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Sample records for simplex virus-mediated human

  1. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  2. Human herpes simplex labialis.

    PubMed

    Fatahzadeh, M; Schwartz, R A

    2007-11-01

    Humans are the natural host for eight of more than 80 known herpes viruses. Infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are ubiquitous worldwide and highly transmissible. Herpes simplex labialis (HSL) is the best-recognized recrudescent infection of the lips and perioral tissues caused by HSV-1. Facial lesions of HSL may be unsightly, frequent outbreaks unpleasant, and the infection itself more severe locally and systemically in immunocompromised people. This article highlights the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic features and management issues for HSL.

  3. High-frequency intermolecular homologous recombination during herpes simplex virus-mediated plasmid DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinping; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2002-06-01

    Homologous recombination is a prominent feature of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 DNA replication. This has been demonstrated and traditionally studied in experimental settings where repeated sequences are present or are being introduced into a single molecule for subsequent genome isomerization. In the present study, we have designed a pair of unique HSV amplicon plasmids to examine in detail intermolecular homologous recombination (IM-HR) between these amplicon plasmids during HSV-mediated DNA replication. Our data show that IM-HR occurred at a very high frequency: up to 60% of the amplicon concatemers retrieved from virion particles underwent intermolecular homologous recombination. Such a high frequency of IM-HR required that both plasmids be replicated by HSV-mediated replication, as IM-HR events were not detected when either one or both plasmids were replicated by simian virus 40-mediated DNA replication, even with the presence of HSV infection. In addition, the majority of the homologous recombination events resulted in sequence replacement or targeted gene repair, while the minority resulted in sequence insertion. These findings imply that frequent intermolecular homologous recombination may contribute directly to HSV genome isomerization. In addition, HSV-mediated amplicon replication may be an attractive model for studying intermolecular homologous recombination mechanisms in general in a mammalian system. In this regard, the knowledge obtained from such a study may facilitate the development of better strategies for targeted gene correction for gene therapy purposes.

  4. Human Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Confiscated Gorilla

    PubMed Central

    Oxford, Kristie L.; Gardner-Roberts, David; Kinani, Jean-Felix; Spelman, Lucy; Barry, Peter A.; Cranfield, Michael R.; Lowenstine, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, we detected human herpes simplex virus type 1, which caused stomatitis, in a juvenile confiscated eastern lowland gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) that had a high degree of direct contact with human caretakers. Our findings confirm that pathogens can transfer between nonhuman primate hosts and humans. PMID:25341185

  5. Evolutionary origins of human herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Wertheim, Joel O; Smith, Martin D; Smith, Davey M; Scheffler, Konrad; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L

    2014-09-01

    Herpesviruses have been infecting and codiverging with their vertebrate hosts for hundreds of millions of years. The primate simplex viruses exemplify this pattern of virus-host codivergence, at a minimum, as far back as the most recent common ancestor of New World monkeys, Old World monkeys, and apes. Humans are the only primate species known to be infected with two distinct herpes simplex viruses: HSV-1 and HSV-2. Human herpes simplex viruses are ubiquitous, with over two-thirds of the human population infected by at least one virus. Here, we investigated whether the additional human simplex virus is the result of ancient viral lineage duplication or cross-species transmission. We found that standard phylogenetic models of nucleotide substitution are inadequate for distinguishing among these competing hypotheses; the extent of synonymous substitutions causes a substantial underestimation of the lengths of some of the branches in the phylogeny, consistent with observations in other viruses (e.g., avian influenza, Ebola, and coronaviruses). To more accurately estimate ancient viral divergence times, we applied a branch-site random effects likelihood model of molecular evolution that allows the strength of natural selection to vary across both the viral phylogeny and the gene alignment. This selection-informed model favored a scenario in which HSV-1 is the result of ancient codivergence and HSV-2 arose from a cross-species transmission event from the ancestor of modern chimpanzees to an extinct Homo precursor of modern humans, around 1.6 Ma. These results provide a new framework for understanding human herpes simplex virus evolution and demonstrate the importance of using selection-informed models of sequence evolution when investigating viral origin hypotheses.

  6. Expression of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus in normal human trigeminal ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Vafai, A.; Wellish, M.; Devlin, M.; Gilden, D.H. ); Murray, R.S. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Denver, CO )

    1988-04-01

    Lysates of radiolabeled explants from four human trigeminal ganglia were immunoprecipitated with antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and to herpes simplex virus. Both herpes simplex virus- and VZV-specific proteins were detected in lysates of all four ganglia. Absence of reactivity in ganglion explants with monoclonal antibodies suggested that herpes simplex virus and VZV were not reactivated during the culture period. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated the presence of RNA transcripts from the VZV immediate early gene 63. This approach to the detection of herpes simplex virus and VZV expression in human ganglia should facilitate analysis of viral RNA and proteins in human sensory ganglia.

  7. Human herpes simplex virus: life cycle and development of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kukhanova, M K; Korovina, A N; Kochetkov, S N

    2014-12-01

    WHO reports that 90% of human population is infected by different types of herpesviruses, which develop latency or cause oral and genital herpes, conjunctivitis, eczema herpeticum, and other diseases. Herpesvirus almost always accompanies HIV-infection and complicates AIDS treatment. Herpes simplex virus type 1 is one of the most wide spread viruses from the Herpesviridae family. HSV virion, genome structure, replication mechanisms, antiherpes drug development strategies, including design of prodrugs, and mutations causing ACV-resistance in clinical HSV isolates are discussed in this review.

  8. Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus infection by ultraviolet light: a human model

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, J.J.; Mannix, M.L.; Rooney, J.F.; Notkins, A.L.; Straus, S.E.

    1987-09-01

    Infection with herpes simplex virus often results in a latent infection of local sensory ganglia and a disease characterized by periodic viral reactivation and mucocutaneous lesions. The factors that trigger reactivation in humans are still poorly defined. In our study, five patients with documented histories of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection on the buttocks or sacrum were exposed to three times their minimal erythema dose of ultraviolet light. Site-specific cutaneous herpes simplex virus infection occurred at 4.4 +/- 0.4 days after exposure to ultraviolet light in 8 of 13 attempts at reactivation. We conclude that ultraviolet light can reactivate herpes simplex virus under experimentally defined conditions. This model in humans should prove useful in evaluating the pathophysiology and prevention of viral reactivation.

  9. Human cytomegalovirus function inhibits replication of herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Cockley, K.D.; Shiraki, K.; Rapp, F.

    1988-01-01

    Human embryonic lung (HEL) cells infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) restricted the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). A delay in HSV replication of 15 h as well as a consistent, almost 3 log inhibition of HSV replication in HCMV-infected cell cultures harvested 24 to 72 h after superinfection were observed compared with controls infected with HSV alone. Treatment of HCMV-infected HEL cells with cycloheximide (100 ..mu..g/ml) for 3 or 24 h was demonstrated effective in blocking HCMV protein synthesis, as shown by immunoprecipitation with HCMV antibody-positive polyvalent serum. Cycloheximide treatment of HCMV-infected HEL cells and removal of the cycloheximide block before superinfection inhibited HSV-1 replication more efficiently than non-drug-treated superinfected controls. HCMV DNA-negative temperature-sensitive mutants restricted HSV as efficiently as wild-type HCMV suggesting that immediate-early and/or early events which occur before viral DNA synthesis are sufficient for inhibition of HSV. Inhibition of HSV-1 in HCMV-infected HEL cells was unaffected by elevated temperature (40.5/sup 0/C). However, prior UV irradiation of HCMV removed the block to HSV replication, demonstrating the requirement for an active HCMV genome. HSV-2 replication was similarly inhibited in HCMV-infected HEL cells. Superinfection of HCMV-infected HEL cells with HSV-1 labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine provided evidence that the labeled virus could penetrate to the nucleus of cells after superinfection. Evidence for penetration of superinfecting HSV into HCMV-infected cells was also provided by blot hybridization of HSV DNA synthesized in cells infected with HSV alone versus superinfected cell cultures at 0 and 48 h after superinfection.

  10. Adeno-associated virus-mediated human IL-10 gene transfer suppresses the development of experimental autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Kashiwakura, Y; Kusumi, N; Tamayose, K; Nasu, Y; Nagai, A; Shimada, T; Daida, H; Kumon, H

    2005-07-01

    Testicular germ cell-induced autoimmune orchitis is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration followed by disturbance of spermatogenesis. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is an animal model for human immunological male infertility; delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response plays a key role in its induction. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a regulatory cytokine that is critical in preventing organ-specific autoimmune inflammation. To determine the effects on EAO of human IL-10 (hIL-10) gene transfer, C3H/He mice immunized by unilateral testicular injury were administered intramuscular (i.m.) injections of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-encoding hIL-10 on the day of immunization. Serum hIL-10 was detected beginning at 1 week postinjection, and peaked at 3 weeks. Histological examinations showed a significantly low incidence of orchitis and disturbance of spermatogenesis in AAV hIL-10-treated mice, and the DTH response to autologous testicular cells was significantly suppressed. Immunohistochemical analysis of IFN- and IL-2, T-cell-associated cytokines, in the spleen and testes revealed significantly fewer cytokine-expressing cells after treatment. We conclude that a single i.m. administration of AAV hIL-10 significantly suppresses EAO and hypospermatogenesis by regulating cell-mediated immunity in the testes.

  11. Elastin-like polypeptide matrices for enhancing adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery to human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-S; Chu, H S; Park, K I; Won, J-I; Jang, J-H

    2012-03-01

    The successful development of efficient and safe gene delivery vectors continues to be a major obstacle to gene delivery in stem cells. In this study, we have developed an elastin-like polypeptide (ELP)-mediated adeno-associated virus (AAV) delivery system for transducing fibroblasts and human neural stem cells (hNSCs). AAVs have significant promise as therapeutic vectors because of their safety and potential for use in gene targeting in stem cell research. ELP has been recently employed as a biologically inspired 'smart' biomaterial that exhibits an inverse temperature phase transition, thereby demonstrating promise as a novel drug carrier. The ELP that was investigated in this study was composed of a repetitive penta-peptide with [Val-Pro-Gly-Val-Gly]. A novel AAV variant, AAV r3.45, which was previously engineered by directed evolution to enhance transduction in rat NSCs, was nonspecifically immobilized onto ELPs that were adsorbed beforehand on a tissue culture polystyrene surface (TCPS). The presence of different ELP quantities on the TCPS led to variations in surface morphology, roughness and wettability, which were ultimately key factors in the modulation of cellular transduction. Importantly, with substantially reduced viral quantities compared with bolus delivery, ELP-mediated AAV delivery significantly enhanced delivery efficiency in fibroblasts and hNSCs, which have great potential for use in tissue engineering applications and neurodegenerative disorder treatments, respectively. The enhancement of cellular transduction in stem cells, as well as the feasibility of ELPs for utilization in three-dimensional scaffolds, will contribute to the advancement of gene therapy for stem cell research and tissue regenerative medicine.

  12. Replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical tissue in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Birch, J; Fink, C G; Skinner, G R; Thomas, G H; Jordan, J A

    1976-08-01

    The replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical tissue in organ culture was investigated. The temporal profile of virus replication was related to the initial virus inoculum; high input inocula induced a rapid increase in virus titre while lower multiplicities induced a more slow-rising increase in virus titre. Our evidence suggested that explants were capable of initiating and supporting virus replication for at least 2 weeks following establishment of the culture. Virus yields were optimal when explants were cultured at 37 degrees and in serum-supplemented medium. Explants also supported the replication of type 1 herpes simplex virus and a "non-human" herpes simplex virus (pseudo-rabies virus). The optimal conditions for replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical explants have been established and will provide a model permitting precise investigation of lytic or other virus-cervical cell interactions and their possible relationship to herpes virus-induced pre-invasive carcinoma of this organ.

  13. Replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical tissue in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Birch, J.; Fink, C. G.; Skinner, G. R.; Thomas, G. H.; Jordan, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical tissue in organ culture was investigated. The temporal profile of virus replication was related to the initial virus inoculum; high input inocula induced a rapid increase in virus titre while lower multiplicities induced a more slow-rising increase in virus titre. Our evidence suggested that explants were capable of initiating and supporting virus replication for at least 2 weeks following establishment of the culture. Virus yields were optimal when explants were cultured at 37 degrees and in serum-supplemented medium. Explants also supported the replication of type 1 herpes simplex virus and a "non-human" herpes simplex virus (pseudo-rabies virus). The optimal conditions for replication of type 2 herpes simplex virus in human endocervical explants have been established and will provide a model permitting precise investigation of lytic or other virus-cervical cell interactions and their possible relationship to herpes virus-induced pre-invasive carcinoma of this organ. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:183806

  14. Evolution and Diversity in Human Herpes Simplex Virus Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gatherer, Derek; Ochoa, Alejandro; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Dolan, Aidan; Bowden, Rory J.; Enquist, Lynn W.; Legendre, Matthieu; Davison, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes a chronic, lifelong infection in >60% of adults. Multiple recent vaccine trials have failed, with viral diversity likely contributing to these failures. To understand HSV-1 diversity better, we comprehensively compared 20 newly sequenced viral genomes from China, Japan, Kenya, and South Korea with six previously sequenced genomes from the United States, Europe, and Japan. In this diverse collection of passaged strains, we found that one-fifth of the newly sequenced members share a gene deletion and one-third exhibit homopolymeric frameshift mutations (HFMs). Individual strains exhibit genotypic and potential phenotypic variation via HFMs, deletions, short sequence repeats, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms, although the protein sequence identity between strains exceeds 90% on average. In the first genome-scale analysis of positive selection in HSV-1, we found signs of selection in specific proteins and residues, including the fusion protein glycoprotein H. We also confirmed previous results suggesting that recombination has occurred with high frequency throughout the HSV-1 genome. Despite this, the HSV-1 strains analyzed clustered by geographic origin during whole-genome distance analysis. These data shed light on likely routes of HSV-1 adaptation to changing environments and will aid in the selection of vaccine antigens that are invariant worldwide. PMID:24227835

  15. Susceptibility of human iris stromal cells to herpes simplex virus 1 entry.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, John; Park, Paul J; Zanotti, Brian; Maus, Erika; Volin, Michael V; Shukla, Deepak; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2013-04-01

    Ocular herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection can lead to multiple complications, including iritis, an inflammation of the iris. Here, we use human iris stroma cells as a novel in vitro model to demonstrate HSV-1 entry and the inflammatory mediators that can damage the iris. The upregulated cytokines observed in this study provide a new understanding of the intrinsic immune mechanisms that can contribute to the onset of iritis.

  16. Antibodies to CD40 prevent Epstein-Barr virus-mediated human B-cell lymphomagenesis in severe combined immune deficient mice given human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, W J; Funakoshi, S; Beckwith, M; Rushing, S E; Conley, D K; Armitage, R J; Fanslow, W C; Rager, H C; Taub, D D; Ruscetti, F W

    1995-09-01

    CD40 is expressed on both normal and neoplastic B lymphocytes. Signal transduction through CD40 in vitro has been shown to exert stimulatory effects on normal B cells and inhibitory effects on Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced B-cell lymphoma lines and some other cell lines derived from patients with aggressive histology lymphoma. The transfer of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes (huPBL) from EBV-seropositive donors into severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice has been previously shown to result in the generation of human B-cell lymphomas. These tumors are similar to the highly aggressive EBV-induced lymphomas that can arise clinically after transplantation or in the setting of immunodeficiency. Treatment of huPBL-SCID chimeric mice with anti-CD40 or anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) significantly delayed the development of EBV-induced B-cell lymphoma. However, the effects of the two MoAb were mechanistically distinct. Anti-CD40 treatment prevented lymphoma generation, while still allowing for functional human B-cell engraftment in the huPBL-SCID mice compared with mice receiving no treatment, all of which succumbed to lymphoma. By contrast, treatment with anti-CD20 significantly inhibited total human B-cell engraftment in the SCID recipients, which accounted for the absence of lymphomas. In vitro assays examining the transformation of human B cells by EBV also indicated that anti-CD40 could directly inhibit EBV-transformation, whereas anti-CD20 antibodies had no effect. Thus, anti-CD40 exerts selective effects to allow for the engraftment of normal human B cells and prevent the emergence of EBV lymphomas. Stimulation of CD40 by antibodies or its physiologic ligand may, therefore, be of significant clinical use in the prevention of EBV-induced B lymphomas that may arise when EBV-seropositive individuals receive immunosuppressive regimens after transplantation or in immune deficiency states, such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

  17. Herpes simplex virus 2 modulates apoptosis and stimulates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation during infection in human epithelial HEp-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yedowitz, Jamie C.; Blaho, John A. . E-mail: john.blaho@mssm.edu

    2005-11-25

    Virus-mediated apoptosis is well documented in various systems, including herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). HSV-2 is closely related to HSV-1 but its apoptotic potential during infection has not been extensively scrutinized. We report that (i) HEp-2 cells infected with HSV-2(G) triggered apoptosis, assessed by apoptotic cellular morphologies, oligosomal DNA laddering, chromatin condensation, and death factor processing when a translational inhibitor (CHX) was added at 3 hpi. Thus, HSV-2 induced apoptosis but was unable to prevent the process from killing cells. (ii) Results from a time course of CHX addition experiment indicated that infected cell protein produced between 3 and 5 hpi, termed the apoptosis prevention window, are required for blocking virus-induced apoptosis. This corresponds to the same prevention time frame as reported for HSV-1. (iii) Importantly, CHX addition prior to 3 hpi led to less apoptosis than that at 3 hpi. This suggests that proteins produced immediately upon infection are needed for efficient apoptosis induction by HSV-2. This finding is different from that observed previously with HSV-1. (iv) Infected cell factors produced during the HSV-2(G) prevention window inhibited apoptosis induced by external TNF{alpha} plus cycloheximide treatment. (v) NF-{kappa}B translocated to nuclei and its presence in nuclei correlated with apoptosis prevention during HSV-2(G) infection. (vi) Finally, clinical HSV-2 isolates induced and prevented apoptosis in HEp-2 cells in a manner similar to that of laboratory strains. Thus, while laboratory and clinical HSV-2 strains are capable of modulating apoptosis in human HEp-2 cells, the mechanism of HSV-2 induction of apoptosis differs from that of HSV-1.

  18. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection Does Not Induce Apoptosis in Human Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Anja; Sinicina, Inga; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Hüfner, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can establish lifelong latency in human trigeminal ganglia. Latently infected ganglia contain CD8+ T cells, which secrete granzyme B and are thus capable of inducing neuronal apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry and single-cell reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), higher frequency and transcript levels of caspase-3 were found in HSV-1-negative compared to HSV-1-positive ganglia and neurons, respectively. No terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay-positive neurons were detected. The infiltrating T cells do not induce apoptosis in latently infected neurons. PMID:25762734

  19. High Efficiency Latency and Activation of Herpes Simplex Virus in Human Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdahl, Brian L.; Scheck, Adrienne C.; de Clercq, Erik; Rapp, Fred

    1982-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) exists in humans in a latent form that can be activated. To characterize the molecular basis of the cell-virus interactions and to analyze the state of the latent HSV genome, an in vitro model system was established. In this system a large fraction of the latently infected cells contain an HSV genome that can be activated. Cell survival was reduced minimally after repression of high multiplicity HSV type 1 (HSV-1) infection of human fibroblast cells with (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine in combination with human leukocyte interferon (IFN-α ). A minimum of 1 to 3 percent of the surviving cells contained an HSV genome that could be activated either by human cytomegalovirus superinfection or reduction in incubation temperature.

  20. Mimicking herpes simplex virus 1 and herpes simplex virus 2 mucosal behavior in a well-characterized human genital organ culture.

    PubMed

    Steukers, Lennert; Weyers, Steven; Yang, Xiaoyun; Vandekerckhove, Annelies P; Glorieux, Sarah; Cornelissen, Maria; Van den Broeck, Wim; Temmerman, Marleen; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-07-15

    We developed and morphologically characterized a human genital mucosa explant model (endocervix and ectocervix/vagina) to mimic genital herpes infections caused by herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2). Subsequent analysis of HSV entry receptor expression throughout the menstrual cycle in genital tissues was performed, and the evolution of HSV-1/-2 mucosal spread over time was assessed. Nectin-1 and -2 were expressed in all tissues during the entire menstrual cycle. Herpesvirus entry mediator expression was limited mainly to some connective tissue cells. Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 exhibited a plaque-wise mucosal spread across the basement membrane and induced prominent epithelial syncytia.

  1. Immune inhibition of virus release from herpes simplex virus-infected cells by human sera.

    PubMed

    Shariff, D M; Hallworth, J; Desperbasques, M; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1988-01-01

    Human sera contain antibody (IVR antibody) which will inhibit the release of herpes simplex virus type 1 from virus-infected cells. This antibody activity was removed by adsorption of sera with virus-infected cell extract. There was a positive correlation between IVR and neutralizing antibody activity, particularly when measured by augmented neutralization test; measurement of IVR antibody was equally as sensitive as measurement of neutralizing antibody by augmented neutralization test. IVR antibody levels provided indication of a history of recurrent herpes labialis, the pattern of antibody response following primary herpetic infection, and indication of response to Skinner herpes vaccine in human subjects. It is suggested that consideration should be given to measurement of IVR antibody in both clinical and epidemiological studies of herpes and other virus infections.

  2. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  3. Adeno-associated virus-mediated expression of recombinant CBD-HepII polypeptide of human fibronectin inhibits metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen-Hui; Lei, Zhang; Zhen, Yan; Gong, Wei; Huang, Bo; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Gui-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Juan; Feng, Zuo-Hua

    2014-01-01

    CH50, a recombinant CBD-HepII polypeptide of human fibronectin, was shown to suppress tumor metastasis in murine hepatocarcinoma and melanoma models. However, the effect of CH50 on human cancer cells is still not clear. Here we evaluated the efficiency of CH50 delivered by recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector for breast cancer treatment. Infection of the two human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 with a rAAV2 vector encoding CH50 resulted in secretion of soluble CH50. In vitro rAAV-CH50 transduction inhibited adhesion to ECM molecules, and transwell migration and invasion of breast cancer cells induced by fibronectin. In both breast cancer cells, rAAV-CH50 targeted αVβ3 signaling, namely inhibited the expression of αVβ3, the activation of FAK, the upregulation of cdc2, and the production and activation of MMP-9 by ECM molecules stimulation. rAAV-mediated tail vein transfusion and stable expression of CH50 in the liver resulted in the long-term presence of CH50 in sera of nude mice. Sustained CH50 expression mediated by rAAV vector suppressed the growth and spontaneous metastasis of orthotopic breast cancer xenograft, experimental metastasis of circulating breast cancer cells, and improved the long-term survival of breast tumor-bearing mice. These findings suggest for the first time that rAAV-CH50 gene therapy may present a novel and promising strategy for treatment against metastatic breast cancer.

  4. Selective retention of herpes simplex virus-specific T cells in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Verjans, Georges M. G. M.; Hintzen, Rogier Q.; van Dun, Jessica M.; Poot, Angelique; Milikan, Johannes C.; Laman, Jon D.; Langerak, Anton W.; Kinchington, Paul R.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) results in lifelong latent infections of neurons in sensory ganglia such as the trigeminal ganglia (TG). It has been postulated that T cells retained in TG inhibit reactivation of latent virus. The acquisition of TG specimens of individuals within hours after death offered the unique opportunity to characterize the phenotype and specificity of TG-resident T cells in humans. High numbers of activated CD8+ T cells expressing a late effector memory phenotype were found to reside in latently infected TG. The T cell infiltrate was oligoclonal, and T cells selectively clustered around HSV-1 but not VZV latently infected neurons. Neuronal damage was not observed despite granzyme B expression by the neuron-interacting CD8+ T cells. The TG-resident T cells, mainly CD8+ T cells, were directed against HSV-1 and not to VZV, despite neuronal expression of VZV proteins. The results implicate that herpesvirus latency in human TG is associated with a local, persistent T cell response, comprising activated late effector memory CD8+ T cells that appear to control HSV-1 latency by noncytolytic pathways. In contrast, T cells do not seem to be directly involved in controlling VZV latency in human TG. PMID:17360672

  5. Analysis of genetically engineered oncolytic herpes simplex viruses in human prostate cancer organotypic cultures.

    PubMed

    Passer, B J; Wu, C-l; Wu, S; Rabkin, S D; Martuza, R L

    2009-12-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses type 1 (oHSVs) such as G47Delta and G207 are genetically engineered for selective replication competence in cancer cells. Several factors can influence the overall effectiveness of oHSV tropism, including HSV-1 receptor expression, extracellular matrix milieu and cellular permissiveness. We have taken advantage of human prostate organ cultures derived from radical prostatectomies to investigate oHSV tropism. In this study, we show that both G47Delta and G207 specifically replicate in epithelial cells of the prostatic glands but not in the surrounding stroma. In contrast, both the epithelial and stromal cell compartments were readily infected by wild-type HSV-1. Analysis of oHSV replication in prostate surgical specimens 3 days post infection showed that G47Delta generated approximately 30-fold more viral progeny than did G207. This correlated with the enhanced expression of G47Delta-derived glycoprotein gB protein levels as compared with G207. In benign prostate tissues, G207 and G47Delta titers were notably reduced, whereas strain F titers were maintained at similar levels compared with prostate cancer specimens. Overall, our results show that these oncolytic herpes vectors show both target specificity and replication competence in human prostate cancer specimens and point to the utility of using human prostate organ cultures in assessing oHSV tropism and cellular specificity.

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 2 infection increases human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry into human primary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Elena; Calistri, Arianna; Salata, Cristiano; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina

    2011-04-12

    Epidemiological and clinical data indicate that genital ulcer disease (GUD) pathogens are associated with an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition and/or transmission. Among them, genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) seems to play a relevant role. Indeed, the ability of HSV-2 to induce massive infiltration at the genital level of cells which are potential targets for HIV-1 infection may represent one of the mechanisms involved in this process. Here we show that infection of human primary macrophages (MDMs) by HSV-2 results in an increase of CCR5 expression levels on cell surface and allows higher efficiency of MDMs to support entry of R5 HIV-1 strains. This finding could strengthen, at the molecular level, the evidence linking HSV-2 infection to an increased susceptibility to HIV-1 acquisition.

  7. Molecular mimicry in virus infection: crossreaction of measles virus phosphoprotein or of herpes simplex virus protein with human intermediate filaments.

    PubMed Central

    Fujinami, R S; Oldstone, M B; Wroblewska, Z; Frankel, M E; Koprowski, H

    1983-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies, we demonstrate that the phosphoprotein of measles virus and a protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 crossreact with an intermediate filament protein of human cells. This intermediate filament protein, probably vimentin, has a molecular weight of 52,000, whereas the molecular weights of the measles viral phosphoprotein and the herpes virus protein are 70,000 and 146,000, respectively. Crossreactivity was shown by immunofluorescent staining of infected and uninfected cells and by immunoblotting. The monoclonal antibody against measles virus phosphoprotein did not react with herpes simplex virus protein and vice versa, indicating that these monoclonal antibodies recognize different antigenic determinants on the intermediate filament molecule. The significance of these results in explaining the appearance of autoantibodies during virus infections in humans is discussed. Images PMID:6300911

  8. Human cytomegalovirus renders cells non-permissive for replication of herpes simplex viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Cockley, K.D.

    1988-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) genome during production infection in vitro may be subject to negative regulation which results in modification of the cascade of expression of herpes virus macromolecular synthesis leading to establishment of HSV latency. In the present study, human embryonic lung (HEL) cells infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) restricted the replication of HSV type-1 (HSV-1). A delay in HSV replication of 15 hr as well as a consistent, almost 1000-fold inhibition of HSV replication in HCMV-infected cell cultures harvested 24 to 72 hr after superinfection were observed compared with controls infected with HSV alone. HSV type-2 (HSV-2) replication was similarly inhibited in HCMV-infected HEL cells. Prior ultraviolet-irradiation (UV) of HCMV removed the block to HSV replication, demonstrating the requirement for an active HCMV genome. HCMV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) negative temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants inhibited HSV replications as efficiently as wild-type (wt) HCMV at the non-permissive temperature. Evidence for penetration and replication of superinfecting HSV into HCMV-infected cells was provided by blot hybridization of HSV DNA synthesized in HSV-superinfected cell cultures and by cesium chloride density gradient analysis of ({sup 3}H)-labeled HSV-1-superinfected cells.

  9. Role of bovine mammillitis virus towards preparation of an alternative vaccine against herpes simplex virus infections of human subjects.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Buchan, A; Durham, J; Cowan, M; Davies, J; Brookes, K; Castrucci, G

    1987-03-01

    Bovine mammillitis virus (BMV) cross-reacted in neutralization and radioimmune assay with herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pre-immunization with BMV protected against challenge by type 2 HSV. There was no evidence to suggest a pathogenic role for BMV as adjudged by a literature search or field enquiry and BMV specific antibody was not detected in 21 human sera or in four sera from personnel engaged in research with BMV; in addition there was no replication or antigen synthesis by BMV in explants of human tissue or cell lines of human origin. It is proposed that BMV might provide an alternative vaccine against HSV infections of human subjects.

  10. Herpes simplex virus downregulation of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor enhances human papillomavirus type 16 infection

    PubMed Central

    Skeate, Joseph G.; Porras, Tania B.; Woodham, Andrew W.; Jang, Julie K.; Taylor, Julia R.; Brand, Heike E.; Kelly, Thomas J.; Jung, Jae U.; Da Silva, Diane M.; Yuan, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) was originally implicated in the aetiology of cervical cancer, and although high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is now the accepted causative agent, the epidemiological link between HSV and HPV-associated cancers persists. The annexin A2 heterotetramer (A2t) has been shown to mediate infectious HPV type 16 (HPV16) uptake by human keratinocytes, and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), an endogenous A2t ligand, inhibits HPV16 uptake and infection. Interestingly, HSV infection induces a sustained downregulation of SLPI in epithelial cells, which we hypothesized promotes HPV16 infection through A2t. Here, we show that in vitro infection of human keratinocytes with HSV-1 or HSV-2, but not with an HSV-1 ICP4 deletion mutant that does not downregulate SLPI, leads to a >70 % reduction of SLPI mRNA and a >60 % decrease in secreted SLPI protein. Consequently, we observed a significant increase in the uptake of HPV16 virus-like particles and gene transduction by HPV16 pseudovirions (two- and 2.5-fold, respectively) in HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected human keratinocyte cell cultures compared with uninfected cells, whereas exogenously added SLPI reversed this effect. Using a SiMPull (single-molecule pulldown) assay, we demonstrated that endogenously secreted SLPI interacts with A2t on epithelial cells in an autocrine/paracrine manner. These results suggested that ongoing HSV infection and resultant downregulation of local levels of SLPI may impart a greater susceptibility for keratinocytes to HPV16 infection through the host cell receptor A2t, providing a mechanism that may, in part, provide an explanation for the aetiological link between HSV and HPV-associated cancers. PMID:26555393

  11. Antibody responses in humans to individual proteins of herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, S C; Docherty, J J; Rawls, W E

    1981-01-01

    Sera from 231 women were used to examine their frequency of precipitation of various herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) proteins and to determine if there was a rank order of immune responsiveness of humans to these HSV antigens. Radiolabeled viral proteins were reacted with serum and immune complexes isolated with staphylococcal protein A. Individual antigens were resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualized by fluorography. As a group, these sera precipitated 31 HSV-1 and 27 HSV-2 proteins. HSV-1 polypeptides with molecular weights of 133,000, 99,000, and 82,000, as well as HSV-2 polypeptides with molecular weights of 131,000 and 101,000, were precipitated by essentially all sera that contained antibodies to HSV-1 and HSV-2. When attempts were made to order the viral proteins by constructing precipitation profiles ranking the antigens in patterns according to their frequency of precipitation, it was observed that the antigens were generally not ordered. Demographic analysis of the sera suggested that the differences in the number of proteins precipitated were associated with differences in age, education, age at first marriage, and income, which collectively may reflect the frequency of exposure to the virus. PMID:6277791

  12. Herpes simplex virus type 2 modulates the susceptibility of human bladder cells to uropathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Superti, F; Longhi, C; Di Biase, A M; Tinari, A; Marchetti, M; Pisani, S; Gallinelli, C; Chiarini, F; Seganti, L

    2001-09-01

    The present study analyses the susceptibility of human bladder-derived cells (HT-1376) to the infection by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and Chlamydia trachomatis, as well as to the adhesiveness of uropathogenic bacteria. HT-1376 cells were efficiently infected by HSV-2 strain 333, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence staining of viral antigens, titration of cytopathic effect, and visualisation by transmission electron microscopy. This cell model was also prone to C. trachomatis (serovar E, Bour strain) replication and to the adherence of clinical uropathogenic isolates of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus vulgaris and Enterococcus faecalis. The pre-infection of HT-1376 cells with HSV-2 caused a tenfold increased adherence of an E. coli strain (U1), isolated from a patient affected by severe haemorrhagic cystitis, whereas in HSV-2 pre-infected cells the number of C. trachomatis inclusion bodies was significantly reduced. Our findings indicate that these cells are a suitable in vitro model for studying infection and super-infection of the lower urinary tract by viruses and bacteria.

