potential. We numerically solve for the density profile and other thermodynamic quantities using as input both randomly generated potential profiles and experimental energy landscapes. We compare with the annealed average, inspired by the Random Energy Model, and find that the quenched and annealed averages differ significantly above the localization temperature, implying sequence induced structural organization long before the system has frozen. Although information about the ground state is preserved at higher temperatures, there exist massive structural reorganizations at fixed temperature when the chemical potential is lowered. This offers another perspective on why different cells, with different chemical potentials, have different gene expression.

  7. MSLICE Sequencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Morris, John R.

    2011-01-01

    MSLICE Sequencing is a graphical tool for writing sequences and integrating them into RML files, as well as for producing SCMF files for uplink. When operated in a testbed environment, it also supports uplinking these SCMF files to the testbed via Chill. This software features a free-form textural sequence editor featuring syntax coloring, automatic content assistance (including command and argument completion proposals), complete with types, value ranges, unites, and descriptions from the command dictionary that appear as they are typed. The sequence editor also has a "field mode" that allows tabbing between arguments and displays type/range/units/description for each argument as it is edited. Color-coded error and warning annotations on problematic tokens are included, as well as indications of problems that are not visible in the current scroll range. "Quick Fix" suggestions are made for resolving problems, and all the features afforded by modern source editors are also included such as copy/cut/paste, undo/redo, and a sophisticated find-and-replace system optionally using regular expressions. The software offers a full XML editor for RML files, which features syntax coloring, content assistance and problem annotations as above. There is a form-based, "detail view" that allows structured editing of command arguments and sequence parameters when preferred. The "project view" shows the user s "workspace" as a tree of "resources" (projects, folders, and files) that can subsequently be opened in editors by double-clicking. Files can be added, deleted, dragged-dropped/copied-pasted between folders or projects, and these operations are undoable and redoable. A "problems view" contains a tabular list of all problems in the current workspace. Double-clicking on any row in the table opens an editor for the appropriate sequence, scrolling to the specific line with the problem, and highlighting the problematic characters. From there, one can invoke "quick fix" as described

  8. Insertion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mahillon, Jacques; Chandler, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Insertion sequences (ISs) constitute an important component of most bacterial genomes. Over 500 individual ISs have been described in the literature to date, and many more are being discovered in the ongoing prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome-sequencing projects. The last 10 years have also seen some striking advances in our understanding of the transposition process itself. Not least of these has been the development of various in vitro transposition systems for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements and, for several of these, a detailed understanding of the transposition process at the chemical level. This review presents a general overview of the organization and function of insertion sequences of eubacterial, archaebacterial, and eukaryotic origins with particular emphasis on bacterial elements and on different aspects of the transposition mechanism. It also attempts to provide a framework for classification of these elements by assigning them to various families or groups. A total of 443 members of the collection have been grouped in 17 families based on combinations of the following criteria: (i) similarities in genetic organization (arrangement of open reading frames); (ii) marked identities or similarities in the enzymes which mediate the transposition reactions, the recombinases/transposases (Tpases); (iii) similar features of their ends (terminal IRs); and (iv) fate of the nucleotide sequence of their target sites (generation of a direct target duplication of determined length). A brief description of the mechanism(s) involved in the mobility of individual ISs in each family and of the structure-function relationships of the individual Tpases is included where available. PMID:9729608

  9. Study Guide: Seven Simple Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterfield, Nancy; Breaux, Annette; Whitaker, Todd

    2007-01-01

    This study guide has been developed to accompany the "Seven Simple Secrets" book written by Dr. Todd Whitaker and Annette Breaux. "Seven Simple Secrets" focuses on those attributes that have been found to help teachers be their absolute best in their daily challenges of teaching and improving student learning. The study guide is divided into the…

  10. Integer sequence discovery from small graphs

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Travis; Petrone, Anna

    2015-01-01

    We have exhaustively enumerated all simple, connected graphs of a finite order and have computed a selection of invariants over this set. Integer sequences were constructed from these invariants and checked against the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences (OEIS). 141 new sequences were added and six sequences were extended. From the graph database, we were able to programmatically suggest relationships among the invariants. It will be shown that we can readily visualize any sequence of graphs with a given criteria. The code has been released as an open-source framework for further analysis and the database was constructed to be extensible to invariants not considered in this work. PMID:27034526

  11. Discrete sequence prediction and its applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, Philip

    1992-01-01

    Learning from experience to predict sequences of discrete symbols is a fundamental problem in machine learning with many applications. We apply sequence prediction using a simple and practical sequence-prediction algorithm, called TDAG. The TDAG algorithm is first tested by comparing its performance with some common data compression algorithms. Then it is adapted to the detailed requirements of dynamic program optimization, with excellent results.

  12. Molecular beacon sequence design algorithm.

    PubMed

    Monroe, W Todd; Haselton, Frederick R

    2003-01-01

    A method based on Web-based tools is presented to design optimally functioning molecular beacons. Molecular beacons, fluorogenic hybridization probes, are a powerful tool for the rapid and specific detection of a particular nucleic acid sequence. However, their synthesis costs can be considerable. Since molecular beacon performance is based on its sequence, it is imperative to rationally design an optimal sequence before synthesis. The algorithm presented here uses simple Microsoft Excel formulas and macros to rank candidate sequences. This analysis is carried out using mfold structural predictions along with other free Web-based tools. For smaller laboratories where molecular beacons are not the focus of research, the public domain algorithm described here may be usefully employed to aid in molecular beacon design.

  13. Entropy analysis of substitutive sequences revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamanos, K.

    2001-11-01

    A given finite sequence of letters over a finite alphabet can always be algorithmically generated, in particular by a Turing machine. This fact is at the heart of complexity theory in the sense of Kolmogorov and Chaitin. A relevant question in this context is whether, given a statistically 'sufficiently long' sequence, there exists a deterministic finite automaton that generates it. In this paper we propose a simple criterion, based on measuring block entropies by lumping, which is satisfied by all automatic sequences. On the basis of this, one can determine that a given sequence is not automatic and obtain interesting information when the sequence is automatic. Following previous work on the Feigenbaum sequence, we give a necessary entropy-based condition valid for all automatic sequences read by lumping. Applications of these ideas to representative examples are discussed. In particular, we establish new entropic decimation schemes for the Thue-Morse, the Rudin-Shapiro and the paperfolding sequences read by lumping.

  14. A Practical Workshop for Generating Simple DNA Fingerprints of Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouziere, A.-S.; Redman, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    Gel electrophoresis DNA fingerprints offer a graphical and visually appealing illumination of the similarities and differences between DNA sequences of different species and individuals. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction digest protocol was designed to give high-school students the opportunity to generate simple fingerprints of…

  15. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldeira, K.; Hoffert, M.I.; Siegenthaler, U.

    1994-02-01

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  16. Student Conceptions of Simple Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredette, Norman; Lochhead, John

    1980-01-01

    Investigates some conceptual difficulties which college students have with regard to simple direct current circuits. The clinical interview technique was used with 57 students in a freshman level engineering course. (HM)

  17. Simple Motor Gestures for Birdsongs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Tim; Cecchi, G.; Magnasco, M.; Laje, R.; Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2001-11-01

    We present a model of sound production in a songbird's vocal organ and find that much of the complexity of the song of the canary (Serinus canaria) can be produced from simple time variations in forcing functions. The starts, stops, and pauses between syllables, as well as variation in pitch and timbre are inherent in the mechanics and can often be expressed through smooth and simple variations in the frequency and relative phase of two driving parameters

  18. Simple motor gestures for birdsongs.

    PubMed

    Gardner, T; Cecchi, G; Magnasco, M; Laje, R; Mindlin, G B

    2001-11-12

    We present a model of sound production in a songbird's vocal organ and find that much of the complexity of the song of the canary (Serinus canaria) can be produced from simple time variations in forcing functions. The starts, stops, and pauses between syllables, as well as variation in pitch and timbre are inherent in the mechanics and can often be expressed through smooth and simple variations in the frequency and relative phase of two driving parameters

  19. A Simple Framework for Complex System Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Sally; Carayon, Pascale; Weiss, Jennifer; Pandhi, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    The need to rapidly improve health care value is unquestioned, but the means to accomplish this task is unknown. Improving performance at the level of the health care organization frequently involves multiple interventions, which must be coordinated and sequenced to fit the specific context. Those responsible for achieving large-scale improvements are challenged by the lack of a framework to describe and organize improvement strategies. Drawing from the fields of health services, industrial engineering, and organizational behavior, a simple framework was developed and has been used to guide and evaluate improvement initiatives at an academic health center. The authors anticipate that this framework will be helpful for health system leaders responsible for improving health care quality. PMID:24723664

  20. Rapid Diagnostics of Onboard Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starbird, Thomas W.; Morris, John R.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Maimone, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Keeping track of sequences onboard a spacecraft is challenging. When reviewing Event Verification Records (EVRs) of sequence executions on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER), operators often found themselves wondering which version of a named sequence the EVR corresponded to. The lack of this information drastically impacts the operators diagnostic capabilities as well as their situational awareness with respect to the commands the spacecraft has executed, since the EVRs do not provide argument values or explanatory comments. Having this information immediately available can be instrumental in diagnosing critical events and can significantly enhance the overall safety of the spacecraft. This software provides auditing capability that can eliminate that uncertainty while diagnosing critical conditions. Furthermore, the Restful interface provides a simple way for sequencing tools to automatically retrieve binary compiled sequence SCMFs (Space Command Message Files) on demand. It also enables developers to change the underlying database, while maintaining the same interface to the existing applications. The logging capabilities are also beneficial to operators when they are trying to recall how they solved a similar problem many days ago: this software enables automatic recovery of SCMF and RML (Robot Markup Language) sequence files directly from the command EVRs, eliminating the need for people to find and validate the corresponding sequences. To address the lack of auditing capability for sequences onboard a spacecraft during earlier missions, extensive logging support was added on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) sequencing server. This server is responsible for generating all MSL binary SCMFs from RML input sequences. The sequencing server logs every SCMF it generates into a MySQL database, as well as the high-level RML file and dictionary name inputs used to create the SCMF. The SCMF is then indexed by a hash value that is automatically included in all command

  1. Recursive sequences in first-year calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainer, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    This article provides ready-to-use supplementary material on recursive sequences for a second-semester calculus class. It equips first-year calculus students with a basic methodical procedure based on which they can conduct a rigorous convergence or divergence analysis of many simple recursive sequences on their own without the need to invoke inductive arguments as is typically required in calculus textbooks. The sequences that are accessible to this kind of analysis are predominantly (eventually) monotonic, but also certain recursive sequences that alternate around their limit point as they converge can be considered.

  2. Simulations Using Random-Generated DNA and RNA Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, C. F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Using a very simple computer program written in BASIC, a very large number of random-generated DNA or RNA sequences are obtained. Students use these sequences to predict complementary sequences and translational products, evaluate base compositions, determine frequencies of particular triplet codons, and suggest possible secondary structures.…

  3. Foreshock and Aftershocks in Simple Earthquake Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemian, J.; Tiampo, K. F.; Klein, W.; Dominguez, R.

    2015-02-01

    Many models of earthquake faults have been introduced that connect Gutenberg-Richter (GR) scaling to triggering processes. However, natural earthquake fault systems are composed of a variety of different geometries and materials and the associated heterogeneity in physical properties can cause a variety of spatial and temporal behaviors. This raises the question of how the triggering process and the structure interact to produce the observed phenomena. Here we present a simple earthquake fault model based on the Olami-Feder-Christensen and Rundle-Jackson-Brown cellular automata models with long-range interactions that incorporates a fixed percentage of stronger sites, or asperity cells, into the lattice. These asperity cells are significantly stronger than the surrounding lattice sites but eventually rupture when the applied stress reaches their higher threshold stress. The introduction of these spatial heterogeneities results in temporal clustering in the model that mimics that seen in natural fault systems along with GR scaling. In addition, we observe sequences of activity that start with a gradually accelerating number of larger events (foreshocks) prior to a main shock that is followed by a tail of decreasing activity (aftershocks). This work provides further evidence that the spatial and temporal patterns observed in natural seismicity are strongly influenced by the underlying physical properties and are not solely the result of a simple cascade mechanism.

  4. Practical Session: Simple Linear Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausel, M.; Grégoire, G.

    2014-12-01

    Two exercises are proposed to illustrate the simple linear regression. The first one is based on the famous Galton's data set on heredity. We use the lm R command and get coefficients estimates, standard error of the error, R2, residuals …In the second example, devoted to data related to the vapor tension of mercury, we fit a simple linear regression, predict values, and anticipate on multiple linear regression. This pratical session is an excerpt from practical exercises proposed by A. Dalalyan at EPNC (see Exercises 1 and 2 of http://certis.enpc.fr/~dalalyan/Download/TP_ENPC_4.pdf).

  5. Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-02

    SIMPLE ROBUST FIXED LAG SMOOTHING by ~N. D. Le R.D. Martin 4 TECHNICAL RlEPORT No. 149 December 1988 Department of Statistics, GN-22 Accesion For...frLsD1ist Special A- Z Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing With Application To Radar Glint Noise * N. D. Le R. D. Martin Department of Statistics, GN...smoothers. The emphasis here is on fixed-lag smoothing , as opposed to the use of existing robust fixed interval smoothers (e.g., as in Martin, 1979

  6. Generalized Gradient Approximation Made Simple

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, J.P.; Burke, K.; Ernzerhof, M.

    1996-10-01

    Generalized gradient approximations (GGA{close_quote}s) for the exchange-correlation energy improve upon the local spin density (LSD) description of atoms, molecules, and solids. We present a simple derivation of a simple GGA, in which all parameters (other than those in LSD) are fundamental constants. Only general features of the detailed construction underlying the Perdew-Wang 1991 (PW91) GGA are invoked. Improvements over PW91 include an accurate description of the linear response of the uniform electron gas, correct behavior under uniform scaling, and a smoother potential. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA.

    PubMed

    Heather, James M; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way.

  8. Determining Salinity by Simple Means.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This paper describes the construction and use of a simple salinometer. The salinometer is composed, mainly, of a milliammeter and a battery and uses the measurement of current flow to determine the salinity of water. A complete list of materials is given, as are details of construction and operation of the equipment. The use of the salinometer in…

  9. A Simple Relativistic Bohr Atom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Andreas F.

    2008-01-01

    A simple concise relativistic modification of the standard Bohr model for hydrogen-like atoms with circular orbits is presented. As the derivation requires basic knowledge of classical and relativistic mechanics, it can be taught in standard courses in modern physics and introductory quantum mechanics. In addition, it can be shown in a class that…

  10. A simple electron plasma wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodin, G.; Stenflo, L.

    2017-03-01

    Considering a class of solutions where the density perturbations are functions of time, but not of space, we derive a new exact large amplitude wave solution for a cold uniform electron plasma. This result illustrates that most simple analytical solutions can appear even if the density perturbations are large.

  11. Correcting Slightly Less Simple Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aivar, M. P.; Brenner, E.; Smeets, J. B. J.

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have analysed how goal directed movements are corrected in response to changes in the properties of the target. However, only simple movements to single targets have been used in those studies, so little is known about movement corrections under more complex situations. Evidence from studies that ask for movements to several targets…

  12. Keeping It Simple and Deep.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Richard; Silver, Harvey; Perini, Matthew

    1999-01-01

    Like today's educators, Japanese haiku poets were caught between standards (like courtly love) and everyday realities. From this tension, they created a remarkable poetic form. Three examples from teachers' professional development work apply simple-and-deep principles to listening tasks, an assessment "deal," and curricular-standards…

  13. Finite simple groups as expanders

    PubMed Central

    Kassabov, Martin; Lubotzky, Alexander; Nikolov, Nikolay

    2006-01-01

    We prove that there exist k ∈ ℕ and 0 < ε ∈ ℝ such that every non-abelian finite simple group G, which is not a Suzuki group, has a set of k generators for which the Cayley graph Cay(G; S) is an ε-expander. PMID:16601101

  14. Simple Machines in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Robert; Laroder, Aris; Tippins, Deborah; Emaz, Meliza; Fox, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    The community can be a powerful context and mini-laboratory for cultivating students' common understandings of science and mathematics. On the island of Panay in the Philippines, the community was the starting place for a group of fifth- and sixth-grade students to explore simple machines in their daily lives. What students learned in the process…

  15. Simple Games . . . or Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arn, Susan Kyle

    2006-01-01

    Students today begin using computers and playing video games as early as two years old. The technology behind these games is more complicated than most people can imagine. In this article, the author presents some simple number games which seem easy at the beginning, but as the games are repeated, mathematical content becomes more of the focus…

  16. Solving Simple Kinetics without Integrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Pen~a, Lisandro Herna´ndez

    2016-01-01

    The solution of simple kinetic equations is analyzed without referencing any topic from differential equations or integral calculus. Guided by the physical meaning of the rate equation, a systematic procedure is used to generate an approximate solution that converges uniformly to the exact solution in the case of zero, first, and second order…

  17. Simple Machines Curriculum. [Teachers' Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka-Hennepin Independent School District No. 11, Coon Rapids, MN.

    This manual provides suggestions for investigating simple machines and the teaching of certain basic concepts which pertain to them. Many of the lessons are designed to be used with the commercially available LEGO kits, in an effort to teach concepts in a way in which students must translate pictures shown in two dimension into three-dimensional…

  18. Simple Echoes and Subtle Reverberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    Reverberation within an enclosed space can be viewed as a superposition of a large number of simple echoes. The echoes that make up the sound of reverberation fall neatly into two categories, relatively loud and sparse early reflections, and relatively soft and dense late reflections. Ways in which readily available music production software can…

  19. Manipulation Capabilities with Simple Hands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Robotiq: The Adaptive Gripper (2010). URL http://robotiq.com/robot-hand/ 17. Smith , L.: A tutorial on principal components analysis (2002) 18. Theobald ...and Kemp’s [20] end-effector designed to robustly capture a large and carefully cho- sen set of household objects; and Theobald et al.’s simple gripper

  20. Simple Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    This review of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids (i.e., those in which the parent bicyclic systems are in general not embedded in polycyclic arrays) is an update of the previous coverage in Volume 55 of this series (2001). The present survey covers the literature from mid-1999 to the end of 2013; and in addition to aspects of the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of the alkaloids, much emphasis is placed on their total synthesis. A brief introduction to the topic is followed by an overview of relevant alkaloids from fungal and microbial sources, among them slaframine, cyclizidine, Steptomyces metabolites, and the pantocins. The important iminosugar alkaloids lentiginosine, steviamine, swainsonine, castanospermine, and related hydroxyindolizidines are dealt with in the subsequent section. The fourth and fifth sections cover metabolites from terrestrial plants. Pertinent plant alkaloids bearing alkyl, functionalized alkyl or alkenyl substituents include dendroprimine, anibamine, simple alkaloids belonging to the genera Prosopis, Elaeocarpus, Lycopodium, and Poranthera, and bicyclic alkaloids of the lupin family. Plant alkaloids bearing aryl or heteroaryl substituents include ipalbidine and analogs, secophenanthroindolizidine and secophenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (among them septicine, julandine, and analogs), ficuseptine, lasubines, and other simple quinolizidines of the Lythraceae, the simple furyl-substituted Nuphar alkaloids, and a mixed quinolizidine-quinazoline alkaloid. The penultimate section of the review deals with the sizable group of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids isolated from, or detected in, ants, mites, and terrestrial amphibians, and includes an overview of the "dietary hypothesis" for the origin of the amphibian metabolites. The final section surveys relevant alkaloids from marine sources, and includes clathryimines and analogs, stellettamides, the clavepictines and pictamine, and bis

  1. The Simple Science of Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennekes, Henk

    1997-05-01

    From the smallest gnat to the largest aircraft, all things that fly obey the same aerodynamic principles. The Simple Science of Flight offers a leisurely introduction to the mechanics of flight and, beyond that, to the scientific attitude that finds wonder in simple calculations, forging connections between, say, the energy efficiency of a peanut butter sandwich and that of the kerosene that fuels a jumbo jet. It is the product of a lifetime of watching and investigating the way flight happens. The hero of the book is the Boeing 747, which Tennekes sees as the current pinnacle of human ingenuity in mastering the science of flight. Also covered are paper airplanes, kites, gliders, and human-powered flying machines as well as birds and insects. Tennekes explains concepts like lift, drag, wing loading, and cruising speed through many fascinating comparisons, anecdotes, and examples.

