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Sample records for simplex virus infections

  1. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections are uncommon, but because of the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection they are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This article summarizes the epidemiology of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections and discusses clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  2. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  3. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cherpes, Thomas L; Matthews, Dean B; Maryak, Samantha A

    2012-12-01

    Neonatal herpes, seen roughly in 1 of 3000 live births in the United States, is the most serious manifestation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in the perinatal period. Although acyclovir therapy decreases infant mortality associated with perinatal HSV transmission, development of permanent neurological disabilities is not uncommon. Mother-to-neonate HSV transmission is most efficient when maternal genital tract HSV infection is acquired proximate to the time of delivery, signifying that neonatal herpes prevention strategies need to focus on decreasing the incidence of maternal infection during pregnancy and more precisely identifying infants most likely to benefit from prophylactic antiviral therapy.

  4. Herpes simplex type-1 virus infection.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A

    2003-06-01

    Oral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus represents one of the more common conditions the dental practitioner will be called upon to manage. Unique in its ability to establish latency and undergo subsequent recurrence, it is an ubiquitous infectious agent for which a cure does not exist. For the immunocompetent patient, herpes virus simplex infection typically represents nothing more than a nuisance. However, for the immunocompromised patient, this infection is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recently introduced antiviral drug regimens may reduce the morbidity and potential mortality of the herpes simplex virus, especially in immunocompromised patients. The value of antiviral therapy in the management of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection in the immunocompetent patient remains an area of contentious debate.

  5. The management of herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Yeung-Yue, Kimberly A; Brentjens, Mathijs H; Lee, Patricia C; Tyring, Stephen K

    2002-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus persists in a latent form for the life of its host, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently no cure is available. Antiviral therapy is the main treatment modality, used either orally, intravenously, or topically to prohibit further replication of the virus and thereby minimize cellular destruction. However, immunologic advances in the treatment and prevention of herpes simplex infections are promising and continue to be studied.

  6. Herpes simplex virus infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Gardella, Carolyn

    2014-12-01

    Genital herpes in pregnancy continues to cause significant maternal morbidity, with an increasing number of infections being due to oral-labial transmission of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1. Near delivery, primary infections with HSV-1 or HSV-2 carry the highest risk of neonatal herpes infection, which is a rare but potentially devastating disease for otherwise healthy newborns. Prevention efforts have been limited by lack of an effective intervention for preventing primary infections and the unclear role of routine serologic testing.

  7. Maternal and neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-02-01

    Genital herpes infections are extremely common worldwide and ~22% of pregnant women are infected with herpes simplex virus. Eighty percent of those affected with genital herpes are unaware of being infected. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is neonatal herpes disease. Fortunately, neonatal herpes simplex infections are uncommon but due to the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction assay for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy have revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Most recently, the initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This review will summarize the epidemiology of maternal and neonatal herpes infections and discuss clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow-up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  8. Zebrafish: modeling for herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Thessicar Evadney; Jones, Kevin S; Dale, Rodney M; Shukla, Deepak; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2014-02-01

    For many years, zebrafish have been the prototypical model for studies in developmental biology. In recent years, zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system to study infectious diseases, including viral infections. Experiments conducted with herpes simplex virus type-1 in adult zebrafish or in embryo models are encouraging as they establish proof of concept with viral-host tropism and possible screening of antiviral compounds. In addition, the presence of human homologs of viral entry receptors in zebrafish such as 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate, nectins, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14-like receptor bring strong rationale for virologists to test their in vivo significance in viral entry in a zebrafish model and compare the structure-function basis of virus zebrafish receptor interaction for viral entry. On the other end, a zebrafish model is already being used for studying inflammation and angiogenesis, with or without genetic manipulations, and therefore can be exploited to study viral infection-associated pathologies. The major advantage with zebrafish is low cost, easy breeding and maintenance, rapid lifecycle, and a transparent nature, which allows visualizing dissemination of fluorescently labeled virus infection in real time either at a localized region or the whole body. Further, the availability of multiple transgenic lines that express fluorescently tagged immune cells for in vivo imaging of virus infected animals is extremely attractive. In addition, a fully developed immune system and potential for receptor-specific knockouts further advocate the use of zebrafish as a new tool to study viral infections. In this review, we focus on expanding the potential of zebrafish model system in understanding human infectious diseases and future benefits.

  9. Zebrafish: Modeling for Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Thessicar Evadney; Jones, Kevin S.; Dale, Rodney M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Abstract For many years, zebrafish have been the prototypical model for studies in developmental biology. In recent years, zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system to study infectious diseases, including viral infections. Experiments conducted with herpes simplex virus type-1 in adult zebrafish or in embryo models are encouraging as they establish proof of concept with viral-host tropism and possible screening of antiviral compounds. In addition, the presence of human homologs of viral entry receptors in zebrafish such as 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate, nectins, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14-like receptor bring strong rationale for virologists to test their in vivo significance in viral entry in a zebrafish model and compare the structure–function basis of virus zebrafish receptor interaction for viral entry. On the other end, a zebrafish model is already being used for studying inflammation and angiogenesis, with or without genetic manipulations, and therefore can be exploited to study viral infection-associated pathologies. The major advantage with zebrafish is low cost, easy breeding and maintenance, rapid lifecycle, and a transparent nature, which allows visualizing dissemination of fluorescently labeled virus infection in real time either at a localized region or the whole body. Further, the availability of multiple transgenic lines that express fluorescently tagged immune cells for in vivo imaging of virus infected animals is extremely attractive. In addition, a fully developed immune system and potential for receptor-specific knockouts further advocate the use of zebrafish as a new tool to study viral infections. In this review, we focus on expanding the potential of zebrafish model system in understanding human infectious diseases and future benefits. PMID:24266790

  10. Vaccines for herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Koelle, David M

    2006-02-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) can have serious medical consequences. Although antiviral medications can suppress symptomatic disease, asymptomatic shedding and transmission, they neither cure nor alter the natural history of HSV infections. Manipulation of the immune response is one potential method to decrease disease burden. Current research on prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination approaches is discussed in this review, with a focus on compounds that have entered clinical trials or that display novel compositions or proposed mechanisms of action. One such vaccine is an alum and monophosphoryl lipid A-adjuvanted subunit glycoprotein D2 vaccine that has demonstrated activity in the prevention of HSV-2 infection and disease in HSV-uninfected women in a phase III clinical trial. Further confirmatory clinical trials of this vaccine are currently underway. Other vaccine formats also in development include attenuated live or replication-incompetent HSV-2 strains and technologies that target virus-specific CD8 T-cell responses.

  11. Peptide inhibitors against herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Tarallo, Rossella; Russo, Luigi; Galdiero, Emilia; Cantisani, Marco; Morelli, Giancarlo; Galdiero, Massimiliano

    2013-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a significant human pathogen causing mucocutaneous lesions primarily in the oral or genital mucosa. Although acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogs provide successful treatment, HSV remains highly prevalent worldwide and is a major cofactor for the spread of human immunodeficiency virus. Encephalitis, meningitis, and blinding keratitis are among the most severe diseases caused by HSV. ACV resistance poses an important problem for immunocompromised patients and highlights the need for new safe and effective agents; therefore, the development of novel strategies to eradicate HSV is a global public health priority. Despite the continued global epidemic of HSV and extensive research, there have been few major breakthroughs in the treatment or prevention of the virus since the introduction of ACV in the 1980s. A therapeutic strategy at the moment not fully addressed is the use of small peptide molecules. These can be either modeled on viral proteins or derived from antimicrobial peptides. Any peptide that interrupts protein-protein or viral protein-host cell membrane interactions is potentially a novel antiviral drug and may be a useful tool for elucidating the mechanisms of viral entry. This review summarizes current knowledge and strategies in the development of synthetic and natural peptides to inhibit HSV infectivity.

  12. Management of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection and exposure.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are rare but are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Advances in diagnostic modalities to identify these infants, as well as the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy, have revolutionised the management of affected infants. This review will summarise the epidemiology of neonatal HSV infections and discuss the management of infants with HSV exposure and infection.

  13. Clinical and biological differences between recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections

    SciTech Connect

    Straus, S.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The major features that distinguish recurrent herpes simplex virus infections from zoster are illustrated in this article by two case histories. The clinical and epidemiologic features that characterize recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections are reviewed. It is noted that herpesvirus infections are more common and severe in patients with cellular immune deficiency. Each virus evokes both humoral and cellular immune response in the course of primary infection. DNA hybridization studies with RNA probes labelled with sulfur-35 indicate that herpes simplex viruses persist within neurons, and that varicella-zoster virus is found in the satellite cells that encircle the neurons.

  14. Herpes Simplex Virus Infections of the Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    This article summarizes knowledge of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of the central nervous system (CNS). Disease pathogenesis, detection of DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis and prognosis, and approaches to therapy warrant consideration. HSV infection of the CNS is one of few treatable viral diseases. Clinical trials indicate that outcome following neonatal herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections of the CNS is significantly improved when 6 months of suppressive oral acyclovir therapy follows IV antiviral therapy. In contrast, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections of the brain do not benefit from extended oral antiviral therapy. This implies a difference in disease pathogenesis between HSV-2 and HSV-1 infections of the brain. PCR detection of viral DNA in the CSF is the gold standard for diagnosis. Use of PCR is now being adopted as a basis for determining the duration of therapy in the newborn. HSV infections are among the most common encountered by humans; seropositivity occurs in 50% to 90% of adult populations. Herpes simplex encephalitis, however, is an uncommon result of this infection. Since no new antiviral drugs have been introduced in nearly 3 decades, much effort has focused on learning how to better use acyclovir and how to use existing databases to establish earlier diagnosis.

  15. The mortality of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Cantey, Joseph B; Sánchez, Pablo J

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study characterized the clinical course of 13 neonates who died with herpes simplex virus infection from 2001 to 2011, representing a 26% case-fatality rate. Fatal disease developed at ≤ 48 hours of age in one-third of infants, was mostly disseminated disease, and occurred despite early administration of high-dose acyclovir therapy.

  16. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection: epidemiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) are highly prevalent viruses capable of establishing lifelong infection. Genital herpes in women of childbearing age represents a major risk for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HSV infection, with primary and first-episode genital HSV infections posing the highest risk. The advent of antiviral therapy with parenteral acyclovir has led to significant improvement in neonatal HSV disease mortality. Further studies are needed to improve the clinician's ability to identify infants at increased risk for HSV infection and prevent MTCT, and to develop novel antiviral agents with increased efficacy in infants with HSV infection.

  17. Early Events in Herpes Simplex Virus Infection: a Radioautographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Hummeler, Klaus; Tomassini, Natale; Zajac, Barbara

    1969-01-01

    The early events in herpes simplex virus infection were studied by means of radio-autography. The virus was rapidly taken up by the host cells and uncoated. Viral deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) reached the nuclear sites of replication in 15 to 30 min after infection. The viral DNA occasionally associated with chromosomes or condensed chromatin but was more frequently found to be randomly distributed. Viral progeny appeared 3 hr after infection. These particles did not show any particular spatial relationship to the parental DNA. The morphological latent period lasted 2.5 hr. Images PMID:4309102

  18. Autophagy Stimulation Abrogates Herpes simplex Virus-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yakoub, Abraam M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that causes life-long infections. HSV-1 infections may lead to herpetic stromal keratitis that may advance to corneal blindness. HSV-1 infections can also cause fatal conditions, such as herpes encephalitis, or neonatal disease. A major virulence mechanism of HSV-1 is the control of autophagy, an innate immune defense strategy that could otherwise degrade viral particles. Here, to investigate a new mechanism for antiviral therapy, we tested the effect of various autophagy inducers (physiological and pharmacological) on infection. Autophagy stimulation was confirmed to significantly suppress HSV-1 infection in various cell types, without affecting cell viability. This study establishes the importance of autophagy for regulating HSV-1 infection, and provides a proof-of-principle evidence for a novel antiviral mechanism. PMID:25856282

  19. Basal Autophagy Is Required for Herpes simplex Virus-2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yakoub, Abraam M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process of the cell, which plays an important role in regulating plethora of infections. The role of autophagy in Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection is unknown. Here, we found that HSV-2 does not allow induction of an autophagic response to infection, but maintains basal autophagy levels mostly unchanged during productive infection. Thus, we investigated the importance of basal autophagy for HSV-2 infection, using pharmacological autophagy suppression or cells genetically deficient in an autophagy-essential gene (ATG5). Interference with basal autophagy flux in cells significantly reduced viral replication and diminished the infection. These results indicate that basal autophagy plays an indispensable role required for a productive infection. Importantly, this study draws a sharp distinction between induced and basal autophagy, where the former acts as a viral clearance mechanism abrogating infection, while the latter supports infection. PMID:26248741

  20. Psoralen inactivation of influenza and herpes simplex viruses and of virus-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Redfield, D C; Richman, D D; Oxman, M N; Kronenberg, L H

    1981-01-01

    Psoralen compounds covalently bind to nucleic acids when irradiated with long-wavelength ultraviolet light. This treatment can destroy the infectivity of deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid viruses. Two psoralen compounds, 4'-hydroxymethyltrioxsalen and 4'-aminomethyltrioxsalen, were used with long-wavelength ultraviolet light to inactivate cell-free herpes simplex and influenza viruses and to render virus-infected cells noninfectious. This method of inactivation was compared with germicidal (short-wavelength) ultraviolet light irradiation. The antigenicity of the treated, virus-infected, antigen-bearing cells was examined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay and by measuring the capacity of the herpes simplex virus-infected cells to stimulate virus-specific lymphocyte proliferation. The infectivity of the virus-infected cells could be totally eliminated without altering their viral antigenicity. The use of psoralen plus long-wavelength ultraviolet light is well suited to the preparation of noninfectious virus antigens and virus antigen-bearing cells for immunological assays. PMID:6265375

  1. Psoralen inactivation of influenza and herpes simplex viruses and of virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Redfield, D.C.; Richman, D.D.; Oxman, M.N.; Kronenberg, L.H.

    1981-06-01

    Psoralen compounds covalently bind to nucleic acids when irradiated with long-wavelength ultraviolet light. This treatment can destroy the infectivity of deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid viruses. Two psoralen compounds, 4'-hydroxymethyltrioxsalen and 4'-aminomethyltrioxsalen, were used with long-wavelength ultraviolet light to inactivate cell-free herpes simplex and influenza viruses and to render virus-infected cells noninfectious. This method of inactivation was compared with germicidal (short-wavelength) ultraviolet light irradiation. The antigenicity of the treated, virus-infected, antigen-bearing cells was examined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay and by measuring the capacity of the herpes simplex virus-infected cells to stimulate virus-specific lymphocyte proliferation. The infectivity of the virus-infected cells could be totally eliminated without altering their viral antigenicity. The use of psoralen plus long-wavelength ultraviolet light is well suited to the preparation of noninfectious virus antigens and virus antigen-bearing cells for immunological assays.

  2. Immune inhibition of virus release from herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Mushi, E Z; Whitney, J E

    By treatment of herpes simplex virus-infected cells with virus antiserum with or without complement, the yield of infectious extracellular virus was significantly reduced. This was shown to be due to an immune alteration of the cell membrane which inhibited release of virus particles from the infected cells and not due to neutralization; both type-common and type-specific antigens of herpes simplex virus were involved. The phenomenon was also evident with antisera directed against cell determinants. The experimental findings are presented and their significance in the immunological defense mechanisms of the body and in viral immunotherapy is discussed.

  3. Autophagy interaction with herpes simplex virus type-1 infection.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Douglas; Liang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of the U.S. population is infected with herpes simplex virus type-I (HSV-1) and global infectious estimates are nearly 90%. HSV-1 is normally seen as a harmless virus but debilitating diseases can arise, including encephalitis and ocular diseases. HSV-1 is unique in that it can undermine host defenses and establish lifelong infection in neurons. Viral reactivation from latency may allow HSV-1 to lay siege to the brain (Herpes encephalitis). Recent advances maintain that HSV-1 proteins act to suppress and/or control the lysosome-dependent degradation pathway of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) and consequently, in neurons, may be coupled with the advancement of HSV-1-associated pathogenesis. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that HSV-1 infection may constitute a gradual risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders. The relationship between HSV-1 infection and autophagy manipulation combined with neuropathogenesis may be intimately intertwined demanding further investigation.

  4. Autophagy interaction with herpes simplex virus type-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Douglas; Liang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    abstract More than 50% of the U.S. population is infected with herpes simplex virus type-I (HSV-1) and global infectious estimates are nearly 90%. HSV-1 is normally seen as a harmless virus but debilitating diseases can arise, including encephalitis and ocular diseases. HSV-1 is unique in that it can undermine host defenses and establish lifelong infection in neurons. Viral reactivation from latency may allow HSV-1 to lay siege to the brain (Herpes encephalitis). Recent advances maintain that HSV-1 proteins act to suppress and/or control the lysosome-dependent degradation pathway of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) and consequently, in neurons, may be coupled with the advancement of HSV-1-associated pathogenesis. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that HSV-1 infection may constitute a gradual risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders. The relationship between HSV-1 infection and autophagy manipulation combined with neuropathogenesis may be intimately intertwined demanding further investigation. PMID:26934628

  5. Empiric acyclovir for neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Vanderpluym, Christina; Tawfik, Gerda; Hervas-Malo, Marilou; Lacaze-Masmonteil, Thierry; Kellner, James; Robinson, Joan L

    2012-08-01

    Because neonatal herpes simplex virus (NHSV) infection is difficult to diagnose, there has been a move towards using more empiric acyclovir (ACV). The purpose of this study was to review the use of ACV to optimize future management of NHSV. Charts were reviewed for infants started on intravenous ACV up to day 43 of life--January 2001 through February 2007--at five hospitals in Edmonton and Calgary. ACV was started for possible (N = 115) or proven (N = 3) herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Six of the infants with possible HSV infection later had proven HSV infection. Seizures (34%), hemodynamic instability (29%) and skin lesions (24%) were the most common indications for ACV. Among the 118 infants, 106 (90%) had cerebrospinal fluid obtained and 82 (69%) had at least one surface swab for HSV but 4 (3%) had no specimens submitted for HSV detection. ACV was continued for 3.9 ± 3.5 days in the infants with no proven HSV disease. Possible nephrotoxicity from ACV was recorded in 3 of these 109 infants and in none of the infants with proven HSV disease. Clinicians in Alberta primarily consider the diagnosis of NHSV infection when confronted with a neonate with seizures, hemodynamic instability or suspicious skin lesions, but need to consider the diagnosis more often if all cases are to be treated at first presentation. They often perform incomplete investigations to rule out NHSV infection. Adverse events from ACV appear to be uncommon when the drug is used for suspected NHSV disease.

  6. Corneal donor infection by herpes simplex virus: herpes simplex virus DNA in donor corneas.

    PubMed

    Cleator, G M; Klapper, P E; Dennett, C; Sullivan, A L; Bonshek, R E; Marcyniuk, B; Tullo, A B

    1994-07-01

    Three corneoscleral discs (from two donors) underwent subtotal endothelial loss during routine "long-term" organ culture storage. Laboratory studies of these corneas revealed evidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. The fellow cornea from one of the donors had been issued for transplant to a patient with keratoconus. Deterioration of the graft was noted 5 days after surgery; the disc was removed at 2 months and was shown to be infected with HSV. In an experiment designed to simulate initial "cleansing" of donor globes, 0.1% polyvinylpyrolidone-iodine protected cells from infection with HSV. It was concluded that the detection of HSV in these corneas could not be explained by external contamination of the ocular surface. Furthermore, culture of conjunctival and pharangeal swabs taken from 47 consecutive donors confirmed that HSV is rarely isolated at or around the time of death. Five pairs of donor corneas destined for use in transplantation were selected at random and investigated for the presence of HSV. HSV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in tissue from two of the corneal donors. Sequential stepwise sectioning suggested that HSV DNA when present was distributed in discrete foci within the cornea. These observations suggest that HSV infection may be a cause of severe endothelial loss during corneal organ culture and possibly provide an explanation for some "failures" of corneal grafting.

  7. Central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection in afebrile children with seizures.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Indrajit; Hartley-McAndrew, Michelle E; Weinstock, Arie L

    2012-04-01

    Central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection is suspected in patients presenting with acute-onset seizures and lethargy. The potential neurologic sequelae from untreated herpes infection can prompt empirical acyclovir therapy, even in afebrile subjects. The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection in children presenting with afebrile seizures and to assess the need for empirical acyclovir therapy. Clinical and laboratory data of children with acute-onset afebrile seizures and children with central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection were compared. Polymerase chain reaction and viral cultures of the cerebrospinal fluid for herpes simplex virus infection were negative in all subjects with afebrile seizures; 32.7% of these subjects were empirically treated with acyclovir. In conclusion, central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection is uncommon in children presenting with afebrile seizures, and acyclovir therapy is rarely necessary in subjects with normal neurologic examination and cerebrospinal fluid analysis.

  8. Prevention and management of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Allen, Upton D; Robinson, Joan L

    2014-04-01

    Human herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in neonates can result in devastating outcomes, including mortality and significant morbidity. All infants are potentially at risk for neonatal HSV infection. This position statement reviews epidemiology, transmission and risk factors, with a focus on intrapartum infection. It considers diagnosis and prognosis according to infection category, along with testing modalities and limitations. Recommendations for managing newborns known to have been exposed intrapartum to HSV are based on expert opinion because a randomized trial to compare management options is not feasible. Guidance is provided for the empirical management of infants with suspected clinical sepsis, including those who do not respond to antibacterial therapy. The present statement replaces a 2006 position statement by the Canadian Paediatric Society.

  9. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection Mimicking Bullous Disease in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lecluse, Anne L.Y.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    Immunodeficient patients are at risk of developing extended or atypical herpes simplex virus infections, which can be easily misdiagnosed. We present the case of a 79-year-old, treatment-induced (oral corticosteroid), immunocompromised female with an extensive atypical herpes simplex virus infection. This patient presented with multiple erosions and vesicles on the trunk with a subacute onset. The clinical differential diagnosis was herpes simplex infection, herpes zoster infection, pemphigus vulgaris or bullous pemphigoid. Due to the atypical clinical presentation and negative Tzanck test, suspicion of viral infection was low. High-dose steroid treatment was initiated. Subsequent histopathology, however, showed a herpes simplex virus infection. After discontinuing steroid treatment and initiating antiviral treatment, the patient recovered within a week. Emphasis must be placed on the importance of clinical awareness of extended and clinically atypical herpes simplex infections in immunocompromised patients. A negative Tzanck test does not rule out the possibility of a herpes infection. PMID:21103195

  10. Limb hypoplasia resulting from intrauterine infection with herpes simplex virus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carola, D; Skibo, M; Cannon, S; Cam, K M; Hyde, P; Aghai, Z H

    2014-11-01

    Intrauterine infection with herpes simplex virus, although very rare, has devastating effects on multiple organ systems in the fetus and can lead to in utero fetal demise. Neonates born following intrauterine herpes simplex virus infection commonly manifest with cutaneous lesions, ocular damage and/or brain abnormalities. We describe the case of a dichorionic, diamniotic twin gestation complicated by intrauterine herpes simplex virus infection. This infection led to the fetal demise of twin A and a very uncommon presentation of limb hypoplasia in twin B.

  11. Treatment of mucocutaneous presentations of herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Nikkels, Arjen F; Pièrard, Gérald E

    2002-01-01

    Infections by herpes simplex virus (HSV) types I and II are diverse and quite frequent. After primary infection, the virus establishes a life-long latency in the sensory ganglia and recrudescences may occur at an unpredictable rate. Recurrent labial and genital herpes infections represent the majority of clinical manifestations of HSV infections. Their management is currently well established using evidence-based medicine data. Primary labial herpes is generally not treated with antivirals in otherwise healthy children, although intravenous aciclovir may be offered in severe primary infections, particularly in the immunocompromised patient. The decision whether or not to treat recurrent labial herpes should be evaluated individually and depends on the frequency and severity of relapses, the impairment of the quality of life, and the cost of therapy. Patients with mild disease may benefit from topical therapy, and those with severe and frequent recurrences may be considered for intermittent or long-term oral antiviral therapy. Primary genital herpes is treated with oral or intravenous antivirals, depending on the severity of the infection and associated symptoms. Recurrent genital herpes can be managed with episodic short courses of oral antivirals in patients whose recurrences are moderate to severe and rare, and have a clear prodrome. Patients with >5 episodes/year, severe recurrences or unrecognisable prodromes may be best managed with long-term suppressive antiviral prophylaxis. HSV is also responsible for a variety of other clinical manifestations, including herpetic whitlow, neonatal infection, disseminated and atypical cutaneous infections, traumatic herpes, eczema herpeticum, and HSV-associated erythema multiforme. HSV infection may also represent a complication following cosmetic procedures of the oro-facial region, surgical and dental interventions, sun exposure and burns. Precise treatment guidelines for these HSV infections are not firmly established.

  12. Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Infection Impacts Stress Granule Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Finnen, Renée L.; Pangka, Kyle R.

    2012-01-01

    Interference with stress granule (SG) accumulation is gaining increased appreciation as a common strategy used by diverse viruses to facilitate their replication and to cope with translational arrest. Here, we examined the impact of infection by herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) on SG accumulation by monitoring the localization of the SG components T cell internal antigen 1 (TIA-1), Ras-GTPase-activating SH3-domain-binding protein (G3BP), and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP). Our results indicate that SGs do not accumulate in HSV-2-infected cells and that HSV-2 can interfere with arsenite-induced SG accumulation early after infection. Surprisingly, SG accumulation was inhibited despite increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), implying that HSV-2 encodes previously unrecognized activities designed to maintain translation initiation downstream of eIF2α. SG accumulation was not inhibited in HSV-2-infected cells treated with pateamine A, an inducer that works independently of eIF2α phosphorylation. The SGs that accumulated following pateamine A treatment of infected cells contained G3BP and PABP but were largely devoid of TIA-1. We also identified novel nuclear structures containing TIA-1 that form late in infection. These structures contain the RNA binding protein 68-kDa Src-associated in mitosis (Sam68) and were noticeably absent in infected cells treated with inhibitors of viral DNA replication, suggesting that they arise as a result of late events in the virus replicative cycle. PMID:22623775

  13. Herpes simplex virus 2 infection impacts stress granule accumulation.

    PubMed

    Finnen, Renée L; Pangka, Kyle R; Banfield, Bruce W

    2012-08-01

    Interference with stress granule (SG) accumulation is gaining increased appreciation as a common strategy used by diverse viruses to facilitate their replication and to cope with translational arrest. Here, we examined the impact of infection by herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) on SG accumulation by monitoring the localization of the SG components T cell internal antigen 1 (TIA-1), Ras-GTPase-activating SH3-domain-binding protein (G3BP), and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP). Our results indicate that SGs do not accumulate in HSV-2-infected cells and that HSV-2 can interfere with arsenite-induced SG accumulation early after infection. Surprisingly, SG accumulation was inhibited despite increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), implying that HSV-2 encodes previously unrecognized activities designed to maintain translation initiation downstream of eIF2α. SG accumulation was not inhibited in HSV-2-infected cells treated with pateamine A, an inducer that works independently of eIF2α phosphorylation. The SGs that accumulated following pateamine A treatment of infected cells contained G3BP and PABP but were largely devoid of TIA-1. We also identified novel nuclear structures containing TIA-1 that form late in infection. These structures contain the RNA binding protein 68-kDa Src-associated in mitosis (Sam68) and were noticeably absent in infected cells treated with inhibitors of viral DNA replication, suggesting that they arise as a result of late events in the virus replicative cycle.

  14. Herpesviridae infections in newborns: varicella zoster virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Enright, Andrea M; Prober, Charles G

    2004-08-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are all members of the Herpesviridae family.Humans are the only source of infection for these double stranded DNA viruses. Infants may acquire these infections in utero, peripartum, or postnatally, resulting in a variety of clinical syndromes, ranging from asymptomatic infection to severe infection,with high mortality rates and significant long-term morbidity. This article presents the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, treatment,and prevention strategies for VZV, HSV, and CMV infections in infants.

  15. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infection by ultraviolet light: a human model

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, J.J.; Mannix, M.L.; Rooney, J.F.; Notkins, A.L.; Straus, S.E.

    1987-09-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus often results in a latent infection of local sensory ganglia and a disease characterized by periodic viral reactivation and mucocutaneous lesions. The factors that trigger reactivation in humans are still poorly defined. In our study, five patients with documented histories of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection on the buttocks or sacrum were exposed to three times their minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet light. Site-specific cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection occurred at 4.4 +/- 0.4 days after exposure to ultraviolet light in 8 of 13 attempts at reactivation. We conclude that ultraviolet light can reactivate herpes simplex virus under experimentally defined conditions. This model in humans should prove useful in evaluating the pathophysiology and prevention of viral reactivation.

  16. Novel agents and strategies to treat herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Kleymann, Gerald

    2003-02-01

    The quiet pandemic of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection has plagued humanity since ancient times, causing mucocutaneous infection, such as herpes labialis and herpes genitalis. Disease symptoms often interfere with everyday activities and occasionally HSV infections are the cause of life-threatening or sight-impairing disease, especially in neonates and the immunocompromised patient population. After primary or initial infection the virus persists for life in a latent form in neurons of the host, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently, no cure is available. In the mid-1950s the first antiviral, idoxuridine, was developed for topical treatment of herpes disease and, in 1978, vidarabine was licensed for systemic use to treat HSV encephalitis. Acyclovir (Zovirax), a potent, specific and tolerable nucleosidic inhibitor of the herpes DNA polymerase, was a milestone in the development of antiviral drugs in the late 1970s. In the mid-1990s, when acyclovir became a generic drug, valacyclovir (Valtrex) and famciclovir (Famvir), prodrugs of the gold standard and penciclovir (Denavir), Vectavir), a close analogue, were launched. Though numerous approaches and strategies were tested and considerable effort was expended in the search of the next generation of an antiherpetic therapy, it proved difficult to outperform acyclovir. Notable in this regard was the award of a Nobel Prize in 1988 for the elucidation of mechanistic principles which resulted in the development of new drugs such as acyclovir. Vaccines, interleukins, interferons, therapeutic proteins, antibodies, immunomodulators and small-molecule drugs with specific or nonspecific modes of action lacked either efficacy or the required safety profile to replace the nucleosidic drugs acyclovir, valacyclovir, penciclovir and famciclovir as the first choice of treatment. Recently though, new inhibitors of the HSV helicase-primase with potent in vitro

  17. Primary herpes simplex virus infection mimicking cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Andrew; White, Catherine; Higgins, Stephen Peter

    2015-06-02

    We report the case of an 18-year-old woman presenting with ulceration of the cervix caused by primary type 2 herpes simplex infection in the absence of skin lesions. The differential diagnosis included cervical cancer and we referred the patient for urgent colposcopy. However, laboratory tests proved the viral aetiology of the cervical ulceration and the cervix had healed completely 3 weeks later. The case highlights the need to consider herpes simplex infection in the differential diagnosis of ulceration of the cervix even when there are no cutaneous signs of herpes.

  18. Surgical excision for recurrent herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) anogenital infection in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    PubMed

    Arinze, Folasade; Shaver, Aaron; Raffanti, Stephen

    2017-05-15

    Recurrent anogenital herpes simplex virus infections are common in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), of whom approximately 5% develop resistance to acyclovir. We present a case of a 49-year-old man with HIV who had an 8-year history of recurrent left inguinal herpes simplex virus type 2 ulcerations. He initially responded to oral acyclovir, but developed resistance to acyclovir and eventually foscarnet. The lesion progressed to a large hypertrophic mass that required surgical excision, which led to resolution without recurrences. Our case highlights the importance of surgical excision as a treatment option in refractory herpes simplex virus anogenital infections.

  19. Preparation and efficacy of an inactivated subunit vaccine (NFUIBHK) against type 2 Herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Williams, D R; Buchan, A; Whitney, J; Harding, M; Bodfish, K

    1978-11-17

    A vaccine against Herpes simplex virus infection was prepared by Nonidet NP 40 and formalin treatment of a type 1, infected-cell extract; virus particles were removed by ultracentrifugation over sucrose. These procedures were not detrimental to the antigenic quality of the vaccine preparation. The vaccine afforded significant protection to experimental type 2 genital herpes virus infection in mice, as adjudged by clinical observations, cytopathological change, and virus yields.

  20. Influence of herpes simplex virus infection on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism in monkey kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, J.H.; Whitcomb, B.; Hall, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Current research in our laboratory is designed to investigate the intracellular interactions of BP with oncogenic DNA viruses of animals and humans. In this study, our purpose was to determine whether BP is metabolized in herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infected cells and whether HSV-2 infection affects intracellular levels of the aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase system necessary for BP metabolism.

  1. Immune inhibition of virus release from herpes simplex virus-infected cells by human sera.

    PubMed

    Shariff, D M; Hallworth, J; Desperbasques, M; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1988-01-01

    Human sera contain antibody (IVR antibody) which will inhibit the release of herpes simplex virus type 1 from virus-infected cells. This antibody activity was removed by adsorption of sera with virus-infected cell extract. There was a positive correlation between IVR and neutralizing antibody activity, particularly when measured by augmented neutralization test; measurement of IVR antibody was equally as sensitive as measurement of neutralizing antibody by augmented neutralization test. IVR antibody levels provided indication of a history of recurrent herpes labialis, the pattern of antibody response following primary herpetic infection, and indication of response to Skinner herpes vaccine in human subjects. It is suggested that consideration should be given to measurement of IVR antibody in both clinical and epidemiological studies of herpes and other virus infections.

  2. Herpes simplex virus 2 infection: molecular association with HIV and novel microbicides to prevent disease.

    PubMed

    Suazo, Paula A; Tognarelli, Eduardo I; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-04-01

    Infection with herpes simplex viruses is one of the most ancient diseases described to affect humans. Infection with these viruses produces vexing effects to the host, which frequently recur. Infection with herpes simplex viruses is lifelong, and currently there is no vaccine or drug to prevent or cure infection. Prevalence of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infection varies significantly depending on the geographical region and nears 20% worldwide. Importantly, HSV-2 is the first cause of genital ulcers in the planet. HSV-2 affects approximately 500 million people around the globe and significantly increases the likelihood of acquiring the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), as well as its shedding. Thus, controlling HSV-2 infection and spread is of public health concern. Here, we review the diseases produced by herpes simplex viruses, the factors that modulate HSV-2 infection, the relationship between HSV-2 and HIV and novel therapeutic and prophylactic microbicides/antivirals under development to prevent infection and pathological outcomes produced by this virus. We also review mutations associated with HSV-2 resistance to common antivirals.

  3. Preparation of herpes simplex virus-infected primary neurons for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Saksena, Monica; Boadle, Ross; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides the resolution necessary to identify both viruses and subcellular components of cells infected with many types of viruses, including herpes simplex virus. Recognized as a powerful tool in both diagnostic and research-based virology laboratories, TEM has made possible the identification of new viruses and has contributed to the elucidation of virus life cycle and virus-host cell interaction. Whilst there are many sample preparation techniques for TEM, conventional processing using chemical fixation and resin embedding remains a useful technique, available in virtually all EM laboratories, for studying virus/cell ultrastructure. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of herpes simplex virus-infected primary neurons, grown on plastic cover slips, to allow sectioning of neurons and axons in their growth plane. This technique allows TEM examination of cell bodies, axons, growth cones, and varicosities, providing powerful insights into virus-cell interaction.

  4. Molecular mimicry in virus infection: crossreaction of measles virus phosphoprotein or of herpes simplex virus protein with human intermediate filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Fujinami, R S; Oldstone, M B; Wroblewska, Z; Frankel, M E; Koprowski, H

    1983-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrate that the phosphoprotein of measles virus and a protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 crossreact with an intermediate filament protein of human cells. This intermediate filament protein, probably vimentin, has a molecular weight of 52,000, whereas the molecular weights of the measles viral phosphoprotein and the herpes virus protein are 70,000 and 146,000, respectively. Crossreactivity was shown by immunofluorescent staining of infected and uninfected cells and by immunoblotting. The monoclonal antibody against measles virus phosphoprotein did not react with herpes simplex virus protein and vice versa, indicating that these monoclonal antibodies recognize different antigenic determinants on the intermediate filament molecule. The significance of these results in explaining the appearance of autoantibodies during virus infections in humans is discussed. Images PMID:6300911

  5. Paraneoplastic pemphigus and Castleman's disease in the setting of herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Koch, Laine H; Layton, Christle J; Pilichowska, Monika; Stadecker, Miguel J; Barak, Orr

    2012-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a 3-week history of mucosal erosions, injected conjunctiva, dehydration, and respiratory distress. She had been treated with intravenous acyclovir for herpes simplex infection with positive herpes simplex virus immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G. Physical examination and imaging revealed a large abdominal mass. Incisional biopsy was obtained, and pathology demonstrated angiofollicular hyperplasia with hyalinized germinal centers and Castleman's syndrome-like features. Based on the mucosal erosions, herpes simplex virus serology and positive herpes simplex virus-1 direct fluorescent antibody, Castleman's disease secondary to overwhelming herpes simplex virus infection was the initial impression. The poor response to antivirals and subsequent development of a bullous eruption on the hands resulted in dermatology consultation. Skin biopsy was obtained from a bullae and revealed suprabasilar acantholysis with necrosis as well as upper dermal, perivascular, and interface infiltrate of lymphocytes and eosinophils. No viropathic changes were present. Direct immunofluorescence was significant for immunoglobulin G deposition intercellularly and along the dermoepidermal junction and focal trace C3 deposition along the dermoepidermal junction consistent with paraneoplastic pemphigus, later confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. We report this case of paraneoplastic pemphigus secondary to Castleman's syndrome confounded by herpes simplex virus-1 positive mucosal erosions.

  6. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  7. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  8. [Relationship between EB virus, Cytomegalo virus, herpes simplex virus and coxsackievirus infection and relapse of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Feng, Zi-jing; Zhao, Ri-guang; Wang, De-xin

    2008-12-01

    To study the relation between the recent active infection with Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus,herpes simplex virus-1, coxsackievirus B I-IV and the relapse of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR MS). Using ELISA method, IgM antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus-1, coxsackievirus BI-IV in the plasma from 34 RR MS patients and 200 normal controls were detected. The rates of recent active infection with the above mentioned viruses of the patients and controls were compared.For patients group,comparison was also made between the clinical data of recent active infected patients and patients without recent active infection. There was no statistically significant difference in positive rates of positive rates of IgM antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus-1 and coxsackievirus BI, II, III or VI between the two groups. While there was statistically significant difference in positive rates of IgM antibodies to coxsackievirus B VI and V in the RR MS patients and those in the controls (being 3/34 and 0/200 P < 0.05; 2/34 and 0/200 P < 0.05, respectively). In the patient group, when patients who had active infection with any of the viruses were compared with those who had no active infection, no significant difference between them was found in terms of age, course, frequency, body temperature on admission, differential leukocyte count (neutrophilic granulocyte, lymphocyte and monocytes), use of glucocorticoids, and EDSS point value. There is a high rate of recent active infection with coxsackievirus B VI and V in RR MS patients at relapsing stage. While the recent virus active infection is unrelated to the severity of the symptoms.

  9. Immune responses in mice against herpes simplex virus: mechanisms of protection against facial and ganglionic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Zweerink, H J; Martinez, D; Lynch, R J; Stanton, L W

    1981-01-01

    We performed experiments with mice to determine the nature of the immune response(s) that prevents primary infections of the skin and the trigeminal ganglia with herpes simplex virus. Immunization with infectious herpes simplex virus, inactivated virus, or material enriched for viral glycoproteins protected hairless mice against primary facial and ganglionic infections. Live and inactivated viruses induced neutralizing antibodies, whereas glycoprotein material did not. Instead, glycoprotein material induced antibodies that were largely directed against two glycopolypeptides with molecular weights of 120,000 to 130,000. Hairless mice immunized with glycoprotein material responded faster than control mice in the synthesis of neutralizing antibodies after challenge with infectious virus. Congenital athymic BALB/c (nu/nu) mice were protected against primary facial infections after immunization with glycoprotein material, but glycoprotein-specific antibodies were not induced. Images PMID:6260662

  10. Pediatric herpes simplex virus infections: an evidence-based approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jennifer E; Garcia, Sylvia E

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is a common virus that causes a variety of clinical presentations ranging from mild to life-threatening. Orolabial and genital herpes are common disorders that can often be managed in an outpatient setting; however, some patients do present to the emergency department with those conditions, and emergency clinicians should be aware of possible complications in the pediatric population. Neonatal herpes is a rare disorder, but prompt recognition and initiation of antiviral therapy is imperative, as the morbidity and mortality of the disease is high. Herpes encephalitis is an emergency that also requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose. Herpes simplex virus is also responsible for a variety of other clinical presentations, including herpes gladiatorum, herpetic whitlow, eczema herpeticum, and ocular herpes. This issue reviews the common clinical presentations of the herpes simplex virus, the life-threatening infections that require expedient identification and management, and recommended treatment regimens.

  11. Defining nervous system susceptibility during acute and latent herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Chandra M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-07-15

    Herpes simplex viruses are neurotropic human pathogens that infect and establish latency in peripheral sensory neurons of the host. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) readily infects the facial mucosa that can result in the establishment of a latent infection in the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG). From latency, HSV-1 can reactivate and cause peripheral pathology following anterograde trafficking from sensory neurons. Under rare circumstances, HSV-1 can migrate into the central nervous system (CNS) and cause Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE), a devastating disease of the CNS. It is unclear whether HSE is the result of viral reactivation within the TG, from direct primary infection of the olfactory mucosa, or from other infected CNS neurons. Areas of the brain that are susceptible to HSV-1 during acute infection are ill-defined. Furthermore, whether the CNS is a true reservoir of viral latency following clearance of virus during acute infection is unknown. In this context, this review will identify sites within the brain that are susceptible to acute infection and harbor latent virus. In addition, we will also address findings of HSV-1 lytic gene expression during latency and comment on the pathophysiological consequences HSV-1 infection may have on long-term neurologic performance in animal models and humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The cycle of human herpes simplex virus infection: virus transport and immune control.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Anthony L; Diefenbach, Russell J; Miranda-Saksena, Monica; Bosnjak, Lidija; Kim, Min; Jones, Cheryl; Douglas, Mark W

    2006-09-15

    After infection of skin or mucosa, herpes simplex virus enters the sensory nerve endings and is conveyed by retrograde axonal transport to the dorsal root ganglion, where the virus develops lifelong latency. Intermittent reactivation, which is spontaneous in humans, leads to anterograde transport of virus particles and proteins to the skin or mucosa, where the virus is shed and/or causes disease. Immune control of viral infection and replication occurs at the level of skin or mucosa during initial or recurrent infection and also within the dorsal root ganglion, where immune mechanisms control latency and reactivation. This article examines current views on the mechanisms of retrograde and anterograde transport of the virus in axons and the mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity that control infection in the skin or mucosa and in the dorsal root ganglion--in particular, the role of interferons, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and interferon- gamma and other cytokines, including their significance in the development of vaccines for genital herpes.

  13. The Type I Interferon Response and Age-Dependent Susceptibility to Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Daniel; Wilcox, Douglas R; Longnecker, Richard

    2017-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a highly prevalent human neurotropic pathogen. HSV-1 infection is associated with a variety of diseases ranging from benign orolabial lesions to more serious and even life-threatening conditions such as herpes simplex keratitis and herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). HSE is a rare occurrence among healthy adult individuals, but newborns are a particularly susceptible population. Type I IFN signaling has been identified as a crucial component of the innate immune response to the control of HSV-1 infection. In this study, we review the contribution of the type I IFN response to controlling HSV-1 infection, and differences in the early host response between adults and newborns that may contribute to the increased susceptibility to infection and central nervous system disease in newborns.

  14. Topical and systemic therapies for oral and perioral herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Stoopler, Eric T; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2013-04-01

    Oral and perioral herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in healthy individuals often present with signs and symptoms that are clearly recognized by oral health care providers (OHCPs). Management of these infections is dependent upon a variety of factors and several agents may be used for treatment to accelerate healing and decrease symptoms associated with lesions. This article will review the pertinent aspects of topical and systemic therapies of HSV infections for the OHCP.

  15. Effect of Acyclovir on Viral Protein Synthesis in Cells Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Phillip A.; McGuirt, Paul V.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the antiviral agent 9-(2-hydroxyethoxymethyl)guanine (acyclovir) on herpes simplex virus type 1 protein synthesis during virus replication was examined. Treatment of infected cells with acyclovir markedly affected the amounts of the four major glycosylated and certain non-glycosylated viral polypeptides synthesized; other viral polypeptides were made in normal amounts. The reduced amount of late protein synthesis was most likely due to the inhibition of progeny viral DNA synthesis by acyclovir. Images PMID:6301368

  16. CD11c controls herpes simplex virus 1 responses to limit virus replication during primary infection.

    PubMed

    Allen, Sariah J; Mott, Kevin R; Chentoufi, Aziz A; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L; Ballantyne, Christie M; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-10-01

    CD11c is expressed on the surface of dendritic cells (DCs) and is one of the main markers for identification of DCs. DCs are the effectors of central innate immune responses, but they also affect acquired immune responses to infection. However, how DCs influence the efficacy of adaptive immunity is poorly understood. Here, we show that CD11c(+) DCs negatively orchestrate both adaptive and innate immunity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ocular infection. The effectiveness and quantity of virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses are increased in CD11c-deficient animals. In addition, the levels of CD83, CD11b, alpha interferon (IFN-α), and IFN-β, but not IFN-γ, were significantly increased in CD11c-deficient animals. Higher levels of IFN-α, IFN-β, and CD8(+) T cells in the CD11c-deficient mice may have contributed to lower virus replication in the eye and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during the early period of infection than in wild-type mice. However, the absence of CD11c did not influence survival, severity of eye disease, or latency. Our studies provide for the first time evidence that CD11c expression may abrogate the ability to reduce primary virus replication in the eye and TG via higher activities of type 1 interferon and CD8(+) T cell responses.

  17. The "Knife-Cut Sign" Revisited: A Distinctive Presentation of Linear Erosive Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R

    2015-10-01

    The "knife-cut sign" is a distinctive presentation of linear erosive herpes simplex virus infection in immunocompromised patients. To describe a man whose herpes simplex virus infection-related skin lesions demonstrated the "knife-cut sign" and to review the characteristics of reported immunosuppressed individuals with "knife-cut" cutaneous herpes simplex virus lesions. A man with multiple myeloma and post-stem cell transplant cutaneous graft-versus-host disease managed with systemic prednisone and sirolimus developed disseminated cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection with virus-associated linear ulcers of the inguinal folds and the area between his ear and scalp; the lesions at both sites had a distinctive "knife-cut" appearance. Using the PubMed database, an extensive literature search was performed on herpes simplex virus, immunocompromised patient, and "knife-cut sign". Herpes simplex virus infection-associated skin lesions that demonstrate the "knife-cut sign" present in patients who are immunosuppressed secondary to either an underlying medical condition or a systemic therapy or both. The distinctive virus-related cutaneous lesions appear as linear ulcers and fissures in intertriginous areas, such as the folds in the inguinal area, the vulva, and the abdomen; in addition, other sites include beneath the breast, within the gluteal cleft, and the area between the ear and the scalp. Not only herpes simplex virus-2, but also herpes simplex virus-1 has been observed as the causative viral serotype; indeed, herpes simplex virus-1 has been associated with genital and inframammary lesions in addition to those above the neck. Direct fluorescent antibody testing is a rapid method for confirming the clinically suspected viral infection; however, since false-negative direct fluorescent antibody testing occurred in some of the patients, it may be prudent to also perform viral cultures and possibly lesional skin biopsies to establish the diagnosis. The herpes simplex

  18. Association between herpes simplex virus-1 infection and idiopathic unilateral facial paralysis in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Khine, Hnin; Mayers, Marguerite; Avner, Jeffrey R; Fox, Amy; Herold, Betsy; Goldman, David L

    2008-05-01

    We studied the association between herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection and Bell palsy in children. Thirty-three of 42 affected patients had a positive HSV-1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay compared with 16 of 41 controls (P = 0.0003). Ten of 47 affected patients had a positive HSV-1 polymerase chain reaction compared with 4 of 45 of controls (P = 0.08). Our findings support an association between HSV-1 infection and Bell palsy in children.

  19. Ascending in utero herpes simplex virus infection in an initially healthy-appearing premature infant.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Morven S; Popek, Edwina J; Wise, Brittany; Hatzenbuehler, Lindsay; Arunachalam, Athis R; Hair, Amy B

    2015-01-01

    The usual route of acquisition for intrauterine herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is transplacental. We evaluated a premature infant with in utero acquisition of HSV resulting from ascending infection. Histopathologic evidence of chronic chorioamnionitis and positive staining with immunohistochemistry for HSV in the placenta and umbilical cord established the diagnosis. The clinical presentation was also of interest in that the infant was initially healthy appearing.

  20. Fluorescent tagging of herpes simplex virus tegument protein VP13/14 in virus infection.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, M; Elliott, G

    2001-03-01

    The cellular site of herpesvirus tegument assembly has yet to be defined. We have previously used a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged tegument protein, namely VP22, to show that VP22 is localized exclusively to the cytoplasm during infection. Here we have constructed a similar virus expressing another fluorescent tegument protein, YFP-VP13/14, and have visualized the intracellular localization of this second tegument protein in live infected cells. In contrast to VP22, VP13/14 is targeted predominantly to the nuclei of infected cells at both early and late times in infection. More specifically, YFP-13/14 localizes initially to the nuclear replication compartments and then progresses into intense punctate domains that appear at around 12 h postinfection. At even later times this intranuclear punctate fluorescence is gradually replaced by perinuclear micropunctate and membranous fluorescence. While the vast majority of YFP-13/14 seems to be targeted to the nucleus, a minor subpopulation also appears in a vesicular pattern in the cytoplasm that closely resembles the pattern previously observed for GFP-22. Moreover, at late times weak fluorescence appears at the cell periphery and in extracellular virus particles, confirming that YFP-13/14 is assembled into virions. This predominantly nuclear targeting of YFP-13/14 together with the cytoplasmic targeting of VP22 may imply that there are multiple sites of tegument protein incorporation along the virus maturation pathway. Thus, our YFP-13/14-expressing virus has revealed the complexity of the intracellular targeting of VP13/14 and provides a novel insight into the mechanism of tegument, and hence virus, assembly.

  1. Treatment of herpes simplex virus infections in pediatric patients: current status and future needs.

    PubMed

    James, S H; Whitley, R J

    2010-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) are members of the Herpesviridae family and are characterized by their ability to establish latency after primary infection and subsequently reactivate. HSV infections in the neonatal and pediatric populations range from uncomplicated mucocutaneous diseases to severe, life-threatening infections involving the central nervous system (CNS). The antiviral agent acyclovir has significantly improved treatment outcomes of HSV infections, including the frequency of mucocutaneous recurrences and mortality associated with CNS and disseminated infections.

  2. Two paths for dissemination of Herpes simplex virus from infected trigeminal ganglion to the murine cornea.

    PubMed

    Ohara, P T; Tauscher, A N; LaVail, J H

    2001-04-27

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) was introduced into the mouse trigeminal ganglion by stereotaxic injection. We examined the form in which the virus was transported anterograde within axons and the spread of virus to glial and endoneurial cells of the nerve using EM immunocytochemistry. Our results indicate that viral dissemination in the trigeminal nerve may occur both within the axon and in the extracellular space of the endoneurium. HSV is intraaxonally transported at least in part as a nucleocapsid, i.e., with neither viral envelope nor additional cellular membranes. Schwann cells are infected as a result of spread in the endoneurium, as well as by nearby axons.

  3. Marrow-dependent cells depleted by 89Sr mediate genetic resistance to herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez, C; Ryshke, R; Bennett, M

    1980-06-01

    Adult mice resistant to infection with 10(6) plaque-forming units of a virulent strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 were treated with 89Sr to abrogate marrow-dependent cell functions. Treated mice were found to be much more susceptible to the herpes simplex virus type 1 infection than untreated mice. The virus persisted in the visceral tissues of 89Sr-treated mice for 3 or more days postinfection but not in those of untreated mice. The virus also spread to the spinal cords of treated but not untreated mice. A marrow-dependent cell appeared to mediate resistance to herpes simplex virus type 1 by controlling the infection early after inoculation and not allowing the infection spread to the central nervous system.

  4. Conjunctival geographic ulcer: an overlooked sign of herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jia-Horung; Chu, Chang-Yao; Lee, Chaw-Ning; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Lee, Julia Yu-Yun; Wang, Jen-Ren; Chang, Kung-Chao; Huang, Fu-Chin

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) ocular infection causes significant visual burden worldwide. Despite the fact that dendritic or geographic corneal ulcers are typical findings in HSV epithelial keratitis, conjunctival ulcer as a sign of HSV infection has rarely been reported. Although easily overlooked, this important sign could be enhanced by fluorescein staining. We report two cases of conjunctival geographic ulcers proven to be HSV infection by viral isolation and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). One patient had bilateral disease and blepharitis, and the other had unilateral involvement without skin lesions. With timely diagnosis and proper management, excellent visual outcome can be expected.

  5. Live-cell analysis of a green fluorescent protein-tagged herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Elliott, G; O'Hare, P

    1999-05-01

    Many stages of the herpes simplex virus maturation pathway have not yet been defined. In particular, little is known about the assembly of the virion tegument compartment and its subsequent incorporation into maturing virus particles. Here we describe the construction of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) recombinant in which we have replaced the gene encoding a major tegument protein, VP22, with a gene expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-VP22 fusion protein (GFP-22). We show that this virus has growth properties identical to those of the parental virus and that newly synthesized GFP-22 is detectable in live cells as early as 3 h postinfection. Moreover, we show that GFP-22 is incorporated into the HSV-1 virion as efficiently as VP22, resulting in particles which are visible by fluorescence microscopy. Consequently, we have used time lapse confocal microscopy to monitor GFP-22 in live-cell infection, and we present time lapse animations of GFP-22 localization throughout the virus life cycle. These animations demonstrate that GFP-22 is present in a diffuse cytoplasmic location when it is initially expressed but evolves into particulate material which travels through an exclusively cytoplasmic pathway to the cell periphery. In this way, we have for the first time visualized the trafficking of a herpesvirus structural component within live, infected cells.

  6. Herpes simplex virus following stab phlebectomy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Lum, Ying Wei; Heller, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection following surgery is an unusual postoperative phenomenon. Many mechanisms have been suggested, with the most likely explanation related to latent virus reactivation due to a proinflammatory response in the setting of local trauma. Here, we present a case of herpes simplex virus reactivation in an immunocompetent female following a conventional right lower extremity stab phlebectomy. Salient clinical and physical examination findings are described, and management strategies for herpes simplex virus reactivation are outlined. This is the first known case report of herpes simplex virus reactivation following lower extremity phlebectomy.

  7. Absence of tumour necrosis factor facilitates primary and recurrent herpes simplex virus-1 infections.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Hiroko; Hashimoto, Koji; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2004-02-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine in the innate immune response against various infections, including herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. It has recently become a molecular target of anti-cytokine treatment in certain inflammatory diseases. TNF depletion resulted in a more rapid emergence of infectious HSV-1 in the explant cultures of latently infected trigeminal ganglia (TG), compared with controls. To further evaluate the importance of TNF in the host's defence responses against HSV-1, TNF-knockout mice were challenged via scarified cornea. These mice were more susceptible to primary acute corneal HSV-1 infection than controls, as manifested by an increased mortality rate and higher infectious virus titres in the eyes and TG, indicating that TNF is critical for defence during acute HSV infection. These results imply that the administration of anti-inflammatory TNF antagonists might facilitate the propagation of infectious HSV, resulting in an exacerbation of primary and recurrent acute lesions.

  8. Systems Analysis of Protein Fatty Acylation in Herpes Simplex Virus-Infected Cells Using Chemical Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Abaitua, Fernando; Krause, Eberhard; Tate, Edward W.; O’Hare, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Protein fatty acylation regulates diverse aspects of cellular function and organization and plays a key role in host immune responses to infection. Acylation also modulates the function and localization of virus-encoded proteins. Here, we employ chemical proteomics tools, bio-orthogonal probes, and capture reagents to study myristoylation and palmitoylation during infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). Using in-gel fluorescence imaging and quantitative mass spectrometry, we demonstrate a generalized reduction in myristoylation of host proteins, whereas palmitoylation of host proteins, including regulators of interferon and tetraspanin family proteins, was selectively repressed. Furthermore, we found that a significant fraction of the viral proteome undergoes palmitoylation; we identified a number of virus membrane glycoproteins, structural proteins, and kinases. Taken together, our results provide broad oversight of protein acylation during HSV infection, a roadmap for similar analysis in other systems, and a resource with which to pursue specific analysis of systems and functions. PMID:26256475

  9. Striated muscle involvement in experimental oral infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, María Inés; Sanjuan, Norberto A

    2013-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is one of the most frequent causes of oral infection in humans, especially during early childhood. Several experimental models have been developed to study the pathogenesis of this virus but all of them employed adult animals. In this work, we developed an experimental model that uses mice younger than 4 days old, to more closely resemble human infection. Mice were infected subcutaneously with the prototype strain McIntyre of Herpes simplex-1, and the progression of infection was studied by immunoperoxidase. All animals died within 24-72 h post-infection, while viral antigens were found in the oral epithelium, nerves and brain. The most striking result was the finding of viral antigens in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells belonging to striated muscles. Organotypic cultures of striated muscles were performed, and viral replication was observed in them by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy and viral isolation. We conclude that the infection of striated muscles is present from the onset of oral infection and, eventually, could explain some clinical observations in humans.

  10. Role of Fc fragments in antibody-mediated recovery from ocular and subcutaneous herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Oakes, J E; Lausch, R N

    1981-01-01

    The contributions of the Fc fragment of virus-specific antibody in the resistance of mice to peripheral herpes simplex virus infection were investigated. Rabbit anti-herpes simplex virus-specific F(ab')2 fragments prepared by pepsin digestion of immune immunoglobulin G (IgG) were found to be inactive in complement-mediated cytolysis while retaining their capacity to neutralize virus infectivity in vitro. When F(ab')2 fragments were passively transferred either before or simultaneously with virus inoculation, they were as efficient as intact IgG was in protecting animals from virus challenge. However, if passive transfer was delayed until 8 h after herpes simplex virus infection, only IgG antibody was protective. The loss of protective activity could not be attributed to a rapid disappearance of F(ab')2 fragments, because comparable levels of F(ab')2 fragments and IgG antibody were maintained in the blood of recipients during the time that antibody mediated its protective effects. The inability of F(ab')2 subunits to activate complement was also not a factor, because complement-deficient A/J mice and complement-sufficient SJL/J mice recovered from herpes simplex virus infection after the passive transfer of IgG. We concluded that the Fc component of the antibody molecule is needed to resolve intracellular infection and that the mechanism by which antibody mediates recovery remains undefined but does not appear to involve virus neutralization or complement activation. PMID:6266961

  11. Apoptosis induction after herpes simplex virus infection differs according to cell type in vivo.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Shinichi; Goshima, Fumi; Katsumi, Sachiyo; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ozaki, Noriyuki; Murakami, Shingo; Nishiyama, Yukihiro

    2010-08-01

    We compared apoptosis induction in mice following three routes of infection. After intravenous infection, wild-type herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 and US3Delta mutants infected the adrenal gland and caused apoptosis. Corneal infection with wild-type virus resulted in apoptosis in a fraction of infected epithelium cells. Interestingly, many uninfected cells were apoptotic in the retina. Although neurons in the trigeminal ganglion were heavily infected, no apoptotic neurons were observed. Intracranial infection with wild-type virus resulted in HSV-infected cells inside the brain; however, most of the infected neurons escaped apoptosis. In contrast, infection with US3Delta and gamma(1)34.5Delta mutants caused apoptosis in infected neurons. Cleaved caspase-8 and p53 were detected in apoptotic cells in the adrenal gland and the brain; however, phospho-JNK was detected only in apoptotic cells of the brain. These results suggest that the activation of apoptotic signaling proteins differs depending on the host cell type and modulates the induction of apoptosis in HSV-infected cells.

  12. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection Does Not Induce Apoptosis in Human Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Anja; Sinicina, Inga; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Hüfner, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can establish lifelong latency in human trigeminal ganglia. Latently infected ganglia contain CD8+ T cells, which secrete granzyme B and are thus capable of inducing neuronal apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry and single-cell reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), higher frequency and transcript levels of caspase-3 were found in HSV-1-negative compared to HSV-1-positive ganglia and neurons, respectively. No terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay-positive neurons were detected. The infiltrating T cells do not induce apoptosis in latently infected neurons. PMID:25762734

  13. Incident Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection Increases the Risk of Subsequent Episodes of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Masese, Linnet; Baeten, Jared M.; Richardson, Barbra A.; Bukusi, Elizabeth; John-Stewart, Grace; Jaoko, Walter; Shafi, Juma; Kiarie, James; McClelland, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infected women have a higher prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV) compared to HSV-2-seronegative women. To explore the temporal association between these conditions, we evaluated the frequency of BV episodes before and after HSV-2 acquisition in a prospective study of 406 HSV-2/HIV-1-seronegative Kenyan women, of whom 164 acquired HSV-2. Incident HSV-2 was associated with increased likelihood of BV (adjusted OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.05–1.56; P = .01). Our findings strengthen the evidence for a causal link between genital HSV-2 infection and disruption of the vaginal microbiota. PMID:24273042

  14. Herpes simplex virus 2 infection in women attending an antenatal clinic in Fuzhou, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang‐Sheng; Yin, Yue‐Ping; Chen, Lei‐Ping; Yu, Yan‐Hua; Wei, Wan‐Hui; Thuy, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Smith, Jennifer S

    2007-01-01

    Genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and the most common cause of genital ulcer disease (GUD) in developed and developing countries. The monitoring of HSV‐2 seroprevalence in pregnant women can identify women at a higher risk of HIV and of neonatal HSV transmission. Very few data are available on type specific seroprevalence of HSV‐2 in China, with only one previous study from southern China. Consequently, we conducted a survey to determine type specific seroprevalence of HSV‐2 and associated risk factors in Fuzhou City, eastern China. PMID:17475682

  15. Herpes simplex virus 2 infection in women attending an antenatal clinic in Fuzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Yin, Yue-Ping; Chen, Lei-Ping; Yu, Yan-Hua; Wei, Wan-Hui; Thuy, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Smith, Jennifer S

    2007-08-01

    Genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and the most common cause of genital ulcer disease (GUD) in developed and developing countries. The monitoring of HSV-2 seroprevalence in pregnant women can identify women at a higher risk of HIV and of neonatal HSV transmission. Very few data are available on type specific seroprevalence of HSV-2 in China, with only one previous study from southern China. Consequently, we conducted a survey to determine type specific seroprevalence of HSV-2 and associated risk factors in Fuzhou City, eastern China.

  16. Proteins associated with mRNA in cells infected with herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Krikorian, C.R.; Read, G.S. )

    1989-10-16

    The structure of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infected cells was analyzed by examining the proteins that could be crosslinked to polyadenylated mRNAs by irradiation of intact cells with ultraviolet light. The profiles of crosslinked proteins were qualitatively similar for mRNPs from mock infected and infected cells. However, infection with wild type HSV-1 caused a decrease in the abundance of a major 52 kda protein and an increase in a 49 kda protein. These changes were observed at early times after infection. They occurred following infection with wild type HSV-1 under conditions that blocked viral gene expression, but not following infection with the virion host shutoff mutant vhs 1.

  17. Chemical sympathectomy increases susceptibility to ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Amanda; Nguyen, Gabrielle; Ash, John D; Straub, Rainer H; Carr, Daniel J J

    2008-06-15

    The cornea is one of the most highly innervated tissues in the mammalian host. We hypothesized changes to cornea innervation through chemical sympathectomy would significantly alter the host response to the neurotropic viral pathogen, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) following ocular infection. Mice treated with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide displayed reduced tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers residing in the cornea. Sympathectomized mice were also found to show a transient rise in virus recovered in infected tissues and succumbed to infection in greater numbers. Whereas there were no differences in infiltrating leukocyte populations including HSV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the infected tissue, an increase in substance P and a decrease in IFN-gamma levels in the trigeminal ganglion but not brain stem of sympathectomized mice were noted. Sympathectomized mice treated with the neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist L703,606 had delayed mortality implicating the involvement of substance P in HSV-1-mediated death.

  18. Chemical Sympathectomy Increases Susceptibility to Ocular Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Amanda; Nguyen, Gabrielle; Ash, John D.; Straub, Rainer H.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2008-01-01

    The cornea is one of the most highly innervated tissues in the mammalian host. We hypothesized changes to cornea innervation through chemical sympathectomy would significantly alter the host response to the neurotropic viral pathogen, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) following ocular infection. Mice treated with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide displayed reduced tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers residing in the cornea. Sympathectomized mice were also found to show a transient rise in virus recovered in infected tissues and succumbed to infection in greater numbers. Whereas there were no differences in infiltrating leukocyte populations including HSV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the infected tissue, an increase in substance P and a decrease in IFN-γ levels in the trigeminal ganglion but not brain stem of sympathectomized mice were noted. Sympathectomized mice treated with the neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist L703,606 had delayed mortality implicating the involvement of substance P in HSV-1-mediated death. PMID:18495255

  19. Hypomethylation of host cell DNA synthesized after infection or transformation of cells by herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Macnab, J.C.M.; Adams, R.L.P.; Rinaldi, A.; Orr, A.; Clark, L.