  13. Divergent effects of human cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus-1 on cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vastag, Livia; Koyuncu, Emre; Grady, Sarah L; Shenk, Thomas E; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2011-07-01

    Viruses rely on the metabolic network of the host cell to provide energy and macromolecular precursors to fuel viral replication. Here we used mass spectrometry to examine the impact of two related herpesviruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), on the metabolism of fibroblast and epithelial host cells. Each virus triggered strong metabolic changes that were conserved across different host cell types. The metabolic effects of the two viruses were, however, largely distinct. HCMV but not HSV-1 increased glycolytic flux. HCMV profoundly increased TCA compound levels and flow of two carbon units required for TCA cycle turning and fatty acid synthesis. HSV-1 increased anapleurotic influx to the TCA cycle through pyruvate carboxylase, feeding pyrimidine biosynthesis. Thus, these two related herpesviruses drive diverse host cells to execute distinct, virus-specific metabolic programs. Current drugs target nucleotide metabolism for treatment of both viruses. Although our results confirm that this is a robust target for HSV-1, therapeutic interventions at other points in metabolism might prove more effective for treatment of HCMV.

  14. The cycle of human herpes simplex virus infection: virus transport and immune control.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Anthony L; Diefenbach, Russell J; Miranda-Saksena, Monica; Bosnjak, Lidija; Kim, Min; Jones, Cheryl; Douglas, Mark W

    2006-09-15

    After infection of skin or mucosa, herpes simplex virus enters the sensory nerve endings and is conveyed by retrograde axonal transport to the dorsal root ganglion, where the virus develops lifelong latency. Intermittent reactivation, which is spontaneous in humans, leads to anterograde transport of virus particles and proteins to the skin or mucosa, where the virus is shed and/or causes disease. Immune control of viral infection and replication occurs at the level of skin or mucosa during initial or recurrent infection and also within the dorsal root ganglion, where immune mechanisms control latency and reactivation. This article examines current views on the mechanisms of retrograde and anterograde transport of the virus in axons and the mechanisms of innate and adaptive immunity that control infection in the skin or mucosa and in the dorsal root ganglion--in particular, the role of interferons, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and interferon- gamma and other cytokines, including their significance in the development of vaccines for genital herpes.

  15. Enhanced replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.S.; Smith, K.O. )

    1991-02-01

    The effects of DNA-damaging agents on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were assessed in vitro. Monolayers of human lung fibroblast cell lines were exposed to DNA-damaging agents (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS), ultraviolet light (UV), or gamma radiation (GR)) at specific intervals, before or after inoculation with low levels of HSV-1. The ability of cell monolayers to support HSV-1 replication was measured by direct plaque assay and was compared with that of untreated control samples. In this system, monolayers of different cell lines infected with identical HSV-1 strains demonstrated dissimilar levels of recovery of the infectious virus. Exposure of DNA-repair-competent cell cultures to DNA-damaging agents produced time-dependent enhanced virus replication. Treatment with agent before virus inoculation significantly (p less than 0.025) increased the number of plaques by 10 to 68%, compared with untreated control cultures, while treatment with agent after virus adsorption significantly increased (p less than 0.025) the number of plaques by 7 to 15%. In a parallel series of experiments, cells deficient in DNA repair (xeroderma pigmentosum) failed to support enhanced virus replication. These results suggest that after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, fibroblasts competent in DNA repair amplify the replication of HSV-1, and that DNA-repair mechanisms that act on a variety of chromosomal lesions may be involved in the repair and biological activation of HSV-1 genomes.

  16. Effects of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 on herpes simplex virus and human immunodeficiency virus replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; McGrath, M. S.; Hanks, D.; Erickson, S.; Pulliam, L.

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of dimethyl prostaglandin A1 (dmPGA1) on the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). dmPGA1 significantly inhibited viral replication in both HSV and HIV infection systems at concentrations of dmPGA1 that did not adversely alter cellular DNA synthesis. The 50% inhibitory concentration (ID50) for several HSV type 1 (HSV-1) strains ranged from 3.8 to 5.6 micrograms/ml for Vero cells and from 4.6 to 7.3 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. The ID50s for two HSV-2 strains varied from 3.8 to 4.5 micrograms/ml for Vero cells; the ID50 was 5.7 micrograms/ml for human foreskin fibroblasts. We found that closely related prostaglandins did not have the same effect on the replication of HSV; dmPGE2 and dmPGA2 caused up to a 60% increase in HSV replication compared with that in untreated virus-infected cells. HIV-1 replication in acutely infected T cells (VB line) and chronically infected macrophages was assessed by quantitative decreases in p24 concentration. The effective ID50s were 2.5 micrograms/ml for VB cells acutely infected with HIV-1 and 5.2 micrograms/m for chronically infected macrophages. dmPGA1 has an unusual broad-spectrum antiviral activity against both HSV and HIV-1 in vitro and offers a new class of potential therapeutic agents for in vivo use.

  17. Comparison of an immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line with Vero cells in the isolation of Herpes simplex virus-1 for the laboratory diagnosis of Herpes simplex keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Athmanathan, Sreedharan; B Reddy, Sesha; Nutheti, Rishita; Rao, Gullapalli N

    2002-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex keratitis (HSK) is a sight threatening ocular infection often requiring a specific and prompt laboratory diagnosis. Isolation of Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in culture provides the most reliable and specific method and is considered as the "Gold Standard" in the laboratory diagnosis of HSK in spite of its low sensitivity. Using "cell lines of corneal origin" for virus isolation may be beneficial under such circumstances, since these cells have been shown to be excellent substrates for the growth of HSV-1 isolated from the cornea. We report a comparative study of a novel human corneal epithelial cell line (HCE) and the Vero cell line in the isolation of HSV-1 from corneal scrapings employing a shell vial assay. Methods Corneal scrapings were obtained from 17 patients with a clinical diagnosis of HSK. All the cases were confirmed by virological investigations (PCR and viral antigen detection positive, n = 15, PCR positive, n = 1, Viral antigen positive, n = 1). Scrapings obtained from 10 patients with infectious keratitis of non-viral origin were included as controls. All the scrapings were simultaneously inoculated into shell vials of HCE and Vero cells. Cultures were terminated at 24 h post-infection. Isolation of HSV-1 was confirmed using an indirect immunofluorescence/ immunoperoxidase assay. Results Virus could be isolated using both or either of the cell lines in 10/17 (58.82%) patients with HSK. HSV-1 was isolated from 10/ 17 (58.82%) and 4/17(23.52%) specimens in HCE and Vero cells, respectively (P = 0.036). None of the controls yielded HSV-1. While all the 10 (100%) strains were isolated in HCE, Vero yielded only 4/10 (40%) strains in the shell vial culture (P = 0.014). Conclusions HCE showed a statistically significant difference in the virus isolation rate with respect to Vero cells. HCE may be an excellent alternative cell line for the isolation of HSV-1, especially from corneal scrapings, for the laboratory diagnosis of HSK

  18. Temporal morphogenesis of herpes simplex virus type 1-infected and brefeldin A-treated human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Helle L.; Norrild, Bodil

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insights in the herpesvirus-cell interactions are of general cell biology interest, especially to studies of intracellular transport, and of considerable significance in the efforts to generate drugs, vaccines, and gene therapy. However, the pathway of virus particle egress and maturation is a contentious issue. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The intracellular transport was inhibited in cultured herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infected human fibroblasts by brefeldin A (BFA). The virus-cell interactions including the viral envelopment, transport of HSV-1 virions, and transport of viral glycoprotein D (gD-1) and glycoprotein C (gC-1) were studied by titration assay, immunoblot, immunofluorescence light microscopy, and immunogold electron microscopy of cryosections. RESULTS: gD-1 and gC-1 were synthesized and normally transported to the plasma membranes of untreated HSV-1 infected host cells. BFA (1 microg/ml medium) effectively blocked the transport of the glycoproteins to the plasma membranes and affected the tubulin and vimentin of the cytoskeleton. Viral particles and glycoproteins accumulated in the perinuclear space and the endoplasmic reticulum of BFA treated cells. Withdrawal of BFA influence up to 9 hr resulted in restored tubulin and vimentin, transport of glycoproteins to the plasma membranes, and steady release of infectious viral particles to the extracellular space superior to the cellular assembly of new virions. The ultrastructural data presented support that the primary envelopment of viral particles occur at the nuclear membranes containing immature glycoproteins followed by multiple de-envelopments and re-envelopments of the virions during the transport and maturation in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex. CONCLUSIONS: BFA-induced changes include the cytoskeleton with significant effect on HSV-1 maturation and egress. The data support a multiple-step envelopment of HSV-1 in a common pathway of glycoprotein synthesis and virion

  19. Herpes Simplex

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). Oral herpes causes cold sores around the mouth or face. Genital herpes affects the genitals, buttocks ... type 2 is the usual cause of genital herpes, but it also can infect the mouth. HSV spreads through direct contact. Some people have ...

  20. Antibody activity to type 1 and type 2 herpes simplex virus in human cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, B M; Skinner, G R

    1977-08-01

    Neutralizing antibody activity in cervical mucus to type 1 herpes virus was detected in 24 of 28 patients, and to type 2 herpes simplex virus in 18 of 24 patients. The neutralizing antibody activity resisted heat inactivation for 30 minutes at 56 degrees C, was independent of complement and followed first order kinetics. There was evidence of antibody against both virus types in immunoglobulin fractions IgG and IgA, the latter containing approximately threefold greater neutralizing antibody activity per unit of immunoglobulin concentration. Type 1 and type 2 neutralizing antibody activity showed a positive but weak correlation and type 2 neutralizing antibody activity showed a positive but weak correlation and a type-common immunoprecipitin was identified in all concentrated pooled mucus samples. However, type-specific neutralizing antibody against both virus types was identified in pooled mucus samples by heterologous absorption techniques. There was a relatively higher average type 2 neutralizing antibody activity in the mucus than in the serum and there was no correlation between serum and mucus antibody levels for either virus type. These observations support the concept of an independent local antibody system for herpes simplex virus in the uterine cervix.

  1. Lichen simplex chronicus

    MedlinePlus

    ... lichen simplex chronicus; Atopic dermatitis - lichen simplex chronicus; Psoriasis - lichen simplex chronicus ... people who have: Skin allergies Eczema (atopic dermatitis) Psoriasis Nervousness, anxiety, depression, and other emotional problems The ...

  2. [Herpes simplex type I virus observed in the superior cervical ganglion from human cadavers and autopsy materials].

    PubMed

    Simşek, C; Us, D; Ilgi, S; Ustaçelebi, S; Akşit, D

    1990-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Type I (HSV I) causes some infections such as herpes labialis, encephalitis, keratoconjunctivitis and also some cranial nerve syndromes such as acute vestibular neuritis, migraine and Meniere's disease in human. We used 4 fixated and 16 fresh cadavers to isolate HSV I virus from the Superior Cervical Ganglia. The ganglia materials are inoculated to PRK (primary rabbit kidney), VERO (African Green Monkey Kidney) and BHK 21 (Baby Hamster Kidney) cell lines in order to isolate the virus. We isolated HSV I virus from 12 fresh cadavers' cervical ganglia (75%) and neutralisation test is performed in order to characterize HSV I. But we could not isolate the virus from any of the fixated cadavers.

  3. Mucosal Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 in a Humanized Mouse Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Kwant-Mitchell, Amanda; Ashkar, Ali A.; Rosenthal, Kenneth L.

    2009-01-01

    Genital herpes, caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide and a risk factor for acquiring human immunodeficiency virus. Although many vaccine candidates have shown promising results in animal models, they have failed to be effective in human trials. In this study, a humanized mouse strain was evaluated as a potential preclinical model for studying human immune responses to HSV-2 infection and vaccination. Immunodeficient mouse strains were examined for their abilities to develop human innate and adaptive immune cells after transplantation of human umbilical cord stem cells. A RAG2−/− γc−/− mouse strain with a BALB/c background was chosen as the most appropriate model and was then examined for its ability to mount innate and adaptive immune responses to intravaginal HSV-2 infection and immunization. After primary infection, human cells in the lymph nodes were able to generate a protective innate immune response and produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ). After intravaginal immunization and infection, human T cells and NK cells were found in the genital tract and iliac lymph nodes. In addition, human T cells in the spleen, lymph nodes, and vaginal tract were able to respond to stimulation with HSV-2 antigens by replicating and producing IFN-γ. Human B cells were also able to produce HSV-2-specific immunoglobulin G. These adaptive responses were also shown to be protective and reduce local viral replication in the genital tract. This approach provides a means for studying human immune responses in vivo using a small-animal model and may become an important preclinical tool. PMID:19656896

  4. Entry Pathways of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 into Human Keratinocytes Are Dynamin- and Cholesterol-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mei-Ju; Rixon, Frazer J.; Knebel-Mörsdorf, Dagmar

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can enter cells via endocytic pathways or direct fusion at the plasma membrane depending on the cell line and receptor(s). Most studies into virus entry have used cultured fibroblasts but since keratinocytes represent the primary entry site for HSV-1 infection in its human host, we initiated studies to characterize the entry pathway of HSV-1 into human keratinocytes. Electron microscopy studies visualized free capsids in the cytoplasm and enveloped virus particles in vesicles suggesting viral uptake both by direct fusion at the plasma membrane and by endocytic vesicles. The ratio of the two entry modes differed in primary human keratinocytes and in the keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. Inhibitor studies further support a role for endocytosis during HSV-1 entry. Infection was inhibited by the cholesterol-sequestering drug methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which demonstrates the requirement for host cholesterol during virus entry. Since the dynamin-specific inhibitor dynasore and overexpression of a dominant-negative dynamin mutant blocked infection, we conclude that the entry pathways into keratinocytes are dynamin-mediated. Electron microscopy studies confirmed that virus uptake is completely blocked when the GTPase activity of dynamin is inhibited. Ex vivo infection of murine epidermis that was treated with dynasore further supports the essential role of dynamin during entry into the epithelium. Thus, we conclude that HSV-1 can enter human keratinocytes by alternative entry pathways that require dynamin and host cholesterol. PMID:22022400

  5. Activation of human papillomavirus type 18 gene expression by herpes simplex virus type 1 viral transactivators and a phorbol ester

    SciTech Connect

    Gius, D.; Laimins, L.A.

    1989-02-01

    Several viral trans-activators and a tumor promoter were examined for the ability to activate human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18) gene expression. A plasmid containing the HPV-18 noncoding region placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene was cotransfected with different herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) genes into several cell lines. Both HSV-1 TIF and ICPO activated HPV-18 expression; however, activation by TIF was observed only in epithelial cells, while ICPO stimulated expression in a wide variety of cells. The element activated by both TIF and ICOP was mapped to a 229-base-pair fragment which also contains an HPV-18 epithelial cell-preferred enhancer. The inclusion of a papillomavirus E2 trans-activator with TIF and ICOP further increased HPV-18 expression. In contrast, the HSV-1 ICP4 and ICP27 genes, as well as the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 tat genes, were found to have no effect on HPV-18 expression. In transient assays, the addition of the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) also activated HPV-18 expression. The region of HPV-18 activated by TPA was localized to a sequence which is homologous to other TPA-responsive elements.

  6. Imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon vector-mediated gene expression in human glioma spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kaestle, Christine; Winkeler, Alexandra; Richter, Raphaela; Sauer, Heinrich; Hescheler, Jürgen; Fraefel, Cornel; Wartenberg, Maria; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2011-06-01

    Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector-mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fluorescent protein (HSV-GFP). After infection or microscopy-guided vector injection of glioma spheroids at various spheroid sizes, injection pressures and injection times, the extent of HSV-1 vector-mediated gene expression was investigated via laser scanning microscopy. Infection of spheroids with HSV-GFP demonstrated a maximal depth of vector-mediated GFP expression at 70 to 80 μm. A > 80% transduction efficiency was reached only in small spheroids with a diameter of < 150 μm. Guided vector injection into the spheroids showed transduction efficiencies ranging between < 10 and > 90%. The results demonstrated that vector-mediated gene expression in glioma spheroids was strongly dependent on the mode of vector application-injection pressure and injection time being the most important parameters. The assessment of these vector application parameters in tissue models will contribute to the development of safe and efficient gene therapy protocols for clinical application.

  7. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Tropism for Human Sensory Ganglion Neurons in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse Model of Neuropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Che, Xibing; Reichelt, Mike; Qiao, Yanli; Gu, Haidong; Arvin, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The tropism of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) for human sensory neurons infected in vivo was examined using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) xenografts maintained in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). In contrast to the HSV-1 lytic infectious cycle in vitro, replication of the HSV-1 F strain was restricted in human DRG neurons despite the absence of adaptive immune responses in SCID mice, allowing the establishment of neuronal latency. At 12 days after DRG inoculation, 26.2% of human neurons expressed HSV-1 protein and 13.1% expressed latency-associated transcripts (LAT). Some infected neurons showed cytopathic changes, but HSV-1, unlike varicella-zoster virus (VZV), only rarely infected satellite cells and did not induce fusion of neuronal and satellite cell plasma membranes. Cell-free enveloped HSV-1 virions were observed, indicating productive infection. A recombinant HSV-1-expressing luciferase exhibited less virulence than HSV-1 F in the SCID mouse host, enabling analysis of infection in human DRG xenografts for a 61-day interval. At 12 days after inoculation, 4.2% of neurons expressed HSV-1 proteins; frequencies increased to 32.1% at 33 days but declined to 20.8% by 61 days. Frequencies of LAT-positive neurons were 1.2% at 12 days and increased to 40.2% at 33 days. LAT expression remained at 37% at 61 days, in contrast to the decline in neurons expressing viral proteins. These observations show that the progression of HSV-1 infection is highly restricted in human DRG, and HSV-1 genome silencing occurs in human neurons infected in vivo as a consequence of virus-host cell interactions and does not require adaptive immune control. PMID:23269807

  8. Herpes simplex virus 1 tropism for human sensory ganglion neurons in the severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model of neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zerboni, Leigh; Che, Xibing; Reichelt, Mike; Qiao, Yanli; Gu, Haidong; Arvin, Ann

    2013-03-01

    The tropism of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) for human sensory neurons infected in vivo was examined using dorsal root ganglion (DRG) xenografts maintained in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). In contrast to the HSV-1 lytic infectious cycle in vitro, replication of the HSV-1 F strain was restricted in human DRG neurons despite the absence of adaptive immune responses in SCID mice, allowing the establishment of neuronal latency. At 12 days after DRG inoculation, 26.2% of human neurons expressed HSV-1 protein and 13.1% expressed latency-associated transcripts (LAT). Some infected neurons showed cytopathic changes, but HSV-1, unlike varicella-zoster virus (VZV), only rarely infected satellite cells and did not induce fusion of neuronal and satellite cell plasma membranes. Cell-free enveloped HSV-1 virions were observed, indicating productive infection. A recombinant HSV-1-expressing luciferase exhibited less virulence than HSV-1 F in the SCID mouse host, enabling analysis of infection in human DRG xenografts for a 61-day interval. At 12 days after inoculation, 4.2% of neurons expressed HSV-1 proteins; frequencies increased to 32.1% at 33 days but declined to 20.8% by 61 days. Frequencies of LAT-positive neurons were 1.2% at 12 days and increased to 40.2% at 33 days. LAT expression remained at 37% at 61 days, in contrast to the decline in neurons expressing viral proteins. These observations show that the progression of HSV-1 infection is highly restricted in human DRG, and HSV-1 genome silencing occurs in human neurons infected in vivo as a consequence of virus-host cell interactions and does not require adaptive immune control.

  9. Trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 by Set1 in the lytic infection of human herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Kent, Jennifer R; Placek, Brandon; Whelan, Kelly A; Hollow, Charles M; Zeng, Ping-Yao; Fraser, Nigel W; Berger, Shelley L

    2006-06-01

    Human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that causes facial, ocular, and encephalitic disease in humans. Previous work showed that the genome of HSV-1 is associated with acetylated and methylated histones during lytic infection. However, the physiological role of histone modifications in lytic infection of HSV-1 is unclear. We examined the role of protein methylation in lytic infection of HSV-1 using a protein methylation inhibitor, 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). We found that MTA strongly reduces the transcription and replication of HSV-1. Moreover, MTA treatment decreases the level of trimethylation of lysine 4 in histone H3 (H3K4me3) on the HSV-1 genome. These results suggest that protein methylation, and in particular, histone methylation, is involved in the lytic infection of HSV-1. To delineate the underlying mechanism, we investigated the role of two H3K4 methyltransferases, Set1 and Set7/9, in the lytic infection of HSV-1. Using small interference RNA, we found that the reduction of Set1, but not Set7/9, reduces the transcription and replication of HSV-1 and specifically decreases H3K4me3 on the virus genome. These results indicate that H3K4me3 mediated by Set1 is required for optimal gene expression and replication of HSV-1 during lytic infection and suggest that this pathway could be a potential point of pharmacological intervention during HSV-1 infection.

  10. Human gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor exert a synergistic blockade on the replication of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Alonso, M A; Carrasco, L

    1989-03-01

    The replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is not inhibited in either HeLa or HEp-2 cells treated with human alpha interferon (HuIFN-alpha), particularly when high multiplicities of infection are used. However, HuIFN-gamma partially inhibits HSV-1 translation in HEp-2 cells infected at low multiplicities. Under these conditions, the transcription of genes alpha 22, TK, and gamma 0 is greatly diminished. The combined addition of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and HuIFN-gamma to HEp-2 cells exerts a synergistic inhibition of HSV-1 translation. Cells treated with both cytokines continue synthesizing cellular proteins, even 20 h after HSV-1 infection. As little as 10 U of IFN-gamma per ml blocked HSV-1 DNA replication, provided that TNF was also present in the medium. Analyses of HSV-1 gene transcription suggest that the action of both TNF and IFN-gamma blocked a step that comes at or prior to early HSV-1 gene expression. This early step in HSV-1 replication inhibited by TNF and IFN-gamma occurs after virus attachment and entry into cells, since the internalization of radioactive HSV-1 virion particles was not blocked by the presence of the two cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the synergistic action of TNF plus IFN-gamma affects a step in HSV-1 replication that comes after virus entry but before or at the transcription of immediate-early genes.

  11. Human gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor exert a synergistic blockade on the replication of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Feduchi, E; Alonso, M A; Carrasco, L

    1989-01-01

    The replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is not inhibited in either HeLa or HEp-2 cells treated with human alpha interferon (HuIFN-alpha), particularly when high multiplicities of infection are used. However, HuIFN-gamma partially inhibits HSV-1 translation in HEp-2 cells infected at low multiplicities. Under these conditions, the transcription of genes alpha 22, TK, and gamma 0 is greatly diminished. The combined addition of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and HuIFN-gamma to HEp-2 cells exerts a synergistic inhibition of HSV-1 translation. Cells treated with both cytokines continue synthesizing cellular proteins, even 20 h after HSV-1 infection. As little as 10 U of IFN-gamma per ml blocked HSV-1 DNA replication, provided that TNF was also present in the medium. Analyses of HSV-1 gene transcription suggest that the action of both TNF and IFN-gamma blocked a step that comes at or prior to early HSV-1 gene expression. This early step in HSV-1 replication inhibited by TNF and IFN-gamma occurs after virus attachment and entry into cells, since the internalization of radioactive HSV-1 virion particles was not blocked by the presence of the two cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the synergistic action of TNF plus IFN-gamma affects a step in HSV-1 replication that comes after virus entry but before or at the transcription of immediate-early genes. Images PMID:2536838

  12. Access to Nectin Favors Herpes Simplex Virus Infection at the Apical Surface of Polarized Human Epithelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Galen, Benjamin; Cheshenko, Natalia; Tuyama, Ana; Ramratnam, Bharat; Herold, Betsy C.

    2006-01-01

    Viral entry may preferentially occur at the apical or the basolateral surfaces of polarized cells, and differences may impact pathogenesis, preventative strategies, and successful implementation of viral vectors for gene therapy. The objective of these studies was to examine the polarity of herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry using several different human epithelial cell lines. Human uterine (ECC-1), colonic (CaCo-2), and retinal pigment (ARPE-19) epithelial cells were grown on collagen-coated inserts, and the polarity was monitored by measuring the transepithelial cell resistance. Controls were CaSki cells, a human cervical cell line that does not polarize in vitro. The polarized cells, but not CaSki cells, were 16- to 50-fold more susceptible to HSV infection at the apical surface than at the basolateral surface. Disruption of the tight junctions by treatment with EGTA overcame the restriction on basolateral infection but had no impact on apical infection. No differences in binding at the two surfaces were observed. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that nectin-1, the major coreceptor for HSV entry, sorted preferentially to the apical surface, overlapping with adherens and tight junction proteins. Transfection with small interfering RNA specific for nectin-1 resulted in a significant reduction in susceptibility to HSV at the apical surface but had little impact on basolateral infection. Infection from the apical but not the basolateral surface triggered focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation and led to nuclear transport of viral capsids and viral gene expression. These studies indicate that access to nectin-1 contributes to preferential apical infection of these human epithelial cells by HSV. PMID:17005657

  13. Efficient KRT14 Targeting and Functional Characterization of Transplanted Human Keratinocytes for the Treatment of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex

    PubMed Central

    Petek, Lisa M; Fleckman, Philip; Miller, Daniel G

    2010-01-01

    Inherited skin blistering conditions collectively named epidermolysis bullosa (EB) cause significant morbidity and mortality due to the compromise of the skin's barrier function, the pain of blisters, inflammation, and in some cases scaring and cancer. The simplex form of EB is usually caused by dominantly inherited mutations in KRT5 or KRT14. These mutations result in the production of proteins with dominant-negative activity that disrupt polymerization of intermediate filaments in the basal keratinocyte layer and result in a weak epidermal–dermal junction. The genome of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can recombine with chromosomal sequence so that mutations can be corrected, or production of proteins with dominant-negative activity can be disrupted. We demonstrate a clinically feasible strategy for efficient targeting of the KRT14 gene in normal and EB-affected human keratinocytes. Using a gene-targeting vector with promoter trap design, targeted alteration of one allele of KRT14 occurred in 100% of transduced cells and transduction frequencies ranged from 0.1 to 0.6% of total cells. EBS patient keratinocytes with precise modifications of the mutant allele are preferentially recovered from targeted cell populations. Single epidermal stem cell clones produced histologically normal skin grafts after transplantation to athymic mice and could generate a sufficient number of cells to transplant the entire skin surface of an individual. PMID:20571545

  14. High Seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Infection in French Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Andréoletti, Laurent; Piednoir, Emmanuel; Legoff, Jérôme; Brodard, Véronique; Beguinot, Isabelle; Strady, Christophe; Rouger, Christine; Piketty, Christophe; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Kazatchkine, Michel Daniel; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Using commercially available herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-specific serological diagnostic tests, HSV type 2 (HSV-2) antibody prevalence was assessed in two parallel prospective studies including 534 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected outpatients living in two areas of northern France. In the first cohort of 434 subjects, 223 (51%) individuals demonstrated a positive HSV-2 serological status while 66 (66%) of 100 subjects in the second cohort were seropositive for HSV-2 (51 versus 66%; P = 0.08). Among the 223 HSV-2-seropositive subjects identified in the first study cohort, only 22 (10%) had suffered from recurrent anogenital lesions during the past 12 months while 154 (69%) had no clinical history of herpesvirus infection. Our findings demonstrate high proportions of subclinical and undiagnosed HSV-2 infection in HIV-1-infected individuals and suggest that HSV type-specific serological testing in the French HIV-1-infected subpopulation could be an efficient strategy to diagnose clinically asymptomatic HSV-2 infections. PMID:16081982

  15. High seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in French human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected outpatients.

    PubMed

    Andréoletti, Laurent; Piednoir, Emmanuel; Legoff, Jérôme; Brodard, Véronique; Beguinot, Isabelle; Strady, Christophe; Rouger, Christine; Piketty, Christophe; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Kazatchkine, Michel Daniel; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Bélec, Laurent

    2005-08-01

    Using commercially available herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-specific serological diagnostic tests, HSV type 2 (HSV-2) antibody prevalence was assessed in two parallel prospective studies including 534 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected outpatients living in two areas of northern France. In the first cohort of 434 subjects, 223 (51%) individuals demonstrated a positive HSV-2 serological status while 66 (66%) of 100 subjects in the second cohort were seropositive for HSV-2 (51 versus 66%; P = 0.08). Among the 223 HSV-2-seropositive subjects identified in the first study cohort, only 22 (10%) had suffered from recurrent anogenital lesions during the past 12 months while 154 (69%) had no clinical history of herpesvirus infection. Our findings demonstrate high proportions of subclinical and undiagnosed HSV-2 infection in HIV-1-infected individuals and suggest that HSV type-specific serological testing in the French HIV-1-infected subpopulation could be an efficient strategy to diagnose clinically asymptomatic HSV-2 infections.

  16. Etiology of acute conjunctivitis due to coxsackievirus A24 variant, human adenovirus, herpes simplex virus, and Chlamydia in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yang, Yongsheng; Lin, Changying; Li, Weihong; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Jia, Lei; Li, Xitai; Chen, Lijuan; Wang, Quanyi

    2014-01-01

    Acute conjunctivitis is a common disease associated with high morbidity and economic burden. To clarify the etiological characteristics of acute conjunctivitis in Beijing, surveillance of acute conjunctivitis was conducted from July to October during 2007-2012 by collecting eye swabs from patients treated at surveillance hospitals affiliated with a surveillance program of 18 districts Center for Disease Prevention and Control in Beijing. Coxsackievirus A24 variant (CA24v), enterovirus 70 (EV70), human adenovirus (HAdV), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and chlamydia were identified by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 region of CA24v was conducted. Comparisons of proportions and statistical significance were performed using the chi-square test. HAdV was found to be the most prevalent pathogen, followed by CA24v, chlamydia, and HSV. Significant differences in the symptoms of ocular pain, photophobia, and epiphora were identified among the 4 agents. The prevalence of HAdV- and CA24v-mediated conjunctivitis peaked in July or August and September or October, respectively. Nucleotide sequences of the VP1 regions among the isolated CA24v strains shared 92.8%-100% homology. In conclusion, HAdV followed by CA24v, chlamydia, and HSV were the most common causative agents of acute conjunctivitis in Beijing. Comprehensive, continuous surveillance and advanced laboratory techniques are needed for further studies.

  17. Amplification of Herpes simplex type 1 and Human Herpes type 5 viral DNA from formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, John D; Royall, Donald; Daum, Luke T; Kagan-Hallet, Kathleen; Chambers, James P

    2005-12-16

    It is known that nucleic acids from formalin-fixed tissues are not nearly as good templates for DNA amplification as those extracted from fresh tissues. However, specimens stored in most pathologic archives are initially fixed in formalin. The possibility of an infectious etiology of several diseases including Alzheimer's underscores the usefulness of archived tissue in assessing the association of infectious agents with specific pathology. In this report, we describe in detail a method resulting in robust amplification of HSV1 and Human Herpes type (HHV) 5 viral DNA targets using formalin-fixed Alzheimer brain frontal and temporal tissue as source of amplification template. Herpes simplex type 2 viral DNA was not detected in the limited samples examined in this study. Amplicons were verified by sequence analysis. Brain tissue stored in formalin longer than 1 year prior to post-formalin-fixation analysis gave rise to significantly shorter amplicons consistent with the observation that template DNA integrity decreases significantly with increasing time of storage in formalin. Thus, this report should be useful in PCR-based investigations assessing the regional presence of viral DNAs in formalin-fixed brain tissue.