  2. Four simple ocean carbon models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the key processes that determine oceanic CO2 uptake and sets this description within the context of four simple ocean carbon models. These models capture, in varying degrees, these key processes and establish a clear foundation for more realistic models that incorporate more directly the underlying physics and biology of the ocean rather than relying on simple parametric schemes. The purpose of this paper is more pedagogical than purely scientific. The problems encountered by current attempts to understand the global carbon cycle not only require our efforts but set a demand for a new generation of scientist, and it is hoped that this paper and the text in which it appears will help in this development.

  3. Analysis of Simple Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-20

    ANALYSIS OF SThlPLE NEURAL NETWORKS Chedsada Chinrungrueng Master’s Report Under the Supervision of Prof. Carlo H. Sequin Department of... Neural Networks 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...and guidJ.nce. I have learned a great deal from his teaching, knowledge, and criti- cism. 1. MOTIVATION ANALYSIS OF SIMPLE NEURAL NETWORKS Chedsada

  4. Simple low Reynolds number microswimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Min Jun

    2016-11-01

    An extremely simple low Reynolds number microswimmer had been observed to swim in bulk fluid. The development of microscopic swimmers had been hindered by technical limitations in micro- and nanofabrication. To address this practical problem, the minimal geometrical requirements for swimming in low Reynolds number has been investigated. Micro- and nanofabrication of complex shapes with specialized materials, such as helices or flexible bodies, on a massive scale requires sophisticated state of the art technologies which have size limitations. In contrast, simple shaped structures, such as spherical particles, can be synthesized massively using chemical methods with relative ease at low costs. In this work, simple microswimmers were fabricated by conjugating two microbeads with debris attached to their surface. The debris allow the 2-bead structures to have two or more planes of symmetry, thus, allowing them to swim in bulk fluid at low Reynolds number. The microswimmers are magnetically actuated and controlled via a rotating magnetic field generated by an electromagnetic coil system. The microswimmers' velocity profiles had been characterized with respect to increasing rotating frequency. Furthermore, the motion of the microswimmers were analyzed using image processing. Finally, their swimming capability had been shown through experiments by steering the microswimmers in any desired direction.

  5. The Simple Spectral Access protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolensky, Markus; Tody, Doug

    2004-09-01

    The goal of the Simple Spectral Access (SSA) specification is to define a uniform interface to spectral data including spectral energy distributions (SEDs), 1D spectra, and time series data. In contrast to 2D images, spectra are stored in a wide variety of formats and there is no widely used standard in astronomy for representing spectral data, hence part of the challenge of specifying SSA was defining a general spectrophotometric data model as well as definitions of standard serializations in a variety of data formats including XML and FITS. Access is provided to both atlas (pre-computed) data and to virtual data which is computed on demand. The term simple in Simple Spectrum Access refers to the design goal of simplicity in both implementing spectral data services and in retrieving spectroscopic data from distributed data collections. SSA is a product of the data access layer (DAL) working group of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). The requirements were derived from a survey among spectral data providers and data consumers and were further refined in a broad discussion in meetings and electronic forums as well as by prototyping efforts within the European Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) and the US National Virtual Observatory (NVO).

  6. A simple microfluidic assay for the detection of ligation product.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Jingjing; Roebelen, Johann; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-02-01

    We present a novel microfluidic-based approach to detect ligation products. The conformal specificity of ligases is used in various molecular assays to detect point mutations. Traditional methods of detecting ligation products include denaturing gel electrophoresis, sequence amplification, and melting curve analysis. Gel electrophoresis is a labor- and time-intensive process, while sequence amplification and melting curve analysis require instruments capable of accurate thermal ramping and sensitive optical detection. Microfluidics has been widely applied in genomics, proteomics, and cell cytometry to enable rapid and automated assays. We designed an assay that fluorogenically detects ligation products following a simple magnetic separation through a microfluidic channel. 100 nM of synthetic HIV-1 K103N minority mutant templates were successfully detected in 30 min. This simple and rapid method can be coupled with any ligation assay for the detection of ligation products.

  7. Contrasting Sequence Groups by Emerging Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Kang; Zaïane, Osmar R.

    Group comparison per se is a fundamental task in many scientific endeavours but is also the basis of any classifier. Contrast sets and emerging patterns contrast between groups of categorical data. Comparing groups of sequence data is a relevant task in many applications. We define Emerging Sequences (ESs) as subsequences that are frequent in sequences of one group and less frequent in the sequences of another, and thus distinguishing or contrasting sequences of different classes. There are two challenges to distinguish sequence classes: the extraction of ESs is not trivially efficient and only exact matches of sequences are considered. In our work we address those problems by a suffix tree-based framework and a similar matching mechanism. We propose a classifier based on Emerging Sequences. Evaluating against two learning algorithms based on frequent subsequences and exact matching subsequences, the experiments on two datasets show that our model outperforms the baseline approaches by up to 20% in prediction accuracy.

  8. Sequence Factorization with Multiple References

    PubMed Central

    Wandelt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The success of high-throughput sequencing has lead to an increasing number of projects which sequence large populations of a species. Storage and analysis of sequence data is a key challenge in these projects, because of the sheer size of the datasets. Compression is one simple technology to deal with this challenge. Referential factorization and compression schemes, which store only the differences between input sequence and a reference sequence, gained lots of interest in this field. Highly-similar sequences, e.g., Human genomes, can be compressed with a compression ratio of 1,000:1 and more, up to two orders of magnitude better than with standard compression techniques. Recently, it was shown that the compression against multiple references from the same species can boost the compression ratio up to 4,000:1. However, a detailed analysis of using multiple references is lacking, e.g., for main memory consumption and optimality. In this paper, we describe one key technique for the referential compression against multiple references: The factorization of sequences. Based on the notion of an optimal factorization, we propose optimization heuristics and identify parameter settings which greatly influence 1) the size of the factorization, 2) the time for factorization, and 3) the required amount of main memory. We evaluate a total of 30 setups with a varying number of references on data from three different species. Our results show a wide range of factorization sizes (optimal to an overhead of up to 300%), factorization speed (0.01 MB/s to more than 600 MB/s), and main memory usage (few dozen MB to dozens of GB). Based on our evaluation, we identify the best configurations for common use cases. Our evaluation shows that multi-reference factorization is much better than single-reference factorization. PMID:26422374

  9. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    SciTech Connect

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  10. What Is a Simple Liquid?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond S.; Schrøder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to identify the real essence of simplicity of liquids in John Locke’s understanding of the term. Simple liquids are traditionally defined as many-body systems of classical particles interacting via radially symmetric pair potentials. We suggest that a simple liquid should be defined instead by the property of having strong correlations between virial and potential-energy equilibrium fluctuations in the NVT ensemble. There is considerable overlap between the two definitions, but also some notable differences. For instance, in the new definition simplicity is not a direct property of the intermolecular potential because a liquid is usually only strongly correlating in part of its phase diagram. Moreover, not all simple liquids are atomic (i.e., with radially symmetric pair potentials) and not all atomic liquids are simple. The main part of the paper motivates the new definition of liquid simplicity by presenting evidence that a liquid is strongly correlating if and only if its intermolecular interactions may be ignored beyond the first coordination shell (FCS). This is demonstrated by NVT simulations of the structure and dynamics of several atomic and three molecular model liquids with a shifted-forces cutoff placed at the first minimum of the radial distribution function. The liquids studied are inverse power-law systems (r-n pair potentials with n=18,6,4), Lennard-Jones (LJ) models (the standard LJ model, two generalized Kob-Andersen binary LJ mixtures, and the Wahnstrom binary LJ mixture), the Buckingham model, the Dzugutov model, the LJ Gaussian model, the Gaussian core model, the Hansen-McDonald molten salt model, the Lewis-Wahnstrom ortho-terphenyl model, the asymmetric dumbbell model, and the single-point charge water model. The final part of the paper summarizes properties of strongly correlating liquids, emphasizing that these are simpler than liquids in general. Simple liquids, as defined here, may be characterized in three quite

  11. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA

    PubMed Central

    Heather, James M.; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way. PMID:26554401

  12. Invariants of simple gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassiola, Aggeliki; Kovner, Israel

    1995-01-01

    We present approximate tests which can be applied to a newly observed quadruple QSO, or to a quadruplet of extended objects distorted by a foreground cluster of galaxies. These tests indicate whether the responsible gravitational lens may have a simple mass distribution. If the lens galaxy is detected, the tests give an approximate orientation for it, which can be compared with the observed orientation of the galaxy. The tests do not require construction of an explicit lens model, and therefore can save time and effort. In the case of many objects distorted by a cluster, these diagnostics can help to select possible quadruplet candidates.

  13. Simple simulations of DNA condensation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, M J

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored coulombic structure is a charge-ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomenon and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong. PMID:11159388

  14. Simple Simulations of DNA Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-07-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored Coulombic structure is a charge ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomena and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong.

  15. Paradox of simple limiter control.

    PubMed

    Hilker, Frank M; Westerhoff, Frank H

    2006-05-01

    Chaos control by simple limiters is an easy-to-implement and effective method of stabilizing irregular fluctuations. Here we show that applying limiter control to a state variable can significantly shift its mean value. In many situations, this is a countereffective as well as unexpected result, when the aim of control is also to restrict the dynamics. We discuss this effect on the basis of a model of population dynamics and conclude that it can have severe implications for the management of pest species and epidemic spread.

  16. Controlling chaos with simple limiters

    PubMed

    Corron; Pethel; Hopper

    2000-04-24

    New experimental results demonstrate that chaos control can be accomplished using controllers that are very simple relative to the system being controlled. Chaotic dynamics in a driven pendulum and a double scroll circuit are controlled using an adjustable, passive limiter-a weight for the pendulum and a diode for the circuit. For both experiments, multiple unstable periodic orbits are selectively controlled using minimal perturbations. These physical examples suggest that chaos control can be practically applied to a much wider array of important problems than initially thought possible.

  17. Multimodal sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Kemény, Ferenc; Meier, Beat

    2016-02-01

    While sequence learning research models complex phenomena, previous studies have mostly focused on unimodal sequences. The goal of the current experiment is to put implicit sequence learning into a multimodal context: to test whether it can operate across different modalities. We used the Task Sequence Learning paradigm to test whether sequence learning varies across modalities, and whether participants are able to learn multimodal sequences. Our results show that implicit sequence learning is very similar regardless of the source modality. However, the presence of correlated task and response sequences was required for learning to take place. The experiment provides new evidence for implicit sequence learning of abstract conceptual representations. In general, the results suggest that correlated sequences are necessary for implicit sequence learning to occur. Moreover, they show that elements from different modalities can be automatically integrated into one unitary multimodal sequence.

  18. Capture zones for simple aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McElwee, Carl D.

    1991-01-01

    Capture zones showing the area influenced by a well within a certain time are useful for both aquifer protection and cleanup. If hydrodynamic dispersion is neglected, a deterministic curve defines the capture zone. Analytical expressions for the capture zones can be derived for simple aquifers. However, the capture zone equations are transcendental and cannot be explicitly solved for the coordinates of the capture zone boundary. Fortunately, an iterative scheme allows the solution to proceed quickly and efficiently even on a modest personal computer. Three forms of the analytical solution must be used in an iterative scheme to cover the entire region of interest, after the extreme values of the x coordinate are determined by an iterative solution. The resulting solution is a discrete one, and usually 100-1000 intervals along the x-axis are necessary for a smooth definition of the capture zone. The presented program is written in FORTRAN and has been used in a variety of computing environments. No graphics capability is included with the program; it is assumed the user has access to a commercial package. The superposition of capture zones for multiple wells is expected to be satisfactory if the spacing is not too close. Because this program deals with simple aquifers, the results rarely will be the final word in a real application.

  19. A Simple Theory for Waterspouts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennó, Nilton O.; Bluestein, Howard B.

    2001-04-01

    It is shown that the simple thermodynamic theory for dust devils, proposed by Rennó et al., also applies to waterspouts. The theory is based on the thermodynamics of heat engines and predicts the central pressure and the wind speed of these convective vortices. Moreover, it provides a simple physical interpretation of their general characteristics. In particular, the heat engine theory shows that convective vortices are more likely to form in the regions where the occurrence of the warmest and moistest updrafts and the coldest and driest downdrafts are supported by the local environment. These are the regions where both the heat input into the convective heat engine is maximum and the solenoidal generation of vorticity is the greatest. This explains why waterspouts are frequently observed near the boundaries between relatively warm and relatively cold waters. Moreover, since the work done by the convective heat engine is equal to the total heat input multiplied by the thermodynamic efficiency, the theory shows that another necessary condition for the formation of intense vortices is the presence of intense convection.

  20. Assembly of simple icosahedral viruses.

    PubMed

    Almendral, José M

    2013-01-01

    Icosahedral viruses exhibit elegant pathways of capsid assembly and maturation regulated by symmetry principles. Assembly is a dynamic process driven by consecutive and genetically programmed morphogenetic interactions between protein subunits. The non-symmetric capsid subunits are gathered by hydrophobic contacts and non-covalent interactions in assembly intermediates, which serve as blocks to build a symmetric capsid. In some cases, non-symmetric interactions among intermediates are involved in assembly, highlighting the remarkable capacity of capsid proteins to fold into demanding conformations compatible with a closed protein shell. In this chapter, the morphogenesis of structurally simple icosahedral viruses, including representative members of the parvoviruses, picornaviruses or polyomaviruses as paradigms, is described in some detail. Icosahedral virus assembly may occur in different subcellular compartments and involve a panoplia of cellular and viral factors, chaperones, and protein modifications that, in general, are still poorly characterized. Mechanisms of viral genome encapsidation may imply direct interactions between the genome and the assembly intermediates, or active packaging into a preformed empty capsid. High stability of intermediates and proteolytic cleavages during viral maturation usually contribute to the overall irreversible character of the assembly process. These and other simple icosahedral viruses were pioneer models to understand basic principles of virus assembly, continue to be leading subjects of morphogenetic analyses, and have inspired ongoing studies on the assembly of larger viruses and cellular and synthetic macromolecular complexes.

  1. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    DOEpatents

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  2. A simple image display application for windows.

    PubMed

    Conrad, G R

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple application for displaying low-to-moderate resolution digital images under the Windows operating environment. The display of scintigraphic images was of special interest, and for this reason the program was designed to show sequences of images and to account for broad ranges of pixel values. In order to function under a variety of Windows versions, the program was developed using the 16-bit Microsoft C +2 compiler and targeted for Windows 3.1 enhanced. It was tested with Trionix images for nuclear medicine and Siemens for computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). The resulting application, called SID, successfully read Magnetom, Somatom, Trionix, and Interfile images of dimension 512 or less on Intel-based Windows PCs with 256 color SVGA-compatible (Super Video Graphics Adapters) video hardware. Early applications of the program included remote monitoring of image studies, resident review of teaching cases, review of research images, and preparation of educational materials. This article describes the features, operation, and potential applications of SID.

  3. Simple thermodynamics of jet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrício, Pedro; Tavares, José M.

    2010-08-01

    We use the first and second laws of thermodynamics to analyze the behavior of an ideal jet engine. Simple analytical expressions for the thermal efficiency, the overall efficiency, and the reduced thrust are derived. We show that the thermal efficiency depends only on the compression ratio r and on the velocity of the aircraft. The other two performance measures depend also on the ratio of the temperature at the turbine to the inlet temperature in the engine, T3/Ti. An analysis of these expressions shows that it is not possible to choose an optimal set of values of r and T3/Ti that maximize both the overall efficiency and thrust. We study how irreversibilities in the compressor and the turbine decrease the overall efficiency of jet engines and show that this effect is more pronounced for smaller T3/Ti.

  4. Simple Method for Culturing Anaerobes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C. E.; Hunter, W. J.; Ryan, J. L.; Braude, A. I.

    1973-01-01

    A simple, effective method is needed for growing obligate anaerobes in the clinical laboratory. This report describes a pre-reduced anaerobic bottle that can be taken to the bedside for direct inoculation, provides a flat agar surface for evaluation of number and morphology of colonies, and can be incubated in conventional bacteriological incubators. Each anaerobic culture set consisted of two bottles containing brain heart infusion agar and CO2. Gentamicin sulfate (50 μg/ml) was added to one of these to inhibit facultative enteric bacilli. Comparison of the anaerobic bottles with an identical aerobic bottle which was also routinely inoculated permitted early identification of anaerobic colonies. Representative species of most anaerobic genera of proven pathogenicity for man have been isolated from this system during 10 months of routine use. Images PMID:4571657

  5. A Glance at Microsatellite Motifs from 454 Sequencing Reads of Watermelon Genomic DNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A single 454 (Life Sciences Sequencing Technology) run of Charleston Gray watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) genomic DNA was performed and sequence data were assembled. A large scale identification of simple sequence repeat (SSR) was performed and SSR sequence data were used for the develo...

  6. Visible periodicity of strong nucleosome DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Salih, Bilal; Tripathi, Vijay; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, Lowary and Widom assembled nucleosomes on synthetic random sequence DNA molecules, selected the strongest nucleosomes and discovered that the TA dinucleotides in these strong nucleosome sequences often appear at 10-11 bases from one another or at distances which are multiples of this period. We repeated this experiment computationally, on large ensembles of natural genomic sequences, by selecting the strongest nucleosomes--i.e. those with such distances between like-named dinucleotides, multiples of 10.4 bases, the structural and sequence period of nucleosome DNA. The analysis confirmed the periodicity of TA dinucleotides in the strong nucleosomes, and revealed as well other periodic sequence elements, notably classical AA and TT dinucleotides. The matrices of DNA bendability and their simple linear forms--nucleosome positioning motifs--are calculated from the strong nucleosome DNA sequences. The motifs are in full accord with nucleosome positioning sequences derived earlier, thus confirming that the new technique, indeed, detects strong nucleosomes. Species- and isochore-specific variations of the matrices and of the positioning motifs are demonstrated. The strong nucleosome DNA sequences manifest the highest hitherto nucleosome positioning sequence signals, showing the dinucleotide periodicities in directly observable rather than in hidden form.

  7. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jennings, T N; Knaus, B J; Mullins, T D; Haig, S M; Cronn, R C

    2011-11-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356,958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5 M (USD).