    1988-04-01

    Infection of rat embryo cells with herpes simplex virus type 2 caused undermethylation of host cell DNA synthesized during infection. DNA made prior to infection was not demethylated, but some of its degradation products, including methyl dCMP, were incorporated into viral DNA. The use of mutant virus showed that some viral DNA synthesis appears to be required for the inhibition of methylation. Inhibition of methylation cannot be explained by an absence of DNA methyltransferase as the activity of this enzyme did not change during the early period of infection. Inhibition of host cell DNA methylation may be an important step in the transformation of cells by herpesviruses, and various transformed cell lines tested showed reduced levels of DNA methylation.

  20. High Seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection in French Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Andréoletti, Laurent; Piednoir, Emmanuel; Legoff, Jérôme; Brodard, Véronique; Beguinot, Isabelle; Strady, Christophe; Rouger, Christine; Piketty, Christophe; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Kazatchkine, Michel Daniel; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Using commercially available herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-specific serological diagnostic tests, HSV type 2 (HSV-2) antibody prevalence was assessed in two parallel prospective studies including 534 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected outpatients living in two areas of northern France. In the first cohort of 434 subjects, 223 (51%) individuals demonstrated a positive HSV-2 serological status while 66 (66%) of 100 subjects in the second cohort were seropositive for HSV-2 (51 versus 66%; P = 0.08). Among the 223 HSV-2-seropositive subjects identified in the first study cohort, only 22 (10%) had suffered from recurrent anogenital lesions during the past 12 months while 154 (69%) had no clinical history of herpesvirus infection. Our findings demonstrate high proportions of subclinical and undiagnosed HSV-2 infection in HIV-1-infected individuals and suggest that HSV type-specific serological testing in the French HIV-1-infected subpopulation could be an efficient strategy to diagnose clinically asymptomatic HSV-2 infections. PMID:16081982

  1. High seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in French human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected outpatients.

    PubMed

    Andréoletti, Laurent; Piednoir, Emmanuel; Legoff, Jérôme; Brodard, Véronique; Beguinot, Isabelle; Strady, Christophe; Rouger, Christine; Piketty, Christophe; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Kazatchkine, Michel Daniel; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-08-01

    Using commercially available herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-specific serological diagnostic tests, HSV type 2 (HSV-2) antibody prevalence was assessed in two parallel prospective studies including 534 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected outpatients living in two areas of northern France. In the first cohort of 434 subjects, 223 (51%) individuals demonstrated a positive HSV-2 serological status while 66 (66%) of 100 subjects in the second cohort were seropositive for HSV-2 (51 versus 66%; P = 0.08). Among the 223 HSV-2-seropositive subjects identified in the first study cohort, only 22 (10%) had suffered from recurrent anogenital lesions during the past 12 months while 154 (69%) had no clinical history of herpesvirus infection. Our findings demonstrate high proportions of subclinical and undiagnosed HSV-2 infection in HIV-1-infected individuals and suggest that HSV type-specific serological testing in the French HIV-1-infected subpopulation could be an efficient strategy to diagnose clinically asymptomatic HSV-2 infections.

  2. Reduced tumorigenicity of rodent tumour cells and tumour explants following infection with wild type and mutant herpes simplex virus, bovine mammillitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, G. R.; Cowan, M.; Davies, J.; Brookes, K.; Billstrom, M.; Buchan, A.

    1988-01-01

    The tumorigenicity of neoplastic hamster and mouse cell lines and tumour explants was reduced by infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), a thymidine-kinaseless mutant of herpes simplex virus, namely 'MDK', encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC) and bovine mammillitis virus (BMV). There was an approximate relationship between duration of virus infection in vitro and reduction in incidence and/or rate of tumour development. The rate of tumour development was also reduced by 'site inoculation' of virus (HSV-1) at various time intervals following inoculation of tumorigenic BHK 21 cells indicating that virus was capable of reducing the rate of tumour development in a situation where the neoplastic cells were already transplanted into the susceptible host species. It is suggested that the therapeutic role of wild type, mutant or recombinant viruses merits further exploration towards prevention and treatment of human cancer. PMID:2846027

  3. Reduced tumorigenicity of rodent tumour cells and tumour explants following infection with wild type and mutant herpes simplex virus, bovine mammillitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Cowan, M; Davies, J; Brookes, K; Billstrom, M; Buchan, A

    1988-08-01

    The tumorigenicity of neoplastic hamster and mouse cell lines and tumour explants was reduced by infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), a thymidine-kinaseless mutant of herpes simplex virus, namely 'MDK', encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC) and bovine mammillitis virus (BMV). There was an approximate relationship between duration of virus infection in vitro and reduction in incidence and/or rate of tumour development. The rate of tumour development was also reduced by 'site inoculation' of virus (HSV-1) at various time intervals following inoculation of tumorigenic BHK 21 cells indicating that virus was capable of reducing the rate of tumour development in a situation where the neoplastic cells were already transplanted into the susceptible host species. It is suggested that the therapeutic role of wild type, mutant or recombinant viruses merits further exploration towards prevention and treatment of human cancer.

  4. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  5. Herpes simplex virus infection in a university health population: clinical manifestations, epidemiology, and implications.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. HSV-1 accounted for 78% of female and 85% of male genital herpes (GH) infections, and oral herpes (OH) infections presented as an acute febrile illness (AFI) in 51% of those 18 to 24 years old. HSV-2 accounted for 68% of GH infections among adults 25 or older. As seroprevalence for both HSV-1 and HSV-2 in the United States is decreasing, a growing college age cohort is at risk for primary HSV-1 infection. The proportion of GH caused by HSV-1 also continues to increase. This understanding has implications for clinical care, sexual health programming, and counseling strategies.

  6. Characterization of soluble glycoprotein D-mediated herpes simplex virus type 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvitov, Marianna; Frampton, Arthur R.; Shah, Waris A.; Wendell, Steven K.; Ozuer, Ali; Kapacee, Zoher; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C. . E-mail: glorioso@pitt.edu

    2007-04-10

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) entry into permissive cells involves attachment to cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and fusion of the virus envelope with the cell membrane triggered by the binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to cognate receptors. In this study, we characterized the observation that soluble forms of the gD ectodomain (sgD) can mediate entry of gD-deficient HSV-1. We examined the efficiency and receptor specificity of this activity and used sequential incubation protocols to determine the order and stability of the initial interactions required for entry. Surprisingly, virus binding to GAGs did not increase the efficiency of sgD-mediated entry and gD-deficient virus was capable of attaching to GAG-deficient cells in the absence of sgD. These observations suggested a novel binding interaction that may play a role in normal HSV infection.

  7. Update On Emerging Antivirals For The Management Of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections: A Patenting Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D.; Vadlapatla, Ramya K.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, some drugs are associated with dose-limiting toxicities which limit their further utility. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antiherpetic compounds with different mechanisms of action which will be safe and effective against emerging drug resistant viral isolates. Significant advances have been made towards the design and development of novel antiviral therapeutics during the last decade. As evident by their excellent antiviral activities, pharmaceutical companies are moving forward with several new compounds into various phases of clinical trials. This review provides an overview of structure and life cycle of HSV, progress in the development of new therapies, update on the advances in emerging therapeutics under clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of Herpes simplex virus infections. PMID:23331181

  8. Update on emerging antivirals for the management of herpes simplex virus infections: a patenting perspective.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D; Vadlapatla, Ramya K; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, some drugs are associated with dose-limiting toxicities which limit their further utility. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antiherpetic compounds with different mechanisms of action which will be safe and effective against emerging drug resistant viral isolates. Significant advances have been made towards the design and development of novel antiviral therapeutics during the last decade. As evident by their excellent antiviral activities, pharmaceutical companies are moving forward with several new compounds into various phases of clinical trials. This review provides an overview of structure and life cycle of HSV, progress in the development of new therapies, update on the advances in emerging therapeutics under clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of Herpes simplex virus infections.

  9. Control of herpes simplex virus infections of the genital tract by vaccination.

    PubMed

    Buchan, A; Skinner, G R; Fuller, A; Hartley, C; Hallworth, J; Stocker, D; Melling, J; Wiblin, C

    1985-03-01

    The apparent increasing incidence of herpes simplex virus infections of the genital tract has focused attention on the efficacy of vaccination in preventing infection or modifying established disease. Results of an 'open trial' using a DNA-free inactivated virus subunit vaccine have shown that vaccination of subjects at risk of contracting infection from their sexual partner reduced the transmission rate from 34% in unvaccinated controls to 0.5%. In a separate study, vaccination of patients who had experienced their first overt attack of herpes genitalis (the initial clinical episode) had significantly fewer recurrences over the follow-up period of 12 months than the unvaccinated control group. The results, we feel, justify a placebo controlled trial.

  10. Agents and strategies in development for improved management of herpes simplex virus infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Kleymann, Gerald

    2005-02-01

    The quiet pandemic of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections has plagued humanity since ancient times, causing mucocutaneous infection such as herpes labialis and herpes genitalis. Disease symptoms often interfere with every-day activities and occasionally HSV infections are the cause of life-threatening or sight-impairing disease, especially in neonates and the immuno-compromised patient population. After infection the virus persists for life in neurons of the host in a latent form, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently no cure is available. So far, vaccines, ILs, IFNs, therapeutic proteins, antibodies, immunomodulators and small-molecule drugs with specific or non-specific modes of action lacked either efficacy or the required safety profile to replace the nucleosidic drugs acyclovir, valacyclovir, penciclovir and famciclovir as the first choice of treatment. The recently discovered inhibitors of the HSV helicase-primase are the most potent development candidates today. These antiviral agents act by a novel mechanism of action and display low resistance rates in vitro and superior efficacy in animal models. This review summarises the current therapeutic options, discusses the potential of preclinical or investigational drugs and provides an up-to-date interpretation of the challenge to establish novel treatments for herpes simplex disease.

  11. Severe acute disseminated encephalomyelitis with clinical findings of transverse myelitis after herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, Berrak; Kose, Seda Sirin; Saritas, Serdar; Kose, Engin; Kanik, Ali; Helvaci, Mehmet

    2014-11-01

    ADEM is a central nervous disease that leads to myelin damage as a result of autoimmune response that develops after infections or vaccination. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) infection rarely leads to ADEM. 25-month-old male due to urinary retention, paradoxical respiration and muscle weakness after herpetic gingivostomatitis diagnosed as transverse myelitis. In follow-up with cranial and spinal magnetic resonance imaging multiple lesions were demonstrated. Electroneuromyography findings were compatible with acute sensorimotor neuropathy, serum anti-GM2 antibodies and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type 1/2 IgM / IgG detected negative and positivite, respectively. With these findings he was diagnosed acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) following HSV infection. Although acyclovir, intravenous immunoglobulin, methylprednisolone and plasmapheresis therapies, he is still in intensive physical therapy program with heavy sequel. In our case, ADEM demonstrated transverse myelitis clinic after HSV infection which is rarely seen in literature. As well as clinic and spinal imaging findings, cranial imaging findings helped establishment of ADEM diagnosis. To our best knowledge, HSV is a rare etiological and probably the poor prognostic factor of ADEM. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Prospects and Perspectives for Development of a Vaccine Against Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Shane C.; Schleiss, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and -2 are human pathogens that lead to significant morbidity and mortality in certain clinical settings. The development of effective antiviral medications, however, has had little discernible impact on the epidemiology of these pathogens, largely because the majority of infections are clinically silent. Decades of work have gone into various candidate HSV vaccines, but to date none has demonstrated sufficient efficacy to warrant licensure. This review examines developments in HSV immunology and vaccine development published since 2010, and assesses the prospects for improved immunization strategies that may result in an effective, licensed vaccine in the near future. PMID:25077372

  13. [Mechanisms of Chlamydia trachomatis and herpes simplex virus persistence during viral-bacterial infection].

    PubMed

    Bekhalo, V A; Sysoliatina, E V; Nagurskaia, E V

    2009-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of persistence on the example of Chlamydia trachomatis in conditions of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) superinfection in vitro and in vivo are described. Emergence of persisting forms of Chlamydia as well as factors influencing on this process are considered. Contemporary views on pathogenesis of viral-bacterial infection with HSV-2 and C. trachomatis as well as interactions of the agents with local immunity factors are described. It was suggested that there are signaling pathways through which HSV-2 changes life cycle of Chlamydia.

  14. Prospects and perspectives for development of a vaccine against herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Shane C; Schleiss, Mark R

    2014-11-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 are human pathogens that lead to significant morbidity and mortality in certain clinical settings. The development of effective antiviral medications, however, has had little discernible impact on the epidemiology of these pathogens, largely because the majority of infections are clinically silent. Decades of work have gone into various candidate HSV vaccines, but to date none has demonstrated sufficient efficacy to warrant licensure. This review examines developments in HSV immunology and vaccine development published since 2010, and assesses the prospects for improved immunization strategies that may result in an effective, licensed vaccine in the near future.

  15. Grover's disease secondarily infected with herpes simplex virus and Staphylococcus aureus: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Bunce, Penelope Am; Stanford, Duncan G

    2013-11-01

    The case of a 73-year old man with herpes simplex and staphylococcus aureus infection complicating established Grover's disease is presented. This was treated successfully with valaciclovir. While reports of bacterial and herpetic infections complicating other acantholytic diseases, such as Darier's disease, have been published previously, only one publication to date shows herpes simplex infection in Grover's disease.

  16. Therapeutic Options for Herpes Simplex Infections.

    PubMed

    Au, Eugene; Sacks, Stephen L.

    2003-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses are responsible for a number of disease states in infected individuals. Capable of establishing latent infection, herpes simplex can reactivate, causing pain, discomfort, and psychosocial consequences. Because no cure is available, treatment modalities for herpes simplex infection are required, from both personal and public health standpoints. To date, therapy has centered around the use of antiviral drugs to control infection and suppress recurrences. To expand the scope of available treatments, efforts have focused on the development of vaccines against herpes simplex virus and new agents such as immune response modifiers. Recent data suggest that these new agents are promising in their therapeutic potential.

  17. Functional hierarchy of herpes simplex virus type-1 membrane proteins in corneal infection and virus transmission to ganglionic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Joong; Saied, Ahmad A; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Subramanian, Ramesh; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2014-12-01

    To determine the relative importance of viral glycoproteins gK, gM, gE and the membrane protein UL11 in infection of mouse corneas and ganglionic neurons. Mouse eyes were scarified and infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1(F), gE-null, gM-null, gK-null, or UL11-null viruses. Clinical signs of ocular disease were monitored daily. Virus shedding was determined at 24, 48 and 72 h post infection. Viral DNA within trigeminal ganglia (TG) was quantified by quantitative PCR at 30 d post infection. The gE-null virus replicated as efficiently as the parental virus and formed viral plaques approximately half-the-size in comparison with the HSV-1(F) wild-type virus. The UL11-null and gM-null viruses replicated approximately one log less efficiently than the wild-type virus, and formed plaques that were on average one-third the size and one-half the size of the wild-type virus, respectively. The gK-null virus replicated more than 3-logs less efficiently than the wild-type virus and formed very small plaques (5-10 cells). Mice infected with the wild-type virus exhibited mild clinical ocular symptoms, while mice infected with the mutant viruses did not show any significant ocular changes. The wild-type virus produced the highest virus shedding post infection followed by the gM-null, gE-null and UL11-null viruses, while no gK-null virus was detected at any time point. All TG collected from mice infected with the wild-type virus and 6-of-10 of TG retrieved from mice infected with the UL11-null virus contained high numbers of viral genomes. The gE-null and gM-null-infected ganglia contained moderate-to-low number of viral genomes in 4-of-10 and 2-of-10 mice, respectively. No viral genomes were detected in ganglionic tissues obtained from gK-null eye infections. The results show that gK plays the most important role among gM, gE and UL11 in corneal and ganglionic infection in the mouse eye model.

  18. Herpes simplex virus infection of the adult lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Graham, B S; Snell, J D

    1983-11-01

    We have reported six adult patients with HSV infection of the lower respiratory tract diagnosed ante-mortem, and have reviewed the literature on this subject. An attempt has been made to define the natural history of the infection, and suggestions have been made regarding diagnosis and treatment. HSV can infect the lower respiratory tract in immunologically normal patients, as well as the immunocompromised host. Many patients have been burned, or intubated, or have other reasons for squamous metaplasia of the respiratory epithelium. The pathogenesis in many cases is an extension or aspiration of oropharyngeal HSV, but there is a suggestion that some cases may be hematogenously spread. The diagnosis of the site and presence of HSV infection should be based initially on cytologic findings, histologic findings, or both. Viral cultures or immunofluorescent or immunoperoxidase labeling can be used to confirm the cytologic and histologic diagnoses. Bronchoscopy is valuable for visualizing ulcerations or membranes in the respiratory tract, and for improving the sensitivity and specificity of the cytologic diagnosis. Because the process is most often focused in the tracheobronchial tree, percutaneous needle biopsy and open lung biopsy may be less sensitive than bronchoscopy. Standard serologic tests are, in general, not helpful diagnostically. They can help verify that a recent HSV infection has occurred, but do not differentiate between primary and recurrent infection, and do not help in localizing the site of infection. However, paired complement fixation or neutralizing antibody titers may be useful prognostically. If the titers do not rise in the presence of a documented HSV lower respiratory tract infection, the outcome is more likely to be fatal. The respiratory epithelium from the oral mucosa to the alveoli can be infected with HSV. The manifestations can range from a few scattered ulcers in the trachea to a severe ulcerative process resulting in an obstructing

  19. Asymptomatic Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in Iranian Mothers and Their Newborns.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Ahmad; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Mollaei, Hamidreza; Abedi-Kiasari, Bahman; Fallah, Fatemeh Hoda; Mortazavi, Helya Sadat

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection among pregnant women as well as congenital infection of their newborns in Tehran. One hundred samples of blood sera from pregnant women were analyzed for the presence of HSV specific antibodies. Umbilical cord blood samples from the newborns were analyzed for the presence of HSV DNA using real-time PCR. HSV IgG and IgM antibodies were found in 97% and 2% of pregnant women, respectively. Of all the 100 cord blood samples, 6 were positive for HSV DNA in which 2 cases were from mothers who had detectable IgM. It was notable that all corresponding mothers of six HSV positive infants had detectable IgG antibodies in their sera. It was demonstrated that the presence of HSV DNA in cord blood of newborns could be a risk marker for maternal-fetal transmission of the virus in asymptomatic pregnant women.

  20. Herpes simplex virus infection in burned patients: epidemiology of 11 cases.

    PubMed

    Bourdarias, B; Perro, G; Cutillas, M; Castede, J C; Lafon, M E; Sanchez, R

    1996-06-01

    Burned patients suffer significant immunosuppression during the first 3 or 4 weeks after hospitalization. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are commonly seen in immunosuppressed patients and may account for considerable morbidity and some mortality. We studied retrospectively 11 patients with severe burn injury who became infected with HSV. We determined the prevalence of viral infection in this group of patients. Serological testing and viral culture was used to diagnose HSV infection. No general complications appeared in these 11 patients in association with HSV but two patients died of multiorgan failure. Locally, areas of active epidermal regeneration were most commonly affected. Acyclovir therapy was not used and the duration of hospitalization was normal in these 11 patients.

  1. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 infection: overview on relevant clinico-pathological features.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Paolo G; Porter, Stephen R

    2008-02-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) is a nuclear replicating enveloped virus, usually acquired through direct contact with infected lesions or body fluids (typically saliva). The prevalence of HSV-1 infection increases progressively from childhood, the seroprevalence being inversely related to socioeconomic background. Primary HSV-1 infections in children are either asymptomatic or following an incubation period of about 1 week gives rise to mucocutaneous vesicular eruptions. Herpetic gingivostomatitis typically affects the tongue, lips, gingival, buccal mucosa and the hard and soft palate. Most primary oro-facial HSV infection is caused by HSV-1, infection by HSV-2 is increasingly common. Recurrent infections, which occur at variable intervals, typically give rise to vesiculo-ulcerative lesions at mucocutaneous junctions particularly the lips (herpes labialis). Recurrent HSV-1 infection within the mouth is uncommon in otherwise healthy patients, although in immunocompromised patients, recurrent infection can be more extensive and/or aggressive. The diagnosis of common herpetic infection can usually be based upon the clinical history and presenting features. Confirmatory laboratory diagnosis is, however, required when patients are, or may be, immunocompromised.

  2. Role of bovine mammillitis virus towards preparation of an alternative vaccine against herpes simplex virus infections of human subjects.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Buchan, A; Durham, J; Cowan, M; Davies, J; Brookes, K; Castrucci, G

    1987-03-01

    Bovine mammillitis virus (BMV) cross-reacted in neutralization and radioimmune assay with herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pre-immunization with BMV protected against challenge by type 2 HSV. There was no evidence to suggest a pathogenic role for BMV as adjudged by a literature search or field enquiry and BMV specific antibody was not detected in 21 human sera or in four sera from personnel engaged in research with BMV; in addition there was no replication or antigen synthesis by BMV in explants of human tissue or cell lines of human origin. It is proposed that BMV might provide an alternative vaccine against HSV infections of human subjects.

  3. Chromatin Dynamics during Lytic Infection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Kristen L.; Schang, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    Latent HSV-1 genomes are chromatinized with silencing marks. Since 2004, however, there has been an apparent inconsistency in the studies of the chromatinization of the HSV-1 genomes in lytically infected cells. Nuclease protection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggested that the genomes were not regularly chromatinized, having only low histone occupancy. However, the chromatin modifications associated with transcribed and non-transcribed HSV-1 genes were those associated with active or repressed transcription, respectively. Moreover, the three critical HSV-1 transcriptional activators all had the capability to induce chromatin remodelling, and interacted with critical chromatin modifying enzymes. Depletion or overexpression of some, but not all, chromatin modifying proteins affected HSV-1 transcription, but often in unexpected manners. Since 2010, it has become clear that both cellular and HSV-1 chromatins are highly dynamic in infected cells. These dynamics reconcile the weak interactions between HSV-1 genomes and chromatin proteins, detected by nuclease protection and chromatin immunoprecipitation, with the proposed regulation of HSV-1 gene expression by chromatin, supported by the marks in the chromatin in the viral genomes and the abilities of the HSV-1 transcription activators to modulate chromatin. It also explains the sometimes unexpected results of interventions to modulate chromatin remodelling activities in infected cells. PMID:23863878

  4. Exposure Stress Induces Reversible Corneal Graft Opacity in Recipients With Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Alexander M.; Yun, Hongmin; Hendricks, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Most of the inflammation in murine herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-induced stromal keratitis (HSK) is due to exposure stress resulting from loss of corneal nerves and blink reflex. Corneal grafts often fail when placed on corneal beds with a history of HSK. We asked if corneal exposure contributes to the severe pathology of corneal grafts on HSV-1–infected corneal beds. Methods Herpes simplex virus type 1–infected corneas were tested for blink reflex. Opacity and vascularization were monitored in allogeneic and syngeneic corneal grafts that were transplanted to corneal beds with no blink reflex or to those that retained blink reflex in at least one quadrant following infection. Results Retention of any level of blink reflex significantly reduced inflammation in HSV-1–infected corneas. Corneal allografts placed on HSV-1–infected beds lacking corneal blink reflex developed opacity faster and more frequently than those placed on infected beds that partially or completely retained blink reflex. Corneal grafts placed on infected corneal beds with no blink reflex rapidly became opaque to a level that would be considered rejection. However, protecting these grafts from exposure by tarsorrhaphy prevented or reversed the opacity in both syngeneic and allogenic grafts. Conclusions Exposure due to HSV-1–engendered hypoesthesia causes rapid, severe, persistent, but reversible opacification of both allogeneic and syngeneic corneal grafts. This opacity should not be interpreted as immunologic rejection. Exposure stress may contribute to the high rate of corneal graft pathology in patients with recurrent HSK. PMID:28055100

  5. Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein B by a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus and Protection of Mice against Lethal Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantin, Edouard M.; Eberle, Richard; Baldick, Joseph L.; Moss, Bernard; Willey, Dru E.; Notkins, Abner L.; Openshaw, Harry

    1987-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strain F gene encoding glycoprotein gB was isolated and modified at the 5' end by in vitro oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The modified gB gene was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome and expressed under the control of a vaccinia virus promoter. The mature gB glycoprotein produced by the vaccinia virus recombinant was glycosylated, was expressed at the cell surface, and was indistinguishable from authentic HSV-1 gB in terms of electrophoretic mobility. Mice immunized intradermally with the recombinant vaccinia virus produced gB-specific neutralizing antibodies and were resistant to a lethal HSV-1 challenge.

  6. Latent herpes simplex virus infection of sensory neurons alters neuronal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Martha F; Cook, W James; Roth, Frederick P; Zhu, Jia; Holman, Holly; Knipe, David M; Coen, Donald M

    2003-09-01

    The persistence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the diseases that it causes in the human population can be attributed to the maintenance of a latent infection within neurons in sensory ganglia. Little is known about the effects of latent infection on the host neuron. We have addressed the question of whether latent HSV infection affects neuronal gene expression by using microarray transcript profiling of host gene expression in ganglia from latently infected versus mock-infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. (33)P-labeled cDNA probes from pooled ganglia harvested at 30 days postinfection or post-mock infection were hybridized to nylon arrays printed with 2,556 mouse genes. Signal intensities were acquired by phosphorimager. Mean intensities (n = 4 replicates in each of three independent experiments) of signals from mock-infected versus latently infected ganglia were compared by using a variant of Student's t test. We identified significant changes in the expression of mouse neuronal genes, including several with roles in gene expression, such as the Clk2 gene, and neurotransmission, such as genes encoding potassium voltage-gated channels and a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. We confirmed the neuronal localization of some of these transcripts by using in situ hybridization. To validate the microarray results, we performed real-time reverse transcriptase PCR analyses for a selection of the genes. These studies demonstrate that latent HSV infection can alter neuronal gene expression and might provide a new mechanism for how persistent viral infection can cause chronic disease.

  7. Herpes simplex virus type 1 corneal infection results in periocular disease by zosteriform spread.

    PubMed

    Summers, B C; Margolis, T P; Leib, D A

    2001-06-01

    In humans and animal models of herpes simplex virus infection, zosteriform skin lesions have been described which result from anterograde spread of the virus following invasion of the nervous system. Such routes of viral spread have not been fully examined following corneal infection, and the possible pathologic consequences of such spread are unknown. To investigate this, recombinant viruses expressing reporter genes were generated to quantify and correlate gene expression with replication in eyes, trigeminal ganglia, and periocular tissue. Reporter activity peaked in eyes 24 h postinfection and rapidly fell to background levels by 48 h despite the continued presence of viral titers. Reporter activity rose in the trigeminal ganglia at 60 h and peaked at 72 h, concomitant with the appearance and persistence of infectious virus. Virus was present in the periocular skin from 24 h despite the lack of significant reporter activity until 84 h postinfection. This detection of reporter activity was followed by the onset of periocular disease on day 4. Corneal infection with a thymidine kinase-deleted reporter virus displayed a similar profile of reporter activity and viral titer in the eyes, but little or no detectable activity was observed in trigeminal ganglia or periocular tissue. In addition, no periocular disease symptoms were observed. These findings demonstrate that viral infection of periocular tissue and subsequent disease development occurs by zosteriform spread from the cornea to the periocular tissue via the trigeminal ganglion rather than by direct spread from cornea to the periocular skin. Furthermore, clinical evidence is discussed suggesting that a similar mode of spreading and disease occurs in humans following primary ocular infection.

  8. Current Concepts for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection: Diagnostics and Pathogenesis of Genital Tract Shedding.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Christine; Corey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is a DNA virus that is efficiently transmitted through intimate genital tract contact and causes persistent infection that cannot be eliminated. HSV-2 may cause frequent, symptomatic self-limited genital ulcers, but in most persons infection is subclinical. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the virus is frequently shed from genital surfaces even in the absence of signs or symptoms of clinical disease and that the virus can be transmitted during these periods of shedding. Furthermore, HSV-2 shedding is detected throughout the genital tract and may be associated with genital tract inflammation, which likely contributes to increased risk of HIV acquisition. This review focuses on HSV diagnostics, as well as what we have learned about the importance of frequent genital HSV shedding for (i) HSV transmission and (ii) genital tract inflammation, as well as (iii) the impact of HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition and transmission. We conclude with discussion of future areas of research to push the field forward.

  9. Current Concepts for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection: Diagnostics and Pathogenesis of Genital Tract Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is a DNA virus that is efficiently transmitted through intimate genital tract contact and causes persistent infection that cannot be eliminated. HSV-2 may cause frequent, symptomatic self-limited genital ulcers, but in most persons infection is subclinical. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the virus is frequently shed from genital surfaces even in the absence of signs or symptoms of clinical disease and that the virus can be transmitted during these periods of shedding. Furthermore, HSV-2 shedding is detected throughout the genital tract and may be associated with genital tract inflammation, which likely contributes to increased risk of HIV acquisition. This review focuses on HSV diagnostics, as well as what we have learned about the importance of frequent genital HSV shedding for (i) HSV transmission and (ii) genital tract inflammation, as well as (iii) the impact of HSV-2 infection on HIV acquisition and transmission. We conclude with discussion of future areas of research to push the field forward. PMID:26561565

  10. Time-resolved global and chromatin proteomics during herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) infection.

    PubMed

    Kulej, Katarzyna; Avgousti, Daphne C; Sidoli, Simone; Herrmann, Christin; Della Fera, Ashley N; Kim, Eui Tae; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2017-02-08

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) lytic infection results in global changes to the host cell proteome and the proteins associated with host chromatin. We present a system level characterization of proteome dynamics during infection by performing a multi-dimensional analysis during HSV-1 lytic infection of human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Our study includes identification and quantification of the host and viral proteomes, phosphoproteomes, chromatin bound proteomes and post-translational modifications (PTMs) on cellular histones during infection. We analyzed proteomes across six time points of virus infection (0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 hours post-infection) and clustered trends in abundance using fuzzy c-means. Globally, we accurately quantified more than 4,000 proteins, 200 differently modified histone peptides and 9,000 phosphorylation sites on cellular proteins. In addition, we identified 67 viral proteins and quantified 571 phosphorylation events (465 with high confidence site localization) on viral proteins, which is currently the most comprehensive map of HSV-1 phosphoproteome. We investigated chromatin bound proteins by proteomic analysis of the high-salt chromatin fraction and identified 510 proteins that were significantly different in abundance during infection. We found 53 histone marks significantly regulated during virus infection, including a steady increase of histone H3 acetylation (H3K9ac and H3K14ac). Our data provide a resource of unprecedented depth for human and viral proteome dynamics during infection. Collectively, our results indicate that the proteome composition of the chromatin of HFF cells is highly affected during HSV-1 infection, and that phosphorylation events are abundant on viral proteins. We propose that our epi-proteomics approach will prove to be important in the characterization of other model infectious systems that involve changes to chromatin composition.

  11. Selective retention of herpes simplex virus-specific T cells in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; van Dun, Jessica M.; Poot, Angelique; Milikan, Johannes C.; Laman, Jon D.; Langerak, Anton W.; Kinchington, Paul R.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) results in lifelong latent infections of neurons in sensory ganglia such as the trigeminal ganglia (TG). It has been postulated that T cells retained in TG inhibit reactivation of latent virus. The acquisition of TG specimens of individuals within hours after death offered the unique opportunity to characterize the phenotype and specificity of TG-resident T cells in humans. High numbers of activated CD8+ T cells expressing a late effector memory phenotype were found to reside in latently infected TG. The T cell infiltrate was oligoclonal, and T cells selectively clustered around HSV-1 but not VZV latently infected neurons. Neuronal damage was not observed despite granzyme B expression by the neuron-interacting CD8+ T cells. The TG-resident T cells, mainly CD8+ T cells, were directed against HSV-1 and not to VZV, despite neuronal expression of VZV proteins. The results implicate that herpesvirus latency in human TG is associated with a local, persistent T cell response, comprising activated late effector memory CD8+ T cells that appear to control HSV-1 latency by noncytolytic pathways. In contrast, T cells do not seem to be directly involved in controlling VZV latency in human TG. PMID:17360672

  12. [The relationship between herpes simplex virus II, human papillomavirus infection and infertility after artificial abortion].

    PubMed

    Li, D; Huang, T; Zhang, Z

    1998-06-01

    In order to study the relationship between infection of sexually transmitted virus Herpes simplex virus II (HSV2), Human papillomavirus (HPV) and female infertility after artificial abortion, we collected 60 genital samples from infertile women who had accepted artificial abortions and 39 genital samples from normal women. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect HSV2 and HPV. The results were compared by x2. The positive rate of HSV2 in infertile and normal women were 80.0% and 25.6% respectively, there was a significant difference (P < 0.01); but that of HPV were 53.5% and 33.3%, which slowed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Mixed infection rates of HSV2 and HPV were 43.3% and 23.1% in infertile and normal women, a significant difference (P < 0.05) was statistically calculated. The results showed that there was a relationship between infertility after artificial abortion and genital infection of HSV2 and HPV or mited infection of HSV 2 and HPV. Taking total 99 genital samples into calculation, the mired infection rate of HSV 2 was 35.35%, a significant relatedness of HSV2 and HPV infection to infertility was proved by chi 2, chi 2 = 12.5, P < 0.01.

  13. Comparative study of different latent infections of herpes simplex virus type I in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Zhao, Ping; Chen, Xiao; Li, Ping; Zhao, Gaonian; Xu, Mingming; Chen, Xiuying; Xie, Peng

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to compare the different latent infections of herpes simplex virus type I in a murine model. One hundred and twenty BALB/c mice were randomly assigned into either of three groups: intravenous inoculation group, ocular abrasion group, and intranasal inoculation group. Six weeks later, the trigeminal ganglia (TG) were removed to detect the expression of HSV-I antigen. HSV DNA in TG was also detected by polymerase chain reaction to confirm latent infection. The rate of HSV DNA in TG detected in the intravenous inoculation group was 18/22 and 22/26 in the ocular abrasion group, both of which were higher than the rate detected in the intranasal inoculation group (18/30). The expression of HSV antigen in TG in these three groups was all negative. Mortality rate in the intravenous inoculation group was 8/30, which was much higher than those of the two other groups. Intranasal virus dripping, cornea abrasion, and intravenous injection can detect latent HSV-I infection in a murine model. Compared to two other groups, the cornea abrasion group showed less severe signs, a quicker recovery rate in acute infection, and higher incidence rate of latent infection. Therefore, it is an ideal method in the presence of latent HSV-I infection.

  14. Natural killer cellular cytotoxicity against herpes simplex virus-infected cells in Igh-1-disparate mice.

    PubMed

    Tamesis, R R; Foster, C S

    1990-11-01

    Susceptibility to Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) stromal keratitis (HSK) in the mouse has previously been linked to the Igh-1 locus. The role of natural killer cells (NK) in resistance to viral infections is controversial. The authors studied the influence of the Igh-1 locus on in vitro murine NK activity against HSV-1 infected cell lines. The HSV-1 infected targets were lysed better than uninfected cells by murine splenic lymphocytes. Strain had no influence on virus-augmented cell lysis. Spleen cells from naive HSK-susceptible CAL-20 (Igh-1d) and BALB/c (Igh-1a) mice lysed YAC-1 targets better than HSK-resistant C.B-17 (Igh-1b) mice. The reverse was seen 24 hours after in vivo infection intraperitoneally with HSV-1. In contrast, CAL-20 splenocytes lysed PU5-1R targets better than BALB/c and C.B-17 splenocytes 24 hours after intraperitoneal (IP) infection. No significant differences were detected in interferon (IFN) levels after IP challenge with HSV-1 among the Igh-1 congenics. The data show that differences in NK activity were determined by both the Igh-1 genotype and the uninfected target cell. Susceptibility to HSK in these Igh-1-disparate congenics thus cannot be explained simply by differences in NK activity against HSV-1-infected targets.

  15. Oral herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy: what are the concerns?

    PubMed

    Ficarra, Giuseppe; Birek, Catalena

    2009-09-01

    Although epidemiologic data and the potentially serious effects of transmission of genital herpes from mother to infant during birth have been widely reported, published reports on oral herpes disease in pregnancy remain scarce and no clear management guidelines exist. Thus, questions remain about acquisition, transmission and outcome of infection, especially with respect to acute gingivostomatitis in pregnancy. In response to these questions, we summarize previous reports on herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) oral disease in pregnancy and, briefly, present 2 cases of primary gingivostomatitis in the first trimester of pregnancy, resulting in a favourable outcome for both mother and infant. We also point out the most recent data on rare, potentially severe in outcome, but treatable, primary central nervous system HSV-1 infection in later stages of pregnancy. Finally, we emphasize a multidisciplinary approach to oral HSV disease in pregnancy, with dentist participation in the diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Nuclear Sensing of Viral DNA, Epigenetic Regulation of Herpes Simplex Virus Infection, and Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. Herpes viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. PMID:25742715

  17. Herpes Simplex Virus: Partner for Life

    PubMed Central

    Blondeau, Joseph M.; Embil, Juan A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors provide a careful review of the characteristics of the herpes simplex virus and its various manifestations. They offer suggestions for its diagnosis and treatment, in various forms, and outline an approach to physician counselling of infected persons.

  18. Herpes simplex virus type 2 infection increases human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry into human primary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Elena; Calistri, Arianna; Salata, Cristiano; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina

    2011-04-12

    Epidemiological and clinical data indicate that genital ulcer disease (GUD) pathogens are associated with an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition and/or transmission. Among them, genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) seems to play a relevant role. Indeed, the ability of HSV-2 to induce massive infiltration at the genital level of cells which are potential targets for HIV-1 infection may represent one of the mechanisms involved in this process. Here we show that infection of human primary macrophages (MDMs) by HSV-2 results in an increase of CCR5 expression levels on cell surface and allows higher efficiency of MDMs to support entry of R5 HIV-1 strains. This finding could strengthen, at the molecular level, the evidence linking HSV-2 infection to an increased susceptibility to HIV-1 acquisition.

  19. Effects of hypo- and hyperthyroid states on herpes simplex virus infectivity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Varedi, Masoumeh; Moattari, Afagh; Amirghofran, Zahra; Karamizadeh, Zohreh; Feizi, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Available data from in vitro studies show that thyroid hormones (THs) regulate herpes simplex virus (HSV) gene expression and may modulate latency/reactivation of the virus. Whether infectivity of the virus is also affected by THs is not known. Using animal models (in vivo study) and Vero cell culture (in vitro study), we examined the effects of alterations in THs level on HSV-1 infectivity. Rats were rendered hypo- and hyperthyroid by daily addition of methimazole and l-thyroxine into their drinking water, respectively. Euthyroid animals served as control. All animals were given a single dose of HSV-1 (10(7)TCID50, ip) and sacrificed 3 d later. The spleen of the animals was then removed and viral particles were recovered from the tissue extract through aseptic procedures. Serial dilution of the extracts was prepared and added to Vero cell culture. For the in vitro study, the cultures were pretreated with l-thyroxine and the viral particles were then added. Virus titration was determined by Reed-Muench quantal assay. The viral load of spleen in hyperthyroid rats was significantly lower (1000-fold) than that of the euthyroid rats. Similarly, in vitro presence of supraphysiologic levels of l-thyroxine in the culture media of Vero cells decreased virus infectivity. Interestingly, hypothyroid animals showed a significant increase (10-fold) in spleen viral load as compared to that of their euthyroid counterparts. These data clearly show that the HSV-1 infectivity is affected by THs, and suggest that THs or their analogs may have a potential application in prevention and/or treatment of viral infections.

  20. Global and Regional Estimates of Prevalent and Incident Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infections in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Looker, Katharine J.; Magaret, Amalia S.; May, Margaret T.; Turner, Katherine M. E.; Vickerman, Peter; Gottlieb, Sami L.; Newman, Lori M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) commonly causes orolabial ulcers, while HSV-2 commonly causes genital ulcers. However, HSV-1 is an increasing cause of genital infection. Previously, the World Health Organization estimated the global burden of HSV-2 for 2003 and for 2012. The global burden of HSV-1 has not been estimated. Methods We fitted a constant-incidence model to pooled HSV-1 prevalence data from literature searches for 6 World Health Organization regions and used 2012 population data to derive global numbers of 0-49-year-olds with prevalent and incident HSV-1 infection. To estimate genital HSV-1, we applied values for the proportion of incident infections that are genital. Findings We estimated that 3709 million people (range: 3440–3878 million) aged 0–49 years had prevalent HSV-1 infection in 2012 (67%), with highest prevalence in Africa, South-East Asia and Western Pacific. Assuming 50% of incident infections among 15-49-year-olds are genital, an estimated 140 million (range: 67–212 million) people had prevalent genital HSV-1 infection, most of which occurred in the Americas, Europe and Western Pacific. Conclusions The global burden of HSV-1 infection is huge. Genital HSV-1 burden can be substantial but varies widely by region. Future control efforts, including development of HSV vaccines, should consider the epidemiology of HSV-1 in addition to HSV-2, and especially the relative contribution of HSV-1 to genital infection. PMID:26510007

  1. Model for in vivo analysis of immune response to Herpes Simplex virus, type 1 infections

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    A murine model was developed which allowed study of autologous humoral and cellular immune responses (CCMI) to a Herpes Simplex Virus, type 1 (HSV-1) infection. Lethal irradiation was used to render BAlb/c mice non-responsive to T-dependent and T-independent antigens. The immune system of the irradiated animals was reconstituted with either HSV-1 primed or non-immune syngeneic spleen cells and the mice were infected with HSV-1 in the rear footpad. Whereas unirradiated mice showed no symptoms of infection, X-irradiated animals followed a clinical course of lesions, monoplegia, paraplegia and death by day 9. Irradiated animals reconstituted with HSV-1 primed spleen cells recovered from the HSV-1 infection following a transient appearance of lesions. HSV-1 infected, immunodeficient animals reconstituted with unprimed spleen cells survived for 12 days post infection. Removal of T cells from the reconstituting cell population prevented both the recovery mediated by the primed cells and the partial protection mediated by the unprimed cells, however, removal of B cells had no effect on the course of infection. The role of autologous anti-HSV-1 antibody in protection from an HSV-1 infection was assessed HSV-1 primed mice treated with cyclophosphamide to abolish their cell mediated immunity.

  2. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1.

  3. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1. PMID:28378566

  4. Expression of herpes simplex virus 1 microRNAs in cell culture models of quiescent and latent infection.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Igor; Hackenberg, Michael; Kim, Ju Youn; Pesola, Jean M; Everett, Roger D; Preston, Chris M; Wilson, Angus C; Coen, Donald M

    2014-02-01

    To facilitate studies of herpes simplex virus 1 latency, cell culture models of quiescent or latent infection have been developed. Using deep sequencing, we analyzed the expression of viral microRNAs (miRNAs) in two models employing human fibroblasts and one using rat neurons. In all cases, the expression patterns differed from that in productively infected cells, with the rat neuron pattern most closely resembling that found in latently infected human or mouse ganglia in vivo.

  5. Herpesvirus Entry Mediator and Nectin-1 Mediate Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection of the Murine Cornea▿

    PubMed Central

    Karaba, Andrew H.; Kopp, Sarah J.; Longnecker, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen that enters cells by the receptor-mediated fusion of the viral envelope with a host cell membrane. The envelope glycoprotein gD of HSV must bind to one of its receptors for entry to take place. Recent studies using knockout (KO) mice demonstrated that the gD receptors herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1 are the primary entry receptors for HSV-2 in the mouse vagina and brain. Nectin-1 was most crucial for the neuronal spread of HSV-2, particularly in the brain. HVEM was dispensable for infection in these models, but when both HVEM and nectin-1 were absent, infection was completely prevented. We sought to determine the receptor requirements of HSV-1 in an ocular model of infection using knockout mice. Wild-type, HVEM KO, nectin-1 KO, and HVEM/nectin-1 double-KO mice were infected via corneal scarification and monitored for clinical signs of infection and viral replication in various tissues. We report that either HVEM or nectin-1 must be present for HSV-1 infection of the cornea. Additionally, we observed that the infection was attenuated in both HVEM KO and nectin-1 KO mice. This is in contrast to what was reported for studies of HSV-2 in vagina and brain and suggests that receptor requirements for HSV vary depending on the route of inoculation and/or serotype. PMID:21795335

  6. [Immune evasion by herpes simplex viruses].

    PubMed

    Retamal-Díaz, Angello R; Suazo, Paula A; Garrido, Ignacio; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses and humans have co-existed for tens of thousands of years. This long relationship has translated into the evolution and selection of viral determinants to evade the host immune response and reciprocally the evolution and selection of host immune components for limiting virus infection and damage. Currently there are no vaccines available to avoid infection with these viruses or therapies to cure them. Herpes simplex viruses are neurotropic and reside latently in neurons at the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia, occasionally reactivating. Most viral recurrences are subclinical and thus, unnoticed. Here, we discuss the initial steps of infection by herpes simplex viruses and the molecular mechanisms they have developed to evade innate and adaptive immunity. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to evade host immunity should help us envision novel vaccine strategies and therapies that limit infection and dissemination.

  7. The herpes simplex virus UL37 protein is phosphorylated in infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Albright, A G; Jenkins, F J

    1993-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) UL37 open reading frame encodes a 120-kDa late (gamma 1), nonstructural protein in infected cells. Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that the UL37 protein interacts in the cytoplasm of infected cells with ICP8, the major HSV-1 DNA-binding protein. As a result of this interaction, the UL37 protein is transported to the nucleus and can be coeluted with ICP8 from single-stranded DNA columns. Pulse-labeling and pulse-chase studies of HSV-1-infected cells with [35S]methionine and 32Pi demonstrated that UL37 was a phosphoprotein which did not have a detectable rate of turnover. The protein was phosphorylated soon after translation and remained phosphorylated throughout the viral replicative cycle. UL37 protein expressed from a vaccinia virus recombinant was also phosphorylated during infection, suggesting that the UL37 protein was phosphorylated by a cellular kinase and that interaction with the ICP8 protein was not a prerequisite for UL37 phosphorylation. Images PMID:8392618

  8. Cytokine-mediated survival from lethal herpes simplex virus infection: role of programmed neuronal death.

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, K D; Gurushanthaiah, D; Howes, E L; Lewandowski, G A; Reed, J C; Bloom, F E; Sarvetnick, N E

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for cytokine-mediated antiviral effects are not fully understood. We approached this problem by studying the outcome of intraocular herpes simplex (HSV) infection in transgenic mice that express interferon gamma in the photoreceptor cells of the retina. These transgenic mice showed selective survival from lethal HSV-2 infection manifested in both eyes, the optic nerve, and the brain. Although transgenic mice developed greater inflammatory responses to the virus in the eyes, inflammation and viral titers in their brains were equivalent to nontransgenic mice. However, survival of transgenic mice correlated with markedly lower numbers of central neurons undergoing apoptosis. The protooncogene Bcl2 was found to be induced in the HSV-2-infected brains of transgenic mice, allowing us to speculate on its role in fostering neuronal survival in this model. These observations imply a complex interaction between cytokine, virus, and host cellular factors. Our results suggest a cytokine-regulated salvage pathway that allows for survival of infected neurons. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7724576

  9. Defensive effects of a fucoidan from brown alga Undaria pinnatifida against herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kyoko; Nakano, Takahisa; Hashimoto, Minoru; Kanekiyo, Kenji; Hayashi, Toshimitsu

    2008-01-01

    Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide isolated from an edible brown alga Undaria pinnatifida, was previously shown to be a potent inhibitor of the in vitro replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). HSV-1 is a member of herpes viruses that cause infections ranging from trivial mucosal ulcers to life-threatening disorders in immunocompromised hosts. In the in vivo conditions, the replication of HSV-1 is controlled under the immunoresponse coordinated by both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In the present study, the effects of the fucoidan were examined on in vivo viral replication and the host's immune defense system. Oral administration of the fucoidan protected mice from infection with HSV-1 as judged from the survival rate and lesion scores. Phagocytic activity of macrophages and B cell blastogenesis in vitro were significantly stimulated by the fucoidan, while no significant change in the release of NO(2)(-) by macrophages was observed. In in vivo studies, oral administration of the fucoidan produced the augmentation of NK activity in HSV-1-infected mice immunosuppressed by 5-fluorouracil treatment. CTL activity in HSV-1-infected mice was also enhanced by oral administration of the fucoidan. The production of neutralizing antibodies in the mice inoculated with HSV-1 was significantly promoted during the oral administration of the fucoidan for 3 weeks. These results suggested that oral intake of the fucoidan might take the protective effects through direct inhibition of viral replication and stimulation of both innate and adaptive immune defense functions.

  10. Oligonucleotides designed to inhibit TLR9 block Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection at multiple steps.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Monica M; Gauger, Joshua J L; Brandt, Curtis R

    2014-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is an important human pathogen which requires activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) during its replication cycle. The persistent nature of HSV-1 infection, and the emergence of drug-resistant strains, highlights the importance of research to develop new antiviral agents. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a prominent role during the early antiviral response by recognizing viral nucleic acid and gene products, activating NFκB, and stimulating the production of inflammatory cytokines. We demonstrate a significant effect on HSV-1 replication in ARPE-19 and Vero cells when oligonucleotides designed to inhibit TLR9 are added 2h prior to infection. A greater than 90% reduction in the yield of infectious virus was achieved at oligonucleotide concentrations of 10-20 μM. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides prevented expression of essential immediate early herpes gene products as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. TLR9 oligonucleotides also interfered with viral attachment and entry. A TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide containing five adjacent guanosine residues (G-ODN) exhibited virucidal activity and inhibited HSV-1 replication when added post-infection. The antiviral effect of the TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides did not depend on the presence of TLR9 protein, suggesting a mechanism of inhibition that is not TLR9 specific. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides also reduced NFκB activity in nuclear extracts. Studies using these TLR inhibitors in the context of viral infection should be interpreted with caution.

  11. Pathophysiology of facial nerve paralysis induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Honda, Nobumitu; Hato, Naohito; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Wakisaka, Hiroyuki; Kisaki, Hisanobu; Murakami, Shingo; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2002-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has been proven to be a cause of Bell's palsy; however, the underlying pathophysiology of the facial nerve paralysis is not fully understood. We established a mouse model with facial nerve paralysis induced by HSV-1 infection simulating Bell's palsy and investigated the pathophysiology of the facial nerve paralysis. The time course of the R1 latency in the blink reflex tests paralleled the recovery of the facial nerve paralysis well, whereas electroneurographic recovery tended to be delayed, compared to that of the paralysis; these responses are usually seen in Bell's palsy. On histopathologic analysis, intact, demyelinated, and degenerated nerves were intermingled in the facial nerve in the model. The similarity of the time course of facial nerve paralysis and the electrophysiological results in Bell's palsy and the model strongly suggest that the pathophysiological basis of Bell's palsy is a mixed lesion of various nerve injuries.

  12. Hospitalization cost per case of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection from claims data.

    PubMed

    Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Flagg, Elaine W; Gift, Thomas L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the average excess inpatient cost of neonatal herpes simplex virus (NHSV) infection from 2005 to 2009 insurance claims data. The estimated adjusted average excess inpatient cost for neonate admissions with HSV diagnosis and >7 days of hospitalization was $40,044 [95% confidence interval (CI), $33,529-$47,775]. When disaggregated by the days of admission, cost estimates were: 8-13 days, $23,918 [CI, $19,490-$29,282]; 14-21 days, $44,358 [CI, $34,654-$56,673]; >21 days, $68,916 [CI, $49,905-$94,967]). Although these estimates are not representative of the entire US, they can inform future economic evaluation studies on NHSV interventions.

  13. A synthetic peptide induces long-term protection from lethal infection with herpes simplex virus 2

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Immunization against viral pathogens is generally directed toward the induction of virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) and the maintenance of the potential for a second-set (IgG) response. Indeed, an elevated level of specific antibody is considered a reliable clinical indicator that a state of immunity exists in the host. However, in the case of herpes simplex virus (HSV), the presence of circulating VNA does not necessarily correlate with protection. Thus, it has been found that secondary infections occur in individuals even with high neutralizing titers to HSV, suggesting that antibody to the virus may be useless or even deleterious. In consideration of these facts, we were interested in inducing a T cell response to HSV. We had already shown that synthetic peptides corresponding to the NH3-terminal region of the glycoprotein D (gD) molecule of HSV could induce a strong T cell response when injected into mice, but did not, by themselves, confer protection. In this report, we examined the ability of peptides, covalently coupled to palmitic acid and incorporated into liposomes, to induce virus-specific T cell responses that confer protection against a lethal challenge of HSV-2. We have demonstrated that long-term protective immunity is achieved with a single immunization in the absence of neutralizing antibody when antigen is presented in this form. Furthermore, T cells but not serum from such immune mice can adoptively transfer this protection. PMID:3029270

  14. Prophylactic and therapeutic modulation of innate and adaptive immunity against mucosal infection of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Eo, Seong Kug

    2014-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are the most common cause of genital ulceration in humans worldwide. Typically, HSV-1 and 2 infections via mucosal route result in a lifelong latent infection after peripheral replication in mucosal tissues, thereby providing potential transmission to neighbor hosts in response to reactivation. To break the transmission cycle, immunoprophylactics and therapeutic strategies must be focused on prevention of infection or reduction of infectivity at mucosal sites. Currently, our understanding of the immune responses against mucosal infection of HSV remains intricate and involves a balance between innate signaling pathways and the adaptive immune responses. Numerous studies have demonstrated that HSV mucosal infection induces type I interferons (IFN) via recognition of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and activates multiple immune cell populations, including NK cells, conventional dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs. This innate immune response is required not only for the early control of viral replication at mucosal sites, but also for establishing adaptive immune responses against HSV antigens. Although the contribution of humoral immune response is controversial, CD4(+) Th1 T cells producing IFN-γ are believed to play an important role in eradicating virus from the hosts. In addition, the recent experimental successes of immunoprophylactic and therapeutic compounds that enhance resistance and/or reduce viral burden at mucosal sites have accumulated. This review focuses on attempts to modulate innate and adaptive immunity against HSV mucosal infection for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. Notably, cells involved in innate immune regulations appear to shape adaptive immune responses. Thus, we summarized the current evidence of various immune mediators in response to mucosal HSV infection, focusing on the importance of innate immune responses.

  15. Immunogenetic influence of Igh-1 phenotype on experimental herpes simplex virus type-1 corneal infection.

    PubMed

    Opremcak, E M; Wells, P A; Thompson, P; Daigle, J A; Rice, B A; Millin, J A; Foster, C S

    1988-05-01

    Patterns of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection were studied in BALB/c congenic, Igh-1 disparate murine strains to establish the influence of Igh-1 phenotype on the development of keratopathy, trigeminal ganglionic latency and keratocyte permissivity. Eighty-two percent of C.AL-20 (Igh-1d) mice, 40% of BALB/cByJ (Igh-1a) mice and 12% of the C.B-17 (Igh-1b) mice developed herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) following corneal challenge with 2.5 X 10(4) PFU HSV-1 strain KOS. While disease frequency was directly proportional to HSV-1 challenge dose, relative resistance and susceptibility patterns in the congenic mice were constant and highly significant. F1 progeny from C.AL-20 X C.B-17 matings demonstrated the HSK pattern of the C.B-17 parent suggesting that Igh-1 linked resistance to HSK is dominantly inherited. Equivalent trigeminal ganglionic latency was established following ocular HSV-1 inoculation in the three congenic Igh-1 disparate murine strains. Cultured keratocytes from the three Igh-1 disparate murine strains demonstrated equivalent in vitro permissivity to HSV-1 replication. These data illustrate a strong correlation between Igh-1 phenotype and the development of a HSK in congenic mice. The susceptibility/resistance to HSK in these mice is unrelated to trigeminal ganglionic latency or keratocyte permissivity.

  16. Visualization of DNA G-quadruplexes in herpes simplex virus 1-infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Artusi, Sara; Perrone, Rosalba; Lago, Sara; Raffa, Paolo; Di Iorio, Enzo; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that clusters of guanine quadruplex (G4) structures can form in the human herpes simplex-1 (HSV-1) genome. Here we used immunofluorescence and immune-electron microscopy with a G4-specific monoclonal antibody to visualize G4 structures in HSV-1 infected cells. We found that G4 formation and localization within the cells was virus cycle dependent: viral G4s peaked at the time of viral DNA replication in the cell nucleus, moved to the nuclear membrane at the time of virus nuclear egress and were later found in HSV-1 immature virions released from the cell nucleus. Colocalization of G4s with ICP8, a viral DNA processing protein, was observed in viral replication compartments. G4s were lost upon treatment with DNAse and inhibitors of HSV-1 DNA replication. The notable increase in G4s upon HSV-1 infection suggests a key role of these structures in the HSV-1 biology and indicates new targets to control both the lytic and latent infection. PMID:27794039

  17. Neonatal case of herpes simplex virus encephalitis after delivery from a woman whose genital herpes simplex virus infection had been treated with acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Kumasaka, Sakae; Takagi, Atsushi; Kuwabara, Kentaro; Migita, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    A case of herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis in a neonate after delivery from a woman whose genital HSV infection had been treated with acyclovir is reported. The main approach to prevent genital HSV infection in the neonate is interruption of transmission at the time of delivery. Guidelines for prophylactic therapy with acyclovir have been established, but the risk of neonatal infection remains. A fever began to develop in a male neonate delivered vaginally from a 35-year-old woman. Treatment with intravenous acyclovir was started on the basis of a diagnosis of HSV encephalitis, because polymerase chain reaction was positive for HSV in the cerebrospinal fluid. The mother had had a first genital HSV infection during the second trimester, but treatment with injected acyclovir had caused the blisters and erosion to resolve by the time of delivery. Important steps for preventing neonatal HSV infection are the appropriate treatment of mothers with a history of genital HSV infection, the assessment of delivery methods, and the appropriate treatment of neonates.

  18. Zinc oxide tetrapods inhibit herpes simplex virus infection of cultured corneas

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Neil; Jaishankar, Dinesh; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Hadigal, Satvik; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Adelung, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Infection of the human cornea by herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) can cause significant vision loss. The purpose of this study was to develop an ex vivo model to visualize viral growth and spread in the cornea. The model was also used to analyze cytokine production and study the antiviral effects of zinc oxide tetrapods. Methods A β-galactosidase-expressing recombinant virus, HSV-1(KOS)tk12, was used to demonstrate the ability of the virus to enter and develop blue plaques on human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells and corneal tissues. Freshly obtained porcine corneas were cultured and then scratched before infection with HSV-1(KOS)tk12. The blue plaques on the corneas were imaged using a stereomicroscope. Western blot analysis for HSV-1 proteins was performed to verify HSV-1 infection of the cornea. Using the ex vivo model, zinc oxide tetrapods were tested for their anti-HSV-1 potential, and a cytokine profile was developed to assess the effects of the treatment. Results Cultured corneas and the use of β-galactosidase-expressing HSV-1(KOS)tk12 virus can provide an attractive ex vivo model to visualize and study HSV-1 entry and spread of the infection in tissues. We found that unlike cultured HCE cells, which demonstrated nearly 100% infectivity, HSV-1 infection of the cultured cornea was more restrictive and took longer to develop. We also found that the zinc oxide tetrapod–shaped nano- and microstructures inhibited HSV infection of the cultured cells, as well as the cultured corneas. The cytokine profile of the infected samples was consistent with previous studies of HSV-1 corneal infection. Conclusions The ability to visualize HSV-1 growth and spread in corneal tissues can provide new details about HSV-1 infection of the cornea and the efficacy of new cornea-specific antiviral drug candidates. The ex vivo model also demonstrates antiviral effects of zinc oxide tetrapods and adequately portrays the drug delivery issues that cornea-specific treatments

  19. Overcoming drug-resistant herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection by a humanized antibody

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Adalbert; Arndt, Michaela A. E.; Grosse-Hovest, Ludger; Weichert, Wilko; Giebel, Bernd; Dittmer, Ulf; Hengel, Hartmut; Jäger, Dirk; Schneweis, Karl E.; Eis-Hübinger, Anna M.; Roggendorf, Michael; Krauss, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of antiviral chemotherapy, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) infections remain a severe global health problem. Of particular concern is the growing incidence of drug resistance in immunocompromised patients, which stresses the urgency to develop new effective treatment alternatives. We have developed a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb hu2c) that completely abrogates viral cell-to-cell spread, a key mechanism by which HSV-1/2 escapes humoral immune surveillance. Moreover, mAb hu2c neutralized HSV fully independent of complement and/or immune effector cell recruitment in a highly efficient manner. Prophylactic and therapeutic administration of mAb hu2c completely prevented infection-related mortality of severely immunodeficient mice being challenged with a lethal dose of HSV-1. The high neutralization capacity of mAb hu2c was fully maintained toward clinical HSV isolates being multiresistant to standard antiviral drugs, and infection was fully resolved in 7/8 nonobese diabetic/SCID mice being infected with a multidrug resistant HSV-1 patient isolate. Immunohistochemical studies revealed no significant cross-reactivity of the antibody toward human tissues. These features warrant further clinical development of mAb hu2c as an immunotherapeutic compound for the management of severe and particularly drug-resistant HSV infections. PMID:23569258

  20. Immunological studies of herpes simplex virus infection in children with atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Goodyear, H M; McLeish, P; Randall, S; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R; Winther, M; Rolland, J; Morgan, G; Harper, J I

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the role of immune defence mechanisms in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in atopic eczema and whether impairment of these mechanisms explains the susceptibility of some children with atopic eczema to cutaneous HSV infections. Ten children with eczema herpeticum and 13 with atopic eczema and recurrent HSV infection affecting multiple skin sites were studied, together with relevant control groups. In all children with atopic eczema, in vitro lymphoproliferation in response to stimulation with concanavalin A (Con A) was significantly decreased and natural killer (NK) cells (CD16 + 56) were reduced compared with non-atopic controls. IL-2 receptors, a marker for lymphocyte activation, were decreased during the acute phase of eczema herpeticum, and for 1 month thereafter. A positive stimulation index (> 3) to HSV antigen, and high HSV IgG antibody titres measured by ELISA, Western blotting and neutralization assay, were seen in children with eczema herpeticum by 6 weeks, and also in children with atopic eczema and recurrent HSV infections. No evidence of an HSV-specific immune defect (either cell-mediated or humoral) was found in atopic eczema. Impairment of cell-mediated immunity in atopic eczema was suggested by the reduced response to Con A. It is likely that reduced numbers of circulating NK cells and a decrease in IL-2 receptors during early eczema herpeticum contribute to the susceptibility of children with atopic eczema to cutaneous HSV infections.

  1. Herpes simplex virus downregulation of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor enhances human papillomavirus type 16 infection

    PubMed Central

    Skeate, Joseph G.; Porras, Tania B.; Woodham, Andrew W.; Jang, Julie K.; Taylor, Julia R.; Brand, Heike E.; Kelly, Thomas J.; Jung, Jae U.; Da Silva, Diane M.; Yuan, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) was originally implicated in the aetiology of cervical cancer, and although high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is now the accepted causative agent, the epidemiological link between HSV and HPV-associated cancers persists. The annexin A2 heterotetramer (A2t) has been shown to mediate infectious HPV type 16 (HPV16) uptake by human keratinocytes, and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), an endogenous A2t ligand, inhibits HPV16 uptake and infection. Interestingly, HSV infection induces a sustained downregulation of SLPI in epithelial cells, which we hypothesized promotes HPV16 infection through A2t. Here, we show that in vitro infection of human keratinocytes with HSV-1 or HSV-2, but not with an HSV-1 ICP4 deletion mutant that does not downregulate SLPI, leads to a >70 % reduction of SLPI mRNA and a >60 % decrease in secreted SLPI protein. Consequently, we observed a significant increase in the uptake of HPV16 virus-like particles and gene transduction by HPV16 pseudovirions (two- and 2.5-fold, respectively) in HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected human keratinocyte cell cultures compared with uninfected cells, whereas exogenously added SLPI reversed this effect. Using a SiMPull (single-molecule pulldown) assay, we demonstrated that endogenously secreted SLPI interacts with A2t on epithelial cells in an autocrine/paracrine manner. These results suggested that ongoing HSV infection and resultant downregulation of local levels of SLPI may impart a greater susceptibility for keratinocytes to HPV16 infection through the host cell receptor A2t, providing a mechanism that may, in part, provide an explanation for the aetiological link between HSV and HPV-associated cancers. PMID:26555393

  2. The role of dendritic cells in immunity against primary herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Bedoui, Sammy; Greyer, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a DNA virus with tropism for infecting skin and mucosal epithelia during the lytic stages of its complex life cycle. The immune system has evolved a multitude of strategies to respond to primary HSV infections. These include rapid innate immune responses largely driven by pattern recognition systems and protective anti-viral immunity. Dendritic cells (DC) represent a versatile and heterogenic group of antigen presenting cells that are important for pathogen recognition at sites of infection and for priming of protective HSV-specific T cells. Here we will review the current knowledge on the role of DCs in the host immune response to primary HSV infection. We will discuss how DCs integrate viral cues into effective innate immune responses, will dissect how HSV infection of DCs interferes with their capacity to migrate from sites of infection to the draining lymph nodes and will outline how migratory DCs can make antigens available to lymph node resident DCs. The role of distinct DC subsets and their relevant contribution to antigen presentation on MHC class I and MHC class II molecules will be detailed in the context of T cell priming in the lymph node and the elicitation of effector function in infected tissues. An improved understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of how DCs recognize HSV, process and present its antigens to naïve and effector T cells will not only assist in the improvement of vaccine-based preventions of this important viral disease, but also serves as a paradigm to resolve basic immunological principles.