  18. Complement Opsonization Promotes Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Infection of Human Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ellegård, Rada; Nyström, Sofia; Rondahl, Elin; Serrander, Lena; Bergström, Tomas; Sjöwall, Christopher; Eriksson, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections globally, with a very high prevalence in many countries. During HSV-2 infection, viral particles become coated with complement proteins and antibodies, both present in genital fluids, which could influence the activation of immune responses. In genital mucosa, the primary target cells for HSV-2 infection are epithelial cells, but resident immune cells, such as dendritic cells (DCs), are also infected. DCs are the activators of the ensuing immune responses directed against HSV-2, and the aim of this study was to examine the effects opsonization of HSV-2, either with complement alone or with complement and antibodies, had on the infection of immature DCs and their ability to mount inflammatory and antiviral responses. Complement opsonization of HSV-2 enhanced both the direct infection of immature DCs and their production of new infectious viral particles. The enhanced infection required activation of the complement cascade and functional complement receptor 3. Furthermore, HSV-2 infection of DCs required endocytosis of viral particles and their delivery into an acid endosomal compartment. The presence of complement in combination with HSV-1- or HSV-2-specific antibodies more or less abolished HSV-2 infection of DCs. Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of studying HSV-2 infection under conditions that ensue in vivo, i.e., conditions under which the virions are covered in complement fragments and complement fragments and antibodies, as these shape the infection and the subsequent immune response and need to be further elucidated. IMPORTANCE During HSV-2 infection, viral particles should become coated with complement proteins and antibodies, both present in genital fluids, which could influence the activation of the immune responses. The dendritic cells are activators of the immune responses directed against HSV-2, and the aim of this study was to examine the

  19. Trimethylation of Histone H3 Lysine 4 by Set1 in the Lytic Infection of Human Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Kent, Jennifer R.; Placek, Brandon; Whelan, Kelly A.; Hollow, Charles M.; Zeng, Ping-Yao; Fraser, Nigel W.; Berger, Shelley L.

    2006-01-01

    Human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that causes facial, ocular, and encephalitic disease in humans. Previous work showed that the genome of HSV-1 is associated with acetylated and methylated histones during lytic infection. However, the physiological role of histone modifications in lytic infection of HSV-1 is unclear. We examined the role of protein methylation in lytic infection of HSV-1 using a protein methylation inhibitor, 5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA). We found that MTA strongly reduces the transcription and replication of HSV-1. Moreover, MTA treatment decreases the level of trimethylation of lysine 4 in histone H3 (H3K4me3) on the HSV-1 genome. These results suggest that protein methylation, and in particular, histone methylation, is involved in the lytic infection of HSV-1. To delineate the underlying mechanism, we investigated the role of two H3K4 methyltransferases, Set1 and Set7/9, in the lytic infection of HSV-1. Using small interference RNA, we found that the reduction of Set1, but not Set7/9, reduces the transcription and replication of HSV-1 and specifically decreases H3K4me3 on the virus genome. These results indicate that H3K4me3 mediated by Set1 is required for optimal gene expression and replication of HSV-1 during lytic infection and suggest that this pathway could be a potential point of pharmacological intervention during HSV-1 infection. PMID:16731913

  20. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003352.htm Serum herpes simplex antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Serum herpes simplex antibodies is a blood test that looks for antibodies ...

  1. Efficacy of Herpes Simplex Virus Vector Encoding the Human Preproenkephalin Gene for Treatment of Facial Pain in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Fei; Wang, Chunmei; Yoder, William E.; Westlund, Karin N.; Carlson, Charles R.; Miller, Craig S.; Danaher, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To determine whether herpes simplex virus–based vectors can efficiently transduce mouse trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons and attenuate preexisting nerve injury–induced whisker pad mechanical hypersensitivity in a trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC) neuropathic pain model. Methods Tissue transduction efficiencies of replication-conditional and replication-defective vectors to mouse whisker pads after topical administration and subcutaneous injection were assessed using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Tissue tropism and transgene expression were assessed using qPCR and reverse-transcriptase qPCR following topical application of the vectors. Whisker pad mechanical sensitivities of TIC-injured mice were determined using graduated von Frey fibers before and after application of human preproenkephalin expressing replication-conditional vector (KHPE). Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests. Results Transduction of target TGs was 8- to 50-fold greater after topical application than subcutaneous injection and ≥ 100-fold greater for replication-conditional than replication-defective vectors. Mean KHPE loads remained constant in TGs (4.5–9.8 × 104 copies/TG) over 3 weeks but were below quantifiable levels (10 copies/tissue) within 2 weeks of application in other nontarget cephalic tissues examined. Transgene expression in TGs was maximal during 2 weeks after topical application (100–200 cDNA copies/mL) and was below quantifiable levels (1 cDNA copy/mL) in all nontarget tissues. Topical KHPE administration reduced TIC-related mechanical hypersensitivity on whisker pads 4-fold (P < .05) for at least 1 week. Conclusion Topically administered KHPE produced a significant antinociceptive effect in the TIC mouse model of chronic facial neuropathic pain. This is the first report in which a gene therapeutic approach reduced trigeminal pain–related behaviors in an established pain state in mice. PMID:26817032

  2. β-Amyloid peptides display protective activity against the human Alzheimer's disease-associated herpes simplex virus-1.

    PubMed

    Bourgade, Karine; Garneau, Hugo; Giroux, Geneviève; Le Page, Aurélie Y; Bocti, Christian; Dupuis, Gilles; Frost, Eric H; Fülöp, Tamàs

    2015-02-01

    Amyloid plaques, the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), contain fibrillar β-amyloid (Aβ) 1-40 and 1-42 peptides. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has been implicated as a risk factor for AD and found to co-localize within amyloid plaques. Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 display anti-bacterial, anti-yeast and anti-viral activities. Here, fibroblast, epithelial and neuronal cell lines were exposed to Aβ 1-40 or Aβ 1-42 and challenged with HSV-1. Quantitative analysis revealed that Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 inhibited HSV-1 replication when added 2 h prior to or concomitantly with virus challenge, but not when added 2 or 6 h after virus addition. In contrast, Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 did not prevent replication of the non-enveloped human adenovirus. In comparison, antimicrobial peptide LL-37 prevented HSV-1 infection independently of its sequence of addition. Our findings showed also that Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 acted directly on HSV-1 in a cell-free system and prevented viral entry into cells. The sequence homology between Aβ and a proximal transmembrane region of HSV-1 glycoprotein B suggested that Aβ interference with HSV-1 replication could involve its insertion into the HSV-1 envelope. Our data suggest that Aβ peptides represent a novel class of antimicrobial peptides that protect against neurotropic enveloped virus infections such as HSV-1. Overproduction of Aβ peptide to protect against latent herpes viruses and eventually against other infections, may contribute to amyloid plaque formation, and partially explain why brain infections play a pathogenic role in the progression of the sporadic form of AD.

  3. Molecular Umbrellas: a Novel Class of Candidate Topical Microbicides To Prevent Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus Infections▿

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Rebecca Pellett; Mesquita, Pedro M. M.; Cheshenko, Natalia; Jing, Bingwen; Shende, Vikas; Guzman, Esmeralda; Heald, Taylor; Keller, Marla J.; Regen, Steven L.; Shattock, Robin J.; Herold, Betsy C.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular umbrella compounds may function as novel topical microbicides to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections. In a preliminary structure-activity investigation, one umbrella compound, designated Spm8CHAS, was identified which inhibited both HIV and HSV infections with no cellular toxicity. The objectives of the current studies were to define its spectrum of antiviral activity, characterize its mechanism of action, and explore the possibility of combining Spm8CHAS with HIV-specific reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Spm8CHAS inhibited infections by laboratory and clinical R5 and X4 clade B and clade C HIV strains in cell culture. Ectocervical tissue explants exposed to HIV-1BaL in the presence of Spm8CHAS were completely protected (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 13.6 μg/ml), and transfer of virus to target T cells via migratory cells was abolished (IC50, 3.8 μg/ml). Spm8CHAS inhibited HSV-2 infection of epithelial cells 10,000-fold if present throughout the infection. Notably, adding Spm8CHAS to cultures following HSV entry significantly reduced viral infection, indicating that the drug also acts postentry. Subsequent studies indicated that Spm8CHAS blocks cell-to-cell spread of HSV. Confocal microscopy using a fluorescently labeled analog of Spm8CHAS demonstrated that this conjugate crosses the plasma cell membrane and is transported to the nucleus. Combinations of Spm8CHAS with UC-781 or 9-[R-2-(phosphonylmethoxy)propyl] adenine monohydrate in vitro exhibited additive anti-HIV activity with preserved anti-HSV activity. The abilities of Spm8CHAS to inhibit primary isolates of HIV, block HSV infection postentry, and cross cell membranes support the development of a combination microbicide containing Spm8CHAS with an HIV-specific reverse transcriptase inhibitor to prevent both HIV and HSV infections by multiple mechanisms. PMID:17494078

  4. Variability of human immunodeficiency virus-1 in the female genital reservoir during genital reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    LeGoff, J; Roques, P; Jenabian, M-A; Charpentier, C; Brochier, C; Bouhlal, H; Gresenguet, G; Frost, E; Pepin, J; Mayaud, P; Belec, L

    2015-09-01

    Clinical and subclinical genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactivations have been associated with increases in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 genital shedding. Whether HSV-2 shedding contributes to the selection of specific genital HIV-1 variants remains unknown. We evaluated the genetic diversity of genital and blood HIV-1 RNA and DNA in 14 HIV-1/HSV-2-co-infected women, including seven with HSV-2 genital reactivation, and seven without as controls. HIV-1 DNA and HIV-1 RNA env V1-V3 sequences in paired blood and genital samples were compared. The HSV-2 selection pressure on HIV was estimated according to the number of synonymous substitutions (dS), the number of non-synonymous substitutions (dN) and the dS/dN ratio within HIV quasi-species. HIV-1 RNA levels in cervicovaginal secretions were higher in women with HSV-2 replication than in controls (p0.02). Plasma HIV-1 RNA and genital HIV-1 RNA and DNA were genetically compartmentalized. No differences in dS, dN and the dS/dN ratio were observed between the study groups for either genital HIV-1 RNA or plasma HIV-1 RNA. In contrast, dS and dN in genital HIV-1 DNA were significantly higher in patients with HSV-2 genital reactivation (p <0.01 and p <0.05, respectively). The mean of the dS/dN ratio in genital HIV-1 DNA was slightly higher in patients with HSV-2 genital replication, indicating a trend for purifying selection (p 0.056). HSV-2 increased the genetic diversity of genital HIV-1 DNA. These observations confirm molecular interactions between HSV-2 and HIV-1 at the genital tract level.

  5. Both plasmacytoid dendritic cells and monocytes stimulate natural killer cells early during human herpes simplex virus type 1 infections.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Karin; Thomann, Sabrina; Vogel, Benjamin; Schuster, Philipp; Schmidt, Barbara

    2014-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a member of the herpes virus family, is characterized by a short replication cycle, high cytopathogenicity and distinct neurotropism. Primary infection and reactivation may cause severe diseases in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed individuals. This study investigated the role of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in the activation of natural killer (NK) cells for the control of herpesviral infections. Within peripheral blood mononuclear cells, UV-inactivated HSV-1 and CpG-A induced CD69 up-regulation on NK cells, whereas infectious HSV-1 was particularly active in inducing NK cell effector functions interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion and degranulation. The pDC-derived IFN-α significantly contributed to NK cell activation, as evident from neutralization and cell depletion experiments. In addition, monocyte-derived tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced after exposure to infectious HSV-1 was found to stimulate IFN-γ secretion. A minority of monocytes was shown to be non-productively infected in experiments using fluorescently labelled viruses and quantitative PCR analyses. HSV-1-exposed monocytes up-regulated classical HLA-ABC and non-classical HLA-E molecules at the cell surface in an IFN-α-dependent manner, whereas stress molecules MICA/B were not induced. Notably, depletion of monocytes reduced NK cell effector functions induced by infectious HSV-1 (P < 0.05). Altogether, our data suggest a model in which HSV-1-stimulated pDC and monocytes activate NK cells via secretion of IFN-α and TNF-α. In addition, infection of monocytes induces NK cell effector functions via TNF-α-dependent and TNF-α-independent mechanisms. Hence, pDC and monocytes, which are among the first cells infiltrating herpetic lesions, appear to have important bystander functions for NK cells to control these viral infections.

  6. Computer-aided active-site-directed modeling of the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and human thymidine kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkers, Gerd; Trumpp-Kallmeyer, Susanne; Gutbrod, Oliver; Krickl, Sabine; Fetzer, Jürgen; Keil, Günther M.

    1991-10-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK), which is induced by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1), plays a key role in the antiviral activity of guanine derivatives such as aciclovir (ACV). In contrast, ACV shows only low affinity to the corresponding host cell enzyme. In order to define the differences in substrate binding of the two enzymes on molecular level, models for the three-dimensional (3-D) structures of the active sites of HSV1-TK and human TK were developed. The reconstruction of the active sites started from primary and secondary structure analysis of various kinases. The results were validated to homologous enzymes with known 3-D structures. The models predict that both enzymes consist of a central core β-sheet structure, connected by loops and α-helices very similar to the overall structure of other nucleotide binding enzymes. The phosphate binding is made up of a highly conserved glycine-rich loop at the N-terminus of the proteins and a conserved region at the C-terminus. The thymidine recognition site was found about 100 amino acids downstream from the phosphate binding loop. The differing substrate specificity of human and HSV1-TK can be explained by amino-acid substitutions in the homologous regions. To achieve a better understanding of the structure of the active site and how the thymidine kinase proteins interact with their substrates, the corresponding complexes of thymidine and dihydroxypropoxyguanine (DHPG) with HSV1 and human TK were built. For the docking of the guanine derivative, the X-ray structure of Elongation Factor Tu (EF-Tu), co-crystallized with guanosine diphosphate, was taken as reference. Fitting of thymidine into the active sites was done with respect to similar interactions found in thymidylate kinase. To complement the analysis of the 3-D structures of the two kinases and the substrate enzyme interactions, site-directed mutagenesis of the thymidine recognition site of HSV1-TK has been undertaken, changing Asp162 in the thymidine recognition site

  7. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated high-efficiency, transient expression of the murine cationic amino acid transporter (ecotropic retroviral receptor) permits stable transduction of human HeLa cells by ecotropic retroviral vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bertran, J; Miller, J L; Yang, Y; Fenimore-Justman, A; Rueda, F; Vanin, E F; Nienhuis, A W

    1996-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus has a broad host range, is nonpathogenic, and integrates into a preferred location on chromosome 19, features that have fostered development of recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV) as gene transfer vectors for therapeutic applications. We have used an rAAV to transfer and express the murine cationic amino acid transporter which functions as the ecotropic retroviral receptor, thereby rendering human cells conditionally susceptible to infection by an ecotropic retroviral vector. The proportion of human HeLa cells expressing the receptor at 60 h varied as a function of the multiplicity of infection (MOI) with the rAAV. Cells expressing the ecotropic receptor were efficiently transduced with an ecotropic retroviral vector encoding a nucleus-localized form of beta-galactosidase. Cells coexpressing the ecotropic receptor and nucleus-localized beta-galactosidase were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and cell lines were recovered by cloning at limiting dilution. After growth in culture, all clones contained the retroviral vector genome, but fewer than 10% (3 of 47) contained the rAAV genome and continued to express the ecotropic receptor. The ecotropic receptor coding sequences in the rAAV genome were under the control of a tetracycline-modulated promoter. In the presence of tetracycline, receptor expression was low and the proportion of cells transduced by the ecotropic retroviral vector was decreased. Modulation of receptor expression was achieved with both an episomal and an integrated form of the rAAV genome. These data establish that functional gene expression from an rAAV genome can occur transiently without genome integration. PMID:8794313

  8. Human papilloma virus, herpes simplex virus and epstein barr virus in oral squamous cell carcinoma from eight different countries.

    PubMed

    Jalouli, Jamshid; Jalouli, Miranda M; Sapkota, Dipak; Ibrahim, Salah O; Larsson, Per-Anders; Sand, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major health problem in many parts of the world, and the major causative agents are thought to be the use of alcohol and tobacco. Oncogenic viruses have also been suggested to be involved in OSCC development. This study investigated the prevalence of human papillomaviruses (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in 155 OSCC from eight different countries from different ethnic groups, continents and with different socioeconomic backgrounds. 41 A total of OSCCs were diagnosed in the tongue (26%) and 23 in the floor of the mouth (15%); the other 91 OSCCs were diagnosed in other locations (59%). The patients were also investigated regarding the use of alcohol and smoking and smokeless tobacco habits. Tissue samples were obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of the OSCC. DNA was extracted and the viral genome was examined by single, nested and semi-nested PCR assays. Sequencing of double-stranded DNA from the PCR product was carried out. Following sequencing of the HPV-, HSV- and EBV-positive PCR products, 100% homology between the sampels was found. Of all the 155 OSCCs examined, 85 (55%) were positive for EBV, 54 (35%) for HPV and 24 (15%) for HSV. The highest prevalence of HPV was seen in Sudan (65%), while HSV (55%) and EBV (80%) were most prevalent in the UK. In 34% (52/155) of all the samples examined, co-infection by two (46/155=30%) or three (6/155=4%) virus specimens was detected. The most frequent double infection was HPV with EBV in 21% (32/155) of all OSCCs. There was a statistically significant higher proportion of samples with HSV (p=0.026) and EBV (p=0.015) in industrialized countries (Sweden, Norway, UK and USA) as compared to developing countries (Sudan, India, Sri Lanka and Yemen). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher co-infection of HSV and EBV in samples from industrialized countries (p=0.00031). No firm conclusions could be drawn regarding the

  9. Interleukin 10 Mediated By Herpes Simplex Virus Vectors Suppresses Neuropathic Pain Induced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus gp120 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wenwen; Huang, Wan; Liu, Shue; Levitt, Roy C.; Candiotti, Keith A.; Lubarsky, David A.; Hao, Shuanglin

    2014-01-01

    Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-associated sensory neuropathy is a common neurological complication of HIV infection affecting up to 30% of HIV-positive individuals. However, the exact neuropathological mechanisms remain unknown, which hinders our ability to develop effective treatments for HIV-neuropathic pain (NP). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of proinflammatory factors with overexpression of interleukin (IL)-10 reduces HIV-related NP in a rat model. Methods NP was induced by the application of recombinant HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 into the sciatic nerve. The hindpaws of rats were inoculated with nonreplicating herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors expressing antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 or control vector. Mechanical threshold was tested using von Frey filaments before and after treatments with the vectors. The mechanical threshold response was assessed over time using the area under curves (AUC). The expression of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated kinase, as tumor necrosis factor alpha, stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 in both the lumbar spinal cord and the L4/5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was examined at 14 and 28 days after vector inoculation using Western blots. Results We found that in the gp120-induced NP model, IL-10 overexpression mediated by the HSV vector resulted in a significant elevation of the mechanical threshold that was apparent on day 3 after vector inoculation compared with the control vector (P<0.0001). The antiallodynic effect of the single HSV vector inoculation expressing IL-10 lasted more than 28 days. The AUC in the HSV vector expressing IL-10 was increased compared with that in the control vector (P<0.0001). HSV vectors expressing IL-10 reversed the upregulation of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated kinase, as tumor necrosis factor alpha, stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 expression at 14 and/or 28

  10. Novel Method Based on Real-Time Cell Analysis for Drug Susceptibility Testing of Herpes Simplex Virus and Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Piret, Jocelyne; Goyette, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The plaque reduction assay (PRA) is the gold standard phenotypic method to determine herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) susceptibilities to antiviral drugs. However, this assay is subjective and labor intensive. Here, we describe a novel antiviral phenotypic method based on real-time cell analysis (RTCA) that measures electronic impedance over time. The effective drug concentrations that reduced by 50% (EC50s) the cytopathic effects induced by HSV-1 and HCMV were evaluated by both methods. The EC50s of acyclovir and foscarnet against a reference wild-type (WT) HSV-1 strain in Vero cells were, respectively, 0.5 μM and 32.6 μM by PRA and 0.8 μM and 93.6 μM by RTCA. The EC50 ratios for acyclovir against several HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK) mutants were 101.8×, 73.4×, 28.8×, and 35.4× (PRA) and 18.0×, 52.0×, 5.5×, and 87.8× (RTCA) compared to those for the WT. The EC50 ratios for acyclovir and foscarnet against the HSV-1 TK/DNA polymerase mutant were 182.8× and 9.7× (PRA) and >125.0× and 10.8× (RTCA) compared to the WT. The EC50s of ganciclovir and foscarnet against WT HCMV strain AD169 in fibroblasts were, respectively, 1.6 μM and 27.8 μM by PRA and 5.0 μM and 111.4 μM by RTCA. The EC50 ratios of ganciclovir against the HCMV UL97 mutant were 3.8× (PRA) and 8.2× (RTCA) compared to those for the WT. The EC50 ratios of ganciclovir and foscarnet against the HCMV UL97/DNA polymerase mutant were 17.1× and 12.1× (PRA) and 14.7× and 4.6× (RTCA) compared to those for the WT. RTCA allows objective drug susceptibility testing of HSV and HCMV and could permit high-throughput screening of new antivirals. PMID:27252463

  11. The preparation, efficacy and safety of 'antigenoid' vaccine NFU1 (S-L+) MRC toward prevention of herpes simplex virus infections in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Buchan, A; Hartley, C E; Turner, S P; Williams, D R

    1980-01-01

    Vaccine NFU1 (S-L+) MRC was prepared by high multiplicity infection of serum-deprived human embryonic lung (MRC 5) cells with type 1 Herpes simplex virus. The preparative process removed inoculum virus particles and virus DNA while virus particle and DNA synthesis was inhibited by the presence of lithium chloride in the cell culture medium. The vaccine stimulated neutralising antibody in vaccinated mice and provided long-term protection against intra-vaginal challenge with type 2 herpes virus. The safety of the vaccine was confirmed by inoculation into newborn mice and cell lines of human, mammalian, and rodent origin. There was no evidence of cell transformation in vitro or of oncogenicity or teratogenicity in rodent species. It is intended to investigate the efficiency of this vaccine in human subjects.

  12. Evidence for an involvement of thymidine kinase in the excision repair of ultraviolet-irradiated herpes simplex virus in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Intine, R.V.; Rainbow, A.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A wild-type strain of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1:KOS) encoding a functional thymidine kinase (tk+) and a tk- mutant strain (HSV-1:PTK3B) were used to study the role of the viral tk in the repair of UV-irradiated HSV-1 in human cells. UV survival of HSV-1:PTK3B was substantially reduced compared with that of HSV-1:KOS when infecting normal human cells. In contrast, the UV survival of HSV-1:PTK3B was similar to that of HSV-1:KOS when infecting excision repair-deficient cells from a xeroderma pigmentosum patient from complementation group A. These results suggest that the repair of UV-irradiated HSV-1 in human cells depends, in part at least, on expression of the viral tk and that the repair process influenced by tk activity is excision repair or a process dependent on excision repair.

  13. MORC3, a Component of PML Nuclear Bodies, Has a Role in Restricting Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Anne; Everett, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously reported that MORC3, a protein associated with promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs), is a target of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0-mediated degradation (E. Sloan, et al., PLoS Pathog 11:e1005059, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1005059). Since it is well known that certain other components of the PML NB complex play an important role during an intrinsic immune response to HSV-1 and are also degraded or inactivated by ICP0, here we further investigate the role of MORC3 during HSV-1 infection. We demonstrate that MORC3 has antiviral activity during HSV-1 infection and that this antiviral role is counteracted by ICP0. In addition, MORC3's antiviral role extends to wild-type (wt) human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, as its plaque-forming efficiency increased in MORC3-depleted cells. We found that MORC3 is recruited to sites associated with HSV-1 genomes after their entry into the nucleus of an infected cell, and in wt infections this is followed by its association with ICP0 foci prior to its degradation. The RING finger domain of ICP0 was required for degradation of MORC3, and we confirmed that no other HSV-1 protein is required for the loss of MORC3. We also found that MORC3 is required for fully efficient recruitment of PML, Sp100, hDaxx, and γH2AX to sites associated with HSV-1 genomes entering the host cell nucleus. This study further unravels the intricate ways in which HSV-1 has evolved to counteract the host immune response and reveals a novel function for MORC3 during the host intrinsic immune response. IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses have devised ways to manipulate the host intrinsic immune response to promote their own survival and persistence within the human population. One way in which this is achieved is through degradation or functional inactivation of PML NB proteins, which are recruited to viral genomes in order to repress viral transcription. Because MORC3 associates with PML NBs in uninfected cells and

  14. Detection of type-specific antibody to herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 in human sera by complement-fixation tests.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Hartley, C H; Whitney, J E

    1976-01-01

    Type-specific antigens for herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 were prepared by rigorous absorption of cell extracts with heterotypic immune sera. Type-specificity was demonstrated by immunodiffusion and complement-fixation tests against immune sera prepared in rabbits. Specific type 1 complement-fixing reactivity was detected in eleven of fifteen sera from Roman Catholic nuns and in two convalescent sera from patients with recurrent herpes labialis; these sera had been previously shown to contain neutralising and complement-fixing antibody to herpes simplex virus. Three of the non-reacting sera contained low or absent levels of type-common complement-fixing reactivity and other contained no type-specific neutralising antibody. With the exception of three "acute" sera, specific type 2 complement-fixing reactivity was detected in every convalescent or interim serum obtained from patients with a virologically-proven history of type 2 herpes virus infection. It is suggested that complement-fixation testing using these absorbed type-specific antigens preparations may provide a convenient and rapid method for the identification of type-specific antibody in human sera.

  15. Characterisation of potential novel allergens in the fish parasite Anisakis simplex

    PubMed Central

    Fæste, Christiane Kruse; Jonscher, Karen R.; Dooper, Maaike M.W.B.; Egge-Jacobsen, Wolfgang; Moen, Anders; Daschner, Alvaro; Egaas, Eliann; Christians, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The parasitic nematode Anisakis simplex occurs in fish stocks in temperate seas. A. simplex contamination of fish products is unsavoury and a health concern considering human infection with live larvae (anisakiasis) and allergic reactions to anisakid proteins in seafood. Protein extracts of A. simplex produce complex band patterns in gel electrophoresis and IgE-immunostaining. In the present study potential allergens have been characterised using sera from A. simplex-sensitised patients and proteome data obtained by mass spectrometry. A. simplex proteins were homologous to allergens in other nematodes, insects, and shellfish indicating cross-reactivity. Characteristic marker peptides for relevant A. simplex proteins were described. PMID:27110489

  16. Epidemiology and clinical characteristics of infants with human parechovirus or human herpes virus-6 detected in cerebrospinal fluid tested for enterovirus or herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Messacar, Kevin; Breazeale, Garrett; Wei, Qi; Robinson, Christine C; Dominguez, Samuel R

    2015-05-01

    Human parechovirus (HPeV) and human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) are acquired commonly in infancy and associated with central nervous system infection. The prevalence of HPeV and HHV-6 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of infants tested for enterovirus (EV) and herpes-simplex virus (HSV) is unknown. All stored CSF samples from EV or HSV testing in infants less than 6 months of age at Children's Hospital Colorado between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 were tested for HPeV, HHV-6, EV, and HSV by PCR. Clinical characteristics and epidemiological data were collected using retrospective electronic chart review. Of 239 infants tested, 29 cases of EV (12.1%), 7 cases of HPeV (2.9%), 5 cases of HHV-6 (2.1%), and 5 cases of HSV (2.1%) were identified with no bacterial co-infections. HPeV cases occurred between July and October in infants with median age of 24 days. Infants with HPeV had a median maximum temperature of 39 °C, median fever duration of 3 days and median peripheral white blood cell count of 5.2 × 10(3)/μL. HHV-6 cases occurred in infants with median age of 61 days without seasonality. Five percent of infants less than 6 months of age undergoing testing for EV or HSV have HPeV or HHV-6 in the CSF. Targeting testing of HPeV towards febrile infants less than 2 months of age with leukopenia in the late summer to early fall, and HHV-6 towards older infants may increase diagnostic yield. The clinical and fiscal impact of testing infants for HPeV and HHV-6 needs to be determined.

  17. Immune inhibition of virus release from human and nonhuman cells by antibody to viral and host cell determinants.

    PubMed

    Shariff, D M; Davies, J; Desperbasques, M; Billstrom, M; Geerligs, H J; Welling, G W; Welling-Wester, S; Buchan, A; Skinner, G R

    1991-01-01

    Immune inhibition of release of the DNA viruses, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and pseudorabies virus by anti-viral and anti-host cell sera occurred while two RNA viruses, influenza and encephalomyocarditis, were inhibited only by anti-viral sera (not anti-host cell sera). Simian virus 40 and surprisingly two herpes viruses, bovine mamillitis and equine abortion, were not inhibited by either anti-viral or anti-host sera. Using the herpes simplex virus model, inhibition of virus release was detected in different cells of human and nonhuman origin with cross-inhibition between cell lines of different origin; thus, this form of immunotherapy may not require antibody to be tissue or organ specific. Evidence of inhibition of virus release from neoplastic and leukemic cell lines suggests possible application of this approach to control of virus-mediated leukoproliferative pathology (e.g. Burkitt's lymphoma or adult T cell leukemia).

  18. Potent efficacy signals from systemically administered oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV1716) in hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Braidwood, Lynne; Learmonth, Kirsty; Graham, Alex; Conner, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV1716), lacking the neurovirulence factor ICP34.5, has highly selective replication competence for cancer cells and has been used in clinical studies of glioma, melanoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, pediatric non-central nervous system solid tumors, and malignant pleural mesothelioma. To date, 88 patients have received HSV1716 and the virus is well tolerated, with selective replication in tumor cells and no spread to surrounding normal tissue. We assessed the potential value of HSV1716 in preclinical studies with two human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines, HuH7 and HepG2-luc. HSV1716 displayed excellent replication kinetics in vitro in HepG2-luc cells, a cell line engineered to express luciferase, and virus-mediated cell killing correlated with loss of light emissions from the cells. In vivo, the HepG2-luc cells readily formed light-emitting xenografts that were easily visualized by an in vivo imaging system and efficiently eliminated by HSV1716 oncolysis after intratumoral injection. HSV1716 also demonstrated strong efficacy signals in subcutaneous HuH7 xenografts in nude mice after intravenous administration of virus. In the HuH7 model, the intravenously injected virus replicated prolifically immediately after efficient tumor localization, resulting in highly significant reductions in tumor growth and enhanced survival. Our preclinical results demonstrate excellent tumor uptake of HSV1716, with prolific replication and potent oncolysis. These observations warrant a clinical study of HSV1716 in hepatocellular carcinoma.

  19. An efficient deletion mutant packaging system for defective herpes simplex virus vectors: Potential applications to human gene therapy and neuronal physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, A.I.; Keyomarsi, K.; Bryan, J.; Pardee, A.B. )

    1990-11-01

    The authors have previously described a defective herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vector system that permits that introduction of virtually any gene into nonmitotic cells. pHSVlac, the prototype vector, stably expresses Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase from a constitutive promoter in many human cell lines, in cultured rat neurons from throughout the nervous system, and in cells in the adult rat brain. HSV-1 vectors expressing other genes may prove useful for studying neuronal physiology or performing human gene therapy for neurological diseases, such as Parkinson disease or brain tumors. A HSV-1 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant, ts K, has been used as helper virus; ts mutants revert to wild type. In contrast, HSV-1 deletion mutants essentially cannot revert to wild type; therefore, use of a deletion mutant as helper virus might permit human gene therapy with HSV-1 vectors. They now report an efficient packaging system for HSV-1 VECTORS USING A DELETION MUTANT, d30EBA, as helper virus; virus is grown on the complementing cell line M64A. pHSVlac virus prepared using the deletion mutant packaging system stably expresses {beta}-galactosidase in cultured rat sympathetic neurons and glia. Both D30EBA and ts K contain a mutation in the IE3 gene of HSV-1 strain 17 and have the same phenotype; therefore, changing the helper virus from ts K to D30EBA does not alter the host range or other properties of the HSV-1 vector system.

  20. Sequential Changes in Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to Herpes Simplex Virus After Recurrent Herpetic Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shillitoe, E. J.; Wilton, J. M. A.; Lehner, T.