  8. Multiplexed microsatellite recovery using massively parallel sequencing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, T.N.; Knaus, B.J.; Mullins, T.D.; Haig, S.M.; Cronn, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    Conservation and management of natural populations requires accurate and inexpensive genotyping methods. Traditional microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR), marker analysis remains a popular genotyping method because of the comparatively low cost of marker development, ease of analysis and high power of genotype discrimination. With the availability of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), it is now possible to sequence microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries in multiplex pools. To test this approach, we prepared seven microsatellite-enriched, barcoded genomic libraries from diverse taxa (two conifer trees, five birds) and sequenced these on one lane of the Illumina Genome Analyzer using paired-end 80-bp reads. In this experiment, we screened 6.1 million sequences and identified 356958 unique microreads that contained di- or trinucleotide microsatellites. Examination of four species shows that our conversion rate from raw sequences to polymorphic markers compares favourably to Sanger- and 454-based methods. The advantage of multiplexed MPS is that the staggering capacity of modern microread sequencing is spread across many libraries; this reduces sample preparation and sequencing costs to less than $400 (USD) per species. This price is sufficiently low that microsatellite libraries could be prepared and sequenced for all 1373 organisms listed as 'threatened' and 'endangered' in the United States for under $0.5M (USD).

  9. De novo sequencing of highly modified therapeutic oligonucleotides by hydrophobic tag sequencing coupled with LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Goto, R; Miyakawa, S; Inomata, E; Takami, T; Yamaura, J; Nakamura, Y

    2017-02-01

    Correct sequences are prerequisite for quality control of therapeutic oligonucleotides. However, there is no definitive method available for determining sequences of highly modified therapeutic RNAs, and thereby, most of the oligonucleotides have been used clinically without direct sequence determination. In this study, we developed a novel sequencing method called 'hydrophobic tag sequencing'. Highly modified oligonucleotides are sequenced by partially digesting oligonucleotides conjugated with a 5'-hydrophobic tag, followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. 5'-Hydrophobic tag-printed fragments (5'-tag degradates) can be separated in order of their molecular masses from tag-free oligonucleotides by reversed-phase liquid chromatography. As models for the sequencing, the anti-VEGF aptamer (Macugen) and the highly modified 38-mer RNA sequences were analyzed under blind conditions. Most nucleotides were identified from the molecular weight of hydrophobic 5'-tag degradates calculated from monoisotopic mass in simple full mass data. When monoisotopic mass could not be assigned, the nucleotide was estimated using the molecular weight of the most abundant mass. The sequences of Macugen and 38-mer RNA perfectly matched the theoretical sequences. The hydrophobic tag sequencing worked well to obtain simple full mass data, resulting in accurate and clear sequencing. The present study provides for the first time a de novo sequencing technology for highly modified RNAs and contributes to quality control of therapeutic oligonucleotides. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. MRO Sequence Checking Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladden, Roy; Khanampornpan, Teerapat

    2008-01-01

    The MRO Sequence Checking Tool program, mro_check, automates significant portions of the MRO (Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter) sequence checking procedure. Though MRO has similar checks to the ODY s (Mars Odyssey) Mega Check tool, the checks needed for MRO are unique to the MRO spacecraft. The MRO sequence checking tool automates the majority of the sequence validation procedure and check lists that are used to validate the sequences generated by MRO MPST (mission planning and sequencing team). The tool performs more than 50 different checks on the sequence. The automation varies from summarizing data about the sequence needed for visual verification of the sequence, to performing automated checks on the sequence and providing a report for each step. To allow for the addition of new checks as needed, this tool is built in a modular fashion.

  11. Two Simple Models for Fracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Jaren Quinn

    Recent developments in fracking have enable the recovery of oil and gas from tight shale reservoirs. These developments have also made fracking one of the most controversial environmental issues in the United States. Despite the growing controversy surrounding fracking, there is relatively little publicly available research. This dissertation introduces two simple models for fracking that were developed using techniques from non-linear and statistical physics. The first model assumes that the volume of induced fractures must be equal to the volume of injected fluid. For simplicity, these fractures are assumed to form a spherically symmetric damage region around the borehole. The predicted volumes of water necessary to create a damage region with a given radius are in good agreement with reported values. The second model is a modification of invasion percolation which was previously introduced to model water flooding. The reservoir rock is represented by a regular lattice of local traps that contain oil and/or gas separated by rock barriers. The barriers are assumed to be highly heterogeneous and are assigned random strengths. Fluid is injected from a central site and the weakest rock barrier breaks allowing fluid to flow into the adjacent site. The process repeats with the weakest barrier breaking and fluid flowing to an adjacent site each time step. Extensive numerical simulations were carried out to obtain statistical properties of the growing fracture network. The network was found to be fractal with fractal dimensions differing slightly from the accepted values for traditional percolation. Additionally, the network follows Horton-Strahler and Tokunaga branching statistics which have been used to characterize river networks. As with other percolation models, the growth of the network occurs in bursts. These bursts follow a power-law size distribution similar to observed microseismic events. Reservoir stress anisotropy is incorporated into the model by assigning

  12. Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth Clinicians: Please make as many copies of this ... Philadelphia, for authoring “Simple Solutions for Treating Dry Mouth.” Ask your family doctor to discontinue or provide ...

  13. A Simple Demonstration Model of Osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Joseph G.

    1999-01-01

    A simple device constructed from a wire screen, a large beaker, beans, and oats is described. It provides a simple and effective visual model of the phenomenon of osmosis and, by extension, the origin of other colligative properties of solutions.

  14. The properties of probabilistic simple regular sticker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2015-10-01

    A mathematical model for DNA computing using the recombination behavior of DNA molecules, known as a sticker system, has been introduced in 1998. In sticker system, the sticker operation is based on the Watson-Crick complementary feature of DNA molecules. The computation of sticker system starts from an incomplete double-stranded sequence. Then by iterative sticking operations, a complete double-stranded sequence is obtained. It is known that sticker systems with finite sets of axioms and sticker rule (including the simple regular sticker system) generate only regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions have been considered to increase the computational power of the languages generated by the sticker systems. In this paper, we study the properties of probabilistic simple regular sticker systems. In this variant of sticker system, probabilities are associated with the axioms, and the probability of a generated string is computed by multiplying the probabilities of all occurrences of the initial strings. The language are selected according to some probabilistic requirements. We prove that the probabilistic enhancement increases the computational power of simple regular sticker systems.

  15. Asymptotics of Simple Branching Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huillet, Thierry; Kłopotowski, Andrzej; Porzio, Anna

    1995-09-01

    In this paper we study a simple deterministic tree structure: an initial individual generates a finite number of offspring, each of which has given integer valued lifetime, iterating the same procedure when dying. Three asymptotic distributions of this asynchronous deterministic branching procedure are considered: the generation distribution, the ability of individuals to generate offspring and the age distribution. Thermodynamic formalism is then developped to reveal the multifractal nature of the mass splitting associated to our process. On considère l'itération d'une structure déterministe arborescente selon laquelle un ancêtre engendre un nombre fini de descendants dont la durée de vie (à valeurs entières) est donnée. Dans un premier temps on s'intéresse aux trois distributions asymptotiques suivantes : répartition des générations, aptitude à engendrer des descendants et répartition selon l'âge. Ensuite nous développons le formalisme thermodynamique pour mettre en évidence le caractère multifractal de la scission d'une masse unitaire associée à cette arborescence.

  16. Simple molecules as complex systems

    PubMed Central

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Árendás, Péter; Mellau, Georg; Császár, Attila G.

    2014-01-01

    For individual molecules quantum mechanics (QM) offers a simple, natural and elegant way to build large-scale complex networks: quantized energy levels are the nodes, allowed transitions among the levels are the links, and transition intensities supply the weights. QM networks are intrinsic properties of molecules and they are characterized experimentally via spectroscopy; thus, realizations of QM networks are called spectroscopic networks (SN). As demonstrated for the rovibrational states of H216O, the molecule governing the greenhouse effect on earth through hundreds of millions of its spectroscopic transitions (links), both the measured and first-principles computed one-photon absorption SNs containing experimentally accessible transitions appear to have heavy-tailed degree distributions. The proposed novel view of high-resolution spectroscopy and the observed degree distributions have important implications: appearance of a core of highly interconnected hubs among the nodes, a generally disassortative connection preference, considerable robustness and error tolerance, and an “ultra-small-world” property. The network-theoretical view of spectroscopy offers a data reduction facility via a minimum-weight spanning tree approach, which can assist high-resolution spectroscopists to improve the efficiency of the assignment of their measured spectra. PMID:24722221

  17. Simple model for ablative stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    1992-11-01

    We present a simple analytic model for ablative stablization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In this model the effect of ablation is to move the peak of the perturbations to the location of peak pressure. This mechanism enhances the density-gradient stabilization, which is effective at short wavelengths, and it also enhances the stabilization of long-wavelength perturbations due to finite shell thickness. We consider the following density profile: exponential blowoff plasma with a density gradient β, followed by a constant-density shell of thickness δt. For perturbations of arbitrary wave number k, we present an explicit expression for the growth rate γ as a function of k, β, and δt. We find that ``thick'' shells defined by β δt>=1 have γ2>=0 for any k, while ``thin'' shells defined by β δt<1 can have γ2<0 for small k, reflecting stability by proximity to the back side of the shell. We also present lasnex simulations that are in good agreement with our analytic formulas.

  18. Independent planning of timing and sequencing for complex movements.

    PubMed

    Maslovat, Dana; Chua, Romeo; Klapp, Stuart T; Franks, Ian M

    2016-08-01

    The current studies examined the processes involved in response sequencing and timing initiation for complex, multiple-component movements. Participants performed a 3 key-press sequence in simple and choice reaction time (RT) paradigms (Experiment 1), or a study time paradigm that allowed the participants to control the foreperiod delay, which is thought to reflect advance preparation duration (Experiment 2). Sequencing complexity was manipulated by using either the same hand and effector for all key presses (low complexity) or different hands/effectors across key presses (high complexity) while timing initiation complexity was manipulated by using either an isochronous (low complexity) or nonisochronous (high complexity) timing pattern. Increasing sequencing complexity had little effect on simple RT but increased participant-controlled foreperiod delay (i.e., study time). Conversely, increasing timing initiation complexity had no effect on foreperiod delay but increased simple RT. These results provide compelling evidence that in a simple RT paradigm, sequencing preparation is performed during the foreperiod while preparation of timing initiation is delayed until the RT interval. Furthermore, choice RT increased with sequencing complexity and was relatively unaffected by timing initiation complexity, indicative of sequencing preparation occurring during the choice RT interval and preparation of timing initiation occurring online. Collectively, the data indicate a dissociation and independence of the preparation of timing initiation and sequencing for complex movements. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Fractal analysis of DNA sequence data

    SciTech Connect

    Berthelsen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequence databases are growing at an almost exponential rate. New analysis methods are needed to extract knowledge about the organization of nucleotides from this vast amount of data. Fractal analysis is a new scientific paradigm that has been used successfully in many domains including the biological and physical sciences. Biological growth is a nonlinear dynamic process and some have suggested that to consider fractal geometry as a biological design principle may be most productive. This research is an exploratory study of the application of fractal analysis to DNA sequence data. A simple random fractal, the random walk, is used to represent DNA sequences. The fractal dimension of these walks is then estimated using the [open quote]sandbox method[close quote]. Analysis of 164 human DNA sequences compared to three types of control sequences (random, base-content matched, and dimer-content matched) reveals that long-range correlations are present in DNA that are not explained by base or dimer frequencies. The study also revealed that the fractal dimension of coding sequences was significantly lower than sequences that were primarily noncoding, indicating the presence of longer-range correlations in functional sequences. The multifractal spectrum is used to analyze fractals that are heterogeneous and have a different fractal dimension for subsets with different scalings. The multifractal spectrum of the random walks of twelve mitochondrial genome sequences was estimated. Eight vertebrate mtDNA sequences had uniformly lower spectra values than did four invertebrate mtDNA sequences. Thus, vertebrate mitochondria show significantly longer-range correlations than to invertebrate mitochondria. The higher multifractal spectra values for invertebrate mitochondria suggest a more random organization of the sequences. This research also includes considerable theoretical work on the effects of finite size, embedding dimension, and scaling ranges.

  20. On simple Shamsuddin derivations in two variables.

    PubMed

    Baltazar, Rene

    2016-01-01

    We study the subgroup of k -automorphisms of k ⁢ [ x , y ] which commute with a simple derivation d of k ⁢ [ x , y ] . We prove, for instance, that this subgroup is trivial when d is a shamsuddin simple derivation. in the general case of simple derivations, we obtain properties for the elements of this subgroup.

  1. SSL - THE SIMPLE SOCKETS LIBRARY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Simple Sockets Library (SSL) allows C programmers to develop systems of cooperating programs using Berkeley streaming Sockets running under the TCP/IP protocol over Ethernet. The SSL provides a simple way to move information between programs running on the same or different machines and does so with little overhead. The SSL can create three types of Sockets: namely a server, a client, and an accept Socket. The SSL's Sockets are designed to be used in a fashion reminiscent of the use of FILE pointers so that a C programmer who is familiar with reading and writing files will immediately feel comfortable with reading and writing with Sockets. The SSL consists of three parts: the library, PortMaster, and utilities. The user of the SSL accesses it by linking programs to the SSL library. The PortMaster initializes connections between clients and servers. The PortMaster also supports a "firewall" facility to keep out socket requests from unapproved machines. The "firewall" is a file which contains Internet addresses for all approved machines. There are three utilities provided with the SSL. SKTDBG can be used to debug programs that make use of the SSL. SPMTABLE lists the servers and port numbers on requested machine(s). SRMSRVR tells the PortMaster to forcibly remove a server name from its list. The package also includes two example programs: multiskt.c, which makes multiple accepts on one server, and sktpoll.c, which repeatedly attempts to connect a client to some server at one second intervals. SSL is a machine independent library written in the C-language for computers connected via Ethernet using the TCP/IP protocol. It has been successfully compiled and implemented on a variety of platforms, including Sun series computers running SunOS, DEC VAX series computers running VMS, SGI computers running IRIX, DECstations running ULTRIX, DEC alpha AXPs running OSF/1, IBM RS/6000 computers running AIX, IBM PC and compatibles running BSD/386 UNIX and HP Apollo 3000

  2. Colligative properties of simple solutions.

    PubMed

    Andrews, F C

    1976-11-05

    Vapor pressure lowering, osmotic pressure, boiling point elevation, and freezing point depression are all related quantitatively to the decrease in micro(1)(soln) upon the addition of solute in forming a solution. In any equilibrium system, regardless of whether it is in a gravitational field or whether it contains walls, semipermeable membranes, phase transitions, or solutes, all equilibria are maintained locally, in the small region of the equilibrium, by the equality of micro(1)(soln). If there are several subsystems in a gravitational field, at any fixed height, microi will have the same value in each subsystem into which substance i can get, and microi + M(i)gh is constant throughout the entire system. In a solution, there is no mechanism by which solvent and solute molecules could sustain different pressures. Both the solvent and solute are always under identical pressures in a region of solution, namely, the pressure of the solution in that region. Since nature does not know which component we call the solvent and which the solute, equations should be symmetric in the two (acknowledging that the nonvolatile component, if any, is commonly chosen to be solute). Simple molecular pictures illustrate what is happening to cause pressure (positive or negative) in liquids, vapor pressure of liquids, and the various colligative properties of solutions. The only effect of solute involved in these properties is that it dilutes the solvent, with the resulting increase in S and decrease in micro(1)(soln). Water can be driven passively up a tree to enormous heights by the difference between its chemical potential in the roots and the ambient air. There is nothing mysterious about the molecular bases for any of these phenomena. Biologists can use the well-understood pictures of these phenomena with confidence to study what is happening in the complicated living systems they consider.

  3. The Connell Sum Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullington, Grady D.

    2007-01-01

    The Connell sum sequence refers to the partial sums of the Connell sequence. In this paper, the Connell sequence, Connell sum sequence and generalizations from Iannucci and Mills-Taylor are interpreted as sums of elements of triangles, relating them to polygonal number-stuttered arithmetic progressions. The n-th element of the Connell sum sequence is established as a sharp upper bound for the value of a gamma-labeling of a graph of size n. The limiting behavior and a explicit formula for the Connell (m,r)-sum sequence are also given.

  4. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  5. A simple model for strong ground motions and response spectra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Mueller, Charles; Boatwright, John

    1988-01-01

    A simple model for the description of strong ground motions is introduced. The model shows that response spectra can be estimated by using only four parameters of the ground motion, the RMS acceleration, effective duration and two corner frequencies that characterize the effective frequency band of the motion. The model is windowed band-limited white noise, and is developed by studying the properties of two functions, cumulative squared acceleration in the time domain, and cumulative squared amplitude spectrum in the frequency domain. Applying the methods of random vibration theory, the model leads to a simple analytical expression for the response spectra. The accuracy of the model is checked by using the ground motion recordings from the aftershock sequences of two different earthquakes and simulated accelerograms. The results show that the model gives a satisfactory estimate of the response spectra.

  6. Morphometric analysis of a fresh simple crater on the Moon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, V.; Ninfo, A.; Massironi, M.; Martellato, E.; Cremonese, G.

    In this research we are proposing an innovative method to determine and quantify the morphology of a simple fresh impact crater. Linné is a well preserved impact crater of 2.2 km in diameter, located at 27.7oN 11.8oE, near the western edge of Mare Serenitatis on the Moon. The crater was photographed by the Lunar Orbiter and the Apollo space missions. Its particular morphology may place Linné as the most striking example of small fresh simple crater. Morphometric analysis, conducted on recent high resolution DTM from LROC (NASA), quantitatively confirmed the pristine morphology of the crater, revealing a clear inner layering which highlight a sequence of lava emplacement events.

  7. Female-specific DNA sequences in geese.

    PubMed

    Huang, M C; Lin, W C; Horng, Y M; Rouvier, R; Huang, C W

    2003-07-01

    1. The OPAE random primers (Operon Technologies, Inc., CA) were used for random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting in Chinese, White Roman and Landaise geese. One of these primers, OPAE-06, produced a 938-bp sex-specific fragment in all females and in no males of Chinese geese only. 2. A novel female-specific DNA sequence in Chinese goose was cloned and sequenced. Two primers, CGSex-F and CGSex-R, were designed in order to amplify a 912-bp sex-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment on genomic DNA from female geese. 3. It was shown that a simple and effective PCR-based sexing technique could be used in the three goose breeds studied. 4. Nucleotide sequencing of the sex-specific fragments in White Roman and Landaise geese was performed and sequence differences were observed among these three breeds.

  8. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  9. A simple second-order digital phase-locked loop.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegnelia, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    A simple second-order digital phase-locked loop has been designed for the Viking Orbiter 1975 command system. Excluding analog-to-digital conversion, implementation of the loop requires only an adder/subtractor, two registers, and a correctable counter with control logic. The loop considers only the polarity of phase error and corrects system clocks according to a filtered sequence of this polarity. The loop is insensitive to input gain variation, and therefore offers the advantage of stable performance over long life. Predictable performance is guaranteed by extreme reliability of acquisition, yet in the steady state the loop produces only a slight degradation with respect to analog loop performance.

  10. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-02-20

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  11. Cellulases and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides three fungal cellulases, their coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the cellulase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present cellulases are from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  12. Sequence information signal processor

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, John C.; Chow, Edward T.; Waterman, Michael S.; Hunkapillar, Timothy J.

    1999-01-01

    An electronic circuit is used to compare two sequences, such as genetic sequences, to determine which alignment of the sequences produces the greatest similarity. The circuit includes a linear array of series-connected processors, each of which stores a single element from one of the sequences and compares that element with each successive element in the other sequence. For each comparison, the processor generates a scoring parameter that indicates which segment ending at those two elements produces the greatest degree of similarity between the sequences. The processor uses the scoring parameter to generate a similar scoring parameter for a comparison between the stored element and the next successive element from the other sequence. The processor also delivers the scoring parameter to the next processor in the array for use in generating a similar scoring parameter for another pair of elements. The electronic circuit determines which processor and alignment of the sequences produce the scoring parameter with the highest value.