  3. Completely assembled virus particles detected by transmission electron microscopy in proximal and mid-axons of neurons infected with herpes simplex virus type 1, herpes simplex virus type 2 and pseudorabies virus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jialing Lazear, Helen M. Friedman, Harvey M.

    2011-01-05

    The morphology of alphaherpesviruses during anterograde axonal transport from the neuron cell body towards the axon terminus is controversial. Reports suggest that transport of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) nucleocapsids and envelope proteins occurs in separate compartments and that complete virions form at varicosities or axon termini (subassembly transport model), while transport of a related alphaherpesvirus, pseudorabies virus (PRV) occurs as enveloped capsids in vesicles (assembled transport model). Transmission electron microscopy of proximal and mid-axons of primary superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons was used to compare anterograde axonal transport of HSV-1, HSV-2 and PRV. SCG cell bodies were infected with HSV-1 NS and 17, HSV-2 2.12 and PRV Becker. Fully assembled virus particles were detected intracellularly within vesicles in proximal and mid-axons adjacent to microtubules after infection with each virus, indicating that assembled virions are transported anterograde within axons for all three alphaherpesviruses.

  4. Comparative activity of penciclovir and acyclovir in mice infected intraperitoneally with herpes simplex virus type 1 SC16.

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, D; Boyd, M R

    1993-01-01

    Penciclovir [PCV; 9-(4-hydroxy-3-hydroxymethylbut-1-yl)guanine; BRL 39123] is a potent and selective inhibitor of herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus in human cell culture. We have compared the activities of PCV and acyclovir (ACV) in DBA/2 mice infected intraperitoneally with herpes simplex virus type 1 SC16 by measuring the amount of virus in peritoneal washings. In untreated mice after an eclipse phase, virus titers are maximum at 48 h after infection and decline thereafter. PCV and ACV reduced virus replication to a similar extent when given ad libitum in drinking water, even though ACV had better oral bioavailability and greater potency in murine cells. Thus, PCV was more active than had been predicted. In dose-response experiments, PCV given as a single subcutaneous dose 24 h after infection was active at a 10-fold-lower dose than ACV (P < 0.01). A single subcutaneous dose of PCV at 5 h after infection prevented virus replication for 3 days and was more effective than three doses of ACV given 1, 5, and 20 h after infection (P < 0.05). The superior activity of PCV following discrete dosing is not due to pharmacokinetic differences but is probably a reflection of the known stability of the intracellular triphosphate. In this model, the maintenance of high concentrations in blood is less important for PCV than for ACV and may lead to less-frequent doses in clinical use. Images PMID:8388195

  5. The effects of lithium and potassium on macromolecular synthesis in herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Hartley, C E; Buchan, A; Randall, S; Skinner, G R; Osborne, M; Tomkins, L M

    1993-08-01

    All herpes simplex virus (HSV) infected cell-specific polypeptides (ICSPs) were synthesized in the presence of lithium at a concentration (60 mM) inhibitory to the production of infectious virus. Yields of certain ICSPs were increased and others, in particular glycoprotein C, decreased. HSV DNA synthesis was completely inhibited; synthesis and in vitro activities of HSV DNA polymerase and thymidine kinase were decreased but to a degree insufficient to account for the complete inhibition of HSV DNA synthesis. HSV DNA synthesis was inhibited to an equivalent degree by either incubation with 60 mM-lithium or by potassium starvation; both procedures decreased intracellular potassium by an equivalent amount as adjudged by X-ray microanalysis. We conclude that lithium inhibits HSV DNA synthesis by displacement of potassium from a potassium-dependent biochemical reaction or by other physiological changes brought about by the loss of cellular potassium. The possibility that lithium also directly inhibits a virus replicative event cannot be excluded.

  6. Herpes simplex virus infection causes cellular beta-amyloid accumulation and secretase upregulation.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Matthew A; Itzhaki, Ruth F; Shipley, Suzanne J; Dobson, Curtis B

    2007-12-18

    It is uncertain whether environmental factors contribute to the formation of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the abnormal features that define the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. We previously proposed that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) is a strong risk factor for AD when it is present in the brains of people who possess the type 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE-epsilon4); however a direct biochemical link between viral infection and the development of the AD pathological features has never previously been examined. Here we show that infection of cultured neuronal and glial cells with HSV1 leads to a dramatic increase in the intracellular levels of beta-amyloid (Abeta) 1-40 and 1-42, whilst levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in cells decrease. Similarly, Abeta1-42 deposits are present in mouse brain after HSV1 infection. In the cultured cells the mechanism involves increased Abeta production, rather than merely greater retention of cellular Abeta, as levels of beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE-1) and of nicastrin, a component of gamma-secretase, both increase in HSV1-infected cells. These novel data show that HSV1 can directly contribute to the development of senile plaques.

  7. Clinical and neuroimaging findings in neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Monika; Mody, Swati; Natarajan, Girija

    2014-08-01

    In a retrospective review of infants with neonatal herpes simplex virus disease (n=29), we found bilateral multilobar (n=8), pontine (n=3), thalamic (n=6), and internal capsule and corticospinal tract (n=5) involvement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diffusion-weighted imaging (n=6) performed early revealed additional involvement than detected by conventional MRI. Neurodevelopmental sequelae were correlated with MRI abnormalities. Our findings demonstrate that MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging, is a valuable prognostic adjunct in neonatal herpes simplex virus disease.

  8. CD11c Controls Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Responses To Limit Virus Replication during Primary Infection ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sariah J.; Mott, Kevin R.; Chentoufi, Aziz A.; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    CD11c is expressed on the surface of dendritic cells (DCs) and is one of the main markers for identification of DCs. DCs are the effectors of central innate immune responses, but they also affect acquired immune responses to infection. However, how DCs influence the efficacy of adaptive immunity is poorly understood. Here, we show that CD11c+ DCs negatively orchestrate both adaptive and innate immunity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ocular infection. The effectiveness and quantity of virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses are increased in CD11c-deficient animals. In addition, the levels of CD83, CD11b, alpha interferon (IFN-α), and IFN-β, but not IFN-γ, were significantly increased in CD11c-deficient animals. Higher levels of IFN-α, IFN-β, and CD8+ T cells in the CD11c-deficient mice may have contributed to lower virus replication in the eye and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during the early period of infection than in wild-type mice. However, the absence of CD11c did not influence survival, severity of eye disease, or latency. Our studies provide for the first time evidence that CD11c expression may abrogate the ability to reduce primary virus replication in the eye and TG via higher activities of type 1 interferon and CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:21775452

  9. Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection activates the Epstein-Barr virus replicative cycle via a CREB-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongling; Li, Ting; Zeng, Musheng; Peng, Tao

    2012-04-01

    The reactivation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to lytic replication is important in pathogenesis and requires virus-host cellular interactions. However, the mechanism underlying the reactivation of EBV is not yet fully understood. In the present study, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was shown to induce the reactivation of latent EBV by triggering BZLF1 expression. The BZLF1 promoter (Zp) was not activated by HSV-1 essential glycoprotein-induced membrane fusion. Nevertheless, Zp was activated within 6 h post HSV-1 infection in virus entry-dependent and replication-independent manners. Using a panel of Zp deletion mutants, HSV-1 was shown to promote Zp through a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element (CRE) located in ZII. The phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding (phos-CREB) protein, the cellular transactivator that binds to CRE, also increased after HSV-1 infection. By transient transfection, cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and HSV-1 US3 protein were found to be capable of activating Zp in CREB- and CRE-dependent manners. The relationship between EBV activation and HSV-1 infection revealed a possible common mechanism that stimulated latent EBV into lytic cycles in vivo.

  10. Nuclear sensing of viral DNA, epigenetic regulation of herpes simplex virus infection, and innate immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Knipe, David M.

    2015-05-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) undergoes a lytic infection in epithelial cells and a latent infection in neuronal cells, and epigenetic mechanisms play a major role in the differential gene expression under the two conditions. HSV viron DNA is not associated with histones but is rapidly loaded with heterochromatin upon entry into the cell. Viral proteins promote reversal of the epigenetic silencing in epithelial cells while the viral latency-associated transcript promotes additional heterochromatin in neuronal cells. The cellular sensors that initiate the chromatinization of foreign DNA have not been fully defined. IFI16 and cGAS are both essential for innate sensing of HSV DNA, and new evidence shows how they work together to initiate innate signaling. IFI16 also plays a role in the heterochromatinization of HSV DNA, and this review will examine how IFI16 integrates epigenetic regulation and innate sensing of foreign viral DNA to show how these two responses are related. - Highlights: • HSV lytic and latent gene expression is regulated differentially by epigenetic processes. • The sensors of foreign DNA have not been defined fully. • IFI16 and cGAS cooperate to sense viral DNA in HSV-infected cells. • IFI16 plays a role in both innate sensing of HSV DNA and in restricting its expression.

  11. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed. PMID:23320014

  12. Role of the small GTPase Rab27a during Herpes simplex virus infection of oligodendrocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The morphogenesis of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) comprises several events, of which some are not completely understood. It has been shown that HSV-1 glycoproteins accumulate in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and in TGN-derived vesicles. It is also accepted that HSV-1 acquires its final morphology through a secondary envelopment by budding into TGN-derived vesicles coated with viral glycoproteins and tegument proteins. Nevertheless, several aspects of this process remain elusive. The small GTPase Rab27a has been implicated in regulated exocytosis, and it seems to play a key role in certain membrane trafficking events. Rab27a also seems to be required for human cytomegalovirus assembly. However, despite the involvement of various Rab GTPases in HSV-1 envelopment, there is, to date, no data reported on the role of Rab27a in HSV-1 infection. Results Herein, we show that Rab27a colocalized with GHSV-UL46, a tegument-tagged green fluorescent protein-HSV-1, in the TGN. In fact, this small GTPase colocalized with viral glycoproteins gH and gD in that compartment. Functional analysis through Rab27a depletion showed a significant decrease in the number of infected cells and viral production in Rab27a-silenced cells. Conclusions Altogether, our results indicate that Rab27a plays an important role in HSV-1 infection of oligodendrocytic cells. PMID:23164453

  13. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Since the type of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection affects prognosis and subsequent counseling, type-specific testing to distinguish HSV-1 from HSV-2 is always recommended. Although PCR has been the diagnostic standard method for HSV infections of the central nervous system, until now viral culture has been the test of choice for HSV genital infection. However, HSV PCR, with its consistently and substantially higher rate of HSV detection, could replace viral culture as the gold standard for the diagnosis of genital herpes in people with active mucocutaneous lesions, regardless of anatomic location or viral type. Alternatively, antigen detection—an immunofluorescence test or enzyme immunoassay from samples from symptomatic patients--could be employed, but HSV type determination is of importance. Type-specific serology based on glycoprotein G should be used for detecting asymptomatic individuals but widespread screening for HSV antibodies is not recommended. In conclusion, rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis of HSV is now become a necessity, given the difficulty in making the clinical diagnosis of HSV, the growing worldwide prevalence of genital herpes and the availability of effective antiviral therapy. PMID:24885431

  14. Infected cell protein 0 functional domains and their coordination in herpes simplex virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen that establishes latent infection in ganglia neurons. Its unique life cycle requires a balanced “conquer and compromise” strategy to deal with the host anti-viral defenses. One of HSV-1 α (immediate early) gene products, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a multifunctional protein that interacts with and modulates a wide range of cellular defensive pathways. These pathways may locate in different cell compartments, which then migrate or exchange factors upon stimulation, for the purpose of a concerted and effective defense. ICP0 is able to simultaneously attack multiple host pathways by either degrading key restrictive factors or modifying repressive complexes. This is a viral protein that contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates among different cell compartments and interacts with major defensive complexes. The multiple functional domains of ICP0 can work independently and at the same time coordinate with each other. Dissecting the functional domains of ICP0 and delineating the coordination of these domains will help us understand HSV-1 pathogenicity as well as host defense mechanisms. This article focuses on describing individual ICP0 domains, their biochemical properties and their implication in HSV-1 infection. By putting individual domain functions back into the picture of host anti-viral defense network, this review seeks to elaborate the complex interactions between HSV-1 and its host. PMID:26870669

  15. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    LeGoff, Jérôme; Péré, Hélène; Bélec, Laurent

    2014-05-12

    Since the type of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection affects prognosis and subsequent counseling, type-specific testing to distinguish HSV-1 from HSV-2 is always recommended. Although PCR has been the diagnostic standard method for HSV infections of the central nervous system, until now viral culture has been the test of choice for HSV genital infection. However, HSV PCR, with its consistently and substantially higher rate of HSV detection, could replace viral culture as the gold standard for the diagnosis of genital herpes in people with active mucocutaneous lesions, regardless of anatomic location or viral type. Alternatively, antigen detection-an immunofluorescence test or enzyme immunoassay from samples from symptomatic patients--could be employed, but HSV type determination is of importance. Type-specific serology based on glycoprotein G should be used for detecting asymptomatic individuals but widespread screening for HSV antibodies is not recommended. In conclusion, rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis of HSV is now become a necessity, given the difficulty in making the clinical diagnosis of HSV, the growing worldwide prevalence of genital herpes and the availability of effective antiviral therapy.

  16. Infected cell protein 0 functional domains and their coordination in herpes simplex virus replication.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haidong

    2016-02-12

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen that establishes latent infection in ganglia neurons. Its unique life cycle requires a balanced "conquer and compromise" strategy to deal with the host anti-viral defenses. One of HSV-1 α (immediate early) gene products, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a multifunctional protein that interacts with and modulates a wide range of cellular defensive pathways. These pathways may locate in different cell compartments, which then migrate or exchange factors upon stimulation, for the purpose of a concerted and effective defense. ICP0 is able to simultaneously attack multiple host pathways by either degrading key restrictive factors or modifying repressive complexes. This is a viral protein that contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates among different cell compartments and interacts with major defensive complexes. The multiple functional domains of ICP0 can work independently and at the same time coordinate with each other. Dissecting the functional domains of ICP0 and delineating the coordination of these domains will help us understand HSV-1 pathogenicity as well as host defense mechanisms. This article focuses on describing individual ICP0 domains, their biochemical properties and their implication in HSV-1 infection. By putting individual domain functions back into the picture of host anti-viral defense network, this review seeks to elaborate the complex interactions between HSV-1 and its host.

  17. Gamma interferon expression during acute and latent nervous system infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, E M; Hinton, D R; Chen, J; Openshaw, H

    1995-01-01

    This study was initiated to evaluate a role for gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. At the acute stage of infection in mice, HSV-1 replication in trigeminal ganglia and brain stem tissue was modestly but consistently enhanced in mice from which IFN-gamma was by ablated monoclonal antibody treatment and in mice genetically lacking the IFN-gamma receptor (Rgko mice). As determined by reverse transcriptase PCR, IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha transcripts were present in trigeminal ganglia during both acute and latent HSV-1 infection. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected initially in trigeminal ganglia at day 5 after HSV-1 inoculation, and these cells persisted for 6 months into latency. The T cells were focused around morphologically normal neurons that showed no signs of active infection, but many of which expressed HSV-1 latency-associated transcripts. Secreted IFN-gamma was present up to 6 months into latency in areas of the T-cell infiltration. By 9 months into latency, both the T-cell infiltrate and IFN-gamma expression had cleared, although there remained a slight increase in macrophage levels in trigeminal ganglia. In HSV-1-infected brain stem tissue, T cells and IFN-gamma expression were present at 1 month but were gone by 6 months after infection. Our hypothesis is that the persistence of T cells and the sustained IFN-gamma expression occur in response to an HSV-1 antigen(s) in the nervous system. This hypothesis is consistent with a new model of HSV-1 latency which suggests that limited HSV-1 antigen expression occurs during latency (M. Kosz-Vnenchak, J. Jacobson, D.M. Coen, and D.M. Knipe, J. Virol. 67:5383-5393, 1993). We speculate that prolonged secretion of IFN-gamma during latency may modulate a reactivated HSV-1 infection. PMID:7609058

  18. Nuclear pore composition and gating in herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Hofemeister, Helmut; O'Hare, Peter

    2008-09-01

    The mechanism by which herpes simplex virus (HSV) exits the nucleus remains a matter of controversy. The generally accepted route proposes that capsids exit via primary envelopment at the inner nuclear membrane and subsequent fusion of this primary particle with the outer nuclear membrane to gain capsid entry to the cytoplasm. However, recent observations indicate that HSV may induce gross morphological alterations of nuclear pores, resulting in the loss of normal pores and the appearance of dilated gaps in the nuclear membrane of up to several 100 nm. On this basis, it was proposed that a main route of capsid exit from the nucleus is directly through these altered pores. Here, we examine the biochemical composition of some of the major nuclear pore components in uninfected and HSV-infected cells. We show that total levels of major nucleoporins and their sedimentation patterns in density gradients remain largely unchanged up to 18 h after HSV infection. Some alteration in modification of one nucleoporin, Nup358/RanBP2, was observed during enrichment with anti-nucleoporin antibody and probing for O glycosylation. In addition, we examine functional gating within the nucleus in live cells, using microinjection of labeled dextran beads and a recombinant virus expressing GFP-VP16 to track the progress of infection. The nuclear permeability barrier for molecules bigger than 70 kDa remained intact throughout infection. Thus, in a functional assay in live cells, we find no evidence for gross perturbation to the gating of nuclear pores, although this might not exclude a small population of modified pores.

  19. Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with fulminant hepatitis and multiorgan failure following primary Epstein–Barr virus and herpes simplex virus type 1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Beinhardt, Sandra; Tomasits, Josef; Dienes, Hans Peter

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of severe fatal hepatitis in a young patient presumably triggered by two ubiquitous viral diseases which occurred in close succession. This case is unusual because of the exceptional chronological sequence of primary Epstein–Barr virus and herpes simplex virus type 1 infection causing systemic immune dysregulation associated with rapidly developing liver failure and consecutive multiorgan failure. Clinical, laboratory and histopathological findings indicated the development of secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis triggered by these closely succeeding viral primary infections. PMID:28356254

  20. Inflammatory infiltration of the trigeminal ganglion after herpes simplex virus type 1 corneal infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Tang, Q; Hendricks, R L

    1996-01-01

    Following herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection of the cornea, the virus is transmitted to the trigeminal ganglion, where a brief period of virus replication is followed by establishment of a latent infection in neurons. A possible role of the immune system in regulating virus replication and maintaining latency in the sensory neurons has been suggested. We have investigated the phenotype and cytokine pattern of cells that infiltrate the A/J mouse trigeminal ganglion at various times after HSV-1 corneal infection. HSV antigen expression in the trigeminal ganglion (indicative of the viral lytic cycle) increased until day 3 postinfection (p.i.) and then diminished to undetectable levels by day 7 p.i. The period of declining HSV antigen expression. was associated with a marked increase in Mac-1+ cells. These cells did not appear to coexpress the F4/80+ (macrophage) or the CD8+ (T cell) markers, and none showed polymorphonuclear leukocyte morphology, suggesting a possible early infiltration of natural killer cells. There was also a significant increase in the trigeminal ganglion of cells expressing the gamma delta T-cell receptor, and these cells were found almost exclusively in very close association with neurons. This period was also characterized by a rapid and equivalent increase in cells expressing gamma interferon and interleukin-4. The density of the inflammatory infiltrate in the trigeminal ganglion increased until days 12 to 21 p.i., when it was predominated by CD8+, Mac-1+, and tumor necrosis factor-expressing cells, which surrounded many neurons. By day 92 p.i., the inflammatory infiltrate diminished but was heaviest in mice with active periocular skin disease. Our data are consistent with the notion that gamma interferon produced by natural killer cells and/or gamma delta T cells may play an important role in limiting HSV-1 replication in the trigeminal ganglion during the acute stage of infection. In addition, tumor necrosis factor produced by CD8

  1. Inflammatory infiltration of the trigeminal ganglion after herpes simplex virus type 1 corneal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, T; Tang, Q; Hendricks, R L

    1996-01-01

    Following herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection of the cornea, the virus is transmitted to the trigeminal ganglion, where a brief period of virus replication is followed by establishment of a latent infection in neurons. A possible role of the immune system in regulating virus replication and maintaining latency in the sensory neurons has been suggested. We have investigated the phenotype and cytokine pattern of cells that infiltrate the A/J mouse trigeminal ganglion at various times after HSV-1 corneal infection. HSV antigen expression in the trigeminal ganglion (indicative of the viral lytic cycle) increased until day 3 postinfection (p.i.) and then diminished to undetectable levels by day 7 p.i. The period of declining HSV antigen expression. was associated with a marked increase in Mac-1+ cells. These cells did not appear to coexpress the F4/80+ (macrophage) or the CD8+ (T cell) markers, and none showed polymorphonuclear leukocyte morphology, suggesting a possible early infiltration of natural killer cells. There was also a significant increase in the trigeminal ganglion of cells expressing the gamma delta T-cell receptor, and these cells were found almost exclusively in very close association with neurons. This period was also characterized by a rapid and equivalent increase in cells expressing gamma interferon and interleukin-4. The density of the inflammatory infiltrate in the trigeminal ganglion increased until days 12 to 21 p.i., when it was predominated by CD8+, Mac-1+, and tumor necrosis factor-expressing cells, which surrounded many neurons. By day 92 p.i., the inflammatory infiltrate diminished but was heaviest in mice with active periocular skin disease. Our data are consistent with the notion that gamma interferon produced by natural killer cells and/or gamma delta T cells may play an important role in limiting HSV-1 replication in the trigeminal ganglion during the acute stage of infection. In addition, tumor necrosis factor produced by CD8

  2. Therapeutic Vaccine for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Infection: Findings From a Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I; Wald, Anna; Warren, Terri; Fife, Kenneth; Tyring, Stephen; Lee, Patricia; Van Wagoner, Nick; Magaret, Amalia; Flechtner, Jessica B; Tasker, Sybil; Chan, Jason; Morris, Amy; Hetherington, Seth

    2017-03-15

    Genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection causes recurrent lesions and frequent viral shedding. GEN-003 is a candidate therapeutic vaccine containing HSV-2 gD2∆TMR and ICP4.2, and Matrix-M2 adjuvant. Persons with genital herpes were randomized into 3 dose cohorts to receive 3 intramuscular doses 21 days apart of 10 µg, 30 µg, or 100 µg of GEN-003, antigens without adjuvant, or placebo. Participants obtained genital swab specimens twice daily for HSV-2 detection and monitored genital lesions for 28-day periods at baseline and at intervals after the last dose. One hundred and thirty-four persons received all 3 doses. Reactogenicity was associated with adjuvant but not with antigen dose or dose number. No serious adverse events were attributed to GEN-003. Compared with baseline, genital HSV-2 shedding rates immediately after dosing were reduced with GEN-003 (from 13.4% to 6.4% for 30 μg [P < .001] and from 15.0% to 10.3% for 100 µg [P < .001]). Lesion rates were also significantly (P < .01) reduced immediately following immunization with 30 µg or 100 µg of GEN-003. GEN-003 elicited increases in antigen binding, virus neutralizing antibody, and T-cell responses. GEN-003 had an acceptable safety profile and stimulated humoral and cellular immune responses. GEN-003 at doses of 30 µg and 100 µg reduced genital HSV shedding and lesion rates. NCT01667341 (funded by Genocea).

  3. Molecular requirement for sterols in herpes simplex virus entry and infectivity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) required cholesterol for virion-induced membrane fusion. HSV successfully entered DHCR24-/-cells, which lack a desmosterol-to-cholesterol conversion enzyme, indicating entry can occur independently of cholesterol. Depletion of desmosterol from these cells resulted in d...

  4. Temporal morphogenesis of herpes simplex virus type 1-infected and brefeldin A-treated human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Helle L.; Norrild, Bodil

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insights in the herpesvirus-cell interactions are of general cell biology interest, especially to studies of intracellular transport, and of considerable significance in the efforts to generate drugs, vaccines, and gene therapy. However, the pathway of virus particle egress and maturation is a contentious issue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The intracellular transport was inhibited in cultured herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infected human fibroblasts by brefeldin A (BFA). The virus-cell interactions including the viral envelopment, transport of HSV-1 virions, and transport of viral glycoprotein D (gD-1) and glycoprotein C (gC-1) were studied by titration assay, immunoblot, immunofluorescence light microscopy, and immunogold electron microscopy of cryosections. RESULTS: gD-1 and gC-1 were synthesized and normally transported to the plasma membranes of untreated HSV-1 infected host cells. BFA (1 microg/ml medium) effectively blocked the transport of the glycoproteins to the plasma membranes and affected the tubulin and vimentin of the cytoskeleton. Viral particles and glycoproteins accumulated in the perinuclear space and the endoplasmic reticulum of BFA treated cells. Withdrawal of BFA influence up to 9 hr resulted in restored tubulin and vimentin, transport of glycoproteins to the plasma membranes, and steady release of infectious viral particles to the extracellular space superior to the cellular assembly of new virions. The ultrastructural data presented support that the primary envelopment of viral particles occur at the nuclear membranes containing immature glycoproteins followed by multiple de-envelopments and re-envelopments of the virions during the transport and maturation in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex. CONCLUSIONS: BFA-induced changes include the cytoskeleton with significant effect on HSV-1 maturation and egress. The data support a multiple-step envelopment of HSV-1 in a common pathway of glycoprotein synthesis and virion

  5. Value of Papanicolaou-stained smears in the diagnosis of trichomoniasis, candidiasis, and cervical herpes simplex virus infection in women.

    PubMed Central

    Thin, R N; Atia, W; Parker, J D; Nicol, C S; Canti, G

    1975-01-01

    In the diagnosis of trichomoniasis Papanicolaou-stained cervical smears gave marginally better results than cultures of vaginal secretion; stained cervical smears and wet films of vaginal material gave similar results. Culture of vaginal secretion on Sabouraud's medium gave the best results in the diagnosis of candidiasis; Papanicolaou-stained smears gave significantly fewer positive results than either cultures or Gram-stained vaginal smears. Papanicolaou-stained smears were reported as positive in only two of five patients with cervical herpes simplex virus infection. It is concluded that Papanicolaou smears are as good as wet films or cultures in the diagnosis of trichomoniasis but cannot be relied on for the diagnosis of candidiasis, or for detecting herpes simplex virus infection. PMID:165860

  6. Virus-cell interactions regulating induction of tumor necrosis factor alpha production in macrophages infected with herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Paludan, S R; Mogensen, S C

    2001-11-01

    Macrophages respond to virus infections by rapidly secreting proinflammatory cytokines, which play an important role in the first line of defense. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the major macrophage-produced cytokines. In this study we have investigated the virus-cell interactions responsible for induction of TNF-alpha expression in herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected macrophages. Both HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 induced TNF-alpha expression in macrophages activated with gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). This induction was to some extent sensitive to UV treatment of the virus. Virus particles unable to enter the cells displayed reduced capacity to stimulate TNF-alpha expression but retained a significant portion which was abolished by HSV-specific antibodies. Recombinant HSV-1 glycoprotein D was able to trigger TNF-alpha secretion in concert with IFN-gamma. Sugar moieties of HSV glycoproteins have been reported to be involved in induction of IFN-alpha but did not contribute to TNF-alpha expression in macrophages. Moreover, the entry-dependent portion of the TNF-alpha induction was investigated with HSV-1 mutants and found to be independent of the tegument proteins VP16 and UL13 and partly dependent on nuclear translocation of the viral DNA. Finally, we found that macrophages expressing an inactive mutant of the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) produced less TNF-alpha in response to infectious HSV infection than the empty-vector control cell line but displayed the same responsiveness to UV-inactivated virus. These results indicate that HSV induces TNF-alpha expression in macrophages through mechanisms involving (i) viral glycoproteins, (ii) early postentry events occurring prior to nuclear translocation of viral DNA, and (iii) viral dsRNA-PKR.

  7. Brincidofovir clearance of acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus-1 and adenovirus infection after stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Voigt, S; Hofmann, J; Edelmann, A; Sauerbrei, A; Kühl, J-S

    2016-10-01

    Infections with adenovirus (AdV) and herpesviruses can result in considerable morbidity and mortality in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT) recipients. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivations are usually prevented by acyclovir (ACV) prophylaxis, whereas cidofovir (CDV) has been used off indication to manage AdV infections. We report a child with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing multiple SCT, who experienced HSV-1 disease including severe mucositis and herpetic whitlow, as well as high viral load AdV DNAemia. Both ACV and CDV were ineffective; however, viral loads were decreased with brincidofovir, resulting in viral clearance. A subsequent Epstein-Barr virus disease with relevant meningoencephalitis responded to rituximab.

  8. Different Mechanisms Regulate Productive Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 Infections in Adult Trigeminal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ma, AyeAye; Margolis, Mathew S.

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 establish latency in different neuronal subtypes (A5+ and KH10+) in murine trigeminal ganglia, results which correlate with restricted productive infection in these neurons in vitro. HSV-2 latency-associated transcript (LAT) contains a cis-acting regulatory element near the transcription start site that promotes productive infection in A5+ neurons and a second element in exon 1 that inhibits productive infection in KH10+ neurons. HSV-1 contains no such regulatory sequences, demonstrating different mechanisms for regulating productive HSV infection in neurons. PMID:23514893

  9. Impact of asymptomatic Herpes simplex virus-2 infection on T cell phenotype and function in the foreskin.

    PubMed

    Prodger, Jessica L; Gray, Ronald; Kigozi, Godfrey; Nalugoda, Fred; Galiwango, Ronald; Nehemiah, Kighoma; Kakanga, Moses; Hirbod, Taha; Wawer, Maria J; Sewankambo, Nelson; Serwadda, David; Kaul, Rupert

    2012-06-19

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) increases the risk of HIV acquisition in men and overall CD4 T cell density in the foreskin. Using tissues obtained during routine male circumcision, we examined the impact of HSV-2 on the function and phenotype of foreskin T cells in Ugandan men. HSV-2 infection was predominantly associated with a compartmentalized increase in CCR5 expression by foreskin CD4 T cells, which may contribute to HIV susceptibility.

  10. A serological study of cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus infections in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dora S. K.; Stern, H.

    1981-01-01

    Healthy Malaysians from various parts of Peninsular Malaysia were examined for CF antibodies against cytomegalovirus (CMV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2. CMV antibodies were detected in 1114 out of 1556 persons (71.6%) and HSV antibodies were detected in 954 persons out of 1554 (61.4%). The age distribution patterns were similar for the two infections, with maximum prevalence at 5 - 14 years of age. Prevalence was higher in women than in men. There were no significant differences among the Malay, Chinese, and Indian groups of the population with respect to CMV, 72 - 78% possessing antibodies, but in the case of HSV, 76% of the Chinese had antibodies, compared with 57 - 60% of the Malays and Indians. More than 90% of newborn infants had CMV and HSV CF antibodies, confirming the highly immune status of childbearing women in Malaysia. No CMV-specific IgM was detected in the Malaysian neonates examined but this does not exclude the possibility of congenital infection. PMID:6279323

  11. Antiviral and immunological effects of tenofovir microbicide in vaginal herpes simplex virus 2 infection.

    PubMed

    Vibholm, Line; Reinert, Line S; Søgaard, Ole S; Paludan, Søren R; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Melchjorsen, Jesper

    2012-11-01

    The anti-HIV microbicide, tenofovir (TFV) gel, has been shown to decrease HIV-1 acquisition by 39% and reduce herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) transmission by 51%. We evaluated the effect of a 1% TFV gel on genital HSV-2 infection in a mouse vaginal challenge model. In vitro plaque assays and luminex multiplex bead analysis were used, respectively, to measure postinfection vaginal viral shedding (day 1) and cytokine secretion (day 2). To further investigate the anti-HSV-2 properties, we evaluated the direct antiviral effect of TFV and the oral prodrug tenofovir disoproxil fumerate (TDF) in cell culture. Compared to placebo-treated mice, TFV-treated mice had significantly lower clinical scores, developed later genital lesions, and showed reduced vaginal viral shedding. Furthermore, the levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, and other cytokines were altered in the vaginal fluid following topical tenofovir treatment and subsequent HSV-2 challenge. Finally, we found that both TFV and TDF inhibited HSV-2 infection in vitro; TDF showed a 50-fold greater potency than TFV. In conclusion, we confirmed that the microbicide TFV had direct anti-HSV-2 effects in a murine vaginal challenge model. Therefore, this model would be suitable for evaluating present and future microbicide candidates. Furthermore, the present study warrants further investigation of TDF in microbicides.

  12. Rapid host immune response and viral dynamics in herpes simplex virus-2 infection

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Corey, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2) is episodically shed throughout the human genital tract. While high viral load correlates with development of genital ulcers, shedding also commonly occurs even when ulcers are not present, allowing for silent transmission during coitus and contributing to high seroprevalence of HSV-2 worldwide. Frequent viral reactivation occurs despite diverse and complementary host and viral mechanisms within ganglionic tissue that predispose towards latency, suggesting that viral replication may be constantly occurring in a small minority of neurons within the ganglia. Within genital mucosa, the in vivo expansion and clearance rates of HSV-2 are extremely rapid. Resident dendritic cells and memory HSV-specific T cells persist at prior sites of genital tract reactivation, and in conjunction with prompt innate recognition of infected cells, lead to rapid containment of infected cells. Shedding episodes vary greatly in duration and severity within a single person over time: this heterogeneity appears best explained by variation in the densities of host immunity across the genital tract. The fact that immune responses usually control viral replication in genital skin prior to development of lesions provides optimism that enhancing such responses could lead to effective vaccines and immunotherapies. PMID:23467247

  13. Extreme Susceptibility of African Naked Mole Rats (Heterocephalus glaber) to Experimental Infection with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Artwohl, James; Ball-Kell, Susan; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Wilson, Steven P; Lu, Ying; Park, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) is widely used as a gene delivery vector in a variety of laboratory animals. In a recent study, a thymidine-kinase–inactive (replication-conditional) HSV1 used as a delivery vector was lethal in naked mole rats, whereas mice infected with the identical virus showed no adverse effects. This result prompted us to undertake a controlled comparative histologic study of the effect of HSV1 infection on naked mole rats and mice. Replication-competent and replication-conditional HSV1 caused widespread inflammation and necrosis in multiple organ systems of naked mole rats but not mice; naked mole rats infected with replication-defective virus showed no adverse effects. We conclude that the lethality of HSV1 for naked mole rats is likely the result of overwhelming infection, possibly in part due to this species’ natural lack of proinflammatory neuropeptides at the initial site of infection. PMID:19295058

  14. An Investigative Peptide–Acyclovir Combination to Control Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Ocular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul J.; Antoine, Thessicar E.; Farooq, Asim V.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Shukla, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the efficacy of a combination treatment composed of the cationic, membrane-penetrating peptide G2, and acyclovir (ACV) in both in vitro and ex vivo models of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ocular infection. Methods. The antiviral activity of a combined G2 peptide and ACV therapy (G2-ACV) was assessed in various treatment models. Viral entry, spread, and plaque assays were performed in vitro to assess the prophylactic efficacy of G2, G2-ACV, and ACV treatments. In the ex vivo model of HSV-1 infection, the level of viral inhibition was also compared among the three treatment groups via Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The potential change in expression of the target receptor for G2 was also assessed using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Results. Statistically significant effects against HSV-1 infection were seen in all treatment groups in the viral entry, spread, and plaque assays. The greatest effects against HSV-1 infection in vitro were seen in the G2-ACV group. In the ex vivo model, statistically significant anti–HSV-1 effects were also noted in all control groups. At 24 hours, the greatest inhibitory effect against HSV-1 infection was seen in the ACV group. At 48 hours, however, the G2-ACV–treated group demonstrated the greatest antiviral activity. Syndecan-1, a target of G2, was found to be upregulated at 12-hours postinfection. Conclusions. This study shows that G2-ACV may be an effective antiviral against HSV-1 (KOS) strain when applied as single prophylactic applications with or without continuous doses postinfection. PMID:23989188

  15. An investigative peptide-acyclovir combination to control herpes simplex virus type 1 ocular infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Paul J; Antoine, Thessicar E; Farooq, Asim V; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Shukla, Deepak

    2013-09-27

    To investigate the efficacy of a combination treatment composed of the cationic, membrane-penetrating peptide G2, and acyclovir (ACV) in both in vitro and ex vivo models of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ocular infection. The antiviral activity of a combined G2 peptide and ACV therapy (G2-ACV) was assessed in various treatment models. Viral entry, spread, and plaque assays were performed in vitro to assess the prophylactic efficacy of G2, G2-ACV, and ACV treatments. In the ex vivo model of HSV-1 infection, the level of viral inhibition was also compared among the three treatment groups via Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The potential change in expression of the target receptor for G2 was also assessed using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Statistically significant effects against HSV-1 infection were seen in all treatment groups in the viral entry, spread, and plaque assays. The greatest effects against HSV-1 infection in vitro were seen in the G2-ACV group. In the ex vivo model, statistically significant anti-HSV-1 effects were also noted in all control groups. At 24 hours, the greatest inhibitory effect against HSV-1 infection was seen in the ACV group. At 48 hours, however, the G2-ACV-treated group demonstrated the greatest antiviral activity. Syndecan-1, a target of G2, was found to be upregulated at 12-hours postinfection. This study shows that G2-ACV may be an effective antiviral against HSV-1 (KOS) strain when applied as single prophylactic applications with or without continuous doses postinfection.

  16. Differential stability of host mRNAs in Friend erythroleukemia cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mayman, B.A.; Nishioka, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The consequences of herpes simplex virus type 1 infection on cellular macromolecules were investigated in Friend erythroleukemia cells. The patterns of protein synthesis, examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, demonstrated that by 4 h postinfection the synthesis of many host proteins, with the exception of histones, was inhibited. Examination of the steady-state level of histone H3 mRNA by molecular hybridization of total RNA to a cloned mouse histone H3 complementary DNA probe demonstrated that the ratio of histone H3 mRNA to total RNA remained unchanged for the first 4 h postinfection. In contrast, the steady-state levels of globin and actin mRNAs decreased progressively at early intervals postinfection. Studies on RNA synthesis in isolated nuclei demonstrated that the transcription of the histone H3 gene was inhibited to approximately the same extent as that of actin gene. It was concluded that the stabilization of preexisting histone H3 mRNA was responsible for the persistence of H3 mRNA and histone protein synthesis in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected Friend erythroleukemia cells. The possible mechanisms influencing the differential stability of host mRNAs during the course of productive infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 are discussed.

  17. Early events in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection: photosensitivity of fluorescein isothiocyanate-treated virions

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, N.; Bzik, D.; Person, S.; Snipes, W.

    1981-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is photosensitized by treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The inactivation of FITC-treated virions upon subsequent exposure to light is inhibited by the presence of sodium azide, suggesting the involvement of singlet oxygen in the process. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that treatment with FITC plus light induces crosslinks in viral envelope glycoproteins. Treatment of virions with high concentrations of FITC (50 ..mu..g/ml) plus light causes a reduction in the adsorption of the virus to monolayers of human embryonic lung cells. For lower concentrations of FITC (10 ..mu..g/ml) plus light, treated virions adsorb to the host cells, but remain sensitive to light until entry occurs. The loss of light sensitivity coincides with the development of resistance to antibodies. These results are most consistent with a mechanism of entry for herpes simplex virus involving fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane of the host cell.

  18. Peptides Derived from Glycoproteins H and B of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Are Capable of Blocking Herpetic Infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cetina-Corona, Abraham; López-Sánchez, Uriel; Salinas-Trujano, Juana; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Barrón, Blanca Lilia; Torres-Flores, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design peptides derived from glycoproteins H (gH) and B (gB) of herpes simplex viruses type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) with the potential to block herpetic infection and to evaluate their ability to inhibit HSV-1 and HSV-2 infection in vitro. A library of continuous 15-25 residue stretches (CRSs) located at the surface of gH and gB from HSV-1 and HSV-2 was created. These CRSs were analyzed, and only those that were highly flexible and rich in charged residues were selected for the design of the antiviral peptides (AVPs). The toxicity of the AVPs was evaluated by MTT reduction assays. Virucidal activity of the AVPs was determined by a plaque reduction assay, and their antiviral effect was measured by cell viability assays. Four AVPs (CB-1, CB-2, U-1, and U-2) derived from gB and gH were designed and synthetized, none of which showed high levels of toxicity in Vero cells. The U-1 and U-2 gB-derived AVPs showed high virucidal and antiviral activities against both HSV-1 and HSV-2. The gH-derived peptide CB-1 showed high virucidal and antiviral activities against HSV-2, while CB-2 showed similar results against HSV-1. The peptides CB-1 and CB-2 showed higher IC50 values than the U-1 and U-2 peptides. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Population-based surveillance of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection in Australia, 1997-2011.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl A; Raynes-Greenow, Camille; Isaacs, David

    2014-08-15

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is uncommon, but mortality after disseminated disease and morbidity after encephalitis are high. For the last decade, increased dose and duration of acyclovir has been advised to prevent disease progression and recurrence. We sought to determine prospectively the epidemiologic, clinical, and secular trends of this condition in Australia. This was prospective national active surveillance for neonatal HSV disease through the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit from 1997 to 2011. Case notification triggered a questionnaire requesting de-identified data from the pediatric clinician. We identified 131 confirmed cases of neonatal HSV disease in 15 years from 261 notifications (95% response). The reported incidence (3.27 cases per 100 000 live births overall; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.73-3.86) was stable. Overall mortality was 18.8% (95% CI, 12.1-25.5); the mortality rate was significantly lower in the latter part of the study period, 2005-2011, compared with 1997-2004 (P = .04). There were significantly more young mothers (<20 years of age) compared with Australian birth record data (18.5% vs 4.8%; P < .001). HSV-1 infection was more common than HSV-2 (62.7% vs 37.3%; P < .001), and the rate of HSV-1 infections increased significantly over the surveillance period (P < .05). From 2002, most infants received high-dose acyclovir. The time from symptom onset to initiation of therapy in survivors did not change over time. Mortality from neonatal HSV infection has fallen but remains high. HSV-1 is the major serotype causing neonatal disease in Australia. Young mothers represent an important target group for prevention. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Epithelial Barriers in Murine Skin during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection: The Role of Tight Junction Formation.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elena; Thier, Katharina; Petermann, Philipp; Rübsam, Matthias; Staeheli, Peter; Iden, Sandra; Niessen, Carien M; Knebel-Mörsdorf, Dagmar

    2017-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 has to overcome skin or mucosa barriers to infect its human host. The impact of the various barrier functions on successful viral invasion is not known. On ex vivo infection of murine skin, we observed efficient invasion only via the basal epidermal layer when the dermis was removed. Here, we investigated how wounding and intercellular junction formation control successful viral entry. After wounding of skin samples or removal of the stratum corneum, infected cells were rarely detected. On the basis of infection studies in epidermis from IFN-stimulated mice, we assume that mechanical wounding does not lead to an antiviral state that impedes infection. When we infected human skin equivalents, we observed entry only into unstratified keratinocytes or after wounding of fully stratified cultures. Reduced infection of keratinocytes after calcium-induced stratification confirmed the impact of junction formation. To assess the effect of functional tight junctions, stratified cultures of polarity regulator partitioning-defective-3- or E-cadherin-deficient keratinocytes were infected. As the number of infected cells strongly increased with enhanced paracellular permeability, we conclude that the formation of functional tight junctions interferes with viral entry indicating that next to the stratum corneum tight junctions are a major physical barrier for herpes simplex virus 1 invasion into tissue. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Longitudinal study on oral shedding of herpes simplex virus 1 and varicella-zoster virus in individuals infected with HIV.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Monique; Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Selke, Stacy; Pas, Suzan D; van Loenen, Freek B; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Wald, Anna; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2013-09-01

    Primary herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection leads to a life-long latent infection of ganglia innervating the oral mucosa. HSV-1 and VZV reactivation is more common in immunocompromised individuals and may result in viral shedding in saliva. We determined the kinetics and quantity of oral HSV-1 and VZV shedding in HSV-1 and VZV seropositive individuals infected with HIV and to assess whether HSV-1 shedding involves reactivation of the same strain intra-individually. HSV-1 and VZV shedding was determined by real-time PCR of sequential daily oral swabs (n = 715) collected for a median period of 31 days from 22 individuals infected with HIV. HSV-1 was genotyped by sequencing the viral thymidine kinase gene. Herpesvirus shedding was detected in 18 of 22 participants. Shedding of HSV-1 occurred frequently, on 14.3% of days, whereas solely VZV shedding was very rare. Two participants shed VZV. The median HSV-1 load was higher compared to VZV. HSV-1 DNA positive swabs clustered into 34 shedding episodes with a median duration of 2 days. The prevalence, duration and viral load of herpesvirus shedding did not correlate with CD4 counts and HIV load. The genotypes of the HSV-1 viruses shed were identical between and within shedding episodes of the same person, but were different between individuals. One-third of the individuals shed an HSV-1 strain potentially refractory to acyclovir therapy. Compared to HSV-1, oral VZV shedding is rare in individuals infected with HIV. Recurrent oral HSV-1 shedding is likely due to reactivation of the same latent HSV-1 strain.

  2. Disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection between black and white men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Netochukwu; Rosenberg, Eli S; Luisi, Nicole; Sanchez, Travis; del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kelley, Colleen F

    2015-09-01

    HIV disproportionately affects black men who have sex with men, and herpes simplex virus type 2 is known to increase acquisition of HIV. However, data on racial disparities in herpes simplex virus type 2 prevalence and risk factors are limited among men who have sex with men in the United States. InvolveMENt was a cohort study of black and white HIV-negative men who have sex with men in Atlanta, GA. Univariate and multivariate cross-sectional associations with herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence were assessed among 455 HIV-negative men who have sex with men for demographic, behavioural and social determinant risk factors using logistic regression. Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 was 23% (48/211) for black and 16% (38/244) for white men who have sex with men (p = 0.05). Education, poverty, drug/alcohol use, incarceration, circumcision, unprotected anal intercourse, and condom use were not associated with herpes simplex virus type 2. In multivariate analyses, black race for those ≤25 years, but not >25 years, and number of sexual partners were significantly associated. Young black men who have sex with men are disproportionately affected by herpes simplex virus type 2, which may contribute to disparities in HIV acquisition. An extensive assessment of risk factors did not explain this disparity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection suggesting differences in susceptibility or partner characteristics.

  3. Herpes simplex virus type-2 and human immunodeficiency virus infections in a rural population in Kilimanjaro Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Mmbaga, Elia John; Leyna, Germana Henry; Stray-Pedersen, Babil; Klepp, Knut-Inge

    2011-03-01

    To estimate the seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Type 2 (HSV-2) and its association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in rural Kilimanjaro Tanzania. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Oria village from March to June 2005 involving all individuals aged 15-44 years with permanent address in the village. Following an informed written consent, participants gave blood for HIV-1 testing and further interviewed regarding their risk behaviours. All HIV cases and randomly selected controls were tested for HSV-2 antibodies. The weighted HSV-2 seroprevalence estimate in the whole population was 33.2%. The HSV-2 seroprevalence was 87.5% and 29.5% among HIV-1 seropositive cases and seronegative controls respectively (Odds ratio (OR) 2.9; 95% Confidence interval: 1.9-4.3). After adjusting for sexual risk behaviors, the association between HSV-2 and HIV-1 infections remained strong (adjusted OR 14.1; CI: 5.0-28.3). Multiple sexual partners, transactional sex and unprotected casual sex were independently associated with HIV-1 infection. These results demonstrate that HSV-2 is highly prevalent in rural communities in Tanzania and strongly associated with HIV-1 infection. Sexual risk behaviours may play a major role in the transmission of both HSV-2 and HIV-1 infection. Due to lack of HSV-2 suppressive antiretroviral therapy in this and similar communities, prevention through promotion of behavioural change might be the most important strategy to mitigate HSV-2 and HIV-1 transmission.

  4. [A study of acute infection of herpes simplex virus in mouse trigeminal ganglia].

    PubMed

    Tani, H; Naito, T; Shiota, H; Mimura, Y

    1996-07-01

    We investigated the shift to latency and protective reaction in mice trigeminal ganglia after inoculation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) onto the cornea. BALB/c mice were inoculated and the trigeminal ganglia were removed periodically. Lymphocytes in the ganglia were observed using immunocytochemical techniques. The results obtained were as follows: (1) HSV-1 positive neuronal cells were recognized at 3 days after inoculation but not at 14 days. (2) The relative proportion of T cells in lymphocytes was greater than that of B cells at 3 days, but B cells were more numerous at 5 days. Then T cells become more numerous again at 7 days. (3) Among the subsets in T cells, the ratio of CD4+ and CD8+ cells was almost equal at 3 days, but then CD4+ cells increased and CD8+ cells had disappeared at 14 days after inoculation. These results show that HSV-1 that reached the trigeminal ganglion from the cornea by axonal transport infected neuronal cells, multiplied there and then disappeared resulting in latency. Cellular immunity, especially the function of CD4+ cells, played a main role in this protective reaction by suppressing the viral growth.

  5. Proteomic analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 transactivator protein in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Suk, Hyung; Knipe, David M

    2015-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 (VP16) tegument protein forms a transactivation complex with the cellular proteins host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (Oct-1) upon entry into the host cell. VP16 has also been shown to interact with a number of virion tegument proteins and viral glycoprotein H to promote viral assembly, but no comprehensive study of the VP16 proteome has been performed at early times postinfection. We therefore performed a proteomic analysis of VP16-interacting proteins at 3 h postinfection. We confirmed the interaction of VP16 with HCF-1 and a large number of cellular Mediator complex proteins, but most surprisingly, we found that the major viral protein associating with VP16 is the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) immediate-early (IE) transactivator protein. These results raise the potential for a new function for VP16 in associating with the IE ICP4 and playing a role in transactivation of early and late gene expression, in addition to its well-documented function in transactivation of IE gene expression.

  6. Inactivation of Herpes Simplex Viruses by Nonionic Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Asculai, Samuel S.; Weis, Margaret T.; Rancourt, Martha W.; Kupferberg, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Nonionic surface-active agents possessing ether or amide linkages between the hydrophillic and hydrophobic portions of the molecule rapidly inactivated the infectivity of herpes simplex viruses. The activity stemmed from the ability of nonionic surfactants to dissolve lipid-containing membranes. This was confirmed by observing surfactant destruction of mammalian cell plasma membranes and herpes simplex virus envelopes. Proprietary vaginal contraceptive formulations containing nonionic surfactants also inactivated herpes simplex virus infectivity. This observation suggests that nonionic surfactants in appropriate formulation could effectively prevent herpes simplex virus transmission. Images PMID:208460

  7. [Epidemiological evaluations of human immunodeficiency virus, herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 and cytomegalovirus infections in drug addicts].

    PubMed

    Sagnelli, E; Filippini, P; Guarino, M; Borrelli, G; Aprea, L; Malafronte, G; Felaco, F M; Piccinino, F; Giusti, G

    1989-01-01

    Eighty-eight drug addicts from the "BAN Center" in Torre Annunziata (Naples) and 88 normal subjects pair-matched for age and sex were tested for IgG to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and 2 and cytomegalovirus (CMV). A high prevalence of subjects with antibodies to HSV-1 and CMV (80.7% and 65.9%) were recorded in the control group testifying to the high level of these infections in Campania. Prevalences were higher in drug addicts, and drug abuse was identified as a risk factor for the acquisition of CMV infection (odds ratio = 2.3). Moreover, drug addiction is also a risk factor for HSV-2 and HIV infection as demonstrated by the observation that drug abusers were anti-HSV-2 (9.1 vs. 1.1%, odds ratio = 6.16) or anti-HIV (11.4 vs. 0%, odds ratio = 23.6) positive more frequently than normal controls. Thus, drug addiction is a risk factor for the acquisition of HIV, HSV-2 and CMV infections. This is probably due to similar habits, frequent among drug addicts from our geographic area and uncommon in the normal population, such as tattooing, needle-sharing needlestick and unsafe sex. Some of these habits, such as unsafe sex and tattooing, seem to be, per se, risk factors for the acquisition of both HIV and CMV infections. The data also suggest that HIV infection was probably introduced in Campania more recently than in northern and central Italy where the prevalence of anti-HIV positive cases among drug addicts is definitely higher.

  8. Role of neutralizing antibodies and T-cells in pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus infection in congenitally athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, A K; Buckmaster, A; Nash, A A; Field, H J; Wildy, P

    1982-11-01

    Congenitally athymic nude mice were infected with 10(4) p.f.u. herpes simplex type 1 (strain SC16). Following the passive transfer of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (AP7, AP8 and AP12) it was observed that AP7 alone reduced the virus infectivity in the nervous system; AP8 and AP12 failed to protect mice probably due to poor in vivo binding to the neutralization site on the virus. Latent ganglionic infection could be established in nude mice following adoptive transfer of optimum number (2 x 10(7) cells/mouse) of immune lymph node cells from day 7 herpes virus-infected hairy immunocompetent donor mice. Moreover, in some of the immune lymph node cell protected nudes, latency could be maintained even in complete absence of neutralizing antibodies. Results of ear-ablation experiments revealed that removal of primary source of infection after day 5 of infection reduced the amount of virus in the ganglia and spinal cord. Acute neurological infection was not detected following transfer of protective anti-gp-D neutralizing antibody (LP2) in combination with removal of infected pinna. These data suggest that continuous seeding of virus occurs in related ganglia via the axonal route from infected ear pinna. It appears that local T-cell-mediated immune mechanisms are involved in maintenance of latency.

  9. Prepubertal vaccination of mice against experimental infection of the genital tract with type 2 herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Williams, D R; Moles, A W; Sargent, A

    1980-01-01

    Pre-pubertal immunisation of mice with a formalin-inactivated type 1 and 2 herpes simplex virus vaccine conferred a level of life-long protection against primary type 2 genital infection. Protection levels were better with type 1 vaccine and strikingly influenced by vaccine dosage where a one-hundred-fold reduction from the standard vaccine dosage diminished protection to insignificant levels. Vaccine efficacy was not significantly affected by the method of virus inactivation, the number of immunisations or the age of the mouse at immunisation. Vaccination conferred better protection than previous type 2 genital infection; this may be a consequence of a higher antigenic dose, more acceptable antigenic presentation or to a perversion of the immune response in a latently infected animal to homologous virus challenge.

  10. Molecular requirement for sterols in herpes simplex virus entry and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Wudiri, George A; Pritchard, Suzanne M; Li, Hong; Liu, Jin; Aguilar, Hector C; Gilk, Stacey D; Nicola, Anthony V

    2014-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) required cholesterol or desmosterol for virion-induced membrane fusion. HSV successfully entered DHCR24(-/-) cells, which lack a desmosterol-to-cholesterol conversion enzyme, indicating that entry can occur independently of cholesterol. Depletion of desmosterol from these cells resulted in diminished HSV-1 entry, suggesting a general sterol requirement for HSV-1 entry and that desmosterol can operate in virus entry. Cholesterol functioned more effectively than desmosterol, suggesting that the hydrocarbon tail of cholesterol influences viral entry. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Oral ulceration associated with concurrent herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus infection in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Mainville, Gisele N; Marsh, William L; Allen, Carl M

    2015-06-01

    In immunocompromised patients, oral ulcerations are common and have a wide spectrum of causes, including herpesvirus infection. We report on a case in which an oral ulcer was simultaneously infected by herpes simplex (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in a kidney-pancreas transplant recipient. A 46-year-old woman presented with a clinically nonspecific dorsal tongue ulcer of 3 months duration. Histopathologic evaluation indicated keratinocytes exhibiting herpetic viral cytopathic effect. Nuclear and cytologic alterations suggestive of CMV infection were found in endothelial cells subjacent to the ulcer. Immunohistochemistry testing for HSV and CMV was positive in these cells. Large atypical mononuclear cells were also evident in the ulcer bed's inflammatory infiltrate, which had intense nuclear positivity for Epstein-Barr encoding region in situ hybridization. We believe this is the first well-documented report of the definitive concomitant presence of HSV, CMV, and EBV in an immunocompromised patient. Although the pathogenesis of coinfected ulcers remains unknown, a synergistic effect is possible.

  12. Acute retinal necrosis caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 in children: reactivation of an undiagnosed latent neonatal herpes infection.

    PubMed

    Grose, Charles

    2012-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is known to cause acute retinal necrosis (ARN). The availability of HSV-2-specific polymerase chain reaction tests for diagnostic analysis has greatly increased our ability to discriminate ARN caused by HSV-2 from ARN caused by either herpes simplex virus type 1 or varicella zoster virus (VZV). Of great interest, HSV-2 appears to be the most common cause of viral ARN in children and adolescents. Although a few children with ARN are known to have had neonatally acquired herpes infection, most children lack a history of known herpes disease. Thus, the origin of the HSV-2 infection is a mystery. The hypothesis of this review is that HSV-2 ARN in children and adolescents may be the first sign of a previously undiagnosed and asymptomatic neonatal HSV-2 infection, which has reactivated several years later from latency in a cranial nerve and entered the retina. The review brings together 7 previously published ARN cases, plus one new case is added. Thus, this review also expands the spectrum of complications from neonatal HSV-2 infection.

  13. Incidence, risk factors, and implemented prophylaxis of varicella zoster virus infection, including complicated varicella zoster virus and herpes simplex virus infections, in lenalidomide-treated multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    König, C; Kleber, M; Reinhardt, H; Knop, S; Wäsch, R; Engelhardt, M

    2014-03-01

    In the era of high-dose chemotherapy and novel antimyeloma agents, the survival of multiple myeloma (MM) patients has substantially improved. Adverse effects, including infections, may however arise in the era of combination antimyeloma therapies. In general, MM patients have shown a risk of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection of 1-4 %, increasing with bortezomib treatment or transplants, but whether immunomodulatory drugs also bear a risk of VZV/complicated herpes simplex virus (HSV) (e.g., VZV-encephalitis [VZV-E], disseminated VZV-infection [d-VZV-i], or conus-cauda syndrome [CCS]) has not been elucidated. We here assessed VZV, VZV-E, d-VZV-i, and CCS in 93 lenalidomide-treated MM patients, consecutively seen and treated in our department. Patients' data were analyzed via electronic medical record retrieval within our research data warehouse as described previously. Of the 93 MM patients receiving lenalidomide, 10 showed VZV or other complicated VZV/HSV infections. These VZV patients showed defined risk factors as meticulously assessed, including suppressed lymphocyte subsets, substantial cell-mediated immune defects, and compromised humoral immune response. Due to our findings-and in line with an aciclovir prophylaxis in bortezomib and stem cell transplant protocols-we introduced a routine aciclovir prophylaxis in our lenalidomide protocols in May 2012 to minimize adverse events and to avoid discontinuation of lenalidomide treatment. Since then, we have observed no case of VZV/complicated HSV infection. Based on our data, we encourage other centers to also focus on these observations, assess viral infections, and-in those centers facilitating a research data warehouse-advocate an analogue data review as an appropriate multicenter approach.

  14. Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection via the bloodstream with apolipoprotein E dependence in the gonads is influenced by gender.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Javier S; Ramirez, Carlos; Sastre, Isabel; Alfaro, Juan M; Valdivieso, Fernando

    2005-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) causes disease in humans and animals. Infection usually occurs via the neural route and possibly occurs via the hematogenous route. The latter, however, is the main route by which immunosuppressed individuals and neonates are infected. Gender-dependent differences in the incidence and severity of some viral infections have been reported. To detect differences between the sexes with respect to HSV-1 colonization and disease, the characteristics of both acute and latent infections in hematogenously infected male and female mice were compared. In acute infection, the female mice had a poorer outcome: HSV-1 colonization was more effective, especially in the gonads and brain. In the encephalon, the midbrain had the highest viral load. In latent infection, brain viral loads were not significantly different with respect to sex. Significant differences were seen, however, in the blood and trigeminal ganglia: HSV-1 seroprevalence was observed in females, with no virus detected in males. In brain dissections, only the cerebral cortex of the females had viral loads statistically higher than those observed in the males. The spread of the virus to several organs of interest during acute infection was examined immunohistochemically. Female mice showed greater viral immunostaining, especially in the adrenal cortex, gonads, and midbrain. In male mice, HSV-1 was detected predominantly in the adrenal cortex. It was also found that apolipoprotein E promotes virus colonization of the ovaries, the APOE gene dose being directly related to viral invasiveness.

  15. Efficacy of topical treatment for herpes simplex virus infections: predictions from an index of drug characteristics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Freeman, D J; Spruance, S L

    1986-01-01

    Topical antiviral treatments for recurrent infection with herpes simplex virus in immunocompetent patients have been generally ineffective. We investigated whether in vitro drug measures could predict in vivo efficacy. Twelve topical antiviral formulations were evaluated in vitro by measuring inhibition of viral plaque formation in cell culture (ID50) and drug penetration through excised guinea pig skin. In vivo efficacy for each treatment was determined in an experimental cutaneous infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 in guinea pigs and expressed as the percent reduction in lesion number, lesion area, and virus titer in the lesions. The in vitro findings were correlated with the results in the animal model. ID50 was a poor predictor of in vivo efficacy, whereas stronger correlations were found between the degree of skin penetration and in vivo activity. The best correlation was noted by using a summary expression of the in vitro results as follows: the ratio of drug penetration through skin at 37 C to ID50 (r = .95, .94, and .92 for lesion number, area, and virus titer, respectively, P less than .0005). Determination of this in vitro index should be included in the preclinical evaluation of new topical antiviral formulations.

  16. Characterization and detection of Vero cells infected with Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 using Raman spectroscopy and advanced statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Salman, A; Shufan, E; Zeiri, L; Huleihel, M

    2014-07-01

    Herpes viruses are involved in a variety of human disorders. Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) is the most common among the herpes viruses and is primarily involved in human cutaneous disorders. Although the symptoms of infection by this virus are usually minimal, in some cases HSV-1 might cause serious infections in the eyes and the brain leading to blindness and even death. A drug, acyclovir, is available to counter this virus. The drug is most effective when used during the early stages of the infection, which makes early detection and identification of these viral infections highly important for successful treatment. In the present study we evaluated the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a sensitive, rapid, and reliable method for the detection and identification of HSV-1 viral infections in cell cultures. Using Raman spectroscopy followed by advanced statistical methods enabled us, with sensitivity approaching 100%, to differentiate between a control group of Vero cells and another group of Vero cells that had been infected with HSV-1. Cell sites that were "rich in membrane" gave the best results in the differentiation between the two categories. The major changes were observed in the 1195-1726 cm(-1) range of the Raman spectrum. The features in this range are attributed mainly to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids.

  17. IL-2 complex treatment amplifies CD8(+) T cell mediated immunity following herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Rajasagi, Naveen K; Rouse, Barry T

    2016-12-01

    CD8(+) T cells play an important role in controlling numerous virus infections and some tumors and therefore several strategies have been adopted to modulate CD8(+) T cell responses. One such approach includes treatment with IL-2 bound to a monoclonal antibody against IL-2 (IL-2 complex) which was shown to enhance CD8(+) T cell responses and provide protection against some cancers and pathogens. This report analyses the value of IL-2 complex therapy to protect against a cutaneous virus infection as occurs with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection. Treatment with IL-2 complex after infection reduced virus levels and lesion severity in a zosteriform model of HSV infection in mice. Furthermore, IL-2 complex treatment expanded HSV-1-gB epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells, IFN-γ and TNF-α producing CD8(+) T cells as well as cells that produced more than one cytokine. In addition, IL-2 complex therapy recipients showed enhanced cytolytic activity of CD8(+) T cells as shown by increased granzyme B expression and lytic granule release. Taken, together, these studies demonstrate that IL-2 complex therapy can be useful to boost protection against a cutaneous virus infection. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of mercuric chloride on macrophage-mediated resistance mechanisms against infection with herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Ellermann-Eriksen, S; Christensen, M M; Mogensen, S C

    1994-11-11

    Macrophages play an important role in the early, nonspecific resistance to infection with herpes simplex virus. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) accumulates in macrophages and has in certain concentrations a marked influence on the functional capacity of these cells. Therefore the influence of HgCl2 on resistance to generalized infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in mice and its effect on the HSV-2-induced activation of macrophages in vitro was examined. Mice injected intraperitoneally with HgCl2 24 h before infection with HSV-2 had more than 100 times higher virus titres in the liver 4 days after infection than mice not receiving any mercury. HgCl2 exerted a toxic effect on macrophages in vitro, which was especially pronounced during their adherence. Macrophages infected with HSV-2 were activated for an enhanced respiratory burst. This activation was abolished by treatment of the cells for 24 h with relatively low concentrations of HgCl2, resulting in macrophages with a potential to react with a respiratory burst comparable to that of uninfected cells. The HSV-2-induced activation of macrophages is mediated through the production and synergistic interaction of interferon-alpha/beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha in an autocrine manner. The ability of these cytokines to activate macrophages and to interact synergistically was not affected by mercury. However the production by macrophages of both cytokines during the HSV-2 infection, but especially interferon-alpha/beta, which is essential for the activation, was reduced at low concentrations of HgCl2. Collectively these data indicate that mercury, by interfering with the early macrophage-production of cytokines, disables the early control of virus replication, leading to an enhanced infection.