    1977-01-01

    Lymphocyte responses to herpes simplex virus (HSV) were studied in 23 patients with recurrent herpes labialis and in 19 control subjects. Lymphocytes of seropositive, but not seronegative, controls responded to HSV by thymidine incorporation, and the supernatant fluids inhibited the migration of guinea pig macrophages. Lymphocytes from patients with a recurrent herpetic lesion responded to HSV by significantly greater thymidine incorporation than seropositive controls, but supernatants did not show an increased macrophage migration inhibition response. During the 28 days after the onset of a lesion, the thymidine incorporation to HSV fell to the level of the seropositive controls, and supernatants then induced an increased inhibition of macrophage migration. Lymphocyte responses to Candida albicans, purified protein derivative, or phytohemagglutinin did not fluctuate according to the presence of a lesion and did not differ from those of the controls. Lymphocyte responses to HSV were unaffected by culture in the presence of serum from seronegative or seropositive controls, or from patients with or without a herpetic lesion. It is suggested that in patients with recurrent herpes labialis a periodic defect of the migration inhibition response might have allowed the recurrent infection to develop, and that the increased thymidine incorporation stimulated by HSV in vitro is a result of antigenic stimulation from the lesion. PMID:198372

  1. [Immune evasion by herpes simplex viruses].

    PubMed

    Retamal-Díaz, Angello R; Suazo, Paula A; Garrido, Ignacio; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses and humans have co-existed for tens of thousands of years. This long relationship has translated into the evolution and selection of viral determinants to evade the host immune response and reciprocally the evolution and selection of host immune components for limiting virus infection and damage. Currently there are no vaccines available to avoid infection with these viruses or therapies to cure them. Herpes simplex viruses are neurotropic and reside latently in neurons at the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia, occasionally reactivating. Most viral recurrences are subclinical and thus, unnoticed. Here, we discuss the initial steps of infection by herpes simplex viruses and the molecular mechanisms they have developed to evade innate and adaptive immunity. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to evade host immunity should help us envision novel vaccine strategies and therapies that limit infection and dissemination.

  2. Herpes simplex esophagitis in immunocompetent hosts.

    PubMed

    Eymard, D; Martin, L; Doummar, G; Piché, J

    1997-11-01

    Over four months, three cases of biopsy-proven herpes simplex esophagitis were seen at Centre hospitalier Pierre-Boucher, Longueuil, in young adult males with no evidence of immunosuppression and negative serological testing for antibody against the human immunodeficiency virus. Clinical presentation consisted of odynophagia, fever and retrosternal chest pain. All patients rapidly improved with acyclovir therapy.

  3. Herpes simplex esophagitis in immunocompetent hosts

    PubMed Central

    Eymard, Daniel; Martin, Luc; Doummar, Gilbert; Piché, Jean

    1997-01-01

    Over four months, three cases of biopsy-proven herpes simplex esophagitis were seen at Centre hospitalier Pierre-Boucher, Longueuil, in young adult males with no evidence of immunosuppression and negative serological testing for antibody against the human immunodeficiency virus. Clinical presentation consisted of odynophagia, fever and retrosternal chest pain. All patients rapidly improved with acyclovir therapy. PMID:22346532

  4. Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-specific proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell responses in humans immunized with an HSF type 2 glycoprotein subunit vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, J.M.; Moran, P.A.; Brewer, L.; Ashley, R.; Corey, L.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether immunization of humans with a herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein-subunit vaccine would result in the priming of both HSV-specific proliferating cells and cytotoxic T cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from all eight vaccinees studied responded by proliferating after stimulation with HSV-2, HSV-1, and glycoprotein gB-1. The PBL of five of these eight vaccinees proliferated following stimulation with gD-2, whereas stimulation with Gd-1 resulted in relatively low or no proliferative responses. T-cell clones were generated from HSV-2-stimulated PBL of three vaccinees who demonstrated strong proliferative responses to HSV-1 and HSV-2. Of 12 clones studied in lymphoproliferative assays, 9 were found to be cross-reactive for HSV-1 and HSV-2. Of the approximately 90 T-cell clones isolated, 14 demonstrated HSV-specific cytotoxic activity. Radioimmunoprecipitation-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses confirmed that the vaccinees had antibodies only to HSV glycoproteins, not to proteins which are absent in the subunit vaccine, indicating that these vaccinees had not become infected with HSV. Immunization of humans with an HSV-2 glycoprotein-subunit vaccine thus results in the priming of T cells that proliferate in response to stimulation with HSV and its glycoproteins and T cells that have cytotoxic activity against HSV-infected cells. Such HSV-specific memory T cells were detected as late as 2 years following the last boost with the subunit vaccine.

  5. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  6. Accumulation of a soluble form of human nectin-2 is required for exerting the resistance against herpes simplex virus type 2 infection in transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Y; Ozaki, K; Iwamori, N; Takakuwa, H; Ono, E

    2016-03-01

    Cell entry of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) requires the interaction of viral glycoprotein D (gD) with the receptor nectin-1 and herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM). In addition, it is known that nectin-2 is also functional as a receptor for HSV-2, although the binding to the gD is weak. To examine an antiviral potential of a soluble form of human nectin-2 (hNectin-2Ig), transfected Vero cells expressing the entire ectodomain of nectin-2 fused to the Fc portion of human IgG were established. Specific binding of hNectin-2Ig to HSV-2 gD was confirmed by ELISA. Competitive ELISA demonstrated that accumulation of hNectin-2Ig in transfected cells increased significantly in a cell culture time dependent manner. Viral growth of several HSV-2 strains was significantly inhibited in the transfected cells that were cultured for 72 hr compared with control Vero cells, but not in cells that were cultured for 24 hr. These results indicate that accumulation of a soluble form of nectin-2 is required for exerting the resistance against HSV-2 infection.

  7. Failure to detect human herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus viral genomes in giant cell arteritis biopsy specimens by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Cankovic, Milena; Zarbo, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    A study provided evidence of human herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA in giant cell arteritis (GCA) biopsy specimens. This prompted us to study our own GCA biopsy specimens using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for the detection of HSV1, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus DNAs. Our study failed to confirm an association between HSV1 and GCA, revealing no viral genome in 35 biopsy specimens of histologically positive temporal arteries.

  8. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Glycoprotein H Interacts with Integrin αvβ3 To Facilitate Viral Entry and Calcium Signaling in Human Genital Tract Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheshenko, Natalia; Trepanier, Janie B.; González, Pablo A.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Jacobs, William R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry requires multiple interactions at the cell surface and activation of a complex calcium signaling cascade. Previous studies demonstrated that integrins participate in this process, but their precise role has not been determined. These studies were designed to test the hypothesis that integrin αvβ3 signaling promotes the release of intracellular calcium (Ca2+) stores and contributes to viral entry and cell-to-cell spread. Transfection of cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting integrin αvβ3, but not other integrin subunits, or treatment with cilengitide, an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) mimetic, impaired HSV-induced Ca2+ release, viral entry, plaque formation, and cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in human cervical and primary genital tract epithelial cells. Coimmunoprecipitation studies and proximity ligation assays indicated that integrin αvβ3 interacts with glycoprotein H (gH). An HSV-2 gH-null virus was engineered to further assess the role of gH in the virus-induced signaling cascade. The gH-2-null virus bound to cells and activated Akt to induce a small Ca2+ response at the plasma membrane, but it failed to trigger the release of cytoplasmic Ca2+ stores and was impaired for entry and cell-to-cell spread. Silencing of integrin αvβ3 and deletion of gH prevented phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the transport of viral capsids to the nuclear pore. Together, these findings demonstrate that integrin signaling is activated downstream of virus-induced Akt signaling and facilitates viral entry through interactions with gH by activating the release of intracellular Ca2+ and FAK phosphorylation. These findings suggest a new target for HSV treatment and suppression. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex viruses are the leading cause of genital disease worldwide, the most common infection associated with neonatal encephalitis, and a major cofactor for HIV acquisition and transmission. There is no effective vaccine

  9. Cervical shedding of herpes simplex virus in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women: effects of hormonal contraception, pregnancy, and vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mostad, S B; Kreiss, J K; Ryncarz, A J; Mandaliya, K; Chohan, B; Ndinya-Achola, J; Bwayo, J J; Corey, L

    2000-01-01

    Genital shedding of herpes simplex virus (HSV) results in frequent transmission of infection to sexual partners and neonates. In a cross-sectional study, cervical shedding of HSV DNA was detected in 43 (17%) cervical swab samples from 273 women seropositive for HSV-1, HSV-2, and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Cervical shedding of HSV was significantly associated with oral contraception (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-12.2), use of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate (aOR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.3-7.7), and pregnancy (aOR, 7.9; 95% CI, 2.0-31.7). In the subgroup of women who were not pregnant and not using hormonal contraception (n=178), serum vitamin A was highly predictive of cervical HSV shedding: concentrations indicating severe deficiency, moderate deficiency, low-normal, and high-normal status were associated with 29%, 18%, 8%, and 2% prevalences of cervical HSV shedding, respectively (linear trend, P=.0002). Several factors appear to influence HSV reactivation in HIV-1 seropositive women.

  10. Analysis of Individual Human Trigeminal Ganglia for Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Varicella-Zoster Virus Nucleic Acids Using Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Cohrs, Randall J.; Randall, Jessica; Smith, John; Gilden, Donald H.; Dabrowski, Christine; van der Keyl, Harjeet; Tal-Singer, Ruth

    2000-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) establish latent infections in the peripheral nervous system following primary infection. During latency both virus genomes exhibit limited transcription, with the HSV-1 LATs and at least four VZV transcripts consistently detected in latently infected human ganglia. In this study we used real-time PCR quantitation to determine the viral DNA copy number in individual trigeminal ganglia (TG) from 17 subjects. The number of HSV-1 genomes was not significantly different between the left and right TG from the same individual and varied per subject from 42.9 to 677.9 copies per 100 ng of DNA. The number of VZV genomes was also not significantly different between left and right TG from the same individual and varied per subject from 37.0 to 3,560.5 copies per 100 ng of DNA. HSV-1 LAT transcripts were consistently detected in ganglia containing latent HSV-1 and varied in relative expression by >500-fold. Of the three VZV transcripts analyzed, only transcripts mapping to gene 63 were consistently detected in latently infected ganglia and varied in relative expression by >2,000-fold. Thus, it appears that, similar to LAT transcription in HSV-1 latently infected ganglia, VZV gene 63 transcription is a hallmark of VZV latency. PMID:11090142

  11. Different presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, and Toxoplasma gondii in schizophrenia: meta-analysis and analytical study

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Fernández, José; Luna del Castillo, Juan de Dios; Mañanes-González, Sara; Carrillo-Ávila, José Antonio; Gutiérrez, Blanca; Cervilla, Jorge A; Sorlózano-Puerto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we have performed both a meta-analysis and an analytical study exploring the presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae, herpes simplex virus type 1, human herpes virus 6, and Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in a sample of 143 schizophrenic patients and 143 control subjects. The meta-analysis was performed on papers published up to April 2014. The presence of serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A was performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. The detection of microbial DNA in total peripheral blood was performed by nested polymerase chain reaction. The meta-analysis showed that: 1) C. pneumoniae DNA in blood and brain are more common in schizophrenic patients; 2) there is association with parasitism by T. gondii, despite the existence of publication bias; and 3) herpes viruses were not more common in schizophrenic patients. In our sample only anti-Toxoplasma immunoglobulin G was more prevalent and may be a risk factor related to schizophrenia, with potential value for prevention. PMID:25848282

  12. Tissue-Specific Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase Gene Delivered by Adeno-Associated Virus Inhibits the Growth of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Athymic Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hua; Lu, Ronghua; Chang, Judy C.; Kan, Yuet Wai

    1997-12-01

    About 70% of hepatocellular carcinomas are known to express α -fetoprotein, which is normally expressed in fetal but not in adult livers. To induce herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase expression in these cancer cells, we constructed an adeno-associated viral vector containing the HSV-TK gene under the control of the α -fetoprotein enhancer and albumin promoter. We previously demonstrated in vitro that although this vector can transduce a variety of human cells, only transduced AFP and albumin-expressing hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines were sensitive to killing by ganciclovir (GCV). In the present study, we explored the effect of this vector on hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vivo. Subcutaneous tumors generated in nude mice by implanting hepatocellular carcinoma cells previously transduced with this vector shrank dramatically after treatment with GCV. Bystander effect was also observed on the tumors generated by mixing transduced and untransduced cells. To test whether the tumor cells can be transduced by the virus in vivo, we injected the recombinant adeno-associated virus into tumors generated by untransduced hepatocarcinoma cell line. Tumor growth were retarded after treatment with GCV. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo transduction of tumor cell with rAAV.

  13. The site of integration of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene in human cells transformed by an HSV-1 DNA fragment.

    PubMed

    Kit, S; Hazen, M; Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Trkula, D; Dubbs, D R

    1981-12-01

    To analyze the site of integration of the herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-I) thymidine kinase (TK) gene in biochemically transformed human cells, TK-HeLa-(BU25) cells were transformed to the TK+ phenotype by a cloned, 2 kbp Pvull fragment of HSV-I DNA. The transformed cells [HeLa(BU25)/TF pAGO PP3] were fused with mouse LM(TK-) cells, and human-mouse somatic cell hybrid clones (LH PP3 clones 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6) were isolated in HATG-ouabain selective medium. The HeLa(BU25)/TF pAGO PP3 cells and the LH PP3 hybrid clones expressed HSV-I specific TK activity and a herpesvirus-associated nuclear antigen, and contained herpesvirus nucleotide sequences. Molecular hybridization experiments were carried out to map the HSV-I and flanking cellular nucleotide sequences in the biochemically transformed cells. These experiments demonstrated that the HSV-I nucleotide sequences were integrated at a single site, and that the same cellular nucleotide sequences flanked the viral DNA in transformed HeLa(BU25)/TF pAGO PP3 and LH PP3 clone 5 cells. TK- revertant subclones isolated by growing the LH PP3 clone 5 cells in BrdUrd (and diphtheria toxin) failed to form colonies in HATG medium, but retained HSV-I nucleotide sequences. Isozyme analyses on 21 gene-enzyme systems representing 21 human chromosomes revealed that all of the LH PP3 clonal lines expressed human hexosaminidase B, which has been assigned to chromosome 5, and all were sensitive to diphtheria toxin, which is also a marker for chromosome 5. Chromosome analyses showed that chromosome 5 was the nly human chromosome present in mitoses of LH PP3 clone 5 cells and that human chromosome 5 was present in most of the mitoses of LH PP3 clone 1, 2, 3, and 6 cells. The latter clones also contained 1 or 2 additional human chromosomes in some of the cells. As expected from the molecular hybridization analyses, TK- revertants of LH PP3 clone 5 cells retained portions of chromosome 5 and expressed human hexosaminidase B. The results

  14. Members of 3-O-Sulfotransferases (3-OST) Family: A Valuable Tool from Zebrafish to Humans for Understanding Herpes Simplex Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, John; Shukla, Deepak; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2013-01-01

    The journey of many viruses to infect cells begins when the virus first binds to cell surface heparan sulfate (HS). The initial step of cell attachment or binding during herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) entry is mediated by envelope glycoprotein B (gB) and C (gC). The binding is followed by fusion between virus envelope and cell membrane during which HSV-1 glycoprotein D (gD) interacts with a modified form of HS know as 3-O-sulfated heparan sulfate (3-OS HS). The rare modification of 3-O-sulfation on HS chain is governed by enzymes known as 3-O-sulfotransferase (3-OST). Currently, there are seven isoforms of human 3-OSTs that have been identified, and with the exception of 3-OST-1, all other 3-OST isoforms allow HSV-1 entry and spread. Recently, the product of the zebrafish (ZF)-encoded 3-OST-3 was also recognized as a gD receptor, which mediates HSV-1 entry and cell-cell fusion similar to human 3-OST-3. Interestingly, the ZF system expresses multiple isoforms of 3-OST which could be very useful for studying the involvement of HS and 3-OS HS in virus tropism and virus-induced inflammation. In addition, therapeutic targeting of 3-OST generated HS is likely to bring about novel interventions against HSV-1. In this review we have taken a closer look at the potential of both human and ZF encoded 3-OSTs as valuable tools in HSV entry and inflammation studies. PMID:23358893

  15. MultiSimplex and experimental design as chemometric tools to optimize a SPE-HPLC-UV method for the determination of eprosartan in human plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Ferreirós, N; Iriarte, G; Alonso, R M; Jiménez, R M

    2006-05-15

    A chemometric approach was applied for the optimization of the extraction and separation of the antihypertensive drug eprosartan from human plasma samples. MultiSimplex program was used to optimize the HPLC-UV method due to the number of experimental and response variables to be studied. The measured responses were the corrected area, the separation of eprosartan chromatographic peak from plasma interferences peaks and the retention time of the analyte. The use of an Atlantis dC18, 100mmx3.9mm i.d. chromatographic column with a 0.026% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in the organic phase and 0.031% TFA in the aqueous phase, an initial composition of 80% aqueous phase in the mobile phase, a stepness of acetonitrile of 3% during the gradient elution mode with a flow rate of 1.25mL/min and a column temperature of 35+/-0.2 degrees C allowed the separation of eprosartan and irbesartan used as internal standard from plasma endogenous compounds. In the solid phase extraction procedure, experimental design was used in order to achieve a maximum recovery percentage. Firstly, the significant variables were chosen by way of fractional factorial design; then, a central composite design was run to obtain the more adequate values of the significant variables. Thus, the extraction procedure for spiked human plasma samples was carried out using C8 cartridges, phosphate buffer pH 2 as conditioning agent, a drying step of 10min, a washing step with methanol-phosphate buffer (20:80, v/v) and methanol as eluent liquid. The SPE-HPLC-UV developed method allowed the separation and quantitation of eprosartan from human plasma samples with an adequate resolution and a total analysis time of 1h.

  16. Short communication: a repeated simian human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase/herpes simplex virus type 2 cochallenge macaque model for the evaluation of microbicides.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Aravantinou, Meropi; Kleinbeck, Kyle; Frank, Ines; Gettie, Agegnehu; Grasperge, Brooke; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Robbiani, Melissa

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that prevalent herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection increases the risk of HIV acquisition, underscoring the need to develop coinfection models to evaluate promising prevention strategies. We previously established a single high-dose vaginal coinfection model of simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)/HSV-2 in Depo-Provera (DP)-treated macaques. However, this model does not appropriately mimic women's exposure. Repeated limiting dose SHIV challenge models are now used routinely to test prevention strategies, yet, at present, there are no reports of a repeated limiting dose cochallenge model in which to evaluate products targeting HIV and HSV-2. Herein, we show that 20 weekly cochallenges with 2-50 TCID50 simian human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT) and 10(7) pfu HSV-2 results in infection with both viruses (4/6 SHIV-RT, 6/6 HSV-2). The frequency and level of vaginal HSV-2 shedding were significantly greater in the repeated exposure model compared to the single high-dose model (p<0.0001). We used this new model to test the Council's on-demand microbicide gel, MZC, which is active against SHIV-RT in DP-treated macaques and HSV-2 and human papillomavirus (HPV) in mice. While MZC reduced SHIV and HSV-2 infections in our repeated limiting dose model when cochallenging 8 h after each gel application, a barrier effect of carrageenan (CG) that was not seen in DP-treated animals precluded evaluation of the significance of the antiviral activity of MZC. Both MZC and CG significantly (p<0.0001) reduced the frequency and level of vaginal HSV-2 shedding compared to no gel treatment. This validates the use of this repeated limiting dose cochallenge model for testing products targeting HIV and HSV-2.

  17. Virus-mediated FCC iron nanoparticle induced synthesis of uranium dioxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Ling, Tao; Yu, Huimin; Shen, Zhongyao; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Jing

    2008-03-19

    A reducing system involving M13 virus-mediated FCC Fe nanoparticles was employed to achieve uranium reduction and synthesize uranium dioxide nanocrystals. Here we show that metastable face-centered cubic (FCC) Fe nanoparticles were fabricated around the surface of the M13 virus during the specific adsorption of the virus towards Fe ions under a reduced environment. The FCC phase of these Fe nanoparticles was confirmed by careful TEM characterization. Moreover, this virus-mediated FCC Fe nanoparticle system successfully reduced contaminable U(VI) into UO(2) crystals with diameters of 2-5 nm by a green and convenient route.

  18. Relationships among cell survival, O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase activity, and reactivation of methylated adenovirus 5 and herpes simplex virus type 1 in human melanoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maynard, K.; Parsons, P.G.; Cerny, T.; Margison, G.P. )

    1989-09-01

    O6-Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (ATase) activity and host cell reactivation (HCR) of 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC)-methylated viruses were compared in human melanoma cell lines that were sensitive or resistant to killing by the antitumor DNA-methylating agent MTIC. Enhanced HCR of adenovirus 5 (defined as the Mer+ phenotype) generally showed a semiquantitative correlation with the natural or induced resistance of the host cells to the toxic effects of MTIC and to the level of ATase activity. However, one MTIC-resistant cell line was found (MM170) which had a low level of ATase and intermediate HCR of adenovirus. The HCR of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was enhanced in the Mer+ cells that had natural resistance to MTIC compared with Mer- cells. On the other hand, HCR of HSV-1 in Mer+ cells with induced resistance to MTIC was similar to that in Mer- cells. Neither adenovirus 5 nor HSV-1 infection induced ATase activity in Mer- cells. This indicates that resistance to the toxic effects of methylating agents is not invariably associated with high levels of ATase activity in human melanoma cells. Furthermore, while induction of the Mer+ phenotype from Mer- cells was usually accompanied by the recovery of ATase activity, induced Mer+ cells had less proficient repair than natural Mer+ cells, as judged quantitatively by slightly lower cellular resistance and qualitatively by deficient HCR response for HSV-1. These results suggest that the Mer- and induced Mer+ cells lack an ATase-independent DNA repair mechanism. No differences in MTIC-induced DNA repair synthesis or strand breaks were found between the Mer-, natural Mer+, and induced Mer+ phenotypes. However, UV-induced DNA repair synthesis was higher in the natural Mer+ than in the Mer- or induced Mer+ cells, both of which had increased cellular sensitivity to the antimetabolites methotrexate and hydroxyurea.

  19. UL69 of human cytomegalovirus, an open reading frame with homology to ICP27 of herpes simplex virus, encodes a transactivator of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, M; Rice, S A; Stamminger, T

    1994-01-01

    The UL69 open reading frame of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is homologous to the immediate-early protein ICP27 of herpes simplex virus, an essential viral regulatory protein involved in the transition from early to late gene expression. Genes with homology to ICP27 have been detected in all subclasses of herpesviruses so far. While the respective proteins in alpha- and gammaherpesviruses have been defined as trans-regulatory molecules, nothing is known about these genes in betaherpesviruses. This study was therefore undertaken in order to investigate expression from the UL69 gene locus of HCMV. Northern (RNA) blot experiments revealed a complex pattern of transcripts that changed during the time course of the HCMV replicative cycle: two transcripts of 2.7 and 3.5 kb that were regulated differentially could be detected as early as 7 h after infection. However, these transcripts could not be detected in the presence of cycloheximide. Additional, larger transcripts were present exclusively at late times after infection. To analyze protein expression from the UL69 gene region, the UL69 open reading frame was expressed as a histidine-tagged protein in Escherichia coli. A specific antiserum was generated and used to detect the UL69 protein in HCMV-infected cells which revealed its localization within the intranuclear inclusions that are characteristic for HCMV infection. In cotransfection experiments, an HCMV true late promoter could not be activated by UL69, whereas an early promoter and several heterologous promoters were stimulated about 10-fold. Complementation studies showed that the UL69 protein cannot substitute for ICP27 in the context of the HSV infection, suggesting functional differences between these two proteins. In summary, these experiments define a novel regulatory protein encoded by HCMV that is expressed as an early-late gene and appears to exert a broad stimulatory effect on gene expression. Images PMID:8189530

  20. Real-Time PCR Quantification of Genital Shedding of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Women Coinfected with HSV and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Legoff, Jérôme; Bouhlal, Hicham; Grésenguet, Gérard; Weiss, Helen; Khonde, Nzambi; Hocini, Hakim; Désiré, Nathalie; Si-Mohamed, Ali; de Dieu Longo, Jean; Chemin, Cécile; Frost, Eric; Pépin, Jacques; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Mayaud, Philippe; Bélec, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    The accuracy and usefulness of laboratory-developed real-time PCR procedures using a Light Cycler instrument (Roche Diagnostics) for detecting and quantifying human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA and DNA as well as herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)/HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal secretions from women coinfected with HIV and HSV were evaluated. For HIV-1, the use of the NEC152 and NEC131 primer set and the NEC-LTR probe in the long terminal repeat gene allowed us to detect accurately the majority of HIV-1 subtypes of group M circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, including subtypes A, B, C, D, and G as well as circulating recombinant forms 02 and 11. The detection threshold of real-time PCR for HIV in cervicovaginal lavage samples was 5 copies per assay for both RNA and DNA; the intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of CT values were 1.30% and 0.69% (HIV-1 RNA) and 1.84% and 0.67% (HIV-1 DNA), respectively. Real-time PCR for HSV using primers and probe targeting the HSV DNA polymerase gene allowed both detection and quantification of HSV DNA and also differentiation between HSV-1 and HSV-2 genotypes. The detection threshold of real-time PCR for HSV was 5 copies per assay; the intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of CT values were 0.96% and 1.49%, respectively. Both manual and automated silica-based procedures were appropriate for combined extraction of HIV and HSV genomes from female genital secretions. Taken together, these findings indicate that real-time PCR may be used as a unique nucleic acid amplification procedure to detect and quantify HIV and HSV genomes in cervicovaginal secretions and thus to assess at reduced costs the genital shedding of both viruses in women included in intervention studies. PMID:16455895

  1. Real-time PCR quantification of genital shedding of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in women coinfected with HSV and HIV.

    PubMed

    Legoff, Jérôme; Bouhlal, Hicham; Grésenguet, Gérard; Weiss, Helen; Khonde, Nzambi; Hocini, Hakim; Désiré, Nathalie; Si-Mohamed, Ali; de Dieu Longo, Jean; Chemin, Cécile; Frost, Eric; Pépin, Jacques; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Mayaud, Philippe; Bélec, Laurent

    2006-02-01

    The accuracy and usefulness of laboratory-developed real-time PCR procedures using a Light Cycler instrument (Roche Diagnostics) for detecting and quantifying human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA and DNA as well as herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)/HSV-2 DNA in cervicovaginal secretions from women coinfected with HIV and HSV were evaluated. For HIV-1, the use of the NEC152 and NEC131 primer set and the NEC-LTR probe in the long terminal repeat gene allowed us to detect accurately the majority of HIV-1 subtypes of group M circulating in sub-Saharan Africa, including subtypes A, B, C, D, and G as well as circulating recombinant forms 02 and 11. The detection threshold of real-time PCR for HIV in cervicovaginal lavage samples was 5 copies per assay for both RNA and DNA; the intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of C(T) values were 1.30% and 0.69% (HIV-1 RNA) and 1.84% and 0.67% (HIV-1 DNA), respectively. Real-time PCR for HSV using primers and probe targeting the HSV DNA polymerase gene allowed both detection and quantification of HSV DNA and also differentiation between HSV-1 and HSV-2 genotypes. The detection threshold of real-time PCR for HSV was 5 copies per assay; the intra- and interassay coefficients of variation of C(T) values were 0.96% and 1.49%, respectively. Both manual and automated silica-based procedures were appropriate for combined extraction of HIV and HSV genomes from female genital secretions. Taken together, these findings indicate that real-time PCR may be used as a unique nucleic acid amplification procedure to detect and quantify HIV and HSV genomes in cervicovaginal secretions and thus to assess at reduced costs the genital shedding of both viruses in women included in intervention studies.

  2. Presence of human papilloma virus, herpes simplex virus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA in oral biopsies from Sudanese patients with regard to toombak use.

    PubMed

    Jalouli, Jamshid; Ibrahim, Salah O; Sapkota, Dipak; Jalouli, Miranda M; Vasstrand, Endre N; Hirsch, Jan M; Larsson, Per-Anders

    2010-09-01

    Using PCR/DNA sequencing, we investigated the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA in brush biopsies obtained from 150 users of Sudanese snuff (toombak) and 25 non-users of toombak in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples obtained from 31 patients with oral dysplasias (25 toombak users and 6 non-users), and from 217 patients with oral cancers (145 toombak users and 72 non-users). In the brush tissue samples from toombak users, HPV was detected in 60 (40%), HSV in 44 (29%) and EBV in 97 (65%) of the samples. The corresponding figures for the 25 samples from non-users were 17 (68%) positive for HPV, 6 (24%) positive for HSV and 21 (84%) for EBV. The formalin-fixed samples with oral dysplasias were all negative for HPV. In the 145 oral cancer samples from toombak users, HPV was detected in 39 (27%), HSV in 15 (10%) and EBV in 53 (37%) of the samples. The corresponding figures for the samples from non-users were 15 (21%) positive for HPV, 5 (7%) for HSV and 16 (22%) for EBV. These findings illustrate that prevalence of HSV, HPV and EBV infections are common and may influence oral health and cancer development. It is not obvious that cancer risk is increased in infected toombak users. These observations warrant further studies involving toombak-associated oral lesions, to uncover the possible mechanisms of these viral infections in the development of oral cancer, and the influence of toombak on these viruses.

  3. Seroprevalence and Co-Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Among Pregnant Women in Lokoja, North-Central Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Olatunji Matthew; Amuda, Oluwatomi Olufunke; Nzurumike, Charles; Suleiman, Muhammed Mustapha; Ikhevha Ogah, Jeremiah

    2016-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is normally associated with orofacial (orolabial) infections and encephalitis, whereas HSV-2 usually causes genital infections and can be transmitted from infected mothers to neonates. The evidence suggesting that HSV is facilitating the spread of the global human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic and the risk posed by these synergies to neonates in developing countries informed this study. Objectives To determine the seroprevalence and co-infection of HIV and HSV, as well as their associated risk factors, in Lokoja, Nigeria. Methods This was a hospital-based cross-sectional, prospective study, which was carried out among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic at the federal medical centre in Lokoja, Nigeria. sociodemographic characteristics and HIV-HSV status were determined by the use of a structured questionnaire and immunoassay kits, respectively. All data were analyzed using Stata statistical software (version 12), and the level of significance was determined to be P < 0.05 using the chi-square test. Results Of the 250 pregnant women screened for HIV and HSV, 154 (61.6%) were in the 2nd trimester of gestation, and all of the co-infected respondents were in their 2nd trimester. Only six (2.4%) of the respondents tested positive for HIV, with all six (100%) showing positivity for HSV so the co-infection rate was six (2.4%). Co-infection was found to occur between the ages of 15 and 35 years, while higher age groups did not show any co-infection. Parity, level of education, and history of painful genital ulcers had no significant association with co-infection. Conclusions Advocacy and publicity to raise awareness of the potential public health impact of HSV and HIV co-infection in Nigeria, where anti-HSV testing is not generally performed in all populations, is therefore recommended. PMID:28180012

  4. Virus-specific HLA-restricted lysis of herpes simplex virus-infected human monocytes and macrophages mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Torpey, D.J. III

    1987-01-01

    Freshly-isolated peripheral blood human monocytes and 5 day in vitro cultured macrophages were infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), labeled with /sup 51/Cr, and used as target cells in a 12-14 hour cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. Mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) from HSV-1 non-immune individuals, whether unstimulated or stimulated with HSV-1 antigen, did not mediate significant lysis of either target cell. HSV-immune MNL, both freshly-isolated and cultured for 5 days without antigen, demonstrated only low levels of natural killer (NK) cell-mediate lysis. MNL from HSV-immune individuals incubated for 5 days in vitro with HSV-1 antigen mediated significant virus-specific lysis of both target cells. Mean virus-specific lysis of autologous monocytes was 8.5(/+-/2.0)% compared to a three-fold greater virus-specific lysis of autologous macrophages. Greater than 70% of this lytic activity was mediated by Leu-11-negative, T3-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Allogeneic target cells lacking a common HLA determinant were not significantly lysed while T8-positive CTL mediated infrequent lysis of target cells sharing a common HLA-A and/or HLA-B determinant. T4-positive lymphocytes were demonstrated to be the predominant cell mediating lysis of autologous target cells and allogeneic target cells sharing both HLA-A and/or HLA-B plus HLA-DR determinants with the CTL; the T4-positive cell was the sole CTL mediator of lysis of allogeneic target cells having a common HLA-DR determinant.

  5. [Ocular hypertension in herpes simplex keratouveitis].