  13. Nonparametric Combinatorial Sequence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wauthier, Fabian L.; Jordan, Michael I.; Jojic, Nebojsa

    This work considers biological sequences that exhibit combinatorial structures in their composition: groups of positions of the aligned sequences are "linked" and covary as one unit across sequences. If multiple such groups exist, complex interactions can emerge between them. Sequences of this kind arise frequently in biology but methodologies for analyzing them are still being developed. This paper presents a nonparametric prior on sequences which allows combinatorial structures to emerge and which induces a posterior distribution over factorized sequence representations. We carry out experiments on three sequence datasets which indicate that combinatorial structures are indeed present and that combinatorial sequence models can more succinctly describe them than simpler mixture models. We conclude with an application to MHC binding prediction which highlights the utility of the posterior distribution induced by the prior. By integrating out the posterior our method compares favorably to leading binding predictors.

  14. Roles of repetitive sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  15. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  16. Precise Editing of the Zebrafish Genome Made Simple and Efficient

    PubMed Central

    Hoshijima, Kazuyuki; Jurynec, Michael J.; Grunwald, David Jonah

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY We present simple and efficient methods for creating heritable modifications of the zebrafish genome. Precisely modified alleles are generated by homologous recombination between the host genome and dsDNA donor molecules, stimulated by the induction of chromosomally targeted DSBs. Several kilobase-long tracts of genome sequence can be replaced. Tagging donor sequences with reporter genes that can be subsequently excised improves recovery of edited alleles by an order of magnitude and facilitates recovery of recessive and phenotypically silent conditional mutations. We generate and demonstrate functionality of: i) alleles with a single codon change, ii) an allele encoding an epitope-tagged version of an endogenous protein, iii) alleles expressing reporter proteins, and iv) a conditional allele in which an exon is flanked by recombinogenic loxP sites. Our methods make recovery of a broad range of genome editing events very practicable, significantly advancing applicability of the zebrafish for studying normal biological processes and modeling diseases. PMID:27003937

  17. Schur monotone decreasing sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganikhodjaev, Rasul; Saburov, Mansoor; Saburov, Khikmat

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce Schur monotone decreasing sequences in an n-dimensional space by considering a majorization pre-order. By means of down arrow mappings, we study omega limiting points of bounded Schur monotone decreasing sequences. We provide convergence criteria for such kinds of sequences. We prove that a Cesaro mean (or an arithmetic mean) of any bounded Schur monotone decreasing sequences converges to a unique limiting point.

  18. Viewing multiple sequence alignments with the JavaScript Sequence Alignment Viewer (JSAV).

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrew C R

    2014-01-01

    The JavaScript Sequence Alignment Viewer (JSAV) is designed as a simple-to-use JavaScript component for displaying sequence alignments on web pages. The display of sequences is highly configurable with options to allow alternative coloring schemes, sorting of sequences and 'dotifying' repeated amino acids. An option is also available to submit selected sequences to another web site, or to other JavaScript code. JSAV is implemented purely in JavaScript making use of the JQuery and JQuery-UI libraries. It does not use any HTML5-specific options to help with browser compatibility. The code is documented using JSDOC and is available from http://www.bioinf.org.uk/software/jsav/.

  19. Career Academy Course Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Thom; Lenz, Robert

    This career academy course sequence guide is designed to give teachers a quick overview of the course sequences of well-known career academy and career pathway programs from across the country. The guide presents a variety of sample course sequences for the following academy themes: (1) arts and communication; (2) business and finance; (3)…

  20. STAR: a simple TAL effector assembly reaction using isothermal assembly

    PubMed Central

    Gogolok, Sabine; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Pollard, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain modular programmable DNA binding domains. Fusing TALEs with effector domains creates synthetic transcription factors (TALE-TFs) or nucleases (TALENs), enabling precise gene manipulations. The construction of TALEs remains challenging due to their repetitive sequences. Here we report a simple TALE assembly reaction (STAR) that enables individual laboratories to generate multiple TALEs in a facile manner. STAR uses an isothermal assembly (‘Gibson assembly’) that is labour- and cost-effective, accessible, rapid and scalable. A small 68-part fragment library is employed, and the specific TALE repeat sequence is generated within ~8 hours. Sequence-verified TALENs or TALE-TF plasmids targeting 17 bp target sequences can be produced within three days, without the need for stepwise intermediate plasmid production. We demonstrate the utility of STAR through production of functional TALE-TFs capable of activating human SOX2 expression. STAR addresses some of the shortcomings of existing Golden Gate or solid-phase assembly protocols and enables routine production of TALE-TFs that will complement emerging CRISPR/Cas9-based reagents across diverse applications in mammalian stem cell and synthetic biology. PMID:27615025

  1. Low autocorrelation binary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packebusch, Tom; Mertens, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Binary sequences with minimal autocorrelations have applications in communication engineering, mathematics and computer science. In statistical physics they appear as groundstates of the Bernasconi model. Finding these sequences is a notoriously hard problem, that so far can be solved only by exhaustive search. We review recent algorithms and present a new algorithm that finds optimal sequences of length N in time O(N {1.73}N). We computed all optimal sequences for N≤slant 66 and all optimal skewsymmetric sequences for N≤slant 119.

  2. HIV Sequence Databases

    PubMed Central

    Kuiken, Carla; Korber, Bette; Shafer, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Two important databases are often used in HIV genetic research, the HIV Sequence Database in Los Alamos, which collects all sequences and focuses on annotation and data analysis, and the HIV RT/Protease Sequence Database in Stanford, which collects sequences associated with the development of viral resistance against anti-retroviral drugs and focuses on analysis of those sequences. The types of data and services these two databases offer, the tools they provide, and the way they are set up and operated are described in detail. PMID:12875108

  3. From deep sequencing to actual clones.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Sara; Kumar, Sandeep; Naranjo, Leslie; Ferrara, Fortunato; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2014-10-01

    The application of deep sequencing to in vitro display technologies has been invaluable for the straightforward analysis of enriched clones. After sequencing in vitro selected populations, clones are binned into identical or similar groups and ordered by abundance, allowing identification of those that are most enriched. However, the greatest strength of deep sequencing is also its greatest weakness: clones are easily identified by their DNA sequences, but are not physically available for testing without a laborious multistep process involving several rounds of polymerization chain reaction (PCR), assembly and cloning. Here, using the isolation of antibody genes from a phage and yeast display selection as an example, we show the power of a rapid and simple inverse PCR-based method to easily isolate clones identified by deep sequencing. Once primers have been received, clone isolation can be carried out in a single day, rather than two days. Furthermore the reduced number of PCRs required will reduce PCR mutations correspondingly. We have observed a 100% success rate in amplifying clones with an abundance as low as 0.5% in a polyclonal population. This approach allows us to obtain full-length clones even when an incomplete sequence is available, and greatly simplifies the subcloning process. Moreover, rarer, but functional clones missed by traditional screening can be easily isolated using this method, and the approach can be extended to any selected library (scFv, cDNA, libraries based on scaffold proteins) where a unique sequence signature for the desired clones of interest is available.

  4. Simple scale interpolator facilitates reading of graphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterman, D. E., Jr.

    1965-01-01

    Simple transparent overlay with interpolation scale facilitates accurate, rapid reading of graph coordinate points. This device can be used for enlarging drawings and locating points on perspective drawings.

  5. Substructure Discovery in Executed Action Sequences.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-16

    37 5.5. Representation of Macrops in PLAND ..................................... 40 6 SYSTEM DETA ILS...labels these chunks macro operators ( macrops ) [Fikes72]. Macro operators can be used by the ,. planning system to achieve greater efficiency the next...choice points in the path of execution of the macrop Sequences are simple blocks of actions that appear in many places of the observed action trace. These

  6. Applications of a simple characterization of human gait in surveillance.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yang; Zheng, Qinfen; Chellappa, Rama; Strat, Thomas M

    2010-08-01

    Applications of a simple spatiotemporal characterization of human gait in the surveillance domain are presented. The approach is based on decomposing a video sequence into x-t slices, which generate periodic patterns referred to as double helical signatures (DHSs). The features of DHS are given as follows: 1) they naturally encode the appearance and kinematics of human motion and reveal geometric symmetries and 2) they are effective and efficient for recovering gait parameters and detecting simple events. We present an iterative local curve embedding algorithm to extract the DHS from video sequences. Two applications are then considered. First, the DHS is used for simultaneous segmentation and labeling of body parts in cluttered scenes. Experimental results showed that the algorithm is robust to size, viewing angles, camera motion, and severe occlusion. Then, the DHS is used to classify load-carrying conditions. By examining various symmetries in DHS, activities such as carrying, holding, and walking with objects that are attached to legs are detected. Our approach possesses several advantages: a compact representation that can be computed in real time is used; furthermore, it does not depend on silhouettes or landmark tracking, which are sensitive to errors in background subtraction stage.

  7. A Case Study Analysing the Process of Analogy-Based Learning in a Teaching Unit about Simple Electric Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paatz, Roland; Ryder, James; Schwedes, Hannelore; Scott, Philip

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to analyse the learning processes of a 16-year-old student as she learns about simple electric circuits in response to an analogy-based teaching sequence. Analogical thinking processes are modelled by a sequence of four steps according to Gentner's structure mapping theory (activate base domain, postulate local…

  8. Single molecule targeted sequencing for cancer gene mutation detection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Deng, Liwei; Yan, Qin; Gao, Yongqian; Wu, Zengding; Cai, Jinsen; Ji, Daorui; Li, Gailing; Wu, Ping; Jin, Huan; Zhao, Luyang; Liu, Song; Ge, Liangjin; Deem, Michael W.; He, Jiankui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid decline in cost of sequencing, it is now affordable to examine multiple genes in a single disease-targeted clinical test using next generation sequencing. Current targeted sequencing methods require a separate step of targeted capture enrichment during sample preparation before sequencing. Although there are fast sample preparation methods available in market, the library preparation process is still relatively complicated for physicians to use routinely. Here, we introduced an amplification-free Single Molecule Targeted Sequencing (SMTS) technology, which combined targeted capture and sequencing in one step. We demonstrated that this technology can detect low-frequency mutations using artificially synthesized DNA sample. SMTS has several potential advantages, including simple sample preparation thus no biases and errors are introduced by PCR reaction. SMTS has the potential to be an easy and quick sequencing technology for clinical diagnosis such as cancer gene mutation detection, infectious disease detection, inherited condition screening and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27193446

  9. Simple and Cooperatively Built Wave Motion Demonstrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortel, Adolf

    2006-01-01

    Some designs of simple wave demonstration devices have been described in this journal and elsewhere. A new simple model can be built using only dowels, binder clips, and loops of thread. Not only can it be easily assembled, stored, or disassembled, but also all the students in a class can cooperate in its building by connecting successive pieces…

  10. The Fluid Foil: The Seventh Simple Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    A simple machine does one of two things: create a mechanical advantage (lever) or change the direction of an applied force (pulley). Fluid foils are unique among simple machines because they not only change the direction of an applied force (wheel and axle); they convert fluid energy into mechanical energy (wind and Kaplan turbines) or vice versa,…

  11. A simple phenomenology for 2 γ+ states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamfir, N. V.; Bucurescu, D.; Casten, R. F.; Ivascu, M.

    1990-05-01

    Based on the microscopic structure of the first gamma vibrational state, a simple but efficient parametrization for the energies of the 2 γ+ states in all (non-magic) nuclei with Z>20 is introduced. A simple analytic formula, similar to that existing for the 3 1- -states, with mass and total active nucleon number dependence, fits the 2 γ+ energies rather well.

  12. Sunspots and Their Simple Harmonic Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribeiro, C. I.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an example of a simple harmonic motion, the apparent motion of sunspots due to the Sun's rotation, is described, which can be used to teach this subject to high-school students. Using real images of the Sun, students can calculate the star's rotation period with the simple harmonic motion mathematical expression.

  13. Simple Numerical Analysis of Longboard Speedometer Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Simple numerical data analysis is described, using a standard spreadsheet program, to determine distance, velocity (speed) and acceleration from voltage data generated by a skateboard/longboard speedometer (Hare 2012 "Phys. Educ." 47 409-17). This simple analysis is an introduction to data processing including scaling data as well as…

  14. Evaluation of anonymous and expressed sequence tag derived polymorphic microsatellite markers in the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polymorphic genetic markers were identified and characterized using a partial genomic library of Heliothis virescens enriched for simple sequence repeats (SSR) and nucleotide sequences of expressed sequence tags (EST). Nucleotide sequences of 192 clones from the partial genomic library yielded 147 u...

  15. A Simple Label Switching Algorithm for Semisupervised Structural SVMs.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, P; Shevade, Shirish; Sundararajan, S

    2015-10-01

    In structured output learning, obtaining labeled data for real-world applications is usually costly, while unlabeled examples are available in abundance. Semisupervised structured classification deals with a small number of labeled examples and a large number of unlabeled structured data. In this work, we consider semisupervised structural support vector machines with domain constraints. The optimization problem, which in general is not convex, contains the loss terms associated with the labeled and unlabeled examples, along with the domain constraints. We propose a simple optimization approach that alternates between solving a supervised learning problem and a constraint matching problem. Solving the constraint matching problem is difficult for structured prediction, and we propose an efficient and effective label switching method to solve it. The alternating optimization is carried out within a deterministic annealing framework, which helps in effective constraint matching and avoiding poor local minima, which are not very useful. The algorithm is simple and easy to implement. Further, it is suitable for any structured output learning problem where exact inference is available. Experiments on benchmark sequence labeling data sets and a natural language parsing data set show that the proposed approach, though simple, achieves comparable generalization performance.

  16. Sequence analysis reveals genomic factors affecting EST-SSR primer performance and polymorphism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Search for simple sequence repeat (SSR) motifs and design of flanking primers in expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences can be easily done at a large scale using bioinformatics programs. However, failed amplification and/or detection, along with lack of polymorphism, is often seen among randomly sel...

  17. How Does Sequence Structure Affect the Judgment of Time? Exploring a Weighted Sum of Segments Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, William J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the judgment of segmented temporal intervals, using short tone sequences as a convenient test case. In four experiments, we investigate how the relative lengths, arrangement, and pitches of the tones in a sequence affect judgments of sequence duration, and ask whether the data can be described by a simple weighted sum of…

  18. Development and transferability of black and red raspberry microsatellite markers from short-read sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies has been a boon to the cost-effective development of molecular markers, particularly in non-model species. Here, we demonstrate the efficiency of microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker development from short-read sequences using th...

  19. Computer assisted multiplex sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Church, G.M.

    1992-08-01

    The objectives of this project are automation and optimization of multiplex sequencing. This year we have integrated direct transfer electrophoresis, automated multiplex hybridizations and automated film reading and applied this toward sequencing of three contiguous E. coli cosmids. Primers for the directed dideoxy sequence walking and sequence confirmation steps were synthesized with a 15 base tag complimentary to an alkaline phosphatase conjugate. A higher throughput synthesis device is well along in testing as are new automated hybridization devices. We have developed software for automatically annotating ORFs and databases of precise termini of proteis and RNA.

  20. DNA sequencing by nanopores: advances and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agah, Shaghayegh; Zheng, Ming; Pasquali, Matteo; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-10-01

    Developing inexpensive and simple DNA sequencing methods capable of detecting entire genomes in short periods of time could revolutionize the world of medicine and technology. It will also lead to major advances in our understanding of fundamental biological processes. It has been shown that nanopores have the ability of single-molecule sensing of various biological molecules rapidly and at a low cost. This has stimulated significant experimental efforts in developing DNA sequencing techniques by utilizing biological and artificial nanopores. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the nanopore sequencing field with a focus on the nature of nanopores and on sensing mechanisms during the translocation. Current challenges and alternative methods are also discussed.

  1. Text mining of DNA sequence homology searches.

    PubMed

    McCallum, John; Ganesh, Siva

    2003-01-01

    Primary tasks in analysis and annotation of expressed sequence tag (EST) datasets are to identify similarity among sequences by unsupervised clustering and assign putative function based on BLAST homology searches. We investigated the usefulness of text mining as a simple approach for further higher-level clustering of EST datasets using IBM Intelligent Miner for Text v2.3 tools. Agglomerative and k-means clustering tools were used to cluster BLASTx homology search documents from two onion EST datasets and optimised by pre-processing and pruning. Subjective evaluation confirmed that these tools provided biologically useful and complementary views of the two libraries, provided new insights into their composition and revealed clusters previously identified by human experts. We compared BLASTx textual clusters for two gene families with their DNA sequence-based clusters and confirmed that these shared similar morphology.

  2. Identifying subset errors in multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Roy, Aparna; Taddese, Bruck; Vohra, Shabana; Thimmaraju, Phani K; Illingworth, Christopher J R; Simpson, Lisa M; Mukherjee, Keya; Reynolds, Christopher A; Chintapalli, Sree V

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) accuracy is important, but there is no widely accepted method of judging the accuracy that different alignment algorithms give. We present a simple approach to detecting two types of error, namely block shifts and the misplacement of residues within a gap. Given a MSA, subsets of very similar sequences are generated through the use of a redundancy filter, typically using a 70-90% sequence identity cut-off. Subsets thus produced are typically small and degenerate, and errors can be easily detected even by manual examination. The errors, albeit minor, are inevitably associated with gaps in the alignment, and so the procedure is particularly relevant to homology modelling of protein loop regions. The usefulness of the approach is illustrated in the context of the universal but little known [K/R]KLH motif that occurs in intracellular loop 1 of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR); other issues relevant to GPCR modelling are also discussed.

  3. Proteins: sequence to structure and function--current status.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Sandhya R; Jayaram, B

    2010-11-01

    In an era that has been dominated by Structural Biology for the last 30-40 years, a dramatic change of focus towards sequence analysis has spurred the advent of the genome projects and the resultant diverging sequence/structure deficit. The central challenge of Computational Structural Biology is therefore to rationalize the mass of sequence information into biochemical and biophysical knowledge and to decipher the structural, functional and evolutionary clues encoded in the language of biological sequences. In investigating the meaning of sequences, two distinct analytical themes have emerged: in the first approach, pattern recognition techniques are used to detect similarity between sequences and hence to infer related structures and functions; in the second ab initio prediction methods are used to deduce 3D structure, and ultimately to infer function, directly from the linear sequence. In this article, we attempt to provide a critical assessment of what one may and may not expect from the biological sequences and to identify major issues yet to be resolved. The presentation is organized under several subtitles like protein sequences, pattern recognition techniques, protein tertiary structure prediction, membrane protein bioinformatics, human proteome, protein-protein interactions, metabolic networks, potential drug targets based on simple sequence properties, disordered proteins, the sequence-structure relationship and chemical logic of protein sequences.

  4. Complex temporal response patterns with a simple retinal circuit.

    PubMed

    Werner, Birgit; Cook, Paul B; Passaglia, Christopher L

    2008-08-01

    The retina can respond to a wide array of features in the visual input. It was recently reported that the retina can even recognize complicated temporal input patterns and signal violations in the patterns. When a sequence of flashes was presented, ganglion cells exhibited a variety of firing profiles and many cells showed an "omitted stimulus response" (OSR), in which they fired strongly if a flash in the sequence was omitted. We examined the synaptic origins of the OSR by recording excitatory synaptic currents from ganglion cells in the salamander retina in response to periodic flash sequences. Consistent with previous spike recordings, ganglion cells exhibited an OSR in their current response and the OSR shifted in time with a change in flash frequency such that it could predict when the next flash should have occurred. Although the behavior may seem sophisticated, we show that a simple linear-nonlinear model with a spike threshold can account for the OSR in on ganglion cells and that the variety of complex firing profiles seen in other ganglion cells can be explained by adding contributions from the off pathway. We discuss the physiological and simulation results and their implications for understanding retinal mechanisms of visual information processing.