  19. Effect of ammonium chloride and tunicamycin on the glycoprotein content and infectivity of herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kousoulas, K.G.; Bzik, D.J.; DeLuca, N.; Person, S.

    1983-01-01

    Infectious virions of MP, a syncytial strain of herpes simplex virus type 1, are formed in the presence of 50 mM NH/sub 4/Cl. Underglycosylated virion glycoproteins are synthesized in infected cells and are incorporated into virions in the presence of the same concentration of NH/sub 4/Cl. We conclude that fully glycosylated glycoproteins are not required for viral infectivity. Virus particles, deficient in glycosylated glycoproteins, are assembled in the presence of tunicamycin but they are not infectious. The decrease in infectivity could be due to the decreased amount of the gB or possibly other peptides and/or to the lack of the high-mannose saccharides of precursor glycoproteins. 32 references, 4 figures.

  20. Visualization of mouse neuronal ganglia infected by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) using multimodal non-linear optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Houle, Marie-Andrée; Blache, Marie-Claire; Légaré, François; Pearson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that causes skin lesions and goes on to enter a latent state in neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Following stress, the virus may reactivate from latency leading to recurrent lesions. The in situ study of neuronal infections by HSV-1 is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in the biology of this virus and how it causes disease; however, this normally requires fixation and sectioning of the target tissues followed by treatment with contrast agents to visualize key structures, which can lead to artifacts. To further our ability to study HSV-1 neuropathogenesis, we have generated a recombinant virus expressing a second generation red fluorescent protein (mCherry), which behaves like the parental virus in vivo. By optimizing the application of a multimodal non-linear optical microscopy platform, we have successfully visualized in unsectioned trigeminal ganglia of mice both infected cells by two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and myelinated axons of uninfected surrounding cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. These results represent the first report of CARS microscopy being combined with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy to visualize virus-infected cells deep within unsectioned explanted tissue, and demonstrate the application of multimodal non-linear optical microscopy for high spatial resolution biological imaging of tissues without the use of stains or fixatives.

  1. Visualization of Mouse Neuronal Ganglia Infected by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Using Multimodal Non-Linear Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Houle, Marie-Andrée; Blache, Marie-Claire; Légaré, François; Pearson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that causes skin lesions and goes on to enter a latent state in neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Following stress, the virus may reactivate from latency leading to recurrent lesions. The in situ study of neuronal infections by HSV-1 is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in the biology of this virus and how it causes disease; however, this normally requires fixation and sectioning of the target tissues followed by treatment with contrast agents to visualize key structures, which can lead to artifacts. To further our ability to study HSV-1 neuropathogenesis, we have generated a recombinant virus expressing a second generation red fluorescent protein (mCherry), which behaves like the parental virus in vivo. By optimizing the application of a multimodal non-linear optical microscopy platform, we have successfully visualized in unsectioned trigeminal ganglia of mice both infected cells by two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and myelinated axons of uninfected surrounding cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. These results represent the first report of CARS microscopy being combined with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy to visualize virus-infected cells deep within unsectioned explanted tissue, and demonstrate the application of multimodal non-linear optical microscopy for high spatial resolution biological imaging of tissues without the use of stains or fixatives. PMID:25133579

  2. Efficacy of N-methanocarbathymidine against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 shedding and infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I; Bravo, Fernando J; Pullum, Derek A; Shen, Hui; Wang, Mei; Rahman, Aquilur; Glazer, Robert I; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2015-02-01

    Current approved nucleoside therapies for genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are effective but improved therapies are needed for treatment of both acute and recurrent diseases. The effects of N-methanocarbathymidine were evaluated and compared to acyclovir using guinea pig models of acute and recurrent infection. For acute disease following intravaginal inoculation of 10(6 )pfu HSV-2 (MS strain), animals were treated intraperitoneally beginning 24 h post-infection, and the effects on disease severity, vaginal virus replication, subsequent recurrences, and latent virus loads were evaluated. For evaluation of recurrent infection, animals were treated for 21 days beginning 14 days after infection and disease recurrence and recurrent shedding were evaluated. Treatment of the acute disease with N-methanocarbathymidine significantly reduced the severity of acute disease and decreased acute vaginal virus shedding more effectively than acyclovir. Significantly, none of the animals developed visible disease in the high-dose N-methanocarbathymidine group and this was the only group in which the number of days with recurrent virus shedding was reduced. Treatment of recurrent disease was equivalent to acyclovir when acyclovir was continuously supplied in the drinking water. N-methanocarbathymidine was effective as therapy for acute and recurrent genital HSV-2 disease in the guinea pig models. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection and Jewish Ritual Circumcision With Oral Suction: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Leas, Brian F.; Umscheid, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Jewish ritual circumcision rarely but occasionally includes a procedure involving direct oral suction of the wound, which can expose an infant to infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). This practice has provoked international controversy in recent years, but no systematic review of the clinical literature has previously been published. We designed this review to identify and synthesize all published studies examining the association between circumcision with direct oral suction and HSV-1 infection. Our search strategy identified 6 published case series or case reports, documenting 30 cases between 1988 and 2012. Clinical findings were consistent with transmission of infection during circumcision, although the evidence base is limited by the small number of infections and incomplete case data. Published evidence suggests that circumcision with direct oral suction has resulted in severe neonatal illness and death from HSV-1 transmission, but further research is necessary to clarify the risk of infection. PMID:26407411

  4. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection and Jewish Ritual Circumcision With Oral Suction: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Leas, Brian F; Umscheid, Craig A

    2015-06-01

    Jewish ritual circumcision rarely but occasionally includes a procedure involving direct oral suction of the wound, which can expose an infant to infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). This practice has provoked international controversy in recent years, but no systematic review of the clinical literature has previously been published. We designed this review to identify and synthesize all published studies examining the association between circumcision with direct oral suction and HSV-1 infection. Our search strategy identified 6 published case series or case reports, documenting 30 cases between 1988 and 2012. Clinical findings were consistent with transmission of infection during circumcision, although the evidence base is limited by the small number of infections and incomplete case data. Published evidence suggests that circumcision with direct oral suction has resulted in severe neonatal illness and death from HSV-1 transmission, but further research is necessary to clarify the risk of infection.

  5. Association between bacterial vaginosis and Herpes simplex virus type‐2 infection: implications for HIV acquisition studies

    PubMed Central

    Nagot, Nicolas; Ouedraogo, Abdoulaye; Defer, Marie‐Christine; Vallo, Roselyne; Mayaud, Philippe; Van de Perre, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Bacterial vaginosis (BV) and Herpes simplex virus type‐2 (HSV‐2) have been linked to an increased risk of HIV‐1 acquisition. Recent research suggests an association between BV and HSV‐2 acquisition, but the converse has not been studied. Here, we investigate whether an association exists between BV and HSV‐2 infection Methods We examined the determinants of BV occurrence in a cohort of female sex workers in Burkina Faso. Participants were followed every 3 months for diagnosis of genital infections and report of sexual behaviours. Factors associated with BV occurrence were assessed using generalised estimating equation models. Results We enrolled 273 women (mean age, 28 years) and conducted 812 follow‐up visits (mean 2.93 visit per woman). Baseline seroprevalence of HIV‐1, HSV‐2 and recent syphilis were 31.5%, 70.1% and 0.4%, respectively, while baseline prevalence of BV, Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and Candida albicans were 20.5%, 3.3% and 2.5%, respectively. In multivariable analysis, HSV‐2 (relative risk (RR) = 1.73, 95% CI 1.12 to 2.65), HIV‐1 (RR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.30 to 2.40), TV (RR = 1.5, 95% CI 1.0 to 2.3), and having ⩾3 sexual partners in the preceding week (RR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.6) were independently associated with BV, while hormonal contraception showed a protective effect (RR = 0.11, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.70). Conclusions HSV‐2 infection was associated with BV occurrence in this population. As HSV‐2 is strongly linked to HIV‐1 acquisition, studies assessing the cofactor effect of BV on HIV acquisition should control for the presence of HSV‐2. Further studies are required to investigate the relative effect of asymptomatic HSV‐2 shedding and/or genital ulcerations on BV occurrence. PMID:17493979

  6. Can Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Cause Aphasia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, H.; Pretorius, E.

    2003-01-01

    Aphasia implies the loss or impairment of language caused by brain damage. The key to understanding the nature of aphasic symptoms is the neuro-anatomical site of brain damage, and not the causative agent. However, because "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis infection usually affects the frontal and temporal lobes, subcortical…

  7. Can Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Cause Aphasia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, H.; Pretorius, E.

    2003-01-01

    Aphasia implies the loss or impairment of language caused by brain damage. The key to understanding the nature of aphasic symptoms is the neuro-anatomical site of brain damage, and not the causative agent. However, because "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis infection usually affects the frontal and temporal lobes, subcortical…

  8. Cbl E3 Ligase Mediates the Removal of Nectin-1 from the Surface of Herpes Simplex Virus 1-Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Thibaut; Dogrammatzis, Christos; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kalamvoki, Maria

    2017-06-15

    The Cbl E3 ligase has been linked to the down-modulation of surface signaling responses by inducing internalization of surface receptors. The adaptor protein CIN85 is a partner of Cbl that augments many of these interactions. Previously, an interaction was demonstrated between ICP0 and CIN85, which results in the removal of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) from the surface of the infected cells with a concomitant attenuation of EGFR signaling. Here, we examined whether Cbl mediates the removal of the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) entry receptor Nectin-1 from the surface of infected cells. We found the following: (i) that Cbl, Nectin-1, and the viral glycoprotein D (gD) form a complex in infected cells; (ii) that during infection Nectin-1 is removed from the surface of the infected cells but is retained on the surface of cells that have been depleted of Cbl; and (iii) that in cells infected with a ΔICP0 mutant virus, Nectin-1 remained on the cell surface. Thus, Cbl is necessary but not sufficient for the removal of Nectin-1 from the cell surface. In addition, we observed that in Cbl-depleted cells there was enhanced entry after infection. These cells were susceptible to secondary infections by HSV-1. Viral entry in CIN85-depleted cells was only moderately enhanced compared to that in the Cbl-depleted cells, suggesting that the Cbl-Nectin-1 interaction is likely the key to the downregulation of surface Nectin-1. The removal of the HSV-1 entry receptor Nectin-1 from the surface of the infected cells may be part of the strategy of the virus to efficiently spread to uninfected cells.IMPORTANCE The Cbl E3 ligase suppresses surface signaling responses by inducing internalization of surface components. The targets of Cbl include such components as immune system receptors, growth factor receptors, adhesion, and cell-to-cell contact molecules. The immediate early protein ICP0 of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) interacts with CIN85, an adaptor protein that augments

  9. Molecular analysis of herpes simplex virus type 1 during epinephrine-induced reactivation of latently infected rabbits in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, D C; Devi-Rao, G B; Hill, J M; Stevens, J G; Wagner, E K

    1994-01-01

    Infectious virus assays and PCR amplification of DNA and RNA were used to investigate herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA replication and gene expression in the rabbit corneal model for virus reactivation in vivo. We used carefully defined latency-associated transcript-negative (LAT-) and LAT+ promoter mutants of the 17syn+ strain of HSV type 1. In agreement with earlier studies using a more extensive LAT- deletion mutant, the 17 delta Pst(LAT-) virus reactivated with extremely low frequency upon epinephrine induction. In contrast to our findings with murine latency models, amounts of viral DNA recovered from rabbit ganglia latently infected with either LAT+ or LAT- virus were equivalent. Also in contrast with the murine models, no net increase in viral DNA was seen in latently infected rabbit trigeminal ganglia induced to reactivate in vivo by iontophoresis of epinephrine. Despite this, transcription of lytic-phase genes could be detected within 4 h following induction of rabbits latently infected with either LAT+ or LAT- virus; this transcription diminished by 16 h following induction. These results are discussed in relation to models for the mechanism of action of HSV LAT. Images PMID:8107194

  10. High-Risk Corneal Graft Rejection in the Setting of Previous Corneal Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Kuffova, Lucia; Knickelbein, Jared E; Yu, Tian; Medina, Carlos; Amescua, Guillermo; Rowe, Alexander M; Hendricks, Robert L; Forrester, John V

    2016-04-01

    The "high-risk phenotype" of corneal graft recipients is considered to be related to preexisting vascularization such as that associated with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) keratitis (HSK). The purpose of this study was to investigate the immunologic mechanisms underlying accelerated corneal graft rejection using a mouse model of HSK. Herpes simplex virus type 1 keratitis was induced in BALB/c mice. Syngeneic and allogeneic (C57BL/6 mice) corneal grafts were performed in mice with HSK at different times after infection. Some grafts were performed on HSV-infected CD4 T cell-deficient BALB/c mice. Clinical, histologic, immunologic, and virus detection studies were performed on samples of cornea, draining lymph node (LN), and trigeminal ganglion (TG) cells. Corneal grafts in mice with HSK rejected with higher frequency and more rapid tempo compared with grafts in uninfected mice. In corneas with HSK and vascularization at the time of grafting, both syngeneic and allogeneic corneal grafts failed with similar frequency and tempo. However, in the absence of preexisting inflammation and vascularization, syngeneic grafts were accepted when the grafts were performed at a late time point after HSV infection (42 days), whereas allografts were rejected at this time. In contrast, syngeneic grafts in nonvascularized HSV-infected recipients failed if they were performed within 10 days of HSV infection, an effect that was dependent on CD4 T cells, as demonstrated using CD4 deficient mice. Importantly, a variably sustained but strongly positive anti-HSV T-cell response was detected in allografted HSK recipients with a similar but lesser response in syngeneic hosts. A previous HSV-1 corneal infection predisposes donor grafts to a high risk of failure by both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms in which an anti-HSV CD4 T-cell response plays a prominent role.

  11. High-Risk Corneal Graft Rejection in the Setting of Previous Corneal Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuffova, Lucia; Knickelbein, Jared E.; Yu, Tian; Medina, Carlos; Amescua, Guillermo; Rowe, Alexander M.; Hendricks, Robert L.; Forrester, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The “high-risk phenotype” of corneal graft recipients is considered to be related to preexisting vascularization such as that associated with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) keratitis (HSK). The purpose of this study was to investigate the immunologic mechanisms underlying accelerated corneal graft rejection using a mouse model of HSK. Methods Herpes simplex virus type 1 keratitis was induced in BALB/c mice. Syngeneic and allogeneic (C57BL/6 mice) corneal grafts were performed in mice with HSK at different times after infection. Some grafts were performed on HSV-infected CD4 T cell–deficient BALB/c mice. Clinical, histologic, immunologic, and virus detection studies were performed on samples of cornea, draining lymph node (LN), and trigeminal ganglion (TG) cells. Results Corneal grafts in mice with HSK rejected with higher frequency and more rapid tempo compared with grafts in uninfected mice. In corneas with HSK and vascularization at the time of grafting, both syngeneic and allogeneic corneal grafts failed with similar frequency and tempo. However, in the absence of preexisting inflammation and vascularization, syngeneic grafts were accepted when the grafts were performed at a late time point after HSV infection (42 days), whereas allografts were rejected at this time. In contrast, syngeneic grafts in nonvascularized HSV-infected recipients failed if they were performed within 10 days of HSV infection, an effect that was dependent on CD4 T cells, as demonstrated using CD4 deficient mice. Importantly, a variably sustained but strongly positive anti-HSV T-cell response was detected in allografted HSK recipients with a similar but lesser response in syngeneic hosts. Conclusions A previous HSV-1 corneal infection predisposes donor grafts to a high risk of failure by both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms in which an anti-HSV CD4 T-cell response plays a prominent role. PMID:27050878

  12. Preventing herpes simplex virus in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-12-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are very common worldwide. Approximately 22% of pregnant women are infected genitally with HSV, and most of them are unaware of this. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is HSV disease in the newborn. Although neonatal HSV infections remain uncommon, due to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with the infection, HSV infection in the newborn is often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. This review summarizes the epidemiology and management of neonatal HSV infections and discusses strategies to prevent HSV infection in the newborn.

  13. Effect of anti-CXCL10 monoclonal antibody on herpes simplex virus type 1 keratitis and retinal infection.

    PubMed

    Carr, Daniel J J; Chodosh, James; Ash, John; Lane, Thomas E

    2003-09-01

    The inflammatory response to acute ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in mice involves the innate and adaptive immune response, with an associated increase in the secretion of chemokines, including CXCL10 (interferon-inducible protein 10 kDa [IP-10]). Neutralizing antibodies to mouse CXCL10 were used to determine the role of CXCL10 during the acute phase of HSV-1 ocular infection. Treatment of HSV-1-infected mice with antibody to CXCL10 significantly reduced CXCL10 levels in the eye and trigeminal ganglion and reduced mononuclear cell infiltration into the corneal stroma. These results coincided with reduced ICAM-1 and CXCR3 transcript expression, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha and CXCL10 levels, and corneal pathology but increased viral titers in the stroma and trigeminal ganglion. Progression of the virus from the corneal stroma to the retina during acute infection was significantly hindered in anti-CXCL10-treated mice. In addition, colocalization of viral antigen with infiltrating leukocytes in the iris and retina during acute infection suggests that one means by which HSV-1 traffics to the retina involves inflammatory cells (primarily CD11b(+) cells). Collectively, the results suggest that CXCL10 expression in the eye initially orchestrates the inflammatory response to acute HSV-1 infection, which facilitates the spread of the virus to other restricted sites within the eye.

  14. Nerve growth factor antibody stimulates reactivation of ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 in latently infected rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hill, J M; Garza, H H; Helmy, M F; Cook, S D; Osborne, P A; Johnson, E M; Thompson, H W; Green, L C; O'Callaghan, R J; Gebhardt, B M

    1997-06-01

    Anti-nerve growth factor (anti-NGF) antibody has been shown to induce reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. We found that systemically administered anti-NGF induces ocular shedding of HSV-1 in vivo in rabbits harboring latent virus. Rabbits in which HSV-1 latency had been established were given intravenous injections of goat anti-NGF serum daily for 10 days beginning 42 days after primary viral infection. Tears were assayed for virus for 12 days beginning on the day of the first injection. All eight rabbits given high titer anti-NGF had infectious virus in their tears at least once during the 12-day period. Fifteen of 16 eyes were positive and the average duration of viral shedding for these eyes was 4.0 days. Latently infected rabbits receiving daily injections of nonimmune goat serum or saline for 10 consecutive days were controls. Only six of the 16 (38%) eyes from rabbits receiving nonimmune goat serum shed virus. Only one of 12 eyes from untreated rabbits shed virus. Sera from control rabbits had no detectable anti-NGF activity; titers in anti-NGF-treated rabbits ranged between 1:1000 and 1:10,000. NGF deprivation may act as a neuronal stressor and may share a common second messenger pathway with heat- or cold-stress induced reactivation of latent HSV-1.

  15. Enhanced lysis of herpes simplex virus type 1-infected mouse cell lines by NC and NK effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenares, C.; Lopez, C.

    1986-05-01

    Spontaneously cytotoxic murine lymphocytes lysed certain cell types infected by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) better than uninfected cells. Although HSV-1 adsorbed to the surface of all the target cells, those in which the virus replicated more efficiently were lysed to a greater extent. As targets, the authors used cell lines that, when uninfected, were spontaneously lysed by NK cells (YAC-1) or by NC cells (WEHI-164). They also used a fibroblastoid cell line (M50) and a monocytic tumor line (PU51R), which were not spontaneously killed. NK cells lysed HSV-1-infected YAC cells better than uninfected cells, and an NC-like activity selectively lysed HSV-1-infected WEHI cells. These findings were consistent with the results of experiments performed to define the role of interferon in induction of virus-augmented cytolysis. Increased lysis of YAC-HSV and PU51R-HSV was entirely due to interferon activation and was completely abolished by performing the /sup 51/Cr-release assay in the presence of anti-interferon serum. The data show that HSV-1 infection of NK/NC targets induces increased cytotoxity, but the effector cell responsible for lysis is determined by the uninfected target, or by an interaction between the virus and target cell, rather than by a viral determinant alone.

  16. Cultured corneas show dendritic spread and restrict herpes simplex virus infection that is not observed with cultured corneal cells

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Neel; Jaishankar, Dinesh; Agelidis, Alex; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Mangano, Kyle; Patel, Shrey; Tekin, Sati Zeynep; Shukla, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) causes life-long morbidities in humans. While fever blisters are more common, occasionally the cornea is infected resulting in vision loss. A very intriguing aspect of HSV-1 corneal infection is that the virus spread is normally restricted to only a small fraction of cells on the corneal surface that connect with each other in a dendritic fashion. Here, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the susceptibility of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells to HSV-1 infection, we infected HCE cells at three different dosages of HSV-1 and measured the outcomes in terms of viral entry, gene and protein expression, viral replication and cytokine induction. In cultured cells, infectivity and cytokine induction were observed even at the minimum viral dosage tested, while a more pronounced dose-restricted infectivity was seen in ex vivo cultures of porcine corneas. Use of fluorescent HSV-1 virions demonstrated a pattern of viral spread ex vivo that mimics clinical findings. We conclude that HCE cell cultures are highly susceptible to infection whereas the cultured corneas demonstrate a higher ability to restrict the infection even in the absence of systemic immune system. The restriction is helped in part by local interferon response and the unique cellular architecture of the cornea. PMID:28198435

  17. A 3-O-Sulfated Heparan Sulfate Binding Peptide Preferentially Targets Herpes Simplex Virus 2-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohamed M.; Karasneh, Ghadah A.; Jarding, Min Jung; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is the primary cause of genital herpes, which is one of the most common sexually transmitted viral infections worldwide and a major cofactor for human immunodeficiency virus infection. The lack of an effective vaccine or treatment and the emergence of drug-resistant strains highlight the need for developing new antivirals for HSV-2. Here, we demonstrate that a low-molecular-weight peptide isolated against 3-O-sulfated heparan sulfate (3-OS HS) can efficiently block HSV-2 infection. Treatment with the peptide inhibited viral entry and cell-to-cell spread both in vitro and in vivo using a mouse model of genital HSV-2 infection. Quite interestingly, the peptide showed a preferential binding to HSV-2-infected cells, with more than 200% increased binding compared to uninfected cells. Our additional results show that heparan sulfate expression is upregulated by 25% upon HSV-2 infection, which is a significant new finding that could be exploited for designing new diagnostic tests and treatment strategies against HSV-2-infected cells. In addition, our results also raise the possibility that 3-OS HS modifications within HS may be upregulated even more to accommodate for a significantly higher increase in the peptide binding to the infected cells. PMID:22491462

  18. Abnormal immune response of CCR5-deficient mice to ocular infection with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Carr, Daniel J J; Ash, John; Lane, Thomas E; Kuziel, William A

    2006-03-01

    Ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection elicits a strong inflammatory response that is associated with production of the beta chemokines CCL3 and CCL5, which share a common receptor, CCR5. To gain insight into the role of these molecules in ocular immune responses, the corneas of wild-type (WT) and CCR5-deficient (CCR5-/-) mice were infected with HSV-1 and inflammatory parameters were measured. In the absence of CCR5, the early infiltration of neutrophils into the cornea was diminished. Associated with this aberrant leukocyte recruitment, neutrophils in CCR5-/- mice were restricted to the stroma, whereas in WT mice, these cells trafficked to the stroma and epithelial layers of the infected cornea. Virus titres and cytokine/chemokine levels in the infected tissue of these mice were similar for the first 5 days after infection. However, by day 7 post-infection, the CCR5-/- mice showed a significant elevation in the chemokines CCL2, CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10 in the trigeminal ganglion and brainstem, as well as a significant increase in virus burden. The increase in chemokine expression was associated with an increase in the infiltration of CD4 and/or CD8 T cells into the trigeminal ganglion and brainstem of CCR5-/- mice. Surprisingly, even though infected CCR5-/- mice were less efficient at controlling the progression of virus replication, there was no difference in mortality. These results suggest that, although CCR5 plays a role in regulating leukocyte trafficking and control of virus burden, compensatory mechanisms are involved in preventing mortality following HSV-1 infection.

  19. Herpes simplex virus 2 infects human endothelial ECV304 cells and induces cell apoptosis synergistically with ox-LDL.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyun; Tang, Qizhu; Xu, Li

    2014-01-01

    Virus infection has been shown to accelerate atherosclerosis. Serological studies indicate a link between the Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection and atherosclerosis, which is initiated and progression of which is promoted by such factors as oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced endothelial dysfunction. In order to recognize the direct role of HSV-2 in endothelial dysfunction, the present study investigated the infection of HSV-2 in endothelial ECV304 cells and the induction of cell apoptosis in the presence of ox-LDL. We firstly examined the HSV-2 infection by immunohistochemical assay for viral gB protein, quantitative PCR for viral ICP4 mRNA, or via virus growth determination. Then we investigated the regulation of HSV-2 infection on the cell viability and apoptosis, in the absence or presence of ox-LDL. In addition, we analyzed the apoptosis-associated molecules in the HSV-2-infected ECV304 cells. The results demonstrated that HSV-2 infected endothelial ECV304 cells and replicated efficiently, and the virus infection significantly reduced the cell viability and significantly induced cell apoptosis; particularly, cell viability reduction and cell apoptosis induction were aggravated by the ox-LDL presence. Moreover, the western blot assay confirmed the apoptosis induction; there was a significantly high level of released cytochrome c, activated caspase 3 and lyzed Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by the activated caspase 3 in the HSV-2-infected ECV304 cells, particularly the cells subject to ox-LDL. Thus, we confirmed that HSV-2 infected endothelial ECV304 cells, induced cell apoptosis, which was aggravated by ox-LDL.

  20. Cofilin 1-Mediated Biphasic F-Actin Dynamics of Neuronal Cells Affect Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yangfei; Zheng, Kai; Ju, Huaiqiang; Wang, Shaoxiang; Pei, Ying; Ding, Weichao; Chen, Zhenping; Wang, Qiaoli; Qiu, Xianxiu; Zhong, Meigong; Zeng, Fanli; Ren, Zhe; Qian, Chuiwen; Liu, Ge

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) invades the nervous system and causes pathological changes. In this study, we defined the remodeling of F-actin and its possible mechanisms during HSV-1 infection of neuronal cells. HSV-1 infection enhanced the formation of F-actin-based structures in the early stage of infection, which was followed by a continuous decrease in F-actin during the later stages of infection. The disruption of F-actin dynamics by chemical inhibitors significantly reduced the efficiency of viral infection and intracellular HSV-1 replication. The active form of the actin-depolymerizing factor cofilin 1 was found to increase at an early stage of infection and then to continuously decrease in a manner that corresponded to the remodeling pattern of F-actin, suggesting that cofilin 1 may be involved in the biphasic F-actin dynamics induced by HSV-1 infection. Knockdown of cofilin 1 impaired HSV-1-induced F-actin assembly during early infection and inhibited viral entry; however, overexpression of cofilin 1 did not affect F-actin assembly or viral entry during early infection but decreased intracellular viral reproduction efficiently. Our results, for the first time, demonstrated the biphasic F-actin dynamics in HSV-1 neuronal infection and confirmed the association of F-actin with the changes in the expression and activity of cofilin 1. These results may provide insight into the mechanism by which HSV-1 productively infects neuronal cells and causes pathogenesis. PMID:22623803

  1. Blocking of PDL-1 Interaction Enhances Primary and Secondary CD8 T Cell Response to Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Twardy, Brandon S.; Suvas, Susmit

    2012-01-01

    The blocking of programmed death ligand-1 (PDL-1) has been shown to enhance virus-specific CD8 T cell function during chronic viral infections. Though, how PDL-1 blocking at the time of priming affects the quality of CD8 T cell response to acute infections is not well understood and remains controversial. This report demonstrates that the magnitude of the primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses to herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection is subject to control by PDL-1. Our results showed that after footpad HSV-1 infection, PD-1 expression increases on immunodominant SSIEFARL peptide specific CD8 T cells. Additionally, post-infection, the level of PDL-1 expression also increases on CD11c+ dendritic cells. Intraperitoneal administration of anti-PDL-1 monoclonal antibody given one day prior to and three days after cutaneous HSV-1 infection, resulted in a marked increase in effector and memory CD8 T cell response to SSIEFARL peptide. This was shown by measuring the quantity and quality of SSIEFARL-specific CD8 T cells by making use of ex-vivo assays that determine antigen specific CD8 T cell function, such as intracellular cytokine assay, degranulation assay to measure cytotoxicity and viral clearance. Our results are discussed in terms of the beneficial effects of blocking PDL-1 interactions, while giving prophylactic vaccines, to generate a more effective CD8 T cell response to viral infection. PMID:22808056

  2. Dynamic Response of IFI16 and Promyelocytic Leukemia Nuclear Body Components to Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intrinsic immunity is an aspect of antiviral defense that operates through diverse mechanisms at the intracellular level through a wide range of constitutively expressed cellular proteins. In the case of herpesviruses, intrinsic resistance involves the repression of viral gene expression during the very early stages of infection, a process that is normally overcome by viral tegument and/or immediate-early proteins. Thus, the balance between cellular repressors and virus-counteracting proteins determines whether or not a cell becomes productively infected. One aspect of intrinsic resistance to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is conferred by components of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs), which respond to infection by accumulating at sites that are closely associated with the incoming parental HSV-1 genomes. Other cellular proteins, including IFI16, which has been implicated in sensing pathogen DNA and initiating signaling pathways that lead to an interferon response, also respond to viral genomes in this manner. Here, studies of the dynamics of the response of PML NB components and IFI16 to invading HSV-1 genomes demonstrated that this response is extremely rapid, occurring within the first hour after addition of the virus, and that human Daxx (hDaxx) and IFI16 respond more rapidly than PML. In the absence of HSV-1 regulatory protein ICP0, which counteracts the recruitment process, the newly formed, viral-genome-induced PML NB-like foci can fuse with existing PML NBs. These data are consistent with a model involving viral genome sequestration into such structures, thereby contributing to the low probability of initiation of lytic infection in the absence of ICP0. IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses have intimate interactions with their hosts, with infection leading either to the productive lytic cycle or to a quiescent infection in which viral gene expression is suppressed while the viral genome is maintained in the host cell nucleus. Whether a cell

  3. Abnormal immune response of CCR5-deficient mice to ocular infection with herpes simplex virus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Daniel J.J.; Ash, John; Lane, Thomas E.; Kuziel, William A.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection elicits a strong inflammatory response that is associated with production of the β chemokines CCL3 and CCL5, which share a common receptor, CCR5. To gain insight into the role of these molecules in ocular immune responses, we infected the corneas of WT and CCR5-deficient (CCR5-/-) mice with HSV-1 and measured inflammatory parameters. In the absence of CCR5, the early infiltration of neutrophils into the cornea was diminished. Associated with this aberrant leukocyte recruitment, neutrophils in CCR5-/- mice were restricted to the stroma whereas in wild type mice these cells trafficked to the stroma and epithelial layers of the infected cornea. Virus titers and cytokine/chemokine levels in the infected tissue of these mice were similar for the first 5 days after infection. However, by day 7 post-infection, the CCR5-/- mice showed a significant elevation in the chemokines CCL2, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10 in the trigeminal ganglion and brain stem as well as a significant increase in viral burden. The increase in chemokine expression was associated with an increase in the infiltration of CD4 and/or CD8 T cells into the trigeminal ganglion and brain stem of CCR5-/- mice. Surprisingly, even though infected CCR5-/- mice were less efficient at controlling the progression of virus replication, there was no difference in mortality. These results suggest that, although CCR5 plays a role in regulating leukocyte trafficking and control of virus burden, compensatory mechanisms are involved in preventing mortality following HSV-1 infection. PMID:16476970

  4. Altered gene expression of glycosyltransferases and sialyltransferases and total amount of glycosphingolipids following herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Kazuki; Furukawa, Jun-Ichi; Suzuki, Youichi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shinohara, Yasuro; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-03

    There is a case report of a patient with overlapping Guillain-Barré syndrome and Bickerstaff brainstem encephalitis after infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), who carried high titers of serum anti-GQ1b IgG antibodies. Several studies have linked viral infection to the modulation of ganglioside expression such as human T-lymphotropic virus to GD2 and simian virus 40 to GM3. Also, enhancement of the expression of GM2 on the cell membrane after cytomegalovirus infection has been reported. The objective of this study was to unveil the relationship between HSV-1 infection and the alteration of cellular ganglioside expression in neuronal and glial cell lines. In addition to these cell lines, several human tumor cell lines including astrocytoma cells, neuroblastoma cells, T-cell leukemia cells and kidney cells derived from normal human and monkey were infected with HSV-1 as well as HSV-2. To measure changes in ganglioside-related gene expressions and gangliosides levels in cells, quantitative PCR and glycosphingolipid-glycomic analysis were performed. Changes in gene expression of glycosyltransferases and sialyltransferases were observed in HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected cells, although with different trends. 39 glycosphingolipid-glycans were quantitatively analyzed. HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections resulted in changes in the total amount of gangliosides depending on the cell lines used and type of virus. Qualitative changes caused by each infection of HSV-1 and HSV-2 were almost negligible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection and syphilis with human immunodeficiency virus infection among men who have sex with men in Peru.

    PubMed

    Lama, Javier R; Lucchetti, Aldo; Suarez, Luis; Laguna-Torres, Victor A; Guanira, Juan V; Pun, Monica; Montano, Silvia M; Celum, Connie L; Carr, Jean K; Sanchez, Jorge; Bautista, Christian T; Sanchez, Jose L

    2006-11-15

    We evaluated associations between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, and syphilis among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Peru. A surveillance survey of 3280 MSM was conducted; sexual behavior was assessed with a structured computer-assisted self-interview, and serum antibody testing was performed for HIV, HSV-2, and Treponema pallidum. HIV, HSV-2, and syphilis seroprevalences of 13.9%, 46.3%, and 13.4% were detected, respectively. HSV-2 seroprevalence was twice as high in HIV-infected subjects (80.5%) than it was in HIV-uninfected subjects (40.8%) (P < .01), and HSV-2 seropositivity (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 5.66) was found to be strongly associated with HIV infection. In addition, homosexual self-definition (AOR, 3.12), exchange of sex for money (AOR, 1.61), unprotected sex (no condom) (AOR, 2.81), history of sex work (AOR, 1.89), oral receptive sex (AOR, 1.43), and cocaine use before/during sex (AOR, 2.53) within the preceding 6 months, as well as such sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and STI syndromes as proctitis (AOR, 2.80), genital ulcer disease (GUD) (AOR, 2.06), prior syphilis (AOR, 2.64), genital warts (AOR, 1.70), and self-reported STIs within the preceding 6 months (AOR, 1.61), were also found to be significant predictors of HIV infection. We found a strong association between HSV-2 seropositivity and HIV infection. Intervention measures against GUD due to HSV-2 infection and syphilis, such as routine testing, early detection, HSV-2 suppressive treatment, and condom distribution, need to be enhanced as part of STI prevention strategies at a national level to effectively reduce HIV infection among MSM in Peru.

  6. Prevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection, human immunodeficiency virus/herpes simplex virus type 2 coinfection, and associated risk factors in a national, population-based survey in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mugo, Nelly; Dadabhai, Sufia S; Bunnell, Rebecca; Williamson, John; Bennett, Eddas; Baya, Isaack; Akinyi, Nelly; Mohamed, Ibrahim; Kaiser, Reinhard

    2011-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a known biologic cofactor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission and acquisition. The Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey 2007 provided Kenya's first nationally representative estimate of HSV-2 prevalence and risk factors. KAIS was a household serosurvey among women and men aged 15 to 64 years. The survey included a behavioral interview and serum testing for HSV-2, HIV, and syphilis infections. Results were weighted for sampling design and nonresponse. Of 19,840 eligible individuals, 90% completed an interview and 80% consented to testing. In all, 35% were infected with HSV-2, of which 42% were women and 26% were men. Between 15 and 24 years of age, HSV-2 prevalence increased from 7% to 34% in women and 3% to 14% in men. Among couples, 30% were HSV-2 concordant-positive, 21% were discordant, and 49% were concordant-negative. In all, 81% of HIV-infected persons were coinfected with HSV-2. HIV prevalence was 16% among those with HSV-2 and 2% among those without HSV-2. Women with circumcised partners had an HSV-2 prevalence of 39% compared to 77% of women with uncircumcised partners. One-third of Kenyans were HSV-2 infected. HIV-1 infection, age, female sex, and lack of male circumcision were population-level predictors for HSV-2 infection. Targeted prevention interventions are needed, including an effective vaccine.

  7. PDZD8 is a novel moesin-interacting cytoskeletal regulatory protein that suppresses infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Henning, Matthew S; Stiedl, Patricia; Barry, Denis S; McMahon, Robert; Morham, Scott G; Walsh, Derek; Naghavi, Mojgan H

    2011-07-05

    The host cytoskeleton plays a central role in the life cycle of many viruses yet our knowledge of cytoskeletal regulators and their role in viral infection remains limited. Recently, moesin and ezrin, two members of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) family of proteins that regulate actin and plasma membrane cross-linking and microtubule (MT) stability, have been shown to inhibit retroviral infection. To further understand how ERM proteins function and whether they also influence infection by other viruses, we identified PDZD8 as a novel moesin-interacting protein. PDZD8 is a poorly understood protein whose function is unknown. Exogenous expression of either moesin or PDZD8 reduced the levels of stable MTs, suggesting that these proteins functioned as part of a cytoskeletal regulatory complex. Additionally, exogenous expression or siRNA-mediated knockdown of either factor affected Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, identifying a cellular function for PDZD8 and novel antiviral properties for these two cytoskeletal regulatory proteins.

  8. The protein ICP0 of herpes simplex virus type 1 is targeted to nucleoli of infected cells. Brief report.

    PubMed

    Morency, E; Couté, Y; Thomas, J; Texier, P; Lomonte, P

    2005-11-01

    This study describes the nucleolar localization of the viral protein ICP0 of herpes simplex virus type 1. We show that the RING finger domain of ICP0 is essential for ICP0 to localize in nucleoli of transfected and 4 hour-infected cells. ICP0 forms particular intranucleolar domains that do not correspond to any known nucleolar domains. This distribution was confirmed by immunoblots performed on fractionated infected cells. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that ICP0 did not increase the transcription from the RNA polymerase I (Pol I) promoter in transfected cells, an effect opposite to that observed on viral and cellular Pol II promoters. Nucleoli are thus, after PML bodies and centromeres, a novel nuclear structure targeted by ICP0.

  9. Herpes simplex virus Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    Weed, Darin J; Nicola, Anthony V

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus mediates multiple distinct fusion events during infection. HSV entry is initiated by fusion of the viral envelope with either the limiting membrane of a host cell endocytic compartment or the plasma membrane. In the infected cell during viral assembly, immature, enveloped HSV particles in the perinuclear space fuse with the outer nuclear membrane in a process termed de-envelopment. A cell infected with some strains of HSV with defined mutations spread to neighboring cells by a fusion event called syncytium formation. Two experimental methods, the transient cell-cell fusion approach and fusion from without, are useful surrogate assays of HSV fusion. These five fusion processes are considered in terms of their requirements, mechanism, and regulation. The execution and modulation of these events require distinct yet often overlapping sets of viral proteins and host cell factors. The core machinery of HSV gB, gD, and the heterodimer gH/gL is required for most if not all of the HSV fusion mechanisms.

  10. Varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus 1 can infect and replicate in the same neurons whether co- or superinfected.

    PubMed

    Sloutskin, Anna; Yee, Michael B; Kinchington, Paul R; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2014-05-01

    The two human neurotropic alphaherpesviruses varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) both establish latency in sensory ganglia. Human trigeminal ganglia are known to frequently harbor both viruses, and there is evidence to suggest the presence of both VZV and HSV1 DNA in the same neuron. We ask here whether VZV and HSV1 can exclude themselves and each other and whether they can productively infect the same cells in human neurons and human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF). Simultaneous infection (coinfection) or consecutive infection (superinfection) was assessed using cell-free HSV1 and VZV expressing fluorescent reporter proteins. Automated analysis was carried out to detect singly and dually infected cells. We demonstrate that VZV and HSV1 both display efficient superinfection exclusion (SE) in HFF, with each virus excluding either itself or the other virus. While SE also occurred in neurons, it was with much lower efficiency. Both alphaherpesviruses productively infected the same neurons, whether applied simultaneously or even consecutively, albeit at lower frequencies. Superinfection exclusion by VZV for itself or the related neurotropic alphaherpesvirus HSV1 has been studied here for the first time. We find that while these viruses display classic SE in fibroblasts, SE is less efficient for both HSV1 and VZV in human neurons. The ability of multiple VZV strains to productively infect the same neurons has important implications in terms of recombination of both wild-type and vaccine strains in patients.

  11. Varicella-Zoster Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Can Infect and Replicate in the Same Neurons whether Co- or Superinfected

    PubMed Central

    Sloutskin, Anna; Yee, Michael B.; Kinchington, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The two human neurotropic alphaherpesviruses varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) both establish latency in sensory ganglia. Human trigeminal ganglia are known to frequently harbor both viruses, and there is evidence to suggest the presence of both VZV and HSV1 DNA in the same neuron. We ask here whether VZV and HSV1 can exclude themselves and each other and whether they can productively infect the same cells in human neurons and human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF). Simultaneous infection (coinfection) or consecutive infection (superinfection) was assessed using cell-free HSV1 and VZV expressing fluorescent reporter proteins. Automated analysis was carried out to detect singly and dually infected cells. We demonstrate that VZV and HSV1 both display efficient superinfection exclusion (SE) in HFF, with each virus excluding either itself or the other virus. While SE also occurred in neurons, it was with much lower efficiency. Both alphaherpesviruses productively infected the same neurons, whether applied simultaneously or even consecutively, albeit at lower frequencies. IMPORTANCE Superinfection exclusion by VZV for itself or the related neurotropic alphaherpesvirus HSV1 has been studied here for the first time. We find that while these viruses display classic SE in fibroblasts, SE is less efficient for both HSV1 and VZV in human neurons. The ability of multiple VZV strains to productively infect the same neurons has important implications in terms of recombination of both wild-type and vaccine strains in patients. PMID:24574392

  12. Herpes simplex virus and the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Eric A; Coyle, Walter J

    2008-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is well known as a sexually transmitted disease. However, relatively little has been published concerning the presentations and treatment of HSV infection within the gastrointestinal tract, where HSV most commonly affects the esophagus in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. HSV proctitis is not uncommon and occurs primarily in males having sex with males. In patients with normal immune systems, gastrointestinal HSV infections are generally self-limited and rarely require antiviral therapy. Treatment of infection is suggested for immunocompromised patients, though no large randomized controlled trials have been performed. This article reviews the manifestations of HSV infection within the luminal gastrointestinal tract and options for diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Thymidine Kinase-Negative Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Can Efficiently Establish Persistent Infection in Neural Tissues of Nude Mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Yu; Yao, Hui-Wen; Wang, Li-Chiu; Shen, Fang-Hsiu; Hsu, Sheng-Min; Chen, Shun-Hua

    2017-02-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes latency in neural tissues of immunocompetent mice but persists in both peripheral and neural tissues of lymphocyte-deficient mice. Thymidine kinase (TK) is believed to be essential for HSV-1 to persist in neural tissues of immunocompromised mice, because infectious virus of a mutant with defects in both TK and UL24 is detected only in peripheral tissues, but not in neural tissues, of severe combined immunodeficiency mice (T. Valyi-Nagy, R. M. Gesser, B. Raengsakulrach, S. L. Deshmane, B. P. Randazzo, A. J. Dillner, and N. W. Fraser, Virology 199:484-490, 1994, https://doi.org/10.1006/viro.1994.1150). Here we find infiltration of CD4 and CD8 T cells in peripheral and neural tissues of mice infected with a TK-negative mutant. We therefore investigated the significance of viral TK and host T cells for HSV-1 to persist in neural tissues using three genetically engineered mutants with defects in only TK or in both TK and UL24 and two strains of nude mice. Surprisingly, all three mutants establish persistent infection in up to 100% of brain stems and 93% of trigeminal ganglia of adult nude mice at 28 days postinfection, as measured by the recovery of infectious virus. Thus, in mouse neural tissues, host T cells block persistent HSV-1 infection, and viral TK is dispensable for the virus to establish persistent infection. Furthermore, we found 30- to 200-fold more virus in neural tissues than in the eye and detected glycoprotein C, a true late viral antigen, in brainstem neurons of nude mice persistently infected with the TK-negative mutant, suggesting that adult mouse neurons can support the replication of TK-negative HSV-1.

  14. Association of a major transcriptional regulatory protein, ICP4, of herpes simplex virus type 1 with the plasma membrane of virus-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yao, F; Courtney, R J

    1991-01-01

    A major transcriptional regulatory protein, ICP4, of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is localized primarily within the nucleus soon after its synthesis. Recent studies have shown that approximately 100 to 200 molecules of ICP4 are located in the tegument region of purified virions (F. Yao and R. J. Courtney, J. Virol. 63:3338-3344, 1989). As an extension to these studies, we present data suggesting that ICP4 may also associate with the plasma membrane of HSV-1-infected cells. The experimental approaches used included the isolation and purification of plasma membranes from HSV-1-infected cells, the isolation of purified vesicular stomatitis virus containing ICP4, and immunofluorescence of HSV-1-infected cells following selective permeabilization with detergent. The results from the above studies support the suggestion that detectable amounts of ICP4 are associated with the inner surface of the plasma membrane of HSV-1-infected cells. Images PMID:1847468

  15. Risk factors for herpes simplex virus type 2 infection among female commercial sex workers in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Salas, F; Hernández-Avila, M; Juárez-Figueroa, L; Conde-Glez, C J; Uribe-Zúñiga, P

    1999-02-01

    A scarce number of studies have been carried out to determine the epidemiology of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection in female sex workers (FSWs). The objective of this study was to examine the correlates of infection for HSV-2 with socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, sexual behaviour and history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among FSWs in Mexico City. A sample frame of commercial sex work sites was constructed during the fall of 1992. Sites identified were streets, bars and massage parlours. During 1993 we surveyed 757 FSWs aged 18-76 years, from a random sample of sites. Participating women provided a blood sample and answered a standardized questionnaire. HSV-2 antibodies were identified based on a Western blot assay, using type-specific recombinant glycoprotein gG2. In a multivariate analysis, the presence of HSV-2 antibodies was correlated (P < 0.005) with increasing age and time working as prostitutes, low education, street working site and positive serology for syphilis. The results showed that the working site and the education level are contextual variables related to the risk of HSV-2 infection, where poorly educated and street FSWs had the highest probability of infection. Characteristics that represent periods of exposure to the virus as age and time working in prostitution were predictors of the HSV-2 infection.

  16. The Characteristics of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Rhesus Macaques and the Associated Pathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shengtao; Cai, Hongzhi; Xu, Xingli; Feng, Min; Wang, Lichun; Liao, Yun; Zhang, Ying; He, Zhanlong; Yang, Fengmei; Yu, Wenhai; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Jumin; Li, Qihan

    2017-01-01

    As one of the major pathogens for human herpetic diseases, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) causes herpes labialis, genital herpes and herpetic encephalitis. Our aim here was to investigate the infectious process of HSV1 in rhesus macaques and the pathological features induced during this infection. Clinical symptoms that manifested in the rhesus macaque during HSV1 infection included vesicular lesions and their pathological features. Viral distribution in the nervous tissues and associated pathologic changes indicated the typical systematic pathological processes associated with viral distribution of HSV1. Interestingly, vesicular lesions recurred in oral skin or in mucosa associated with virus shedding in macaques within four to five months post-infection, and viral latency-associated transcript (LAT) mRNA was found in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) on day 365 post-infection. Neutralization testing and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) detection of specific T cell responses confirmed the specific immunity induced by HSV1 infection. Thus, rhesus macaques could serve as an infectious model for HSV1 due to their typical clinical symptoms and the pathological recurrence associated with viral latency in nervous tissues. PMID:28146109

  17. A5-Positive Primary Sensory Neurons Are Nonpermissive for Productive Infection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 In Vitro▿

    PubMed Central

    Bertke, Andrea S.; Swanson, Sophia M.; Chen, Jenny; Imai, Yumi; Kinchington, Paul R.; Margolis, Todd P.

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) establish latency and express the latency-associated transcript (LAT) preferentially in different murine sensory neuron populations, with most HSV-1 LAT expression in A5+ neurons and most HSV-2 LAT expression in KH10+ neurons. To study the mechanisms regulating the establishment of HSV latency in specific subtypes of neurons, cultured dissociated adult murine trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons were assessed for relative permissiveness for productive infection. In contrast to that for neonatal TG, the relative distribution of A5+ and KH10+ neurons in cultured adult TG was similar to that seen in vivo. Productive infection with HSV was restricted, and only 45% of cultured neurons could be productively infected with either HSV-1 or HSV-2. A5+ neurons supported productive infection with HSV-2 but were selectively nonpermissive for productive infection with HSV-1, a phenomenon that was not due to restricted viral entry or DNA uncoating, since HSV-1 expressing β-galactosidase under the control of the neurofilament promoter was detected in ∼90% of cultured neurons, with no preference for any neuronal subtype. Infection with HSV-1 reporter viruses expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) from immediate early (IE), early, and late gene promoters indicated that the block to productive infection occurred before IE gene expression. Trichostatin A treatment of quiescently infected neurons induced productive infection preferentially from non-A5+ neurons, demonstrating that the nonpermissive neuronal subtype is also nonpermissive for reactivation. Thus, HSV-1 is capable of entering the majority of sensory neurons in vitro; productive infection occurs within a subset of these neurons; and this differential distribution of productive infection is determined at or before the expression of the viral IE genes. PMID:21507969

  18. A5-positive primary sensory neurons are nonpermissive for productive infection with herpes simplex virus 1 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bertke, Andrea S; Swanson, Sophia M; Chen, Jenny; Imai, Yumi; Kinchington, Paul R; Margolis, Todd P

    2011-07-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) establish latency and express the latency-associated transcript (LAT) preferentially in different murine sensory neuron populations, with most HSV-1 LAT expression in A5(+) neurons and most HSV-2 LAT expression in KH10(+) neurons. To study the mechanisms regulating the establishment of HSV latency in specific subtypes of neurons, cultured dissociated adult murine trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons were assessed for relative permissiveness for productive infection. In contrast to that for neonatal TG, the relative distribution of A5(+) and KH10(+) neurons in cultured adult TG was similar to that seen in vivo. Productive infection with HSV was restricted, and only 45% of cultured neurons could be productively infected with either HSV-1 or HSV-2. A5(+) neurons supported productive infection with HSV-2 but were selectively nonpermissive for productive infection with HSV-1, a phenomenon that was not due to restricted viral entry or DNA uncoating, since HSV-1 expressing β-galactosidase under the control of the neurofilament promoter was detected in ∼90% of cultured neurons, with no preference for any neuronal subtype. Infection with HSV-1 reporter viruses expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) from immediate early (IE), early, and late gene promoters indicated that the block to productive infection occurred before IE gene expression. Trichostatin A treatment of quiescently infected neurons induced productive infection preferentially from non-A5(+) neurons, demonstrating that the nonpermissive neuronal subtype is also nonpermissive for reactivation. Thus, HSV-1 is capable of entering the majority of sensory neurons in vitro; productive infection occurs within a subset of these neurons; and this differential distribution of productive infection is determined at or before the expression of the viral IE genes.

  19. Infected Cell Protein (ICP)47 Enhances Herpes Simplex Virus Neurovirulence by Blocking the CD8+ T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Kim; Chen, Wei; Johnson, David C.; Hendricks, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) infected cell protein (ICP)47 blocks CD8+ T cell recognition of infected cells by inhibiting the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP). In vivo, HSV-1 replicates in two distinct tissues: in epithelial mucosa or epidermis, where the virus enters sensory neurons; and in the peripheral and central nervous system, where acute and subsequently latent infections occur. Here, we show that an HSV-1 ICP47− mutant is less neurovirulent than wild-type HSV-1 in mice, but replicates normally in epithelial tissues. The reduced neurovirulence of the ICP47− mutant was due to a protective CD8+ T cell response. When compared with wild-type virus, the ICP47− mutant expressed reduced neurovirulence in immunologically normal mice, and T cell–deficient nude mice after reconstitution with CD8+ T cells. However, the ICP47− mutant exhibited normal neurovirulence in mice that were acutely depleted of CD8+ T cells, and in nude mice that were not reconstituted, or were reconstituted with CD4+ T cells. In contrast, CD8+ T cell depletion did not increase the neurovirulence of an unrelated, attenuated HSV-1 glycoprotein (g)E− mutant. ICP47 is the first viral protein shown to influence neurovirulence by inhibiting CD8+ T cell protection. PMID:9449714

  20. Infection of Polarized MDCK Cells with Herpes Simplex Virus 1: Two Asymmetrically Distributed Cell Receptors Interact with Different Viral Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Amy E.; McGwire, Bradford S.; Roizman, Bernard

    1991-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 attaches to at least two cell surface receptors. In polarized epithelial (Madin-Darby canine kidney; MDCK) cells one receptor is located in the apical surface and attachment to the cells requires the presence of glycoprotein C in the virus. The second receptor is located in the basal surface and does not require the presence of glycoprotein C. Exposure of MDCK cells at either the apical or basal surface to wild-type virus yields plaques and viral products whereas infection by a glycoprotein C-negative mutant yields identical results only after exposure of MDCK cells to virus at the basal surface. Multiple receptors for viral entry into cells expand the host range of the virus. The observation that glycoprotein C-negative mutants are infectious in many nonpolarized cell lines suggests that cells in culture may express more than one receptor and explains why genes that specify the viral proteins that recognize redundant receptors, like glycoprotein C, are expendable.

  1. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis In A Young Child With Histological Evidence On Brain Biopsy Of Coexistent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Ellul, Mark A; Griffiths, Michael J; Iyer, Anand; Avula, Shivaram; Defres, Sylviane; Baborie, Atik; Vincent, Angela; Martin, Natalie G; Sadarangani, Manish; Pollard, Andrew J; Solomon, Tom; Kneen, Rachel

    2016-03-01

    We report a 3-year-old boy with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis with a typical syndrome of movement disorder and encephalopathy and evidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 infection on brain biopsy. HSV type 1 infection and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis are temporally linked in some cases: this case suggests that prodromal HSV type-1 infection may be clinically subtle and easily missed.

  2. Vaccination with the Secreted Glycoprotein G of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Induces Protective Immunity after Genital Infection.

    PubMed

    Önnheim, Karin; Ekblad, Maria; Görander, Staffan; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2016-04-22

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infects the genital mucosa and establishes a life-long infection in sensory ganglia. After primary infection HSV-2 may reactivate causing recurrent genital ulcerations. HSV-2 infection is prevalent, and globally more than 400 million individuals are infected. As clinical trials have failed to show protection against HSV-2 infection, new vaccine candidates are warranted. The secreted glycoprotein G (sgG-2) of HSV-2 was evaluated as a prophylactic vaccine in mice using two different immunization and adjuvant protocols. The protocol with three intramuscular immunizations combining sgG-2 with cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) motifs and alum induced almost complete protection from genital and systemic disease after intra-vaginal challenge with HSV-2. Robust immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers were detected with no neutralization activity. Purified splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced interferon-γ (IFN-γ) when re-stimulated with the antigen in vitro. sgG-2 + adjuvant intra-muscularly immunized mice showed a significant reduction of infectious HSV-2 and increased IFN-γ levels in vaginal washes. The HSV-2 DNA copy numbers were significantly reduced in dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, and in serum at day six or day 21 post challenge. We show that a sgG-2 based vaccine is highly effective and can be considered as a novel candidate in the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HSV-2 infection.

  3. Fate of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor and nuclear lamins in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Scott, E S; O'Hare, P

    2001-09-01

    During herpesvirus egress, capsids bud through the inner nuclear membrane. Underlying this membrane is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments with which it is tightly associated. Details of alterations to the lamina and the inner nuclear membrane during infection and the mechanisms involved in capsid transport across these structures remain unclear. Here we describe the fate of key protein components of the nuclear envelope and lamina during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. We followed the distribution of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR) and lamins A and B(2) tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in live infected cells. Together with additional results from indirect immunofluorescence, our studies reveal major morphologic distortion of nuclear-rim LBR and lamins A/C, B(1), and B(2). By 8 h p.i., we also observed a significant redistribution of LBR-GFP to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it colocalized with a subpopulation of cytoplasmic glycoprotein B by immunofluorescence. In addition, analysis by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching reveals that LBR-GFP exhibited increased diffusional mobility within the nuclear membrane of infected cells. This is consistent with the disruption of interactions between LBR and the underlying lamina. In addition to studying stably expressed GFP-lamins by fluorescence microscopy, we studied endogenous A- and B-type lamins in infected cells by Western blotting. Both approaches reveal a loss of lamins associated with virus infection. These data indicate major disruption of the nuclear envelope and lamina of HSV-1-infected cells and are consistent with a virus-induced dismantling of the nuclear lamina, possibly in order to gain access to the inner nuclear membrane.

  4. Infection with human immunodeficiency virus, herpes simplex virus type 2, and human herpes virus 8 in remote villages of southwestern Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Suligoi, B; Danaya, R T; Sarmati, L; Owen, I L; Boros, S; Pozio, E; Andreoni, M; Rezza, G

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted viruses, two serosurveys (the first in 1999 among 56 adults and the second in 2001 among 351 adults) were conducted in remote villages of the southwestern part of Papua New Guinea. Only one individual was positive for antibodies to HIV. In 2001, the seroprevalence of human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) was 32.2%, and the seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was 27.4%. Both prevalence rates increased with age, and were lower in the villages near the Bensbach River. The seropositivity of HSV-2 was independently correlated with HHV-8 infection. Our data show that the inhabitants of the southwestern region of Papua New Guinea currently experience an extremely low circulation of HIV. However, the high prevalence of infectious agents that can be sexually transmitted, such as HSV-2 and to a lesser extent HHV-8, indicates the presence of behavioral patterns that may facilitate the spread of HIV in this area of currently low endemicity.

  5. Topical treatment of cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection in hairless mice with (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine and related compounds.

    PubMed Central

    de Clercq, E

    1984-01-01

    (E)-5-(2-Bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (bromovinyldeoxyuridine) was found to suppress the development of herpetic skin lesions and the paralysis and mortality associated therewith in hairless mice inoculated intracutaneously with herpes simplex virus type 1. This protective effect was achieved with bromovinyldeoxyuridine applied topically at 1, 3, or 10% in either dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), Beeler base, Tween-glycerol-water, 5% Azone (1-dodecylazacycloheptan-2-one) in water, or 5% Azone in DMSO. The optimal vehicle was 5% Azone in DMSO, in which bromovinyldeoxyuridine was effective even at a concentration as low as 0.3%. In its protective activity against cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in hairless mice, bromovinyldeoxyuridine was clearly superior to other established antiherpes compounds such as 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine, 5-ethyl-2'-deoxyuridine, arabinosyl thymine, and arabinosyl (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl) uracil when formulated at 10% in DMSO or Azone-DMSO. However, no activity was noted with any of these drug formulations against cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 2 infection. In contrast, acycloguanosine (acyclovir) proved quite effective in the topical treatment of cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 2 infection when used at 10% in DMSO or at 5% in propylene glycol. PMID:6486759

  6. Protective antibody therapy is associated with reduced chemokine transcripts in herpes simplex virus type 1 corneal infection.

    PubMed Central

    Su, Y H; Yan, X T; Oakes, J E; Lausch, R N

    1996-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection on the murine cornea induces an intense inflammatory response which can lead to blindness. This disease, known as herpes stromal keratitis, can be prevented by the timely passive transfer of monoclonal antibody specific for viral glycoprotein D (gD). Precisely how antibody treatment prevents excessive corneal inflammation is not known. In this study we investigated whether chemokine mRNA expression is inhibited by antibody treatment. Total cellular RNAs isolated from normal corneas and at various times after virus infection were analyzed via reverse transcription-PCR for mRNA coding for seven different chemokines. Constitutive levels of IP-10, KC, MIP-2, MCP-1, MIP-1 beta, and RANTES mRNA were detected in uninfected corneas of BALB/c mice. When the cornea was mechanically traumatized, message for all six chemokines was transiently elevated above constitutive levels. In contrast, HSV-1 infection resulted in prolonged enhanced chemokine message expression. The kinetics of mRNA accumulation was distinctive for each chemokine analyzed. MIP-1 alpha message, not detected constitutively, was not evident until day 7 postinfection. Administration of anti-HSV gD monoclonal antibody 1 day after infection was associated with reduced message for MIP-2, MCP-1, MIP-1 alpha, and MIP-1 beta. IP-10, KC, and RANTES messages were not altered. Collectively, our results suggest that anti-gD treatment may protect, at least in part, by inhibiting production of chemokines believed to promote inflammation. PMID:8551595

  7. Excoecarianin, Isolated from Phyllanthus urinaria Linnea, Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection through Inactivation of Viral Particles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hua-Yew; Yang, Chien-Min; Lin, Ta-Chen; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chiang, Lien-Chai; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Phyllanthus urinaria Linnea (Euphorbiaceae) is one of the traditional medicinal plants widely used by oriental people to treat various diseases. We have previously demonstrated that the acetone extract of P. urinaria inhibits herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) but not HSV-1 infection. In a continuing effort to clarify the antiviral mechanisms of P. urinaria, we isolated the pure compound excoecarianin from the whole plant of P. urinaria through acetone extraction, and investigated its anti-HSV-1 and HSV-2 activities. Our results indicated that excoecarianin protected Vero cells from HSV-2 but not HSV-1 infection, and its 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was 1.4 ± 0.1 μM. The antiviral effective concentration of excoecarianin did not affect the viability or the morphology of Vero cells. Although excoecarianin inhibited HSV-2 infection, the inhibitory effect, however, was most prominent when excoecarianin was concurrently added with the virus. Pretreatment of Vero cells with excoecarianin with removal of the drug prior to infection did not yield any antiviral effects, and the same observation was made for post viral entry treatment. Subsequent studies revealed that excoecarianin inactivated HSV-2 virus particles to prevent viral infection. A synergistic antiviral effect against HSV-2 was also observed when Vero cells were treated with a combination of acyclovir (ACV) and excoecarianin. These results suggested that excoecarianin merits to be further explored as an entry inhibitor against HSV-2 and could potentially be investigated for combinatorial drug treatment with nucleoside analogues such as ACV in therapeutic management of HSV-2 infection. PMID:19808846

  8. Excoecarianin, Isolated from Phyllanthus urinaria Linnea, Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection through Inactivation of Viral Particles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hua-Yew; Yang, Chien-Min; Lin, Ta-Chen; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Chiang, Lien-Chai; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Phyllanthus urinaria Linnea (Euphorbiaceae) is one of the traditional medicinal plants widely used by oriental people to treat various diseases. We have previously demonstrated that the acetone extract of P. urinaria inhibits herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) but not HSV-1 infection. In a continuing effort to clarify the antiviral mechanisms of P. urinaria, we isolated the pure compound excoecarianin from the whole plant of P. urinaria through acetone extraction, and investigated its anti-HSV-1 and HSV-2 activities. Our results indicated that excoecarianin protected Vero cells from HSV-2 but not HSV-1 infection, and its 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) was 1.4 ± 0.1 μM. The antiviral effective concentration of excoecarianin did not affect the viability or the morphology of Vero cells. Although excoecarianin inhibited HSV-2 infection, the inhibitory effect, however, was most prominent when excoecarianin was concurrently added with the virus. Pretreatment of Vero cells with excoecarianin with removal of the drug prior to infection did not yield any antiviral effects, and the same observation was made for post viral entry treatment. Subsequent studies revealed that excoecarianin inactivated HSV-2 virus particles to prevent viral infection. A synergistic antiviral effect against HSV-2 was also observed when Vero cells were treated with a combination of acyclovir (ACV) and excoecarianin. These results suggested that excoecarianin merits to be further explored as an entry inhibitor against HSV-2 and could potentially be investigated for combinatorial drug treatment with nucleoside analogues such as ACV in therapeutic management of HSV-2 infection.

  9. Engineering herpes simplex viruses by infection-transfection methods including recombination site targeting by CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases.