    PubMed

    Burcea, M; Avram, Corina-Ioana; Stamate, Alina-Cristina; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus is one of the most common pathogens in humans, who are seropositive for the virus in 90% of the cases at the adult age. It determines reccurent infections in more than a third of the population and these infections depend on the immune response of the host. Ocular infections of newborns are due to the herpes simplex virus type 2, meanwhile type 1 is found predominantly at adults; almost all ocular structures can be affected. HSV-1 in the most frequent etiologic agent in infectious anterior uveitis (with the varicelo-zosterian virus) and it is responsible for 6-10% of all cases of anterior uveitis. More than half of the keratouveitides due to HSV will develop intraocular hypertension and open-angle secondary glaucoma, during reccurences and most of them will resolve after proper control of inflammation.

  6. Enrichment of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactive mucosal T cells in the human female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Posavad, C M; Zhao, L; Dong, L; Jin, L; Stevens, C E; Magaret, A S; Johnston, C; Wald, A; Zhu, J; Corey, L; Koelle, D M

    2017-01-04

    Local mucosal cellular immunity is critical in providing protection from HSV-2. To characterize and quantify HSV-2-reactive mucosal T cells, lymphocytes were isolated from endocervical cytobrush and biopsy specimens from 17 HSV-2-infected women and examined ex vivo for the expression of markers associated with maturation and tissue residency and for functional T-cell responses to HSV-2. Compared with their circulating counterparts, cervix-derived CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were predominantly effector memory T cells (CCR7-/CD45RA-) and the majority expressed CD69, a marker of tissue residency. Co-expression of CD103, another marker of tissue residency, was highest on cervix-derived CD8+ T cells. Functional HSV-2 reactive CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses were detected in cervical samples and a median of 17% co-expressed CD103. HSV-2-reactive CD4+ T cells co-expressed IL-2 and were significantly enriched in the cervix compared with blood. This first direct ex vivo documentation of local enrichment of HSV-2-reactive T cells in the human female genital mucosa is consistent with the presence of antigen-specific tissue-resident memory T cells. Ex vivo analysis of these T cells may uncover tissue-specific mechanisms of local control of HSV-2 to assist the development of vaccine strategies that target protective T cells to sites of HSV-2 infection.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication, 4 January 2017; doi:10.1038/mi.2016.118.

  7. Different efficacy of in vivo herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene transduction and ganciclovir treatment on the inhibition of tumor growth of murine and human melanoma cells and rat glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berenstein, M; Adris, S; Ledda, F; Wolfmann, C; Medina, J; Bravo, A; Mordoh, J; Chernajovsky, Y; Podhajcer, O L

    1999-01-01

    Initial studies have demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy for cancer treatment of in vivo transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment. However, recent studies have questioned the validity of this approach. Using retroviral vector-producing cells (VPC) as a source for in vivo gene transfer, we evaluated the efficacy of in vivo transduction of malignant cells using three different tumor cell models: B16 murine and IIB-MEL-LES human melanomas and a C6 rat glioblastoma. In vitro studies showed a bystander effect only in C6 cells. In vivo studies showed an inhibition of tumor growth in the two melanoma models when tumor cells were coinjected with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene, followed by GCV treatment; however, 100% of mice developed tumors in both models. Under similar experimental conditions, 70% (7 of 10) of syngeneic rats completely rejected stereotactically transferred C6 tumor cells; most of them (5 of 10) showed a prolonged survival. Treating established C6 tumors with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene and GCV led to the cure of 33% (4 of 12) of the animals. Rats that rejected tumor growth developed an antitumor immune memory, leading to a rejection of a stereotactic contralateral challenge with parental cells. The immune infiltrate, which showed the presence of T lymphocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear cells at the site of the first injection and mainly T lymphocytes and macrophages at the site of tumor challenge, strengthened the importance of the immune system in achieving complete tumor rejection.

  8. Simplex turbopump design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Matt; Cowan, Penny

    1994-01-01

    Turbomachinery used in liquid rocket engines typically are composed of complex geometries made from high strength-to-weight super alloys and have long design and fabrication cycle times (3 to 5 years). A simple, low-cost turbopump is being designed in-house to demonstrate the ability to reduce the overall cost to $500K and compress life cycle time to 18 months. The simplex turbopump was designed to provide a discharge pressure of 1500 psia of liquid oxygen at 90 lbm/s. The turbine will be powered by gaseous oxygen. This eliminates the need for an inter-propellant seal typically required to separate the fuel-rich turbine gases from the liquid oxygen pump components. Materials used in the turbine flow paths will utilize existing characterized metals at 800 deg R that are compatible with a warm oxygen environment. This turbopump design would be suitable for integration with a 40 K pound thrust hybrid motor that provides warm oxygen from a tapped-off location to power the turbine. The preliminary and detailed analysis was completed in a year by a multiple discipline, concurrent engineering team. Manpower, schedule, and cost data were tracked during the process for a comparison to the initial goal. The Simplex hardware is the procurement cycle with the expectation of the first test to occur approximately 1.5 months behind the original schedule goal.

  9. Relative Contributions of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP0 and vhs to Loss of Cellular IFI16 Vary in Different Human Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Orzalli, Megan H.; Broekema, Nicole M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) ICP0 protein is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that promotes the degradation of several host cell proteins. Most studies have found that ICP0 promotes the loss of IFI16 in infected cells, but one study reported that ICP0 was not necessary or sufficient for loss of IFI16 in a tumor-derived cell line. Therefore, in this study, we examined the requirement for ICP0 in promoting the loss of IFI16 in several normal and tumor-derived cell lines. HSV-1 infection resulted in an observable decrease of IFI16 protein levels in normal human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs), normal oral keratinocytes (NOKs), and HeLa cells but not in U2OS cells. During infection with an ICP0-null virus, we observed a reduced loss of IFI16 in HFFs and NOKs but not in HeLa cells. Ectopic expression of ICP0 from a transfected plasmid was sufficient to promote the loss of IFI16 in HFFs and NOKs. In the absence of ICP0, we observed a delayed reduction of IFI16 protein that correlated with a reduction in the steady-state levels of IFI16 mRNA. In addition, we show that the ICP0-independent loss of IFI16 in HeLa cells is dependent in part on the activity of the viral virion host shutoff (vhs) tegument protein. Together, these results demonstrate that HSV-1 promotes the loss of IFI16 through at least two mechanisms: (i) by ICP0-dependent degradation of IFI16 and (ii) by vhs-dependent turnover of IFI16 mRNA. In addition, this study highlights a potential intrinsic difference between normal and tumor-derived cells for the activities of IFI16 and HSV-1 ICP0. IMPORTANCE HSV-1 is a ubiquitous virus that establishes a lifetime persistent infection in humans. The relative success of HSV-1 as a pathogen is, in part, dependent on the expression of viral proteins that counteract host intrinsic defense mechanisms and that modulate immune responses during viral infection. In this study, we examined the relative roles of two viral gene products for the ability to promote loss of the

  10. Genome Sequence of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Strain SC16

    PubMed Central

    Rastrojo, Alberto; López-Muñoz, Alberto Domingo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), also known as Human herpesvirus 1, is a highly prevalent human neurotropic pathogen that causes a variety of diseases, including lethal encephalitis. Here, we report the genome sequence of the HSV-1 strain SC16. PMID:28126930

  11. Genital herpes simplex.

    PubMed Central

    Tummon, I. S.; Dudley, D. K.; Walters, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the herpes simplex virus. Following the initial infection the virus becomes latent in the sacral ganglia. Approximately 80% of patients are then subject to milder but unpredictable recurrences and may shed the virus even when they are asymptomatic. The disorder causes concern because genital herpes in the mother can result in rare but catastrophic neonatal infection and because of a possible association between genital herpes and cancer of the cervix. No effective treatment is as yet available. Weekly monitoring for virus by cervical culture from 32 weeks' gestation is recommended for women with a history of genital herpes and for those whose sexual partner has such a history. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:7020907

  12. Viruses and host evolution: virus-mediated self identity.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis

    2012-01-01

    human evolution from the perspective of the great HERV colonization. The origin of a large social brain able to support the learning of language is presented from this viral perspective. The role of addiction modules in the origin of extended social bonding of humans is outlined and applied to the emergence of language as a system of group identity.

  13. Stability of glycoprotein gene sequences of herpes simplex virus type 2 from primary to recurrent human infection, and diversity of the sequences among patients attending an STD clinic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is sexually transmitted, leading to blisters and ulcers in the genito-anal region. After primary infection the virus is present in a latent state in neurons in sensory ganglia. Reactivation and production of new viral particles can cause asymptomatic viral shedding or new lesions. Establishment of latency, maintenance and reactivation involve silencing of genes, continuous suppression of gene activities and finally gene activation and synthesis of viral DNA. The purpose of the present work was to study the genetic stability of the virus during these events. Methods HSV-2 was collected from 5 patients with true primary and recurrent infections, and the genes encoding glycoproteins B,G,E and I were sequenced. Results No nucleotide substitution was observed in any patient, indicating genetic stability. However, since the total number of nucleotides in these genes is only a small part of the total genome, we cannot rule out variation in other regions. Conclusions Although infections of cell cultures and animal models are useful for studies of herpes simplex virus, it is important to know how the virus behaves in the natural host. We observed that several glycoprotein gene sequences are stable from primary to recurrent infection. However, the virus isolates from the different patients were genetically different. PMID:24502528

  14. Δγ₁134.5 herpes simplex viruses encoding human cytomegalovirus IRS1 or TRS1 induce interferon regulatory factor 3 phosphorylation and an interferon-stimulated gene response.

    PubMed

    Cassady, Kevin A; Saunders, Ute; Shimamura, Masako

    2012-01-01

    The chimeric herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are Δγ₁34.5 vectors encoding the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IRS1 or TRS1 genes. They are capable of late viral protein synthesis and are superior to Δγ₁34.5 HSVs in oncolytic activity. The interferon (IFN) response limits efficient HSV gene expression and replication. HCMV TRS1 and IRS1 restore one γ₁34.5 gene function: evasion of IFN-inducible protein kinase R, allowing late viral protein synthesis. Here we show that, unlike wild-type HSV, the chimeric HSV do not restore another γ₁34.5 function, the suppression of early IFN signaling mediated by IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3).

  15. Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle: Lichen simplex chronicus is also known as neurodermatitis. A minor itch may encourage scratching which increases the irritation, leading to more scratching. This ...

  16. Herpes Simplex - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Herpes Simplex URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Herpes Simplex - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and mucous membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal...

  18. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and mucous membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal...

  19. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and mucous membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305 Section 866.3305 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and mucous membranes to a severe form of encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Neonatal...

  1. Naturally occurring antibodies against nerve growth factor in human and rabbit sera: comparison between control and herpes simplex virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Dicou, E; Nerrière, V; Labropoulou, V

    1991-11-01

    Antibodies against nerve growth factor (NGF) in sera were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), by their isolation after passage of sera through NGF immunoadsorbent columns and by their specificity to bind and immunoprecipitate mouse NGF as well as to stain by immunohistochemical methods cellular sites of NGF synthesis. Increased levels of anti-NGF antibodies were found in sera of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected patients but not in HSV-inoculated rabbits. As HSV latency is known to be promoted by NGF in vitro, these results may suggest that anti-NGF antibodies modulate the cytokine function of NGF and thus might play a role in HSV infection. The biological function of circulating antibodies against NGF, in general, is now open to future investigation.

  2. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-04-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus infections are uncommon, but because of the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection they are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This article summarizes the epidemiology of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections and discusses clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  3. Anisakis simplex allergy: a murine model of anaphylaxis induced by parasitic proteins displays a mixed Th1/Th2 pattern

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, M L; Conejero, L; Higaki, Y; Martín, E; Pérez, C; Infante, S; Rubio, M; Zubeldia, J M

    2005-01-01

    The study of the singular hypersensitivity reactions to Anisakis simplex (A.s) proteins, may help us to undestand many of the unknown immune interactions between helmiths infections and allergy. We have developed a murine model of allergy to A. simplex, that mimics human A. simplex allergy to study the specific aspects of anaphylaxis induced by parasites. Male C3H/HeJ mice were intraperitoneally sensitized to A. simplex. Mice were then intravenous or orally challenged with A. simplex. Antigen-specific immunoglobulins, polyclonal IgE, anaphylactic symptoms, plasma histamine levels and cytokine profiles were determined. Comparative IgE immunoblot analyses were also performed. Specific IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a were detected in sensitized mice since week 3. Polyclonal IgE raised and peaked with different kinetics. Intravenous A. simplex challenge produced anaphylaxis in mice, accompanied by plasma histamine release. Oral A. simplex challenge in similarly sensitized mice did not caused symptoms nor histamine release. Numerous A. simplex allergens were recognized by sensitized mouse sera, some of them similar to human serum. The A. simplex stimulated splenocytes released IL-10, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-13 and IL-5. We describe a new animal model of anaphylaxis. It exhibits characteristics of type I hypersensitivity reactions to Anisakis simplex similar to those observed in allergic humans. Different responses to i.v. or oral A. simplex challenges emerged, which did not reflect a window tolerization period. The cytokine profile developed (mixed Th1/Th2 pattern) differed from the observed in classical models of anaphylaxis or allergy to food antigens. This model may permit to investigate the peculiar allergic reactions to parasitic proteins. PMID:16297154

  4. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305... simplex virus serological assays. (a) Identification. Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices... herpes simplex virus in serum. Additionally, some of the assays consist of herpes simplex virus...

  5. The Significance of Herpes Simplex for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensor, Deirdre

    2005-01-01

    Herpes simplex is a common recurrent viral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. The two closely related but distinct viruses that cause herpes simplex infections are herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2). HSV-1 is commonly associated with infections around the oral mucosa and is the cause of herpes labialis, often referred…

  6. Tegument-Specific, Virus-Reactive CD4 T Cells Localize to the Cornea in Herpes Simplex Virus Interstitial Keratitis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, David M.; Reymond, Sigrid N.; Chen, Hongbo; Kwok, William W.; McClurkan, Christopher; Gyaltsong, Tashi; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Rotkis, Walter; Talley, Audrey R.; Harrison, Devin A.

    2000-01-01

    Herpes stromal keratitis (HSK) is a prevalent and frequently vision-threatening disease associated with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. In mice, HSK progression occurs after viral clearance and requires T cells and neutrophils. One model implicates Th1-like CD4 T cells with cross-reactivity between the HSV-1 protein UL6 and a corneal autoantigen. HSK can be prevented by establishing specific immunological tolerance. However, HSK can also occur in T-cell receptor-transgenic X SCID mice lacking HSV-specific T cells. To study the pathogenesis of HSK in the natural host species, we measured local HSV-specific T-cell responses in HSK corneas removed at transplant surgery (n = 5) or control corneas (n = 2). HSV-1 DNA was detected by PCR in two specimens. HSV-specific CD4 T cells were enriched in three of the five HSK specimens and were not detectable in the control specimens. Reactivity with peptide epitopes within the tegument proteins UL21 and UL49 was documented. Responses to HSV-1 UL6 were not detected. Diverse HLA DR and DP alleles restricted these local responses. Most clones secreted gamma interferon, but not interleukin-5, in response to antigen. HSV-specific CD8 cells were also recovered. Some clones had cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte activity. The diverse specificities and HLA-restricting alleles of local virus-specific T cells in HSK are consistent with their contribution to HSK by a proinflammatory effect. PMID:11069987

  7. Volatile Organic Compound Gamma-Butyrolactone Released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 Acute Infection Modulated Membrane Potential and Repressed Viral Infection in Human Neuron-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waguespack, Yan; Figliozzi, Robert W.; Kharel, Madan K.; Zhang, Qiaojuan; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 (HSV-1) infections can cause serious complications such as keratitis and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to identify any changes in the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells that could potentially be used as an indicator of a response to stress. An additional objective was to study if any VOCs released from acute epithelial infection may influence subsequent neuronal infection to facilitate latency. To investigate these hypotheses, Vero cells were infected with HSV-1 and the emission of VOCs was analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (2D GC/MS). It was observed that the concentrations of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in particular changed significantly after a 24-hour infection. Since HSV-1 may establish latency in neurons after the acute infection, GBL was tested to determine if it exerts neuronal regulation of infection. The results indicated that GBL altered the resting membrane potential of differentiated LNCaP cells and promoted a non-permissive state of HSV-1 infection by repressing viral replication. These observations may provide useful clues towards understanding the complex signaling pathways that occur during the HSV-1 primary infection and establishment of viral latency. PMID:27537375

  8. Development of a high-throughput β-Gal-based neutralization assay for quantitation of herpes simplex virus-neutralizing antibodies in human samples.

    PubMed

    Baccari, Amy; Cooney, Michael; Blevins, Tamara P; Morrison, Lynda A; Larson, Shane; Skoberne, Mojca; Belshe, Robert B; Flechtner, Jessica B; Long, Deborah

    2016-07-19

    Measurement of neutralizing antibodies against herpes simplex virus (HSV) is important for evaluation of candidate vaccines. The established plaque-reduction neutralization assay is time consuming, labor intensive, and difficult to validate and transfer. Here, we describe the characterization of a HSV-neutralization assay based on the expression of a reporter gene, β-galactosidase (β-Gal). Using previously constructed HSV-β-Gal recombinant viruses, HSV-2/Gal and HSV-1/tk12, we developed a colorimetric β-Gal-based neutralization assay that is sensitive and highly reproducible, and performed in less than 48h. HSV-1 and HSV-2 neutralizing titers measured by the β-Gal-based neutralization assay were equivalent to those obtained by a plaque reduction neutralization assay. Intra- and inter-assay precision studies demonstrated that the β-Gal-based assay was repeatable and yielded low and acceptable variation. In addition, comparison of HSV-2 neutralizing antibody (NAb) titers measured in two independent laboratories by two unique β-Gal-based assays showed a highly significant correlation (r=0.9499, p<0.0001) between the two assays. The new assay will serve as an important tool both for preclinical and clinical trials of new HSV vaccines.

  9. A serosurvey of Haemophilus ducreyi, syphilis, and herpes simplex virus type 2 and their association with human immunodeficiency virus among female sex workers in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Dada, A J; Ajayi, A O; Diamondstone, L; Quinn, T C; Blattner, W A; Biggar, R J

    1998-05-01

    Cross-sectional standard serologic assays were used to determine the prevalence of Haemophilus ducreyi, Treponema pallidum, and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) antibodies among 796 female commercial sex workers from Lagos, Nigeria, and their association with HIV antibody status. The seroprevalence rates were 86% for anti-H. ducreyi IgG and 69% for anti-H. ducreyi IgA, 4% for rapid plasma reagin and Treponema palladium hemagglutination assay confirmed syphilis, 59% for HSV-2, 12% for HIV-1, and 2% for HIV-2. Lower-class sex workers were significantly more likely than upper-class sex workers to be H. ducreyi-positive and to have current or past syphilis infection. The presence of syphilis increased significantly with older age. Non-Nigerian sex workers had significantly higher reactivity to chancroid and borderline reactivity to syphilis. A history of sex with non-Nigerian Africans was significantly associated with chancroid reactivity and borderline significant with syphilis serostatus. H. ducreyi seropositivity was significantly more likely in female sex workers with HSV-2 and syphilis. Chancroid and HSV-2 antibodies were also more common in HIV-infected sex workers. The high prevalence of H. ducreyi antibodies detected in this study underscores the importance of an effective program to control genital ulcerative disease as part of the strategy to prevent the spread of HIV in Nigeria.

  10. Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    these tumors. We have been working with genetically engineered human herpes simplex virus (HSV) as a means of treating nervous system tumors. We have... genetically modified these viruses to make them safe and unable to grow in normal cells, but that can grow in tumor cells causing them to die, a...the sporadic susceptibility or resistance to infection of MPNST cells to genetically engineered, oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs) in our

  11. Natural remedies for Herpes simplex.

    PubMed

    Gaby, Alan R

    2006-06-01

    Herpes simplex is a common viral infection of the skin or mucous membranes. The lesions caused by this infection are often painful, burning, or pruritic, and tend to recur in most patients. Short-term treatment with acyclovir can accelerate the healing of an acute outbreak, and continuous acyclovir therapy is often prescribed for people with frequent recurrences. While this drug can reduce the recurrence rate by 60-90 percent, it can also cause a wide array of side effects, including renal failure, hepatitis, and anaphylaxis. Safe and effective alternatives are therefore needed. There is evidence that certain dietary modifications and natural substances may be useful for treating active Herpes simplex lesions or preventing recurrences. Treatments discussed include lysine, vitamin C, zinc, vitamin E, adenosine monophosphate, and lemon balm (Melissa officinalis).

  12. Therapeutic Options for Herpes Simplex Infections.

    PubMed

    Au, Eugene; Sacks, Stephen L.

    2003-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses are responsible for a number of disease states in infected individuals. Capable of establishing latent infection, herpes simplex can reactivate, causing pain, discomfort, and psychosocial consequences. Because no cure is available, treatment modalities for herpes simplex infection are required, from both personal and public health standpoints. To date, therapy has centered around the use of antiviral drugs to control infection and suppress recurrences. To expand the scope of available treatments, efforts have focused on the development of vaccines against herpes simplex virus and new agents such as immune response modifiers. Recent data suggest that these new agents are promising in their therapeutic potential.

  13. Herpes simplex virus following stab phlebectomy.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Lum, Ying Wei; Heller, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection following surgery is an unusual postoperative phenomenon. Many mechanisms have been suggested, with the most likely explanation related to latent virus reactivation due to a proinflammatory response in the setting of local trauma. Here, we present a case of herpes simplex virus reactivation in an immunocompetent female following a conventional right lower extremity stab phlebectomy. Salient clinical and physical examination findings are described, and management strategies for herpes simplex virus reactivation are outlined. This is the first known case report of herpes simplex virus reactivation following lower extremity phlebectomy.

  14. Low Prevalence of Varicella Zoster Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 in Saliva from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Persons in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunmei C.; Yepes, Luis C.; Danaher, Robert J.; Berger, Joseph R.; Mootoor, Yunanan; Kryscio, Richard J.; Miller, Craig S.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Human herpesviruses (HHVs), e.g. herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1, Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus, appear in saliva at greater frequency in persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than healthy individuals. However, it is not known if varicella zoster virus (VZV) and HSV-2 appear simultaneously during HIV infection at greater frequency in saliva during this era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and amounts of VZV and HSV-2 in the saliva of HIV-infected, orally asymptomatic patients. Study Design Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate the prevalence, quantity, risk, and correlates of salivary VZV and HSV-2 from 59 HIV-seropositive individuals and 53 healthy controls in a case-control, cross-sectional study. Seventy-eight percent of the HIV-seropositive patients (46/59) were taking HAART. Results VZV DNA was detected in the saliva of 5.1% (3/59) of the HIV-positive group and in only one healthy control 1.9% (1/53; P = 0.62). The amount of VZV DNA in the expressors was low, generally less than 1,100 copies/mL with no observed difference between the HIV-positive group and the controls (P= 1.0). HSV-2 DNA was not detected in either group. In the HIV-infected group, VZV shedding occurred in those on HAART, but was not associated with oral lesions, specific CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell levels, or demographic factors. Conclusions VZV was detected at low prevalence in the saliva of HIV-infected persons whereas HSV-2 was not detected in the saliva of this cohort. HAART does not appear to diminish the risk for asymptomatic VZV shedding. PMID:20123407

  15. Hereditary orotic aciduria, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, and xeroderma pigmentosum probed by herpes simplex virus: /sup 125/I-iododeoxycytidine incorporation as an assay for viral growth. [Human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, J.; Hafner, J.; Boorstein, R.; Pardee, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    /sup 125/I-Iododeoxycytidine (/sup 125/IdC) incorporation into acid-insoluble material was a sensitive, rapid, and quantitative assay for the growth of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in human fibroblasts. Cellular utilization of the isotope was 10 to 25% of the incorporation by infected cells and could be 80% inhibited by tetrahydrouridine (THU). Viral utilization was inhibited by acycloguanosine, thioguanine (TG), and cytosine arabinoside. Isotope was incorporated equally well by growing or quiescent infected cells. HSV-1 was used to probe the metabolic capabilities of three mutant human fibroblast strains. /sup 125/IdC incorporation quantitatively measured the ability of the virus to grow in these cells. Viral /sup 125/IdC incorporation was sensitive to TG in normal fibroblasts but showed a 8- to 10-fold greater resistance to TG in fibroblasts derived from patients with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LN). Similarly, the growth of ultraviolet irradiated HSV-1 in normal fibroblasts was 5-fold greater than in fibroblasts derived from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. In fibroblasts derived from patients with hereditary orotic aciduria, viral /sup 125/IdC incorporation was sensitive to adenosine (AD) at concentrations which were slightly stimulatory in normal fibroblasts. This was a 2-fold difference in AD sensitivity, which the radioassay reliably and quantitatively documented. HSV-1 infected cells could be individually identified by their incorporated /sup 125/IdC; such cells had blackened nuclei in autoradiograms prepared 12 hr after infection. Normal cells infected in the presence of TG had many fewer labeled nuclei than LN cells similarly infected in the presence of the drug. (JMT)

  16. H11/HspB8 and Its Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 Homologue ICP10PK Share Functions That Regulate Cell Life/Death Decisions and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aurelian, Laure; Laing, Jennifer M.; Lee, Ki Seok

    2012-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsp) also known as HspB are a large family of widely expressed proteins that contain a 90 residues domain known as α-crystallin. Here, we focus on the family member H11/HspB8 and its herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) homologue ICP10PK, and discuss the possible impact of this relationship on human disease. H11/HspB8 and ICP10PK are atypical protein kinases. They share multi-functional activity that encompasses signaling, unfolded protein response (UPR) and the regulation of life cycle potential. In melanocytes H11/HspB8 causes growth arrest. It is silenced in a high proportion of melanoma prostate cancer, Ewing's sarcoma and hematologic malignancies through aberrant DNA methylation. Its restored expression induces cell death and inhibits tumor growth in xenograft models, identifying H11/HspB8 as a tumor suppressor. This function involves the activation of multiple and distinct death pathways, all of which initiate with H11/HspB8-mediated phosphorylation of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1). Both ICP10PK and H11/HspB8 were implicated in inflammatory processes that involve dendritic cells activation through Toll-like receptor-dependent pathways and may contribute to the onset of autoimmunity. The potential evolutionary relationship of H11/HspB8 to ICP10PK, its impact on human disorders and the development of therapeutic strategies are discussed. PMID:23056924

  17. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement.

  18. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cherpes, Thomas L; Matthews, Dean B; Maryak, Samantha A

    2012-12-01

    Neonatal herpes, seen roughly in 1 of 3000 live births in the United States, is the most serious manifestation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in the perinatal period. Although acyclovir therapy decreases infant mortality associated with perinatal HSV transmission, development of permanent neurological disabilities is not uncommon. Mother-to-neonate HSV transmission is most efficient when maternal genital tract HSV infection is acquired proximate to the time of delivery, signifying that neonatal herpes prevention strategies need to focus on decreasing the incidence of maternal infection during pregnancy and more precisely identifying infants most likely to benefit from prophylactic antiviral therapy.

  19. Evasion of early antiviral responses by herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Suazo, Paula A; Ibañez, Francisco J; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency.

  20. Improvements of the Hermite-Hadamard inequality for the simplex.

    PubMed

    Pavić, Zlatko

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the simplex whose vertices are barycenters of the given simplex facets plays an essential role. The article provides an extension of the Hermite-Hadamard inequality from the simplex barycenter to any point of the inscribed simplex except its vertices. A two-sided refinement of the generalized inequality is obtained in completion of this work.

  1. A Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Human Asymptomatic CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes-Based Vaccine Protects Against Ocular Herpes in a “Humanized” HLA Transgenic Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Huang, Jiawei; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. A clinical vaccine that protects from ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and disease still is lacking. In the present study, preclinical vaccine trials of nine asymptomatic (ASYMP) peptides, selected from HSV-1 glycoproteins B (gB), and tegument proteins VP11/12 and VP13/14, were performed in the “humanized” HLA–transgenic rabbit (HLA-Tg rabbit) model of ocular herpes. We recently reported that these peptides are highly recognized by CD8+ T cells from “naturally” protected HSV-1–seropositive healthy ASYMP individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Methods. Mixtures of three ASYMP CD8+ T-cell peptides derived from either HSV-1 gB, VP11/12, or VP13/14 were delivered subcutaneously to different groups of HLA-Tg rabbits (n = 10) in incomplete Freund's adjuvant, twice at 15-day intervals. The frequency and function of HSV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cells induced by these peptides and their protective efficacy, in terms of survival, virus replication in the eye, and ocular herpetic disease were assessed after an ocular challenge with HSV-1 (strain McKrae). Results. All mixtures elicited strong and polyfunctional IFN-γ– and TNF-α–producing CD107+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, associated with a significant reduction in death, ocular herpes infection, and disease (P < 0.015). Conclusions. The results of this preclinical trial support the screening strategy used to select the HSV-1 ASYMP CD8+ T-cell epitopes, emphasize their valuable immunogenic and protective efficacy against ocular herpes, and provide a prototype vaccine formulation that may be highly efficacious for preventing ocular herpes in humans. PMID:26098469

  2. A combination microbicide gel protects macaques against vaginal simian human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase infection, but only partially reduces herpes simplex virus-2 infection after a single high-dose cochallenge.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Mayla; Aravantinou, Meropi; Menon, Radhika; Seidor, Samantha; Goldman, Daniel; Kenney, Jessica; Derby, Nina; Gettie, Agegnehu; Blanchard, James; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Fernández-Romero, Jose A; Zydowsky, Thomas M; Robbiani, Melissa

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection increases HIV susceptibility. We previously established a rhesus macaque model of vaginal HSV-2 preexposure followed by cochallenge with HSV-2 and simian/human immunodeficiency virus-reverse transcriptase (SHIV-RT). Using this model, we showed that a gel containing the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) MIV-150 in carrageenan (CG) reduced SHIV-RT infection. To evaluate the efficacy of new generation microbicides against both viruses, we first established dual infection after single vaginal cochallenge with SHIV-RT and HSV-2 in HSV-2-naive macaques. All animals (6/6) became HSV-2 infected, with 4/6 coinfected with SHIV-RT. In a control group cochallenged with SHIV-RT and UV-inactivated HSV-2, 2/4 became SHIV-RT infected, and none had detectable HSV-2. Low-level HSV-2-specific antibody and T cell responses were detected in some HSV-2-infected animals. To test a CG gel containing MIV-150 and zinc acetate (MZC), which provided naive animals full protection from SHIV-RT for at least 8 h, MZC (vs. CG) was applied daily for 14 days followed by cochallenge 8 h later. MZC prevented SHIV-RT infection (0/9 infected, p=0.04 vs. 3/6 in CG controls), but only reduced HSV-2 infection by 20% (6/9 infected vs. 5/6 in CG, p=0.6). In HSV-2-infected animals, none of the gel-treated animals seroconverted, and only the CG controls had measurable HSV-2-specific T cell responses. This study shows the promise of MZC to prevent immunodeficiency virus infection (even in the presence of HSV-2) and reduce HSV-2 infection after exposure to a high-dose inoculum. Additionally, it demonstrates the potential of a macaque coinfection model to evaluate broad-spectrum microbicides.

  3. Recidivous acute urticaria caused by Anisakis simplex.

    PubMed

    Montoro, A; Perteguer, M J; Chivato, T; Laguna, R; Cuéllar, C

    1997-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the cause of acute recidivous urticaria in patients who usually eat fish or other seafood. Twenty-five patients were studied. The skin prick test with larval Anisakis simplex extract was performed; total and specific IgE against A. simplex was measured with the CAP System; specific antibodies to A. simplex were determined by ELISA; and immunorecognition patterns of the sera were studied by Western blot. Nineteen patients showed specific IgE to A. simplex, but specific IgE to Ascaris was demonstrated in only two patients. No patients reacted to Toxocara canis or Echinoccocus granulosus antigens with the same test. The skin prick test was positive in 16 patients, in two of them persisting for 48 h. Five patients showed neither skin reaction nor specific IgE to A. simplex. Sera showed specific immunoglobulin levels against A. simplex larval crude extract, by both ELISA and Western blot. Likewise, specific immunoglobulin levels against excretory-secretory antigen were also measured by ELISA. Only one patient showed sensitization to fish. A. simplex was found to be the main cause of acute recidivous urticaria in patients who usually eat fish and are not sensitized to it.