  5. Modeling How, When, and What Is Learned in a Simple Fault-Finding Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Frank E.; Bibby, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a process model that learns in multiple ways while finding faults in a simple control panel device. The model predicts human participants' learning through its own learning. The model's performance was systematically compared to human learning data, including the time course and specific sequence of learned behaviors. These…

  6. Achieving Learning Outcomes of Acquisition, Fluency, and Application for Adolescents with Difficulty Constructing Simple Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Datchuk, Shawn M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study used a multiple-baseline, single-case experimental design to investigate effects of three sequential experimental conditions on frequency of correct word sequences (CWS) and construction of simple sentences per 1-minute. Sentence Instruction, Frequency Building to a Performance Criteria (FBPC), and Paragraph Instruction comprised…

  7. Simple numerical analysis of longboard speedometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Simple numerical data analysis is described, using a standard spreadsheet program, to determine distance, velocity (speed) and acceleration from voltage data generated by a skateboard/longboard speedometer (Hare 2012 Phys. Educ. 47 409-17). This simple analysis is an introduction to data processing including scaling data as well as simple numerical differentiation and integration. This is an interesting, fun and instructive way to start to explore data manipulation at GCSE and A-level—analysis and skills so essential for the engineer and scientist.

  8. Sequences, Series, and Mathematica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, John H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes how the computer algebra system Mathematica can be used to enhance the teaching of the topics of sequences and series. Examines its capabilities to find exact, approximate, and graphically generated approximate solutions to problems from these topics and to understand proofs about sequences. (MDH)

  9. Can sequence determine function?

    PubMed Central

    Gerlt, John A; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2000-01-01

    The functional annotation of proteins identified in genome sequencing projects is based on similarities to homologs in the databases. As a result of the possible strategies for divergent evolution, homologous enzymes frequently do not catalyze the same reaction, and we conclude that assignment of function from sequence information alone should be viewed with some skepticism. PMID:11178260

  10. Lichenase and coding sequences

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xin-Liang; Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Chen, Huizhong

    2000-08-15

    The present invention provides a fungal lichenase, i.e., an endo-1,3-1,4-.beta.-D-glucanohydrolase, its coding sequence, recombinant DNA molecules comprising the lichenase coding sequences, recombinant host cells and methods for producing same. The present lichenase is from Orpinomyces PC-2.

  11. Biotools: Patenting DNA sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonsky, M.D.; Hone, W.J.

    1995-07-01

    The decision, known as In re Deuel{sup 2}, rejects the PTO`s interpretation of a previous decision of the Federal Circuit and makes it more possible that a {open_quotes}nucleic acid of a particular sequence{close_quotes} - commonly known as a gene sequence - may be patentable. 15 refs.

  12. Sequences for Student Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Jeffrey; Feil, David; Lartigue, David; Mullins, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    We describe two classes of sequences that give rise to accessible problems for undergraduate research. These problems may be understood with virtually no prerequisites and are well suited for computer-aided investigation. The first sequence is a variation of one introduced by Stephen Wolfram in connection with his study of cellular automata. The…

  13. Cosmetology: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a cosmetology vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  14. Agriculture: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This guide, which was written as an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System, outlines the suggested scope and sequence of a 3-year program in agriculture. The guide consists of a course description; general course objectives;…

  15. Sequencing the maize genome.

    PubMed

    Martienssen, Robert A; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; O'Shaughnessy, Andrew; McCombie, W Richard

    2004-04-01

    Sequencing of complex genomes can be accomplished by enriching shotgun libraries for genes. In maize, gene-enrichment by copy-number normalization (high C(0)t) and methylation filtration (MF) have been used to generate up to two-fold coverage of the gene-space with less than 1 million sequencing reads. Simulations using sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones predict that 5x coverage of gene-rich regions, accompanied by less than 1x coverage of subclones from BAC contigs, will generate high-quality mapped sequence that meets the needs of geneticists while accommodating unusually high levels of structural polymorphism. By sequencing several inbred strains, we propose a strategy for capturing this polymorphism to investigate hybrid vigor or heterosis.

  16. Sequence History Update Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; DelGuercio, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Sequence History Update Tool performs Web-based sequence statistics archiving for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using a single UNIX command, the software takes advantage of sequencing conventions to automatically extract the needed statistics from multiple files. This information is then used to populate a PHP database, which is then seamlessly formatted into a dynamic Web page. This tool replaces a previous tedious and error-prone process of manually editing HTML code to construct a Web-based table. Because the tool manages all of the statistics gathering and file delivery to and from multiple data sources spread across multiple servers, there is also a considerable time and effort savings. With the use of The Sequence History Update Tool what previously took minutes is now done in less than 30 seconds, and now provides a more accurate archival record of the sequence commanding for MRO.

  17. Genetic relationships of boxwood (Buxus L.) accessions based on genic simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boxwood (Buxus L. spp., Buxaceae) are popular woody landscape shrubs grown for their diverse forms and broad-leaved evergreen foliage. Boxwood plants grown in temperate zones are now threatened by a destructive new blight disease caused by the ascomycete fungus Calonectria pseudonaviculata Henricot ...

  18. Analyzing clonal fidelity of micropropagated Psidium guajava L. plants using simple sequence repeat markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micropropagation of Psidium guajava L. (guava) is a viable alternative to currently adopted techniques for large-scale plant propagation of commercial cultivars. Assessment of clonal fidelity in micropropagated plants is the first step towards ensuring genetic uniformity in mass production of planti...

  19. Confirmation of Pearl Millet-Napiergrass Hybrids Using EST-derived Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prospects for deploying perennial grasses that are currently considered leading candidates for dedicated energy crops over large acreages are debatable because of several limitations, including vegetative propagation or small seed size, low biomass production during the first growing season, and inc...

  20. Simple Sequence Repeat Markers Useful for Sorghum Downy Mildew (Peronosclerospora sorghi) and Related Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent outbreak of sorghum downy mildew, in Texas, has led to the discovery of both metalaxyl resistance and a new pathotype in the causal organism, Peronosclerospora sorghi. These observations and the difficulty in resolving among phylogenetically related downy mildew pathogens dramatically poin...

  1. Assessing probability of ancestry using simple sequence repeat profiles: applications to maize hybrids and inbreds.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Donald A; Seltzer, Jon D; Xie, Chongqing; Wright, Deanne L; Smith, J Stephen C

    2002-01-01

    Determination of parentage is fundamental to the study of biology and to applications such as the identification of pedigrees. Limitations to studies of parentage have stemmed from the use of an insufficient number of hypervariable loci and mismatches of alleles that can be caused by mutation or by laboratory error and that can generate false exclusions. Furthermore, most studies of parentage have been limited to comparisons of small numbers of specific parent-progeny triplets thereby precluding large-scale surveys of candidates where there may be no prior knowledge of parentage. We present an algorithm that can determine probability of parentage in circumstances where there is no prior knowledge of pedigree and that is robust in the face of missing data or mistyped data. We present data from 54 maize hybrids and 586 maize inbreds that were profiled using 195 SSR loci including simulations of additional levels of missing and mistyped data to demonstrate the utility and flexibility of this algorithm. PMID:12072476

  2. Genetic characterization of Iranian safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) markers.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Bahman; Ghorbanzadeh Neghab, Mahmoud

    2013-04-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorious L.) is valued as a source of high quality vegetable oil. 20 ISSR primers were used to assess the genetic diversity of 18 accessions of safflower collected from different geographical regions of Iran. The ISSR primers combinations revealed 57.6 % polymorphism, among 338 genetic loci amplified from the accessions. The sum of effective number of alleles and observed number of alleles were 29.76 and 36.77, respectively. To understand genetic relationships among these cultivars, Jacquards' similarity coefficient and UPGMA clustering algorithm were applied to the ISSR marker data set. ISSR markers grouped accessions into two main clusters and four sub clusters. Also, the principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) supported the cluster analysis results. The results showed these genotypes have high genetic diversity, and can be used for alternative safflower breeding program.

  3. Occurrence, distribution, and possible functional roles of simple sequence repeats in phytoplasma genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoplasmas are unculturable, cell wall-less bacteria that parasitize plants and insects. This transkingdom life cycle requires rapid responses to vastly different environments including transitions from plant phloem sieve elements to various insect tissues and alterations of diverse plant hosts. ...

  4. Molecular Characterization and Genetic Structure in Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) Using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avocado (Persea americana Mill.) is an economically important tropical fruit native to Mesoamerica. It belongs to the Lauraceae family and is subdivided in three horticultural races (Guatemalan, Mexican, and West Indian) based primarily on ecological adaptation, botanical and physiological traits. T...

  5. Characterization and compilation of polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers of peanut from public database

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are several reports describing thousands of SSR markers in the peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genome. There is a need to integrate various research reports of peanut DNA polymorphism into a single platform. Further, because of lack of uniformity in the labeling of these markers across the publications, there is some confusion on the identities of many markers. We describe below an effort to develop a central comprehensive database of polymorphic SSR markers in peanut. Findings We compiled 1,343 SSR markers as detecting polymorphism (14.5%) within a total of 9,274 markers. Amongst all polymorphic SSRs examined, we found that AG motif (36.5%) was the most abundant followed by AAG (12.1%), AAT (10.9%), and AT (10.3%).The mean length of SSR repeats in dinucleotide SSRs was significantly longer than that in trinucleotide SSRs. Dinucleotide SSRs showed higher polymorphism frequency for genomic SSRs when compared to trinucleotide SSRs, while for EST-SSRs, the frequency of polymorphic SSRs was higher in trinucleotide SSRs than in dinucleotide SSRs. The correlation of the length of SSR and the frequency of polymorphism revealed that the frequency of polymorphism was decreased as motif repeat number increased. Conclusions The assembled polymorphic SSRs would enhance the density of the existing genetic maps of peanut, which could also be a useful source of DNA markers suitable for high-throughput QTL mapping and marker-assisted selection in peanut improvement and thus would be of value to breeders. PMID:22818284

  6. Genetic analysis of citron (Citrus medica L.) using simple sequence repeats and single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citron (Citrus medica L.) is one of the three basic species of the genus Citrus L. that has contributed to the development of many commercial cultivars. We analyzed the genetic diversity of a total of 54 varieties (47 citrons) to understand the relationships within the species. Thirty two varieties ...

  7. Assessing the genetic relationships of Curcuma alismatifolia varieties using simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Taheri, S; Abdullah, T L; Abdullah, N A P; Ahmad, Z; Karimi, E; Shabanimofrad, M R

    2014-09-05

    The genus Curcuma is a member of the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) that has recently become popular for use as flowering pot plants, both indoors and as patio and landscape plants. We used PCR-based molecular markers (SSRs) to elucidate genetic variation and relationships between five varieties of Curcuma (Curcuma alismatifolia) cultivated in Malaysia. Of the primers tested, 8 (of 17) SSR primers were selected for their reproducibility and high rates of polymorphism. The number of presumed alleles revealed by the SSR analysis ranged from two to six alleles, with a mean value of 3.25 alleles per locus. The values of HO and HE ranged from 0 to 0.8 (mean value of 0.2) and 0.1837 to 0.7755 (mean value of 0.5102), respectively. Eight SSR primers yielded 26 total amplified fragments and revealed high rates of polymorphism among the varieties studied. The polymorphic information content varied from 0.26 to 0.73. Dice's similarity coefficient was calculated for all pairwise comparisons and used to construct an unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA) dendrogram. Similarity coefficient values from 0.2105 to 0.6667 (with an average of 0.4386) were found among the five varieties examined. A cluster analysis of data using a UPGMA algorithm divided the five varieties/hybrids into 2 groups.

  8. Characterization of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and genetic relationships within cultivated peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 709 SSR markers were collected from public database and 556 SSRs passed an initial screen and were used to characterize 16 Arachis hypogaea genotypes. PIC (polymorphism information content) scores and heterozygosity indices were calculated to access the genetic diversity of SSR markers an...

  9. Genetic characterization of cassava (Manihot esculenta) landraces in Brazil assessed with simple sequence repeats

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Based on nine microsatellite loci, the aim of this study was to appraise the genetic diversity of 42 cassava (Manihot esculenta) landraces from selected regions in Brazil, and examine how this variety is distributed according to origin in several municipalities in the states of Minas Gerais, São Paulo, Mato Grosso do Sul, Amazonas and Mato Grosso. High diversity values were found among the five above-mentioned regions, with 3.3 alleles per locus on an average, a high percentage of polymorphic loci varying from 88.8% to 100%, an average of 0.265 for observed heterozygosity and 0.570 for gene diversity. Most genetic diversity was concentrated within the regions themselves (HS = 0.52). Cluster analysis and principal component based scatter plotting showed greater similarity among landraces from São Paulo, Mato Grosso do Sul and Amazonas, whereas those from Minas Gerais were clustered into a sub-group within this group. The plants from Mato Grosso, mostly collected in the municipality of General Carneiro, provided the highest differentiation. The migration of human populations is one among the possible reasons for this closer resemblance or greater disparity among plants from the various regions. PMID:21637653

  10. Genetic Diversity in Lens Species Revealed by EST and Genomic Simple Sequence Repeat Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Harsh Kumar; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Dharmendra; Aski, Muraleedhar Sidaram; Prakash, Prapti; Jain, Neelu; Meena, Suresh; Kumar, Shiv; Sarker, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Low productivity of pilosae type lentils grown in South Asia is attributed to narrow genetic base of the released cultivars which results in susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stresses. For enhancement of productivity and production, broadening of genetic base is essentially required. The genetic base of released cultivars can be broadened by using diverse types including bold seeded and early maturing lentils from Mediterranean region and related wild species. Genetic diversity in eighty six accessions of three species of genus Lens was assessed based on twelve genomic and thirty one EST-SSR markers. The evaluated set of genotypes included diverse lentil varieties and advanced breeding lines from Indian programme, two early maturing ICARDA lines and five related wild subspecies/species endemic to the Mediterranean region. Genomic SSRs exhibited higher polymorphism in comparison to EST SSRs. GLLC 598 produced 5 alleles with highest gene diversity value of 0.80. Among the studied subspecies/species 43 SSRs detected maximum number of alleles in L. orientalis. Based on Nei's genetic distance cultivated lentil L. culinaris subsp. culinaris was found to be close to its wild progenitor L. culinaris subsp. orientalis. The Prichard's structure of 86 genotypes distinguished different subspecies/species. Higher variability was recorded among individuals within population than among populations.

  11. Cohomological invariants of central simple algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkurjev, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    We determine the indecomposable degree 3 cohomological invariants of tuples of central simple algebras with linear relations. Equivalently, we determine the degree 3 reductive cohomological invariants of all split semisimple groups of type A.

  12. Simple, one transistor circuit boosts pulse amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keon, T.; Matchett, M. W.

    1966-01-01

    Simple circuit that uses a single transistor to accomplish capacitor storage followed by common-base switching supplies a pulse voltage, higher than that normally available from emitter-follower circuits, to drive a 100-watt transmitter.

  13. Optimized chaos control with simple limiters.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C; Stoop, R

    2001-01-01

    We present an elementary derivation of chaos control with simple limiters using the logistic map and the Henon map as examples. This derivation provides conditions for optimal stabilization of unstable periodic orbits of a chaotic attractor.

  14. A simple device for disinfecting endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Wagenvoort, J H; van Blankenstein, M; Kooyman-Op de Hoek, G; Boks, A L; van Oudenaarde, P H

    1986-01-01

    A method for disinfecting fibreoptic endoscopes with povidone-iodine and a simple cleaning device, consisting of a curved glass pipe and a peristaltic pump is described. If properly employed the system produces satisfactory results.

  15. The Invention Convention: Mind Meets Simple Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadi-Tabassum, Samina

    1997-01-01

    Describes an Earth Day celebration where students had to design an invention made of simple machines that could crush an empty aluminum can through 10 rapid mechanical movements using materials foraged from the students' homes. (JRH)

  16. Equation of State of Simple Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-10

    This is the final report of A. L. Ruoff and N. W. Ashcroft on Equation of State of Simple Metals. It includes experimental equation of state results for potassium and theoretical calculations of its equation of state . (Author)

  17. Simple tests of the factorization assumption

    SciTech Connect

    Mannel, T. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, D-2000 Hamburg 52, Germany ); Roberts, W.; Ryzak, Z. )

    1991-07-01

    We suggest simple experimental tests to determine whether or not the factorization assumption is valid for the two-body, nonleptonic decays of heavy hadrons, when both daughter hadrons are also heavy.

  18. Simple Perturbation Example for Quantum Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodfriend, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a simple example that illustrates various aspects of the Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory. The example is a particularly good one because it is straightforward and can be compared with both the exact solution and with experimental data. (JN)

  19. Pendulum: Rich physics from a simple system

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.A.; Olsson, M.G.

    1986-02-01

    We provide a comprehensive discussion of the corrections needed to accurately measure the acceleration of gravity using a plane pendulum. A simple laboratory experiment is described in which g was determined to four significant figures of accuracy.

  20. Thirty Simple Ideas for Interactive Whiteboards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    This article presents thirty simple ideas for interactive whiteboards and how IWB can make one's teaching life easier. These teaching ideas for the interactive whiteboard can be used by teachers every day. Tips for classroom management are also presented.

  1. Simple and Clear Proofs of Stirling's Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niizeki, Shozo; Araki, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to show two simpler and clearer methods of proving Stirling's formula than the traditional and conventional ones. The distinction of our method is to use the simple trapezoidal formula.

  2. Armenian virtual observatory simple image access service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazyan, A. V.; Astsatryan, H. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the article is to introduce the data sharing service of the Armenian Virtual Observatory (ArVO) based on the Simple Image Access (SIA) Protocol of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA).

  3. On the Canonical Shape of Simple Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martellato, E.; Vivaldi, V.; Cremonese, G.; Massironi, M.; Marzari, F.; Robinson, M.; Haruyama, J.

    2015-09-01

    NASA LRO images evidenced that Linné (Moon) is described by an inverted truncated cone. We compare morphometric analysis, radar data, numerical modelling and ejecta distribution in order to investigate the shape of the archetype of simple craters.

  4. Simple phase-shifting lateral shearing interferometer.

    PubMed

    Mihaylova, Emilia; Whelan, Maurice; Toal, Vincent

    2004-06-01

    A phase-shifting electronic speckle pattern shearing interferometer with a very simple shearing device is proposed. Two partially reflective glass plates are used to introduce the shear in this new interferometer. The reflection coefficients of the coatings on the two plates are 0.3 and 0.7. The distance between the two glass plates controls the size of the shear. The proposed new interferometric system is simple, flexible, and low cost.

  5. Empirical insights into the stochasticity of small RNA sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Li-Xuan; Tuschl, Thomas; Singer, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    The choice of stochasticity distribution for modeling the noise distribution is a fundamental assumption for the analysis of sequencing data and consequently is critical for the accurate assessment of biological heterogeneity and differential expression. The stochasticity of RNA sequencing has been assumed to follow Poisson distributions. We collected microRNA sequencing data and observed that its stochasticity is better approximated by gamma distributions, likely because of the stochastic nature of exponential PCR amplification. We validated our findings with two independent datasets, one for microRNA sequencing and another for RNA sequencing. Motivated by the gamma distributed stochasticity, we provided a simple method for the analysis of RNA sequencing data and showed its superiority to three existing methods for differential expression analysis using three data examples of technical replicate data and biological replicate data.