    PubMed

    Russell, Tiffany A; Stefanovic, Tijana; Tscharke, David C

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are frequent human pathogens and the ability to engineer these viruses underpins much research into their biology and pathogenesis. Often the ultimate aim is to produce a virus that has the desired phenotypic change and no additional alterations in characteristics. This requires methods that minimally disrupt the genome and, for insertions of foreign DNA, sites must be found that can be engineered without disrupting HSV gene function or expression. This study advances both of these requirements. Firstly, the use of homologous recombination between the virus genome and plasmids in mammalian cells is a reliable way to engineer HSV such that minimal genome changes are made. This has most frequently been achieved by cotransfection of plasmid and isolated viral genomic DNA, but an alternative is to supply the virus genome by infection in a transfection-infection method. Such approaches can also incorporate CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering methods. Current descriptions of infection-transfection methods, either with or without the addition of CRISPR/Cas9 targeting, are limited in detail and the extent of optimization. In this study it was found that transfection efficiency and the length of homologous sequences improve the efficiency of recombination in these methods, but the targeting of the locus to be engineered by CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases has an overriding positive impact. Secondly, the intergenic space between UL26 and UL27 was reexamined as a site for the addition of foreign DNA and a position identified that allows insertions without compromising HSV growth in vitro or in vivo.

  10. The prevalence of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 infection in Iran: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Malary, Mina; Abedi, Ghasem; Hamzehgardeshi, Zeinab; Afshari, Mahdi; Moosazadeh, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Background: Seroepidemiologic studies indicate a high prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. This infection leads to ophthalmic, dermatologic, oral, neurologic, vaginal and cervical problems. Different studies have been carried out to estimate the HSV seroprevalence in Iran. Combining the results of these studies would be useful for health policy-making. Objective: This study aims to estimate the pooled prevalence of HSV infection using meta-analysis. Materials and Methods: Using relevant keywords, national and international data banks were searched. Restricting the search strategy, excluding duplicates and investigating the titles and abstracts, relevant articles were identified. To increase the search sensitivity, the lists of references were investigated. To find un-published studies, specialized experts as well as research centers were interviewed. The heterogeneity between the results was assessed using Cochrane test and I-squared indicator. The pooled prevalence of HSV infection was estimated using random effects model. Results: We recruited 33 eligible papers investigated 7762 individuals. The total prevalences (95% confidence intervals) of HSV1, HSV2 and HSV infections were estimated as of 42.04% (20.9-63.1), 6.5% (4.7-8.2) and 25.7% (8.8-42.5) respectively. Conclusion: This meta-analysis showed that the HSV2 seroprevalence among Iranian people is considerably lower than HSV1 infection. PMID:27921084

  11. Effects of Toll-like receptor 3 on herpes simplex virus type-1-infected mouse neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuning; Shi, Lihong; Zhang, Haoyun; Li, Ruifang; Liang, Ruiwen; Liu, Zhijun

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection on the phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and the expression of interferon-β (IFN-β), as well as to clarify the functions of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in mouse neural stem cells (NSCs) infected with HSV-1. In HSV-1-infected cultured NSCs, immunofluorescence, reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and ELISA were performed to reveal the expression patterns of TLR3, IRF3, and IFN-β. Then, lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was used to block the expression of TLR3, and its effect on host resistance to HSV-1 infection was investigated. Under uninfected conditions, NSCs expressed TLR3 and phosphorylated IRF3, but after infection, the expression level of TLR3 was upregulated and the phosphorylation level of IRF3 in the nucleus was significantly enhanced, while IFN-β was also expressed. After TLR3 expression was blocked by lentivirus-mediated RNAi, IRF3 phosphorylation and IFN-β expression were downregulated. Therefore, HSV-1 upregulated the expression of TLR3 in NSCs and promoted nuclear translocation after IRF3 was phosphorylated to induce IFN-β expression. TLR3 exhibited an anti-HSV-1 infection capacity via innate immune functions.

  12. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection of Tree Shrews Differs from That of Mice in the Severity of Acute Infection and Viral Transcription in the Peripheral Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lihong; Li, Zhuoran; Wang, Erlin; Yang, Rui; Xiao, Yu; Han, Hongbo; Lang, Fengchao; Li, Xin; Xia, Yujie; Gao, Feng; Li, Qihan; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of humans are limited by the use of rodent models such as mice, rabbits, and guinea pigs. Tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) are small mammals indigenous to southwest Asia. At behavioral, anatomical, genomic, and evolutionary levels, tree shrews are much closer to primates than rodents are, and tree shrews are susceptible to HSV infection. Thus, we have studied herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection in the tree shrew trigeminal ganglion (TG) following ocular inoculation. In situ hybridization, PCR, and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses confirm that HSV-1 latently infects neurons of the TG. When explant cocultivation of trigeminal ganglia was performed, the virus was recovered after 5 days of cocultivation with high efficiency. Swabbing the corneas of latently infected tree shrews revealed that tree shrews shed virus spontaneously at low frequencies. However, tree shrews differ significantly from mice in the expression of key HSV-1 genes, including ICP0, ICP4, and latency-associated transcript (LAT). In acutely infected tree shrew TGs, no level of ICP4 was observed, suggesting the absence of infection or a very weak, acute infection compared to that of the mouse. Immunofluorescence staining with ICP4 monoclonal antibody, and immunohistochemistry detection by HSV-1 polyclonal antibodies, showed a lack of viral proteins in tree shrew TGs during both acute and latent phases of infection. Cultivation of supernatant from homogenized, acutely infected TGs with RS1 cells also exhibited an absence of infectious HSV-1 from tree shrew TGs. We conclude that the tree shrew has an undetectable, or a much weaker, acute infection in the TGs. Interestingly, compared to mice, tree shrew TGs express high levels of ICP0 transcript in addition to LAT during latency. However, the ICP0 transcript remained nuclear, and no ICP0 protein could be seen during the course of mouse and tree shrew TG

  13. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection of Tree Shrews Differs from That of Mice in the Severity of Acute Infection and Viral Transcription in the Peripheral Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Li, Lihong; Li, Zhuoran; Wang, Erlin; Yang, Rui; Xiao, Yu; Han, Hongbo; Lang, Fengchao; Li, Xin; Xia, Yujie; Gao, Feng; Li, Qihan; Fraser, Nigel W; Zhou, Jumin

    2015-10-28

    Studies of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of humans are limited by the use of rodent models such as mice, rabbits, and guinea pigs. Tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) are small mammals indigenous to southwest Asia. At behavioral, anatomical, genomic, and evolutionary levels, tree shrews are much closer to primates than rodents are, and tree shrews are susceptible to HSV infection. Thus, we have studied herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection in the tree shrew trigeminal ganglion (TG) following ocular inoculation. In situ hybridization, PCR, and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses confirm that HSV-1 latently infects neurons of the TG. When explant cocultivation of trigeminal ganglia was performed, the virus was recovered after 5 days of cocultivation with high efficiency. Swabbing the corneas of latently infected tree shrews revealed that tree shrews shed virus spontaneously at low frequencies. However, tree shrews differ significantly from mice in the expression of key HSV-1 genes, including ICP0, ICP4, and latency-associated transcript (LAT). In acutely infected tree shrew TGs, no level of ICP4 was observed, suggesting the absence of infection or a very weak, acute infection compared to that of the mouse. Immunofluorescence staining with ICP4 monoclonal antibody, and immunohistochemistry detection by HSV-1 polyclonal antibodies, showed a lack of viral proteins in tree shrew TGs during both acute and latent phases of infection. Cultivation of supernatant from homogenized, acutely infected TGs with RS1 cells also exhibited an absence of infectious HSV-1 from tree shrew TGs. We conclude that the tree shrew has an undetectable, or a much weaker, acute infection in the TGs. Interestingly, compared to mice, tree shrew TGs express high levels of ICP0 transcript in addition to LAT during latency. However, the ICP0 transcript remained nuclear, and no ICP0 protein could be seen during the course of mouse and tree shrew TG infections

  14. Inhibition of viral RNA methylation in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected cells by 5' S-isobutyl-adenosine.

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemont, B; Huppert, J

    1977-01-01

    5' S-isobutyl-adenosine (SIBA), a structural analogue of S-adenosylhomocysteine, reversibly blocks the multiplication of herpes simplex type 1 virus. In the presence of SIBA, viral protein synthesis is inhibited. After removing SIBA the synthesis of proteins starts rapidly again. The new polypeptides are mainly alpha proteins (Honess and Roizman, J. Virol. 14:8-19, 1974,), normally the first to be synthesized after infection. The rapid synthesis of proteins after release of inhibition seems to be directed by mRNA formed in the presence of SIBA as indicated by experiments using actinomycin D but which was undermethylated as shown by analysis of methyl groups on RNA. SIBA inhibits the methylation of mRNA and especially that of the 5' cap. Capping of mRNA thus seems to be essential for efficient translation. The analogue affected various methylations to different extents. Images PMID:192910

  15. Phosphorylation of the VP16 transcriptional activator protein during herpes simplex virus infection and mutational analysis of putative phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Ottosen, Søren; Herrera, Francisco J.; Doroghazi, James R.; Hull, Angela; Mittal, Sheenu; Lane, William S.; Triezenberg, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    VP16 is a virion phosphoprotein of herpes simplex virus and a transcriptional activator of the viral immediate-early (IE) genes. We identified four novel VP16 phosphorylation sites (Ser18, Ser353, Ser411, and Ser452) at late times in infection, but found no evidence of phosphorylation of Ser375, a residue reportedly phosphorylated when VP16 is expressed from a transfected plasmid. A virus carrying a S375A mutation of VP16 was viable in cell culture but with a slow growth rate. The association of the mutant VP16 protein with IE gene promoters and subsequent IE gene expression was markedly reduced during infection, consistent with prior transfection and in vitro results. Surprisingly, the association of Oct-1 with IE promoters was also diminished during infection by the mutant strain. We propose that Ser375 is important for the interaction of VP16 with Oct-1, and that the interaction is required to enable both proteins to bind to IE promoters. PMID:16297954

  16. Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus-2 infection among women seeking medical care for signs and symptoms of vaginitis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sharon E; Carter, Belvia; Lambert, Seraphine

    2009-01-01

    Two identically designed studies were conducted to determine the prevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection and viral shedding among women with no known history of genital herpes or HSV-2 seropositivity, who sought care at a US-based obstetrics/gynaecology clinic because of recurrent signs and symptoms of vaginitis. Samples comprised 50 women of any race (All-Comers Sample; Study 1) and 49 black women (Black Sample; Study 2) diagnosed at the clinic visit with vaginitis on the basis of standard work-up and medical history. In the All-Comers Sample, 15 (30%) women were HSV-2 seropositive and two (4%) were positive for HSV-2 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); these two patients were also HSV-2 seropositive. Therefore, among patients seropositive for HSV-2, two (13%) were shedding virus at the time of the clinic visit. In the Black Sample, 25 (51%) were HSV-2 seropositive and two (4%) were PCR positive for HSV-2. Factors associated with HSV-2 seropositivity included age >30 years, erythema on pelvic examination, age < or = 15 years at first intercourse and having more than four lifetime sexual partners. The high prevalence of HSV-2 infection in these samples underscores the need to test for HSV-2 infection in women consulting with signs and symptoms of vaginitis.

  17. Herpes simplex virus 1 Us3 deletion mutant is infective despite impaired capsid translocation to the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Wild, Peter; Leisinger, Sabine; de Oliveira, Anna Paula; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Kaech, Andres; Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt

    2015-01-12

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) capsids are assembled in the nucleus bud at the inner nuclear membrane into the perinuclear space, acquiring envelope and tegument. In theory, these virions are de-enveloped by fusion of the envelope with the outer nuclear membrane and re-enveloped by Golgi membranes to become infective. Us3 enables the nucleus to cytoplasm capsid translocation. Nevertheless, Us3 is not essential for the production of infective progeny viruses. Determination of phenotype distribution by quantitative electron microscopy, and calculation per mean nuclear or cell volume revealed the following: (i) The number of R7041(∆US3) capsids budding at the inner nuclear membrane was significantly higher than that of wild type HSV-1; (ii) The mean number of R7041(∆US3) virions per mean cell volume was 2726, that of HSV-1 virions 1460 by 24 h post inoculation; (iii) 98% of R7041(∆US3) virions were in the perinuclear space; (iv) The number of R7041(∆US3) capsids in the cytoplasm, including those budding at Golgi membranes, was significantly reduced. Cell associated R7041(∆US3) yields were 2.37×10(8) and HSV-1 yields 1.57×10(8) PFU/mL by 24 h post inoculation. We thus conclude that R7041(∆US3) virions, which acquire envelope and tegument by budding at the inner nuclear membrane into the perinuclear space, are infective.

  18. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Us3 Deletion Mutant is Infective Despite Impaired Capsid Translocation to the Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Peter; Leisinger, Sabine; de Oliveira, Anna Paula; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Kaech, Andres; Ackermann, Mathias; Tobler, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) capsids are assembled in the nucleus bud at the inner nuclear membrane into the perinuclear space, acquiring envelope and tegument. In theory, these virions are de-enveloped by fusion of the envelope with the outer nuclear membrane and re-enveloped by Golgi membranes to become infective. Us3 enables the nucleus to cytoplasm capsid translocation. Nevertheless, Us3 is not essential for the production of infective progeny viruses. Determination of phenotype distribution by quantitative electron microscopy, and calculation per mean nuclear or cell volume revealed the following: (i) The number of R7041(∆US3) capsids budding at the inner nuclear membrane was significantly higher than that of wild type HSV-1; (ii) The mean number of R7041(∆US3) virions per mean cell volume was 2726, that of HSV-1 virions 1460 by 24 h post inoculation; (iii) 98% of R7041(∆US3) virions were in the perinuclear space; (iv) The number of R7041(∆US3) capsids in the cytoplasm, including those budding at Golgi membranes, was significantly reduced. Cell associated R7041(∆US3) yields were 2.37 × 108 and HSV-1 yields 1.57 × 108 PFU/mL by 24 h post inoculation. We thus conclude that R7041(∆US3) virions, which acquire envelope and tegument by budding at the inner nuclear membrane into the perinuclear space, are infective. PMID:25588052

  19. A cell line that secretes inducibly a reporter protein for monitoring herpes simplex virus infection and drug susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Liu, Wu-Tse; Sun, Jun-Ren; Tai, Yi-Er; Kung, Szu-Hao

    2002-12-01

    A cell line modified genetically (Vero-ICP10-SEAP) that responds to infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV) was established. The cell line was constructed by stable transfection of Vero cell with a plasmid encoding the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) driven by the promoter of the HSV-2 ICP10 gene. Following infection with HSV, the stable line secretes a high level of the SEAP in the supernatants as measured by a chemiluminescence-based assay. The detection system is sensitive to an HSV titer as low as a single plaque-forming unit (PFU), with a linear range up to the equivalent of 2.5 x 10(4) PFU inoculum after infection for 24 h. There was no detectable enhancement in SEAP activities following inoculations with several viruses other than HSV. The Vero-ICP10-SEAP cell line was also utilized to develop an assay for determination of antiviral susceptibility given that the induced SEAP activity appeared to reflect the numbers of plaque. Evaluations of the stable line with representative acyclovir (ACV)-sensitive and-resistant HSV isolates demonstrated that their drug susceptibilities were determined accurately. In summary, this novel SEAP reporter system is a sensitive means for rapid diagnosis, quantitation, and drug susceptibility testing for HSV, with potential to the development of an automated assay. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Attitudes and Willingness to Assume Risk of Experimental Therapy to Eradicate Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Oseso, Linda; Magaret, Amalia S; Jerome, Keith R; Fox, Julie; Wald, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Current treatment of genital herpes is focused on ameliorating signs and symptoms but is not curative. However, as potential herpes simplex virus (HSV) cure approaches are tested in the laboratory, we aimed to assess the interest in such studies by persons with genital herpes and the willingness to assume risks associated with experimental therapy. We constructed an anonymous online questionnaire that was posted on websites that provide information regarding genital herpes. The questions collected demographic and clinical information on adults who self-reported as having genital herpes, and assessed attitudes toward and willingness to participate in HSV cure clinical research. Seven hundred eleven participants provided sufficient responses to be included in the analysis. Sixty-six percent were women; the median age was 37 years, and the median time since genital HSV diagnosis was 4.7 years. The willingness to participate in trials increased from 59.0% in phase 1 to 68.5% in phase 2, and 81.2% in phase 3 trials, and 40% reported willingness to participate even in the absence of immediate, personal benefits. The most desirable outcome was the elimination of risk for transmission to sex partner or neonate. The mean perceived severity of receiving a diagnosis of genital HSV-2 was 4.2 on a scale of 1 to 5. Despite suppressive therapy available, persons with genital herpes are interested in participating in clinical research aimed at curing HSV, especially in more advanced stages of development.

  1. Leflunomide in the Treatment of a Pseudotumoral Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in an HIV Patient.

    PubMed

    Roger, Marie R; Anstead, Gregory M

    2017-01-01

    The patient is a 52-year-old African American man with a past medical history of HIV infection (on antiretroviral therapy, CD4 count 399 cells/µL, and undetectable HIV viral load) and recurrent genital herpes. While on valacyclovir, the patient presented with four tumorous lesions on the perineum and scrotum. A biopsy specimen stained positively with HSV-1 and HSV-2 immunostains and displayed a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. The patient received foscarnet and imiquimod for two weeks with minimal improvement. Based on the previous activity of leflunomide, which has both antiviral and immunomodulatory properties, in cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex infections, leflunomide 20 mg orally twice daily was started. The patient received 23 days of foscarnet, 14 days of topical imiquimod, and 11 days of leflunomide with approximately 80% reduction in the size of the perineal lesion. After nine months on leflunomide there was complete regression of the large perineal lesion and only two small ulcerations remained on the scrotum. Pseudotumoral herpes lesions in HIV patients represent an immune reconstitution event and are poorly responsive to the usual anti-herpes agents. This report demonstrates the successful use of leflunomide in the treatment of an HIV patient with pseudotumoral herpes. Thalidomide has also been used with some success.

  2. Leflunomide in the Treatment of a Pseudotumoral Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in an HIV Patient

    PubMed Central

    Roger, Marie R.

    2017-01-01

    The patient is a 52-year-old African American man with a past medical history of HIV infection (on antiretroviral therapy, CD4 count 399 cells/µL, and undetectable HIV viral load) and recurrent genital herpes. While on valacyclovir, the patient presented with four tumorous lesions on the perineum and scrotum. A biopsy specimen stained positively with HSV-1 and HSV-2 immunostains and displayed a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. The patient received foscarnet and imiquimod for two weeks with minimal improvement. Based on the previous activity of leflunomide, which has both antiviral and immunomodulatory properties, in cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex infections, leflunomide 20 mg orally twice daily was started. The patient received 23 days of foscarnet, 14 days of topical imiquimod, and 11 days of leflunomide with approximately 80% reduction in the size of the perineal lesion. After nine months on leflunomide there was complete regression of the large perineal lesion and only two small ulcerations remained on the scrotum. Pseudotumoral herpes lesions in HIV patients represent an immune reconstitution event and are poorly responsive to the usual anti-herpes agents. This report demonstrates the successful use of leflunomide in the treatment of an HIV patient with pseudotumoral herpes. Thalidomide has also been used with some success. PMID:28373917

  3. Both plasmacytoid dendritic cells and monocytes stimulate natural killer cells early during human herpes simplex virus type 1 infections.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Karin; Thomann, Sabrina; Vogel, Benjamin; Schuster, Philipp; Schmidt, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a member of the herpes virus family, is characterized by a short replication cycle, high cytopathogenicity and distinct neurotropism. Primary infection and reactivation may cause severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals. This study investigated the role of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in the activation of natural killer (NK) cells for the control of herpesviral infections. Within peripheral blood mononuclear cells, UV-inactivated HSV-1 and CpG-A induced CD69 up-regulation on NK cells, whereas infectious HSV-1 was particularly active in inducing NK cell effector functions interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion and degranulation. The pDC-derived IFN-α significantly contributed to NK cell activation, as evident from neutralization and cell depletion experiments. In addition, monocyte-derived tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced after exposure to infectious HSV-1 was found to stimulate IFN-γ secretion. A minority of monocytes was shown to be non-productively infected in experiments using fluorescently labelled viruses and quantitative PCR analyses. HSV-1-exposed monocytes up-regulated classical HLA-ABC and non-classical HLA-E molecules at the cell surface in an IFN-α-dependent manner, whereas stress molecules MICA/B were not induced. Notably, depletion of monocytes reduced NK cell effector functions induced by infectious HSV-1 (P < 0.05). Altogether, our data suggest a model in which HSV-1-stimulated pDC and monocytes activate NK cells via secretion of IFN-α and TNF-α. In addition, infection of monocytes induces NK cell effector functions via TNF-α-dependent and TNF-α-independent mechanisms. Hence, pDC and monocytes, which are among the first cells infiltrating herpetic lesions, appear to have important bystander functions for NK cells to control these viral infections.

  4. Requirements for the Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Translocation of Infected-Cell Protein 0 of Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Pascal; Van Sant, Charles; Roizman, Bernard

    2001-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that wild-type infected-cell protein 0 (ICP0), a key herpes simplex virus regulatory protein, translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of human embryonic lung (HEL) fibroblasts within several hours after infection (Y. Kawaguchi, R. Bruni, and B. Roizman, J. Virol. 71:1019–1024, 1997). Translocation of ICP0 was also observed in cells infected with the d120 mutant, in which both copies of the gene encoding ICP4, the major regulatory protein, had been deleted (V. Galvan, R. Brandimarti, J. Munger, and B. Roizman, J. Virol. 74:1931–1938, 2000). Furthermore, a mutant (R7914) carrying the D199A substitution in ICP0 does not bind or stabilize cyclin D3 and is retained in the nucleus (C. Van Sant, P. Lopez, S. J. Advani, and B. Roizman, J. Virol. 75:1888–1898, 2001). Studies designed to elucidate the requirements for the translocation of ICP0 between cellular compartments revealed the following. (i) Translocation of ICP0 to the cytoplasm in productive infection maps to the D199 amino acid, inasmuch as wild-type ICP0 delivered in trans to cells infected with an ICP0 null mutant was translocated to the cytoplasm whereas the D199A-substituted mutant ICP0 was not. (ii) Translocation of wild-type ICP0 requires a function expressed late in infection, inasmuch as phosphonoacetate blocked the translocation of ICP0 in wild-type virus-infected cells but not in d120 mutant-infected cells. Moreover, whereas in d120 mutant-infected cells ICP0 was translocated rapidly from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at approximately 5 h after infection, the translocation of ICP0 in wild-type virus-infected cells extended from 5 to at least 9 h after infection. (iii) In wild-type virus-infected cells, the MG132 proteasomal inhibitor blocked the translocation of ICP0 to the cytoplasm early in infection, but when added late in infection, it caused ICP0 to be relocated back to the nucleus from the cytoplasm. (iv) MG132 blocked the translocation of ICP0 in d120 mutant-infected

  5. Microglial GLT-1 is upregulated in response to herpes simplex virus infection to provide an antiviral defence via glutathione.

    PubMed

    Persson, Mikael; Brantefjord, Mona; Liljeqvist, Jan-Ake; Bergström, Tomas; Hansson, Elisabeth; Rönnbäck, Lars

    2007-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) can enter the central nervous system and cause encephalitis (HSV-1) or meningitis (HSV-2). Microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the central nervous system, are potentially able to detect viral infections. Microglia have been shown to express the glutamate transporter GLT-1 during pathological events, leading to increased microglial glutamate uptake and glutathione synthesis. This study aims to address the role of GLT-1 and glutathione, a major antioxidant with antiviral properties, during HSV infections. Using neuron-enriched mixed primary cultures from rat, it was found that microglia have higher resistance to HSV infections than neurons or astrocytes after 24 h incubation with HSV. Purified microglia in culture were used to further address this. It was found that microglia were able to detect HSV and responded by releasing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and upregulating GLT-1 after 24 h incubation with 1 PFU/cell HSV-1 or HSV-2. Furthermore, the microglial glutathione levels were not significantly diminished after 24 h. Inhibition of the microglial glutathione synthesis with 200 microM buthionine sulfoximide (BSO) led to significantly more infected cells after 24 h incubation with 1 PFU/cell HSV-1 or HSV-2. These data indicate that the higher resistance in microglia against HSV infections may be due to the expression of GLT-1, which can maintain the glutathione levels and provide a mechanism for microglial self-defense against HSV.

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 2 and HIV infection among US military personnel: implications for health prevention programmes.

    PubMed

    Bautista, C T; Singer, D E; O'Connell, R J; Crum-Cianflone, N; Agan, B K; Malia, J A; Sanchez, J L; Peel, S A; Michael, N L; Scott, P T

    2009-09-01

    US military personnel are routinely screened for HIV infection. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a risk factor for HIV acquisition. To determine the association between HSV-2 and HIV, a matched case-control study was conducted among US Army and Air Force service members with incident HIV infections (cases) randomly matched with two HIV-uninfected service members (controls) between 2000 and 2004. HSV-2 prevalence was significantly higher among cases (30.3%, 138/456) than among controls (9.7%, 88/912, P < 0.001). HSV-2 was strongly associated with HIV in univariate (odds ratio [OR] = 4.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.1-5.8) and multiple analyses (adjusted [OR] = 3.9, 95% CI = 2.8-5.6). The population attributable risk percentage of HIV infection due to HSV-2 was 23%. Identifying HSV-2 infections may afford the opportunity to provide targeted behavioural interventions that could decrease the incidence of HIV infections in the US military population; further studies are needed.

  7. Neonatal genital herpes simplex virus type 1 infection after Jewish ritual circumcision: modern medicine and religious tradition.

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Grisaru-Soen, Galia; Greenberg, David; Levtzion-Korach, Osnat; Malkin, David; Petric, Martin; Koren, Gideon; Tendler, Moshe D; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Vardi, Amir; Dagan, Ron; Engelhard, Dan

    2004-08-01

    Genital neonatal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection was observed in a series of neonates after traditional Jewish ritual circumcision. The objective of this study was to describe neonate genital HSV-1 infection after ritual circumcision and investigate the association between genital HSV-1 after circumcision and the practice of the traditional circumcision. Eight neonates with genital HSV-1 infection after ritual circumcision were identified. The average interval from circumcision to clinical manifestations was 7.25 +/- 2.5 days. In all cases, the traditional circumciser (the mohel) had performed the ancient custom of orally suctioning the blood after cutting the foreskin (oral metzitzah), which is currently practiced by only a minority of mohels. Six infants received intravenous acyclovir therapy. Four infants had recurrent episodes of genital HSV infection, and 1 developed HSV encephalitis with neurologic sequelae. All four mohels tested for HSV antibodies were seropositive. Ritual Jewish circumcision that includes metzitzah with direct oral-genital contact carries a serious risk for transmission of HSV from mohels to neonates, which can be complicated by protracted or severe infection. Oral metzitzah after ritual circumcision may be hazardous to the neonate.

  8. Extracellular vesicles during Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 infection: an inquire.

    PubMed

    Kalamvoki, Maria; Deschamps, Thibaut

    2016-04-05

    Extracellular vesicles are defined as a heterogeneous group of vesicles that are released by prokaryotic to higher eukaryotic cells and by plant cells in an evolutionary conserved manner. The significance of these vesicles lies in their capacity to transfer selected cargo composed of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids to both recipient and parent cells and to influence various physiological and pathological functions. Microorganisms such as parasites, fungi and protozoa and even single cell organisms such as bacteria generate extracellular vesicles. In addition, several viruses have evolved strategies to hijack the extracellular vesicles for egress or to alter the surrounding environment. The thesis of this article is that: a) during HSV-1 infection vesicles are delivered from infected to uninfected cells that influence the infection; b) the cargo of these vesicles consists of viral and host transcripts (mRNAs, miRNAs and non-coding RNAs) and proteins including innate immune components, such as STING; and c) the viral vesicles carry the tetraspanins CD9, CD63 and CD81, which are considered as markers of exosomes. Therefore, we assume that the STING-carrying vesicles, produced during HSV-1 infection, are reminiscent to exosomes. The presumed functions of the exosomes released from HSV-1 infected cells include priming the recipient cells and accelerating antiviral responses to control the dissemination of the virus. This may be one strategy used by the virus to prevent the elimination by the host and establish persistent infection. In conclusion, the modification of the cargo of exosomes appears to be part of the strategy that HSV-1 has evolved to establish lifelong persistent infections into the human body to ensure successful dissemination between individuals.

  9. Herpes simplex virus 1 infection induces activation and subsequent inhibition of the IFI16 and NLRP3 inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Karen E; Chikoti, Leela; Chandran, Bala

    2013-05-01

    Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that recognize pathogens and pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns. They induce the maturation and secretion of powerful proinflammatory interleukin-1B (IL-1β), IL-18, and IL-33 cytokines, which in turn activate expression of other immune genes and lymphocyte recruitment to the site of primary infection, thereby controlling invading pathogens. Inflammasomes are comprised of cytoplasmic sensor molecules, such as NLRP3 and AIM2 or nuclear sensor IFI16, the adaptor protein ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing CARD), and the effector protein procaspase-1. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), a ubiquitous virus that infects humans and establishes life-long latency, has evolved numerous mechanisms to evade host detection and immune responses. Here, we show that early during in vitro infection of human foreskin fibroblasts (2 to 4 h), HSV-1 induced the activation of the IFI16 and NLRP3 inflammasomes and maturation of IL-1β. Independent of viral gene expression, IFI16 recognized the HSV-1 genome in infected cell nuclei, relocalized, and colocalized with ASC in the cytoplasm. However, HSV-1 specifically targeted IFI16 for rapid proteasomic degradation at later times postinfection, which was dependent on the expression of ICP0, an immediate early protein of HSV-1. In contrast, NLRP3, AIM2, and ASC levels were not decreased. Also, caspase-1 was "trapped" in actin clusters at later time points that likely blocked the NLRP3/IFI16 inflammasome activity. In addition, the secretion of mature IL-1β was inhibited. These results suggest that though the host cell responds to HSV-1 infection by IFI16 and NLRP3 inflammasomes early during infection, HSV-1 has evolved mechanisms to shut down these responses to evade the proinflammatory consequences.

  10. Patterns of accumulation of miRNAs encoded by herpes simplex virus during productive infection, latency, and on reactivation.

    PubMed

    Du, Te; Han, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Guoying; Zhou, Grace; Roizman, Bernard

    2015-01-06

    The key events in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are (i) replication at a portal of entry into the body modeled by infection of cultured cells; (ii) establishment of a latent state characterized by a sole latency-associated transcript and microRNAs (miRNAs) modeled in murine peripheral ganglia 30 d after inoculation; and (iii) reactivation from the latent state modeled by excision and incubation of ganglia in medium containing anti-NGF antibody for a timespan of a single viral replicative cycle. In this report, we examine the pattern of synthesis and accumulation of 18 HSV-1 miRNAs in the three models. We report the following: (i) H2-3P, H3-3P, H4-3P, H5-3P, H6-3P, and H7-5P accumulated in ganglia harboring latent virus. All but H4-3P were readily detected in productively infected cells, and most likely they originate from three transcriptional units. (ii) H8-5P, H15, H17, H18, H26, and H27 accumulated during reactivation. Of this group, only H26 and H27 could be detected in productively infected cells. (iii) Of the 18 we have examined, only 10 miRNAs were found to accumulate above background levels in productively infected cells. The disparity in the accumulation of miRNAs in cell culture and during reactivation may reflect differences in the patterns of regulation of viral gene expression during productive infection and during reactivation from the latent state.

  11. Demonstration of different modes of cell death upon herpes simplex virus 1 infection in different types of oral cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, C R; Lin, S S; Chou, M Y; Ho, C C; Wang, L; Lee, Y L; Chen, C S; Yang, C C

    2005-01-01

    The effects of Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection on five different types of oral cancerous cells (neck metastasis of gingival carcinoma (GNM) cells and tongue squamous cells of carcinoma (TSCCa) and non-cancerous cells (buccal mucosal fibroblasts (BF), gingival fibroblasts (GF), oral submucosal fibrosis cells (OSF)) and one type of non-oral cancerous cells (KB cells) were investigated. In HSV-1-infected cells the cell viability, CPE, viral antigens accumulation, caspase-3 activity, annexin V binding and DNA fragmentation were estimated. Three different forms or pathways of cell death were considered: apoptosis (the presence or rise of caspase-3 activity, DNA fragmentation and annexin V binding), slow cell death (the presence or rise of DNA fragmentation, the absence or decline of caspase-3 activity and annexin V binding), and necrosis (the absence of decline of caspase-3 activity, DNA fragmentation and annexin V binding). The viability of all cell types, except for KB cells, was reduced by the infection. CPE and viral antigens data demonstrated that all six types of cells could be infected with HSV-1. Upon HSV-1 infection there occurred (i) a classical apoptosis in GF cells, (ii) apoptosis in the early phase of infection and necrosis in the late phase of infection in GNM and TSCCa cells, (iii) slow cell death followed by necrosis in BF and OSF cells (however, these cells showed a different type of CPE), (iv) a classical slow cell death in KB cells. It is hypothesized that HSV-1 infection has a potential to induce several distinct pathways leading to cell death or several forms of cell death. Moreover, more than one pathway may be involved in the death of particular cell type. As HSV-1 was demonstrated to infect different oral and non-oral cells and cause different pathways or forms of cell death, the safety of using HSV-1 as a vector for gene therapy should be re-considered.

  12. Effect of aminoguanidine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, on ocular infection with herpes simplex virus in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Benencia, F; Courrèges, M C; Gamba, G; Cavalieri, H; Massouh, E J

    2001-05-01

    To study the effect of aminoguanidine (AMG), an inhibitor of nitric oxide production, on the ocular infection of Balb/c mice with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 strain F and HSV-2 strain G. Animals were treated with different amounts of AMG (0.5, 0.1, and 0.05 mg/mouse) by topical application in the eye from postinfection (PI) days -2 through +5, considering 0 the day of infection. At different PI days, development of herpetic keratitis was evaluated in treated and control mice. Treated animals showed a dose-dependent increase in ocular disease after viral infection, compared with control animals. Viral titers in ocular washings were higher in AMG-treated mice (PI day 2, HSV-1: AMG 0.5 mg, 1.3 x 10(3) plaque-forming units (PFU)/ml; control, 0. 22 x 10(2) PFU/ml, P < 0.025). At PI day 3, control corneas had only scattered inflammatory cells, whereas those from treated animals showed a conspicuous infiltrate consisting primarily of neutrophils. Viral titers were also higher in brains of treated mice. These animals died earlier and in a greater proportion than control animals (percentage of mortality, PI day 12, HSV-1: AMG 0.5 mg, 40% +/- 4%; control, 18% +/- 3%, P < 0.05). These data indicate an inhibitory effect of nitric oxide on HSV ocular infection.

  13. Extended Release of an Anti–Heparan Sulfate Peptide From a Contact Lens Suppresses Corneal Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jaishankar, Dinesh; Buhrman, Jason S.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Gemeinhart, Richard A.; Shukla, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To prolong the release of a heparan sulfate binding peptide, G2-C, using a commercially available contact lens as a delivery vehicle and to demonstrate the ability of the released peptide to block herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of corneal HSV-1 infection. Methods Commercially available contact lenses were immersed in peptide solution for 5 days prior to determining the release of the peptide at various time points. Cytotoxicity of the released samples was determined by MTT and cell cycle analysis, and the functional activity of the released samples were assessed by viral entry, and viral spread assay using human corneal epithelial cells (HCE). The ability to suppress infection in human and pig cornea ex vivo and mouse in vivo models were also assessed. Results Peptide G2-C was released through the contact lens. Following release for 3 days, the peptide showed significant activity by inhibiting HSV-1 viral entry and spread in HCE cells. Significant suppression of infection was also observed in the ex vivo and in vivo experiments involving corneas. Conclusions Extended release of an anti–HS peptide through a commercially available contact lens can generate significant anti–HSV-1 activity and provides a new and effective way to control corneal herpes. PMID:26780322

  14. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 in Igh-1 disparate congenic mice.

    PubMed

    Tamesis, R R; Rodriguez, A; Hoang-Xuan, T; Foster, C S

    1993-08-01

    The mouse Igh-1 locus on chromosome 12 influences herpetic stromal keratitis (HSK) patterns following corneal challenge with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Both cellular and humoral immune mechanisms appear to be important in modulating responses to HSV-1 infections, but the role of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is unclear. We studied the effector-cell function and antibody in an ADCC assay in Igh-1-disparate mice. Splenocytes from both HSK-susceptible C.AL-20 (Igh-1d) and HSK-resistant C.B-17 (Igh-1b) mice mediated equal amounts of ADCC to HSV-infected cell targets using monoclonal antibodies against HSV-1 glycoprotein D. Natural killer cell activity was significantly greater in C.AL-20 than in C.B-17 splenocytes. IgG2a was less efficient than both IgG1 and IgG2b in mediating ADCC to HSV-1-infected cell targets. The Igh-1 phenotype of the antibody source had no influence on ADCC activity. Our results suggest that the susceptibility of HSK observed in these Igh-1-disparate congenics cannot be explained by qualitative differences in the ADCC activity of effector cells and antibody produced in response to HSV-1 infection.

  15. Medroxyprogesterone acetate and levonorgestrel increase genital mucosal permeability and enhance susceptibility to genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

    PubMed

    Quispe Calla, N E; Vicetti Miguel, R D; Boyaka, P N; Hall-Stoodley, L; Kaur, B; Trout, W; Pavelko, S D; Cherpes, T L

    2016-11-01

    Depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is a hormonal contraceptive especially popular in areas with high prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). Although observational studies identify DMPA as an important STI risk factor, mechanisms underlying this connection are undefined. Levonorgestrel (LNG) is another progestin used for hormonal contraception, but its effect on STI susceptibility is much less explored. Using a mouse model of genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection, we herein found that DMPA and LNG similarly reduced genital expression of the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1α (DSG1α), enhanced access of inflammatory cells to genital tissue by increasing mucosal epithelial permeability, and increased susceptibility to viral infection. Additional studies with uninfected mice revealed that DMPA-mediated increases in mucosal permeability promoted tissue inflammation by facilitating endogenous vaginal microbiota invasion. Conversely, concomitant treatment of mice with DMPA and intravaginal estrogen restored mucosal barrier function and prevented HSV-2 infection. Evaluating ectocervical biopsy tissue from women before and 1 month after initiating DMPA remarkably revealed that inflammation and barrier protection were altered by treatment identically to changes seen in progestin-treated mice. Together, our work reveals DMPA and LNG diminish the genital mucosal barrier; a first-line defense against all STI, but may offer foundation for new contraceptive strategies less compromising of barrier protection.

  16. Transcription of the herpes simplex virus 1 genome during productive and quiescent infection of neuronal and nonneuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Justine M; Kader, Muhamuda; DeLuca, Neal A

    2014-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can undergo a productive infection in nonneuronal and neuronal cells such that the genes of the virus are transcribed in an ordered cascade. HSV-1 can also establish a more quiescent or latent infection in peripheral neurons, where gene expression is substantially reduced relative to that in productive infection. HSV mutants defective in multiple immediate early (IE) gene functions are highly defective for later gene expression and model some aspects of latency in vivo. We compared the expression of wild-type (wt) virus and IE gene mutants in nonneuronal cells (MRC5) and adult murine trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons using the Illumina platform for cDNA sequencing (RNA-seq). RNA-seq analysis of wild-type virus revealed that expression of the genome mostly followed the previously established kinetics, validating the method, while highlighting variations in gene expression within individual kinetic classes. The accumulation of immediate early transcripts differed between MRC5 cells and neurons, with a greater abundance in neurons. Analysis of a mutant defective in all five IE genes (d109) showed dysregulated genome-wide low-level transcription that was more highly attenuated in MRC5 cells than in TG neurons. Furthermore, a subset of genes in d109 was more abundantly expressed over time in neurons. While the majority of the viral genome became relatively quiescent, the latency-associated transcript was specifically upregulated. Unexpectedly, other genes within repeat regions of the genome, as well as the unique genes just adjacent the repeat regions, also remained relatively active in neurons. The relative permissiveness of TG neurons to viral gene expression near the joint region is likely significant during the establishment and reactivation of latency. During productive infection, the genes of HSV-1 are transcribed in an ordered cascade. HSV can also establish a more quiescent or latent infection in peripheral neurons. HSV mutants

  17. Evidence that herpes simplex virus DNA derived from quiescently infected cells in vitro, and latently infected cells in vivo, is physically damaged

    PubMed Central

    Millhouse, Scott; Su, Ying-Hsiu; Zhang, Xianchao; Wang, Xiaohe; Song, Benjamin P.; Zhu, Li; Oppenheim, Emily; Fraser, Nigel W.; Block, Timothy M.

    2010-01-01

    Using PCR and alkaline gel electrophoresis, we show that, compared with DNA derived from virions used to establish infection, herpes simplex virus DNA derived from quiescently infected rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells in culture accumulates alkaline-labile lesions. That is, compared with equivalent amounts of virion DNA, viral DNA from nerve growth factor-differentiated long-term infected cells in culture is consistently 3 to 10 times more refractory to amplification by PCR. Despite using equal mole amounts of DNA isolated from quiescently infected cells (determined by quantitative Southern blots), DNA from quiescently infected cells could not be detected by PCR under conditions in which the virion-derived DNA was easily detected. Refractoriness to PCR was confirmed by analysis with a ligation-mediated PCR technique. The refractoriness was not the result of genomic circularization. The refractoriness was, however, related to the time that the quiescently infected cells had been maintained in culture. The refractoriness to PCR was taken as an indication that the viral DNA was damaged. This hypothesis was confirmed by showing that viral DNA from quiescently infected PC12 cells accumulated alkaline-labile DNA lesions, as determined by alkaline gel electrophoresis. The phenomenon was not limited to tissue culture, because viral DNA derived from the ganglia of latently infected mice is also 3 to 10 times more refractory to amplification than are equivalent amounts of virion-derived genomes. Taken together, these results represent the first evidence that herpes simplex virus DNA is physically damaged as a function of long-term infection. Implications for viral reactivation and pathogenesis are discussed. PMID:20874012

  18. Delayed control of herpes simplex virus infection and impaired CD4(+) T-cell migration to the skin in mouse models of DOCK8 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Flesch, Inge E A; Randall, Katrina L; Hollett, Natasha A; Di Law, Hsei; Miosge, Lisa A; Sontani, Yovina; Goodnow, Christopher C; Tscharke, David C

    2015-07-01

    DOCK8 deficiency in humans and mice leads to multiple defects in immune cell numbers and function. Patients with this immunodeficiency have a high morbidity and mortality, and are distinguished by chronic cutaneous viral infections, including those caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). The underlying mechanism of the specific susceptibility to these chronic cutaneous viral infections is currently unknown, largely because the effect of DOCK8 deficiency has not been studied in suitable models. A better understanding of these mechanisms is required to underpin the development of more specific therapies. Here we show that DOCK8-deficient mice have poor control of primary cutaneous herpes simplex lesions and this is associated with increased virus loads. Furthermore, DOCK8-deficient mice showed a lack of CD4(+) T-cell infiltration into HSV-infected skin.

  19. Coexistence of herpes simplex virus infection in microsporidial stromal keratitis associated with granulomatous inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ruchi; Balne, Praveen K; Sahu, Srikant; Das, Sujata; Sharma, Savitri

    2017-01-01

    Background: Microsporidial stromal keratitis poses several diagnostic challenges. Patients may present with corneal ulceration, marked stromal thinning, or even as a quite corneal scar. The presentation of microsporidial stromal keratitis commonly mimics viral keratitis. Microbiology scrapings are usually helpful; however, scraping and culture-negative cases pose a significant diagnostic dilemma. Histopathological examination is diagnostic but shows varying degree of inflammation, predominantly composed of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Granulomatous inflammation, in microsporidial stromal keratitis, is never well described, and the authors in this article aim to describe the presence of granulomatous inflammation in microsporidial stromal keratitis, in patients with associated herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis. Methods: This was a retrospective and observational study conducted at a tertiary eye care center. Results: Of 263 patients who underwent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty for infectious keratitis, during 2011–2013, seven patients were diagnosed as microsporidial stromal keratitis. Microsporidial spores could be demonstrated on microbiological scrapings in 5/7 (71%) of cases, but identified on histopathological examination and also confirmed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for microsporidium in 100% of cases. There was evidence of diffuse stromal necrosis with markedly severe degree of polymorphonuclear leukocytic infiltrates, with granulomatous inflammation in 42% of cases. Interestingly, these were positive for HSV-1 DNA on PCR. Review of medical records revealed much severe clinical presentations in patients with granulomatous inflammation, in comparison to cases without granulomatous inflammation. Conclusions: The authors hereby recommend that severe clinical presentation in patients with microsporidial stromal keratitis, markedly dense polymorphonuclear leukocytic infiltrates or the presence of granulomatous inflammation on the

  20. Role of IFN-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Minami, Masato; Kita, Masakazu; Yan, Xiao-Qun; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Iida, Tohko; Sekikawa, Kenji; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Imanishi, Jiro

    2002-06-01

    One of the characteristics of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is that recurrent diseases often develop from latent infection established after acute infection. Cytokines have been proposed to play an important role in each stage of HSV-1 infection, but the exact role of cytokines remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in acute infection and reactivation using IFN-gamma gene knockout (IFN-gamma(-/-)) mice and TNF-alpha gene knockout (TNF-alpha(-/-)) mice. We first examined the survival rate after corneal infection with HSV-1. The survival rates of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, IFN-gamma(-/-) mice, and TNF-alpha(-/-) mice were 97% (73 of 75), 57% (24 of 42), and 83% (60 of 72), respectively. These results suggest that TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma play a protective role in acute infection with HSV-1. We also examined the rate of reactivation induced by ultraviolet (UV) light in latently infected mice over 60 days postinoculation. The reactivation was confirmed by detecting viral DNA extracted from eyeballs by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method at day 2 after the UV light stimulation. The rates of reactivation in IFN-gamma(-/-) mice and TNF-alpha(-/-) mice were significantly higher than that in B6 mice; 16% (4 of 25) showed reactivation in B6 mice, 47% (9 of 19) in IFN-gamma(-/-) mice, and 48% (10 of 21) in TNF-alpha(-/-) mice. These results suggest that IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha play an important role in acute infection and reactivation from latency.

  1. Antiviral Action of Diphenyl Diselenide on Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Infection in Female BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Gláubia; Jardim, Natália Silva; Marcondes Sari, Marcel Henrique; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Pesarico, Ana Paula; Rodrigues, Luiz Carlos; Cargnelutti, Juliana; Flores, Eduardo F; Prigol, Marina; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2016-07-01

    Diphenyl diselenide, (PhSe)2 , is an organoselenium compound with pharmacological actions mostly related to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The study investigated its antiviral and virucidal actions against herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infection in vitro and in a vaginal infection model in mice. The plaque reduction assay indicated that (PhSe)2 showed virucidal and antiviral actions reducing infectivity in 70.8% and 47%, respectively. The antiviral action of (PhSe)2 against HSV-2 vaginal infection was performed by infecting mice (10(5)  PFU/ml(-1) ) at day 6. The treatment with (PhSe)2 (5 mg/kg/day, intragastric [i.g.]) followed 5 days before and for more 5 days after infection. The extravaginal lesion score was evaluated from days 6 to 10. At day 11, animals were killed, and histological evaluation, determination of viral load, and TNF-α and IFN-γ levels were performed in supernatants of homogenized vaginal tissue. The levels of reactive species (RS), protein carbonyl, non-protein thiols (NPSH), nitrate/nitrite (NOx), and malondialdehyde (MDA), and the activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) were determined. (PhSe)2 reduced the histological damage, extravaginal lesion scores, the viral load of vaginal tissue, and the activity of MPO, but increased the levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ. (PhSe)2 attenuated the increase of RS, MDA, NOx levels and the activity of GR caused by infection. (PhSe)2 also attenuated the reduction of NPSH content and the inhibition of CAT, SOD, and GPx activities. The antiviral action of (PhSe)2 against HSV-2 infection was related to its immunomodulatory, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1638-1648, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Modulation of the AMPK/Sirt1 axis during neuronal infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carolina; Leyton, Luis; Arancibia, Yennyfer; Cuevas, Alexei; Zambrano, Angara; Concha, Margarita I; Otth, Carola

    2014-01-01

    Currently, it is unclear whether a neuron that undergoes viral reactivation and produces infectious particles survives and resumes latency or is killed, which is intriguing even if still unanswered. Previous reports have shown that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) inhibits apoptosis during early infection, but is pro-apoptotic during productive infection. Taking in consideration that the stress sensors AMPK and Sirt1 are involved in neuronal survival and neuroprotection, we hypothesized that HSV-1 could activate the AMPK/Sirt1 axis as a strategy to establish latency through inhibition of apoptosis and restoration of the energy status. These effects could be accomplished through deacetylation of pro-apoptotic protein p53 and regulation of the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function PGC-1α and its target gene TFAM. Accordingly, we evaluated the AMPK/Sirt1 axis and its targets p53, PGC-1α, and acetyl CoA carboxylase in mice neuronal cultures infected with HSV-1 by western blot, RT-qPCR, and immunofluorescence analyses. Herein, we show that HSV-1 differentially modulates the AMPK/Sirt1 axis during the course of infection. In fact, during early infection (2 hpi) activated AMPK (p-AMPK) was down-regulated, but thereafter recovered gradually. In contrast, the levels of acetylated-p53 increased during the first hours post infection, but afterwards were reduced in parallel with the activation of Sirt1. However, acetylated-p53 peaked again at 18 hpi during productive infection, suggesting an activation of apoptosis. Strikingly, acetylated-p53, Sirt1, and p-AMPK apparently translocate from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after 4 hpi, where they accumulate in discrete foci in the perinuclear region. These results suggest that HSV-1 modulates the AMPK/Sirt1 axis differentially during the course of infection interfering with pro-apoptotic signaling and regulating mitochondrial biogenesis.

  3. Tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles show antiviral activity in herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Gniadek, Marianna; Baska, Piotr; Nowakowska, Julita; Sokolowska, Justyna; Nowak, Zuzanna; Donten, Mikolaj; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between silver nanoparticles and herpesviruses is attracting great interest due to their antiviral activity and possibility to use as microbicides for oral and anogenital herpes. In this work, we demonstrate that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles sized 13 nm, 33 nm and 46 nm are capable of reducing HSV-2 infectivity both in vitro and in vivo. The antiviral activity of tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles was size-related, required direct interaction and blocked virus attachment, penetration and further spread. All tested tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles reduced both infection and inflammatory reaction in the mouse model of HSV-2 infection when used at infection or for a post-infection treatment. Smaller-sized nanoparticles induced production of cytokines and chemokines important for anti-viral response. The corresponding control buffers with tannic acid showed inferior antiviral effects in vitro and were ineffective in blocking in vivo infection. Our results show that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles are good candidates for microbicides used in treatment of herpesvirus infections.

  4. Tannic Acid Modified Silver Nanoparticles Show Antiviral Activity in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Piotr; Tomaszewska, Emilia; Gniadek, Marianna; Baska, Piotr; Nowakowska, Julita; Sokolowska, Justyna; Nowak, Zuzanna; Donten, Mikolaj; Celichowski, Grzegorz; Grobelny, Jaroslaw; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between silver nanoparticles and herpesviruses is attracting great interest due to their antiviral activity and possibility to use as microbicides for oral and anogenital herpes. In this work, we demonstrate that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles sized 13 nm, 33 nm and 46 nm are capable of reducing HSV-2 infectivity both in vitro and in vivo. The antiviral activity of tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles was size-related, required direct interaction and blocked virus attachment, penetration and further spread. All tested tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles reduced both infection and inflammatory reaction in the mouse model of HSV-2 infection when used at infection or for a post-infection treatment. Smaller-sized nanoparticles induced production of cytokines and chemokines important for anti-viral response. The corresponding control buffers with tannic acid showed inferior antiviral effects in vitro and were ineffective in blocking in vivo infection. Our results show that tannic acid modified silver nanoparticles are good candidates for microbicides used in treatment of herpesvirus infections. PMID:25117537

  5. Association of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and herpes simplex virus type 2 serostatus with genital human papillomavirus infection in men: the HPV in men study.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Catharina Johanna; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Papenfuss, Mary R; da Silva, Roberto José Carvalho; Villa, Luisa Lina; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Nyitray, Alan G; Giuliano, Anna R

    2013-06-01

    Studies in women indicate that some sexually transmitted infections promote human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence and carcinogenesis. Little is known about this association in men; therefore, we assessed whether Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) serostatus are associated with genital HPV prevalence, an early event in HPV-related pathogenesis. Genital exfoliated cells, first-void urine, and blood from 3971 men recruited in the United States, Mexico, and Brazil were tested for HPV, CT, and HSV-2 antibodies, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association of CT infection and HSV-2 serostatus with 4 HPV outcomes (any, oncogenic, nononcogenic only, and multiple infections). A total of 64 (1.6%) men were CT positive, and 811 (20.4%) men were HSV-2 seropositive. After adjustment for potential confounders, CT was associated with any HPV (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-4.24), oncogenic HPV (aOR, 3.10; 95% CI, 1.53-6.28), and multiple HPV (aOR, 3.43; 95% CI, 1.69-6.95) prevalence. Herpes simplex virus type 2 serostatus was associated with any HPV (aOR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.02-1.52), nononcogenic HPV only (aOR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.08-1.75), and multiple HPV (aOR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.06-1.68) prevalence. In analyses stratified by sexual behavior, CT infection was significantly associated with HPV detection among men reporting 2 or more recent sexual partners, whereas HSV-2 serostatus was significantly associated with HPV detection in men reporting 0 to 5 lifetime sexual partners. In this population, CT infection and HSV-2 serostatus were associated with prevalent genital HPV infection. Future prospective studies should investigate whether these infections influence HPV acquisition and/or persistence.

  6. Interferon gamma regulates platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 expression and neutrophil infiltration into herpes simplex virus- infected mouse corneas

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In a mouse model of herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 corneal infection, tissue destruction results from a CD4+ T cell-mediated chronic inflammation, in which interleukin 2 and interferon (IFN) gamma are requisite inflammatory mediators and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are the predominant infiltrating cells. In vivo neutralization of IFN- gamma relieved inflammation at least in part through a specific block of PMN extravasation into HSV-1-infected corneas. Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) 1 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM) 1 were upregulated on the vascular endothelium of inflamed corneas. Reduced PMN extravasation in anti-IFN-gamma-treated mice was associated with a dramatic reduction of PECAM-1 but not ICAM-1 expression on vascular endothelium. PMN accumulated in the lumen of corneal vessels after in vivo IFN-gamma neutralization. PECAM-1 was readily detectable on PMN inside the vessels but was not detectable on PMN that extravasated into the infected cornea. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis revealed reduced PECAM-1 expression but elevated major histocompatibility complex class I expression on PMN that recently extravasated into the peritoneal cavity when compared with PMN in the peripheral blood. We conclude that IFN-gamma contributes to HSV- 1-induced corneal inflammation by facilitating PMN infiltration; this appears to be accomplished through upregulation of PECAM-1 expression on the vascular endothelium; and PMN downregulate PECAM-1 expression during the process of extravasation. PMID:8879215

  7. Cervical Infection with Herpes simplex Virus, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae among Symptomatic Women, Dubai, UAE: A Molecular Approach.

    PubMed

    Mehrabani, Davood; Behzadi, Mohammad Amin; Azizi, Saeed; Payombarnia, Hamid; Vahdani, Ali; Namayandeh, Mandana; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2014-01-01

    Tragically, genital tract infections are still a major public health problem in many regions. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of cervical infection with Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) among married women referring to Iranian Hospital, Dubai, UAE. In a retrospective cross-sectional survey, 201 female patients aged 16-80 years who referred to the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of Iranian Hospital, Dubai, UAE, in 2010 were enrolled. The patients were categorized into three age groups: 15-30 (group I), 31-40 (group II), and ≥41 years old (group III). A cervical swab sample was collected from each woman and the prevalence of cervical infection with HSV, CT, and NG was determined by PCR method. HSV, CT, and NG were detected in 6.5%, 10.4%, and 5.5% of swab samples, respectively. Regarding age, a significant difference was noticed for prevalence of NG and HSV between groups I and III. Because of public health importance of sexual transmitted diseases (STDs), their long-lasting impact on quality of life, and their economic burden, preventing measures and education of women seem necessary.

  8. A functional type I interferon pathway drives resistance to cornea herpes simplex virus type 1 infection by recruitment of leukocytes☆

    PubMed Central

    Conrady, Christopher D.; Jones, Heather; Zheng, Min; Carr, Daniel J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Type I interferons are critical antiviral cytokines produced following herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection that act to inhibit viral spread. In the present study, we identify HSV-infected and adjacent uninfected corneal epithelial cells as the source of interferon-α. We also report mice deficient in the A1 chain of the type I IFN receptor (CD118−/−) are extremely sensitive to ocular infection with low doses (100 PFU) of HSV-1 as seen by significantly elevated viral titers in the cornea compared to wild type (WT) controls. The enhanced susceptibility correlated with a loss of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell recruitment and aberrant chemokine production in the cornea despite mounting an adaptive immune response in the draining mandibular lymph node of CD118−/− mice. Taken together, these results highlight the importance of IFN production in both the innate immune response as well as eliciting chemokine production required to facilitate adaptive immune cell trafficking. PMID:21709805

  9. Dendritic cells are required for optimal activation of natural killer functions following primary infection with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Kassim, Sadik H; Rajasagi, Naveen K; Ritz, Barry W; Pruett, Stephen B; Gardner, Elizabeth M; Chervenak, Robert; Jennings, Stephen R

    2009-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the optimal clearance of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in mice. Activated NK cells function via cytokine secretion or direct cytolysis of target cells; dendritic cells (DCs) are thought to make critical contributions in the activation of both of these functions. Yet, the magnitude and physiological relevance of DC-mediated NK cell activation in vivo is not completely understood. To examine the contribution of DC help in regulating NK cell functions after infection with HSV-1, we utilized a transgenic mouse model that allows the transient ablation of DCs. Using this approach, it was found that the gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) expression potential of NK cells is quantitatively and qualitatively impaired in the absence of DCs. With regard to priming of NK cytolytic functions, the ablation of DCs did not significantly affect cytotoxic protein expression by NK cells. An in vivo cytolytic assay did, however, reveal impairments in the magnitude of NK cell cytotoxicity. Overall, this study provides direct evidence that functional DCs are required for optimal IFN-gamma expression and cytolytic function by NK cells following infection with HSV-1.

  10. Cervical Infection with Herpes simplex Virus, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae among Symptomatic Women, Dubai, UAE: A Molecular Approach

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Mohammad Amin; Azizi, Saeed; Payombarnia, Hamid; Vahdani, Ali; Namayandeh, Mandana; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2014-01-01

    Tragically, genital tract infections are still a major public health problem in many regions. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of cervical infection with Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) among married women referring to Iranian Hospital, Dubai, UAE. In a retrospective cross-sectional survey, 201 female patients aged 16–80 years who referred to the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of Iranian Hospital, Dubai, UAE, in 2010 were enrolled. The patients were categorized into three age groups: 15–30 (group I), 31–40 (group II), and ≥41 years old (group III). A cervical swab sample was collected from each woman and the prevalence of cervical infection with HSV, CT, and NG was determined by PCR method. HSV, CT, and NG were detected in 6.5%, 10.4%, and 5.5% of swab samples, respectively. Regarding age, a significant difference was noticed for prevalence of NG and HSV between groups I and III. Because of public health importance of sexual transmitted diseases (STDs), their long-lasting impact on quality of life, and their economic burden, preventing measures and education of women seem necessary. PMID:24982675

  11. Successful Treatment of Corticosteroid with Antiviral Therapy for a Neonatal Liver Failure with Disseminated Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Maeba, Shinji; Hasegawa, Shunji; Shimomura, Maiko; Ichimura, Takuya; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Motoyama, Masashi; Fukunaga, Shinnosuke; Ito, Yoshinori; Ichiyama, Takashi; Ohga, Shouichi

    2015-10-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection carries one of the poorest outcomes of neonatal liver failure (NLF). Neonates with disseminated HSV infection can develop hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), and occasionally need orthotopic liver transplantation. Early interventions may be critical for the cure of NLF. Case Report We describe herewith a 6-day-old neonate with fulminant hepatic failure due to disseminated HSV-1 infection, who successfully responded to high-dose corticosteroid therapy 72 hours after the onset of disease. Preceding acyclovir, gamma globulin, and exchange blood transfusion therapies failed to control the disease. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy led to a drastic improvement of liver function and cytokine storms, and prevented the disease progression to HLH. Sustained levels of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid HSV DNA declined after prolonged acyclovir therapy. Bilateral lesions of the periventricular white matter areas, assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, disappeared at 3 months of age. The infant showed normal growth and development at 4 years of age. Conclusion Early anti-hypercytokinemia therapy using corticosteroid, and prolonged antiviral therapy might only provide the transplantation-free cure of NLF with HSV dissemination.

  12. The serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinases (SGK) stimulate bovine herpesvirus 1 and herpes simplex virus 1 productive infection.

    PubMed

    Kook, Insun; Jones, Clinton

    2016-08-15

    Serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinases (SGK) are serine/threonine protein kinases that contain a catalytic domain resembling other protein kinases: AKT/protein kinase B, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C-Zeta for example. Unlike these constitutively expressed protein kinases, SGK1 RNA and protein levels are increased by growth factors and corticosteroids. Stress can directly stimulate SGK1 levels as well as stimulate bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) productive infection and reactivation from latency suggesting SGK1 can stimulate productive infection. For the first time, we provide evidence that a specific SGK inhibitor (GSK650394) significantly reduced BoHV-1 and HSV-1 replication in cultured cells. Proteins encoded by the three BoHV-1 immediate early genes (bICP0, bICP4, and bICP22) and two late proteins (VP16 and gE) were consistently reduced by GSK650394 during early stages of productive infection. In summary, these studies suggest SGK may stimulate viral replication following stressful stimuli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Behaviour of IgG antibody avidity for the antigen and of IgA antibody in active cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus and human herpes virus 6 infections. Adaptation of a commercial test.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, J; Rodríguez, M; Maroto, M C; Piédrola, G; Peirón, J

    1997-07-01

    The clinical value of specific IgA and IgG antibody avidity to herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and human herpes virus 6 for the detection of active disease and primary infection, respectively, was evaluated. The IgG avidity test, with a break point of 55%, for the detection of primary infection, and of the IgA test for the detection of disease, were associated with a sensitivity of 97% and 64%, respectively; specificity of 100% and 82%; a positive predictive value of 100% and 76%; and a negative predictive value of 96% and 72%, respectively.

  14. Protection from lethal herpes simplex virus type 1 infection by vaccination with a UL41-deficient recombinant strain.

    PubMed

    Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Ishioka, Ken; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Ikuta, Kazufumi; Suzutani, Tatsuo

    2016-06-08

    The UL41 gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encodes a virion host shut off protein which is involved in immune evasion. The growth and virulence of HSV-1 is markedly reduced by the deletion of UL41. In this report, the UL41-deleted recombinant HSV-1 strain VR∆41 was evaluated as a prophylactic live attenuated vaccine against lethal HSV-1 infection in a mouse model. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation with the VR∆41 strain clearly inhibited lethal wild-type HSV-1 (VR-3 strain) infection after both i.p. and intracerebral (i.c.) inoculations. Vaccination with the VR∆41 strain was safer than VR-3 vaccination and was able to protect against a wild-type challenge to the same degree as VR-3 vaccination. In contrast, i.p. inoculation with ultraviolet-irradiated VR-3 induced resistance against i.p. infection, but not against i.c. Although replication of the VR∆41 strain in mice was greatly reduced compared to that of the VR-3 strain, VR∆41 strain maintained the ability to spread to the central nervous system (CNS) from a peripheral inoculation site. These results indicated that the VR∆41 strain evoked a potent immune reaction through viral protein expression within CNS without the induction of lethal encephalitis. The entry of antigens into the CNS was essential for the establishment of protective immunity against the lethal HSV encephalitis. We concluded that only a live attenuated vaccine is able to afford a prophylactic effect against CNS infection with HSV. In order to fulfill this requirement, UL41-deleted viruses provide a strong candidate for use as a recombinant live vaccine.

  15. Identification and characterization of a DNA primase activity present in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, A.M.; Wietstock, S.M.; Ruyechan, W.T. )

    1988-03-01

    A novel DNA primase activity has been identified in HeLa cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Such an activity has not been detected in mock-infected cells. The primase activity coeluted with a portion of HSV-1 DNA polymerase from single-stranded DNA agarose columns loaded with high-salt extracts derived from infected cells. This DNA primase activity could be distinguished from host HeLa cell DNA primase by several criteria. First, the pH optimum of the HSV primase was relatively broad and peaked at 8.2 to 8.7 pH units. Second, freshly isolated HSV DNA primase was less salt sensitive than the HeLa primase. Third, antibodies raised against individual peptides of the calf thymus DNA polymerase:primase complex cross-reacted with the HeLa primase but did not react with the HSV DNA primase. Fourth, freshly prepared HSV DNA primase appeared to be associated with the HSV polymerase, but after storage at 4{degree}C for several weeks, the DNA primase separated from the viral DNA polymerase. This free DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 40 kilodaltons, whereas free HeLa DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 110 kilodaltons. On the basis of these data, the authors believe that the novel DNA primase activity in HSV-infected cells may be virus coded and that this enzyme represents a new and important function involved in the replication of HSV DNA.