  4. Peptide inhibitors against herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Tarallo, Rossella; Russo, Luigi; Galdiero, Emilia; Cantisani, Marco; Morelli, Giancarlo; Galdiero, Massimiliano

    2013-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a significant human pathogen causing mucocutaneous lesions primarily in the oral or genital mucosa. Although acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogs provide successful treatment, HSV remains highly prevalent worldwide and is a major cofactor for the spread of human immunodeficiency virus. Encephalitis, meningitis, and blinding keratitis are among the most severe diseases caused by HSV. ACV resistance poses an important problem for immunocompromised patients and highlights the need for new safe and effective agents; therefore, the development of novel strategies to eradicate HSV is a global public health priority. Despite the continued global epidemic of HSV and extensive research, there have been few major breakthroughs in the treatment or prevention of the virus since the introduction of ACV in the 1980s. A therapeutic strategy at the moment not fully addressed is the use of small peptide molecules. These can be either modeled on viral proteins or derived from antimicrobial peptides. Any peptide that interrupts protein-protein or viral protein-host cell membrane interactions is potentially a novel antiviral drug and may be a useful tool for elucidating the mechanisms of viral entry. This review summarizes current knowledge and strategies in the development of synthetic and natural peptides to inhibit HSV infectivity.

  5. Herpes Simplex Virus: Partner for Life

    PubMed Central

    Blondeau, Joseph M.; Embil, Juan A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors provide a careful review of the characteristics of the herpes simplex virus and its various manifestations. They offer suggestions for its diagnosis and treatment, in various forms, and outline an approach to physician counselling of infected persons.

  6. Herpes simplex type-1 virus infection.

    PubMed

    Huber, Michaell A

    2003-06-01

    Oral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus represents one of the more common conditions the dental practitioner will be called upon to manage. Unique in its ability to establish latency and undergo subsequent recurrence, it is an ubiquitous infectious agent for which a cure does not exist. For the immunocompetent patient, herpes virus simplex infection typically represents nothing more than a nuisance. However, for the immunocompromised patient, this infection is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Recently introduced antiviral drug regimens may reduce the morbidity and potential mortality of the herpes simplex virus, especially in immunocompromised patients. The value of antiviral therapy in the management of recurrent herpes simplex virus infection in the immunocompetent patient remains an area of contentious debate.

  7. Anisakis simplex: from obscure infectious worm to inducer of immune hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Audicana, M Teresa; Kennedy, Malcolm W

    2008-04-01

    Infection of humans with the nematode worm parasite Anisakis simplex was first described in the 1960s in association with the consumption of raw or undercooked fish. During the 1990s it was realized that even the ingestion of dead worms in food fish can cause severe hypersensitivity reactions, that these may be more prevalent than infection itself, and that this outcome could be associated with food preparations previously considered safe. Not only may allergic symptoms arise from infection by the parasites ("gastroallergic anisakiasis"), but true anaphylactic reactions can also occur following exposure to allergens from dead worms by food-borne, airborne, or skin contact routes. This review discusses A. simplex pathogenesis in humans, covering immune hypersensitivity reactions both in the context of a living infection and in terms of exposure to its allergens by other routes. Over the last 20 years, several studies have concentrated on A. simplex antigen characterization and innate as well as adaptive immune response to this parasite. Molecular characterization of Anisakis allergens and isolation of their encoding cDNAs is now an active field of research that should provide improved diagnostic tools in addition to tools with which to enhance our understanding of pathogenesis and controversial aspects of A. simplex allergy. We also discuss the potential relevance of parasite products such as allergens, proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors and the activation of basophils, eosinophils, and mast cells in the induction of A. simplex-related immune hypersensitivity states induced by exposure to the parasite, dead or alive.

  8. The management of herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Yeung-Yue, Kimberly A; Brentjens, Mathijs H; Lee, Patricia C; Tyring, Stephen K

    2002-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus persists in a latent form for the life of its host, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently no cure is available. Antiviral therapy is the main treatment modality, used either orally, intravenously, or topically to prohibit further replication of the virus and thereby minimize cellular destruction. However, immunologic advances in the treatment and prevention of herpes simplex infections are promising and continue to be studied.

  9. Neutralizing human recombinant antibodies against herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoproteins B from a phage-displayed scFv antibody library.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Vahid; Nejatollahi, Foroogh; Esmaeili, Seyed Alireza; Momtazi, Amir Abbas; Motamedifar, Mohamad; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-01-15

    The HSV-1 envelope glycoprotein B (gB) plays a critical role in virus entry into host cells. Neutralizing antibodies can therefore potentially prevent virus entry into target cells and cell-to-cell spread of infection. Our present study focused on the selection of neutralizing single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies of a phage-displayed nonimmune human scFv antibody library against gB of HSV-1. To enrich specific scFvs, two phage antibodies were isolated against amino acid residues 31-43 derived from the N-terminal part of gB using panning technique. Two scFvs, scFv-gB1 and scFv-gB2, with frequencies of 45% and 20% were obtained from scFv clones after performing PCR and MvaI fingerprinting. In phage ELISA analysis, both gB1 and gB2 scFvs demonstrated high reactivity with the gB peptide. In the neutralization assay, scFv-gB1 and scFv-gB2 represented neutralizing effects of 55% and 59%, respectively. Upon further enhancement of the neutralizing effects of these antibodies, they can be considered as new potential alternatives in the treatment and prophylaxis of HSV-1 infections.

  10. Development and application of a rapid detection system for human papillomavirus and Herpes simplex virus-2 by loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin-Fang; Zhao, Chang-Zhen; Lu, Ke-Xin

    2016-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is an important factor that causes cervical cancer and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), while HSV-2 plays an important role when HR-HPV triggers the cancer. Thus, a quick and convenient assay in the detection of HPV and HSV-2in the screening of HPV and HSV-2 infection is required. Two respective HPV and HSV-2 detection methods were established based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay. Specific outer primers, inner primers, and loop primers were designed according to the conserved domains of HPV and HSV-2 genomes, respectively, while degenerate primers were used for HPV assay. After optimizing the reaction conditions, the results were observed by LAMP Tubidimeter real-time LA-320. Standard plasmids HPV-L-P and HSV-2-L-P were cloned and used in sensitivity tests of HPV LAMP and HSV-2 LAMP, respectively. Fifty samples of actinic keratosis (AK), 20 samples of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 50 samples of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and 20 samples of seborrheic keratosis (SK) were detected by HPV assay. Seventy three clinical samples of vaginitis, chronic cervicitis, cervical intraepithelial neoplasias and cervical cancer level positive were detected with HPV and HSV-2 assays. The reaction conditions of two assays were the same with a reaction temperature of 63 °C and a reaction time of 45 min. The sensitivity of HPV LAMP assay was 10 copies/μL, while that of the HSV-2 LAMP assay was 100 copies/μL. No cross-reactivity was observed. The HPV positive rates of AK, SCC, BCC and SK samples were 80% (40/50), 75% (15/20), 44% (22/50) and 21% (15/72), respectively. As an economic and quick diagnostic tool, LAMP assay is conducive to the extensive screening of HPV and HSV-2 and has huge potential to be promoted in resource-limited hospitals.

  11. The nematode Anisakis simplex in American shad (Alosa sapidissima) in two Oregon rivers.

    PubMed

    Shields, B A; Bird, P; Liss, W J; Groves, K L; Olson, R; Rossignol, P A

    2002-10-01

    This paper represents the first report of the nematode Anisakis simplex in the American shad (Alosa sapidissima) in its introduced range in the American Pacific Northwest. All the adult shad sampled from spawning populations in the Willamette (n = 9) and Umpqua (n = 12) rivers were infected with A. simplex with intensities ranging from 6 to 89 worms per fish. This preliminary investigation contrasts sharply with previous studies in the native range of American shad and confirms that this fish may be an important intermediate host for A. simplex in the Pacific Northwest. It is suggested that this new parasite-host relationship has led to an ecological expansion into rivers and Anisakis may present an emerging health risk for wildlife and some human consumers.

  12. Antihelmintic effects of nutmeg (Myristica fragans) on Anisakis simplex L3 larvae obtained from Micromesistius potassou.

    PubMed

    López, Víctor; Gerique, Javier; Langa, Elisa; Berzosa, César; Valero, Marta Sofía; Gómez-Rincón, Carlota

    2015-06-01

    Anisakis simplex is a foodborne pathogen that can produce human infections and allergic reactions due to the high consumption of raw fish. The seeds of Myristica fragans (Myristicaceae), popularly known as nutmeg, are worldwide used as a culinary spice due to its flavour and properties in food preservation. A nutmeg extract was prepared, analyzed, screened for cytotoxicity and tested against Anisakis simplex L3 larvae. In order to detect the biologically active constituents of the extract, myristicin was tested on the larvae. An acetylcholinesterase inhibition bioassay was also carried out to investigate the antihelmintic mechanism of action. Our results demonstrate that nutmeg exerts antihelmintic effects on Anisakis simplex, being myristicin one of the active compounds. The extract induced a high rate of dead anisakis at concentrations between 0.5 and 0.7 mg/ml without being considered cytotoxic; however, an inhibition of acetylcholinesterase was discarded as the molecular mechanism involved in the activity.

  13. Influence of herpes simplex virus infection on benzo(a)pyrene metabolism in monkey kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, J.H.; Whitcomb, B.; Hall, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    Current research in our laboratory is designed to investigate the intracellular interactions of BP with oncogenic DNA viruses of animals and humans. In this study, our purpose was to determine whether BP is metabolized in herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infected cells and whether HSV-2 infection affects intracellular levels of the aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase system necessary for BP metabolism.

  14. Animal models of herpes simplex virus immunity and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kollias, Christina M; Huneke, Richard B; Wigdahl, Brian; Jennings, Stephen R

    2015-02-01

    Herpes simplex viruses are ubiquitous human pathogens represented by two distinct serotypes: herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1); and HSV type 2 (HSV-2). In the general population, adult seropositivity rates approach 90% for HSV-1 and 20-25% for HSV-2. These viruses cause significant morbidity, primarily as mucosal membrane lesions in the form of facial cold sores and genital ulcers, with much less common but more severe manifestations causing death from encephalitis. HSV infections in humans are difficult to study in many cases because many primary infections are asymptomatic. Moreover, the neurotropic properties of HSV make it much more difficult to study the immune mechanisms controlling reactivation of latent infection within the corresponding sensory ganglia and crossover into the central nervous system of infected humans. This is because samples from the nervous system can only be routinely obtained at the time of autopsy. Thus, animal models have been developed whose use has led to a better understanding of multiple aspects of HSV biology, molecular biology, pathogenesis, disease, and immunity. The course of HSV infection in a spectrum of animal models depends on important experimental parameters including animal species, age, and genotype; route of infection; and viral serotype, strain, and dose. This review summarizes the animal models most commonly used to study HSV pathogenesis and its establishment, maintenance, and reactivation from latency. It focuses particularly on the immune response to HSV during acute primary infection and the initial invasion of the ganglion with comparisons to the events governing maintenance of viral latency.

  15. Addition of a single E2 binding site to the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 long control region enhances killing of HPV positive cells via HPV E2 protein-regulated herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase-mediated suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rachna; Palefsky, Joel M

    2010-07-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is associated with the development of anogenital cancers and their precursor lesions, intraepithelial neoplasia. Treatment strategies against HPV-induced intraepithelial neoplasia are not HPV specific and mostly consist of physical removal or ablation of lesions. We had previously designed an HPV-specific approach to kill HPV-infected cells by the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (TK) gene driven by HPV E2 binding to E2-binding sites (E2BS) in the native HPV16 long control region. E2-induced TK expression renders the cells sensitive to the prodrug ganciclovir. To optimize this therapeutic approach, we modified the native long control region by adding variable numbers of E2BS adjacent to E2BS4, resulting in greatly increased cell death in HPV-positive cell lines with variable levels of E2 protein expression and no reduction in HPV specificity. Our results showed maximum increase in TK expression and cell killing when one additional E2BS was added adjacent to E2BS. As HPV-infected patients also exhibit variable E2 expression across lesions and within a lesion, this approach may potentiate the clinical utility of the herpes simplex virus type 1 TK/ganciclovir therapeutic approach.

  16. Identification of autoclave-resistant Anisakis simplex allergens.

    PubMed

    Carballeda-Sangiao, Noelia; Olivares, Fabiola; Rodriguez-Mahillo, Ana I; Careche, Mercedes; Tejada, Margarita; Moneo, Ignacio; González-Muñoz, Miguel

    2014-04-01

    Anisakis simplex is a fish parasite able to induce allergic reactions in humans infected when eating raw or undercooked fish parasitized with viable third-stage larvae. Some authors claim that exposure to nonviable Anisakis material can result in allergic symptoms in previously sensitized patients, indicating that parasite allergens are resistant to the thermal treatments of usual cooking procedures. Furthermore, some patients report symptoms after eating canned fish. The aim of this work was the analysis of parasite allergen stability in heating to 121 °C in an autoclave to simulate the thermal process applied to canned fish. Third-stage larvae were subjected to autoclaving for 20, 40, and 80 min, and parasite crude extracts were analyzed by electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and a flow-cytometric basophil activation test. Allergens resistant to autoclaving were separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by ion trap mass spectrometry. Protein analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that autoclaving considerably reduced the number and intensity of identifiable protein bands in a time-dependent manner. Several allergens were detected by immunoblotting with a pool of A. simplex allergic patients' sera after autoclaving. Allergens of 9 and 14 kDa resistant to autoclaving were identified as Ani s 4 and Ani s 1 allergens, respectively. Functional analysis showed that allergens retain their capacity to activate basophils even after autoclaving for 80 min. In conclusion, some relevant A. simplex allergens retain their capacity to bind immunoglobulin E and activate basophils after being subjected to autoclaving, which is a method equivalent to that used in industrial canning processes.

  17. Bell's palsy and herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Schirm, J; Mulkens, P S

    1997-11-01

    Bell's palsy, which is defined as idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis of sudden onset, accounts for > 50% of all cases of facial paralysis. Different theories on the etiology of Bell's palsy have been proposed and investigated. Various clinical studies have suggested an etiological link between Bell's palsy and herpes simplex virus (HSV). In addition, animal experiments have shown the ability of HSV to induce facial paralysis. In our opinion, the possible link between Bell's palsy and HSV can only be explored properly by studying the human facial nerve, and especially the geniculate ganglion itself. Different groups have tried to detect hypothetically reactivated and hypothetically latent HSV in the facial nerves of Bell's palsy patients and control patients, respectively. The isolation of infectious HSV from facial nerve tissue by conventional cell culture methods appeared to be very difficult, also when Bell's palsy patients were tested. Instead, modern molecular methods, such as in situ hybridization and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) could easily detect HSV DNA in geniculate ganglia. The detection of HSV-specific latency-associated transcripts in the ganglia of control patients provided further evidence for the hypothetically latent state of HSV in the geniculate ganglia in these patients. Recent PCR experiments performed by a Japanese group strongly suggest that the area adjacent to the geniculate ganglia does not usually contain any HSV at all, except in patients with Bell's palsy. This well-controlled study provides conclusive evidence that reactivation of HSV genomes from the geniculate ganglia is the most important cause of Bell's palsy. Consequently, it has been suggested that "Bell's palsy" be renamed as "herpetic facial paralysis".

  18. The development of antibody-based immunotherapy for methamphetamine abuse: immunization, and virus-mediated gene transfer approaches.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a highly addictive psychostimulant that has been seriously abused worldwide, and currently there are no approved medications for the treatment of its abuse. Conventional treatments for drug addiction mainly seek to use small molecule agonists or antagonists to target the drug receptors in the brain, but unfortunately it is difficult to find a similar small molecule for the treatment of methamphetamine dependence. Alternatively, anti-methamphetamine antibodies can sequester the drug in the bloodstream and reduce the amount of drug available to the central nervous system, acting as peripheral pharmacokinetic antagonists. This review describes the development of antibody-based immunotherapies, classified into active and passive immunizations, for the treatment of methamphetamine addiction. Furthermore, an alternative therapeutic approach, using a recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer technique to achieve in vivo expression of characterized anti-methamphetamine monoclonal antibodies, is proposed in this article.

  19. Herpes simplex virus 2 infection: molecular association with HIV and novel microbicides to prevent disease.

    PubMed

    Suazo, Paula A; Tognarelli, Eduardo I; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-04-01

    Infection with herpes simplex viruses is one of the most ancient diseases described to affect humans. Infection with these viruses produces vexing effects to the host, which frequently recur. Infection with herpes simplex viruses is lifelong, and currently there is no vaccine or drug to prevent or cure infection. Prevalence of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infection varies significantly depending on the geographical region and nears 20% worldwide. Importantly, HSV-2 is the first cause of genital ulcers in the planet. HSV-2 affects approximately 500 million people around the globe and significantly increases the likelihood of acquiring the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), as well as its shedding. Thus, controlling HSV-2 infection and spread is of public health concern. Here, we review the diseases produced by herpes simplex viruses, the factors that modulate HSV-2 infection, the relationship between HSV-2 and HIV and novel therapeutic and prophylactic microbicides/antivirals under development to prevent infection and pathological outcomes produced by this virus. We also review mutations associated with HSV-2 resistance to common antivirals.

  20. Induction of interferon-λ contributes to TLR3 and RIG-I activation-mediated inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 2 replication in human cervical epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Li, Jie-Liang; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Jin-Biao; Zhuang, Ke; Gao, Jian-Feng; Liu, Shi; Sang, Ming; Wu, Jian-Guo; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    STUDY HYPOTHESIS Is it possible to immunologically activate human cervical epithelial cells to produce antiviral factors that inhibit herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) replication? STUDY FINDING Our results indicate that human cervical epithelial cells possess a functional TLR3/RIG-I signaling system, the activation of which can mount an Interferon-λ (IFN-λ)-mediated anti-HSV-2 response. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY There is limited information about the role of cervical epithelial cells in genital innate immunity against HSV-2 infection. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS We examined the expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible I (RIG-I) in End1/E6E7 cells by real-time PCR. The IFN-λ induced by TLR3 and RIG-I activation of End1/E6E7 cells was also examined by real-time PCR and ELISA. HSV-2 infection of End1/E6E7 cells was evaluated by the real-time PCR detection of HSV-2 gD expression. The antibody to IL-10Rβ was used to determine whether IFN-λ contributes to TLR3/RIG-I mediated HSV-2 inhibition. Expression of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF7, IFN-stimulated gene 56 (ISG56), 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase I (OAS-1) and myxovirus resistance A (MxA) were determined by the real-time PCR and western blot. End1/E6E7 cells were transfected with shRNA to knockdown the IRF3, IRF7 or RIG-I expression. Student's t-test and post Newman–Keuls test were used to analyze stabilized differences in the immunological parameters above between TLR3/RIG-I-activated cells and control cells. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Human cervical epithelial cells expressed functional TLR3 and RIG-I, which could be activated by poly I:C and 5′ppp double-strand RNAs (5′ppp dsRNA), resulting in the induction of endogenous interferon lambda (IFN-λ). The induced IFN-λ contributed to TLR3/RIG-I-mediated inhibition of HSV-2 replication in human cervical epithelial cells, as an antibody to IL-10Rβ, an IFN-λ receptor subunit, could

  1. Anorexia nervosa with herpes simplex encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    George, G. C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa appear to show an increased immunity to certain infections, as well as immunological deficiencies. This is the report of a patient with anorexia nervosa who developed herpes simplex encephalitis, a condition associated with lowered immunological defence mechanisms. PMID:7301681

  2. The simplex method for nonlinear mass determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branham, Richard L.

    1988-03-01

    The Gauss-Newton method, and calculating a mass that minimizes the variation of residuals are standard techniques for determining planetary masses, but both may fail under certain circums tances. The Gauss-Newton method, in particular, may diverge, and when it converges may converge to a local, rather than global, minimum of the nonlinear regression problem. The simplex method of nonlinear optimization needs no initial estimate for the solution and can be made to converge to a global minimum. It may also be used with non-least squares criteria, such as the L1 criterion, for greater robustness. But the simplex method achieves these advantages at a high computational price. To test the method as a tool for dynamical astronomy, over 12,000 observations of Neptune were used to calculate Pluto's mass. From an initial estimate of 1/1, 812,000 the Gauss-Newton method diverged. The simplex method converged to a more satisfactory 1/22,000,000 with a range of 1/47,000,000 to 1/14,000,000 as indicated by the mean error. Because the simplex method is considerably slower than competing methods, it should be reserved for refractory problems that do not yield facil solutions when tackled by other methods.

  3. Can Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Cause Aphasia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, H.; Pretorius, E.

    2003-01-01

    Aphasia implies the loss or impairment of language caused by brain damage. The key to understanding the nature of aphasic symptoms is the neuro-anatomical site of brain damage, and not the causative agent. However, because "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis infection usually affects the frontal and temporal lobes, subcortical…

  4. Herpes simplex ulcerative esophagitis in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman A; Fagih, Mosa A

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is a common cause of ulcerative esophagitis in the immunocompromised or debilitated host. Despite a high prevalence of primary and recurrent Herpes simplex virus infection in the general population, Herpes simplex virus esophagitis (HSVE) appears to be rare in the immunocompetent host. We report three cases of endoscopically-diagnosed HSVE in apparently immunocompetent children; the presentation was characterized by acute onset of fever, odynophagia, and dysphagia. In two cases, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically by identification of herpes viral inclusions and culture of the virus in the presence of inflammation. The third case was considered to have probable HSVE based on the presence of typical cold sore on his lip, typical endoscopic finding, histopathological evidence of inflammation in esophageal biopsies and positive serologic evidence of acute Herpes simplex virus infection. Two cases received an intravenous course of acyclovir and one had self-limited recovery. All three cases had normal immunological workup and excellent health on long-term follow-up.

  5. Human Asymptomatic Epitopes Identified from the Herpes Simplex Virus Tegument Protein VP13/14 (UL47) Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional Effector Memory CD44high CD62Llow CD8+ TEM Cells and Protect Humanized HLA-A*02:01 Transgenic Mice against Ocular Herpesvirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A; Garg, Sumit; Syed, Sabrina A; Furness, Julie N; Vahed, Hawa; Pham, Tiffany; Yu, Howard T; Nesburn, Anthony B; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is widespread among humans. The HSV-1 virion protein 13/14 (VP13/14), also known as UL47, is a tegument antigen targeted by CD8(+) T cells from HSV-seropositive individuals. However, whether VP13/14-specific CD8(+) T cells play a role in the natural protection seen in asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (individuals who have never had a clinical herpetic disease) has not been elucidated. Using predictive computer-assisted algorithms, we identified 10 potential HLA-A*02:01-restricted CD8(+) T-cell epitopes from the 693-amino-acid sequence of the VP13/14 protein. Three out of 10 epitopes exhibited a high to moderate affinity of binding to soluble HLA-A*02:01 molecules. The phenotype and function of CD8(+) T cells specific for each epitope were compared in HLA-A*02:01-positive ASYMP individuals and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (individuals who have frequent clinical herpetic diseases) using determination of a combination of tetramer frequency and the levels of granzyme B, granzyme K, perforin, gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-2 production and CD107(a/b) cytotoxic degranulation. High frequencies of multifunctional CD8(+) T cells directed against three epitopes, VP13/14 from amino acids 286 to 294 (VP13/14286-294), VP13/14 from amino acids 504 to 512 (VP13/14504-512), and VP13/14 from amino acids 544 to 552 (VP13/14544-552), were detected in ASYMP individuals, while only low frequencies were detected in SYMP individuals. The three epitopes also predominantly recalled more CD45RA(low) CD44(high) CCR7(low) CD62L(low) CD8(+) effector memory T cells (TEM cells) in ASYMP individuals than SYMP individuals. Moreover, immunization of HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three CD8(+) TEM-cell epitopes from ASYMP individuals induced robust and polyfunctional HSV-specific CD8(+) TEM cells associated with strong protective immunity against ocular herpesvirus infection and disease. Our findings outline the

  6. Hypertrophic herpes simplex simulating anal neoplasia in AIDS patients: report of five cases.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Sidney R; Calore, Edenilson E; Manzione, Carmen R; Horta, Sergio C; Ferreira, Aurea F; Almeida, Lis V

    2005-12-01

    Five patients (4 males; mean age, 46.4 years) with painful verrucous perianal lesions caused by herpes simplex virus are described. All patients had had AIDS for a long time and were using highly active antiretroviral therapy. CD4+ counts ranged from 73 to 370/mm3. All lesions were submitted to resection under subdural anesthesia. Histologic examinations revealed epithelial hyperplasia and dense inflammatory process, composed mainly of lymphocytes and plasma cells, extended just to the hypodermis. Immunohistochemistry was positive for herpes simplex virus Type 2 in four patients and for herpes simplex virus Type 1 in one patient, and did not detect human papillomavirus antigens. Three patients had recurrences after 3, 10, and 12 months. Resection was performed on two patients; one had a new recurrence after three months. Oral acyclovir eliminated the lesion in the third patient. The analysis of our patients suggests that herpes simplex virus, Types 1 and 2, may cause verrucous lesions simulating neoplasia in patients with AIDS using antiretroviral therapy.

  7. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part II: potential clinical application of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Gregory K; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Gillespie, George Yancey; Markert, James M; Waters, Alicia M; Chen, Chun-Yu; Denton, Nicholas L; Haworth, Kellie B; Hutzen, Brian; Leddon, Jennifer L; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Cripe, Timothy P

    Oncolytic engineered herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) possess many biologic and functional attributes that support their use in clinical trials in children with solid tumors. Tumor cells, in an effort to escape regulatory mechanisms that would impair their growth and progression, have removed many mechanisms that would have protected them from virus infection and eventual virus-mediated destruction. Viruses engineered to exploit this weakness, like mutant HSV, can be safely employed as tumor cell killers, since normal cells retain these antiviral strategies. Many preclinical studies and early phase trials in adults demonstrated that oncolytic HSV can be safely used and are highly effective in killing tumor cells that comprise pediatric malignancies, without generating the toxic side effects of nondiscriminatory chemotherapy or radiation therapy. A variety of engineered viruses have been developed and tested in numerous preclinical models of pediatric cancers and initial trials in patients are underway. In Part II of this review series, we examine the preclinical evidence to support the further advancement of oncolytic HSV in the pediatric population. We discuss clinical advances made to date in this emerging era of oncolytic virotherapy.

  8. Protection from Ebola Virus Mediated by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Specific for the Viral Nucleoprotein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    be required for optimal protection from Ebola virus. Ebola viruses are associated with outbreaks of highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans and...nonhuman primates. The Ebola Zaire viruses responsible for outbreaks of human dis- ease in 1976 and 1995 had case-fatality rates of greater than 80...encoding the Ebola virus NP protein (12, 13) or with a control replicon encoding Lassa virus N (14). For booster vaccinations, animals 2660 VOL

  9. Downhill simplex approach for vehicle headlights detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ho-Joong; Kim, Ho-Kun; Oh, Il-Whan; Choi, Kyoung-Ho

    2014-03-01

    Nighttime vehicle detection is an essential problem to be solved in the development of highway surveillance systems that provide information about the vehicle speed, traffic volume, and traffic jams, and so on. In this paper, a novel downhill simplex approach for vehicle headlights detection is presented. In the proposed approach, a rough position of vehicle headlights is detected first. Then, a downhill simplex optimization approach is adopted to find the accurate location of vehicle headlights. For the optimization process, a novel cost function is designed and various headlights are evaluated for possible headlight positions on the detected vehicles, locating an optimal headlight position. Simulation results are provided to show the robustness of the proposed approach for headlights detection.

  10. Maternal and neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2013-02-01

    Genital herpes infections are extremely common worldwide and ~22% of pregnant women are infected with herpes simplex virus. Eighty percent of those affected with genital herpes are unaware of being infected. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is neonatal herpes disease. Fortunately, neonatal herpes simplex infections are uncommon but due to the morbidity and mortality associated with the infection are often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. The use of polymerase chain reaction assay for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy have revolutionized the diagnosis and management of these infants. Most recently, the initiation of long-term antiviral suppressive therapy in these infants has led to significant improvement in morbidity. This review will summarize the epidemiology of maternal and neonatal herpes infections and discuss clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and follow-up of infants with neonatal herpes disease.

  11. Pediatrics and herpes simplex virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Richard; Rosenthal, Susan L; Stanberry, Lawrence R

    2005-01-01

    This review explores the development of prophylactic genital herpes vaccines and their potential impact on perinatal and oral-facial disease. Vaccine strategies have included the use of whole killed virus, viral subunits, attenuated live virus, viral vectors, and bare DNA. To date, the recombinant subunit vaccine, truncated HSV-2 gD and alum/MPL, has been the most efficacious. The vaccine is 73 to 74 percent effective in preventing genital disease in herpes simplex virus seronegative women but is not effective in men or seropositive women. Models predict a significant impact on genital herpes if it limits viral shedding. Reductions in perinatal and oral-facial disease are likely to occur as well. Once an efficacious herpes vaccine is available, its effectiveness will depend ultimately on vaccine acceptance by professional organizations, healthcare professionals, and parents. Further research is required to improve on and fully understand the implications of prophylactic herpes simplex vaccines.

  12. Herpes simplex virus infection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Gardella, Carolyn

    2014-12-01

    Genital herpes in pregnancy continues to cause significant maternal morbidity, with an increasing number of infections being due to oral-labial transmission of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1. Near delivery, primary infections with HSV-1 or HSV-2 carry the highest risk of neonatal herpes infection, which is a rare but potentially devastating disease for otherwise healthy newborns. Prevention efforts have been limited by lack of an effective intervention for preventing primary infections and the unclear role of routine serologic testing.

  13. Bell's palsy associated with herpes simplex gingivostomatitis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nasatzky, E; Katz, J

    1998-09-01

    Bell's palsy is a sudden, isolated, peripheral facial paralysis caused by various known and sometimes unknown factors. The case of an 18-year-old man who developed Bell's palsy after onset of primary herpetic gingivostomatitis is presented. Although Bell's palsy has already been associated with herpes simplex virus type 1, the described case is the first in the literature in which enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for immunoglobulin G to herpes simplex virus type 1 and herpes simplex virus type 1 culture were both positive. The recent literature regarding the possible relationship between herpes simplex virus type 1 and Bell's palsy is reviewed and discussed.

  14. Prevention and management of neonatal herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Allen, Upton D; Robinson, Joan L

    2014-04-01

    Human herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection in neonates can result in devastating outcomes, including mortality and significant morbidity. All infants are potentially at risk for neonatal HSV infection. This position statement reviews epidemiology, transmission and risk factors, with a focus on intrapartum infection. It considers diagnosis and prognosis according to infection category, along with testing modalities and limitations. Recommendations for managing newborns known to have been exposed intrapartum to HSV are based on expert opinion because a randomized trial to compare management options is not feasible. Guidance is provided for the empirical management of infants with suspected clinical sepsis, including those who do not respond to antibacterial therapy. The present statement replaces a 2006 position statement by the Canadian Paediatric Society.

  15. New strategies against drug resistance to herpes simplex virus

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu-Chen; Feng, Hui; Lin, Yu-Chun; Guo, Xiu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is a significant human pathogen that results in mucocutaneous lesions in the oral cavity or genital infections. Acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogues can successfully treat HSV infections, but the emergence of drug resistance to ACV has created a barrier for the treatment of HSV infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. There is an urgent need to explore new and effective tactics to circumvent drug resistance to HSV. This review summarises the current strategies in the development of new targets (the DNA helicase/primase (H/P) complex), new types of molecules (nature products) and new antiviral mechanisms (lethal mutagenesis of Janus-type nucleosides) to fight the drug resistance of HSV. PMID:27025259

  16. The influence of the milieu on the rate of neutralisation of herpes simplex virus 1.

    PubMed

    Bolt, C E; Davies, J A; Randall, S; Skinner, G R

    1998-01-01

    The rate of neutralisation of herpes simplex virus 1 was increased by up to more than five hundred-fold when the virus suspension and antiserum were each diluted to one hundred-fold in water instead of phosphate buffered saline. This phenomenon, which was observed for two human positive sera and a rabbit purified polyclonal antibody, may represent an unrecognised homeostatic mechanism where neutralising antibody is 'dilution-fast' under physiological conditions of transudation or pathological conditions of inflammation.