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Le Gallo, Matthieu; Lozy, Fred; Bell, Daphne W

    2017-01-01

    Endometrial cancers are the most frequently diagnosed gynecological malignancy and were expected to be the seventh leading cause of cancer death among American women in 2015. The majority of endometrial cancers are of serous or endometrioid histology. Most human tumors, including endometrial tumors, are driven by the acquisition of pathogenic mutations in cancer genes. Thus, the identification of somatic mutations within tumor genomes is an entry point toward cancer gene discovery. However, efforts to pinpoint somatic mutations in human cancers have, until recently, relied on high-throughput sequencing of single genes or gene families using Sanger sequencing. Although this approach has been fruitful, the cost and throughput of Sanger sequencing generally prohibits systematic sequencing of the ~22,000 genes that make up the exome. The recent development of next-generation sequencing technologies changed this paradigm by providing the capability to rapidly sequence exomes, transcriptomes, and genomes at relatively low cost. Remarkably, the application of this technology to catalog the mutational landscapes of endometrial tumor exomes, transcriptomes, and genomes has revealed, for the first time, that serous and endometrioid endometrial cancers can be classified into four distinct molecular subgroups. In this chapter, we overview the characteristic genomic features of each subgroup and discuss the known and putative cancer genes that have emerged from next-generation sequencing of endometrial carcinomas.

  7. HIV Sequence Compendium 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian Thomas; Leitner, Thomas Kenneth; Apetrei, Cristian; Hahn, Beatrice; Mizrachi, Ilene; Mullins, James; Rambaut, Andrew; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette Tina Marie

    2015-10-05

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. We try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2015. Hence, though it is published in 2015 and called the 2015 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2014 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing. In total, at the end of 2014, there were 624,121 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 7% since the previous year. This is the first year that the number of new sequences added to the database has decreased compared to the previous year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 5834 by end of 2014. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a fraction of these. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  8. Personalized Course Sequence Recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Xing, Tianwei; van der Schaar, Mihaela

    2016-10-01

    Given the variability in student learning it is becoming increasingly important to tailor courses as well as course sequences to student needs. This paper presents a systematic methodology for offering personalized course sequence recommendations to students. First, a forward-search backward-induction algorithm is developed that can optimally select course sequences to decrease the time required for a student to graduate. The algorithm accounts for prerequisite requirements (typically present in higher level education) and course availability. Second, using the tools of multi-armed bandits, an algorithm is developed that can optimally recommend a course sequence that both reduces the time to graduate while also increasing the overall GPA of the student. The algorithm dynamically learns how students with different contextual backgrounds perform for given course sequences and then recommends an optimal course sequence for new students. Using real-world student data from the UCLA Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering department, we illustrate how the proposed algorithms outperform other methods that do not include student contextual information when making course sequence recommendations.

  9. Sedimentary sequence evolution in a Foredeep basin: Eastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Bejarano, C.; Funes, D.; Sarzalho, S.; Audemard, F.; Flores, G.

    1996-08-01

    Well log-seismic sequence stratigraphy analysis in the Eastern Venezuela Foreland Basin leads to study of the evolution of sedimentary sequences onto the Cretaceous-Paleocene passive margin. This basin comprises two different foredeep sub-basins: The Guarico subbasin to the west, older, and the Maturin sub-basin to the east, younger. A foredeep switching between these two sub-basins is observed at 12.5 m.y. Seismic interpretation and well log sections across the study area show sedimentary sequences with transgressive sands and coastal onlaps to the east-southeast for the Guarico sub-basin, as well as truncations below the switching sequence (12.5 m.y.), and the Maturin sub-basin shows apparent coastal onlaps to the west-northwest, as well as a marine onlap (deeper water) in the west, where it starts to establish. Sequence stratigraphy analysis of these sequences with well logs allowed the study of the evolution of stratigraphic section from Paleocene to middle Miocene (68.0-12.0 m.y.). On the basis of well log patterns, the sequences were divided in regressive-transgressive-regressive sedimentary cycles caused by changes in relative sea level. Facies distributions were analyzed and the sequences were divided into simple sequences or sub- sequences of a greater frequencies than third order depositional sequences.

  10. Phylogenetic Trees From Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryvkin, Paul; Wang, Li-San

    In this chapter, we review important concepts and approaches for phylogeny reconstruction from sequence data.We first cover some basic definitions and properties of phylogenetics, and briefly explain how scientists model sequence evolution and measure sequence divergence. We then discuss three major approaches for phylogenetic reconstruction: distance-based phylogenetic reconstruction, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood. In the third part of the chapter, we review how multiple phylogenies are compared by consensus methods and how to assess confidence using bootstrapping. At the end of the chapter are two sections that list popular software packages and additional reading.

  11. Automatic Command Sequence Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Forest; Gladded, Roy; Khanampompan, Teerapat

    2007-01-01

    Automatic Sequence Generator (Autogen) Version 3.0 software automatically generates command sequences for the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and several other JPL spacecraft operated by the multi-mission support team. Autogen uses standard JPL sequencing tools like APGEN, ASP, SEQGEN, and the DOM database to automate the generation of uplink command products, Spacecraft Command Message Format (SCMF) files, and the corresponding ground command products, DSN Keywords Files (DKF). Autogen supports all the major multi-mission mission phases including the cruise, aerobraking, mapping/science, and relay mission phases. Autogen is a Perl script, which functions within the mission operations UNIX environment. It consists of two parts: a set of model files and the autogen Perl script. Autogen encodes the behaviors of the system into a model and encodes algorithms for context sensitive customizations of the modeled behaviors. The model includes knowledge of different mission phases and how the resultant command products must differ for these phases. The executable software portion of Autogen, automates the setup and use of APGEN for constructing a spacecraft activity sequence file (SASF). The setup includes file retrieval through the DOM (Distributed Object Manager), an object database used to store project files. This step retrieves all the needed input files for generating the command products. Depending on the mission phase, Autogen also uses the ASP (Automated Sequence Processor) and SEQGEN to generate the command product sent to the spacecraft. Autogen also provides the means for customizing sequences through the use of configuration files. By automating the majority of the sequencing generation process, Autogen eliminates many sequence generation errors commonly introduced by manually constructing spacecraft command sequences. Through the layering of commands into the sequence by a series of scheduling algorithms, users are able to rapidly and reliably construct the

  12. Toward nanoscale genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Declan; Rahimi, Maryam; Lund, John; Mehta, Ranjana; Parviz, Babak A

    2007-09-01

    This article reports on the state-of-the-art technologies that sequence DNA using miniaturized devices. The article considers the miniaturization of existing technologies for sequencing DNA and the opportunities for cost reduction that 'on-chip' devices can deliver. The ability to construct nano-scale structures and perform measurements using novel nano-scale effects has provided new opportunities to identify nucleotides directly using physical, and not chemical, methods. The challenges that these technologies need to overcome to provide a US$1000-genome sequencing technology are also presented.

  13. DNA sequences encoding osteoinductive products

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.A.; Wozney, J.M.; Rosen, V.

    1991-05-07

    This patent describes an isolated DNA sequence encoding an osteoinductive protein the DNA sequence comprising a coding sequence. It comprises: nucleotide No.1 through nucleotide No.387, nucleotide No.356 through nucleotide No.1543, nucleotide $402 through nucleotide No.1626, naturally occurring allelic sequences and equivalent degenerative codon sequences and sequences which hybridize to any of sequences under stringent hybridization conditions; and encode a protein characterized by the ability to induce the formation of bone and/or cartilage.

  14. Compact rotary sequencer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleberry, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Rotary sequencer is assembled from conventional planetary differential gearset and latching mechanism utilizing inputs and outputs which are coaxial. Applications include automated production-line equipment in home appliances and in vehicles.

  15. Authentication of byte sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, S.D.

    1991-06-01

    Algorithms for the authentication of byte sequences are described. The algorithms are designed to authenticate data in the Storage, Retrieval, Analysis, and Display (SRAD) Test Data Archive of the Radiation Effects and Testing Directorate (9100) at Sandia National Laboratories, and may be used in similar situations where authentication of stored data is required. The algorithms use a well-known error detection method called the Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC). When a byte sequence is authenticated and stored, CRC bytes are generated and attached to the end of the sequence. When the authenticated data is retrieved, the authentication check consists of processing the entire sequence, including the CRC bytes, and checking for a remainder of zero. The error detection properties of the CRC are extensive and result in a reliable authentication of SRAD data.

  16. Advances in sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Califano, A

    2001-06-01

    In its early days, the entire field of computational biology revolved almost entirely around biological sequence analysis. Over the past few years, however, a number of new non-sequence-based areas of investigation have become mainstream, from the analysis of gene expression data from microarrays, to whole-genome association discovery, and to the reverse engineering of gene regulatory pathways. Nonetheless, with the completion of private and public efforts to map the human genome, as well as those of other organisms, sequence data continue to be a veritable mother lode of valuable biological information that can be mined in a variety of contexts. Furthermore, the integration of sequence data with a variety of alternative information is providing valuable and fundamentally new insight into biological processes, as well as an array of new computational methodologies for the analysis of biological data.

  17. A simple physical mechanism enables homeostasis in primitive cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhart, Aaron E.; Adamala, Katarzyna P.; Szostak, Jack W.

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of homeostatic mechanisms that enable maintenance of an intracellular steady state during growth was critical to the advent of cellular life. Here, we show that concentration-dependent reversible binding of short oligonucleotides, of both specific and random sequence, can modulate ribozyme activity. In both cases, catalysis is inhibited at high concentrations, and dilution activates the ribozyme via inhibitor dissociation, thus maintaining near-constant ribozyme specific activity throughout protocell growth. To mimic the result of RNA synthesis within non-growing protocells, we co-encapsulated high concentrations of ribozyme and oligonucleotides within fatty acid vesicles, and ribozyme activity was inhibited. Following vesicle growth, the resulting internal dilution produced ribozyme activation. This simple physical system enables a primitive homeostatic behaviour: the maintenance of constant ribozyme activity per unit volume during protocell volume changes. We suggest that such systems, wherein short oligonucleotides reversibly inhibit functional RNAs, could have preceded sophisticated modern RNA regulatory mechanisms, such as those involving miRNAs.

  18. Simple spline-function equations for fracture mechanics calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents simple spline-function equations for fracture mechanics calculations. A spline function is a sequence of piecewise polynomials of degree n greater than 1 whose coefficients are such that the function and its first n-1 derivatives are continuous. Second-degree spline equations are presented for the compact, three point bend, and crack-line wedge-loaded specimens. Some expressions can be used directly, so that for a cyclic crack propagation test using a compact specimen, the equation given allows the cracklength to be calculated from the slope of the load-displacement curve. For an R-curve test, equations allow the crack length and stress intensity factor to be calculated from the displacement and the displacement ratio.

  19. A Simple, Realistic Stochastic Model of Gastric Emptying

    PubMed Central

    Yokrattanasak, Jiraphat; De Gaetano, Andrea; Panunzi, Simona; Satiracoo, Pairote; Lawton, Wayne M.; Lenbury, Yongwimon

    2016-01-01

    Several models of Gastric Emptying (GE) have been employed in the past to represent the rate of delivery of stomach contents to the duodenum and jejunum. These models have all used a deterministic form (algebraic equations or ordinary differential equations), considering GE as a continuous, smooth process in time. However, GE is known to occur as a sequence of spurts, irregular both in size and in timing. Hence, we formulate a simple stochastic process model, able to represent the irregular decrements of gastric contents after a meal. The model is calibrated on existing literature data and provides consistent predictions of the observed variability in the emptying trajectories. This approach may be useful in metabolic modeling, since it describes well and explains the apparently heterogeneous GE experimental results in situations where common gastric mechanics across subjects would be expected. PMID:27057750

  20. Gradational evolution of young, simple impact craters on the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    From these three craters, a first order gradational evolutionary sequence can be proposed. As crater rims are reduced by backwasting and downwasting through fluvial and mass wasting processes, craters are enlarged by approx. 10 pct. Enlargement of drainages inside the crater eventually forms rim breaches, thereby capturing headward portions of exterior drainages. At the same time, the relative importance of gradational processes may reverse on the ejecta: aeolian activity may supersede fluvial incisement and fan formation at late stages of modification. Despite actual high drainage densities on the crater exterior during early stages of gradation, the subtle scale of these systems results in low density estimates from air photos and satellite images. Because signatures developed on surfaces around all three craters appear to be mostly gradient dependent, they may not be unique to simple crater morphologies. Similar signatures may develop on portions of complex craters as well; however, important differences may also occur.

  1. HIV Sequence Compendium 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Carla; Foley, Brian; Leitner, Thomas; Apetrei, Christian; Hahn, Beatrice; Mizrachi, Ilene; Mullins, James; Rambaut, Andrew; Wolinsky, Steven; Korber, Bette

    2010-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2010. Hence, though it is called the 2010 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2009 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing exponentially. In total, at the time of printing, there were 339,306 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 45% since last year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 2576 by end of 2009, reflecting a smaller increase than in previous years. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a small fraction of these. Included in the alignments are a small number of sequences representing each of the subtypes and the more prevalent circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) such as 01 and 02, as well as a few outgroup sequences (group O and N and SIV-CPZ). Of the rarer CRFs we included one representative each. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html. Reprints are available from our website in the form of both HTML and PDF files. As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  2. The Design of SimpleITK

    PubMed Central

    Lowekamp, Bradley C.; Chen, David T.; Ibáñez, Luis; Blezek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    SimpleITK is a new interface to the Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK) designed to facilitate rapid prototyping, education and scientific activities via high level programming languages. ITK is a templated C++ library of image processing algorithms and frameworks for biomedical and other applications, and it was designed to be generic, flexible and extensible. Initially, ITK provided a direct wrapping interface to languages such as Python and Tcl through the WrapITK system. Unlike WrapITK, which exposed ITK's complex templated interface, SimpleITK was designed to provide an easy to use and simplified interface to ITK's algorithms. It includes procedural methods, hides ITK's demand driven pipeline, and provides a template-less layer. Also SimpleITK provides practical conveniences such as binary distribution packages and overloaded operators. Our user-friendly design goals dictated a departure from the direct interface wrapping approach of WrapITK, toward a new facade class structure that only exposes the required functionality, hiding ITK's extensive template use. Internally SimpleITK utilizes a manual description of each filter with code-generation and advanced C++ meta-programming to provide the higher-level interface, bringing the capabilities of ITK to a wider audience. SimpleITK is licensed as open source software library under the Apache License Version 2.0 and more information about downloading it can be found at http://www.simpleitk.org. PMID:24416015

  3. The Design of SimpleITK.

    PubMed

    Lowekamp, Bradley C; Chen, David T; Ibáñez, Luis; Blezek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    SimpleITK is a new interface to the Insight Segmentation and Registration Toolkit (ITK) designed to facilitate rapid prototyping, education and scientific activities via high level programming languages. ITK is a templated C++ library of image processing algorithms and frameworks for biomedical and other applications, and it was designed to be generic, flexible and extensible. Initially, ITK provided a direct wrapping interface to languages such as Python and Tcl through the WrapITK system. Unlike WrapITK, which exposed ITK's complex templated interface, SimpleITK was designed to provide an easy to use and simplified interface to ITK's algorithms. It includes procedural methods, hides ITK's demand driven pipeline, and provides a template-less layer. Also SimpleITK provides practical conveniences such as binary distribution packages and overloaded operators. Our user-friendly design goals dictated a departure from the direct interface wrapping approach of WrapITK, toward a new facade class structure that only exposes the required functionality, hiding ITK's extensive template use. Internally SimpleITK utilizes a manual description of each filter with code-generation and advanced C++ meta-programming to provide the higher-level interface, bringing the capabilities of ITK to a wider audience. SimpleITK is licensed as open source software library under the Apache License Version 2.0 and more information about downloading it can be found at http://www.simpleitk.org.

  4. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  5. PyMod: sequence similarity searches, multiple sequence-structure alignments, and homology modeling within PyMOL

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years, an exponential growing number of tools for protein sequence analysis, editing and modeling tasks have been put at the disposal of the scientific community. Despite the vast majority of these tools have been released as open source software, their deep learning curves often discourages even the most experienced users. Results A simple and intuitive interface, PyMod, between the popular molecular graphics system PyMOL and several other tools (i.e., [PSI-]BLAST, ClustalW, MUSCLE, CEalign and MODELLER) has been developed, to show how the integration of the individual steps required for homology modeling and sequence/structure analysis within the PyMOL framework can hugely simplify these tasks. Sequence similarity searches, multiple sequence and structural alignments generation and editing, and even the possibility to merge sequence and structure alignments have been implemented in PyMod, with the aim of creating a simple, yet powerful tool for sequence and structure analysis and building of homology models. Conclusions PyMod represents a new tool for the analysis and the manipulation of protein sequences and structures. The ease of use, integration with many sequence retrieving and alignment tools and PyMOL, one of the most used molecular visualization system, are the key features of this tool. Source code, installation instructions, video tutorials and a user's guide are freely available at the URL http://schubert.bio.uniroma1.it/pymod/index.html PMID:22536966

  6. A simple model linking galaxy and dark matter evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Birrer, Simon; Lilly, Simon; Amara, Adam; Paranjape, Aseem; Refregier, Alexandre E-mail: simon.lilly@phys.ethz.ch

    2014-09-20

    We construct a simple phenomenological model for the evolving galaxy population by incorporating predefined baryonic prescriptions into a dark matter hierarchical merger tree. The model is based on the simple gas-regulator model introduced by Lilly et al., coupled with the empirical quenching rules of Peng et al. The simplest model already does quite well in reproducing, without re-adjusting the input parameters, many observables, including the main sequence sSFR-mass relation, the faint end slope of the galaxy mass function, and the shape of the star forming and passive mass functions. Similar to observations and/or the recent phenomenological model of Behroozi et al., which was based on epoch-dependent abundance-matching, our model also qualitatively reproduces the evolution of the main sequence sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) star formation rate density relations, the M{sub s} – M{sub h} stellar-to-halo mass relation, and the SFR – M{sub h} relation. Quantitatively the evolution of sSFR(z) and SFRD(z) is not steep enough, the M{sub s} – M{sub h} relation is not quite peaked enough, and, surprisingly, the ratio of quenched to star forming galaxies around M* is not quite high enough. We show that these deficiencies can simultaneously be solved by ad hoc allowing galaxies to re-ingest some of the gas previously expelled in winds, provided that this is done in a mass-dependent and epoch-dependent way. These allow the model galaxies to reduce an inherent tendency to saturate their star formation efficiency, which emphasizes how efficient galaxies around M* are in converting baryons into stars and highlights the fact that quenching occurs at the point when galaxies are rapidly approaching the maximum possible efficiency of converting baryons into stars.

  7. A simple physical model for deep moonquake occurrence times

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weber, R.C.; Bills, B.G.; Johnson, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    The physical process that results in moonquakes is not yet fully understood. The periodic occurrence times of events from individual clusters are clearly related to tidal stress, but also exhibit departures from the temporal regularity this relationship would seem to imply. Even simplified models that capture some of the relevant physics require a large number of variables. However, a single, easily accessible variable - the time interval I(n) between events - can be used to reveal behavior not readily observed using typical periodicity analyses (e.g., Fourier analyses). The delay-coordinate (DC) map, a particularly revealing way to display data from a time series, is a map of successive intervals: I(n+. 1) plotted vs. I(n). We use a DC approach to characterize the dynamics of moonquake occurrence. Moonquake-like DC maps can be reproduced by combining sequences of synthetic events that occur with variable probability at tidal periods. Though this model gives a good description of what happens, it has little physical content, thus providing only little insight into why moonquakes occur. We investigate a more mechanistic model. In this study, we present a series of simple models of deep moonquake occurrence, with consideration of both tidal stress and stress drop during events. We first examine the behavior of inter-event times in a delay-coordinate context, and then examine the output, in that context, of a sequence of simple models of tidal forcing and stress relief. We find, as might be expected, that the stress relieved by moonquakes influences their occurrence times. Our models may also provide an explanation for the opposite-polarity events observed at some clusters. ?? 2010.