  16. Entry of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) into the Distal Axons of Trigeminal Neurons Favors the Onset of Nonproductive, Silent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eing, Bodo R.; Müller, Marcus; King, Nicholas J. C.; Klupp, Barbara; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Kühn, Joachim E.

    2012-01-01

    Following productive, lytic infection in epithelia, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) establishes a lifelong latent infection in sensory neurons that is interrupted by episodes of reactivation. In order to better understand what triggers this lytic/latent decision in neurons, we set up an organotypic model based on chicken embryonic trigeminal ganglia explants (TGEs) in a double chamber system. Adding HSV-1 to the ganglion compartment (GC) resulted in a productive infection in the explants. By contrast, selective application of the virus to distal axons led to a largely nonproductive infection that was characterized by the poor expression of lytic genes and the presence of high levels of the 2.0-kb major latency-associated transcript (LAT) RNA. Treatment of the explants with the immediate-early (IE) gene transcriptional inducer hexamethylene bisacetamide, and simultaneous co-infection of the GC with HSV-1, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) or pseudorabies virus (PrV) helper virus significantly enhanced the ability of HSV-1 to productively infect sensory neurons upon axonal entry. Helper-virus-induced transactivation of HSV-1 IE gene expression in axonally-infected TGEs in the absence of de novo protein synthesis was dependent on the presence of functional tegument protein VP16 in HSV-1 helper virus particles. After the establishment of a LAT-positive silent infection in TGEs, HSV-1 was refractory to transactivation by superinfection of the GC with HSV-1 but not with HSV-2 and PrV helper virus. In conclusion, the site of entry appears to be a critical determinant in the lytic/latent decision in sensory neurons. HSV-1 entry into distal axons results in an insufficient transactivation of IE gene expression and favors the establishment of a nonproductive, silent infection in trigeminal neurons. PMID:22589716

  17. Immune- and Nonimmune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Responses Are Critical Determinants of Herpes Simplex Virus-Induced Generalized Infections and Acute Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Parker, Zachary M; Pasieka, Tracy Jo; Parker, George A; Leib, David A

    2016-12-01

    The interferon (IFN) response to viral pathogens is critical for host survival. In humans and mouse models, defects in IFN responses can result in lethal herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections, usually from encephalitis. Although rare, HSV-1 can also cause fulminant hepatic failure, which is often fatal. Although herpes simplex encephalitis has been extensively studied, HSV-1 generalized infections and subsequent acute liver failure are less well understood. We previously demonstrated that IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice are exquisitely susceptible to liver infection following corneal infection with HSV-1. In this study, we used bone marrow chimeras of IFN-αβγR(-/-) (AG129) and wild-type (WT; 129SvEv) mice to probe the underlying IFN-dependent mechanisms that control HSV-1 pathogenesis. After infection, WT mice with either IFN-αβγR(-/-) or WT marrow exhibited comparable survival, while IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice with WT marrow had a significant survival advantage over their counterparts with IFN-αβγR(-/-) marrow. Furthermore, using bioluminescent imaging to maximize data acquisition, we showed that the transfer of IFN-competent hematopoietic cells controlled HSV-1 replication and damage in the livers of IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice. Consistent with this, the inability of IFN-αβγR(-/-) immune cells to control liver infection in IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice manifested as profoundly elevated aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels, indicative of severe liver damage. In contrast, IFN-αβγR(-/-) mice receiving WT marrow exhibited only modest elevations of AST and ALT levels. These studies indicate that IFN responsiveness of the immune system is a major determinant of viral tropism and damage during visceral HSV infections. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is an incurable viral infection with the most significant morbidity and mortality occurring in neonates and patients with compromised immune systems. Severe pathologies from HSV include the

  18. In vitro antiviral activity of neem (Azardirachta indica L.) bark extract against herpes simplex virus type-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Darmani, Nissar A.; Yue, Beatrice Y. J. T.; Shukla, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) causes significant health problems from periodical skin and corneal lesions to encephalitis. We report here that an aqueous extract preparation from the barks of neem plant Azardirachta indica acts as a potent entry inhibitor against HSV-1 infection into natural target cells. The extract from neem bark (NBE) significantly blocked HSV-1 entry into cells at concentrations ranging from 50 to 100 μg/ml. The blocking activity of NBE was observed when the extract was pre-incubated with the virus but not with the target cells suggesting a direct anti-HSV-1 property of the neem bark. Further, virions treated with NBE failed to bind the cells which implicate a role of NBE as an attachment step blocker. Cells treated with NBE also inhibited HSV-1 glycoprotein mediated cell to cell fusion and polykaryocytes formation suggesting an additional role of NBE at the viral fusion step. These finding open a potential new avenue for the development of NBE as a novel anti-herpetic microbicide. PMID:20041417

  19. Stability of glycoprotein gene sequences of herpes simplex virus type 2 from primary to recurrent human infection, and diversity of the sequences among patients attending an STD clinic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is sexually transmitted, leading to blisters and ulcers in the genito-anal region. After primary infection the virus is present in a latent state in neurons in sensory ganglia. Reactivation and production of new viral particles can cause asymptomatic viral shedding or new lesions. Establishment of latency, maintenance and reactivation involve silencing of genes, continuous suppression of gene activities and finally gene activation and synthesis of viral DNA. The purpose of the present work was to study the genetic stability of the virus during these events. Methods HSV-2 was collected from 5 patients with true primary and recurrent infections, and the genes encoding glycoproteins B,G,E and I were sequenced. Results No nucleotide substitution was observed in any patient, indicating genetic stability. However, since the total number of nucleotides in these genes is only a small part of the total genome, we cannot rule out variation in other regions. Conclusions Although infections of cell cultures and animal models are useful for studies of herpes simplex virus, it is important to know how the virus behaves in the natural host. We observed that several glycoprotein gene sequences are stable from primary to recurrent infection. However, the virus isolates from the different patients were genetically different. PMID:24502528

  20. Stability of glycoprotein gene sequences of herpes simplex virus type 2 from primary to recurrent human infection, and diversity of the sequences among patients attending an STD clinic.

    PubMed

    Haarr, Lars; Nilsen, Arvid; Knappskog, Per M; Langeland, Nina

    2014-02-06

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is sexually transmitted, leading to blisters and ulcers in the genito-anal region. After primary infection the virus is present in a latent state in neurons in sensory ganglia. Reactivation and production of new viral particles can cause asymptomatic viral shedding or new lesions. Establishment of latency, maintenance and reactivation involve silencing of genes, continuous suppression of gene activities and finally gene activation and synthesis of viral DNA. The purpose of the present work was to study the genetic stability of the virus during these events. HSV-2 was collected from 5 patients with true primary and recurrent infections, and the genes encoding glycoproteins B,G,E and I were sequenced. No nucleotide substitution was observed in any patient, indicating genetic stability. However, since the total number of nucleotides in these genes is only a small part of the total genome, we cannot rule out variation in other regions. Although infections of cell cultures and animal models are useful for studies of herpes simplex virus, it is important to know how the virus behaves in the natural host. We observed that several glycoprotein gene sequences are stable from primary to recurrent infection. However, the virus isolates from the different patients were genetically different.

  1. Access to Nectin Favors Herpes Simplex Virus Infection at the Apical Surface of Polarized Human Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Galen, Benjamin; Cheshenko, Natalia; Tuyama, Ana; Ramratnam, Bharat; Herold, Betsy C.

    2006-01-01

    Viral entry may preferentially occur at the apical or the basolateral surfaces of polarized cells, and differences may impact pathogenesis, preventative strategies, and successful implementation of viral vectors for gene therapy. The objective of these studies was to examine the polarity of herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry using several different human epithelial cell lines. Human uterine (ECC-1), colonic (CaCo-2), and retinal pigment (ARPE-19) epithelial cells were grown on collagen-coated inserts, and the polarity was monitored by measuring the transepithelial cell resistance. Controls were CaSki cells, a human cervical cell line that does not polarize in vitro. The polarized cells, but not CaSki cells, were 16- to 50-fold more susceptible to HSV infection at the apical surface than at the basolateral surface. Disruption of the tight junctions by treatment with EGTA overcame the restriction on basolateral infection but had no impact on apical infection. No differences in binding at the two surfaces were observed. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that nectin-1, the major coreceptor for HSV entry, sorted preferentially to the apical surface, overlapping with adherens and tight junction proteins. Transfection with small interfering RNA specific for nectin-1 resulted in a significant reduction in susceptibility to HSV at the apical surface but had little impact on basolateral infection. Infection from the apical but not the basolateral surface triggered focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation and led to nuclear transport of viral capsids and viral gene expression. These studies indicate that access to nectin-1 contributes to preferential apical infection of these human epithelial cells by HSV. PMID:17005657

  2. Comparison of anticomplement immunofluorescence and fluorescent antibody-to-membrane antigen tests for determination of immunity status to varicella-zoster virus and for serodifferentiation of varicella-zoster and herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, D; Schmidt, N J

    1981-01-01

    The anticomplement immunofluorescence (ACIF) test was compared with the fluorescent antibody-to-membrane antigen (FAMA) test for determining varicella-zoster virus antibody levels as a measure of varicella-zoster virus immunity status. The ACIF test was found to be comparable to the FAMA test in sensitivity and could be used for examining sera at low dilutions of 1:2 and 1:4. In addition, the ACIF method proved to be a more economical procedure in terms of antigen required and personnel time necessary to perform the test. Heterologous varicella-zoster virus antibody titer rises were demonstrated by the FAMA test with 10 serum pairs from patients with clinically diagnosed genital herpes simplex virus infection, indicating that the FAMA test is no more suitable than other serological methods for serodifferentiation of those herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections in which antibody increases occur to both antigens. PMID:6273453

  3. Experimental investigation of herpes simplex virus latency.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, E K; Bloom, D C

    1997-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of herpes simplex virus infection generally involve a mild and localized primary infection followed by asymptomatic (latent) infection interrupted sporadically by periods of recrudescence (reactivation) where virus replication and associated cytopathologic findings are manifest at the site of initial infection. During the latent phase of infection, viral genomes, but not infectious virus itself, can be detected in sensory and autonomic neurons. The process of latent infection and reactivation has been subject to continuing investigation in animal models and, more recently, in cultured cells. The initiation and maintenance of latent infection in neurons are apparently passive phenomena in that no virus gene products need be expressed or are required. Despite this, a single latency-associated transcript (LAT) encoded by DNA encompassing about 6% of the viral genome is expressed during latent infection in a minority of neurons containing viral DNA. This transcript is spliced, and the intron derived from this splicing is stably maintained in the nucleus of neurons expressing it. Reactivation, which can be induced by stress and assayed in several animal models, is facilitated by the expression of LAT. Although the mechanism of action of LAT-mediated facilitation of reactivation is not clear, all available evidence argues against its involving the expression of a protein. Rather, the most consistent models of action involve LAT expression playing a cis-acting role in a very early stage of the reactivation process. PMID:9227860

  4. Ascitic fluid due to type II herpes simplex virus infection: report of a case with immunocytochemical confirmation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Keiko; Miyahira, Yoshimitsu; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Iwai, Muneo; Kagotani, Akiko; Arita, Namie; Iwamoto, Nozomi; Takikita, Mikiko; Kojima, Fumiyoshi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2013-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is usually observed in the oral cavity and external genitals, and HSV peritonitis is extremely rare. Herein, we report a case of type II HSV peritonitis successfully diagnosed by ascitic cytology. A 66-year-old Japanese man, who had been treated with steroid inhalation for 5 years due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, was suspected to have acute cholecystitis. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy and intraoperative cytological examination of ascitic fluid were performed. Cytological study of ascitic fluid revealed that abundant granular cell debris, degenerative cells and apoptotic bodies were present, as well as some single or multinucleated cells with ground glass nuclei. However, vivid mesothelial cells were rarely seen. Immunocytochemical staining for type II HSV was positive in single or multinucleated cells with ground glass nuclei. Therefore, a diagnosis of type II HSV peritonitis was made. This is the first reported case of type II HSV peritonitis successfully diagnosed by ascitic cytology. This report highlights that the presence of abundant cell debris, degenerative cells and apoptotic bodies, and the absence of vivid mesothelial cells are the key cytological findings to suspect HSV peritonitis, and the diagnosis can be confirmed by careful surveillance for characteristic nuclear findings of single or multinucleated cells. The frequency of opportunistic infection is increased because of the increased numbers of iatrogenic immunocompromised patients as seen in this case, therefore, cytological examination is a useful method for early detection of the causative agent of peritonitis including HSV.

  5. Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Genital Tract Shedding Is Not Predictable over Months or Years in Infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    Dhankani, Varsha; Kutz, J. Nathan; Schiffer, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) is a chronic reactivating infection that leads to recurrent shedding episodes in the genital tract. A minority of episodes are prolonged, and associated with development of painful ulcers. However, currently, available tools poorly predict viral trajectories and timing of reactivations in infected individuals. We employed principal components analysis (PCA) and singular value decomposition (SVD) to interpret HSV-2 genital tract shedding time series data, as well as simulation output from a stochastic spatial mathematical model. Empirical and model-derived, time-series data gathered over >30 days consists of multiple complex episodes that could not be reduced to a manageable number of descriptive features with PCA and SVD. However, single HSV-2 shedding episodes, even those with prolonged duration and complex morphologies consisting of multiple erratic peaks, were consistently described using a maximum of four dominant features. Modeled and clinical episodes had equivalent distributions of dominant features, implying similar dynamics in real and simulated episodes. We applied linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to simulation output and identified that local immune cell density at the viral reactivation site had a predictive effect on episode duration, though longer term shedding suggested chaotic dynamics and could not be predicted based on spatial patterns of immune cell density. These findings suggest that HSV-2 shedding patterns within an individual are impossible to predict over weeks or months, and that even highly complex single HSV-2 episodes can only be partially predicted based on spatial distribution of immune cell density. PMID:25375183

  6. Efficacy of Thai medicinal plant extracts against herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lipipun, Vimolmas; Kurokawa, Masahiko; Suttisri, Rutt; Taweechotipatr, Pagorn; Pramyothin, Pornpen; Hattori, Masao; Shiraki, Kimiyasu

    2003-11-01

    Twenty Thai medicinal plant extracts were evaluated for anti-herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) activity. Eleven of them inhibited plaque formation of HSV-1 more than 50% at 100microg/ml in a plaque reduction assay. Aglaia odorata, Moringa oleifera, and Ventilago denticulata among the 11 were also effective against thymidine kinase-deficient HSV-1 and phosphonoacetate-resistant HSV-1 strains. These therapeutic efficacies were characterized using a cutaneous HSV-1 infection in mice. The extract of M. oleifera at a dose of 750mg/kg per day significantly delayed the development of skin lesions, prolonged the mean survival times and reduced the mortality of HSV-1 infected mice as compared with 2% DMSO in distilled water (P<0.05). The extracts of A. odorata and V. denticulata were also significantly effective in limiting the development of skin lesions (P<0.05). There were no significant difference between acyclovir and these three plant extracts in the delay of the development of skin lesions and no significant difference between acyclovir and M. oleifera in mean survival times. Toxicity of these plant extracts were not observed in treated mice. Thus, these three plant extracts may be possible candidates of anti-HSV-1 agents.

  7. Antigen-specific immune-suppressor factor in herpes simplex virus type 2 infections of UV B-irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Aurelian, L.; Yasumoto, S.; Smith, C.C.

    1988-07-01

    UV B-irradiation (280 to 320 nm) of mice at the site of cutaneous infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) induced suppressor T-cell circuits that decreased HSV-2-induced proliferative responses of HSV-2-immune lymph node cells. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that splenocytes from UV B-irradiated HSV-2-infected animals contain L3T4+ cells that suppress proliferative responses in vivo, consistent with suppressor inducer cells. However, following in vitro culture of the splenocytes with HSV-2 antigen, the proliferation of immune lymph node cells was inhibited by Lyt2+ suppressor T cells, consistent with antigen-induced suppressor effector cells. Antigen-specific and nonspecific suppressor factors were fractionated from supernatants of HSV-2-stimulated spleen cells by molecular-sieve chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the Sephadex fraction that contained the antigen-specific suppressor factor, in the presence or absence of 2-mercaptoethanol, defined a 115-kilodalton protein consisting of two disulfide-bound components with molecular sizes of 70 and 52 kilodaltons. The implications of these results with respect to the regulation of HSV-induced cell-mediated immunity following UV B-irradiation are discussed.

  8. Antigen-specific immune-suppressor factor in herpes simplex virus type 2 infections of UV B-irradiated mice.

    PubMed Central

    Aurelian, L; Yasumoto, S; Smith, C C

    1988-01-01

    UV B-irradiation (280 to 320 nm) of mice at the site of cutaneous infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) induced suppressor T-cell circuits that decreased HSV-2-induced proliferative responses of HSV-2-immune lymph node cells. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that splenocytes from UV B-irradiated HSV-2-infected animals contain L3T4+ cells that suppress proliferative responses in vivo, consistent with suppressor inducer cells. However, following in vitro culture of the splenocytes with HSV-2 antigen, the proliferation of immune lymph node cells was inhibited by Lyt2+ suppressor T cells, consistent with antigen-induced suppressor effector cells. Antigen-specific and nonspecific suppressor factors were fractionated from supernatants of HSV-2-stimulated spleen cells by molecular-sieve chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the Sephadex fraction that contained the antigen-specific suppressor factor, in the presence or absence of 2-mercaptoethanol, defined a 115-kilodalton protein consisting of two disulfide-bound components with molecular sizes of 70 and 52 kilodaltons. The implications of these results with respect to the regulation of HSV-induced cell-mediated immunity following UV B-irradiation are discussed. Images PMID:2836632

  9. The combined effects of irradiation and herpes simplex virus type 1 infection on an immortal gingival cell line

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral mucosa is frequently exposed to Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and irradiation due to dental radiography. During radiotherapy for oral cancer, the surrounding clinically normal tissues are also irradiated. This prompted us to study the effects of HSV-1 infection and irradiation on viability and apoptosis of oral epithelial cells. Methods Immortal gingival keratinocyte (HMK) cells were infected with HSV-1 at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) and irradiated with 2 Gy 24 hours post infection. The cells were then harvested at 24, 72 and 144 hours post irradiation for viability assays and qRT-PCR analyses for the apoptosis-related genes caspases 3, 8, and 9, bcl-2, NFκB1, and viral gene VP16. Mann–Whitney U-test was used for statistical calculations. Results Irradiation improved the cell viability at 144 hours post irradiation (P = 0.05), which was further improved by HSV-1 infection at MOI of 0.00001 (P = 0.05). Simultaneously, the combined effects of infection at MOI of 0.0001 and irradiation resulted in upregulation in NFκB1 (P = 0.05). The combined effects of irradiation and HSV infection also significantly downregulated the expression of caspases 3, 8, and 9 at 144 hours (P = 0.05) whereas caspase 3 and 8 significantly upregulated in non-irradiated, HSV-infected cells as compared to uninfected controls (P = 0.05). Infection with 0.0001 MOI downregulated bcl-2 in non-irradiated cells but was upregulated by 27% after irradiation when compared to non-irradiated infected cells (P = 0.05). Irradiation had no effect on HSV-1 shedding or HSV gene expression at 144 hours. Conclusions HSV-1 infection may improve the viability of immortal cells after irradiation. The effect might be related to inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:25005804

  10. Prevalence and association of human papillomavirus 16, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus-1 and cytomegalovirus infection with human esophageal carcinoma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Hong; Zhang, Qing-Ying; Hong, Chao-Qun; Chen, Jiong-Yu; Shen, Zhong-Ying; Zhu, Yi

    2011-06-01

    Recent research shows esophageal carcinoma (EC) as the ninth most common malignancy in the world. The association of viral infection and EC has been reported in the last 30 years. However, geographic variation in infection rates and the key mechanisms of the viral action have yet to be resolved. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and association of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16), herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in the etiology of EC in the area of Shantou, Guangdong, China. Nested PCR was used to detect viral DNA in the mucosa of 70 cases of EC and in paracancerous tissues, as well as 100 cases of normal esophagus mucosa. Data were analyzed by χ2 test, Fisher's exact test and bivariate correlation analysis. The infection rates of HPV-16, HSV-1 and EBV were 40.0, 30.0 and 30.0%, respectively, in EC mucosa, and were significantly higher than those in normal mucosa. However, no CMV DNA was detected in either EC or normal mucosa. HPV-16 or EBV infection was mainly detected in EC patients 48-58 years old, and the infection rate was positively associated with pathological grade of EC (P<0.05). Tobacco smoking and alcohol consuption were high risk factors for HPV-16 infection for male patients [odds ratio (OR), 5.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4-24.6; OR = 3.8; 95% CI, 1.1-13.8]. Rates of infection with a mixture of these 3 viruses were all more than 10.0% in cancerous mucosa and closely related to the pathological grade of EC (P = 0.001). Infection with HPV-16, HSV-1 or EBV may be an important etiological factor in EC.

  11. Volatile Organic Compound Gamma-Butyrolactone Released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 Acute Infection Modulated Membrane Potential and Repressed Viral Infection in Human Neuron-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waguespack, Yan; Figliozzi, Robert W.; Kharel, Madan K.; Zhang, Qiaojuan; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 (HSV-1) infections can cause serious complications such as keratitis and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to identify any changes in the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells that could potentially be used as an indicator of a response to stress. An additional objective was to study if any VOCs released from acute epithelial infection may influence subsequent neuronal infection to facilitate latency. To investigate these hypotheses, Vero cells were infected with HSV-1 and the emission of VOCs was analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (2D GC/MS). It was observed that the concentrations of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in particular changed significantly after a 24-hour infection. Since HSV-1 may establish latency in neurons after the acute infection, GBL was tested to determine if it exerts neuronal regulation of infection. The results indicated that GBL altered the resting membrane potential of differentiated LNCaP cells and promoted a non-permissive state of HSV-1 infection by repressing viral replication. These observations may provide useful clues towards understanding the complex signaling pathways that occur during the HSV-1 primary infection and establishment of viral latency. PMID:27537375

  12. Prevalence and predictors of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection among female sex workers in Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Wang, Ning; Chen, Ray Y; Sharp, Gerald B; Ma, Yanling; Wang, Guixiang; Ding, Guowei; Wu, Zhenglai

    2008-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), and to evaluate the relationship between HSV-2 infection and sociodemographic factors and the sexual practices of female sex workers (FSWs) in Kaiyuan city, Yunnan Province, China. This cross-sectional study involved 737 FSWs and was carried out from March to May 2006 with confidential interviews and laboratory tests for HSV-2 and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). HSV-2 was the most common STI (68%), followed by Chlamydia trachomatis (26%), Trichomonas vaginalis (11%), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (8%) and syphilis (7%). Prevalence of HIV-1 was 10.3%. Adjusted odds ratios of HSV-2 seroprevalence were 2.6 (95% CI [confidence interval]: 1.30–5.38) for HIV-1 infection, 2.0 (95% CI: 1.33–3.16) for vaginal douching, 2.0 (95% CI: 0.45–0.86) for condom breaking or falling off during sexual intercourse with the client in the previous week, 1.8 (95% CI: 1.07–3.18) for ≥5 years of commercial sex work, 1.6 (95% CI: 1.08–2.33) for ≥5 clients in the previous week, 0.6 (95% CI: 0.45–0.86) for ≥9 years of education. This study identifies a very high prevalence of HSV-2 infections among FSWs in Yunnan Province, with only a few who reported a prior history of genital herpes. HSV-2 serological screening and suppressive therapy should be considered for study populations. Education on the importance of diagnosis, treatment and prevention may help control the spread of HSV-2 infection. PMID:18725558

  13. Conjunctival macrophage-mediated influence of the local and systemic immune response after corneal herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Dirk; Schmitz, Andreas; Van Rooijen, Nico; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Heiligenhaus, Arnd

    2002-09-01

    Recently it has been shown that selective subconjunctival macrophage depletion reduced the incidence and severity of stromal herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis in mice. In this study, we examined the effect of conjunctival macrophage depletion on the corneal and systemic T-cell-mediated immune response. BALB/c mice were treated with subconjunctival injections of dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP)-liposomes (Cl2MDP-LIP) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) 7 and 2 days before corneal infection with 105 plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1 (KOS strain). Interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-2, and IL-4 production in the cornea was analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and cytokine mRNA levels (IFN-gamma, IL-4) were measured by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cell culture supernatants from submandibular lymph nodes were analysed by ELISA for expression of IFN-gamma, IL-2, and IL-4 and by bioassay for IL-6. The HSV-1-specific proliferative response of lymphocytes from regional lymph nodes and the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response were tested after corneal infection. Virus-neutralizing antibody titres and HSV-1-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a/IgG1-ratios were measured. Cytokine mRNA expression (IFN-gamma, IL-4) and secretion (IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-4) in the corneas were decreased after HSV-1 corneal infection in the macrophage-depleted mice. The secretion of IFN-gamma and IL-2 was decreased in the regional lymph nodes from Cl2MDP-LIP-treated animals (P<0.05). Furthermore, Cl2MDP-LIP-treated mice had decreased HSV-1 specific proliferative responses (P<0.05) and DTH response after corneal HSV-1 infection (P<0.05). The virus-neutralizing serum-antibody levels (P<0.05) increased while the HSV-1 specific IgG2a/IgG1-ratio was unaffected after macrophage depletion. Macrophage depletion did not induce a shift between the T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 response in this HSK model. The data suggest that

  14. Conjunctival macrophage-mediated influence of the local and systemic immune response after corneal herpes simplex virus-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Dirk; Schmitz, Andreas; van Rooijen, Nico; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Heiligenhaus, Arnd

    2002-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that selective subconjunctival macrophage depletion reduced the incidence and severity of stromal herpes simplex virus (HSV) keratitis in mice. In this study, we examined the effect of conjunctival macrophage depletion on the corneal and systemic T-cell-mediated immune response. BALB/c mice were treated with subconjunctival injections of dichloromethylene diphosphonate (Cl2MDP)-liposomes (Cl2MDP-LIP) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) 7 and 2 days before corneal infection with 105 plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1 (KOS strain). Interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, and IL-4 production in the cornea was analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and cytokine mRNA levels (IFN-γ, IL-4) were measured by semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Cell culture supernatants from submandibular lymph nodes were analysed by ELISA for expression of IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-4 and by bioassay for IL-6. The HSV-1-specific proliferative response of lymphocytes from regional lymph nodes and the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response were tested after corneal infection. Virus-neutralizing antibody titres and HSV-1-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a/IgG1-ratios were measured. Cytokine mRNA expression (IFN-γ, IL-4) and secretion (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4) in the corneas were decreased after HSV-1 corneal infection in the macrophage-depleted mice. The secretion of IFN-γ and IL-2 was decreased in the regional lymph nodes from Cl2MDP-LIP-treated animals (P < 0·05). Furthermore, Cl2MDP-LIP-treated mice had decreased HSV-1 specific proliferative responses (P < 0·05) and DTH response after corneal HSV-1 infection (P < 0·05). The virus-neutralizing serum-antibody levels (P < 0·05) increased while the HSV-1 specific IgG2a/IgG1-ratio was unaffected after macrophage depletion. Macrophage depletion did not induce a shift between the T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 response in this HSK model. The data suggest that

  15. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts. PMID:25278776

  16. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts.

  17. Long-term follow-up of HIV-infected patients once diagnosed with acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Seang, Sophie; Boutolleau, David; Burrel, Sonia; Regnier, Stephanie; Epelboin, Loic; Voujon, Delphine; Valantin, Marc-Antoine; Katlama, Christine; Agut, Henri; Caumes, Eric

    2014-08-01

    Acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is common in immunocompromised patients, but the course of such infection is little known. We describe the long-term follow-up of HIV-infected patients diagnosed once with acyclovir-resistant HSV infections. We retrospectively studied all HIV-infected patients between 2000 and 2010 diagnosed with virologically confirmed acyclovir-resistant HSV infection. Patients' socio-demographic and immunovirological characteristics were described. Response to foscarnet or cidofovir and recurrences were reported. Among 5295 HIV-infected patients, 13 (0.2%) were once diagnosed with an acyclovir-resistant HSV infection. Twelve patients were men, nine patients were of African origin. All patients reported previous acyclovir exposure and median CD4 count was 183 cells/mm(3) Ten patients presented exclusively with cutaneous lesions. Initially, 11 patients were treated with foscarnet and two with cidofovir. The median follow-up was 67 months (6-145). All patients recurred, 10 presenting at least one acyclovir-resistant HSV recurrence. The median number of acyclovir-resistant HSV recurrences per patient was 2 (0 - 5). Regarding the first and second recurrences, 7/13 (54%) and 5/11 (45%) HSV clinical isolates exhibited resistance to acyclovir, respectively. Acyclovir-resistant HSV infection prevalence was low in our cohort. The rate of acyclovir-resistant HSV episodes averaged 50% during the two first recurrences.

  18. Core Histones H2B and H4 Are Mobilized during Infection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Kristen L.; Hendzel, Michael J.; Schang, Luis M.

    2011-01-01

    The infecting genomes of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) are assembled into unstable nucleosomes soon after nuclear entry. The source of the histones that bind to these genomes has yet to be addressed. However, infection inhibits histone synthesis. The histones that bind to HSV-1 genomes are therefore most likely those previously bound in cellular chromatin. In order for preexisting cellular histones to associate with HSV-1 genomes, however, they must first disassociate from cellular chromatin. Consistently, we have shown that linker histones are mobilized during HSV-1 infection. Chromatinization of HSV-1 genomes would also require the association of core histones. We therefore evaluated the mobility of the core histones H2B and H4 as measures of the mobilization of H2A-H2B dimers and the more stable H3-H4 core tetramer. H2B and H4 were mobilized during infection. Their mobilization increased the levels of H2B and H4 in the free pools and decreased the rate of H2B fast chromatin exchange. The histones in the free pools would then be available to bind to HSV-1 genomes. The mobilization of H2B occurred independently from HSV-1 protein expression or DNA replication although expression of HSV-1 immediate-early (IE) or early (E) proteins enhanced it. The mobilization of core histones H2B and H4 supports a model in which the histones that associate with HSV-1 genomes are those that were previously bound in cellular chromatin. Moreover, this mobilization is consistent with the assembly of H2A-H2B and H3-H4 dimers into unstable nucleosomes with HSV-1 genomes. PMID:21994445

  19. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection following Jewish ritual circumcisions that included direct orogenital suction - New York City, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    2012-06-08

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection commonly causes "cold sores" (HSV type 1 [HSV-1]) and genital herpes (HSV-1 or HSV type 2 [HSV-2]); HSV infection in newborns can result in death or permanent disability. During November 2000-December 2011, a total of 11 newborn males had laboratory-confirmed HSV infection in the weeks following out-of-hospital Jewish ritual circumcision, investigators from the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) learned. Ten of the 11 newborns were hospitalized; two died. In six of the 11 cases, health-care providers confirmed parental reports that the ritual circumcision included an ultra-Orthodox Jewish practice known as metzitzah b'peh, in which the circumciser (mohel, plural: mohelim) places his mouth directly on the newly circumcised penis and sucks blood away from the circumcision wound (direct orogenital suction). In the remaining cases, other evidence suggested that genital infection was introduced by direct orogenital suction (probable direct orogenital suction). Based on cases reported to DOHMH during April 2006-December 2011, the risk for neonatal herpes caused by HSV-1 and untyped HSV following Jewish ritual circumcision with confirmed or probable direct orogenital suction in New York City was estimated at 1 in 4,098 or 3.4 times greater than the risk among male infants considered unlikely to have had direct orogenital suction. Oral contact with a newborn's open wound risks transmission of HSV and other pathogens. Circumcision is a surgical procedure that should be performed under sterile conditions. Health-care professionals advising parents and parents choosing Jewish ritual circumcision should inquire in advance whether direct orogenital suction will be performed, and orogenital suction should be avoided.

  20. Effects of S-acetylglutathione in cell and animal model of herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Jens-Uwe; Cinatl, Jaroslav; Dauletbaev, Nurlan; Buxbaum, Sigune; Treusch, Gernot; Cinatl, Jindrich; Gerein, Valentin; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm

    2005-01-01

    Intracellular glutathione (GSH) plays an important regulatory role in the host response to viral infections. Replenishment of intracellular GSH is a desirable yet challenging goal, since systemic GSH supplementation is rather inefficient due to a short half-life of GSH in blood plasma. Further, GSH is not taken up by cells directly, but needs to be broken down into amino acids and resynthesized to GSH intracellularly, this process often being impaired during viral infections. These obstacles may be overcome by a novel glutathione derivative S-acetylglutathione (S-GSH), which is more stable in plasma and taken up directly by cells with subsequent conversion to GSH. In the present study, in vitro effects of supplementation with S-GSH or GSH on intracellular GSH levels, cell survival and replication of human herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were studied in human foreskin fibroblasts. In addition, in vivo effects of supplementation with S-GSH or GSH on HSV-1-induced mortality were studied in hr/hr mice. In cell culture, viral infection resulted in a significant decrease of intracellular GSH levels. S-GSH efficiently and dose-dependently (5 and 10 mM tested) restored intracellular GSH, and this replenishment was more efficient than with GSH supplementation. In mice, S-GSH, but not GSH, significantly decreased HSV-1-induced mortality ( P<0.05). The data suggest that S-GSH is a suitable antiviral agent against HSV-1 both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that this drug may be of benefit in the adjunctive therapy of HSV-1 infections.

  1. Effects of oat β-glucan on the macrophage cytokine response to herpes simplex virus 1 infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E Angela; Davis, J Mark; Brown, Adrienne S; Carmichael, Martin D; Ghaffar, Abdul; Mayer, Eugene P

    2012-08-01

    Oat β-glucan can counteract the increased risk for Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) infection in mice, the effects of which have, at least in part, been attributed to macrophages. However, the specific responses of macrophages to oat β-glucan treatment in this model have yet to be elucidated. We examined the effects of varying doses of oat β-glucan on the pro-inflammatory cytokine response in both peritoneal and lung macrophages with and without exposure to HSV-1 infection in vitro. Peritoneal and lung macrophages were obtained from mice and cultured with varying concentrations of oat β-glucan (0 (control), 10, 100, and 1,000 μg) for 24 h and supernatants were collected. A standardized dose of HSV-1 was added for a second 24 h incubation period after which supernatants were again collected. Samples were analyzed for interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In most cases, oat β-glucan resulted in a dose-dependent increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) in lung and peritoneal macrophages with and without exposure to HSV-1 infection. When comparing across macrophage source, this response was greater for IL-1β and IL-6 in peritoneal macrophages and for TNF-α in lung macrophages. This may be a mechanism for the decreased risk for HSV-1 infection following oat β-glucan feedings in mice.

  2. Seroprevalence and Co-Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Among Pregnant Women in Lokoja, North-Central Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Olatunji Matthew; Amuda, Oluwatomi Olufunke; Nzurumike, Charles; Suleiman, Muhammed Mustapha; Ikhevha Ogah, Jeremiah

    2016-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is normally associated with orofacial (orolabial) infections and encephalitis, whereas HSV-2 usually causes genital infections and can be transmitted from infected mothers to neonates. The evidence suggesting that HSV is facilitating the spread of the global human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic and the risk posed by these synergies to neonates in developing countries informed this study. Objectives To determine the seroprevalence and co-infection of HIV and HSV, as well as their associated risk factors, in Lokoja, Nigeria. Methods This was a hospital-based cross-sectional, prospective study, which was carried out among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic at the federal medical centre in Lokoja, Nigeria. sociodemographic characteristics and HIV-HSV status were determined by the use of a structured questionnaire and immunoassay kits, respectively. All data were analyzed using Stata statistical software (version 12), and the level of significance was determined to be P < 0.05 using the chi-square test. Results Of the 250 pregnant women screened for HIV and HSV, 154 (61.6%) were in the 2nd trimester of gestation, and all of the co-infected respondents were in their 2nd trimester. Only six (2.4%) of the respondents tested positive for HIV, with all six (100%) showing positivity for HSV so the co-infection rate was six (2.4%). Co-infection was found to occur between the ages of 15 and 35 years, while higher age groups did not show any co-infection. Parity, level of education, and history of painful genital ulcers had no significant association with co-infection. Conclusions Advocacy and publicity to raise awareness of the potential public health impact of HSV and HIV co-infection in Nigeria, where anti-HSV testing is not generally performed in all populations, is therefore recommended. PMID:28180012

  3. Psychological stress compromises CD8+ T cell control of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 infections.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael L; Sheridan, Brian S; Bonneau, Robert H; Hendricks, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    Recurrent HSV-1 ocular disease results from reactivation of latent virus in trigeminal ganglia, often following immunosuppression or exposure to a variety of psychological or physical stressors. HSV-specific CD8+ T cells can block HSV-1 reactivation from latency in ex vivo trigeminal ganglia cultures through production of IFN-gamma. In this study, we establish that either CD8+ T cell depletion or exposure to restraint stress permit HSV-1 to transiently escape from latency in vivo. Restraint stress caused a reduction of TG-resident HSV-specific CD8+ T cells and a functional compromise of those cells that survive. Together, these effects of stress resulted in an approximate 65% reduction of cells capable of producing IFN-gamma in response to reactivating virus. Our findings demonstrate persistent in vivo regulation of latent HSV-1 by CD8+ T cells, and strongly support the concept that stress induces HSV-1 reactivation from latency at least in part by compromising CD8+ T cell surveillance of latently infected neurons.

  4. Persistent expression of chemokine and chemokine receptor RNAs at primary and latent sites of herpes simplex virus 1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Cook, W James; Kramer, Martha F; Walker, Russell M; Burwell, Timothy J; Holman, Holly A; Coen, Donald M; Knipe, David M

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines and infiltrating T cells are readily detected in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infected mouse cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during the acute phase of infection, and certain cytokines continue to be expressed at lower levels in infected TG during the subsequent latent phase. Recent results have shown that HSV infection activates Toll-like receptor signaling. Thus, we hypothesized that chemokines may be broadly expressed at both primary sites and latent sites of HSV infection for prolonged periods of time. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymrease chain reaction (RT-PCR) to quantify expression levels of transcripts encoding chemokines and their receptors in cornea and TG following corneal infection. RNAs encoding the inflammatory-type chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR3, which are highly expressed on activated T cells, macrophages and most immature dendritic cells (DC), and the more broadly expressed CCR7, were highly expressed and strongly induced in infected cornea and TG at 3 and 10 days postinfection (dpi). Elevated levels of these RNAs persisted in both cornea and TG during the latent phase at 30 dpi. RNAs for the broadly expressed CXCR4 receptor was induced at 30 dpi but less so at 3 and 10 dpi in both cornea and TG. Transcripts for CCR3 and CCR6, receptors that are not highly expressed on activated T cells or macrophages, also appeared to be induced during acute and latent phases; however, their very low expression levels were near the limit of our detection. RNAs encoding the CCR1 and CCR5 chemokine ligands MIP-1α, MIP-1β and RANTES, and the CCR2 ligand MCP-1 were also strongly induced and persisted in cornea and TG during the latent phase. These and other recent results argue that HSV antigens or DNA can stimulate expression of chemokines, perhaps through activation of Toll-like receptors, for long periods of time at both primary and latent sites of HSV infection. These chemokines recruit activated T cells and other

  5. Persistent expression of chemokine and chemokine receptor RNAs at primary and latent sites of herpes simplex virus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cook, W James; Kramer, Martha F; Walker, Russell M; Burwell, Timothy J; Holman, Holly A; Coen, Donald M; Knipe, David M

    2004-09-23

    Inflammatory cytokines and infiltrating T cells are readily detected in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infected mouse cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG) during the acute phase of infection, and certain cytokines continue to be expressed at lower levels in infected TG during the subsequent latent phase. Recent results have shown that HSV infection activates Toll-like receptor signaling. Thus, we hypothesized that chemokines may be broadly expressed at both primary sites and latent sites of HSV infection for prolonged periods of time. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymrease chain reaction (RT-PCR) to quantify expression levels of transcripts encoding chemokines and their receptors in cornea and TG following corneal infection. RNAs encoding the inflammatory-type chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR3, which are highly expressed on activated T cells, macrophages and most immature dendritic cells (DC), and the more broadly expressed CCR7, were highly expressed and strongly induced in infected cornea and TG at 3 and 10 days postinfection (dpi). Elevated levels of these RNAs persisted in both cornea and TG during the latent phase at 30 dpi. RNAs for the broadly expressed CXCR4 receptor was induced at 30 dpi but less so at 3 and 10 dpi in both cornea and TG. Transcripts for CCR3 and CCR6, receptors that are not highly expressed on activated T cells or macrophages, also appeared to be induced during acute and latent phases; however, their very low expression levels were near the limit of our detection. RNAs encoding the CCR1 and CCR5 chemokine ligands MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta and RANTES, and the CCR2 ligand MCP-1 were also strongly induced and persisted in cornea and TG during the latent phase. These and other recent results argue that HSV antigens or DNA can stimulate expression of chemokines, perhaps through activation of Toll-like receptors, for long periods of time at both primary and latent sites of HSV infection. These chemokines recruit activated T cells and

  6. Herpes simplex virus-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Kuchynka, Petr; Palecek, Tomas; Hrbackova, Hana; Vitkova, Ivana; Simek, Stanislav; Nemecek, Eduard; Aster, Viktor; Louch, William E; Aschermann, Michael; Linhart, Ales

    2010-10-01

    Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) represents an acquired form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Viral infection is the most common cause of DCMi. In contrast with other cardiotropic viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a very rare finding in endomyocardial biopsies of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a case of HSV-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

  7. Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Antibodies in Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodu, Brad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of 125 sophomore preclinical dental students found that these young professionals, because of having a low prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies, are at risk for acquiring a primary HSV infection when treating HSV positive patients and should take precautions to avoid virus transmission. (MSE)

  8. Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Antibodies in Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodu, Brad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of 125 sophomore preclinical dental students found that these young professionals, because of having a low prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies, are at risk for acquiring a primary HSV infection when treating HSV positive patients and should take precautions to avoid virus transmission. (MSE)

  9. Case Presentation of a 23-Month-old Herpes Simplex Virus-infected Girl with Brain and Oesophageal Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Kasiri, Karam-Ali; Khoshdel, Abolfazl

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is the most common identifiable cause of serious or life threatening sporadic, endemic encephalitis. Typical HSV encephalitis in patients outside neonatal age is caused by HSV-1. A 23-month-old girl was referred to our hospital with a three-day history of fever, listlessness, slurred speech, and suspicious oesophageal foreign body impaction. Laboratory evaluations showed white blood cell count of 10900 /mm3 with 65% neutrophils. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse severe ulceration in middle to distal third of oesophagus and no foreign body was found in oesophagus or stomach. Parenteral acyclovir was prescribed for herpes encephalitis in addition to antibiotics for central nervous system infection. Chest X-ray and brain MRI was unremarkable. Lumbar puncture revealed normal protein and glucose with 10 white cell count. She developed a raising liver enzyme tests. Total and direct bilirubin was 1.2 mg/dc and 0.2 mg/dc respectively. Because of neurological symptoms, acyclovir was adopted for our patient from the beginning. The girl did not respond to medication and died after 28 days. Progression of her disease prior to referral appears to contribute to the administered treatment inefficacy. Severe rapid progression of disease prior to referral and potential resistance to acyclovir could cause treatment failure. PMID:26155527

  10. Locked-in-like fulminant infantile Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with herpes simplex virus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Dilena, Robertino; Strazzer, Sandra; Esposito, Susanna; Paglialonga, Fabio; Tadini, Laura; Barbieri, Sergio; Giannini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) may rarely manifest as a peripheral locked-in syndrome. Clinical and instrumental features of a fulminant form of infantile GBS were assessed. After 2 days of rhinitis, a 6-month-old infant was intubated in the emergency room for sudden-onset respiratory failure. Neurological examination showed generalized areflexic flaccid paralysis with no detectable interaction, which resembled a coma. Brain MRI was normal. Lumbar puncture showed pleocytosis (43 cells/mm(3)) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) PCR positivity. EEG showed normal sleep-wake cycles, and EMG demonstrated nerve inexcitability. Acyclovir and immunoglobulins provided no benefit. After 1 week, lumbar puncture showed albuminocytological dissociation (protein 217 mg/dl). Plasmapheresis was then started, and progressive improvement occurred. At age 1 year, the child had recovered well with residual distal lower limb hyporeflexic weakness. A fulminant infantile GBS variant presenting as peripheral locked-in syndrome can be associated with HSV1 infection likely due to autoimmune cross-reactivity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Sequential Changes in Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to Herpes Simplex Virus After Recurrent Herpetic Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shillitoe, E. J.; Wilton, J. M. A.; Lehner, T.

    1977-01-01

    Lymphocyte responses to herpes simplex virus (HSV) were studied in 23 patients with recurrent herpes labialis and in 19 control subjects. Lymphocytes of seropositive, but not seronegative, controls responded to HSV by thymidine incorporation, and the supernatant fluids inhibited the migration of guinea pig macrophages. Lymphocytes from patients with a recurrent herpetic lesion responded to HSV by significantly greater thymidine incorporation than seropositive controls, but supernatants did not show an increased macrophage migration inhibition response. During the 28 days after the onset of a lesion, the thymidine incorporation to HSV fell to the level of the seropositive controls, and supernatants then induced an increased inhibition of macrophage migration. Lymphocyte responses to Candida albicans, purified protein derivative, or phytohemagglutinin did not fluctuate according to the presence of a lesion and did not differ from those of the controls. Lymphocyte responses to HSV were unaffected by culture in the presence of serum from seronegative or seropositive controls, or from patients with or without a herpetic lesion. It is suggested that in patients with recurrent herpes labialis a periodic defect of the migration inhibition response might have allowed the recurrent infection to develop, and that the increased thymidine incorporation stimulated by HSV in vitro is a result of antigenic stimulation from the lesion. PMID:198372

  12. Preparation and Evaluation of Novel In Situ Gels Containing Acyclovir for the Treatment of Oral Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Binu; Verma, Surajpal

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop an oral mucosal drug delivery system to facilitate the local and systemic delivery of acyclovir for the treatment of oral herpes infection caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). An in situ gelling system was used to increase the residence time and thus the bioavailability of acyclovir in oral mucosa. Temperature and pH trigged in situ gel formulations were prepared by cold method using polymers like poloxamer 407, carbopol 934, and HPMC. Glycerin and a mixture of tween 80 and ethanol (1 : 2 ratio) were used as the drug dissolving solvent. The pH of carbopol containing formulation was adjusted to pH 5.8 while the pH of poloxamer solution was adjusted to pH 7. These formulations were evaluated for sol-gel transition temperature, gelling capacity, pH, viscosity, spreadability, gel strength, drug content, ex-vitro permeation, and mucoadhesion. The gelation temperatures of all the formulations were within the range of 28–38°C. All the formulations exhibited fairly uniform drug content (98.15–99.75%). Drug release study of all the formulations showed sustained release properties. The release of drug through these in situ gel formulations followed the Higuchi model and Korsmeyer peppas model mechanism. PMID:24790559

  13. Preparation and evaluation of novel in situ gels containing acyclovir for the treatment of oral herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Binu; Verma, Surajpal

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop an oral mucosal drug delivery system to facilitate the local and systemic delivery of acyclovir for the treatment of oral herpes infection caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). An in situ gelling system was used to increase the residence time and thus the bioavailability of acyclovir in oral mucosa. Temperature and pH trigged in situ gel formulations were prepared by cold method using polymers like poloxamer 407, carbopol 934, and HPMC. Glycerin and a mixture of tween 80 and ethanol (1 : 2 ratio) were used as the drug dissolving solvent. The pH of carbopol containing formulation was adjusted to pH 5.8 while the pH of poloxamer solution was adjusted to pH 7. These formulations were evaluated for sol-gel transition temperature, gelling capacity, pH, viscosity, spreadability, gel strength, drug content, ex-vitro permeation, and mucoadhesion. The gelation temperatures of all the formulations were within the range of 28-38°C. All the formulations exhibited fairly uniform drug content (98.15-99.75%). Drug release study of all the formulations showed sustained release properties. The release of drug through these in situ gel formulations followed the Higuchi model and Korsmeyer peppas model mechanism.

  14. Human Antiviral Protein IFIX Suppresses Viral Gene Expression during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Infection and Is Counteracted by Virus-induced Proteasomal Degradation.

    PubMed

    Crow, Marni S; Cristea, Ileana M

    2017-04-01

    The interferon-inducible protein X (IFIX), a member of the PYHIN family, was recently recognized as an antiviral factor against infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). IFIX binds viral DNA upon infection and promotes expression of antiviral cytokines. How IFIX exerts its host defense functions and whether it is inhibited by the virus remain unknown. Here, we integrated live cell microscopy, proteomics, IFIX domain characterization, and molecular virology to investigate IFIX regulation and antiviral functions during HSV-1 infection. We find that IFIX has a dynamic localization during infection that changes from diffuse nuclear and nucleoli distribution in uninfected cells to discrete nuclear puncta early in infection. This is rapidly followed by a reduction in IFIX protein levels. Indeed, using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry, we define IFIX interactions during HSV-1 infection, finding an association with a proteasome subunit and proteins involved in ubiquitin-proteasome processes. Using synchronized HSV-1 infection, microscopy, and proteasome-inhibition experiments, we demonstrate that IFIX co-localizes with nuclear proteasome puncta shortly after 3 h of infection and that its pyrin domain is rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to several other host defense factors, IFIX degradation is not dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the viral protein ICP0. However, we show IFIX degradation requires immediate-early viral gene expression, suggesting a viral host suppression mechanism. The IFIX interactome also demonstrated its association with transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the 5FMC complex. We validate this interaction using microscopy and reciprocal isolations and determine it is mediated by the IFIX HIN domain. Finally, we show IFIX suppresses immediate-early and early viral gene expression during infection. Altogether, our study demonstrates that IFIX antiviral

  15. Health-related quality of life in Indian patients with three viral sexually transmitted infections: herpes simplex virus-2, genital human papilloma virus and HIV.

    PubMed

    Raj, Rama; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Mehta, Manju; Gupta, Somesh

    2011-04-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has not been studied in Indian patients with viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs): herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) and genital human papilloma virus (HPV) infections. Furthermore, there is no reported study that compares HRQOL among these two viral STIs and HIV. All consenting adults with any of the three viral infections attending a sexually transmitted disease clinic and 35 healthy controls were enrolled. HRQOL was evaluated using the WHOQOL-BREF instrument, which evaluates QOL under physical, psychological, social and environmental domains. Data concerning demographic and socioeconomic status were collected. There were 65 (27.3%), 60 (25.2%) and 53 (22.3%) patients with HIV, HSV-2 and HPV, respectively, and 25 (10.5%) patients with mixed infections. The WHOQOL-BREF scores of patients in different STI groups were significantly lower than those of controls. The total HRQOL scores (mean±SD) were 280.1±83.56 (among controls), 196.9±72.41 (genital HPV), 141.0±50.50 (HSV-2), 101.0±75.25 (HIV) and 103.4±47.23(mixed infection groups). Mean HRQOL scores were lowest in the physical and psychological domains. HRQOL scores were least in HIV and mixed infections groups, while patients with genital HPV infection had significantly better HRQOL scores compared to other patient groups. Higher education and socioeconomic status had a positive influence on HRQOL. Viral STIs were associated with a significant reduction in HRQOL scores. Among patient groups, the greatest impact on HRQOL was seen in those with HIV and mixed infections and the least impact seen in those with genital HPV infection. Comprehensive care including counselling services need to be implemented in STI clinics.

  16. Characterization of Neuronal Populations in the Human Trigeminal Ganglion and Their Association with Latent Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Anja K. E.; Sinicina, Inga; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Theil, Diethilde; Hüfner, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Following primary infection Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) establishes lifelong latency in the neurons of human sensory ganglia. Upon reactivation HSV-1 can cause neurological diseases such as facial palsy, vestibular neuritis or encephalitis. Certain populations of sensory neurons have been shown to be more susceptible to latent infection in the animal model, but this has not been addressed in human tissue. In the present study, trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons expressing six neuronal marker proteins were characterized, based on staining with antibodies against the GDNF family ligand receptor Ret, the high-affinity nerve growth factor receptor TrkA, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the antibody RT97 against 200kDa neurofilament, calcitonin gene-related peptide and peripherin. The frequencies of marker-positive neurons and their average neuronal sizes were assessed, with TrkA-positive (61.82%) neurons being the most abundant, and Ret-positive (26.93%) the least prevalent. Neurons positive with the antibody RT97 (1253 µm2) were the largest, and those stained against peripherin (884 µm2) were the smallest. Dual immunofluorescence revealed at least a 4.5% overlap for every tested marker combination, with overlap for the combinations TrkA/Ret, TrkA/RT97 and Ret/nNOS lower, and the overlap between Ret/CGRP being higher than would be expected by chance. With respect to latent HSV-1 infection, latency associated transcripts (LAT) were detected using in situ hybridization (ISH) in neurons expressing each of the marker proteins. In contrast to the mouse model, co-localization with neuronal markers Ret or CGRP mirrored the magnitude of these neuron populations, whereas for the other four neuronal markers fewer marker-positive cells were also LAT-ISH+. Ret and CGRP are both known to label neurons related to pain signaling. PMID:24367603

  17. Topical cidofovir-induced acute kidney injury in two severely immunocompromised patients with refractory multidrug-resistant herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Ila M; Lahoti, Amit; Chemaly, Roy F; Trevino, Cynthia; Westmoreland, Michael; Hosing, Chitra

    2016-04-01

    Cidofovir, a nucleoside analog of deoxycytidine monophosphate, is a water-soluble polar molecule that exhibits antiviral activity against a broad range of DNA viruses. Cidofovir for injection is approved for the treatment of cytomegalovirus retinitis in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The safety and efficacy of topical cidofovir has been described in a limited number of patients. We present two cases of multidrug-resistant herpes simplex virus infections that responded to topical cidofovir therapy yet resulted in irreversible acute kidney injury.

  18. Antivirals Reduce the Formation of Key Alzheimer's Disease Molecules in Cell Cultures Acutely Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Matthew A.; Frost, Alison L.; Preston, Chris M.; Itzhaki, Ruth F.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) afflicts around 20 million people worldwide and so there is an urgent need for effective treatment. Our research showing that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) is a risk factor for AD for the brains of people who possess a specific genetic factor and that the virus causes accumulation of key AD proteins (β-amyloid (Aβ) and abnormally phosphorylated tau (P-tau)), suggests that anti-HSV1 antiviral agents might slow AD progression. However, currently available antiviral agents target HSV1 DNA replication and so might be successful in AD only if Aβ and P-tau accumulation depend on viral DNA replication. Therefore, we investigated firstly the stage(s) of the virus replication cycle required for Aβ and P-tau accumulation, and secondly whether antiviral agents prevent these changes using recombinant strains of HSV1 that progress only partly through the replication cycle and antiviral agents that inhibit HSV1 DNA replication. By quantitative immunocytochemistry we demonstrated that entry, fusion and uncoating of HSV1, are insufficient to induce Aβ and P-tau production. We showed also that none of the “immediate early” viral proteins is directly responsible, and that Aβ and P-tau are produced at a subsequent stage of the HSV1 replication cycle. Importantly, the anti-HSV1 antiviral agents acyclovir, penciclovir and foscarnet reduced Aβ and P-tau accumulation, as well as HSV1, with foscarnet being less effective in each case. P-tau accumulation was found to depend on HSV1 DNA replication, whereas Aβ accumulation was not. The antiviral-induced decrease in Aβ is attributable to the reduced number of new viruses, and hence the reduction in viral spread. Since antiviral agents reduce greatly Aβ and P-tau accumulation in HSV1-infected cells, they would be suitable for treating AD with great advantage unlike current AD therapies, only the virus, not the host cell, would be targeted. PMID:22003387

  19. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis during treatment with etanercept.

    PubMed

    Crusio, Robbert H J; Singson, Stephanie V; Haroun, Faysal; Mehta, Hetal H; Parenti, David M

    2014-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors are widely used for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. They are associated with an increased risk for infections. We report a case of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encephalitis in a patient receiving etanercept and review the literature on TNF-α and TNF-α inhibitors, and their importance in the pathophysiology of herpes simplex encephalitis.

  20. Helicase-primase inhibitors for herpes simplex virus: looking to the future of non-nucleoside inhibitors for treating herpes virus infections.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subhajit; Sukla, Soumi; Field, Hugh J

    2014-01-01

    Helicase-primase inhibitors (HPIs) are the first new family of potent herpes virus (herpes simplex and varicella-zoster virus) inhibitors to go beyond the preliminary stages of investigation since the emergence of the original nucleoside analog inhibitors. To consider the clinical future of HPIs, this review puts the exciting new findings with two HPIs, amenamevir and pritelivir, into the historical context of antiviral development for the prevention and treatment of herpes simplex virus over the last century and, on this basis, the authors speculate on the potential evolution of these and other non-nucleoside inhibitors in the future.

  1. The preparation, efficacy and safety of 'antigenoid' vaccine NFU1 (S-L+) MRC toward prevention of herpes simplex virus infections in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Buchan, A; Hartley, C E; Turner, S P; Williams, D R

    1980-01-01

    Vaccine NFU1 (S-L+) MRC was prepared by high multiplicity infection of serum-deprived human embryonic lung (MRC 5) cells with type 1 Herpes simplex virus. The preparative process removed inoculum virus particles and virus DNA while virus particle and DNA synthesis was inhibited by the presence of lithium chloride in the cell culture medium. The vaccine stimulated neutralising antibody in vaccinated mice and provided long-term protection against intra-vaginal challenge with type 2 herpes virus. The safety of the vaccine was confirmed by inoculation into newborn mice and cell lines of human, mammalian, and rodent origin. There was no evidence of cell transformation in vitro or of oncogenicity or teratogenicity in rodent species. It is intended to investigate the efficiency of this vaccine in human subjects.

  2. Multiple Roles of the Cytoplasmic Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Envelope Glycoprotein D in Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arii, Jun; Shindo, Keiko; Koyanagi, Naoto; Kato, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) envelope glycoprotein D (gD) plays an essential role in viral entry. The functional regions of gD responsible for viral entry have been mapped to its extracellular domain, whereas the gD cytoplasmic domain plays no obvious role in viral entry. Thus far, the role(s) of the gD cytoplasmic domain in HSV-1 replication has remained to be elucidated. In this study, we show that ectopic expression of gD induces microvillus-like tubular structures at the plasma membrane which resemble the reported projection structures of the plasma membrane induced in HSV-1-infected cells. Mutations in the arginine cluster (residues 365 to 367) in the gD cytoplasmic domain greatly reduced gD-induced plasma membrane remodeling. In agreement with this, the mutations in the arginine cluster in the gD cytoplasmic domain reduced the number of microvillus-like tubular structures at the plasma membrane in HSV-1-infected cells. In addition, the mutations produced an accumulation of unenveloped nucleocapsids in the cytoplasm and reduced viral replication and cell-cell spread. These results suggest that the arginine cluster in the gD cytoplasmic domain is required for the efficient induction of plasma membrane projections and viral final envelopment, and these functions of the gD domain may lead to efficient viral replication and cell-cell spread. IMPORTANCE The cytoplasmic domain of HSV-1 gD, an envelope glycoprotein essential for viral entry, was reported to promote viral replication and cell-cell spread, but the role(s) of the domain during HSV-1 infection has remained unknown. In this study, we clarify two functions of the arginine cluster in the HSV-1 gD cytoplasmic domain, both of which require host cell membrane remodeling, i.e., the formation of microvillus-like projections at the plasma membrane and viral final envelopment in HSV-1-infected cells. We also show that the gD arginine cluster is required for efficient HSV-1 replication and cell

  3. CD8+ T Cells Play a Bystander Role in Mice Latently Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Kevin R.; Gate, David; Matundan, Harry H.; Ghiasi, Yasamin N.; Town, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Based on an explant reactivation model, it has been proposed that CD8+ T cells maintain latency in trigeminal ganglia (TG) of mice latently infected with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) [T. Liu, K. M. Khanna, X. Chen, D. J. Fink, and R. L. Hendricks, J Exp Med 191:1459–1466, 2000, doi:10.1084/jem.191.9.1459; K. M. Khanna, R. H. Bonneau, P. R. Kinchington, and R. L. Hendricks, Immunity 18:593-603, 2003, doi:10.1016/S1074-7613(03)00112-2]. In those studies, BALB/c mice were ocularly infected with an avirulent HSV-1 strain (RE) after corneal scarification. However, in our studies, we typically infect mice with a virulent HSV-1 strain (McKrae) that does not require corneal scarification. Using a combination of knockout mice, adoptive transfers, and depletion studies, we recently found that CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs) contribute to HSV-1 latency and reactivation in TG of ocularly infected mice (K. R. Mott, S. J. Allen, M. Zandian, B. Konda, B. G. Sharifi, C. Jones, S. L. Wechsler, T. Town, and H. Ghiasi, PLoS One 9:e93444, 2014, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0093444). This suggested that CD8+ T cells might not be the major regulators of HSV-1 latency in the mouse TG. To investigate this iconoclastic possibility, we used a blocking CD8 antibody and CD8+ T cells in reactivated TG explants from mice latently infected with (i) the avirulent HSV-1 strain RE following corneal scarification or (ii) the virulent HSV-1 strain McKrae without corneal scarification. Independently of the strain or approach, our results show that CD8α+ DCs, not CD8+ T cells, drive latency and reactivation. In addition, adoptive transfer of CD8+ T cells from wild-type (wt) mice to CD8α−/− mice did not restore latency to the level for wt mice or wt virus. In the presence of latency-associated transcript (LAT(+); wt virus), CD8+ T cells seem to play a bystander role in the TG. These bystander T cells highly express PD-1, most likely due to the presence of CD8α+ DCs. Collectively, these

  4. CD8+ T Cells Play a Bystander Role in Mice Latently Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus 1.

    PubMed

    Mott, Kevin R; Gate, David; Matundan, Harry H; Ghiasi, Yasamin N; Town, Terrence; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2016-05-15

    Based on an explant reactivation model, it has been proposed that CD8(+) T cells maintain latency in trigeminal ganglia (TG) of mice latently infected with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) [T. Liu, K. M. Khanna, X. Chen, D. J. Fink, and R. L. Hendricks, J Exp Med 191:1459-1466, 2000, doi:10.1084/jem.191.9.1459; K. M. Khanna, R. H. Bonneau, P. R. Kinchington, and R. L. Hendricks, Immunity 18:593-603, 2003, doi:10.1016/S1074-7613(03)00112-2]. In those studies, BALB/c mice were ocularly infected with an avirulent HSV-1 strain (RE) after corneal scarification. However, in our studies, we typically infect mice with a virulent HSV-1 strain (McKrae) that does not require corneal scarification. Using a combination of knockout mice, adoptive transfers, and depletion studies, we recently found that CD8α(+) dendritic cells (DCs) contribute to HSV-1 latency and reactivation in TG of ocularly infected mice (K. R. Mott, S. J. Allen, M. Zandian, B. Konda, B. G. Sharifi, C. Jones, S. L. Wechsler, T. Town, and H. Ghiasi, PLoS One 9:e93444, 2014, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0093444). This suggested that CD8(+) T cells might not be the major regulators of HSV-1 latency in the mouse TG. To investigate this iconoclastic possibility, we used a blocking CD8 antibody and CD8(+) T cells in reactivated TG explants from mice latently infected with (i) the avirulent HSV-1 strain RE following corneal scarification or (ii) the virulent HSV-1 strain McKrae without corneal scarification. Independently of the strain or approach, our results show that CD8α(+) DCs, not CD8(+) T cells, drive latency and reactivation. In addition, adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cells from wild-type (wt) mice to CD8α(-/-) mice did not restore latency to the level for wt mice or wt virus. In the presence of latency-associated transcript (LAT((+)); wt virus), CD8(+) T cells seem to play a bystander role in the TG. These bystander T cells highly express PD-1, most likely due to the presence of CD8α(+) DCs. Collectively

  5. Isolation of a protein kinase induced by herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, W.T.; Stobbs, D.G.

    1981-04-01

    Researchers have isolated a new cyclic AMP-independent protein kinase activity induced in HeLa cells by infection with herpes simplex virus type 1. Induction of the enzyme does not occur in cells treated with cycloheximide at the time of infection, or in cells infected with UV-inactivated herpes simplex virus type 1. The amount of enzyme induced in infected cells is dependent upon the multiplicity of infection. An enzyme with identical properties to the appearing in infected HeLa cells is also induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 in BHK cells.