  17. Attenuation of Dengue Virus Infection by Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated siRNA Delivery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-09

    Pharmingen) for 7 days prior to infection with DEN. Blocking dengue virus infection in vitro 1 × 105 Vero cells or DCs were seeded into six-well tissue...essential for dengue pathogenesis in the human host. In this study, we also utilized peripheral blood iDCs as a cell model to test our AAV system. Similar to...attenu- ate DEN infection. List of abbreviations AAV, adeno-associated virus; DCs, dendritic cells ; DEN, dengue virus; DHF/DSS, dengue hemorrhagic fever

  18. Herpes Simplex Vaccines: Prospects of Live-attenuated HSV Vaccines to Combat Genital and Ocular infections.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, Brent; Kousoulas, Konstantin Gus

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) and its closely related type-2 (HSV-2) viruses cause important clinical manifestations in humans including acute ocular disease and genital infections. These viruses establish latency in the trigeminal ganglionic and dorsal root neurons, respectively. Both viruses are widespread among humans and can frequently reactivate from latency causing disease. Currently, there are no vaccines available against herpes simplex viral infections. However, a number of promising vaccine approaches are being explored in pre-clinical investigations with few progressing to early phase clinical trials. Consensus research findings suggest that robust humoral and cellular immune responses may partially control the frequency of reactivation episodes and reduce clinical symptoms. Live-attenuated viral vaccines have long been considered as a viable option for generating robust and protective immune responses against viral pathogens. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the same alphaherpesvirus subfamily with herpes simplex viruses. A live-attenuated VZV vaccine has been extensively used in a prophylactic and therapeutic approach to combat primary and recurrent VZV infection indicating that a similar vaccine approach may be feasible for HSVs. In this review, we summarize pre-clinical approaches to HSV vaccine development and current efforts to test certain vaccine approaches in human clinical trials. Also, we discuss the potential advantages of using a safe, live-attenuated HSV-1 vaccine strain to protect against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections.

  19. Translational Data from Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, Margaret H.; Arruda, Valder R.; Stedman, Hansell H.; Kay, Mark A.; High, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Preclinical testing of new therapeutic strategies in relevant animal models is an essential part of drug development. The choice of animal models of disease that are used in these studies is driven by the strength of the translational data for informing about safety, efficacy, and success or failure of human clinical trials. Hemophilia B is a monogenic, X-linked, inherited bleeding disorder that results from absent or dysfunctional coagulation factor IX (FIX). Regarding preclinical studies of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene therapy for hemophilia B, dogs with severe hemophilia B (<1% FIX) provide well-characterized phenotypes and genotypes in which a species-specific transgene can be expressed in a mixed genetic background. Correction of the hemophilic coagulopathy by sustained expression of FIX, reduction of bleeding events, and a comprehensive assessment of the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to the expressed transgene and recombinant AAV vector are all feasible end points in these dogs. This review compares the preclinical studies of AAV vectors used to treat dogs with hemophilia B with the results obtained in subsequent human clinical trials using muscle- and liver-based approaches. PMID:25675273

  20. Deciphering the host-pathogen protein interface in chikungunya virus-mediated sickness.

    PubMed

    Rana, Jyoti; Sreejith, R; Gulati, Sahil; Bharti, Isha; Jain, Surangna; Gupta, Sanjay

    2013-06-01

    Successful infection with chikungunya virus (CHIKV) depends largely on the ability of this virus to manipulate cellular processes in its favour through specific interactions with several host factors. The knowledge of virus-host interactions is of particular value for understanding the interface through which therapeutic strategies could be applied. In the current study, the authors have employed a computational method to study the protein interactions between CHIKV and both its human host and its mosquito vector. In this structure-based study, 2028 human and 86 mosquito proteins were predicted to interact with those of CHIKV through 3918 and 112 unique interactions, respectively. This approach could predict 40 % of the experimentally confirmed CHIKV-host interactions along with several novel interactions, suggesting the involvement of CHIKV in intracellular cell signaling, programmed cell death, and transcriptional and translational regulation. The data corresponded to those obtained in earlier studies for HIV and dengue viruses using the same methodology. This study provides a conservative set of potential interactions that can be employed for future experimental studies with a view to understanding CHIKV biology.

  1. Long-term observation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in a child with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and a possible reactivation mechanism for thymidine kinase-negative HSV-1 in humans.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Tomoyuki; Kurane, Ichiro; Morikawa, Shigeru; Saijo, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections in a child with congenital immunodeficiency syndrome were observed over a 10-year period. The child suffered from recurrent and severe HSV-1 mucocutaneous infections. He frequently suffered from acyclovir (ACV)-resistant (ACV(r)) HSV-1 infection in the later phase of his life, especially after the episode of ACV(r) HSV-1 infection. Virological analyses on the HSV-1 isolates recovered from this patient revealed that all the ACV(r) HSV-1 isolates were thymidine kinase (TK)-negative (TK(-)) due to a single cytosine (C) deletion within the 4-C residues (positions 1061 to 1064) in the TK gene, indicating that the recurrent TK(-)/ACV(r) HSV-1 infections throughout the patient's life were due to the identical ACV(r) HSV-1 strain. Furthermore, it was found that the ACV-sensitive (ACV(s)) isolate recovered from the skin lesions that appeared between the episodes of ACV(r) infection at the ages of 8 and 9 contained ACV(r) HSV-1 with the same mutation in the TK gene. These results indicate that, although TK activity is required for reactivation of TK(+)/ACV(s) HSV-1 from latency and TK(-)/ACV(r) HSV-1 is unable to reactivate from latency, the TK(-)/ACV(r) HSV-1 strain isolated herein reactivated in this patient, possibly by using the TK activity induced by the latently co-infected TK(+)/ACV(s) HSV-1.

  2. Simplex Algorithm for Deep-Level Transient Spectroscopy: Simplex-DLTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benchenane-Mehor, Halima; Benzohra, Mohamed; Idrissi-Benzohra, Malika; Olivie, François; Saÿdane, Abdelkader

    2004-11-01

    The Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm improved by Lagarias for low-dimension functions is introduced for the first time on transient capacitance signal analysis to decrease noise sensitivity and increase the resolution of deep-level transient spectroscopy method (DLTS). The application of the resolution figure of merit in predetermining the success of DLTS analyses’ ability to resolve defects has shown that the performances of the simplex-DLTS developed in this work are significantly better than those of matrix pencil-DLTS method (MP-DLTS) published in 1998. Comparing experimentally the two methods in analyzing the signals generated by the same 150 keV germanium preamorphized p+n samples, we found that the simplex-DLTS method detects six defects in which some show very close activation energy values, while the MP-DLTS method found only two defects. Hence, the superiority of the simplex-DLTS method is proved; it reveals deep levels in which the emission process is carried out in the same temperature range.

  3. A case of late herpes simplex encephalitis relapse.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Andrea; Lauria, Giuseppe; Mantero, Vittorio; Salmaggi, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Late relapse of herpes simplex encephalitis, defined as recurrence more than 3 months after the first initial encephalitic episode, is a rare condition. We describe the case of an adult patient who presented a relapse of herpes simplex encephalitis 8 years after the first episode occurred at the age of 57 years and review the literature of this topic.

  4. Role of CD137 signaling in dengue virus-mediated apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nagila, Amar; Netsawang, Janjuree; Srisawat, Chatchawan; Noisakran, Sansanee; Morchang, Atthapan; Yasamut, Umpa; Puttikhunt, Chunya; Kasinrerk, Watchara; and others

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} For the first time the role of CD137 in dengue virus (DENV) infection. {yields} Induction of DENV-mediated apoptosis by CD137 signaling. {yields} Sensitization to CD137-mediated apoptosis by dengue virus capsid protein (DENV C). {yields} Nuclear localization of DENV C is required for CD137-mediated apoptosis. -- Abstract: Hepatic dysfunction is a well recognized feature of dengue virus (DENV) infection. However, molecular mechanisms of hepatic injury are still poorly understood. A complex interaction between DENV and the host immune response contributes to DENV-mediated tissue injury. DENV capsid protein (DENV C) physically interacts with the human death domain-associated protein Daxx. A double substitution mutation in DENV C (R85A/K86A) abrogates Daxx interaction, nuclear localization and apoptosis. Therefore we compared the expression of cell death genes between HepG2 cells expressing DENV C and DENV C (R85A/K86A) using a real-time PCR array. Expression of CD137, which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, increased significantly in HepG2 cells expressing DENV C compared to HepG2 cells expressing DENV C (R85A/K86A). In addition, CD137-mediated apoptotic activity in HepG2 cells expressing DENV C was significantly increased by anti-CD137 antibody compared to that of HepG2 cells expressing DENV C (R85A/K86A). In DENV-infected HepG2 cells, CD137 mRNA and CD137 positive cells significantly increased and CD137-mediated apoptotic activity was increased by anti-CD137 antibody. This work is the first to demonstrate the contribution of CD137 signaling to DENV-mediated apoptosis.

  5. Herpes simplex virus and the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Eric A; Coyle, Walter J

    2008-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is well known as a sexually transmitted disease. However, relatively little has been published concerning the presentations and treatment of HSV infection within the gastrointestinal tract, where HSV most commonly affects the esophagus in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. HSV proctitis is not uncommon and occurs primarily in males having sex with males. In patients with normal immune systems, gastrointestinal HSV infections are generally self-limited and rarely require antiviral therapy. Treatment of infection is suggested for immunocompromised patients, though no large randomized controlled trials have been performed. This article reviews the manifestations of HSV infection within the luminal gastrointestinal tract and options for diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Herpes simplex encephalitis: some interesting presentations.

    PubMed

    Jha, S; Jose, M; Kumar, V

    2003-09-01

    Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE) is the most common cause of fatal viral encephalitis. A high index of suspicion is mandatory for early diagnosis and successful therapy to restrict morbidity and mortality. We report 4 patients of HSE, with interesting presentations, viz. brainstem involvement in an immunosuppressed patient, Kluver-Bucy Syndrome-a consequence of untreated HSE, HSE in the postpartum period mistaken as cortical venous thrombosis, and response to inadequate treatment. They demonstrate the wide spectrum of clinical features, pitfalls in diagnosis, and a variable response to therapy in HSE.

  7. Phenylphenalenones from the Australian plant Haemodorum simplex.

    PubMed

    Dias, Daniel Anthony; Goble, David James; Silva, Claudio Andres; Urban, Sylvia

    2009-06-01

    Chemical investigation of the Australian plant Haemodorum simplex resulted in the isolation of three new phenylphenalenones, haemodorone (10), haemodorol (11), and haemodorose (12), together with the previously reported compounds 5, dilatrin (6), and xiphidone (8). The first complete 2D NMR characterization for all of the compounds isolated, including several chemical shift reassignments for dilatrin (6), is reported. In addition this is one of the few reports to discuss the isolation of new phenylphenalenones from an Australian medicinal plant. The crude extract of both the bulbaceous and aerial components of the plant exhibited varying degrees of antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activity, and only the bulbs displayed potent cytotoxic activity.

  8. Preventing herpes simplex virus in the newborn.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-12-01

    Genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are very common worldwide. Approximately 22% of pregnant women are infected genitally with HSV, and most of them are unaware of this. The most devastating consequence of maternal genital herpes is HSV disease in the newborn. Although neonatal HSV infections remain uncommon, due to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with the infection, HSV infection in the newborn is often considered in the differential diagnosis of ill neonates. This review summarizes the epidemiology and management of neonatal HSV infections and discusses strategies to prevent HSV infection in the newborn.

  9. Early events in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection: photosensitivity of fluorescein isothiocyanate-treated virions

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, N.; Bzik, D.; Person, S.; Snipes, W.

    1981-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is photosensitized by treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). The inactivation of FITC-treated virions upon subsequent exposure to light is inhibited by the presence of sodium azide, suggesting the involvement of singlet oxygen in the process. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that treatment with FITC plus light induces crosslinks in viral envelope glycoproteins. Treatment of virions with high concentrations of FITC (50 ..mu..g/ml) plus light causes a reduction in the adsorption of the virus to monolayers of human embryonic lung cells. For lower concentrations of FITC (10 ..mu..g/ml) plus light, treated virions adsorb to the host cells, but remain sensitive to light until entry occurs. The loss of light sensitivity coincides with the development of resistance to antibodies. These results are most consistent with a mechanism of entry for herpes simplex virus involving fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane of the host cell.

  10. Defining nervous system susceptibility during acute and latent herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Chandra M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-03-08

    Herpes simplex viruses are neurotropic human pathogens that infect and establish latency in peripheral sensory neurons of the host. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) readily infects the facial mucosa that can result in the establishment of a latent infection in the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia (TG). From latency, HSV-1 can reactivate and cause peripheral pathology following anterograde trafficking from sensory neurons. Under rare circumstances, HSV-1 can migrate into the central nervous system (CNS) and cause Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE), a devastating disease of the CNS. It is unclear whether HSE is the result of viral reactivation within the TG, from direct primary infection of the olfactory mucosa, or from other infected CNS neurons. Areas of the brain that are susceptible to HSV-1 during acute infection are ill-defined. Furthermore, whether the CNS is a true reservoir of viral latency following clearance of virus during acute infection is unknown. In this context, this review will identify sites within the brain that are susceptible to acute infection and harbor latent virus. In addition, we will also address findings of HSV-1 lytic gene expression during latency and comment on the pathophysiological consequences HSV-1 infection may have on long-term neurologic performance in animal models and humans.

  11. Oncolytic virotherapy using herpes simplex virus: how far have we come?

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Nicolas As; Rizos, Helen; Diefenbach, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy exploits the properties of human viruses to naturally cytolysis of cancer cells. The human pathogen herpes simplex virus (HSV) has proven particularly amenable for use in oncolytic virotherapy. The relative safety of HSV coupled with extensive knowledge on how HSV interacts with the host has provided a platform for manipulating HSV to enhance the targeting and killing of human cancer cells. This has culminated in the approval of talimogene laherparepvec for the treatment of melanoma. This review focuses on the development of HSV as an oncolytic virus and where the field is likely to head in the future.

  12. Oncolytic virotherapy using herpes simplex virus: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, Nicolas AS; Rizos, Helen; Diefenbach, Russell J

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy exploits the properties of human viruses to naturally cytolysis of cancer cells. The human pathogen herpes simplex virus (HSV) has proven particularly amenable for use in oncolytic virotherapy. The relative safety of HSV coupled with extensive knowledge on how HSV interacts with the host has provided a platform for manipulating HSV to enhance the targeting and killing of human cancer cells. This has culminated in the approval of talimogene laherparepvec for the treatment of melanoma. This review focuses on the development of HSV as an oncolytic virus and where the field is likely to head in the future. PMID:27512683

  13. Enhanced Protection against Ebola Virus Mediated by an Improved Adenovirus-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kaylie N.; Croyle, Maria A.; Strong, James E.; Feldmann, Heinz; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2009-01-01

    Background The Ebola virus is transmitted by direct contact with bodily fluids of infected individuals, eliciting death rates as high as 90% among infected humans. Currently, replication defective adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine is being studied in a phase I clinical trial. Another Ebola vaccine, based on an attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus has shown efficacy in post-exposure treatment of nonhuman primates to Ebola infection. In this report, we modified the common recombinant adenovirus serotype 5-based Ebola vaccine expressing the wild-type ZEBOV glycoprotein sequence from a CMV promoter (Ad-CMVZGP). The immune response elicited by this improved expression cassette vector (Ad-CAGoptZGP) and its ability to afford protection against lethal ZEBOV challenge in mice was compared to the standard Ad-CMVZGP vector. Methodology/Principal Findings Ad-CMVZGP was previously shown to protect mice, guinea pigs and nonhuman primates from an otherwise lethal challenge of Zaire ebolavirus. The antigenic expression cassette of this vector was improved through codon optimization, inclusion of a consensus Kozak sequence and reconfiguration of a CAG promoter (Ad-CAGoptZGP). Expression of GP from Ad-CAGoptZGP was substantially higher than from Ad-CMVZGP. Ad-CAGoptZGP significantly improved T and B cell responses at doses 10 to 100-fold lower than that needed with Ad-CMVZGP. Additionally, Ad-CAGoptZGP afforded full protections in mice against lethal challenge at a dose 100 times lower than the dose required for Ad-CMVZGP. Finally, Ad-CAGoptZGP induced full protection to mice when given 30 minutes post-challenge. Conclusions/Significance We describe an improved adenovirus-based Ebola vaccine capable of affording post-exposure protection against lethal challenge in mice. The molecular modifications of the new improved vaccine also translated in the induction of significantly enhanced immune responses and complete protection at a dose 100 times lower than with the previous generation

  14. Anisakis simplex larvae: infection status in marine fish and cephalopods purchased from the Cooperative Fish Market in Busan, Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seon Hee; Kim, Jung; Jo, Jin Ok; Cho, Min Kyung; Yu, Hak Sun; Cha, Hee Jae; Ock, Mee Sun

    2011-03-01

    The infection status of marine fish and cephalopods with Anisakis simplex third stage larva (L3) was studied over a period of 1 year. A total of 2,537 specimens, which consisted of 40 species of fish and 3 species of cephalopods, were purchased from the Cooperative Fish Market in Busan, Korea, from August 2006 to July 2007. They were examined for A. simplex L3 from the whole body cavity, viscera, and muscles. A. simplex L3 were confirmed by light microscopy. The overall infection rate reached 34.3%, and average 17.1 larvae were parasitized per infected fish. Fish that recorded the highest infection rate was Lophiomus setigerus (100%), followed by Liparis tessellates (90%), Pleurogrammus azonus (90%), and Scomber japonicus (88.7%). The intensity of infection was the highest in Gadus macrocephalus (117.7 larvae per fish), followed by S. japonicus (103.9 larvae) and L. setigerus (54.2 larvae). Although abundance of A. simplex L3 was not seasonal in most of the fish species, 10 of the 16 selected species showed the highest abundance in February and April. A positive correlation between the intensity of L3 infection and the fish length was obvious in S. japonicus and G. macrocephalus. It was likely that A. simplex L3 are more frequently infected during the spring season in some species of fish. Our study revealed that eating raw or undercooked fish or cephalopods could still be a source of human infection with A. simplex L3 in Korea.

  15. Use of acyclovir for suppression of human immunodeficiency virus infection is not associated with genotypic evidence of herpes simplex virus type 2 resistance to acyclovir: analysis of specimens from three phase III trials.

    PubMed

    Watson-Jones, Deborah; Wald, Anna; Celum, Connie; Lingappa, Jairam; Weiss, Helen A; Changalucha, John; Baisley, Kathy; Tanton, Clare; Hayes, Richard J; Marshak, Joshua O; Gladden, Rula Green; Koelle, David M

    2010-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is the most common cause of genital ulcer disease and is a cofactor for HIV-1 acquisition and transmission. We analyzed specimens from three separate phase III trials of acyclovir (ACV) for prevention of HIV-1 acquisition and transmission to determine if failure of ACV to interrupt HIV acquisition and transmission was associated with genotypic ACV resistance. Acyclovir (400 mg twice daily) or placebo was provided to HSV-2-infected persons at risk of HIV-1 infection in the Mwanza and HPTN 039 trials and to persons dually infected with HSV-2 and HIV-1 who had an HIV-negative partner in the Partners in Prevention study. We extracted HSV DNA from genital ulcer swabs or cervicovaginal lavage fluids from 68 samples obtained from 64 participants randomized to ACV and sequenced the HSV-2 UL23 gene encoding thymidine kinase. The UL23 sequences were compared with published and unpublished data. Variants were observed in 38/1,128 (3.4%) nucleotide positions in the UL23 open reading frame, with 58% of these encoding amino acid changes. No deletions, insertions, or mutations known to be associated with resistance were detected. Thirty-one of the variants (81.5%) are newly reported, 15 of which code for amino acid changes. Overall, UL23 is highly polymorphic compared to other loci in HSV-2, but no drug resistance mutations were detected that could explain the failure to reduce HIV incidence or to prevent HIV-1 transmission in these studies.

  16. Inhibitors of nucleotidyltransferase superfamily enzymes suppress herpes simplex virus replication.

    PubMed

    Tavis, John E; Wang, Hong; Tollefson, Ann E; Ying, Baoling; Korom, Maria; Cheng, Xiaohong; Cao, Feng; Davis, Katie L; Wold, William S M; Morrison, Lynda A

    2014-12-01

    Herpesviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that cause serious human diseases. Herpesvirus DNA replication depends on multiple processes typically catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferase superfamily (NTS) enzymes. Therefore, we investigated whether inhibitors of NTS enzymes would suppress replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. Eight of 42 NTS inhibitors suppressed HSV-1 and/or HSV-2 replication by >10-fold at 5 μM, with suppression at 50 μM reaching ∼1 million-fold. Five compounds in two chemical families inhibited HSV replication in Vero and human foreskin fibroblast cells as well as the approved drug acyclovir did. The compounds had 50% effective concentration values as low as 0.22 μM with negligible cytotoxicity in the assays employed. The inhibitors suppressed accumulation of viral genomes and infectious particles and blocked events in the viral replication cycle before and during viral DNA replication. Acyclovir-resistant mutants of HSV-1 and HSV-2 remained highly sensitive to the NTS inhibitors. Five of six NTS inhibitors of the HSVs also blocked replication of another herpesvirus pathogen, human cytomegalovirus. Therefore, NTS enzyme inhibitors are promising candidates for new herpesvirus treatments that may have broad efficacy against members of the herpesvirus family.

  17. Behaviour disturbances during recovery from herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, R; Bhalla, A; Gordon, A; Roberts, J

    1983-01-01

    Bizarre behaviour disturbances in four patients occurring during incomplete recovery from herpes simplex encephalitis are described. Some aspects of their behaviour were similar to that originally described by Klüver and Bucy in monkeys following bilateral temporal lobectomy. Previous reports of behavioural disturbances in man after herpes simplex encephalitis are reviewed and attention drawn to the aggressive and disruptive behaviour that is often seen. With the reduced mortality in herpes simplex encephalitis in recent years it is possible that behaviour disturbances such as those described here will be seen more frequently. Images PMID:6619889

  18. Vaccinia Virus Recombinant Expressing Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D Prevents Latent Herpes in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Kenneth J.; Mackett, Michael; Wohlenberg, Charles; Notkins, Abner Louis; Moss, Bernard

    1985-05-01

    In humans, herpes simplex virus causes a primary infection and then often a latent ganglionic infection that persists for life. Because these latent infections can recur periodically, vaccines are needed that can protect against both primary and latent herpes simplex infections. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that contain the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D gene under control of defined early or late vaccinia virus promoters were constructed. Tissue culture cells infected with these recombinant viruses synthesized a glycosylated protein that had the same mass (60,000 daltons) as the glycoprotein D produced by HSV-1. Immunization of mice with one of these recombinant viruses by intradermal, subcutaneous, or intraperitoneal routes resulted in the production of antibodies that neutralized HSV-1 and protected the mice against subsequent lethal challenge with HSV-1 or HSV-2. Immunization with the recombinant virus also protected the majority of the mice against the development of a latent HSV-1 infection of the trigeminal ganglia. This is the first demonstration that a genetically engineered vaccine can prevent the development of latency.

  19. Expression of herpes simplex virus 1 microRNAs in cell culture models of quiescent and latent infection.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Igor; Hackenberg, Michael; Kim, Ju Youn; Pesola, Jean M; Everett, Roger D; Preston, Chris M; Wilson, Angus C; Coen, Donald M

    2014-02-01

    To facilitate studies of herpes simplex virus 1 latency, cell culture models of quiescent or latent infection have been developed. Using deep sequencing, we analyzed the expression of viral microRNAs (miRNAs) in two models employing human fibroblasts and one using rat neurons. In all cases, the expression patterns differed from that in productively infected cells, with the rat neuron pattern most closely resembling that found in latently infected human or mouse ganglia in vivo.

  20. Optimization using the gradient and simplex methods.

    PubMed

    Cerdà, Víctor; Cerdà, Juan Luis; Idris, Abubakr M

    2016-02-01

    Traditionally optimization of analytical methods has been conducted using a univariate method, varying each parameter one-by-one holding fixed the remaining. This means in many cases to reach only local minima and not get the real optimum. Among the various options for multivariate optimization, this paper highlights the gradient method, which involves the ability to perform the partial derivatives of a mathematical model, as well as the simplex method that does not require that condition. The advantages and disadvantages of those two multivariate optimization methods are discussed, indicating when they can be applied and the different forms that have been introduced. Different cases are described on the applications of these methods in analytical chemistry.

  1. Herpes simplex infection of the larynx requiring laryngectomy.

    PubMed

    Sims, John R; Massoll, Nicole A; Suen, James Y

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection of the larynx is an exceedingly rare clinical entity, most frequently reported in the pediatric population or in immunocompromised adults. We present a 62-year-old woman presented with neck pain, hoarseness, crepitus over the larynx, and what appeared to be a necrotic mass of the right true vocal cord on laryngoscopy. Due to near-complete destruction of the cartilaginous framework of the larynx, a total laryngectomy was performed. The final pathology report showed squamous mucosal changes consistent with herpes simplex infection, confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Though herpes simplex laryngitis is uncommon, this case shows the potential for herpes simplex to cause extensive damage and compromise airway patency when left untreated.

  2. [The lysate and recombinant antigens in ELISA-test-systems for diagnostic of herpes simplex].

    PubMed

    Ganova, L A; Kovtoniuk, G V; Korshun, L N; Kiseleva, E K; Tereshchenko, M I; Vudmaska, M I; Moĭsa, L N; Shevchuk, V A; Spivak, N Ia

    2014-08-01

    The lysate and recombinant antigens of various production included informula of ELISA-test-systems were analyzed. The ELISA-test-systems are used for detection of IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I and II. For testing the panel of serums PTH 201 (BBI Inc.) were used. The samples of this panel contain antibodies to Herpes simplex virus type I and II in mixed titers. The 69 serums of donors were used too (17 samples had IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I, 23 samples to Herpes simplex virus type II and 29 samples had no antibodies to Herpes simplex virus). The diagnostic capacity of mixture of recombinant antigens gG1 Herpes simplex virus type I and gG2 Herpes simplex virus type II (The research-and-production complex "DiaprofMed") was comparable with mixture of lysate antigen Herpes simplex virus type I and II (Membrane) EIE Antigen ("Virion Ltd."). In the test-systems for differentiation of IgG to Herpes simplex virus type I the recombinant antigen gG1 Herpes simplex virus type I proved to be comparable with commercial analogue Herpes simplex virus-1 gG1M ("Viral Therapeutics Inc."'). At the same time, capacity to detect IgG to Herpes simplex virus type II in recombinant protein gG2 Herpes simplex virus type II is significantly higher than in its analogue Herpes simplex virus-2 gG2c ("Viral Therapeutics Inc.").

  3. Novel agents and strategies to treat herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Kleymann, Gerald

    2003-02-01

    The quiet pandemic of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection has plagued humanity since ancient times, causing mucocutaneous infection, such as herpes labialis and herpes genitalis. Disease symptoms often interfere with everyday activities and occasionally HSV infections are the cause of life-threatening or sight-impairing disease, especially in neonates and the immunocompromised patient population. After primary or initial infection the virus persists for life in a latent form in neurons of the host, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently, no cure is available. In the mid-1950s the first antiviral, idoxuridine, was developed for topical treatment of herpes disease and, in 1978, vidarabine was licensed for systemic use to treat HSV encephalitis. Acyclovir (Zovirax), a potent, specific and tolerable nucleosidic inhibitor of the herpes DNA polymerase, was a milestone in the development of antiviral drugs in the late 1970s. In the mid-1990s, when acyclovir became a generic drug, valacyclovir (Valtrex) and famciclovir (Famvir), prodrugs of the gold standard and penciclovir (Denavir), Vectavir), a close analogue, were launched. Though numerous approaches and strategies were tested and considerable effort was expended in the search of the next generation of an antiherpetic therapy, it proved difficult to outperform acyclovir. Notable in this regard was the award of a Nobel Prize in 1988 for the elucidation of mechanistic principles which resulted in the development of new drugs such as acyclovir. Vaccines, interleukins, interferons, therapeutic proteins, antibodies, immunomodulators and small-molecule drugs with specific or nonspecific modes of action lacked either efficacy or the required safety profile to replace the nucleosidic drugs acyclovir, valacyclovir, penciclovir and famciclovir as the first choice of treatment. Recently though, new inhibitors of the HSV helicase-primase with potent in vitro

  4. Cervical cancer: is herpes simplex virus type II a cofactor?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C

    1995-01-01

    In many ways, cervical cancer behaves as a sexually transmitted disease. The major risk factors are multiple sexual partners and early onset of sexual activity. Although high-risk types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) play an important role in the development of nearly all cases of cervical cancer, other sexually transmitted infectious agents may be cofactors. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is transmitted primarily by sexual contact and therefore has been implicated as a risk factor. Several independent studies suggest that HSV-2 infections correlate with a higher than normal incidence of cervical cancer. In contrast, other epidemiological studies have concluded that infection with HSV-2 is not a major risk factor. Two separate transforming domains have been identified within the HSV-2 genome, but continued viral gene expression apparently is not necessary for neoplastic transformation. HSV infections lead to unscheduled cellular DNA synthesis, chromosomal amplifications, and mutations. These observations suggest that HSV-2 is not a typical DNA tumor virus. It is hypothesized that persistent or abortive infections induce permanent genetic alterations that interfere with differentiation of cervical epithelium and subsequently induce abnormal proliferation. Thus, HSV-2 may be a cofactor in some but not all cases of cervical cancer. PMID:8665469

  5. Higher Throughput Quantification of Neutralizing Antibody to Herpes Simplex Viruses.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Tamara P; Mitchell, Michelle C; Korom, Maria; Wang, Hong; Yu, Yinyi; Morrison, Lynda A; Belshe, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    We report a rapid, higher throughput method for measuring neutralizing antibody to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in human sera. Clinical isolates and sera from the Herpevac Trial for Women were used in a colorimetric assay in which infection of tissue culture (lack of neutralization) was indicated by substrate metabolism by beta-galactosidase induced in the ELVIS cell line. The neutralization assay was optimized by addition of guinea pig complement, which particularly enhanced neutralizing antibody titers to HSV-2. Higher neutralizing antibody titers were also achieved using virus particles isolated from the supernatant of infected cells rather than lysate of infected cells as the source of virus. The effect of assay incubation time and incubation time with substrate were also optimized. We found that incubating with substrate until a standard optical density of 1.0 was reached permitted a better comparison among virus isolates, and achieved reliable measurement of neutralizing antibody activity. Interestingly, in contrast to results in the absence of complement, addition of complement allowed sera from HSV-2 gD-vaccinated subjects to neutralize HSV-1 and HSV-2 clinical and laboratory isolates with equal potency.

  6. Herpes simplex virus type 1-derived recombinant and amplicon vectors.

    PubMed

    Fraefel, Cornel; Marconi, Peggy; Epstein, Alberto L

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153 kbp double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes (1) the two approaches most commonly used to prepare recombinant vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria, and (2) the two methodologies currently used to generate helper-free amplicon vectors, either using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based approach or a Cre/loxP site-specific recombination strategy.

  7. Prospects and perspectives for development of a vaccine against herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Shane C; Schleiss, Mark R

    2014-11-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 are human pathogens that lead to significant morbidity and mortality in certain clinical settings. The development of effective antiviral medications, however, has had little discernible impact on the epidemiology of these pathogens, largely because the majority of infections are clinically silent. Decades of work have gone into various candidate HSV vaccines, but to date none has demonstrated sufficient efficacy to warrant licensure. This review examines developments in HSV immunology and vaccine development published since 2010, and assesses the prospects for improved immunization strategies that may result in an effective, licensed vaccine in the near future.

  8. Mycosis inhibits cannibalism by Melanoplus sanguinipes, M. differentialis, Schistocerca americana, and Anabrus simplex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cannibalism is common among the Acrididae and the Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex, a tettigonid. These behaviors have been proposed as mechanisms for the horizontal transmission of Microsporida and entomopathogenic fungi. After anecdotal observations that Melanoplus sanguinipes and A. simplex did ...

  9. 75 FR 59611 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY: Food and... corrects the regulation classifying herpes simplex virus (HSV) serological assays by removing the...