  8. Vortex breakdown in simple pipe bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, Jesse; Shin, Sangwoo; Stone, Howard

    2016-11-01

    Pipe bends and elbows are one of the most common fluid mechanics elements that exists. However, despite their ubiquity and the extensive amount of research related to these common, simple geometries, unexpected complexities still remain. We show that for a range of geometries and flow conditions, these simple flows experience unexpected fluid dynamical bifurcations resembling the bubble-type vortex breakdown phenomenon. Specifically, we show with simulations and experiments that recirculation zones develop within the bends under certain conditions. As a consequence, fluid and particles can remain trapped within these structures for unexpectedly-long time scales. We also present simple techniques to mitigate this recirculation effect which can potentially have impact across industries ranging from biomedical and chemical processing to food and health sciences.

  9. Simple microfluidic stagnation point flow geometries.

    PubMed

    Dockx, Greet; Verwijlen, Tom; Sempels, Wouter; Nagel, Mathias; Moldenaers, Paula; Hofkens, Johan; Vermant, Jan

    2016-07-01

    A geometrically simple flow cell is proposed to generate different types of stagnation flows, using a separation flow and small variations of the geometric parameters. Flows with high local deformation rates can be changed from purely rotational, over simple shear flow, to extensional flow in a region surrounding a stagnation point. Computational fluid dynamic calculations are used to analyse how variations of the geometrical parameters affect the flow field. These numerical calculations are compared to the experimentally obtained streamlines of different designs, which have been determined by high speed confocal microscopy. As the flow type is dictated predominantly by the geometrical parameters, such simple separating flow devices may alleviate the requirements for flow control, while offering good stability for a wide variety of flow types.

  10. Simple methods for the 3' biotinylation of RNA.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Bodo; Wahle, Elmar

    2014-03-01

    Biotinylation of RNA allows its tight coupling to streptavidin and is thus useful for many types of experiments, e.g., pull-downs. Here we describe three simple techniques for biotinylating the 3' ends of RNA molecules generated by chemical or enzymatic synthesis. First, extension with either the Schizosaccharomyces pombe noncanonical poly(A) polymerase Cid1 or Escherichia coli poly(A) polymerase and N6-biotin-ATP is simple, efficient, and generally applicable independently of the 3'-end sequences of the RNA molecule to be labeled. However, depending on the enzyme and the reaction conditions, several or many biotinylated nucleotides are incorporated. Second, conditions are reported under which splint-dependent ligation by T4 DNA ligase can be used to join biotinylated and, presumably, other chemically modified DNA oligonucleotides to RNA 3' ends even if these are heterogeneous as is typical for products of enzymatic synthesis. Third, we describe the use of 29 DNA polymerase for a template-directed fill-in reaction that uses biotin-dUTP and, thanks to the enzyme's proofreading activity, can cope with more extended 3' heterogeneities.

  11. TRSkit: A Simple Digital Library Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Esler, Sandra L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper introduces TRSkit, a simple and effective toolkit for building digital libraries on the World Wide Web. The toolkit was developed for the creation of the Langley Technical Report Server and the NASA Technical Report Server, but is applicable to most simple distribution paradigms. TRSkit contains a handful of freely available software components designed to be run under the UNIX operating system and served via the World Wide Web. The intended customer is the person that must continuously and synchronously distribute anywhere from 100 - 100,000's of information units and does not have extensive resources to devote to the problem.

  12. Introducing Ask, a simple knowledgeable system

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, B.H.; Thompson, F.B.

    1983-01-01

    Ask, a simple knowledgeable system, is a total system for the structuring, manipulation and communication of information. It is a simple system in the sense that its development concentrated on engineering solutions to what could be done now with good response times. The user interface is a limited dialect of English. Ask is aimed at the user who wishes to create, test, modify, extend and make use of his own knowledge base. It is a system for a research team, management or military staff, or a business office.

  13. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Simple Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carnerero, Esther M; Agarrabeitia, Antonia R; Moreno, Florencio; Maroto, Beatriz L; Muller, Gilles; Ortiz, María J; de la Moya, Santiago

    2015-09-21

    This article aims to show the identity of "circularly polarized luminescent active simple organic molecules" as a new concept in organic chemistry due to the potential interest of these molecules, as availed by the exponentially growing number of research articles related to them. In particular, it describes and highlights the interest and difficulty in developing chiral simple (small and non-aggregated) organic molecules able to emit left- or right-circularly polarized light efficiently, the efforts realized up to now to reach this challenging objective, and the most significant milestones achieved to date. General guidelines for the preparation of these interesting molecules are also presented.

  14. Emergent complexity in simple neural systems

    PubMed Central

    Oster, George

    2009-01-01

    The ornate and diverse patterns of seashells testify to the complexity of living systems. Provocative computational explorations have shown that similarly complex patterns may arise from the collective interaction of a small number of rules. This suggests that, although a system may appear complex, it may still be understood in terms of simple principles. It is still debatable whether shell patterns emerge from some undiscovered simple principles, or are the consequence of an irreducibly complex interaction of many effects. Recent work by Boettiger, Ermentrout and Oster on the biological mechanisms of shell patterning has provided compelling evidence that, at least for this system, simplicity produces diversity and complexity. PMID:20195452

  15. Investigating decoherence in a simple system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, Andreas

    1991-01-01

    The results of some simple calculations designed to study quantum decoherence are presented. The physics of quantum decoherence are briefly reviewed, and a very simple 'toy' model is analyzed. Exact solutions are found using numerical techniques. The type of incoherence exhibited by the model can be changed by varying a coupling strength. The author explains why the conventional approach to studying decoherence by checking the diagonality of the density matrix is not always adequate. Two other approaches, the decoherence functional and the Schmidt paths approach, are applied to the toy model and contrasted to each other. Possible problems with each are discussed.

  16. Cognitive Processing in New and Practiced Discrete Keying Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Verwey, Willem B.; Abrahamse, Elger L.; de Kleine, Elian

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the role of cognitive control in the initiation and execution of familiar and unfamiliar movement sequences. To become familiar with two movement sequences participants first practiced two discrete key press sequences by responding to two fixed series of 6-key specific stimuli. In the ensuing test phase they executed these two familiar and also two unfamiliar keying sequences while there was a two-third chance a tone was presented together with one randomly selected key specific stimulus in each sequence. In the counting condition of the test phase participants counted the low pitched (i.e., target) tones. By and large the results support the dual processor model in which the prime role of the cognitive processor shifts from executing to initiating sequences while the gradual development of motor chunks allows a motor processor to execute the sequences. Yet, the results extend this simple model by suggesting that with little practice sequence execution is based also on some non-cognitive (perhaps associative) learning mechanism and, for some participants, on the use of explicit sequence knowledge. Also, after extensive practice the cognitive processor appears to still contribute to slower responses. The occurrence of long interkey intervals was replicated suggesting that fixed 6-key sequences include several motor chunks. Yet, no indication was found that the cognitive processor is responsible for concatenating these chunks. PMID:21833202

  17. Statistical mechanics of simple models of protein folding and design.

    PubMed Central

    Pande, V S; Grosberg, A Y; Tanaka, T

    1997-01-01

    It is now believed that the primary equilibrium aspects of simple models of protein folding are understood theoretically. However, current theories often resort to rather heavy mathematics to overcome some technical difficulties inherent in the problem or start from a phenomenological model. To this end, we take a new approach in this pedagogical review of the statistical mechanics of protein folding. The benefit of our approach is a drastic mathematical simplification of the theory, without resort to any new approximations or phenomenological prescriptions. Indeed, the results we obtain agree precisely with previous calculations. Because of this simplification, we are able to present here a thorough and self contained treatment of the problem. Topics discussed include the statistical mechanics of the random energy model (REM), tests of the validity of REM as a model for heteropolymer freezing, freezing transition of random sequences, phase diagram of designed ("minimally frustrated") sequences, and the degree to which errors in the interactions employed in simulations of either folding and design can still lead to correct folding behavior. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:9414231

  18. Detection of Sequence Polymorphism in Rubus Occidentalis L. Monomorphic Microsatellite Markers by High Resolution Melting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microsatellite, or simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, are valuable as co-dominant genetic markers with a variety of applications such as DNA fingerprinting, linkage mapping, and population structure analysis. Development of microsatellite primers through the identification of appropriate repeate...

  19. Program Synthesizes UML Sequence Diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.; Osborne, Richard N.

    2006-01-01

    A computer program called "Rational Sequence" generates Universal Modeling Language (UML) sequence diagrams of a target Java program running on a Java virtual machine (JVM). Rational Sequence thereby performs a reverse engineering function that aids in the design documentation of the target Java program. Whereas previously, the construction of sequence diagrams was a tedious manual process, Rational Sequence generates UML sequence diagrams automatically from the running Java code.

  20. A Simple Laser Microphone for Classroom Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, James M.; Trout, K. P.

    2006-01-01

    Communication through the modulation of electromagnetic radiation has become a foundational technique in modern technology. In this paper we discuss a modern day method of eavesdropping based upon the modulation of laser light reflected from a window pane. A simple and affordable classroom demonstration of a "laser microphone" is…

  1. Simple Phenomena, Slow Motion, Surprising Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koupil, Jan; Vicha, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a few simple experiments that are worthwhile for slow motion recording and analysis either because of interesting phenomena that can be seen only when slowed down significantly or because of the ability to do precise time measurements. The experiments described in this article are quite commonly done in Czech schools. All…

  2. Insights into Biological Complexity from Simple Foundations.

    PubMed

    Albergante, L; Liu, D; Palmer, S; Newman, T J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss an overtly "simple approach" to complex biological systems borrowing selectively from theoretical physics. The approach is framed by three maxims, and we show examples of its success in two different applications: investigating cellular robustness at the level of gene regulatory networks and quantifying rare events of DNA replication errors.

  3. Simple Cloud Chambers Using Gel Ice Packs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-01-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry…

  4. Simple Demonstration of the Seebeck Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molki, Arman

    2010-01-01

    In this article we propose a simple and low-cost experimental set-up through which science educators can demonstrate the Seebeck effect using a thermocouple and an instrumentation amplifier. The experiment can be set up and conducted during a 1-hour laboratory session. (Contains 3 tables and 3 figures.)

  5. Simple Activity Demonstrates Wind Energy Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Wind energy is an exciting and clean energy option often described as the fastest-growing energy system on the planet. With some simple materials, teachers can easily demonstrate its key principles in their classroom. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)

  6. Air: Simple Experiments for Young Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Larry

    This book contains simple experiments through which students explore air and its properties. Some of the topics discussed include alternative energy, bacteria, carbon dioxide, motion, weather, and flight. Experiments include: blowing a balloon up in a bottle; seeing air in water; making a lunch-bag kite, weather vanes, and paper glider;…

  7. ON THE EQUILIBRIUM STRUCTURE OF SIMPLE LIQUIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    It is shown that the repulsive (not merely the positive) portion of the Lennard - Jones potential quantitatively dominates the equilibrium structure of...the Lennard - Jones liquid. A simple and accurate approximation for the radial distribution function at high densities is presented.

  8. Jarzynski's Equality Illustrated by Simple Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hijar, Humberto; Ortiz de Zarate, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    The Jarzynski theorem is perhaps the most recently discovered simple general formula in elementary statistical physics. In this paper, written with a pedagogical aim, we illustrate the physical concepts under the Jarzynski and related results by a detailed calculation with a representative example. The physics of the model is sufficiently…

  9. Water: Simple Experiments for Young Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Larry

    This book contains simple experiments and projects through which students can learn about water and its properties. Some of the topics discussed include acid rain, dehydration, distillation, electrons, tidal waves, and the water cycle. Experiments include: finding out about the amount of water in the body; why there is water in the body; how to…

  10. Simple circuit positions film frames in projector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, R. H.

    1965-01-01

    Individual frames on a photographic film strip in a projector are automatically positioned by a simple circuit. The circuit uses a photodiode that senses frame registry position and a relay that stops the film-advance motor to suspend the film at point of registry.

  11. A Simple ELISA Exercise for Undergraduate Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy R.

    Understanding of immunological techniques such as the Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (ELISA) is an important part of instructional units in human health, developmental biology, microbiology, and biotechnology. This paper describes a simple ELISA exercise for undergraduate biology that effectively simulates the technique using a paper model.…

  12. A Simple Method for Collecting Airborne Pollen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Peter G.; DiGiovanni, Franco; Ho, Rong H.; Taki, Hisatomo; Ferguson, Kristyn A.; Pawlowski, Agata K.

    2006-01-01

    Pollination is a broad area of study within biology. For many plants, pollen carried by wind is required for successful seed set. Airborne pollen also affects human health. To foster studies of airborne pollen, we introduce a simple device--the "megastigma"--for collecting pollen from the air. This device is flexible, yielding easily obtained data…

  13. A Simple Photometer to Study Skylight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh Gordon

    2006-01-01

    A simple photometer constructed from an LED and an op amp can be used to measure light in a number of physical situations. A variety of LEDs exist to investigate different wavelength ranges. Combined with an inexpensive transit, the LED photometer can be used to carry out skylight studies and atmospheric optical depth measurements. The activities…

  14. Richard Kluger's "Simple Justice" after 29 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Although it is obligatory to mark the anniversary of "Brown v. Board of Education," why it deserves to be commemorated is not necessarily obvious at a distance of fifty years. In this article, the author discusses this issue in the light of Richard Kluger's remarkable book--"Simple Justice." He states that, today the widespread existence of…

  15. Energy: Simple Experiments for Young Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Larry

    This book contains simple experiments through which students can learn about the properties of energy. These experiments include making a kitchen "volcano," a soda-pop "cannon," and a puffed-rice "scooter." Topics include: energy and work, fossil fuels, solar energy, kinetic energy, potential energy, mechanical energy, heat energy, sound energy,…

  16. Simple colorimetric method determines uranium in tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doran, D.; Frigerio, N. A.

    1967-01-01

    Simple colorimetric micromethod determines concentrations of uranium in tissue. The method involves dry ashing organic extraction, and colorimetric determination of uranyl ferrocyanide. This uranium determination technique could be used in agricultural research, tracer studies, testing of food products, or medical research.

  17. A Simple Model for Inelastic Scattering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeser, J. G.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes a model for inelastic scattering obtained by suitably generalizing scattering from a square well. The generalization introduces matrices into the quantum-mechanical scattering equations, which may be solved exactly to give an explicit expression for the scattering matrix. Discusses the results it predicts for a simple example. (Author/SK)

  18. A simple dead-reckoning navigational system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walls, B. F.; Mastin, W. C.; Broussard, P., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Simple navigation system is designed for vehicles operating in remote locations where it is not feasible to transport extensive equipment. System consists of four main components: directional gyrocompass to establish inertial direction; odometer to measure distance; signal processor to combine measured distance and direction; and sun compass to determine initial direction.

  19. Tour of a Simple Trigonometry Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Kin-Keung

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on a simple trigonometric problem that generates a strange phenomenon when different methods are applied to tackling it. A series of problem-solving activities are discussed, so that students can be alerted that the precision of diagrams is important when solving geometric problems. In addition, the problem-solving plan was…

  20. A Simple Classroom Demonstration of Natural Convection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Dean R.

    2005-01-01

    This article explains a simple way to demonstrate natural convection, such as from a lit candle, in the classroom using an overhead projector. The demonstration is based on the principle of schlieren imaging, commonly used to visualize variations in density for gas flows.

  1. Simple Analysis of Historical Lime Mortars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Joa~o

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described in which a simple characterization of a historical lime mortar is made by the determination of its approximate composition by a gravimetric method. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are also used for the qualitative characterization of the lime mortar components. These…

  2. Multi-dimensional MHD simple waves

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, G. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.; Brio, M.; Zank, G. P.

    1996-07-20

    In this paper we consider a formalism for multi-dimensional simple MHD waves using ideas developed by Boillat. For simple wave solutions one assumes that all the physical variables (the density {rho}, gas pressure p, fluid velocity u, gas entropy S, and magnetic induction B in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function {phi}(r,t). The simple wave solution ansatz and the MHD equations then require that the phase function {phi} satisfies an implicit equation of the form f({phi})=r{center_dot}n({phi})-{lambda}({phi})t, where n({phi})={nabla}{phi}/|{nabla}{phi}| is the wave normal, {lambda}({phi})={omega}/k=-{phi}{sub t}/|{nabla}{phi}| is the normal speed of the wave front, and f({phi}) is an arbitrary differentiable function of {phi}. The formalism allows for more general simple waves than that usually dealt with in which n({phi}) is a constant unit vector that does not vary along the wave front. The formalism has implications for shock formation and wave breaking for multi-dimensional waves.

  3. Multi-dimensional MHD simple waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.; Brio, M.; Zank, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we consider a formalism for multi-dimensional simple MHD waves using ideas developed by Boillat. For simple wave solutions one assumes that all the physical variables (the density rho, gas pressure p, fluid velocity V, gas entropy S, and magnetic induction B in the MHD case) depend on a single phase function phi(r,t). The simple wave solution ansatz and the MHD equations then require that the phase function has the form phi = r x n(phi) - lambda(phi)t, where = n(phi) = Delta phi / (absolute value of Delta phi) is the wave normal and lambda(phi) = omega/k = -phi t / (absolute value of Delta phi) is the normal speed of the wave front. The formalism allows for more general simple waves than that usually dealt with in which n(phi) is a constant unit vector that does not vary along the wave front. The formalism has implications for shock formation for multi-dimensional waves.

  4. From Complex to Simple: Interdisciplinary Stochastic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazilu, D. A.; Zamora, G.; Mazilu, I.

    2012-01-01

    We present two simple, one-dimensional, stochastic models that lead to a qualitative understanding of very complex systems from biology, nanoscience and social sciences. The first model explains the complicated dynamics of microtubules, stochastic cellular highways. Using the theory of random walks in one dimension, we find analytical expressions…

  5. Decoherence and a simple quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, I.L.; Yamamoto, Y.; Laflamme, R.

    1995-10-01

    The authors analyze the effect of decoherence on the operation of part of a simple quantum computer. The results indicate that quantum bit coding techniques may be used to mitigate the effects of two sources of decoherence - amplitude damping and phase randomization.

  6. A Simple Illustration of Hemihedral Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2004-01-01

    A simple way to represent hemihedral faces and to illustrate the relationship between the resulting left-handed and right-handed hemihedra is presented. The illustrations highlight that the chirality corresponds to the absence of reflective symmetry but not necessarily to the absence of a C2 axis of symmetry.