  6. Chitosan as an Immunomodulating Adjuvant on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Do-Hyun; Anower, A. K. M. Mostafa; Islam, S. M. Shamsul

    2016-01-01

    Herpes disease caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is an intractable condition. It is a major concern in public health. Our purpose of this study was to verify the function of chitosan as an adjuvant for immune regulation specifically under herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. Ahead of HSV infection, chitosan, heat inactivated green fluorescent protein expressing HSV (G-HSV), and a combination of chitosan and G-HSV were used to pretreat ICR mice followed by HSV-1 infection. Using flow cytometric analysis, the frequencies of T-cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and natural killer (NK) cells were analyzed by surface expression of CD4+, CD8+, CD14+, CD11c+, NK1.1+, and DX5+ cells. In HSV infected mice, chitosan treatment significantly increased the frequencies of CD4+ T-cells (33.6 ± 5.78%) compared to those in the control group (24.02 ± 12.47%, p = 0.05). The frequencies of DC and NK cells were also significantly different between chitosan treated mice and control mice. In addition, anti-HSV IgG antibody was downregulated in chitosan treated mice. These results suggest that chitosan is a potential modulator or immune stimulator as an adjuvant in HSV-1 infected mice. PMID:28096567

  7. Is Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) a sign of Encephalitis in Iranian Newborns? Prevalence of HSV Infection in Pregnant Women in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Arabsalmani, Masoumeh; Behzadifar, Meysam; Baradaranmd, Hamid Reza; Toghae, Mansoureh; Beyranvand, Gholam; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Behzadifar, Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the world. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of herpes simplex virus in pregnant women in Iran. A systematic literature review was conducted to study the HSV subtypes in Persian and English papers through several databases. We searched Pub Med, Scopus, Ovid, Science Direct and national databases as Magiran, Iranmedex and Science Information Database (SID) up to October 2015. Random-effects model were applied to calculate the pooled prevalence of HSV subtypes. Five eligible studies were identified, including 1140 participants. The pooled prevalence of HSV infection in pregnant women was 0.64% (95% CI: 0.10- 1.18) in Iran. The pooled prevalence of studies on both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was 0.91% (CI: 0.81-1.02) and studies on only HSV-2 was 0.23% (CI: -0.61-0.63), respectively. The prevalence of HSV infection in pregnant women in Iran was higher. HSV infection of the central nervous system, especially with HSV-2, can also cause recurrent aseptic meningitis and monophasic, as well as radiuculitis or myelitis. The performance of screening to detect infection in pregnant women can play an important role in the prevention and treatment of patients and help to prevent the transmission of HSV infection to infants in Iran.

  8. Interleukin-27 Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection by Activating STAT1 and 3, Interleukin-6, and Chemokines IP-10 and MIG.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Outi; Nygårdas, Michaela; Paavilainen, Henrik; Ryödi, Elina; Hukkanen, Veijo

    2016-11-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) inhibits the replication of many viruses, but the mechanism differs according to virus and cell type. In this study, we observed that IL-27 expression was upregulated in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected SJL/J mice, which led us to further investigate the role of IL-27 in HSV-1 infection using epithelial, glioma, and immunological cells as cell models. We showed that in all studied cell lines, the IL-27 messenger RNA (mRNA) level was upregulated due to the HSV-1 infection. When the cells were primed with IL-27 before the virus infection, the virus release was prevented, indicating an antiviral role of IL-27 in HSV-1 infection. Furthermore, we observed that IL-27 secretion to the culture medium was reduced in infected epithelial and immunological cells, but not in glioma cells. Not surprisingly, HSV-1 induced type I, II, and III interferons regardless of cell line, but IL-27 itself caused varying interferon responses dependent on cell type. However, common to all cell types was the IL-27-stimulated secretion of IL-6 and chemokines IP-10 and MIG. In addition, IL-27 stimulation activated STAT1 and STAT3 in HeLa and T98G cells, suggesting that IL-27 engages the STAT1/3 pathway, which then leads to the upregulation of IL-6, IP-10, and MIG.

  9. Large Amounts of Reactivated Virus in Tears Precedes Recurrent Herpes Stromal Keratitis in Stressed Rabbits Latently Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus.

    PubMed

    Perng, Guey-Chuen; Osorio, Nelson; Jiang, Xianzhi; Geertsema, Roger; Hsiang, Chinhui; Brown, Don; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent herpetic stromal keratitis (rHSK), due to an immune response to reactivation of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), can cause corneal blindness. The development of therapeutic interventions such as drugs and vaccines to decrease rHSK have been hampered by the lack of a small and reliable animal model in which rHSK occurs at a high frequency during HSV-1 latency. The aim of this study is to develop a rabbit model of rHSK in which stress from elevated temperatures increases the frequency of HSV-1 reactivations and rHSK. Rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 were subjected to elevated temperatures and the frequency of viral reactivations and rHSK were determined. In an experiment in which rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 were subjected to ill-defined stress as a result of failure of the vivarium air conditioning system, reactivation of HSV-1 occurred at over twice the normal frequency. In addition, 60% of eyes developed severe rHSK compared to <1% of eyes normally. All episodes of rHSK were preceded four to five days prior by an unusually large amount of reactivated virus in the tears of that eye and whenever this unusually large amount of reactivated virus was detected in tears, rHSK always appeared 4-5 days later. In subsequent experiments using well defined heat stress the reactivation frequency was similarly increased, but no eyes developed rHSK. The results reported here support the hypothesis that rHSK is associated not simply with elevated reactivation frequency, but rather with rare episodes of very high levels of reactivated virus in tears 4-5 days earlier.

  10. Large Amounts of Reactivated Virus in Tears Precedes Recurrent Herpes Stromal Keratitis in Stressed Rabbits Latently Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Perng, Guey-Chuen; Osorio, Nelson; Jiang, Xianzhi; Geertsema, Roger; Hsiang, Chinhui; Brown, Don; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2017-01-01

    Aim Recurrent herpetic stromal keratitis (rHSK), due to an immune response to reactivation of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), can cause corneal blindness. The development of therapeutic interventions such as drugs and vaccines to decrease rHSK have been hampered by the lack of a small and reliable animal model in which rHSK occurs at a high frequency during HSV-1 latency. The aim of this study is to develop a rabbit model of rHSK in which stress from elevated temperatures increases the frequency of HSV-1 reactivations and rHSK. Materials and methods Rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 were subjected to elevated temperatures and the frequency of viral reactivations and rHSK were determined. Results In an experiment in which rabbits latently infected with HSV-1 were subjected to ill-defined stress as a result of failure of the vivarium air conditioning system, reactivation of HSV-1 occurred at over twice the normal frequency. In addition, 60% of eyes developed severe rHSK compared to <1% of eyes normally. All episodes of rHSK were preceded four to five days prior by an unusually large amount of reactivated virus in the tears of that eye and whenever this unusually large amount of reactivated virus was detected in tears, rHSK always appeared 4–5 days later. In subsequent experiments using well defined heat stress the reactivation frequency was similarly increased, but no eyes developed rHSK. Conclusions The results reported here support the hypothesis that rHSK is associated not simply with elevated reactivation frequency, but rather with rare episodes of very high levels of reactivated virus in tears 4–5 days earlier. PMID:25859798

  11. Assembly of herpes simplex virus (HSV) intermediate capsids in insect cells infected with recombinant baculoviruses expressing HSV capsid proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, D R; Roof, L L; Homa, F L

    1994-01-01

    The capsid of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is composed of seven proteins, VP5, VP19C, VP21, VP22a, VP23, VP24, and VP26, which are the products of six HSV-1 genes. Recombinant baculoviruses were used to express the six capsid genes (UL18, UL19, UL26, UL26.5, UL35, and UL38) in insect cells. All constructs expressed the appropriate-size HSV proteins, and insect cells infected with a mixture of the six recombinant baculoviruses contained large numbers of HSV-like capsids. Capsids were purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and electron microscopy showed that the capsids made in Sf9 cells had the same size and appearance as authentic HSV B capsids. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that the protein composition of these capsids was nearly identical to that of B capsids isolated from HSV-infected Vero cells. Electron microscopy of thin sections clearly demonstrated that the capsids made in insect cells contained the inner electron-translucent core associated with HSV B capsids. In infections in which single capsid genes were left out, it was found that the UL18 (VP23), UL19 (VP5), UL38 (VP19C), and either the UL26 (VP21 and VP24) or the UL26.5 (VP22a) genes were required for assembly of 100-nm capsids. VP22a was shown to form the inner core of the B capsid, since in infections in which the UL26.5 gene was omitted the 100-nm capsids that formed lacked the inner core. The UL35 (VP26) gene was not required for assembly of 100-nm capsids, although assembly of B capsids was more efficient when it was present. These and other observations indicate that (i) the products of the UL18, UL19, UL35, and UL38 genes self-assemble into structures that form the outer surface (icosahedral shell) of the capsid, (ii) the products of the UL26 and/or UL26.5 genes are required (as scaffolds) for assembly of 100-nm capsids, and (iii) the interaction of the outer surface of the capsid with the scaffolding proteins requires the product

  12. Penetration of guinea pig skin by acyclovir in different vehicles and correlation with the efficacy of topical therapy of experimental cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Spruance, S L; McKeough, M B; Cardinal, J R

    1984-01-01

    Inadequate penetration of antiviral agents through the stratum corneum of the skin may be one of the limiting factors in the topical therapy of recurrent cutaneous herpes simplex virus infections in humans. In vitro studies of the penetration of the nucleoside analog acyclovir (ACV) through guinea pig skin demonstrated a marked increase in drug flux when ACV was formulated in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), compared with water or polyethylene glycol (PEG) as the vehicle. To examine whether the increased transcutaneous flux of ACV effected by DMSO was meaningful in vivo, topical 5% ACV in DMSO was evaluated for the treatment of cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection in guinea pigs and compared with topical 5% ACV in PEG. When compared with infection sites treated with the vehicle alone, ACV in DMSO produced a greater percent reduction than did ACV in PEG in median lesion number (8 versus 58%; P less than 0.001), median lesion area (35 versus 73%; P = 0.001), and median lesion virus titer (21 versus 84%; P = 0.08). We conclude that DMSO is a highly effective vehicle for topical administration of ACV and is superior to PEG in our model. Careful choice of vehicle and consideration of transcutaneous penetration may be important for realization of the full potential of topical antiviral therapy in humans.

  13. Dual Function of the pUL7-pUL51 Tegument Protein Complex in Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Albecka, Anna; Owen, Danielle J.; Ivanova, Lyudmila; Brun, Juliane; Liman, Rukayya; Davies, Laura; Ahmed, M. Firoz; Colaco, Susanna; Hollinshead, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tegument of herpesviruses is a highly complex structural layer between the nucleocapsid and the envelope of virions. Tegument proteins play both structural and regulatory functions during replication and spread, but the interactions and functions of many of these proteins are poorly understood. Here we focus on two tegument proteins from herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), pUL7 and pUL51, which have homologues in all other herpesviruses. We have now identified that HSV-1 pUL7 and pUL51 form a stable and direct protein-protein interaction, their expression levels rely on the presence of each other, and they function as a complex in infected cells. We demonstrate that expression of the pUL7-pUL51 complex is important for efficient HSV-1 assembly and plaque formation. Furthermore, we also discovered that the pUL7-pUL51 complex localizes to focal adhesions at the plasma membrane in both infected cells and in the absence of other viral proteins. The expression of pUL7-pUL51 is important to stabilize focal adhesions and maintain cell morphology in infected cells and cells infected with viruses lacking pUL7 and/or pUL51 round up more rapidly than cells infected with wild-type HSV-1. Our data suggest that, in addition to the previously reported functions in virus assembly and spread for pUL51, the pUL7-pUL51 complex is important for maintaining the attachment of infected cells to their surroundings through modulating the activity of focal adhesion complexes. IMPORTANCE Herpesviridae is a large family of highly successful human and animal pathogens. Virions of these viruses are composed of many different proteins, most of which are contained within the tegument, a complex structural layer between the nucleocapsid and the envelope within virus particles. Tegument proteins have important roles in assembling virus particles as well as modifying host cells to promote virus replication and spread. However, little is known about the function of many tegument proteins

  14. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 UL34 Protein Regulates the Global Architecture of the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Fumio; Arii, Jun; Hirohata, Yoshitaka; Maruzuru, Yuhei; Koyanagi, Naoto; Kato, Akihisa; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2017-06-15

    Upon herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection, the CD98 heavy chain (CD98hc) is redistributed around the nuclear membrane (NM), where it promotes viral de-envelopment during the nuclear egress of nucleocapsids. In this study, we attempted to identify the factor(s) involved in CD98hc accumulation and demonstrated the following: (i) the null mutation of HSV-1 UL34 caused specific dispersion throughout the cytoplasm of CD98hc and the HSV-1 de-envelopment regulators, glycoproteins B and H (gB and gH); (ii) as observed with CD98hc, gB, and gH, wild-type HSV-1 infection caused redistribution of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) markers calnexin and ERp57 around the NM, whereas the UL34-null mutation caused cytoplasmic dispersion of these markers; (iii) the ER markers colocalized efficiently with CD98hc, gB, and gH in the presence and absence of UL34 in HSV-1-infected cells; (iv) at the ultrastructural level, wild-type HSV-1 infection caused ER compression around the NM, whereas the UL34-null mutation caused cytoplasmic dispersion of the ER; and (v) the UL34-null mutation significantly decreased the colocalization efficiency of lamin protein markers of the NM with CD98hc and gB. Collectively, these results indicate that HSV-1 infection causes redistribution of the ER around the NM, with resulting accumulation of ER-associated CD98hc, gB, and gH around the NM and that UL34 is required for ER redistribution, as well as for efficient recruitment to the NM of the ER-associated de-envelopment factors. Our study suggests that HSV-1 induces remodeling of the global ER architecture for recruitment of regulators mediating viral nuclear egress to the NM.IMPORTANCE The ER is an important cellular organelle that exists as a complex network extending throughout the cytoplasm. Although viruses often remodel the ER to facilitate viral replication, information on the effects of herpesvirus infections on ER morphological integrity is limited. Here, we showed that HSV-1 infection led to

  15. Virus-Specific Immune Memory at Peripheral Sites of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 (HSV-2) Infection in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jingya; Veselenak, Ronald L.; Gorder, Summer R.; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its importance in modulating HSV-2 pathogenesis, the nature of tissue-resident immune memory to HSV-2 is not completely understood. We used genital HSV-2 infection of guinea pigs to assess the type and location of HSV-specific memory cells at peripheral sites of HSV-2 infection. HSV-specific antibody-secreting cells were readily detected in the spleen, bone marrow, vagina/cervix, lumbosacral sensory ganglia, and spinal cord of previously-infected animals. Memory B cells were detected primarily in the spleen and to a lesser extent in bone marrow but not in the genital tract or neural tissues suggesting that the HSV-specific antibody-secreting cells present at peripheral sites of HSV-2 infection represented persisting populations of plasma cells. The antibody produced by these cells isolated from neural tissues of infected animals was functionally relevant and included antibodies specific for HSV-2 glycoproteins and HSV-2 neutralizing antibodies. A vigorous IFN-γ-secreting T cell response developed in the spleen as well as the sites of HSV-2 infection in the genital tract, lumbosacral ganglia and spinal cord following acute HSV-2 infection. Additionally, populations of HSV-specific tissue-resident memory T cells were maintained at these sites and were readily detected up to 150 days post HSV-2 infection. Unlike the persisting plasma cells, HSV-specific memory T cells were also detected in uterine tissue and cervicothoracic region of the spinal cord and at low levels in the cervicothoracic ganglia. Both HSV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ resident memory cell subsets were maintained long-term in the genital tract and sensory ganglia/spinal cord following HSV-2 infection. Together these data demonstrate the long-term maintenance of both humoral and cellular arms of the adaptive immune response at the sites of HSV-2 latency and virus shedding and highlight the utility of the guinea pig infection model to investigate tissue-resident memory in the setting of HSV-2 latency

  16. Virus-specific immune memory at peripheral sites of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jingya; Veselenak, Ronald L; Gorder, Summer R; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N

    2014-01-01

    Despite its importance in modulating HSV-2 pathogenesis, the nature of tissue-resident immune memory to HSV-2 is not completely understood. We used genital HSV-2 infection of guinea pigs to assess the type and location of HSV-specific memory cells at peripheral sites of HSV-2 infection. HSV-specific antibody-secreting cells were readily detected in the spleen, bone marrow, vagina/cervix, lumbosacral sensory ganglia, and spinal cord of previously-infected animals. Memory B cells were detected primarily in the spleen and to a lesser extent in bone marrow but not in the genital tract or neural tissues suggesting that the HSV-specific antibody-secreting cells present at peripheral sites of HSV-2 infection represented persisting populations of plasma cells. The antibody produced by these cells isolated from neural tissues of infected animals was functionally relevant and included antibodies specific for HSV-2 glycoproteins and HSV-2 neutralizing antibodies. A vigorous IFN-γ-secreting T cell response developed in the spleen as well as the sites of HSV-2 infection in the genital tract, lumbosacral ganglia and spinal cord following acute HSV-2 infection. Additionally, populations of HSV-specific tissue-resident memory T cells were maintained at these sites and were readily detected up to 150 days post HSV-2 infection. Unlike the persisting plasma cells, HSV-specific memory T cells were also detected in uterine tissue and cervicothoracic region of the spinal cord and at low levels in the cervicothoracic ganglia. Both HSV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ resident memory cell subsets were maintained long-term in the genital tract and sensory ganglia/spinal cord following HSV-2 infection. Together these data demonstrate the long-term maintenance of both humoral and cellular arms of the adaptive immune response at the sites of HSV-2 latency and virus shedding and highlight the utility of the guinea pig infection model to investigate tissue-resident memory in the setting of HSV-2 latency

  17. Mutation of UL24 impedes the dissemination of acute herpes simplex virus 1 infection from the cornea to neurons of trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Bourget, Amélie; Sanabria-Solano, Carolina; Lahmidi, Soumia; Lavallée, Gabriel Ouellet; Pearson, Angela

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (human herpesvirus 1) initially infects epithelial cells of the mucosa and then goes on to infect sensory neurons leading ultimately to a latent infection in trigeminal ganglia (TG). UL24 is a core herpesvirus gene that has been identified as a determinant of pathogenesis in several Alphaherpesvirinae, although the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In a mouse model of ocular infection, a UL24-deficient virus exhibited a reduction in viral titres in tear films of 1 log10, whilst titres in TG are often below the level of detection. Moreover, the efficiency of reactivation from latency was also severely reduced. Herein, we investigated how UL24 contributed to acute infection of TG. Our results comparing the impact of UL24 on viral titres in eye tissue versus in tear films did not reveal a general defect in virus release from the cornea. We also found that the impairment of replication seen in mouse primary embryonic neurons with a UL24-deficient virus was not more severe than that observed in an epithelial cell line. Rather, in situ histological analyses revealed that infection with a UL24-deficient virus led to a significant reduction in the number of acutely infected neurons at 3 days post-infection (p.i.). Moreover, there was a significant reduction in the number of neurons positive for viral DNA at 2 days p.i. for the UL24-deficient virus as compared with that observed for WT or a rescue virus. Our results supported a model whereby UL24 functions in the dissemination of acute infection from the cornea to neurons in TG.

  18. Inhibition of host protein synthesis and degradation of cellular mRNAs during infection by influenza and herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Inglis, S.C.

    1982-12-01

    Cloned DNA copies of two cellular genes were used to monitor, by blot hybridization, the stability of particular cell mRNAs after infection by influenza virus and herpes virus. The results indicated that the inhibition of host cell protein synthesis that accompanied infection by each virus could be explained by a reduction in the amounts of cellular mRN As in the cytoplasm, and they suggested that this decrease was due to virus-mediated mRNA degradation.

  19. Thin-layer immunoassay for determination of antibodies to herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Jeansson, S; Elwing, H; Nilsson, L A

    1979-01-01

    Thin-layer immunoassay (TIA) is a simple serological technique suitable for analysis of large numbers of samples. In this study, TIA was evaluated for determination of antibodies to herpes simplex virus. Herpes simplex virus antigen used in TIA was purified from material released from virus-infected cells. The results obtained by TIA were compared with those obtained by neutralization and complement fixation tests. TIA was found to be as sensitive as the neutralization test for demonstration of herpes simplex virus antibodies. No false-negative or -positive reactions were observed. In primary herpes simplex virus-1 infections, an antibody response was demonstrated by TIA, whereas antibodies could not be demonstrated in patients with primary herpes simplex virus-2 infections. Images PMID:222798

  20. Absent anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NR1a antibodies in herpes simplex virus encephalitis and varicella zoster virus infections.

    PubMed

    Berger, Benjamin; Pytlik, Maximilian; Hottenrott, Tilman; Stich, Oliver

    2017-02-01

    A 2012 report and subsequent case series described anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients during the acute phase and relapse of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) encephalitis (HSV1E). However, the prevalence of this phenomenon is unknown and systematic studies on other viral infections of the nervous system are missing. We retrospectively analyzed serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples of consecutive patients treated for neurological HSV1, HSV2 and varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections in our tertiary care university hospital between 2003 and 2013 for the presence of antibodies directed against the NR1a subunit of the NMDAR using indirect immunofluorescence. In total, 88 patients with the following infections were identified through an electronic database search: HSV1 (24 with encephalitis), HSV2 (6 with meningitis, 3 with encephalitis and 1 with myelitis), or VZV (3 with meningitis, 33 with encephalitis, 17 with radiculitis and 1 with myelitis). Two patients with HSV1E and HSV2E, respectively, experienced a clinical relapse. Clinical follow-up was for up to 85 months, and repetitive serum and CSF analyses for up to 43 months. However, at no time did any of the 88 patients exhibit anti-NMDAR NR1a antibodies. In this study, we did not detect anti-NMDAR NR1a antibodies in serial CSF and serum samples of HSV1E patients or patients with other viral infections (HSV2 and VZV). However, the presence of antibodies directed against other epitopes of the NMDAR and other neuronal cell surface antigens cannot be excluded, necessitating further studies.

  1. Association of Chlamydia trachomatis infection and herpes simplex virus type 2 serostatus with genital human papillomavirus infection in men: the HIM Study

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Catharina Johanna; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Papenfuss, Mary R.; da Silva, Roberto José Carvalho; Villa, Luisa Lina; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Nyitray, Alan G.; Giuliano, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies in women indicate that some sexually transmitted infections promote human papillomavirus (HPV) persistence and carcinogenesis. Little is known about this association in men, therefore we assessed whether Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) serostatus are associated with genital HPV prevalence, an early event in HPV related pathogenesis. Methods Genital exfoliated cells, first-void urine and blood from 3,971 men recruited in the USA, Mexico, and Brazil, were tested for HPV, CT, and HSV-2 antibodies, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association of CT infection and HSV-2 serostatus with four HPV outcomes (any, oncogenic, non-oncogenic only, and multiple infections). Results A total of 64 (1.6%) men were CT positive and 811 (20.4%) men were HSV-2 seropositive. After adjustment for potential confounders, CT was associated with any HPV (aOR 2.19, 95%CI: 1.13–4.24), oncogenic HPV (aOR 3.10, 95%CI: 1.53–6.28), and multiple HPV (aOR 3.43, 95%CI: 1.69-6.95) prevalence. HSV-2 serostatus was associated with any HPV (aOR 1.25, 95%CI: 1.02-1.52), non-oncogenic HPV only (aOR 1.38, 95%CI: 1.08-1.75), and multiple HPV (aOR 1.33, 95%CI: 1.06-1.68) prevalence. In analyses stratified by sexual behaviour, CT infection was significantly associated with HPV detection among men reporting ≥2 recent sexual partners, while HSV-2 serostatus was significantly associated with HPV detection in men reporting 0-5 lifetime sexual partners. Conclusion In this population, CT infection and HSV-2 serostatus were associated with prevalent genital HPV infection. Future prospective studies should investigate whether these infections influence HPV acquisition and/or persistence. PMID:23680908

  2. Enhancement of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Infection by Seminal Plasma and Semen Amyloids Implicates a New Target for the Prevention of HSV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Lilith; Ortiz, Tatiana; Tang, Qiyi

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesviruses cause different infectious diseases, resulting in world-wide health problems. Sexual transmission is a major route for the spread of both herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and -2. Semen plays an important role in carrying the viral particle that invades the vaginal or rectal mucosa and, thereby, initiates viral replication. Previously, we demonstrated that the amyloid fibrils semenogelin (SEM) and semen-derived enhancer of viral infection (SEVI), and seminal plasma (SP) augment cytomegalovirus infection (Tang et al., J. Virol 2013). Whether SEM or SEVI amyloids or SP could also enhance other herpesvirus infections has not been examined. In this study, we found that the two amyloids as well as SP strongly enhance both HSV-1 and -2 infections in cell culture. Along with SP, SEM and SEVI amyloids enhanced viral entry and increased infection rates by more than 10-fold, as assessed by flow cytometry assay and fluorescence microscopy. Viral replication was increased by about 50- to 100-fold. Moreover, viral growth curve assays showed that SEM and SEVI amyloids, as well as SP, sped up the kinetics of HSV replication such that the virus reached its replicative peak more quickly. The interactions of SEM, SEVI, and SP with HSVs are direct. Furthermore, we discovered that the enhancing effects of SP, SEM, and SEVI can be significantly reduced by heparin, a sulfated polysaccharide with an anionic charge. It is probable that heparin abrogates said enhancing effects by interfering with the interaction of the viral particle and the amyloids, which interaction results in the binding of the viral particles and both SEM and SEVI. PMID:25903833

  3. Cervical shedding of herpes simplex virus in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women: effects of hormonal contraception, pregnancy, and vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mostad, S B; Kreiss, J K; Ryncarz, A J; Mandaliya, K; Chohan, B; Ndinya-Achola, J; Bwayo, J J; Corey, L

    2000-01-01

    Genital shedding of herpes simplex virus (HSV) results in frequent transmission of infection to sexual partners and neonates. In a cross-sectional study, cervical shedding of HSV DNA was detected in 43 (17%) cervical swab samples from 273 women seropositive for HSV-1, HSV-2, and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Cervical shedding of HSV was significantly associated with oral contraception (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-12.2), use of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate (aOR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.3-7.7), and pregnancy (aOR, 7.9; 95% CI, 2.0-31.7). In the subgroup of women who were not pregnant and not using hormonal contraception (n=178), serum vitamin A was highly predictive of cervical HSV shedding: concentrations indicating severe deficiency, moderate deficiency, low-normal, and high-normal status were associated with 29%, 18%, 8%, and 2% prevalences of cervical HSV shedding, respectively (linear trend, P=.0002). Several factors appear to influence HSV reactivation in HIV-1 seropositive women.

  4. Herpes simplex virus lymphadenitis: the elusive doppelganger in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Cases, Margaret; Leduc, Charles; Farmer, Patricia L; Richardson, Susan E; Zoutman, Dick E

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus has protean manifestations and is an important cause of morbidity in the immunocompromised host. We report a case of recurrent lymphadenopathy and rash in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The elusive clinical diagnosis eventually required core biopsy of a lymph node with immunohistochemistry and confirmation by polymerase chain reaction. This case illustrates the challenging clinical and laboratory diagnosis of herpes simplex virus lymphadenitis and the need to maintain a high index of suspicion for infection when treating an immunocompromised patient with unusual and/or persistent symptoms.

  5. Virus-specific HLA-restricted lysis of herpes simplex virus-infected human monocytes and macrophages mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Torpey, D.J. III

    1987-01-01

    Freshly-isolated peripheral blood human monocytes and 5 day in vitro cultured macrophages were infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), labeled with /sup 51/Cr, and used as target cells in a 12-14 hour cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. Mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) from HSV-1 non-immune individuals, whether unstimulated or stimulated with HSV-1 antigen, did not mediate significant lysis of either target cell. HSV-immune MNL, both freshly-isolated and cultured for 5 days without antigen, demonstrated only low levels of natural killer (NK) cell-mediate lysis. MNL from HSV-immune individuals incubated for 5 days in vitro with HSV-1 antigen mediated significant virus-specific lysis of both target cells. Mean virus-specific lysis of autologous monocytes was 8.5(/+-/2.0)% compared to a three-fold greater virus-specific lysis of autologous macrophages. Greater than 70% of this lytic activity was mediated by Leu-11-negative, T3-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Allogeneic target cells lacking a common HLA determinant were not significantly lysed while T8-positive CTL mediated infrequent lysis of target cells sharing a common HLA-A and/or HLA-B determinant. T4-positive lymphocytes were demonstrated to be the predominant cell mediating lysis of autologous target cells and allogeneic target cells sharing both HLA-A and/or HLA-B plus HLA-DR determinants with the CTL; the T4-positive cell was the sole CTL mediator of lysis of allogeneic target cells having a common HLA-DR determinant.

  6. Detection of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) -specific cell-mediated immune responses in guinea pigs during latent HSV-2 genital infection.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clarice L; Banasik, Brianne N; Gorder, Summer R; Xia, Jingya; Auclair, Sarah; Bourne, Nigel; Milligan, Gregg N

    2016-12-01

    Genital infections with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) are a source of considerable morbidity and are a health concern for newborns exposed to virus during vaginal delivery. Additionally, HSV-2 infection diminishes the integrity of the vaginal epithelium resulting in increased susceptibility of individuals to infection with other sexually transmitted pathogens. Understanding immune protection against HSV-2 primary infection and immune modulation of virus shedding events following reactivation of the virus from latency is important for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. Although the murine model of HSV-2 infection is useful for understanding immunity following immunization, it is limited by the lack of spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency. Genital infection of guinea pigs with HSV-2 accurately models the disease of humans including the spontaneous reactivation of HSV-2 from latency and provides a unique opportunity to examine virus-host interactions during latency. Although the guinea pig represents an accurate model of many human infections, relatively few reagents are available to study the immunological response to infection. To analyze the cell-mediated immune response of guinea pigs at extended periods of time after establishment of HSV-2 latency, we have modified flow-cytometry based proliferation assays and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays to detect and quantify HSV-specific cell-mediated responses during latent infection of guinea pigs. Here we demonstrate that a combination of proliferation and ELISPOT assays can be used to quantify and characterize effecter function of virus-specific immune memory responses during HSV-latency.

  7. Evolutionary origins of human herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, Joel O; Smith, Martin D; Smith, Davey M; Scheffler, Konrad; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L

    2014-09-01

    Herpesviruses have been infecting and codiverging with their vertebrate hosts for hundreds of millions of years. The primate simplex viruses exemplify this pattern of virus-host codivergence, at a minimum, as far back as the most recent common ancestor of New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, and apes. Humans are the only primate species known to be infected with two distinct herpes simplex viruses: HSV-1 and HSV-2. Human herpes simplex viruses are ubiquitous, with over two-thirds of the human population infected by at least one virus. Here, we investigated whether the additional human simplex virus is the result of ancient viral lineage duplication or cross-species transmission. We found that standard phylogenetic models of nucleotide substitution are inadequate for distinguishing among these competing hypotheses; the extent of synonymous substitutions causes a substantial underestimation of the lengths of some of the branches in the phylogeny, consistent with observations in other viruses (e.g., avian influenza, Ebola, and coronaviruses). To more accurately estimate ancient viral divergence times, we applied a branch-site random effects likelihood model of molecular evolution that allows the strength of natural selection to vary across both the viral phylogeny and the gene alignment. This selection-informed model favored a scenario in which HSV-1 is the result of ancient codivergence and HSV-2 arose from a cross-species transmission event from the ancestor of modern chimpanzees to an extinct Homo precursor of modern humans, around 1.6 Ma. These results provide a new framework for understanding human herpes simplex virus evolution and demonstrate the importance of using selection-informed models of sequence evolution when investigating viral origin hypotheses.

  8. The range and distribution of murine central nervous system cells infected with the gamma(1)34.5- mutant of herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed Central

    Markovitz, N S; Baunoch, D; Roizman, B

    1997-01-01

    Wild-type herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) multiplies, spreads, and rapidly destroys cells of the murine central nervous system (CNS). In contrast, mutants lacking both copies of the gamma(1)34.5- gene have been shown to be virtually lacking in virulence even after direct inoculation of high-titered virus into the CNS of susceptible mice (J. Chou, E. R. Kern, R. J. Whitley, and B. Roizman, Science 250:1262-1266, 1990). To investigate the host range and distribution of infected cells in the CNS of mice, 4- to 5-week-old mice were inoculated stereotaxically into the caudate/putamen with 3 x 10(5) PFU of the gamma(1)34.5- virus R3616. Four-micrometer-thick sections of mouse brains removed on day 3, 5, or 7 after infection were reacted with a polyclonal antibody directed primarily to structural proteins of the virus and with antibodies specific for neurons, astrocytes, or oligodendrocytes. This report shows the following: (i) most of the tissue damage caused by R3616 was at the site of injection, (ii) the virus spread by retrograde transport from the site of infection to neuronal cell nuclei at distant sites and to ependymal cells by cerebrospinal fluid, (iii) the virus infected neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymal cells and hence did not discriminate among CNS cells, (iv) viral replication in some neurons could be deduced from the observation of infected astrocytes and oligodendrocytes at distant sites, and (v) infected cells were being efficiently cleared from the nervous system by day 7 after infection. We conclude that the gamma(1)34.5- attenuation phenotype is reflected in a gross reduction in the ability of the virus to replicate and spread from cell to cell and is not due to a restricted host range. The block in viral replication appears to be a late event in viral replication. PMID:9188630

  9. Herpes simplex virus oesophagitis in a pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Remmelts, H H F; van den Brink, J-W; Laan, R; Bac, D-J

    2011-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) oesophagitis is well described in immunocompromised patients. In immunocompetent individuals HSV oesophagitis is rare. We present a case of HSV oesophagitis in a pregnant woman. A possible explanation for HSV oesophagitis during pregnancy is the decreased cellular immunity, leading to an increased frequency and severity of viral infections. Antiviral therapy is advocated in pregnancy.

  10. [A study of the antiherpetic activity of the chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) extracts in the Vero cells infected with the herpes simplex virus].

    PubMed

    Polkovnikova, M V; Nosik, N N; Garaev, T M; Kondrashina, N G; Finogenova, M P; Shibnev, V A

    2014-01-01

    The chaga mushroom (Inonotus obliquus) contains a wide range of excellent bioactive compounds. However, limited information exists on the antiviral activity of the compounds extracted from chaga. A number of subfractions of chaga were obtained using different solvents and different procedures. The subfractions of chaga extracted with water, alcohol, alkali were tested for their toxicity for the Vero cell culture and antiviral effect in the Vero cells infected with the Herpes simplex virus (HSV), Type 1. It was shown that most of the subfractions were not toxic for the Vero cells and had protective effect on the Vero cells infected with HSV. The subfraction IV in the concentration 5 microg/ml protected the Vero cells from cytodestructive action of HSV and no viral DNA was detected in infected cells treated with chaga extracts. Best protective effect was observed when compound was added before or within one hour after the Vero cells were infected with HSV.

  11. Delayed Recurrence of Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in the Central Nervous System After Neonatal Infection and Completion of Six Months of Suppressive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Baylee; Kimberlin, David W; Fjie, Sarah E

    2017-04-04

    A 10-day-old child was treated for neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) central nervous system (CNS) disease with 21 days of intravenous acyclovir and 6 months of oral acyclovir. She presented 7 years later with HSV CNS disease and new lesions in her brain, illustrating the non-benign nature of delayed recurrent HSV CNS disease.

  12. Evasion of early antiviral responses by herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Suazo, Paula A; Ibañez, Francisco J; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency.

  13. Evasion of Early Antiviral Responses by Herpes Simplex Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Suazo, Paula A.; Ibañez, Francisco J.; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R.; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V.; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; González, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency. PMID:25918478

  14. Autophagy is involved in anti-viral activity of pentagalloylglucose (PGG) against Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, Ying; Chen, Zhen-Ping; Ju, Huai-Qiang; Komatsu, Masaaki; Ji, Yu-hua; Liu, Ge; Guo, Chao-wan; Zhang, Ying-Jun; Yang, Chong-Ren; Wang, Yi-Fei; Kitazato, Kaio

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} We showed PGG has anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and can induce autophgy. {yields} Autophagy may be a novel and important mechanism mediating PGG anti-viral activities. {yields} Inhibition of mTOR pathway is an important mechanism of induction of autophagy by PGG. -- Abstract: Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with broad-spectrum anti-viral activity, however, the mechanisms underlying anti-viral activity remain undefined. In this study, we investigated the effects of PGG on anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) associated with autophagy. We found that the PGG anti-HSV-1 activity was impaired significantly in MEF-atg7{sup -/-} cells (autophagy-defective cells) derived from an atg7{sup -/-} knockout mouse. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that PGG-induced autophagosomes engulfed HSV-1 virions. The mTOR signaling pathway, an essential pathway for the regulation of autophagy, was found to be suppressed following PGG treatment. Data presented in this report demonstrated for the first time that autophagy induced following PGG treatment contributed to its anti-HSV activity in vitro.

  15. Activation of Cellular Immunity in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1-Infected Mice by the Oral Administration of Aqueous Extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. Leaves.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Masahiko; Wadhwani, Ashish; Kai, Hisahiro; Hidaka, Muneaki; Yoshida, Hiroki; Sugita, Chihiro; Watanabe, Wataru; Matsuno, Koji; Hagiwara, Akinori

    2016-05-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. is used as a nutritive vegetable and spice. Its ethanol extract has been previously shown to be significantly effective in alleviating herpetic skin lesions in mice. In this study, we evaluated the alleviation by the aqueous extract (AqMOL) and assessed the mode of its anti-herpetic action in a murine cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection model. AqMOL (300 mg/kg) was administered orally to HSV-1-infected mice three times daily on days 0 to 5 after infection. AqMOL significantly limited the development of herpetic skin lesions and reduced virus titers in the brain on day 4 without toxicity. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction to inactivated HSV-1 antigen was significantly stronger in infected mice administered AqMOL and AqMOL augmented interferon (IFN)-γ production by HSV-1 antigen from splenocytes of HSV-1-infected mice at 4 days post-infection. AqMOL administration was effective in elevating the ratio of CD11b(+) and CD49b(+) subpopulations of splenocytes in infected mice. As DTH is a major host defense mechanism for intradermal HSV infection, augmentation of the DTH response by AqMOL may contribute to their efficacies against HSV-1 infection. These results provided an important insights into the mechanism by which AqMOL activates cellular immunity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. A combination microbicide gel protects macaques against vaginal simian human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase infection, but only partially reduces herpes simplex virus-2 infection after a single high-dose cochallenge.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Mayla; Aravantinou, Meropi; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Goldman, Daniel; Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Fernández-Romero, Jose A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Robbiani, Melissa

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection increases HIV susceptibility. We previously established a rhesus macaque model of vaginal HSV-2 preexposure followed by cochallenge with HSV-2 and simian/human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT). Using this model, we showed that a gel containing the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 in carrageenan (CG) reduced SHIV-RT infection. To evaluate the efficacy of new generation microbicides against both viruses, we first established dual infection after single vaginal cochallenge with SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in HSV-2-naive macaques. All animals (6/6) became HSV-2 infected, with 4/6 coinfected with SHIV-RT. In a control group cochallenged with SHIV-RT and UV-inactivated HSV-2, 2/4 became SHIV-RT infected, and none had detectable HSV-2. Low-level HSV-2-specific antibody and T cell responses were detected in some HSV-2-infected animals. To test a CG gel containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate (MZC), which provided naive animals full protection from SHIV-RT for at least 8 h, MZC (vs. CG) was applied daily for 14 days followed by cochallenge 8 h later. MZC prevented SHIV-RT infection (0/9 infected, p=0.04 vs. 3/6 in CG controls), but only reduced HSV-2 infection by 20% (6/9 infected vs. 5/6 in CG, p=0.6). In HSV-2-infected animals, none of the gel-treated animals seroconverted, and only the CG controls had measurable HSV-2-specific T cell responses. This study shows the promise of MZC to prevent immunodeficiency virus infection (even in the presence of HSV-2) and reduce HSV-2 infection after exposure to a high-dose inoculum. Additionally, it demonstrates the potential of a macaque coinfection model to evaluate broad-spectrum microbicides.

  17. A Combination Microbicide Gel Protects Macaques Against Vaginal Simian Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Reverse Transcriptase Infection, But Only Partially Reduces Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Infection After a Single High-Dose Cochallenge

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mayla; Aravantinou, Meropi; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Goldman, Daniel; Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Fernández-Romero, Jose A.; Zydowsky, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection increases HIV susceptibility. We previously established a rhesus macaque model of vaginal HSV-2 preexposure followed by cochallenge with HSV-2 and simian/human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT). Using this model, we showed that a gel containing the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 in carrageenan (CG) reduced SHIV-RT infection. To evaluate the efficacy of new generation microbicides against both viruses, we first established dual infection after single vaginal cochallenge with SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in HSV-2-naive macaques. All animals (6/6) became HSV-2 infected, with 4/6 coinfected with SHIV-RT. In a control group cochallenged with SHIV-RT and UV-inactivated HSV-2, 2/4 became SHIV-RT infected, and none had detectable HSV-2. Low-level HSV-2-specific antibody and T cell responses were detected in some HSV-2-infected animals. To test a CG gel containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate (MZC), which provided naive animals full protection from SHIV-RT for at least 8 h, MZC (vs. CG) was applied daily for 14 days followed by cochallenge 8 h later. MZC prevented SHIV-RT infection (0/9 infected, p=0.04 vs. 3/6 in CG controls), but only reduced HSV-2 infection by 20% (6/9 infected vs. 5/6 in CG, p=0.6). In HSV-2-infected animals, none of the gel-treated animals seroconverted, and only the CG controls had measurable HSV-2-specific T cell responses. This study shows the promise of MZC to prevent immunodeficiency virus infection (even in the presence of HSV-2) and reduce HSV-2 infection after exposure to a high-dose inoculum. Additionally, it demonstrates the potential of a macaque coinfection model to evaluate broad-spectrum microbicides. PMID:24117013

  18. Evolutionary Origins of Human Herpes Simplex Viruses 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Joel O.; Smith, Martin D.; Smith, Davey M.; Scheffler, Konrad; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.

    2014-01-01

    Herpesviruses have been infecting and codiverging with their vertebrate hosts for hundreds of millions of years. The primate simplex viruses exemplify this pattern of virus–host codivergence, at a minimum, as far back as the most recent common ancestor of New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, and apes. Humans are the only primate species known to be infected with two distinct herpes simplex viruses: HSV-1 and HSV-2. Human herpes simplex viruses are ubiquitous, with over two-thirds of the human population infected by at least one virus. Here, we investigated whether the additional human simplex virus is the result of ancient viral lineage duplication or cross-species transmission. We found that standard phylogenetic models of nucleotide substitution are inadequate for distinguishing among these competing hypotheses; the extent of synonymous substitutions causes a substantial underestimation of the lengths of some of the branches in the phylogeny, consistent with observations in other viruses (e.g., avian influenza, Ebola, and coronaviruses). To more accurately estimate ancient viral divergence times, we applied a branch-site random effects likelihood model of molecular evolution that allows the strength of natural selection to vary across both the viral phylogeny and the gene alignment. This selection-informed model favored a scenario in which HSV-1 is the result of ancient codivergence and HSV-2 arose from a cross-species transmission event from the ancestor of modern chimpanzees to an extinct Homo precursor of modern humans, around 1.6 Ma. These results provide a new framework for understanding human herpes simplex virus evolution and demonstrate the importance of using selection-informed models of sequence evolution when investigating viral origin hypotheses. PMID:24916030

  19. Herpes simplex infection of the larynx requiring laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Sims, John R; Massoll, Nicole A; Suen, James Y

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection of the larynx is an exceedingly rare clinical entity, most frequently reported in the pediatric population or in immunocompromised adults. We present a 62-year-old woman presented with neck pain, hoarseness, crepitus over the larynx, and what appeared to be a necrotic mass of the right true vocal cord on laryngoscopy. Due to near-complete destruction of the cartilaginous framework of the larynx, a total laryngectomy was performed. The final pathology report showed squamous mucosal changes consistent with herpes simplex infection, confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Though herpes simplex laryngitis is uncommon, this case shows the potential for herpes simplex to cause extensive damage and compromise airway patency when left untreated.

  20. Inhibitory effects of Indonesian medicinal plants on the infection of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Nawawi, A; Nakamura, N; Hattori, M; Kurokawa, M; Shiraki, K

    1999-02-01

    Water and methanol extracts of 30 traditional medicinal plants, collected in Indonesia, were tested for their anti HSV-1 activity. The extracts of eight plant species showed potent activity on the plaque assay at a concentration of 100 micrograms/mL. The therapeutic efficacy of seven selected plants was demonstrated by using a mouse HSV-1 infection assay, both the methanol extracts of the fruit of Melaleuca leucadendron (Myrtaceae) and the pericarp of Nephelium lappaceum (Sapindaceae) significantly prolonged the development of skin lesions and reduced the mortality.

  1. Incidence and clinical features of herpes simplex viruses (1 and 2) and varicella-zoster virus infections in an adult Korean population with aseptic meningitis or encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Rihwa; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Jo, Ik Joon; Sim, Min Seob; Song, Keun Jeong; Kim, Byoung Joon; Na, Duk L; Huh, Hee Jae; Kim, Jong-Won; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Nam Yong

    2014-06-01

    Since there are limited data on the incidence and clinical findings of central nervous system (CNS) infection by three α-herpesviruses including human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2 and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in Korea, a retrospective analysis of clinical data and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results was performed in patients who presented with suspicion of acute viral meningitis and/or encephalitis at the emergency department of a tertiary referral hospital in Seoul, Korea. During the 3-year study period, a total of 224 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 224 patients were examined. Among the 224 patients, 135 (60.3%) patients were identified as having aseptic meningitis (n = 70, 51.9%), encephalitis (n = 41, 30.4%) or meningoencephalitis (n = 24, 17.8%) at discharge. Twenty-four (17.8%) patients were identified as having VZV meningitis (n = 16, 11.9%), VZV meningoencephalitis (n = 2, 1.5%), HSV-2 meningitis (n = 4, 3.0%), or HSV-1 encephalitis (n = 2, 1.5%). Of the 24 patients infected with the three herpesviruses, immunocompromised patients accounted for 33.3% (n = 8). Skin rashes were observed in half (n = 9) of the patients with VZV, and none with HSV-1 or HSV-2. One patient with VZV meningitis and four patients with brain parenchymal involvement had neurologic sequelae. In conclusion, three herpesviruses are important causative agents of CNS infectious disease with significant morbidity in adults, regardless of the immunologic status. Therefore, CSF should be examined for HSV-1, HSV-2, and VZV using sensitive diagnostic methods in all cases of adult patients with clinical manifestations of CNS disease in order to identify the correct etiology and to determine appropriate therapy.

  2. A model of genital herpes simplex virus Type 1 infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Aravantinou, Meropi; Frank, Ines; Arrode-Bruses, Geraldine; Szpara, Moriah; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Gettie, Agegnehu; Derby, Nina; Martinelli, Elena

    2017-08-01

    Although HSV-2 is the major cause of genital lesions, HSV-1 accounts for half of new cases in developed countries. Three healthy SHIV-SF162P3-infected Indian rhesus macaques were inoculated with 4×10(8) pfu of HSV-1 twice, with the second inoculation performed after the vaginal mucosa was gently abraded with a cytobrush. HSV-1 DNA was detected in vaginal swabs 5 days after the second but not the first inoculation in all three macaques. An increase in inflammatory cytokines was detected in the vaginal fluids of the animals with no or intermittent shedding. Higher frequency of blood α4 β7(high) CD4(+) T cells was measured in the animals with consistent and intermitted shedding, while a decrease in the frequency of CD69(+) CD4(+) T cells was present in all animals. This macaque model of genital HSV-1 could be useful to study the impact of the growing epidemic of genital HSV-1 on HIV infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Analysis of the 2-kilobase latency-associated transcript expressed in PC12 cells productively infected with herpes simplex virus type 1: evidence for a stable, nonlinear structure.

    PubMed Central

    Rødahl, E; Haarr, L

    1997-01-01

    The major latency-associated transcript (LAT) expressed in PC12 cells productively infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 is a 2-kb, nonpolyadenylated RNA molecule that accumulates in the nuclei of infected cells. In actinomycin D-treated cells, the 2-kb LAT gene transcript has a half-life considerably greater than 12 h. After polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, two species of the transcript were observed, a major species that was retarded in the gel and a minor species that migrated as a 1.96-kb RNA molecule. RNase H digestion after hybridization of the RNA with an oligonucleotide complementary to positions -80 to -101 relative to the 3' end of the 2-kb LAT gene transcript changed the mobility of the retarded species into that of the rapidly migrating species. Our data indicate that the 2-kb LAT gene transcript expressed in productively infected PC12 cells is present in a stable, nonlinear form. PMID:8995704

  4. Effects of herpes simplex virus type 1 infection on the plasma membrane and related functions of HeLa S3 cells.

    PubMed

    Palù, G; Biasolo, M A; Sartor, G; Masotti, L; Papini, E; Floreani, M; Palatini, P

    1994-12-01

    In this study we evaluated modifications of various structural and functional properties of the plasma membrane of HeLa S3 cells following infection by the lytic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity considerably decreased during the first few hours post-infection (p.i.), whereas Na+ and K+ concentrations were not significantly affected until a much later period. By 8 h p.i., a partial membrane depolarization in infected cells had occurred, as indicated by a small change in the transmembrane potential. HSV infection induced a time-dependent lipid peroxidation of HeLa cell plasma membranes temporally correlated with the progressive reduction in Na+/K(+)-ATPase activity. Moreover, a significant decrease of membrane fluidity appeared at a late phase of the viral replicative cycle probably representing cumulative membrane damage. These results demonstrate that HSV-1 infection induced the production of free radicals in non-phagocytic cells. Since lipid peroxidation begins at an early stage of the virus replicative cycle, it may be directly related to viral cytopathicity.

  5. Nectin-1-specific entry of herpes simplex virus 1 is sufficient for infection of the cornea and viral spread to the trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Navika D.; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Primary and recurrent infections of the cornea by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) are important causes of eye disease. Three unrelated classes of glycoprotein D receptors for HSV-1 entry into cells have been identified. This study was undertaken to uncover the relative significance of nectin-1 as an entry receptor in corneal infection and HSV-1 spread to the trigeminal ganglia (TG), a site important for HSV-1 latency and recurrent corneal infection. Methods To assess the significance of nectin-1, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, in primary HSV-1 infection and spread to the TG, we used a murine model of corneal infection and a HSV-1 mutant, KOS(Rid1), which can only use nectin-1 for entry. Immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR, and plaque assays using HSV-1 infected tissues were performed. Results We demonstrated that receptor usage by HSV-1 limited to nectin-1 does not significantly change the spread of HSV-1 in the corneal epithelium during primary infection. We also found that nectin-1-specific entry does not affect the capacity of the virus to spread to the TG from the cornea. Conclusions Our findings suggest that nectin-1 alone is sufficient for HSV-1 entry into the cornea and spread to the TG. PMID:23213272

  6. Nectin-1-specific entry of herpes simplex virus 1 is sufficient for infection of the cornea and viral spread to the trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Navika D; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor

    2012-01-01

    Primary and recurrent infections of the cornea by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) are important causes of eye disease. Three unrelated classes of glycoprotein D receptors for HSV-1 entry into cells have been identified. This study was undertaken to uncover the relative significance of nectin-1 as an entry receptor in corneal infection and HSV-1 spread to the trigeminal ganglia (TG), a site important for HSV-1 latency and recurrent corneal infection. To assess the significance of nectin-1, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, in primary HSV-1 infection and spread to the TG, we used a murine model of corneal infection and a HSV-1 mutant, KOS(Rid1), which can only use nectin-1 for entry. Immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR, and plaque assays using HSV-1 infected tissues were performed. We demonstrated that receptor usage by HSV-1 limited to nectin-1 does not significantly change the spread of HSV-1 in the corneal epithelium during primary infection. We also found that nectin-1-specific entry does not affect the capacity of the virus to spread to the TG from the cornea. Our findings suggest that nectin-1 alone is sufficient for HSV-1 entry into the cornea and spread to the TG.

  7. A viral function represses accumulation of transcripts from productive-cycle genes in mouse ganglia latently infected with herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, S H; Kramer, M F; Schaffer, P A; Coen, D M

    1997-08-01

    Latent infections of neurons by herpes simplex virus form reservoirs of recurrent viral infections that resist cure. In latently infected neurons, viral gene expression is severely repressed; only the latency-associated transcripts (LATs) are expressed abundantly. Using sensitive reverse transcriptase PCR assays, we analyzed the effects of a deletion mutation in the LAT locus on viral gene expression in latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. The deletion mutation, which reduced expression of the major LATs 10(5)-fold, resulted in a approximately 5-fold increase in accumulation of transcripts from the immediate-early gene encoding ICP4, an essential transactivator of viral gene expression. The LAT deletion also resulted in a >10-fold increase in the accumulation of transcripts from the early gene encoding thymidine kinase, whose expression during productive infection stringently depends on ICP4, and positively affected the correlation of the levels of these transcripts with the levels of ICP4 transcripts. We also detected transcripts antisense to ICP4 RNA, which were in substantial excess to ICP4 transcripts in ganglia latently infected with wild-type virus. In contrast to its effects on productive-cycle transcripts, the LAT deletion reduced the accumulation of these antisense transcripts approximately 15-fold. Thus, a viral function associated with the LAT locus represses the accumulation of transcripts from at least two productive-cycle genes in latently infected mouse ganglia. We discuss possible mechanisms and consequences of this repression.

  8. Quantitative uptake studies of /sup 131/I-labeled (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine in herpes simplex virus-infected cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.J.; Samuel, J.; Wiebe, L.I.; Knaus, E.E.; Tyrrell, D.L.

    1984-04-01

    We have synthesized a /sup 131/I-radiolabeled antiviral compound (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (IVdU) and shown that this agent was selectively trapped within rabbit kidney cells, infected in vitro by thymidine kinase-positive (TK+) herpes simplex virus (HSV). The uptake of /sup 131/I-labeled IVdU was specific, as it was not concentrated within either HSV (TK-) or mock-infected cells. In certain conditions, over 40% of the radiolabel was selectively trapped within HSV (TK+)-infected cells. This was a 20- to 30-fold increase over the uptake of /sup 131/I-labeled IVdU by HSV (TK-) or mock-infected cells. The uptake of /sup 131/I-labeled IVdU varied directly with (i) the dose of the virus used to infect the rabbit kidney cells; (ii) the concentration of radiolabeled IVdU added to the system; and (iii) the time of exposure of IVdU to infected cells. The ability of this agent to be trapped within HSV (TK+)-infected cells merits further evaluation in animal models as it has potential as a noninvasive, herpes-specific diagnostic test, in particular for HSV encephalitis.

  9. Antiviral effect of compounds derived from Angelica archangelica L. on Herpes simplex virus-1 and Coxsackievirus B3 infections.

    PubMed

    Rajtar, Barbara; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Świątek, Łukasz; Stec, Agnieszka; Boguszewska, Anastazja; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata

    2017-05-06

    The dichloromethane extract from fruits of Angelica archangelica L. was separated by the modern high-performance countercurrent chromatography (HPCCC). The extract and five pure compounds: xanthotoxin, bergapten, imperatorin, phellopterin and isoimperatorin, and the mixture of imperatorin and phellopterin, have been studied as the potential antiviral agents against Herpes simplex virus type l and Coxsackievirus B3. The cytotoxicity was measured using the MTT method. Compounds were tested for the in vitro antiviral activity using the cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibitory assay and by the virus titre reduction assay. Real-time PCR was used to quantify the relative inhibition of the HSV-1 replication. The results indicate that the highest activity was demonstrated by the extract, imperatorin, phellopterin and the mixture of imperatorin and phellopterin, reducing the HSV-1 replication by 5.61 log, 4.7 log, 3.01 log and 3.73 log, respectively. The influence of isolated compounds on the CVB3 replication was not significant. Only the extract caused the decrease in the titre of virus in relation to the virus control. Our results show that coumarins of A. archangelica L. might be a potential candidate for the development of the alternative natural anti- HSV-1 compound. Moreover, the presence of isopentenyloxy moiety at C-8 position significantly improves their activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Valacyclovir for herpes simplex virus infection: long-term safety and sustained efficacy after 20 years' experience with acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Tyring, Stephen K; Baker, David; Snowden, Wendy

    2002-10-15

    An extensive clinical trial program combined with 5 years' postmarketing experience with valacyclovir provides evidence of favorable safety and efficacy in herpes simplex virus (HSV) management. Valacyclovir enhances acyclovir bioavailability compared with orally administered acyclovir. Long-term use of acyclovir for up to 10 years for HSV suppression is effective and well tolerated. Acyclovir is also approved for use in children, is available in some countries over the counter in cream formulation for herpes labialis, and has been monitored in over 1000 pregnancies. Safety monitoring data from clinical trials of valacyclovir, involving over 3000 immunocompetent and immunocompromised persons receiving long-term therapy for HSV suppression, were analyzed. Safety profiles of valacyclovir (

  11. Previous immunization of mice with herpes simplex virus type-1 strain MP protects against secondary corneal infection.

    PubMed

    Sandstrom, I K; Foster, C S; Wells, P A; Knipe, D; Caron, L; Greene, M I

    1986-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-induced ocular disease is occurring in epidemic proportions throughout the world, and is the number one cause of unilateral corneal blindness in all developed countries. We have found, in a mouse model of herpes simplex keratitis (HSK), that products encoded by the Igh-1 locus on chromosome 12 exert a profound influence on the immune/inflammatory response in the cornea after HSV inoculation in the cornea. Thus, mice with Igh-1c or Igh-1d phenotype routinely develop extreme keratopathy and loss of corneal clarity after HSV encounter in the eye, while congenic strains expressing other Igh-1 phenotypes develop substantially less keratopathy. We examined the effect of previous subcutaneous immunization with the mutant, less virulent, MP strain of HSV on the development of keratitis and encephalitis after secondary corneal inoculation with strains MP, mP, F, and KOS. A/J mice (Igh-1c), 5-6 weeks old, were injected sc with live HSV-1 strain MP. Controls were injected with culture media without virus. Three weeks later both immunized and control nonimmunized animals were challenged in the cornea with HSV-1, strains MP, mP, F, and KOS. The animals were clinically scored for keratitis and encephalitis at regular intervals for 21 days following corneal challenge. None of the immunized animals challenged in the cornea with strain MP, 5 X 10(4) plaque-forming units (PFU), developed clinical signs of encephalitis compared to 86% of unimmunized controls. Of the immunized animals challenged in the cornea with strain MP, 5 X 10(4) PFU, only 18% developed a mild keratitis, while 96% of unimmunized controls developed severe keratitis. Mice immunized subcutaneously with MP and subsequently challenged corneally with other HSV-1 strains (mP, F, or KOS) were also protected from development of severe keratopathy.

  12. Cells infected with herpes simplex virus 1 export to uninfected cells exosomes containing STING, viral mRNAs, and microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Kalamvoki, Maria; Du, Te; Roizman, Bernard

    2014-11-18

    STING (stimulator of IFN genes) activates the IFN-dependent innate immune response to infection on sensing the presence of DNA in cytosol. The quantity of STING accumulating in cultured cells varies; it is relatively high in some cell lines [e.g., HEp-2, human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL), and HeLa] and low in others (e.g., Vero cells). In a preceding publication we reported that STING was stable in four cell lines infected with herpes simplex virus 1 and that it was actively stabilized in at least two cell lines derived from human cancers. In this report we show that STING is exported from HEp-2 cells to Vero cells along with virions, viral mRNAs, microRNAs, and the exosome marker protein CD9. The virions and exosomes copurified. The quantity of STING and CD9 exported from one cell line to another was inoculum-size-dependent and reflected the levels of STING and CD9 accumulating in the cells in which the virus inoculum was made. The export of STING, an innate immune sensor, and of viral mRNAs whose major role may be in silencing viral genes in latently infected neurons, suggests that the virus has evolved mechanisms that curtail rather than foster the spread of infection under certain conditions.

  13. Psychological stress exacerbates primary vaginal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection by impairing both innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ashcraft, Kathleen A; Bonneau, Robert H

    2008-11-01

    Chronic psychological stress is generally immunosuppressive and contributes to an increase in herpes simplex virus (HSV) pathogenicity. We have previously shown that mice experiencing stress at the time of intranasal HSV infection have increased levels of infectious virus in their nasal cavity, as compared to control mice that were not subjected to stress. We have extended our studies to determine the effects of stress at another clinically-relevant mucosal site by examining the immune response to and pathogenesis of vaginal HSV infection. Mice experiencing psychological stress during vaginal HSV infection exhibited an increase in both vaginal viral titers and the pathology associated with this HSV infection. We demonstrate that these observations result from the failure of both the innate and HSV-specific adaptive immune responses. At 2 days post-infection, NK cell numbers were significantly decreased in mice experiencing restraint stress. Studies examining the adaptive immune response revealed a decrease in the number of HSV-specific CD8(+) T cells in not only the vaginal tissue itself but also the draining iliac lymph nodes (ILN). Furthermore, the number of functional cells, in terms of both their degranulation and interferon-gamma production, in the ILN of stressed mice was decreased as compared to non-stressed mice. We conclude that psychological stress, through its suppression of both innate and adaptive immune responses, may be an important factor in the ability to control vaginal HSV infection.

  14. Naturally occurring antibodies against nerve growth factor in human and rabbit sera: comparison between control and herpes simplex virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Dicou, E; Nerrière, V; Labropoulou, V

    1991-11-01

    Antibodies against nerve growth factor (NGF) in sera were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), by their isolation after passage of sera through NGF immunoadsorbent columns and by their specificity to bind and immunoprecipitate mouse NGF as well as to stain by immunohistochemical methods cellular sites of NGF synthesis. Increased levels of anti-NGF antibodies were found in sera of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected patients but not in HSV-inoculated rabbits. As HSV latency is known to be promoted by NGF in vitro, these results may suggest that anti-NGF antibodies modulate the cytokine function of NGF and thus might play a role in HSV infection. The biological function of circulating antibodies against NGF, in general, is now open to future investigation.

  15. Recurrent neonatal herpes simplex virus infection with central nervous system disease after completion of a 6-month course of suppressive therapy: Case report.

    PubMed

    Kato, Koji; Hara, Shinya; Kawada, Jun-Ichi; Ito, Yoshinori

    2015-12-01

    A boy at 12 days of age developed neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 infection with central nervous system (CNS) disease. After a 21-day course of high-dose intravenous acyclovir, the patient recovered with negative results for HSV DNA in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Two weeks after a 6-month course of oral valacyclovir suppressive therapy with negative virological assessment, the disease recurred. Another 21-day course of intravenous acyclovir and subsequent 1-year course of oral suppressive therapy were completed. He showed mild developmental delay in language-social skills at 18 months of age. Although recurrences of neonatal HSV infection with CNS disease after suppressive therapy are uncommon, both clinical and virological assessments at the end of the suppressive therapy may be required. Administration of extended long-term suppressive ACV therapy should be considered to reduce the rate of recurrence.