  7. Using Simple Machines to Leverage Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotger, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    What would your students say if you told them they could lift you off the ground using a block and a board? Using a simple machine, they'll find out they can, and they'll learn about work, energy, and motion in the process! In addition, this integrated lesson gives students the opportunity to investigate variables while practicing measurement…

  8. Jacks--A Study of Simple Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Ralph

    This vocational physics individualized student instructional module on jacks (simple machines used to lift heavy objects) contains student prerequisites and objectives, an introduction, and sections on the ratchet bumper jack, the hydraulic jack, the screw jack, and load limitations. Designed with a laboratory orientation, each section consists of…

  9. Extremely simple holographic projection of color images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Michal; Ducin, Izabela; Kakarenko, Karol; Suszek, Jaroslaw; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej; Sypek, Maciej

    2012-03-01

    A very simple scheme of holographic projection is presented with some experimental results showing good quality image projection without any imaging lens. This technique can be regarded as an alternative to classic projection methods. It is based on the reconstruction real images from three phase iterated Fourier holograms. The illumination is performed with three laser beams of primary colors. A divergent wavefront geometry is used to achieve an increased throw angle of the projection, compared to plane wave illumination. Light fibers are used as light guidance in order to keep the setup as simple as possible and to provide point-like sources of high quality divergent wave-fronts at optimized position against the light modulator. Absorbing spectral filters are implemented to multiplex three holograms on a single phase-only spatial light modulator. Hence color mixing occurs without any time-division methods, which cause rainbow effects and color flicker. The zero diffractive order with divergent illumination is practically invisible and speckle field is effectively suppressed with phase optimization and time averaging techniques. The main advantages of the proposed concept are: a very simple and highly miniaturizable configuration; lack of lens; a single LCoS (Liquid Crystal on Silicon) modulator; a strong resistance to imperfections and obstructions of the spatial light modulator like dead pixels, dust, mud, fingerprints etc.; simple calculations based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) easily processed in real time mode with GPU (Graphic Programming).

  10. Studying the Greenhouse Effect: A Simple Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papageorgiou, G.; Ouzounis, K.

    2000-01-01

    Studies the parameters involved in a presentation of the greenhouse effect and describes a simple demonstration of this effect. Required equipment includes a 100-120 watt lamp, a 250mL beaker, and a thermometer capable of recording 0-750 degrees Celsius together with a small amount of chloroform. (Author/SAH)

  11. Correcting the SIMPLE Model of Free Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Michael D.; Pooley, James P.

    2013-01-01

    The scale-invariant memory, perception, and learning (SIMPLE) model developed by Brown, Neath, and Chater (2007) formalizes the theoretical idea that scale invariance is an important organizing principle across numerous cognitive domains and has made an influential contribution to the literature dealing with modeling human memory. In the context…

  12. Building Simple Hidden Markov Models. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Wai-Ki; Ng, Michael K.

    2004-01-01

    Hidden Markov models (HMMs) are widely used in bioinformatics, speech recognition and many other areas. This note presents HMMs via the framework of classical Markov chain models. A simple example is given to illustrate the model. An estimation method for the transition probabilities of the hidden states is also discussed.

  13. A Simple Technique for High Resistance Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguia; Landin, Ramon Ochoa

    2012-01-01

    A simple electronic system for the measurement of high values of resistance is shown. This system allows the measurement of resistance in the range of a few megohm up to 10[superscript 9] [omega]. We have used this system for the evaluation of CdS thin film resistance, but other practical uses in the basic physics laboratory are presented.…

  14. Learning in a Simple Motor System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broussard, Dianne M.; Kassardjian, Charles D.

    2004-01-01

    Motor learning is a very basic, essential form of learning that appears to share common mechanisms across different motor systems. We evaluate and compare a few conceptual models for learning in a relatively simple neural system, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of vertebrates. We also compare the different animal models that have been used to…

  15. Experimental Control of Simple Pendulum Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper conveys information about a Physics laboratory experiment for students with some theoretical knowledge about oscillatory motion. Students construct a simple pendulum that behaves as an ideal one, and analyze model assumption incidence on its period. The following aspects are quantitatively analyzed: vanishing friction, small amplitude,…

  16. Special Relativity as a Simple Geometry Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Abreu, Rodrigo; Guerra, Vasco

    2009-01-01

    The null result of the Michelson-Morley experiment and the constancy of the one-way speed of light in the "rest system" are used to formulate a simple problem, to be solved by elementary geometry techniques using a pair of compasses and non-graduated rulers. The solution consists of a drawing allowing a direct visualization of all the fundamental…

  17. SLURM: Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, M; Grondona, M

    2002-12-19

    Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM) is an open source, fault-tolerant, and highly scalable cluster management and job scheduling system for Linux clusters of thousands of nodes. Components include machine status, partition management, job management, scheduling and stream copy modules. This paper presents an overview of the SLURM architecture and functionality.

  18. Nature versus Nurture: The Simple Contrast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidoff, Jules; Goldstein, Julie; Roberson, Debi

    2009-01-01

    We respond to the commentary of Franklin, Wright, and Davies ("Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 102", 239-245 [2009]) by returning to the simple contrast between nature and nurture. We find no evidence from the toddler data that makes us revise our ideas that color categories are learned and never innate. (Contains 1 figure.)

  19. Making Simple Folk Instruments for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cline, Dallas

    1980-01-01

    Instructions are provided for making these simple musical instruments from inexpensive materials: an Indian bull-roarer; bottle chimes; a ham can guitar; flower pot, box, and steel drums; a xylophone; a musical sawhorse; rattles; a melody box; and a box thumb harp. (SJL)

  20. Seismic Safety Of Simple Masonry Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnuolo, Mariateresa; Faella, Giuseppe

    2008-07-08

    Several masonry buildings comply with the rules for simple buildings provided by seismic codes. For these buildings explicit safety verifications are not compulsory if specific code rules are fulfilled. In fact it is assumed that their fulfilment ensures a suitable seismic behaviour of buildings and thus adequate safety under earthquakes. Italian and European seismic codes differ in the requirements for simple masonry buildings, mostly concerning the building typology, the building geometry and the acceleration at site. Obviously, a wide percentage of buildings assumed simple by codes should satisfy the numerical safety verification, so that no confusion and uncertainty have to be given rise to designers who must use the codes. This paper aims at evaluating the seismic response of some simple unreinforced masonry buildings that comply with the provisions of the new Italian seismic code. Two-story buildings, having different geometry, are analysed and results from nonlinear static analyses performed by varying the acceleration at site are presented and discussed. Indications on the congruence between code rules and results of numerical analyses performed according to the code itself are supplied and, in this context, the obtained result can provide a contribution for improving the seismic code requirements.

  1. A novel and simple atrial retractor.

    PubMed

    Kofidis, Theo; Lee, Chuen Neng

    2011-05-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac operations require specialized equipment. Atrial retractors are a frequently used tool to expose heart valves for minimally invasive and open procedures. The models currently available in the market are efficient; however, they may be complex, bulky, or expensive. We introduce a novel, very simple atrial retractor we designed using ubiquitously available materials.

  2. Earthways: Simple Environmental Activities for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrash, Carol

    This book presents simple environmental activities designed for young children. The contents are organized seasonally and each section features subsections: The Whole Earth Home and Classroom, Bringing Nature In, The Season Garden, Seasonal Crafts, and Supplying the Missing Links. These sections provide information on how to set up an indoor…

  3. Simple Harmonic Motion in Harmonic Plane Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benumof, Reuben

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the distribution of kinetic and potential energy in transverse and longitudinal waves and examines the transmission of power and momentum. This discussion is intended to aid in understanding the simple harmonic motion of a particle involved in the propagation of a harmonic mechanical plane wave. (HM)

  4. Teaching Alveolar Ventilation with Simple, Inexpensive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2008-01-01

    When teaching and learning about alveolar ventilation with our class of 300 first-year medical students, we use four simple, inexpensive "models." The models, which encourage research-oriented learning and help our students to understand complex ideas, are distributed to the students before class. The students anticipate something new every day,…

  5. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  6. Figuring the Acceleration of the Simple Pendulum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberherr, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The centripetal acceleration has been known since Huygens' (1659) and Newton's (1684) time. The physics to calculate the acceleration of a simple pendulum has been around for more than 300 years, and a fairly complete treatise has been given by C. Schwarz in this journal. But sentences like "the acceleration is always directed towards the…

  7. Sex Differences in Infants' Ability to Represent Complex Event Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweinle, Amy; Wilcox, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Prior research suggests that when very simple event sequences are used, 4.5-month-olds demonstrate the ability to individuate objects based on the continuity or disruption of their speed of motion (Wilcox & Schweinle, 2003). However, infants demonstrate their ability to individuate objects in an event-monitoring task (i.e., infants must keep track…

  8. Cuentos Faciles. Habia una vez.... (Simple Stories. There was a Time....) (Presenting Simple Stories in Spanish.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arroyo, Nancy; And Others

    For Spanish-speaking children, simple stories in Spanish, told in a natural language suitable for their age, are not only entertaining, but a means of developing vocabulary and concepts. Non-Spanish-speaking children, too, need exposure to more language than they can understand word for word. However, the simple stories for the Spanish speaker…

  9. Sequencing the Connectome

    PubMed Central

    Zador, Anthony M.; Dubnau, Joshua; Oyibo, Hassana K.; Zhan, Huiqing; Cao, Gang; Peikon, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    Connectivity determines the function of neural circuits. Historically, circuit mapping has usually been viewed as a problem of microscopy, but no current method can achieve high-throughput mapping of entire circuits with single neuron precision. Here we describe a novel approach to determining connectivity. We propose BOINC (“barcoding of individual neuronal connections”), a method for converting the problem of connectivity into a form that can be read out by high-throughput DNA sequencing. The appeal of using sequencing is that its scale—sequencing billions of nucleotides per day is now routine—is a natural match to the complexity of neural circuits. An inexpensive high-throughput technique for establishing circuit connectivity at single neuron resolution could transform neuroscience research. PMID:23109909

  10. Reading sequence-directed computational nucleosome maps.

    PubMed

    Nibhani, Reshma; Trifonov, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    Recently developed latest version of the sequence-directed single-base resolution nucleosome mapping reveals existence of strong nucleosomes and chromatin columnar structures (columns). Broad application of this simple technique for further studies of chromatin and chromosome structure requires some basic understanding as to how it works and what information it affords. The paper provides such an introduction to the method. The oscillating maps of singular nucleosomes, of short and long oligonucleosome columns, are explained, as well as maps of chromatin on satellite DNA and occurrences of counter-phase (antiparallel) nucleosome neighbors.

  11. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system

    PubMed Central

    Jenior, Matthew L.; Koumpouras, Charles C.; Westcott, Sarah L.; Highlander, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3–V5, V1–V3, V1–V5, V1–V6, and V1–V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1–V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina’s MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting. PMID:27069806

  12. Sequencing 16S rRNA gene fragments using the PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing system.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Patrick D; Jenior, Matthew L; Koumpouras, Charles C; Westcott, Sarah L; Highlander, Sarah K

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, microbial ecologists have largely abandoned sequencing 16S rRNA genes by the Sanger sequencing method and have instead adopted highly parallelized sequencing platforms. These new platforms, such as 454 and Illumina's MiSeq, have allowed researchers to obtain millions of high quality but short sequences. The result of the added sequencing depth has been significant improvements in experimental design. The tradeoff has been the decline in the number of full-length reference sequences that are deposited into databases. To overcome this problem, we tested the ability of the PacBio Single Molecule, Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing platform to generate sequence reads from the 16S rRNA gene. We generated sequencing data from the V4, V3-V5, V1-V3, V1-V5, V1-V6, and V1-V9 variable regions from within the 16S rRNA gene using DNA from a synthetic mock community and natural samples collected from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. The mock community allowed us to assess the actual sequencing error rate and how that error rate changed when different curation methods were applied. We developed a simple method based on sequence characteristics and quality scores to reduce the observed error rate for the V1-V9 region from 0.69 to 0.027%. This error rate is comparable to what has been observed for the shorter reads generated by 454 and Illumina's MiSeq sequencing platforms. Although the per base sequencing cost is still significantly more than that of MiSeq, the prospect of supplementing reference databases with full-length sequences from organisms below the limit of detection from the Sanger approach is exciting.

  13. 54 Gbps real time quantum random number generator with simple implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Jinlu; Su, Qi; Li, Zhengyu; Fan, Fan; Xu, Bingjie; Guo, Hong

    2016-11-01

    We present a random number generation scheme based on measuring the phase fluctuations of a laser with a simple and compact experimental setup. A simple model is established to analyze the randomness and the simulation result based on this model fits well with the experiment data. After the analog to digital sampling and suitable randomness extraction integrated in the field programmable gate array, the final random bits are delivered to a PC, realizing a 5.4 Gbps real time quantum random number generation. The final random bit sequences have passed all the NIST and DIEHARD tests.

  14. NCBI Mass Sequence Downloader-Large dataset downloading made easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pina-Martins, F.; Paulo, O. S.

    Sequence databases, such as NCBI, are a very important resource in many areas of science. Downloading small amounts of sequences to local storage can easily be performed using any recent web browser, but downloading tens of thousands of sequences is not as simple. NCBI Mass Sequence Downloader is an open source program aimed at simplifying obtaining large amounts of sequence data from NCBI databases to local storage. It is written in python (can be run under both python 2 and python 3), and uses PyQt5 for the GUI. The program can be run in either graphical or command line mode. Source code is licensed under the GPLv3, and is supported on Linux, Windows and Mac OSX. Available at https://github.com/ElsevierSoftwareX/SOFTX-D-15-00072.git, https://github.com/StuntsPT/NCBI_Mass_Downloader

  15. Method to amplify variable sequences without imposing primer sequences

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Zeytun, Ahmet

    2006-11-14

    The present invention provides methods of amplifying target sequences without including regions flanking the target sequence in the amplified product or imposing amplification primer sequences on the amplified product. Also provided are methods of preparing a library from such amplified target sequences.

  16. Sequence-Dependent Persistence Lengths of DNA.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan S; Glowacki, Jaroslaw; Grandchamp, Alexandre E; Manning, Robert S; Maddocks, John H

    2017-03-24

    A Monte Carlo code applied to the cgDNA coarse-grain rigid-base model of B-form double-stranded DNA is used to predict a sequence-averaged persistence length of lF = 53.5 nm in the sense of Flory, and of lp = 160 bp or 53.5 nm in the sense of apparent tangent-tangent correlation decay. These estimates are slightly higher than the consensus experimental values of 150 bp or 50 nm, but we believe the agreement to be good given that the cgDNA model is itself parametrized from molecular dynamics simulations of short fragments of length 10-20 bp, with no explicit fit to persistence length. Our Monte Carlo simulations further predict that there can be substantial dependence of persistence lengths on the specific sequence [Formula: see text] of a fragment. We propose, and confirm the numerical accuracy of, a simple factorization that separates the part of the apparent tangent-tangent correlation decay [Formula: see text] attributable to intrinsic shape, from a part [Formula: see text] attributable purely to stiffness, i.e., a sequence-dependent version of what has been called sequence-averaged dynamic persistence length l̅d (=58.8 nm within the cgDNA model). For ensembles of both random and λ-phage fragments, the apparent persistence length [Formula: see text] has a standard deviation of 4 nm over sequence, whereas our dynamic persistence length [Formula: see text] has a standard deviation of only 1 nm. However, there are notable dynamic persistence length outliers, including poly(A) (exceptionally straight and stiff), poly(TA) (tightly coiled and exceptionally soft), and phased A-tract sequence motifs (exceptionally bent and stiff). The results of our numerical simulations agree reasonably well with both molecular dynamics simulation and diverse experimental data including minicircle cyclization rates and stereo cryo-electron microscopy images.

  17. Sorghum genome sequencing by methylation filtration.

    PubMed

    Bedell, Joseph A; Budiman, Muhammad A; Nunberg, Andrew; Citek, Robert W; Robbins, Dan; Jones, Joshua; Flick, Elizabeth; Rholfing, Theresa; Fries, Jason; Bradford, Kourtney; McMenamy, Jennifer; Smith, Michael; Holeman, Heather; Roe, Bruce A; Wiley, Graham; Korf, Ian F; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Lakey, Nathan; McCombie, W Richard; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Martienssen, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Sorghum bicolor is a close relative of maize and is a staple crop in Africa and much of the developing world because of its superior tolerance of arid growth conditions. We have generated sequence from the hypomethylated portion of the sorghum genome by applying methylation filtration (MF) technology. The evidence suggests that 96% of the genes have been sequence tagged, with an average coverage of 65% across their length. Remarkably, this level of gene discovery was accomplished after generating a raw coverage of less than 300 megabases of the 735-megabase genome. MF preferentially captures exons and introns, promoters, microRNAs, and simple sequence repeats, and minimizes interspersed repeats, thus providing a robust view of the functional parts of the genome. The sorghum MF sequence set is beneficial to research on sorghum and is also a powerful resource for comparative genomics among the grasses and across the entire plant kingdom. Thousands of hypothetical gene predictions in rice and Arabidopsis are supported by the sorghum dataset, and genomic similarities highlight evolutionarily conserved regions that will lead to a better understanding of rice and Arabidopsis.

  18. Statistical and linguistic features of DNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havlin, S.; Buldyrev, S. V.; Goldberger, A. L.; Mantegna, R. N.; Peng, C. K.; Simons, M.; Stanley, H. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present evidence supporting the idea that the DNA sequence in genes containing noncoding regions is correlated, and that the correlation is remarkably long range--indeed, base pairs thousands of base pairs distant are correlated. We do not find such a long-range correlation in the coding regions of the gene. We resolve the problem of the "non-stationary" feature of the sequence of base pairs by applying a new algorithm called Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA). We address the claim of Voss that there is no difference in the statistical properties of coding and noncoding regions of DNA by systematically applying the DFA algorithm, as well as standard FFT analysis, to all eukaryotic DNA sequences (33 301 coding and 29 453 noncoding) in the entire GenBank database. We describe a simple model to account for the presence of long-range power-law correlations which is based upon a generalization of the classic Levy walk. Finally, we describe briefly some recent work showing that the noncoding sequences have certain statistical features in common with natural languages. Specifically, we adapt to DNA the Zipf approach to analyzing linguistic texts, and the Shannon approach to quantifying the "redundancy" of a linguistic text in terms of a measurable entropy function. We suggest that noncoding regions in plants and invertebrates may display a smaller entropy and larger redundancy than coding regions, further supporting the possibility that noncoding regions of DNA may carry biological information.

  19. Parallel sequence alignment in limited space.

    PubMed

    Grice, J A; Hughey, R; Speck, D

    1995-01-01

    Sequence comparison with affine gap costs is a problem that is readily parallelizable on simple single-instruction, multiple-data stream (SIMD) parallel processors using only constant space per processing element. Unfortunately, the twin problem of sequence alignment, finding the optimal character-by-character correspondence between two sequences, is more complicated. While the innovative O(n2)-time and O(n)-space serial algorithm has been parallelized for multiple-instruction, multiple-data stream (MIMD) computers with only a communication-time slowdown, typically O(log n), it is not suitable for hardware-efficient SIMD parallel processors with only local communication. This paper proposes several methods of computing sequence alignments with limited memory per processing element. The algorithms are also well-suited to serial implementation. The simpler algorithms feature, for an arbitrary integer L, a factor of L slowdown in exchange for reducing space requirements from O(n) to O(L square root of n) per processing element. Using this result, we describe an O(n log n) parallel time algorithm that requires O(log n) space per processing element on O(n) SIMD processing elements with only a mesh or linear interconnection network.

  20. Quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles and linear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangouard, Nicolas; Simon, Christoph; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Gisin, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of quantum states over long distances is limited by photon loss. Straightforward amplification as in classical telecommunications is not an option in quantum communication because of the no-cloning theorem. This problem could be overcome by implementing quantum repeater protocols, which create long-distance entanglement from shorter-distance entanglement via entanglement swapping. Such protocols require the capacity to create entanglement in a heralded fashion, to store it in quantum memories, and to swap it. One attractive general strategy for realizing quantum repeaters is based on the use of atomic ensembles as quantum memories, in combination with linear optical techniques and photon counting to perform all required operations. Here the theoretical and experimental status quo of this very active field are reviewed. The potentials of different approaches are compared quantitatively, with a focus on the most immediate goal of outperforming the direct transmission of photons.