  16. Replication-Competent Controlled Herpes Simplex Virus.

    PubMed

    Bloom, David C; Feller, Joyce; McAnany, Peterjon; Vilaboa, Nuria; Voellmy, Richard

    2015-10-01

    We present the development and characterization of a replication-competent controlled herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Replication-essential ICP4 and ICP8 genes of HSV-1 wild-type strain 17syn+ were brought under the control of a dually responsive gene switch. The gene switch comprises (i) a transactivator that is activated by a narrow class of antiprogestins, including mifepristone and ulipristal, and whose expression is mediated by a promoter cassette that comprises an HSP70B promoter and a transactivator-responsive promoter and (ii) transactivator-responsive promoters that drive the ICP4 and ICP8 genes. Single-step growth experiments in different cell lines demonstrated that replication of the recombinant virus, HSV-GS3, is strictly dependent on an activating treatment consisting of administration of a supraphysiological heat dose in the presence of an antiprogestin. The replication-competent controlled virus replicates with an efficiency approaching that of the wild-type virus from which it was derived. Essentially no replication occurs in the absence of activating treatment or if HSV-GS3-infected cells are exposed only to heat or antiprogestin. These findings were corroborated by measurements of amounts of viral DNA and transcripts of the regulated ICP4 gene and the glycoprotein C (gC) late gene, which was not regulated. Similar findings were made in experiments with a mouse footpad infection model. The alphaherpesviruses have long been considered vectors for recombinant vaccines and oncolytic therapies. The traditional approach uses vector backbones containing attenuating mutations that restrict replication to ensure safety. The shortcoming of this approach is that the attenuating mutations tend to limit both the immune presentation and oncolytic properties of these vectors. HSV-GS3 represents a novel type of vector that, when activated, replicates with the efficiency of a nonattenuated virus and whose safety is derived from deliberate, stringent regulation of

  17. Replication-Competent Controlled Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, David C.; Feller, Joyce; McAnany, Peterjon; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present the development and characterization of a replication-competent controlled herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Replication-essential ICP4 and ICP8 genes of HSV-1 wild-type strain 17syn+ were brought under the control of a dually responsive gene switch. The gene switch comprises (i) a transactivator that is activated by a narrow class of antiprogestins, including mifepristone and ulipristal, and whose expression is mediated by a promoter cassette that comprises an HSP70B promoter and a transactivator-responsive promoter and (ii) transactivator-responsive promoters that drive the ICP4 and ICP8 genes. Single-step growth experiments in different cell lines demonstrated that replication of the recombinant virus, HSV-GS3, is strictly dependent on an activating treatment consisting of administration of a supraphysiological heat dose in the presence of an antiprogestin. The replication-competent controlled virus replicates with an efficiency approaching that of the wild-type virus from which it was derived. Essentially no replication occurs in the absence of activating treatment or if HSV-GS3-infected cells are exposed only to heat or antiprogestin. These findings were corroborated by measurements of amounts of viral DNA and transcripts of the regulated ICP4 gene and the glycoprotein C (gC) late gene, which was not regulated. Similar findings were made in experiments with a mouse footpad infection model. IMPORTANCE The alphaherpesviruses have long been considered vectors for recombinant vaccines and oncolytic therapies. The traditional approach uses vector backbones containing attenuating mutations that restrict replication to ensure safety. The shortcoming of this approach is that the attenuating mutations tend to limit both the immune presentation and oncolytic properties of these vectors. HSV-GS3 represents a novel type of vector that, when activated, replicates with the efficiency of a nonattenuated virus and whose safety is derived from deliberate

  18. Herpes simplex virus: isolation, cytopathological characterization and antiviral sensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa, Carlos; Hattori, Lilian Yumi; Galhardi, Ligia Carla Faccin; Lopes, Nayara; Bomfim, Wesley Andrade; de Cândido, Ligyana Korki; de Azevedo, Elbens Marcos Minoreli; Gon, Airton dos Santos; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is an endemic disease and it is estimated that 6095% of the adult population are infected with symptoms that are usually self-limiting, though they can be serious, extensive and prolonged in immunocompromised individuals, highlighted by the emergence of drug-resistant strains. The study of the wild-type HSV strains based on the cytopathogenic features and its antiviral sensitivity are important in the establishment of an antivirogram for controlling the infection. OBJECTIVE This study sought to isolate and examine the cytopathological characteristics of circulating strains of the Herpes simplex virus, from clinical specimens and their sensitivity to commercially available antiherpesvirus drugs, acyclovir, phosphonophormic acid and trifluridine. METHODS Herpes simplex virus isolation, cytopathological features and antiviral sensitivity assays were performed in cell culture by tissue culture infectious dose or plaque forming unit assay. RESULTS From twenty-two clinical specimens, we isolated and adapted nine strains. Overall, the cytopathic effect was detected 24 h post-infection (p.i.) and the presence of syncytia was remarkable 48 h p.i., observed after cell staining. Out of eight isolates, four developed plaques of varying sizes. All the isolates were sensitive to acyclovir, phosphonophormic and trifluridine, with the percentage of virus inhibition (%VI) ranging from 49.7-100%. CONCLUSIONS The methodology for HSV isolation and characterization is a straightforward approach, but the drug sensitivity test, regarded as being of great practical importance, needs to be better understood. PMID:24937819

  19. CD40 ligand exhibits a direct antiviral effect on Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 infection via a PI3K-dependent, autophagy-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vlahava, Virginia-Maria; Eliopoulos, Aristides G; Sourvinos, George

    2015-06-01

    The interaction between CD40 and its ligand, CD40L/CD154, is crucial for the efficient initiation and regulation of immune responses against viruses. Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus capable of manipulating host responses and exploiting host proteins to establish productive infection. Herein we have examined the impact of CD40L-mediated CD40 activation on HSV-1 replication in U2OS cells stably expressing the CD40 receptor. Treatment of these cells with CD40L significantly reduced the HSV-1 progeny virus compared to non-treated cells. The activation of CD40 signaling did not affect the binding of HSV-1 virions on the cell surface but rather delayed the translocation of VP16 to the nucleus, affecting all stages of viral life cycle. Using pharmacological inhibitors and RNAi we show that inhibition of PI3 kinase but not autophagy reverses the effects of CD40L on HSV-1 replication. Collectively, these data demonstrate that CD40 activation exerts a direct inhibitory effect on HSV-1, initiating from the very early stages of the infection by exploiting PI3 kinase-dependent but autophagy-independent mechanisms.

  20. The impact of oral herpes simplex virus infection and candidiasis on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis among patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-K; Hou, H-A; Chow, J-M; Chen, Y-C; Hsueh, P-R; Tien, H-F

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of oral candidiasis and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections in chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (OM). The medical records of 424 consecutive patients with hematological malignancies who had received chemotherapy at a medical center in Taiwan from January 2006 to November 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. The results of swab cultures of fungus and HSV-1 for OM were correlated with associated clinical features. Younger age, myeloid malignancies, and disease status other than complete remission before chemotherapy were significantly correlated with the development of OM. Risks of fever (p < 0.001) and bacteremia were higher in patients with OM. Among 467 episodes of OM with both swab cultures available, 221 were non-infection (47.3%) and 246 were related to either fungal infections, HSV-1 infections, or both (52.7%); of the 246 episodes, 102 were associated with fungal infections alone (21.8%), 98 with HSV-1 infections alone (21%), and 46 with both infections (9.9%). Patients who had received antifungal agents prior to OM occurrence tended to have HSV-1 infection (p < 0.001). Our results suggest that Candida albicans and HSV-1 play an important role in chemotherapy-induced OM in patients with hematological malignancies.

  1. Concomitant herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis in a man with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Varun K.; Friedman-Moraco, Rachel J.; Quigley, Brian C.; Farris, Alton B.; Norvell, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Herpesvirus infections often complicate the clinical course of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; however, invasive disease due to herpes simplex virus is distinctly uncommon. Methods: We present a case of herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis, review all the previously published cases of herpes simplex virus colitis, and discuss common clinical features and outcomes. We also discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of herpes simplex virus infections, focusing specifically on patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Results: A 43-year-old man with ulcerative colitis, previously controlled with an oral 5-aminosalicylic agent, developed symptoms of a colitis flare that did not respond to treatment with systemic corticosteroid therapy. One week later he developed orolabial ulcers and progressive hepatic dysfunction, with markedly elevated transaminases and coagulopathy. He underwent emergent total colectomy when imaging suggested bowel micro-perforation. Pathology from both the colon and liver was consistent with herpes simplex virus infection, and a viral culture of his orolabial lesions and a serum polymerase chain reaction assay also identified herpes simplex virus. He was treated with systemic antiviral therapy and made a complete recovery. Conclusions: Disseminated herpes simplex virus infection with concomitant involvement of the colon and liver has been reported only 3 times in the published literature, and to our knowledge this is the first such case in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk of invasive herpes simplex virus infections increases with some, but not all immunomodulatory therapies. Optimal management of herpes simplex virus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease includes targeted prophylactic therapy for patients with evidence of latent infection, and timely initiation of antiviral therapy for those patients suspected to have invasive disease. PMID:27759636

  2. Herpes simplex virus 1 microRNAs expressed abundantly during latent infection are not essential for latency in mouse trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Martha F.; Jurak, Igor; Pesola, Jean M.; Boissel, Sandrine; Knipe, David M.; Coen, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Several herpes simplex virus 1 microRNAs are encoded within or near the latency associated transcript (LAT) locus, and are expressed abundantly during latency. Some of these microRNAs can repress the expression of important viral proteins and are hypothesized to play important roles in establishing and/or maintaining latent infections. We found that in lytically infected cells and in acutely infected mouse ganglia, expression of LAT-encoded microRNAs was weak and unaffected by a deletion that includes the LAT promoter. In mouse ganglia latently infected with wild type virus, the microRNAs accumulated to high levels, but deletions of the LAT promoter markedly reduced expression of LAT-encoded microRNAs and also miR-H6, which is encoded upstream of LAT and can repress expression of ICP4. Because these LAT deletion mutants establish and maintain latent infections, these microRNAs are not essential for latency, at least in mouse trigeminal ganglia, but may help promote it. PMID:21782205

  3. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy in a Rhesus Monkey Model of Vaccine Ac NFU1(S-) MRC Against Primary Type 2 Herpes Simplex Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, G. R. B.; Buchan, A.; Williams, D.; Marsden, J.; Hartley, C.; Wilbanks, G.; Turyk, M.; Namkoong, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Adult and juvenile Rhesus monkeys were vaccinated with sub-unit formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine Ac NFU1(S-) MRC; no local or systemic side-effects followed vaccination. Vaccinated monkeys developed neutralizing and immunoprecipitating antibody to both type 1 and 2 herpes simplex virus. Antibody levels declined with time but were re-stimulated after virus challenge and to a lesser extent after attempted virus reactivation. There was evidence of protection against s.c. challenge with live type 2 herpes simplex virus. PMID:6295430

  4. Level of herpes simplex virus type 1 latency correlates with severity of corneal scarring and exhaustion of CD8+ T cells in trigeminal ganglia of latently infected mice.

    PubMed

    Mott, Kevin R; Bresee, Catherine J; Allen, Sariah J; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2009-03-01

    A hallmark of infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is the establishment of latency in ganglia of the infected individual. During the life of the latently infected individual, the virus can occasionally reactivate, travel back to the eye, and cause recurrent disease. Indeed, a major cause of corneal scarring (CS) is the scarring induced by HSV-1 following reactivation from latency. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the amount of CS and the level of the HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) in trigeminal ganglia (TG) of latently infected mice. Our results suggested that the amount of CS was not related to the amount of virus replication following primary ocular HSV-1 infection, since replication in the eyes was similar in mice that did not develop CS, mice that developed CS in just one eye, and mice that developed CS in both eyes. In contrast, mice with no CS had significantly less LAT, and thus presumably less latency, in their TG than mice that had CS in both eyes. Higher CS also correlated with higher levels of mRNAs for PD-1, CD4, CD8, F4/80, interleukin-4, gamma interferon, granzyme A, and granzyme B in both cornea and TG. These results suggest that (i) the immunopathology induced by HSV-1 infection does not correlate with primary virus replication in the eye; (ii) increased CS appears to correlate with increased latency in the TG, although the possible cause-and-effect relationship is not known; and (iii) increased latency in mouse TG correlates with higher levels of PD-1 mRNA, suggesting exhaustion of CD8+ T cells.

  5. Induction of cellular transcription factors in trigeminal ganglia of mice by corneal scarification, herpes simplex virus type 1 infection, and explantation of trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed Central

    Valyi-Nagy, T; Deshmane, S; Dillner, A; Fraser, N W

    1991-01-01

    In a mouse model for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency in which the virus was inoculated via the eye after corneal scarification, HSV-1 replicated in corneal epithelial cells and infected the nerve cell endings. HSV-1 reached the trigeminal ganglia by fast axonal transport between 2 and 10 days postinfection (p.i.) and established a latent infection in neuronal cells or replicated and spread to nonneuronal cells. By using in situ hybridization, we showed that cellular transcription factors are stimulated by HSV-1 infection in trigeminal ganglia. This stimulation is biphasic, peaking at 1 and 3 to 4 days p.i. The first peak involves c-jun and oct-1 expression in neurons, and the second involves c-jun, c-fos, and oct-1 expression in neurons and nonneuronal cells. Corneal scarification, alone or followed by infection with UV-inactivated HSV-1, induced monophasic c-jun and oct-1 expression in some neurons of the trigeminal ganglia, with a peak at 1 day p.i. Corneal infection without prior scarification induced c-jun, c-fos, and oct-1 expression in some neuronal and nonneuronal cells of the trigeminal ganglia 2 to 9 days p.i. Explanation of ganglia from latently infected animals resulted in reactivation of the latent virus. Independently of the presence of latent HSV-1 in explanted ganglia, expression of c-fos, c-jun, and oct-1 was induced first in nonneuronal cells, peaking 6 to 10 h postexplantation, and then in neuronal cells, with a peak at 24 h after explantation when expression of viral replicative genes was first detectable. Since ocular HSV-1 infection, corneal scarification, and explantation of trigeminal ganglia all resulted in induction of expression of cellular transcription factors in ganglia, these factors may play a critical role in the permissiveness of cells for HSV-1 replication during acute infection, latency, and reactivation. Images PMID:1649322

  6. Induction of cellular transcription factors in trigeminal ganglia of mice by corneal scarification, herpes simplex virus type 1 infection, and explantation of trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Valyi-Nagy, T; Deshmane, S; Dillner, A; Fraser, N W

    1991-08-01

    In a mouse model for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency in which the virus was inoculated via the eye after corneal scarification, HSV-1 replicated in corneal epithelial cells and infected the nerve cell endings. HSV-1 reached the trigeminal ganglia by fast axonal transport between 2 and 10 days postinfection (p.i.) and established a latent infection in neuronal cells or replicated and spread to nonneuronal cells. By using in situ hybridization, we showed that cellular transcription factors are stimulated by HSV-1 infection in trigeminal ganglia. This stimulation is biphasic, peaking at 1 and 3 to 4 days p.i. The first peak involves c-jun and oct-1 expression in neurons, and the second involves c-jun, c-fos, and oct-1 expression in neurons and nonneuronal cells. Corneal scarification, alone or followed by infection with UV-inactivated HSV-1, induced monophasic c-jun and oct-1 expression in some neurons of the trigeminal ganglia, with a peak at 1 day p.i. Corneal infection without prior scarification induced c-jun, c-fos, and oct-1 expression in some neuronal and nonneuronal cells of the trigeminal ganglia 2 to 9 days p.i. Explanation of ganglia from latently infected animals resulted in reactivation of the latent virus. Independently of the presence of latent HSV-1 in explanted ganglia, expression of c-fos, c-jun, and oct-1 was induced first in nonneuronal cells, peaking 6 to 10 h postexplantation, and then in neuronal cells, with a peak at 24 h after explantation when expression of viral replicative genes was first detectable. Since ocular HSV-1 infection, corneal scarification, and explantation of trigeminal ganglia all resulted in induction of expression of cellular transcription factors in ganglia, these factors may play a critical role in the permissiveness of cells for HSV-1 replication during acute infection, latency, and reactivation.

  7. Secreted Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Glycoprotein G Modifies NGF-TrkA Signaling to Attract Free Nerve Endings to the Site of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Jorge Rubén; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Martinez-Martín, Nadia; Blanco, Soledad; Wandosell, Francisco; Alcamí, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 are highly prevalent viruses that cause a variety of diseases, from cold sores to encephalitis. Both viruses establish latency in peripheral neurons but the molecular mechanisms facilitating the infection of neurons are not fully understood. Using surface plasmon resonance and crosslinking assays, we show that glycoprotein G (gG) from HSV-2, known to modulate immune mediators (chemokines), also interacts with neurotrophic factors, with high affinity. In our experimental model, HSV-2 secreted gG (SgG2) increases nerve growth factor (NGF)-dependent axonal growth of sympathetic neurons ex vivo, and modifies tropomyosin related kinase (Trk)A-mediated signaling. SgG2 alters TrkA recruitment to lipid rafts and decreases TrkA internalization. We could show, with microfluidic devices, that SgG2 reduced NGF-induced TrkA retrograde transport. In vivo, both HSV-2 infection and SgG2 expression in mouse hindpaw epidermis enhance axonal growth modifying the termination zone of the NGF-dependent peptidergic free nerve endings. This constitutes, to our knowledge, the discovery of the first viral protein that modulates neurotrophins, an activity that may facilitate HSV-2 infection of neurons. This dual function of the chemokine-binding protein SgG2 uncovers a novel strategy developed by HSV-2 to modulate factors from both the immune and nervous systems. PMID:25611061

  8. Secreted herpes simplex virus-2 glycoprotein G modifies NGF-TrkA signaling to attract free nerve endings to the site of infection.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Jorge Rubén; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Martinez-Martín, Nadia; Blanco, Soledad; Wandosell, Francisco; Alcamí, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 are highly prevalent viruses that cause a variety of diseases, from cold sores to encephalitis. Both viruses establish latency in peripheral neurons but the molecular mechanisms facilitating the infection of neurons are not fully understood. Using surface plasmon resonance and crosslinking assays, we show that glycoprotein G (gG) from HSV-2, known to modulate immune mediators (chemokines), also interacts with neurotrophic factors, with high affinity. In our experimental model, HSV-2 secreted gG (SgG2) increases nerve growth factor (NGF)-dependent axonal growth of sympathetic neurons ex vivo, and modifies tropomyosin related kinase (Trk)A-mediated signaling. SgG2 alters TrkA recruitment to lipid rafts and decreases TrkA internalization. We could show, with microfluidic devices, that SgG2 reduced NGF-induced TrkA retrograde transport. In vivo, both HSV-2 infection and SgG2 expression in mouse hindpaw epidermis enhance axonal growth modifying the termination zone of the NGF-dependent peptidergic free nerve endings. This constitutes, to our knowledge, the discovery of the first viral protein that modulates neurotrophins, an activity that may facilitate HSV-2 infection of neurons. This dual function of the chemokine-binding protein SgG2 uncovers a novel strategy developed by HSV-2 to modulate factors from both the immune and nervous systems.

  9. Infection by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Causes Near-Complete Loss of RNA Polymerase II Occupancy on the Host Cell Genome.

    PubMed

    Abrisch, Robert G; Eidem, Tess M; Yakovchuk, Petro; Kugel, Jennifer F; Goodrich, James A

    2015-12-16

    Lytic infection by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) triggers a change in many host cell programs as the virus strives to express its own genes and replicate. Part of this process is repression of host cell transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II), which also transcribes the viral genome. Here, we describe a global characterization of Pol II occupancy on the viral and host genomes in response to HSV-1 infection using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq). The data reveal near-complete loss of Pol II occupancy throughout host cell mRNA genes, in both their bodies and promoter-proximal regions. Increases in Pol II occupancy of host cell genes, which would be consistent with robust transcriptional activation, were not observed. HSV-1 infection induced a more potent and widespread repression of Pol II occupancy than did heat shock, another cellular stress that widely represses transcription. Concomitant with the loss of host genome Pol II occupancy, we observed Pol II covering the HSV-1 genome, reflecting a high level of viral gene transcription. Interestingly, the positions of the peaks of Pol II occupancy at HSV-1 and host cell promoters were different. The primary peak of Pol II occupancy at HSV-1 genes is ∼170 bp upstream of where it is positioned at host cell genes, suggesting that specific steps in transcription are regulated differently at HSV-1 genes than at host cell mRNA genes. We investigated the effect of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection on transcription of host cell and viral genes by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). The approach we used was to determine how levels of genome-bound Pol II changed after HSV-1 infection. We found that HSV-1 caused a profound loss of Pol II occupancy across the host cell genome. Increases in Pol II occupancy were not observed, showing that no host genes were activated after infection. In contrast, Pol II occupied the entire HSV-1 genome. Moreover, the pattern of Pol II at HSV-1 genes

  10. Infection by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Causes Near-Complete Loss of RNA Polymerase II Occupancy on the Host Cell Genome

    PubMed Central

    Abrisch, Robert G.; Eidem, Tess M.; Yakovchuk, Petro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lytic infection by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) triggers a change in many host cell programs as the virus strives to express its own genes and replicate. Part of this process is repression of host cell transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II), which also transcribes the viral genome. Here, we describe a global characterization of Pol II occupancy on the viral and host genomes in response to HSV-1 infection using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq). The data reveal near-complete loss of Pol II occupancy throughout host cell mRNA genes, in both their bodies and promoter-proximal regions. Increases in Pol II occupancy of host cell genes, which would be consistent with robust transcriptional activation, were not observed. HSV-1 infection induced a more potent and widespread repression of Pol II occupancy than did heat shock, another cellular stress that widely represses transcription. Concomitant with the loss of host genome Pol II occupancy, we observed Pol II covering the HSV-1 genome, reflecting a high level of viral gene transcription. Interestingly, the positions of the peaks of Pol II occupancy at HSV-1 and host cell promoters were different. The primary peak of Pol II occupancy at HSV-1 genes is ∼170 bp upstream of where it is positioned at host cell genes, suggesting that specific steps in transcription are regulated differently at HSV-1 genes than at host cell mRNA genes. IMPORTANCE We investigated the effect of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection on transcription of host cell and viral genes by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). The approach we used was to determine how levels of genome-bound Pol II changed after HSV-1 infection. We found that HSV-1 caused a profound loss of Pol II occupancy across the host cell genome. Increases in Pol II occupancy were not observed, showing that no host genes were activated after infection. In contrast, Pol II occupied the entire HSV-1 genome. Moreover, the pattern of Pol II at

  11. The Product of the Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 UL16 Gene is Critical for the Egress of Capsids from the Nuclei of Infected Cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Hay, Thomas J M; Banfield, Bruce W

    2017-03-08

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) UL16 gene is conserved throughout the Herpesviridae and encodes a poorly understood tegument protein. The HSV-1 UL16 protein forms complexes with several viral proteins including UL11, gE, VP22 and UL21. We previously demonstrated that HSV-2 UL21 was essential for virus propagation due to the failure of DNA-containing capsids to exit the nucleus. We hypothesized that if a UL16/UL21 complex were required for nuclear egress then HSV-2 lacking UL16 would have a similar phenotype as HSV-2 lacking UL21. Deletion of HSV-2 UL16 (Δ16) resulted in a 950-fold reduction in virus propagation in mouse L cell fibroblasts and a 200-fold reduction in virus propagation in Vero cells that was fully reversed upon repair of Δ16 (Δ16R), and partially reversed by infecting UL16 expressing cells with Δ16. The kinetics of viral gene expression in cells infected with Δ16 was indistinguishable from cells infected with Δ16R or parental virus. Additionally, similar numbers of capsids were isolated from the nuclei of cells infected with Δ16 and parental virus. However, transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments and fluorescent capsid localization assays all indicated a reduction in the ability of Δ16 C-capsids to exit the nucleus of infected cells. Taken together, these data indicate that, like UL21, UL16 is critical for HSV-2 propagation and suggest that UL16 and UL21 proteins may function together to facilitate the nuclear egress of capsids.IMPORTANCE HSV-2 is a highly prevalent sexually transmitted human pathogen that is the main cause of genital herpes infections and is fueling the epidemic transmission of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. Despite important differences in the pathological features of HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections, HSV-2 is understudied compared to HSV-1. Here we demonstrate that deletion of the HSV-2 UL16 gene results in a substantial inhibition of virus replication due to a reduction in the ability of DNA

  12. Lack of association of herpes simplex virus type 2 seropositivity with the progression of HIV infection in the HERS cohort.

    PubMed

    Hoots, Brooke E; Hudgens, Michael G; Cole, Stephen R; King, Caroline C; Klein, Robert S; Mayer, Kenneth H; Rompalo, Anne M; Sobel, Jack D; Jamieson, Denise J; Smith, Jennifer S

    2011-04-01

    Many studies have chronicled the "epidemiologic synergy" between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). HIV adversely affects the natural history of HSV-2 and results in more frequent and severe HSV-2 reactivation. Few longitudinal studies, however, have examined whether HSV-2 is associated with increased HIV plasma viral loads or decreased CD4 counts. The authors estimated the effect of HSV-2 seropositivity on HIV RNA viral load and on CD4 count over time among 777 HIV-seropositive US women not receiving suppressive HSV-2 therapy in the HIV Epidemiology Research Study (1993-2000). Linear mixed models were used to assess the effect of HSV-2 on log HIV viral load and CD4 count/mm(3) prior to widespread initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Coinfection with HSV-2 was not associated with HIV RNA plasma viral loads during study follow-up. There was a statistically significant association between HSV-2 seropositivity and CD4 count over time, but this difference was small and counterintuitive at an increase of 8 cells/mm(3) (95% confidence interval: 2, 14) per year among HSV-2-seropositive women compared with HSV-2-seronegative women. These data do not support a clinically meaningful effect of baseline HSV-2 seropositivity on the trajectories of HIV plasma viral loads or CD4 counts.

  13. The molecular basis of herpes simplex virus latency.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Michael P; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is a neurotropic herpesvirus that establishes latency within sensory neurones. Following primary infection, the virus replicates productively within mucosal epithelial cells and enters sensory neurones via nerve termini. The virus is then transported to neuronal cell bodies where latency can be established. Periodically, the virus can reactivate to resume its normal lytic cycle gene expression programme and result in the generation of new virus progeny that are transported axonally back to the periphery. The ability to establish lifelong latency within the host and to periodically reactivate to facilitate dissemination is central to the survival strategy of this virus. Although incompletely understood, this review will focus on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of latency that centre on the functions of the virus-encoded latency-associated transcripts (LATs), epigenetic regulation of the latent virus genome and the molecular events that precipitate reactivation.

  14. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) as a coronary atherosclerosis risk factor in HIV-infected men: Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hechter, Rulin C.; Budoff, Matthew; Hodis, Howard N.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Jenkins, Frank J.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Taiwo, Babafemi; Post, Wendy S.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Detels, Roger

    2012-01-01

    We assessed associations of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and -2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) infection with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in 291 HIV-infected men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by non-contrast coronary CT imaging. Markers for herpesviruses infection were measured in frozen specimens collected 10-12 years prior to case identification. Multivariable logistic regression models and ordinal logistic regression models were performed. HSV-2 seropositivity was associated with coronary atherosclerosis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =4.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.58-10.85) after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, cardiovascular risk factors, and HIV infection related factors. Infection with a greater number of herpesviruses was associated with elevated CAC levels (AOR=1.58, 95% CI=1.06-2.36). Our findings suggest HSV-2 may be a risk factor for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in HIV-infected men. Infection with multiple herpesviruses may contribute to the increased burden of atherosclerosis. PMID:22472456

  15. Evaluation of the in vitro skin permeation of antiviral drugs from penciclovir 1% cream and acyclovir 5% cream used to treat herpes simplex virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Hasler-Nguyen, Nathalie; Shelton, Donald; Ponard, Gilbert; Bader, Marlene; Schaffrik, Martina; Mallefet, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus infection (HSV) is a common and ubiquitous infection of the skin which causes mucocutaneous lesions called cold sores (herpes labialis) or fever blisters. It is estimated that approximately 80% of the population worldwide are carriers of the Herpes simplex virus, approximately 40% suffer from recurrent recurrent infections. This study evaluates the in vitro skin permeation and penetration of penciclovir and acyclovir from commercialized creams for the treatment of herpes labialis (cold sores), using non viable excised human abdominal skin samples, which were exposed to 5 mg/cm2 of acyclovir 5% cream or penciclovir 1% cream. Methods After 24 h of cream application, excess cream was washed off and layers of stratum corneum were removed by successive tape stripping. Amounts of active ingredients having penetrated through the skin were measured, as well as the amounts in the washed-off cream, in skin strips and creams remaining in the skin. Molecular modelling was used to evaluate physico-chemical differences between the drugs. Western blot analysis enabled to determine whether the marker of basal cells keratin 5 could be detected in the various tape strips. Results Application of penciclovir 1% cream yielded higher concentration of drug in the deeper layers of the epidermis as well as a higher drug flux through the skin. Molecular modelling showed two higher hydrophobic moieties for acyclovir. Presence of the basal cell marker keratin 5 was underscored in the deeper tape strips from the skin, giving evidence that both drugs can reach their target cells. Conclusion Penciclovir 1% cream has the tendency to facilitate the diffusion of the drug through the stratum corneum into the deeper epidermis layers, in which it could reach the target basal cells at effective therapeutical concentration. The small difference in the surface properties between both molecules might also contribute to favour the passage of penciclovir through the epidermis

  16. OASL1 deficiency promotes antiviral protection against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 infection by enhancing type I interferon production.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Eun; Lee, Myeong Sup; Kim, Young-Joon; Lee, Heung Kyu

    2016-01-11

    Type I interferon (IFN) interferes with virus replication, promotes antiviral responses, and controls innate and adaptive immune responses to certain viruses. Recently, we reported that 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like 1 (OASL1) negatively regulates type I IFN production by inhibiting the translation of the type I IFN-regulating master transcription factor, IRF7. Notably, while OASL1-deficient mice induce robust production of type I IFN and are resistant to systemic viral infection, the effects of OASL1 during localized viral infection has not been studied. To this end, we investigated the role of OASL1 during mucosal HSV-2 infection of the genital tract. Oasl1(-/-) mice exhibited better survival rates than wild type (WT) mice following intravaginal HSV-2 infection, and suppressed virus replication more efficiently despite comparable recruitment of effector immune cells. Moreover, Ly6C(high) monocytes, and not pDCs or other cell types, displayed enhanced production of type I IFNs in Oasl1(-/-) mice in response to HSV-2 infection. Furthermore, cytotoxic T cell responses including IFN-γ production were accelerated in Oasl1(-/-) mice after mucosal HSV-2 infection. Collectively, these results demonstrate that OASL1 deficiency promotes antiviral immunity against local mucosal viral infection and suggest that OASL1 could be a therapeutic target for treatment of HSV-2 infection of the genital mucosa.

  17. Functional interaction between herpes simplex virus type 2 gD and HVEM transiently dampens local chemokine production after murine mucosal infection.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Miri; Kopp, Sarah J; Taylor, Joann M; Storti, Christopher S; Spear, Patricia G; Muller, William J

    2011-01-24

    Herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) is one of two principal receptors mediating herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry into murine and human cells. It functions naturally as an immune signaling co-receptor, and may participate in enhancing or repressing immune responses depending on the natural ligand used. To investigate whether engagement of HVEM by HSV affects the in vivo response to HSV infection, we generated recombinants of HSV-2(333) that expressed wild-type gD (HSV-2/gD) or mutant gD able to bind to nectin-1 (the other principal entry receptor) but not HVEM. Replication kinetics and yields of the recombinant strains on Vero cells were indistinguishable from those of wild-type HSV-2(333). After intravaginal inoculation with mutant or wild-type virus, adult female C57BL/6 mice developed vaginal lesions and mortality in similar proportions, and mucosal viral titers were similar or lower for mutant strains at different times. Relative to HSV-2/gD, percentages of HSV-specific CD8(+) T-cells were similar or only slightly reduced after infection with the mutant strain HSV-2/gD-Δ7-15, in all tissues up to 9 days after infection. Levels of HSV-specific CD4(+) T-cells five days after infection also did not differ after infection with either strain. Levels of the cytokine IL-6 and of the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CCL4 were significantly lower in vaginal washes one day after infection with HSV-2/gD compared with HSV-2/gD-Δ7-15. We conclude that the interaction of HSV gD with HVEM may alter early innate events in the murine immune response to infection, without significantly affecting acute mortality, morbidity, or initial T-cell responses after lethal challenge.

  18. Functional Interaction between Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 gD and HVEM Transiently Dampens Local Chemokine Production after Murine Mucosal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Miri; Kopp, Sarah J.; Taylor, Joann M.; Storti, Christopher S.; Spear, Patricia G.; Muller, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) is one of two principal receptors mediating herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry into murine and human cells. It functions naturally as an immune signaling co-receptor, and may participate in enhancing or repressing immune responses depending on the natural ligand used. To investigate whether engagement of HVEM by HSV affects the in vivo response to HSV infection, we generated recombinants of HSV-2(333) that expressed wild-type gD (HSV-2/gD) or mutant gD able to bind to nectin-1 (the other principal entry receptor) but not HVEM. Replication kinetics and yields of the recombinant strains on Vero cells were indistinguishable from those of wild-type HSV-2(333). After intravaginal inoculation with mutant or wild-type virus, adult female C57BL/6 mice developed vaginal lesions and mortality in similar proportions, and mucosal viral titers were similar or lower for mutant strains at different times. Relative to HSV-2/gD, percentages of HSV-specific CD8+ T-cells were similar or only slightly reduced after infection with the mutant strain HSV-2/gD-Δ7-15, in all tissues up to 9 days after infection. Levels of HSV-specific CD4+ T-cells five days after infection also did not differ after infection with either strain. Levels of the cytokine IL-6 and of the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CCL4 were significantly lower in vaginal washes one day after infection with HSV-2/gD compared with HSV-2/gD-Δ7-15. We conclude that the interaction of HSV gD with HVEM may alter early innate events in the murine immune response to infection, without significantly affecting acute mortality, morbidity, or initial T-cell responses after lethal challenge. PMID:21283640

  19. RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type 1 isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda Perse da; Lopes, Juliana Freitas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RNA interference to inhibit herpes simplex virus type-1 replication in vitro. For herpes simplex virus type-1 gene silencing, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 gene (sequence si-UL 39-1, si-UL 39-2, and si-UL 39-3) were used, which encode the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an essential enzyme for DNA synthesis. Herpes simplex virus type-1 was isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions from infected patients. All mucocutaneous lesions' samples were positive for herpes simplex virus type-1 by real-time PCR and by virus isolation; all herpes simplex virus type-1 from saliva samples were positive by real-time PCR and 50% were positive by virus isolation. The levels of herpes simplex virus type-1 DNA remaining after siRNA treatment were assessed by real-time PCR, whose results demonstrated that the effect of siRNAs on gene expression depends on siRNA concentration. The three siRNA sequences used were able to inhibit viral replication, assessed by real-time PCR and plaque assays and among them, the sequence si-UL 39-1 was the most effective. This sequence inhibited 99% of herpes simplex virus type-1 replication. The results demonstrate that silencing herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 expression by siRNAs effectively inhibits herpes simplex virus type-1 replication, suggesting that siRNA based antiviral strategy may be a potential therapeutic alternative.

  20. De Novo Herpes Simplex Virus VP16 Expression Gates a Dynamic Programmatic Transition and Sets the Latent/Lytic Balance during Acute Infection in Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Sawtell, Nancy M.; Thompson, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    The life long relationship between herpes simplex virus and its host hinges on the ability of the virus to aggressively replicate in epithelial cells at the site of infection and transport into the nervous system through axons innervating the infection site. Interaction between the virus and the sensory neuron represents a pivot point where largely unknown mechanisms lead to a latent or a lytic infection in the neuron. Regulation at this pivot point is critical for balancing two objectives, efficient widespread seeding of the nervous system and host survival. By combining genetic and in vivo in approaches, our studies reveal that the balance between latent and lytic programs is a process occurring early in the trigeminal ganglion. Unexpectedly, activation of the latent program precedes entry into the lytic program by 12 -14hrs. Importantly, at the individual neuronal level, the lytic program begins as a transition out of this acute stage latent program and this escape from the default latent program is regulated by de novo VP16 expression. Our findings support a model in which regulated de novo VP16 expression in the neuron mediates entry into the lytic cycle during the earliest stages of virus infection in vivo. These findings support the hypothesis that the loose association of VP16 with the viral tegument combined with sensory axon length and transport mechanisms serve to limit arrival of virion associated VP16 into neuronal nuclei favoring latency. Further, our findings point to specialized features of the VP16 promoter that control the de novo expression of VP16 in neurons and this regulation is a key component in setting the balance between lytic and latent infections in the nervous system. PMID:27607440

  1. De Novo Herpes Simplex Virus VP16 Expression Gates a Dynamic Programmatic Transition and Sets the Latent/Lytic Balance during Acute Infection in Trigeminal Ganglia.

    PubMed

    Sawtell, Nancy M; Thompson, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    The life long relationship between herpes simplex virus and its host hinges on the ability of the virus to aggressively replicate in epithelial cells at the site of infection and transport into the nervous system through axons innervating the infection site. Interaction between the virus and the sensory neuron represents a pivot point where largely unknown mechanisms lead to a latent or a lytic infection in the neuron. Regulation at this pivot point is critical for balancing two objectives, efficient widespread seeding of the nervous system and host survival. By combining genetic and in vivo in approaches, our studies reveal that the balance between latent and lytic programs is a process occurring early in the trigeminal ganglion. Unexpectedly, activation of the latent program precedes entry into the lytic program by 12 -14hrs. Importantly, at the individual neuronal level, the lytic program begins as a transition out of this acute stage latent program and this escape from the default latent program is regulated by de novo VP16 expression. Our findings support a model in which regulated de novo VP16 expression in the neuron mediates entry into the lytic cycle during the earliest stages of virus infection in vivo. These findings support the hypothesis that the loose association of VP16 with the viral tegument combined with sensory axon length and transport mechanisms serve to limit arrival of virion associated VP16 into neuronal nuclei favoring latency. Further, our findings point to specialized features of the VP16 promoter that control the de novo expression of VP16 in neurons and this regulation is a key component in setting the balance between lytic and latent infections in the nervous system.

  2. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Neuronal Infection Perturbs Golgi Apparatus Integrity through Activation of Src Tyrosine Kinase and Dyn-2 GTPase.

    PubMed

    Martin, Carolina; Leyton, Luis; Hott, Melissa; Arancibia, Yennyfer; Spichiger, Carlos; McNiven, Mark A; Court, Felipe A; Concha, Margarita I; Burgos, Patricia V; Otth, Carola

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous pathogen that establishes a latent persistent neuronal infection in humans. The pathogenic effects of repeated viral reactivation in infected neurons are still unknown. Several studies have reported that during HSV-1 epithelial infection, the virus could modulate diverse cell signaling pathways remodeling the Golgi apparatus (GA) membranes, but the molecular mechanisms implicated, and the functional consequences to neurons is currently unknown. Here we report that infection of primary neuronal cultures with HSV-1 triggers Src tyrosine kinase activation and subsequent phosphorylation of Dynamin 2 GTPase, two players with a role in GA integrity maintenance. Immunofluorescence analyses showed that HSV-1 productive neuronal infection caused a scattered and fragmented distribution of the GA through the cytoplasm, contrasting with the uniform perinuclear distribution pattern observed in control cells. In addition, transmission electron microscopy revealed swollen cisternae and disorganized stacks in HSV-1 infected neurons compared to control cells. Interestingly, PP2, a selective inhibitor for Src-family kinases markedly reduced these morphological alterations of the GA induced by HSV-1 infection strongly supporting the possible involvement of Src tyrosine kinase. Finally, we showed that HSV-1 tegument protein VP11/12 is necessary but not sufficient to induce Dyn2 phosphorylation. Altogether, these results show that HSV-1 neuronal infection triggers activation of Src tyrosine kinase, phosphorylation of Dynamin 2 GTPase, and perturbation of GA integrity. These findings suggest a possible neuropathogenic mechanism triggered by HSV-1 infection, which could involve dysfunction of the secretory system in neurons and central nervous system.

  3. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Neuronal Infection Perturbs Golgi Apparatus Integrity through Activation of Src Tyrosine Kinase and Dyn-2 GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Carolina; Leyton, Luis; Hott, Melissa; Arancibia, Yennyfer; Spichiger, Carlos; McNiven, Mark A.; Court, Felipe A.; Concha, Margarita I.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Otth, Carola

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous pathogen that establishes a latent persistent neuronal infection in humans. The pathogenic effects of repeated viral reactivation in infected neurons are still unknown. Several studies have reported that during HSV-1 epithelial infection, the virus could modulate diverse cell signaling pathways remodeling the Golgi apparatus (GA) membranes, but the molecular mechanisms implicated, and the functional consequences to neurons is currently unknown. Here we report that infection of primary neuronal cultures with HSV-1 triggers Src tyrosine kinase activation and subsequent phosphorylation of Dynamin 2 GTPase, two players with a role in GA integrity maintenance. Immunofluorescence analyses showed that HSV-1 productive neuronal infection caused a scattered and fragmented distribution of the GA through the cytoplasm, contrasting with the uniform perinuclear distribution pattern observed in control cells. In addition, transmission electron microscopy revealed swollen cisternae and disorganized stacks in HSV-1 infected neurons compared to control cells. Interestingly, PP2, a selective inhibitor for Src-family kinases markedly reduced these morphological alterations of the GA induced by HSV-1 infection strongly supporting the possible involvement of Src tyrosine kinase. Finally, we showed that HSV-1 tegument protein VP11/12 is necessary but not sufficient to induce Dyn2 phosphorylation. Altogether, these results show that HSV-1 neuronal infection triggers activation of Src tyrosine kinase, phosphorylation of Dynamin 2 GTPase, and perturbation of GA integrity. These findings suggest a possible neuropathogenic mechanism triggered by HSV-1 infection, which could involve dysfunction of the secretory system in neurons and central nervous system. PMID:28879169

  4. Dual Function of the pUL7-pUL51 Tegument Protein Complex in Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Albecka, Anna; Owen, Danielle J; Ivanova, Lyudmila; Brun, Juliane; Liman, Rukayya; Davies, Laura; Ahmed, M Firoz; Colaco, Susanna; Hollinshead, Michael; Graham, Stephen C; Crump, Colin M

    2017-01-15

    The tegument of herpesviruses is a highly complex structural layer between the nucleocapsid and the envelope of virions. Tegument proteins play both structural and regulatory functions during replication and spread, but the interactions and functions of many of these proteins are poorly understood. Here we focus on two tegument proteins from herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), pUL7 and pUL51, which have homologues in all other herpesviruses. We have now identified that HSV-1 pUL7 and pUL51 form a stable and direct protein-protein interaction, their expression levels rely on the presence of each other, and they function as a complex in infected cells. We demonstrate that expression of the pUL7-pUL51 complex is important for efficient HSV-1 assembly and plaque formation. Furthermore, we also discovered that the pUL7-pUL51 complex localizes to focal adhesions at the plasma membrane in both infected cells and in the absence of other viral proteins. The expression of pUL7-pUL51 is important to stabilize focal adhesions and maintain cell morphology in infected cells and cells infected with viruses lacking pUL7 and/or pUL51 round up more rapidly than cells infected with wild-type HSV-1. Our data suggest that, in addition to the previously reported functions in virus assembly and spread for pUL51, the pUL7-pUL51 complex is important for maintaining the attachment of infected cells to their surroundings through modulating the activity of focal adhesion complexes.

  5. Herpes simplex virus 2 modulates apoptosis and stimulates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation during infection in human epithelial HEp-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yedowitz, Jamie C.; Blaho, John A. . E-mail: john.blaho@mssm.edu

    2005-11-25

    Virus-mediated apoptosis is well documented in various systems, including herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). HSV-2 is closely related to HSV-1 but its apoptotic potential during infection has not been extensively scrutinized. We report that (i) HEp-2 cells infected with HSV-2(G) triggered apoptosis, assessed by apoptotic cellular morphologies, oligosomal DNA laddering, chromatin condensation, and death factor processing when a translational inhibitor (CHX) was added at 3 hpi. Thus, HSV-2 induced apoptosis but was unable to prevent the process from killing cells. (ii) Results from a time course of CHX addition experiment indicated that infected cell protein produced between 3 and 5 hpi, termed the apoptosis prevention window, are required for blocking virus-induced apoptosis. This corresponds to the same prevention time frame as reported for HSV-1. (iii) Importantly, CHX addition prior to 3 hpi led to less apoptosis than that at 3 hpi. This suggests that proteins produced immediately upon infection are needed for efficient apoptosis induction by HSV-2. This finding is different from that observed previously with HSV-1. (iv) Infected cell factors produced during the HSV-2(G) prevention window inhibited apoptosis induced by external TNF{alpha} plus cycloheximide treatment. (v) NF-{kappa}B translocated to nuclei and its presence in nuclei correlated with apoptosis prevention during HSV-2(G) infection. (vi) Finally, clinical HSV-2 isolates induced and prevented apoptosis in HEp-2 cells in a manner similar to that of laboratory strains. Thus, while laboratory and clinical HSV-2 strains are capable of modulating apoptosis in human HEp-2 cells, the mechanism of HSV-2 induction of apoptosis differs from that of HSV-1.

  6. The helicase primase inhibitor, BAY 57-1293 shows potent therapeutic antiviral activity superior to famciclovir in BALB/c mice infected with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Subhajit; Jennens, Lyn; Field, Hugh J

    2007-07-01

    BAY 57-1293 represents a new class of potent inhibitors of herpes simplex virus (HSV) that target the virus helicase primase complex. The present study was conducted using the zosteriform infection model in BALB/c mice. The helicase primase inhibitor, BAY 57-1293 was shown to be highly efficacious in this model. The beneficial effects of therapy were obtained rapidly (within 2 days) although the onset of treatment was delayed for 1 day after virus inoculation. The compound given orally, or intraperitoneally once per day at a dose of 15 mg/kg for 4 successive days was equally effective or superior to a much higher dose of famciclovir (1mg/ml, i.e. approximately 140-200mg/kg/day) given in the drinking water for 7 consecutive days, which, in our hands, is the most effective method for administering famciclovir to mice. In contrast to the vehicle-treated infected mice, all mice that received antiviral therapy looked normal and active with no mortality, no detectable loss of weight and no marked change in ear thickness. BAY 57-1293 and famciclovir reduced the virus titers in the skin to below the level of detection by days 3 and 7 post infection, respectively. In both BAY 57-1293 and famciclovir-treated mice, infectious virus titers in the ear pinna and brainstem remained below the level of detection. Consistent with these findings, BAY 57-1293 also showed a potent antiviral effect in an experiment involving a small number of severely immunocompromised athymic-nude BALB/c mice.

  7. Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR9 Expressed in Trigeminal Ganglia are Critical to Viral Control During Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Zolini, Guilherme Pimenta; Mansur, Daniel Santos; Freire Lima, Bráulio Henrique; Wischhoff, Uschi; Astigarraga, Ruiz Gerhardt; Dias, Marcela França; Silva, Mariana das Graças Almeida; Béla, Samantha Ribeiro; do Valle Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro; Arantes, Rosa Maria; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Báfica, André; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Campos, Marco Antônio

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic DNA virus that is responsible for several clinical manifestations in humans, including encephalitis. HSV-1 triggers toll-like receptors (TLRs), which elicit cytokine production. Viral multiplication and cytokine expression in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice infected with HSV-1 were evaluated. Virus was found in the trigeminal ganglia (TG), but not in the brains of animals without signs of encephalitis, between 2 and 6 days postinfection (d.p.i.). Cytokine expression in the TG peaked at 5 d.p.i. TLR9−/− and TLR2/9−/− mice were more susceptible to the virus, with 60% and 100% mortality, respectively, as opposed to 10% in the WT and TLR2−/− mice. Increased levels of both CXCL10/IP-10 and CCL2/MCP-1, as well as reduced levels of interferon-γ and interleukin 1-β transcripts, measured in both the TG and brains at 5 d.p.i., and the presence of virus in the brain were correlated with total mortality in TLR2/9−/− mice. Cytokine alterations in TLR2/9−/− mice coincided with histopathological changes in their brains, which did not occur in WT and TLR2−/− mice and occurred only slightly in TLR9−/− mouse brain. Increased cellularity, macrophages, CD8 T cells producing interferon-γ, and expression levels of TLR2 and TLR9 were detected in the TG of WT-infected mice. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection is controlled by TLR-dependent immune responses in the TG, which prevent HSV-1 encephalitis. PMID:20864677

  8. Latent herpes simplex virus-1 infection in SCID mice transferred with immune CD4+T cells: a new model for latency.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, H; Yanagi, Y

    2000-01-01

    In C.B-17 severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, corneal challenge with herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) KOS strain usually leads to fatal encephalitis. With the transfer of T cells from immunized BALB/c mice, these SCID mice developed a latent HSV-1 infection. In order to determine the responsible T cell subset, fractionated immune T cells were transferred. Those SCID mice transferred with immune CD4+T cell-enriched fraction developed latent HSV-1 infection in their trigeminal ganglia. Their splenocytes had an increased percentage of CD4+T cells and showed a proliferative response against HSV-1. The transfer of CD8+T cells increased survival in the acute infection, but their engraftment seemed less needed for latency than that of CD4+T cells. Mice that received immune serum survived without developing latent HSV-1 infection. Some latently infected SCID mice had anti-HSV antibodies while others did not, indicating that the engraftment of antibody-producing B cells was not required for latency. Thus, immune CD4+T cells were important for the survival of SCID mice with latent HSV-1 infection. This animal model should be useful for investigation of latency/reactivation of HSV-1.

  9. RNA from an immediate early region of the type 1 herpes simplex virus genome is present in the trigeminal ganglia of latently infected mice

    SciTech Connect

    Deatly, A.M.; Spivack, J.G.; Lavi, E.; Fraser, N.W.

    1987-05-01

    Transcription of the type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) genome in trigeminal ganglia of latently infected mice was studied using in situ hybridization. Probes representative of each temporal gene class were used to determine the regions of the genome that encode the transcripts present in latently infected cells. Probes encoding HSV-1 sequences of the five immediate early genes and representative early (thymidine kinase), early-late (major capsid protein), and late (glycoprotein C) genes were used in these experiments. Of the probes tested, only those encoding the immediate early gene product infected-cell polypeptide (ICP) 0 hybridized to RNA in latently infected tissues. Probes containing the other immediate early genes (ICP4, ICP22, ICP27, and ICP47) and the representative early, early-late, and late genes did not hybridize. Two probes covering approx. = 30% of the HSV-1 genome and encoding over 20 early and late transcripts also did not hybridize to RNA in latently infected tissues. These results, with probes spanning > 60% of the HSV-1 genome, suggest that transcription of the HSV-1 genome is restricted to one region in latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglia.

  10. During herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of rabbits, the ability to express the latency-associated transcript increases latent-phase transcription of lytic genes.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Nicole V; Neumann, Donna M; Kwiatkowski, Dacia L; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; McAnany, Peterjon K; Hill, James M; Bloom, David C

    2008-06-01

    Trigeminal ganglia (TG) from rabbits latently infected with either wild-type herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or the latency-associated transcript (LAT) promoter deletion mutant 17DeltaPst were assessed for their viral chromatin profile and transcript abundance. The wild-type 17syn+ genomes were more enriched in the transcriptionally permissive mark dimethyl H3 K4 than were the 17DeltaPst genomes at the 5' exon and ICP0 and ICP27 promoters. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed significantly more ICP4, tk, and glycoprotein C lytic transcripts in 17syn+ than in 17DeltaPst. These results suggest that, for efficient reactivation from latency in rabbits, the LAT is important for increased transcription of lytic genes during latency.

  11. Expression, Inducers and Cellular Sources of the Chemokine MIG (CXCL 9), During Primary Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Infection of the Cornea.

    PubMed

    Molesworth-Kenyon, Sara J; Milam, Ashley; Rockette, Amanda; Troupe, Allison; Oakes, John E; Lausch, Robert N

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the production of monokine induced by gamma-interferon (MIG) during a primary Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection of the cornea. We hypothesize that multiple CXCR3 ligands are involved in T cell recruitment during HSV-1 corneal infection and that neutrophils have the potential to contribute to their production. Levels of MIG were evaluated in an in vivo murine model of HSV-1 corneal infection by quantitative ELISA. Cultured murine corneal fibroblast (MCF) cells and purified neutrophils were stimulated in vitro with IFN-γ and IL-1α to determine inducers of MIG. Cellular sources of MIG production in vivo were investigated via cellular depletion studies. Additionally, MIG production resulting from interaction between resident human corneal cells and neutrophils was evaluated in an ex vivo model of human corneal infection. MIG was significantly elevated on days 2-6 and on day 8 following corneal infection. MCF and neutrophils secreted MIG in response to IFN-γ, but not IL-1α stimulation. Co-stimulation with IFN-γ and IL-1α induced a four-fold increase in MIG production by MCF. However, the same combination led to a three-fold decrease in MIG production by neutrophils. In vivo, a 52% reduction in MIG levels was observed in the neutrophil depleted host. In the human ex vivo model, MIG levels were significantly elevated in response to communication between HSV-1 infected corneal tissue and neutrophils. Here, we report the evidence for the production of MIG, a second CXCR3 ligand, during the primary immune response to HSV-1 corneal infection. Our results support the hypothesis that both neutrophils and resident corneal cells contribute to MIG production in vivo. However, neutrophils produce MIG in response to communication with HSV-1-infected resident corneal cells more efficiently than by direct interaction with virus. In addition, we found that MIG production by neutrophils and resident corneal cells was differentially regulated by IL-1α.

  12. Infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by herpes simplex and Epstein-Barr viruses. Differential induction of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, J; Flamand, L; D'Addario, M; Hiscott, J; Menezes, J

    1992-01-01

    Infection by herpesviruses can result in profound immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory effects. However, no significant information is available on the effect of such infections on the production of immunoregulatory cytokines. We studied the kinetics of production of two monocyte-derived cytokines, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha), induced by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures and in fractionated cell populations. We observed that, when compared to HSV-1, EBV is a stronger inducer of IL-6. In EBV-infected cultures, IL-6 protein was detected at day 1 postinfection and gradually increased with time. In contrast, lower amounts of IL-6 were detected 5 d postinfection in HSV-1-infected cultures. HSV-1-infected cultures secreted significant amounts of TNF alpha protein after 5 d of culture and reached a maximal level of production at day 7, whereas EBV inhibited TNF alpha production. In fractionated cell populations, monocytic cells were found to be the main source of IL-6 synthesis after EBV or HSV-1 infection. However, TNF alpha synthesis in HSV-1-infected cultures was from both B and monocytic cells. By using the polymerase chain reaction technique we show that, after infection by these two herpesviruses, differences in cytokine gene products are also observed at the transcriptional level. These observations demonstrate that EBV and HSV-1 exert differential effects on IL-6 and TNF alpha gene transcription and on the resulting protein secretion in human mononuclear blood cells. Images PMID:1318324

  13. Human herpes simplex virus: life cycle and development of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kukhanova, M K; Korovina, A N; Kochetkov, S N

    2014-12-01

    WHO reports that 90% of human population is infected by different types of herpesviruses, which develop latency or cause oral and genital herpes, conjunctivitis, eczema herpeticum, and other diseases. Herpesvirus almost always accompanies HIV-infection and complicates AIDS treatment. Herpes simplex virus type 1 is one of the most wide spread viruses from the Herpesviridae family. HSV virion, genome structure, replication mechanisms, antiherpes drug development strategies, including design of prodrugs, and mutations causing ACV-resistance in clinical HSV isolates are discussed in this review.

  14. Detection of immediate early protein ICP27/IE63 and thymidine kinase in the course of reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Durmanová, V; Rajcáni, J

    2003-01-01

    We followed the kinetics of reactivation of latent Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection established in rabbits by corneal route. The corresponding trigeminal ganglia (TG) were cultured and the culture medium was examined at daily intervals for release of infectious virus. Sections from the cultured TG fragments were stained with antisera against non-structural proteins such as the immediate early (IE) protein ICP27 and the early (E) proteins thymidine kinase (TK), the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase (RR1), the ori-binding protein OBP and with a human serum obtained from volunteers immunized with an experimental subunit HSV-1 envelope (env) vaccine containing late structural proteins gB1, gC1, gD1 and gG1 (env antiserum). By indirect immunofluorescence (IF) test, ICP27 was detected in a few neurons from day 1 post explantation (p.e.), while TK was observed in neurons from day 2 p.e. Fluorescence with the human env antiserum was seen at day 3 p.e. The RR1 and OBP antisera stained productively infected Vero cells from 3 and 4 hrs post inoculation (p.i.), respectively. However, these sera showed no IF in cultured ganglion fragments at any interval examined. Our results showed the same cascade of HSV-1 IE and E protein expression during productive infection and reactivation in vitro.

  15. PI3K/Akt signaling mediated apoptosis blockage and viral gene expression in oral epithelial cells during herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Mei-Ju; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chiang, Hsiao-Han; Lai, Yu-Lin; Hung, Shan-Ling

    2010-10-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks) function in the anti-apoptotic pathway, and are commonly exploited by various viruses to accomplish the viral life cycle. This study examined the role of the PI3K pathway in human oral epithelial cells following herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. The results showed that HSV-1 induced the phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3). Phosphorylation of Akt, but not GSK-3, induced by HSV-1 was PI3K-dependent. The expression of HSV-1 immediate-early genes may be involved in the initial phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3. Inhibition of HSV-1-induced PI3K activity increased DNA fragmentation and cleavage of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 7 compared with infected alone. Inhibition of PI3K attenuated the expression of HSV-1-infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), but not thymidine kinase (TK) and viral replication. Collectively, these data suggested that, in oral epithelial cells, the HSV-1-induced PI3K/Akt activation was involved in the regulation of apoptosis blockage and viral gene expression.

  16. Amplification of bovine papillomavirus DNA by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, ultraviolet irradiation, or infection with herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J.; Schlehofer, J.R.; Mergener, K.; Gissmann, L.; zur Hausen, H. )

    1989-09-01

    Treatment with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) or irradiation with ultraviolet light (uv254 nm) induces amplification of integrated as well as episomal sequences of bovine papillomavirus (BPV) type 1 DNA in BPV-1-transformed mouse C127 cells (i.e., ID13 cells). This is shown by filter in situ hybridization and Southern blot analysis of cellular DNA. Similarly, infection of ID13 cells with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 which has been shown to be mutagenic for host cell DNA leads to amplification of BPV DNA sequences. In contrast to this induction of DNA amplification by initiators, treatment of ID13 cells with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) does not result in increased synthesis of BPV DNA nor does TPA treatment modulate the initiator-induced DNA amplification. Similar to other cell systems infection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 2 inhibits BPV-1 DNA amplification irrespective of the inducing agent. In contrast to initiator-induced DNA amplification, treatment with carcinogen (MNNG) or tumor promoters or combination of MNNG and promoter of C127 cells prior to transformation by BPV-1 does not lead to an increase in the number of transformed foci. The induction of amplification of papillomavirus DNA by initiating agents possibly represents one of the mechanisms by which the observed synergism between papillomavirus infection and initiators in tumorigenesis might occur.

  17. Poly(A)-Binding Protein 1 Partially Relocalizes to the Nucleus during Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in an ICP27-Independent Manner and Does Not Inhibit Virus Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Salaun, C.; MacDonald, A. I.; Larralde, O.; Howard, L.; Lochtie, K.; Burgess, H. M.; Brook, M.; Malik, P.; Gray, N. K.; Graham, S. V.

    2010-01-01

    Infection of cells by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) triggers host cell shutoff whereby mRNAs are degraded and cellular protein synthesis is diminished. However, virus protein translation continues because the translational apparatus in HSV-infected cells is maintained in an active state. Surprisingly, poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1), a predominantly cytoplasmic protein that is required for efficient translation initiation, is partially relocated to the nucleus during HSV-1 infection. This relocalization occurred in a time-dependent manner with respect to virus infection. Since HSV-1 infection causes cell stress, we examined other cell stress inducers and found that oxidative stress similarly relocated PABP1. An examination of stress-induced kinases revealed similarities in HSV-1 infection and oxidative stress activation of JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Importantly, PABP relocalization in infection was found to be independent of the viral protein ICP27. The depletion of PABP1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown had no significant effect on viral replication or the expression of selected virus late proteins, suggesting that reduced levels of cytoplasmic PABP1 are tolerated during infection. PMID:20573819

  18. Silicone-Acyclovir Controlled Release Devices Suppress Primary Herpes Simplex Virus-2 and Varicella Zoster Virus Infections In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Berkower, Carol L.; Johnson, Nicole M.; Longdo, Stephen B.; McGusty-Robinson, Shenika O.; Semenkow, Samantha L.; Margulies, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    Following initial infection, herpesviruses retreat into a permanent latent state with periodic reactivation resulting in an enhanced likelihood of transmission and clinical disease. The nucleoside analogue acyclovir reduces clinical symptoms of the three human alpha herpesviruses, HSV-1, HSV-2, and VZV. Long-term administration of acyclovir (ACV) can reduce the frequency and severity of reactivation, but its low bioavailability and short half-life require a daily drug regimen. Our lab is working to develop a subcutaneous delivery system to provide long-lasting, sustained release of ACV. Previously, we demonstrated that an implantable silicone (MED-4050) device, impregnated with ACV protected against HSV-1 both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we extend our in vitro observations to include protection against both HSV-2 and VZV. We also demonstrate protection against HSV-2 in vitro using MED-4750, a silicone polymer designed for long-term use in humans. When release of ACV from MED-4750 is quantitated on a daily basis, an initial burst of 5 days is observed, followed by a long period of slow release with near-zero-order kinetics, with an average daily release of 1.3923 ± 0.5908 μg ACV over days 20–60. Development of a slow-release implant has the potential to significantly impact the treatment of human alpha herpesvirus infections. PMID:23983683

  19. The Role of LAT in Increased CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion in Trigeminal Ganglia of Mice Latently Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus 1▿

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sariah J.; Hamrah, Pedram; Gate, David; Mott, Kevin R.; Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Zheng, Lixin; Town, Terrence; Jones, Clinton; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Ahmed, Rafi; Wechsler, Steven L.; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is a classic example of latent viral infection in humans and experimental animal models. The HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) plays a major role in the HSV-1 latency reactivation cycle and thus in recurrent disease. Whether the presence of LAT leads to generation of dysfunctional T cell responses in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of latently infected mice is not known. To address this issue, we used LAT-positive [LAT(+)] and LAT-deficient [LAT(−)] viruses to evaluate the effect of LAT on CD8 T cell exhaustion in TG of latently infected mice. The amount of latency as determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) of viral DNA in total TG extracts was 3-fold higher with LAT(+) than with LAT(−) virus. LAT expression and increased latency correlated with increased mRNA levels of CD8, PD-1, and Tim-3. PD-1 is both a marker for exhaustion and a primary factor leading to exhaustion, and Tim-3 can also contribute to exhaustion. These results suggested that LAT(+) TG contain both more CD8+ T cells and more CD8+ T cells expressing the exhaustion markers PD-1 and Tim-3. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analyses of expression of CD3/CD8/PD-1/Tim-3, HSV-1, CD8+ T cell pentamer (specific for a peptide derived from residues 498 to 505 of glycoprotein B [gB498–505]), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The functional significance of PD-1 and its ligands in HSV-1 latency was demonstrated by the significantly reduced amount of HSV-1 latency in PD-1- and PD-L1-deficient mice. Together, these results may suggest that both PD-1 and Tim-3 are mediators of CD8+ T cell exhaustion and latency in HSV-1 infection. PMID:21307196

  20. The role of LAT in increased CD8+ T cell exhaustion in trigeminal ganglia of mice latently infected with herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed

    Allen, Sariah J; Hamrah, Pedram; Gate, David; Mott, Kevin R; Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Zheng, Lixin; Town, Terrence; Jones, Clinton; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Freeman, Gordon J; Sharpe, Arlene H; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Ahmed, Rafi; Wechsler, Steven L; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is a classic example of latent viral infection in humans and experimental animal models. The HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) plays a major role in the HSV-1 latency reactivation cycle and thus in recurrent disease. Whether the presence of LAT leads to generation of dysfunctional T cell responses in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of latently infected mice is not known. To address this issue, we used LAT-positive [LAT(+)] and LAT-deficient [LAT(-)] viruses to evaluate the effect of LAT on CD8 T cell exhaustion in TG of latently infected mice. The amount of latency as determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) of viral DNA in total TG extracts was 3-fold higher with LAT(+) than with LAT(-) virus. LAT expression and increased latency correlated with increased mRNA levels of CD8, PD-1, and Tim-3. PD-1 is both a marker for exhaustion and a primary factor leading to exhaustion, and Tim-3 can also contribute to exhaustion. These results suggested that LAT(+) TG contain both more CD8(+) T cells and more CD8(+) T cells expressing the exhaustion markers PD-1 and Tim-3. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analyses of expression of CD3/CD8/PD-1/Tim-3, HSV-1, CD8(+) T cell pentamer (specific for a peptide derived from residues 498 to 505 of glycoprotein B [gB(498-505)]), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The functional significance of PD-1 and its ligands in HSV-1 latency was demonstrated by the significantly reduced amount of HSV-1 latency in PD-1- and PD-L1-deficient mice. Together, these results may suggest that both PD-1 and Tim-3 are mediators of CD8(+) T cell exhaustion and latency in HSV-1 infection.

  1. Pediatrics and herpes simplex virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Richard; Rosenthal, Susan L; Stanberry, Lawrence R

    2005-01-01

    This review explores the development of prophylactic genital herpes vaccines and their potential impact on perinatal and oral-facial disease. Vaccine strategies have included the use of whole killed virus, viral subunits, attenuated live virus, viral vectors, and bare DNA. To date, the recombinant subunit vaccine, truncated HSV-2 gD and alum/MPL, has been the most efficacious. The vaccine is 73 to 74 percent effective in preventing genital disease in herpes simplex virus seronegative women but is not effective in men or seropositive women. Models predict a significant impact on genital herpes if it limits viral shedding. Reductions in perinatal and oral-facial disease are likely to occur as well. Once an efficacious herpes vaccine is available, its effectiveness will depend ultimately on vaccine acceptance by professional organizations, healthcare professionals, and parents. Further research is required to improve on and fully understand the implications of prophylactic herpes simplex vaccines.

  2. Corneal infection of herpes simplex virus type 2--induced neuronal apoptosis in the brain stem of mice with expression of tumor suppressor gene (p53) and transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, D; Honda, T; Nishio, K; Tomita, Y; Sugiura, Y; Nishiyama, Y

    2000-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of neuronal apoptosis induced by herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in vivo, the distribution of viral antigen, the appearance of apoptotic bodies, and the expressions of the tumor suppressor gene p53 and several transcription factors such as c-fos, c-jun and NF-kappaB were examined immunohistochemically and histopathologically after corneal infection of mice with HSV type 2 strain 186. Five days after HSV infection, viral antigen was diffusely detected in the corneal epithelium, the trigeminal ganglion and the pars caudalis of the spinal trigeminal nucleus. Neuronal apoptosis was observed in the brain stem ipsilateral to the HSV-infected side with the immunoreactivities of c-fos, c-jun, NF-kappaB and p53. Dual-labeling immunohistochemical studies revealed that almost all of the viral antigen-positive neurons and glia in the brain stem also showed p53 immunoreactivity. On the other hand, no neuronal apoptosis but only with the expression of c-jun was found in the trigeminal ganglion. Our results suggest that the different expression of transcription factors between the brain stem and the trigeminal ganglion may influence the neuronal apoptosis induced by HSV infection.

  3. Prevalence of Treponema pallidum seropositivity and herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in a cohort of men who have sex with men, Bangkok, Thailand, 2006-2010.