  10. Efficient revised simplex method for SVM training.

    PubMed

    Sentelle, Christopher; Anagnostopoulos, Georgios C; Georgiopoulos, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Existing active set methods reported in the literature for support vector machine (SVM) training must contend with singularities when solving for the search direction. When a singularity is encountered, an infinite descent direction can be carefully chosen that avoids cycling and allows the algorithm to converge. However, the algorithm implementation is likely to be more complex and less computationally efficient than would otherwise be required for an algorithm that does not have to contend with the singularities. We show that the revised simplex method introduced by Rusin provides a guarantee of nonsingularity when solving for the search direction. This method provides for a simpler and more computationally efficient implementation, as it avoids the need to test for rank degeneracies and also the need to modify factorizations or solution methods based upon those rank degeneracies. In our approach, we take advantage of the guarantee of nonsingularity by implementing an efficient method for solving the search direction and show that our algorithm is competitive with SVM-QP and also that it is a particularly effective when the fraction of nonbound support vectors is large. In addition, we show competitive performance of the proposed algorithm against two popular SVM training algorithms, SVMLight and LIBSVM.

  11. Vaccines for herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Koelle, David M

    2006-02-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2) can have serious medical consequences. Although antiviral medications can suppress symptomatic disease, asymptomatic shedding and transmission, they neither cure nor alter the natural history of HSV infections. Manipulation of the immune response is one potential method to decrease disease burden. Current research on prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination approaches is discussed in this review, with a focus on compounds that have entered clinical trials or that display novel compositions or proposed mechanisms of action. One such vaccine is an alum and monophosphoryl lipid A-adjuvanted subunit glycoprotein D2 vaccine that has demonstrated activity in the prevention of HSV-2 infection and disease in HSV-uninfected women in a phase III clinical trial. Further confirmatory clinical trials of this vaccine are currently underway. Other vaccine formats also in development include attenuated live or replication-incompetent HSV-2 strains and technologies that target virus-specific CD8 T-cell responses.

  12. Experimental investigation of herpes simplex virus latency.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, E K; Bloom, D C

    1997-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of herpes simplex virus infection generally involve a mild and localized primary infection followed by asymptomatic (latent) infection interrupted sporadically by periods of recrudescence (reactivation) where virus replication and associated cytopathologic findings are manifest at the site of initial infection. During the latent phase of infection, viral genomes, but not infectious virus itself, can be detected in sensory and autonomic neurons. The process of latent infection and reactivation has been subject to continuing investigation in animal models and, more recently, in cultured cells. The initiation and maintenance of latent infection in neurons are apparently passive phenomena in that no virus gene products need be expressed or are required. Despite this, a single latency-associated transcript (LAT) encoded by DNA encompassing about 6% of the viral genome is expressed during latent infection in a minority of neurons containing viral DNA. This transcript is spliced, and the intron derived from this splicing is stably maintained in the nucleus of neurons expressing it. Reactivation, which can be induced by stress and assayed in several animal models, is facilitated by the expression of LAT. Although the mechanism of action of LAT-mediated facilitation of reactivation is not clear, all available evidence argues against its involving the expression of a protein. Rather, the most consistent models of action involve LAT expression playing a cis-acting role in a very early stage of the reactivation process. PMID:9227860

  13. Striated muscle involvement in experimental oral infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, María Inés; Sanjuan, Norberto A

    2013-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is one of the most frequent causes of oral infection in humans, especially during early childhood. Several experimental models have been developed to study the pathogenesis of this virus but all of them employed adult animals. In this work, we developed an experimental model that uses mice younger than 4 days old, to more closely resemble human infection. Mice were infected subcutaneously with the prototype strain McIntyre of Herpes simplex-1, and the progression of infection was studied by immunoperoxidase. All animals died within 24-72 h post-infection, while viral antigens were found in the oral epithelium, nerves and brain. The most striking result was the finding of viral antigens in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells belonging to striated muscles. Organotypic cultures of striated muscles were performed, and viral replication was observed in them by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy and viral isolation. We conclude that the infection of striated muscles is present from the onset of oral infection and, eventually, could explain some clinical observations in humans.

  14. Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0498 TITLE: Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the...August 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engineered Herpes Simplex Viruses for the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...for each blot. Glyco-protein D is produced at extraordinarily high levels by our herpes simplex virus, and thus, it is quite common in herpes simplex

  15. Prevention of type 2 herpes simplex virus induced cervical carcinoma in mice by prior immunization with a vaccine prepared from type 1 herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, M H; Dong, C Y; Liu, Z H; Skinner, G R; Hartley, C E

    1983-12-01

    Repeated intra-vaginal inoculation of mice with inactivated type 2 herpes simplex virus induced cervical carcinoma in approximately 50% of mice. Prior immunization with subunit vaccine Ac NFU1(S-) BHK reduced the frequency of cervical carcinoma to 19%. Inoculation of mice with a control preparation of uninfected cell extract never induced preinvasive or invasive cervical cancer. There was evidence of an antibody response in every vaccinated and/or innoculated animal. Mice developing cervical cancer had a significantly higher antibody titre to type 2 herpes virus than mice not developing cancer. These results are in general accord with sero-epidemiological studies of preinvasive and invasive cervical carcinoma in human subjects and suggests that this experimental model may be appropriate for further investigation of prevention of human cervical cancer by vaccination.

  16. Oncolytic virus therapy using genetically engineered herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Genetically engineered, conditionally replicating herpes simplex viruses type 1 (HSV-1) are promising therapeutic agents for cancer. They can replicate in situ, spread, and exhibit oncolytic activity via a direct cytocidal effect. In addition, oncolytic HSV-1 can transfer and express foreign genes in host cells. The phase I clinical study with G207, a double-mutated HSV-1, in recurrent malignant glioma patients has shown that oncolytic HSV-1 can be safely administered into human brains. The therapeutic benefits of oncolytic HSV-1 depend on the extent of both intratumoral viral replication and induction of host antitumor immune responses. We develop new-generation oncolytic HSV-1 by enhancing these properties while retaining the safety features. G47delta was created from G207 by introducing another genetic mutation. Compared with G207, G47delta showed 1) better stimulation of human antitumor immune cells, 2) better growth properties leading to higher virus yields and increased cytopathic effect in vitro, 3) better antitumor efficacy in both immuno-competent and -incompetent animals, and 4) preserved safety in the brain of HSV-1-sensitive mice. Preparation is under way for a clinical trial using G47delta in progressive glioblastoma patients. G47delta is also suited as a backbone vector for expressing foreign molecules. Using bacterial artificial chromosome and two DNA recombinases, we have created an "armed" oncolytic HSV-1 generation system that allows insertion of transgene(s) into the genome of G47delta in a rapid and accurate manner. We found that expression of immunostimulatory molecules can significantly enhance the antitumor efficacy of G47delta. Based on these advances, we anticipate that oncolytic virus therapy using oncolytic HSV-1 will soon be established as an important modality of cancer treatment.

  17. Prefixation of Simplex Pairs in Czech: An Analysis of Spatial Semantics, Distributive Verbs, and Procedural Meanings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilchey, Christian Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation examines prefixation of simplex pairs. A simplex pair consists of an iterative imperfective and a semelfactive perfective verb. When prefixed, both of these verbs are perfective. The prefixed forms derived from semelfactives are labeled single act verbs, while the prefixed forms derived from iterative imperfective simplex verbs…

  18. 76 FR 48715 - Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ...; Reclassification of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological Assay Device AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... the herpes simplex virus (HSV) serological assay device type, which is classified as class II (special... tests to identify antibodies to herpes simplex virus in serum, and the devices that consist of...

  19. 75 FR 59670 - Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ...; Reclassification of the Herpes Simplex Virus Serological Assay Device AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... controls for the herpes simplex virus (HSV) serological assay device type, which is classified as class II... serological tests to identify antibodies to herpes simplex virus in serum, and the devices that consist...

  20. Investigation of a sub-unit vaccine using an animal model of herpes simplex keratitis.

    PubMed

    Harney, B A; Easty, D L; Skinner, G R

    1983-01-01

    A rabbit and a mouse model of herpes simplex eye disease have been used to evaluate a sub-unit herpes simplex vaccine. Various immunization schedules were investigated. The vaccine was found to stimulate humoral and cellular immune responses and to offer protection against corneal infection with liver herpes simplex virus.

  1. Occurrence of Anisakis simplex sensu stricto in imported Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) represents a risk for Turkish consumers.

    PubMed

    Pekmezci, Gokmen Zafer

    2014-08-18

    Anisakid larvae are a prevalent food-borne pathogen that has been found in numerous fish species destined for human consumption. The accidental consumption of infected raw or poorly cooked fish may cause gastroenteric diseases and allergies in humans. In spite of the fact that thorough cooking or freezing kills Anisakis worms, this method does not destroy their allergenic capacity. The presence of A. simplex (s.s.) in seafood products may present a health risk for consumers. In Turkey, Atlantic mackerels are marketed as frozen and mainly imported from Norway. The aim of this study was to identify the Anisakis species found in deep-frozen whole Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) destined for human consumption in fish markets that imported fish from Norway to Turkey. All Anisakis larvae isolated from imported Atlantic mackerel were identified via morphology as third larvae of Anisakis Type I. The ITS region (ITS-1, 5.8S subunit, ITS-2) was amplified and digested with the restriction enzymes Hinf I and Hha I. Larvae of the genus Anisakis were identified via PCR-RFLP as belonging to Anisakis simplex (s.s.), and this was confirmed by sequencing the cox2 gene. The overall prevalence of Anisakis larvae was 25% (95% confidence limits: 13-41%), and the mean intensity was 19.1 (bootstrap 95% confidence limits: 15.3-25.5). Recognized zoonotic A. simplex (s.s.) larvae found in imported Atlantic mackerel could represent a risk. Those who consume them could acquire parasitic allergies. The results will have an important impact on public health risk assessment in that they suggest reviewing critical control points at the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) programmer to reduce the risk of anisakid-induced allergies among consumers. Consequently, the present study provides the first data regarding the occurrence of A. simplex (s.s.) larvae in imported Atlantic mackerel in Turkish markets.

  2. Retargeting Strategies for Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; Petrovic, Biljana; Leoni, Valerio; Gianni, Tatiana; Avitabile, Elisa; Casiraghi, Costanza; Gatta, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Most of the oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) exhibit a high safety profile achieved through attenuation. They carry defects in virulence proteins that antagonize host cell response to the virus, including innate response, apoptosis, authophagy, and depend on tumor cell proliferation. They grow robustly in cancer cells, provided that these are deficient in host cell responses, which is often the case. To overcome the attenuation limits, a strategy is to render the virus highly cancer-specific, e.g., by retargeting their tropism to cancer-specific receptors, and detargeting from natural receptors. The target we selected is HER-2, overexpressed in breast, ovarian and other cancers. Entry of wt-HSV requires the essential glycoproteins gD, gH/gL and gB. Here, we reviewed that oncolytic HSV retargeting was achieved through modifications in gD: the addition of a single-chain antibody (scFv) to HER-2 coupled with appropriate deletions to remove part of the natural receptors’ binding sites. Recently, we showed that also gH/gL can be a retargeting tool. The insertion of an scFv to HER-2 at the gH N-terminus, coupled with deletions in gD, led to a recombinant capable to use HER-2 as the sole receptor. The retargeted oncolytic HSVs can be administered systemically by means of carrier cells-forcedly-infected mesenchymal stem cells. Altogether, the retargeted oncolytic HSVs are highly cancer-specific and their replication is not dependent on intrinsic defects of the tumor cells. They might be further modified to express immunomodulatory molecules. PMID:26927159

  3. Retargeting Strategies for Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viruses.

    PubMed

    Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella; Petrovic, Biljana; Leoni, Valerio; Gianni, Tatiana; Avitabile, Elisa; Casiraghi, Costanza; Gatta, Valentina

    2016-02-26

    Most of the oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) exhibit a high safety profile achieved through attenuation. They carry defects in virulence proteins that antagonize host cell response to the virus, including innate response, apoptosis, authophagy, and depend on tumor cell proliferation. They grow robustly in cancer cells, provided that these are deficient in host cell responses, which is often the case. To overcome the attenuation limits, a strategy is to render the virus highly cancer-specific, e.g., by retargeting their tropism to cancer-specific receptors, and detargeting from natural receptors. The target we selected is HER-2, overexpressed in breast, ovarian and other cancers. Entry of wt-HSV requires the essential glycoproteins gD, gH/gL and gB. Here, we reviewed that oncolytic HSV retargeting was achieved through modifications in gD: the addition of a single-chain antibody (scFv) to HER-2 coupled with appropriate deletions to remove part of the natural receptors' binding sites. Recently, we showed that also gH/gL can be a retargeting tool. The insertion of an scFv to HER-2 at the gH N-terminus, coupled with deletions in gD, led to a recombinant capable to use HER-2 as the sole receptor. The retargeted oncolytic HSVs can be administered systemically by means of carrier cells-forcedly-infected mesenchymal stem cells. Altogether, the retargeted oncolytic HSVs are highly cancer-specific and their replication is not dependent on intrinsic defects of the tumor cells. They might be further modified to express immunomodulatory molecules.

  4. Diagnostic imaging of herpes simplex virus encephalitis using a radiolabeled antiviral drug: autoradiographic assessment in an animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Y.; Rubenstein, R.; Price, R.W.; Fox, J.J.; Watanabe, K.A.

    1984-06-01

    To develop a new approach to the diagnosis of herpes simplex encephalitis, we used a radiolabeled antiviral drug, 2'-fluoro-5-methyl-1-beta-D-arabinosyluracil labeled with carbon 14 ((14C)FMAU), as a probe for selectively imaging brain infection in a rat model by quantitative autoradiography. A high correlation was found between focal infection, as defined by immunoperoxidase viral antigen staining, and increased regional (14C)FMAU uptake in brain sections. Two potential sources of false-positive imaging were defined: high concentrations of drug in the choroid plexus because of its higher permeability compared with brain, and drug sequestration by proliferating uninfected cell populations. Our results support the soundness of the proposed strategy of using a labeled antiviral drug that is selectively phosphorylated by herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase in conjunction with scanning methods for human diagnosis, and also define some of the factors that must be taken into account when planning clinical application.

  5. Herpes simplex virus lymphadenitis: the elusive doppelganger in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Cases, Margaret; Leduc, Charles; Farmer, Patricia L; Richardson, Susan E; Zoutman, Dick E

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus has protean manifestations and is an important cause of morbidity in the immunocompromised host. We report a case of recurrent lymphadenopathy and rash in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The elusive clinical diagnosis eventually required core biopsy of a lymph node with immunohistochemistry and confirmation by polymerase chain reaction. This case illustrates the challenging clinical and laboratory diagnosis of herpes simplex virus lymphadenitis and the need to maintain a high index of suspicion for infection when treating an immunocompromised patient with unusual and/or persistent symptoms.

  6. Simplex-stochastic collocation method with improved scalability

    SciTech Connect

    Edeling, W.N.; Dwight, R.P.; Cinnella, P.

    2016-04-01

    The Simplex-Stochastic Collocation (SSC) method is a robust tool used to propagate uncertain input distributions through a computer code. However, it becomes prohibitively expensive for problems with dimensions higher than 5. The main purpose of this paper is to identify bottlenecks, and to improve upon this bad scalability. In order to do so, we propose an alternative interpolation stencil technique based upon the Set-Covering problem, and we integrate the SSC method in the High-Dimensional Model-Reduction framework. In addition, we address the issue of ill-conditioned sample matrices, and we present an analytical map to facilitate uniformly-distributed simplex sampling.

  7. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Complicated by Cerebral Hemorrhage during Acyclovir Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yukinori; Hara, Yuuta

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can be complicated by adverse events in the acute phase. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old woman with HSE complicated by cerebral hemorrhage. She presented with acute deterioration of consciousness and fever and was diagnosed with HSE based on the detection of herpes simplex virus-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid by a polymerase chain reaction. The cerebral hemorrhage developed during acyclovir therapy; however, its diagnosis was delayed for 2 days. After the conservative treatment of the cerebral hemorrhage, the patient made a near-complete recovery. Cerebral hemorrhage should be considered as an acute-phase complication of HSE. PMID:28090058

  8. SIMPLEX: simulator and postprocessor for free-electron laser experiments.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    SIMPLEX is a computer program developed for simulating the amplification process of free-electron lasers (FELs). It numerically solves the so-called FEL equations describing the evolution of the radiation field and growth of microbunching while the electron beam travels along the undulator. In order to reduce the numerical cost, the FEL equations have been reduced to more convenient forms for numerical implementation by applying reasonable approximations. SIMPLEX is equipped with a postprocessor to facilitate the retrieval of desired information from the simulation results, which is crucial for practical applications such as designing the beamline and analyzing the experimental results.

  9. SIMPLEX: simulator and postprocessor for free-electron laser experiments

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    SIMPLEX is a computer program developed for simulating the amplification process of free-electron lasers (FELs). It numerically solves the so-called FEL equations describing the evolution of the radiation field and growth of microbunching while the electron beam travels along the undulator. In order to reduce the numerical cost, the FEL equations have been reduced to more convenient forms for numerical implementation by applying reasonable approximations. SIMPLEX is equipped with a postprocessor to facilitate the retrieval of desired information from the simulation results, which is crucial for practical applications such as designing the beamline and analyzing the experimental results. PMID:26289287

  10. Primary herpes simplex virus infection mimicking cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Andrew; White, Catherine; Higgins, Stephen Peter

    2015-06-02

    We report the case of an 18-year-old woman presenting with ulceration of the cervix caused by primary type 2 herpes simplex infection in the absence of skin lesions. The differential diagnosis included cervical cancer and we referred the patient for urgent colposcopy. However, laboratory tests proved the viral aetiology of the cervical ulceration and the cervix had healed completely 3 weeks later. The case highlights the need to consider herpes simplex infection in the differential diagnosis of ulceration of the cervix even when there are no cutaneous signs of herpes.

  11. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Complicated by Cerebral Hemorrhage during Acyclovir Therapy.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yukinori; Hara, Yuuta

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can be complicated by adverse events in the acute phase. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old woman with HSE complicated by cerebral hemorrhage. She presented with acute deterioration of consciousness and fever and was diagnosed with HSE based on the detection of herpes simplex virus-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid by a polymerase chain reaction. The cerebral hemorrhage developed during acyclovir therapy; however, its diagnosis was delayed for 2 days. After the conservative treatment of the cerebral hemorrhage, the patient made a near-complete recovery. Cerebral hemorrhage should be considered as an acute-phase complication of HSE.

  12. Herpes Simplex Virus: The Interplay Between HSV, Host, and HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Desai, Dipen Vijay; Kulkarni, Smita Shrikant

    2015-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus proteins interact with host (human) proteins and create an environment conducive for its replication. Genital ulceration due to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections is an important clinical manifestation reported to increase the risk of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) acquisition and replication in HIV-1/HSV-2 coinfection. Dampening the innate and adaptive immune responses of the skin-resident dendritic cells, HSV-2 not only helps itself, but creates a "yellow brick road" for one of the most dreaded viruses HIV, which is transmitted mainly through the sexual route. Although, data from clinical trials show that HSV-2 suppression reduces HIV-1 viral load, there are hardly any reports presenting conclusive evidence on the impact of HSV-2 coinfection on HIV-1 disease progression. Be that as it may, understanding the interplay between these three characters (HSV, host, and HIV-1) is imperative. This review endeavors to collate studies on the influence of HSV-derived proteins on the host response and HIV-1 replication. Studying such complex interactions may help in designing and developing common strategies for the two viruses to keep these "partners in crime" at bay.

  13. Replication-Competent Controlled Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, David C.; Feller, Joyce; McAnany, Peterjon; Vilaboa, Nuria

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present the development and characterization of a replication-competent controlled herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). Replication-essential ICP4 and ICP8 genes of HSV-1 wild-type strain 17syn+ were brought under the control of a dually responsive gene switch. The gene switch comprises (i) a transactivator that is activated by a narrow class of antiprogestins, including mifepristone and ulipristal, and whose expression is mediated by a promoter cassette that comprises an HSP70B promoter and a transactivator-responsive promoter and (ii) transactivator-responsive promoters that drive the ICP4 and ICP8 genes. Single-step growth experiments in different cell lines demonstrated that replication of the recombinant virus, HSV-GS3, is strictly dependent on an activating treatment consisting of administration of a supraphysiological heat dose in the presence of an antiprogestin. The replication-competent controlled virus replicates with an efficiency approaching that of the wild-type virus from which it was derived. Essentially no replication occurs in the absence of activating treatment or if HSV-GS3-infected cells are exposed only to heat or antiprogestin. These findings were corroborated by measurements of amounts of viral DNA and transcripts of the regulated ICP4 gene and the glycoprotein C (gC) late gene, which was not regulated. Similar findings were made in experiments with a mouse footpad infection model. IMPORTANCE The alphaherpesviruses have long been considered vectors for recombinant vaccines and oncolytic therapies. The traditional approach uses vector backbones containing attenuating mutations that restrict replication to ensure safety. The shortcoming of this approach is that the attenuating mutations tend to limit both the immune presentation and oncolytic properties of these vectors. HSV-GS3 represents a novel type of vector that, when activated, replicates with the efficiency of a nonattenuated virus and whose safety is derived from deliberate

  14. Structural basis for the antibody neutralization of Herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Cheng-Chung; Lin, Li-Ling; Chan, Woan-Eng; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Lai, Jiann-Shiun; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2013-10-01

    The gD–E317-Fab complex crystal revealed the conformational epitope of human mAb E317 on HSV gD, providing a molecular basis for understanding the viral neutralization mechanism. Glycoprotein D (gD) of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) binds to a host cell surface receptor, which is required to trigger membrane fusion for virion entry into the host cell. gD has become a validated anti-HSV target for therapeutic antibody development. The highly inhibitory human monoclonal antibody E317 (mAb E317) was previously raised against HSV gD for viral neutralization. To understand the structural basis of antibody neutralization, crystals of the gD ectodomain bound to the E317 Fab domain were obtained. The structure of the complex reveals that E317 interacts with gD mainly through the heavy chain, which covers a large area for epitope recognition on gD, with a flexible N-terminal and C-terminal conformation. The epitope core structure maps to the external surface of gD, corresponding to the binding sites of two receptors, herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and nectin-1, which mediate HSV infection. E317 directly recognizes the gD–nectin-1 interface and occludes the HVEM contact site of gD to block its binding to either receptor. The binding of E317 to gD also prohibits the formation of the N-terminal hairpin of gD for HVEM recognition. The major E317-binding site on gD overlaps with either the nectin-1-binding residues or the neutralizing antigenic sites identified thus far (Tyr38, Asp215, Arg222 and Phe223). The epitopes of gD for E317 binding are highly conserved between two types of human herpesvirus (HSV-1 and HSV-2). This study enables the virus-neutralizing epitopes to be correlated with the receptor-binding regions. The results further strengthen the previously demonstrated therapeutic and diagnostic potential of the E317 antibody.

  15. GPU acceleration of simplex volume algorithm for hyperspectral endmember extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Haicheng; Zhang, Junping; Lin, Zhouhan; Chen, Hao; Huang, Bormin

    2012-10-01

    The simplex volume algorithm (SVA)1 is an endmember extraction algorithm based on the geometrical properties of a simplex in the feature space of hyperspectral image. By utilizing the relation between a simplex volume and its corresponding parallelohedron volume in the high-dimensional space, the algorithm extracts endmembers from the initial hyperspectral image directly without the need of dimension reduction. It thus avoids the drawback of the N-FINDER algorithm, which requires the dimension of the data to be reduced to one less than the number of the endmembers. In this paper, we take advantage of the large-scale parallelism of CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) to accelerate the computation of SVA on the NVidia GeForce 560 GPU. The time for computing a simplex volume increases with the number of endmembers. Experimental results show that the proposed GPU-based SVA achieves a significant 112.56x speedup for extracting 16 endmembers, as compared to its CPU-based single-threaded counterpart.

  16. Larvicidal constituents of Zingiber officinale (ginger) against Anisakis simplex.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rong-Jyh; Chen, Chung-Yi; Lee, June-Der; Lu, Chin-Mei; Chung, Li-Yu; Yen, Chuan-Min

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the anthelmintic activity of [10]-shogaol, [6]-shogaol, [10]-gingerol and [6]-gingerol, compounds isolated from the roots of Zingiber officinale L., Zingiberaceae (ginger), against Anisakis simplex. The above compounds kill or reduce spontaneous movement in A. simplex larvae. The maximum lethal efficacy of [10]-shogaol and [10]-gingerol was approximately 80% and 100%, respectively. We further examined the time course of compound-induced loss of mobility in A. simplex. The results showed that various concentrations of [10]-shogaol, [6]-shogaol, [10]-gingerol and [6]-gingerol have maximum effects on loss of spontaneous movement from 24 to 72 h. In addition, the time course of mortality and the percentage of loss of spontaneous movements were ascertained to determine the minimum effective doses of [10]-gingerol and [10]-shogaol. [10]-Gingerol exhibited a larger maximum larvicidal effect and greater loss of spontaneous movement than [10]-shogaol and albendazole. In addition, these constituents of Zingiber officinale showed effects against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and peroxyl radicals. These constituents of Zingiber officinale are responsible for its larvicidal activity against A. simplex.

  17. Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Antibodies in Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodu, Brad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of 125 sophomore preclinical dental students found that these young professionals, because of having a low prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies, are at risk for acquiring a primary HSV infection when treating HSV positive patients and should take precautions to avoid virus transmission. (MSE)

  18. Stability of Three-Wave Simplex Estimates of Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coenders, Germa; Saris, Willem E.; Batista-Foguet, Joan M.; Andreenkova, Anna

    1999-01-01

    Illustrates that sampling variance can be very large when a three-wave quasi simplex model is used to obtain reliability estimates. Also shows that, for the reliability parameter to be identified, the model assumes a Markov process. These problems are evaluated with both real and Monte Carlo data. (SLD)

  19. Herpes simplex virus-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Kuchynka, Petr; Palecek, Tomas; Hrbackova, Hana; Vitkova, Ivana; Simek, Stanislav; Nemecek, Eduard; Aster, Viktor; Louch, William E; Aschermann, Michael; Linhart, Ales

    2010-10-01

    Inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) represents an acquired form of dilated cardiomyopathy. Viral infection is the most common cause of DCMi. In contrast with other cardiotropic viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a very rare finding in endomyocardial biopsies of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a case of HSV-induced cardiomyopathy successfully treated with acyclovir.

  20. The N-Simplex and Its Generalizations towards Fractals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosi-Ulbl, Irena; Pagon, Dusan

    2002-01-01

    Nature is full of different crystals and many of them have shapes of regular geometric objects. Those in which the fractal structure of a geometric object can be recognized are especially unusual. In this paper a generalization of one of these shapes is described: a formation, based on an n-dimensional simplex. The construction of an n-dimensional…

  1. Nonlinear and Quasi-Simplex Patterns in Latent Growth Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianconcini, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    In the SEM literature, simplex and latent growth models have always been considered competing approaches for the analysis of longitudinal data, even if they are strongly connected and both of specific importance. General dynamic models, which simultaneously estimate autoregressive structures and latent curves, have been recently proposed in the…

  2. Argument Structure of Tsou: Simplex and Complex Predicates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Gujing

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates the argument structure of Tsou, a Formosan language within the Austronesian family. The investigation studies both simplex and complex predicates as well as describes the valency groupings and alignment patterns emerging from various clausal configurations. Assuming the stance that language description should respect…

  3. The "Other" Venereal Diseases: Herpes Simplex, Trichomoniasis and Candidiasis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNab, Warren L.

    1979-01-01

    Although the term venereal disease has been synonymous with gonorrhea and syphilis, the Center for Disease Control now states that the number of new cases of herpes simplex, trichomoniasis, and candidiasis is rapidly approaching the number of cases of syphilis and gonorrhea. (MM)

  4. Management of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection and exposure.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Swetha G; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are rare but are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Advances in diagnostic modalities to identify these infants, as well as the development of safe and effective antiviral therapy, have revolutionised the management of affected infants. This review will summarise the epidemiology of neonatal HSV infections and discuss the management of infants with HSV exposure and infection.

  5. The mortality of neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Medina, Eduardo; Cantey, Joseph B; Sánchez, Pablo J

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study characterized the clinical course of 13 neonates who died with herpes simplex virus infection from 2001 to 2011, representing a 26% case-fatality rate. Fatal disease developed at ≤ 48 hours of age in one-third of infants, was mostly disseminated disease, and occurred despite early administration of high-dose acyclovir therapy.

  6. Rad51 and Rad52 Are Involved in Homologous Recombination of Replicating Herpes Simplex Virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ka-Wei; Norberg, Peter; Holmudden, Martin; Elias, Per; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Replication of herpes simplex virus 1 is coupled to recombination, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly characterized. The role of Rad51 and Rad52 recombinases in viral recombination was examined in human fibroblast cells 1BR.3.N (wild type) and in GM16097 with replication defects caused by mutations in DNA ligase I. Intermolecular recombination between viruses, tsS and tsK, harboring genetic markers gave rise to ∼17% recombinants in both cell lines. Knock-down of Rad51 and Rad52 by siRNA reduced production of recombinants to 11% and 5%, respectively, in wild type cells and to 3% and 5%, respectively, in GM16097 cells. The results indicate a specific role for Rad51 and Rad52 in recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus 1 DNA. Mixed infections using clinical isolates with restriction enzyme polymorphisms in the US4 and US7 genes revealed recombination frequencies of 0.7%/kbp in wild type cells and 4%/kbp in GM16097 cells. Finally, tandem repeats in the US7 gene remained stable upon serial passage, indicating a high fidelity of recombination in infected cells. PMID:25365323

  7. Rad51 and Rad52 are involved in homologous recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ka-Wei; Norberg, Peter; Holmudden, Martin; Elias, Per; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Replication of herpes simplex virus 1 is coupled to recombination, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly characterized. The role of Rad51 and Rad52 recombinases in viral recombination was examined in human fibroblast cells 1BR.3.N (wild type) and in GM16097 with replication defects caused by mutations in DNA ligase I. Intermolecular recombination between viruses, tsS and tsK, harboring genetic markers gave rise to ∼17% recombinants in both cell lines. Knock-down of Rad51 and Rad52 by siRNA reduced production of recombinants to 11% and 5%, respectively, in wild type cells and to 3% and 5%, respectively, in GM16097 cells. The results indicate a specific role for Rad51 and Rad52 in recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus 1 DNA. Mixed infections using clinical isolates with restriction enzyme polymorphisms in the US4 and US7 genes revealed recombination frequencies of 0.7%/kbp in wild type cells and 4%/kbp in GM16097 cells. Finally, tandem repeats in the US7 gene remained stable upon serial passage, indicating a high fidelity of recombination in infected cells.

  8. Immunological Signaling During Herpes Simplex Virus-2 and Cytomegalovirus Vaginal Shedding After Initiation of Antiretroviral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nason, Martha C; Patel, Eshan U; Kirkpatrick, Allison R; Prodger, Jessica L; Shahabi, Kamnoosh; Tobian, Aaron A R; Gianella, Sara; Kalibbala, Sarah; Ssebbowa, Paschal; Kaul, Rupert; Gray, Ronald H; Quinn, Thomas C; Serwadda, David; Reynolds, Steven J; Redd, Andrew D

    2016-03-01

    Vaginal proinflammatory cytokine expression during herpes virus reactivation was examined in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women before and after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Vaginal swabs were screened for levels of cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and interferon-γ. The relative risk (RR) of herpes simplex virus-2 or cytomegalovirus (CMV) shedding being associated with cytokine levels above the median were estimated. Herpes simplex virus-2 shedding was significantly associated with higher levels of IL-6 (RR = 1.4, P = .003) and TNF-α (RR = 1.3, P = .010), whereas CMV shedding was associated with higher IL-6 (RR = 1.3, P = .006) and IL-2 (RR = 1.4, P = .01). The association of viral shedding with higher IL-6 levels suggests that herpes virus reactivation may be playing a role in immune activation after ART initiation.

  9. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Encephalitis in Adults: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Michael J; Venkatesan, Arun

    2016-07-01

    Herpetic infections have plagued humanity for thousands of years, but only recently have advances in antiviral medications and supportive treatments equipped physicians to combat the most severe manifestations of disease. Prompt recognition and treatment can be life-saving in the care of patients with herpes simplex-1 virus encephalitis, the most commonly identified cause of sporadic encephalitis worldwide. Clinicians should be able to recognize the clinical signs and symptoms of the infection and familiarize themselves with a rational diagnostic approach and therapeutic modalities, as early recognition and treatment are key to improving outcomes. Clinicians should also be vigilant for the development of acute complications, including cerebral edema and status epilepticus, as well as chronic complications, including the development of autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and other neuronal cell surface and synaptic epitopes. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis, and clinical and radiological features of herpes simplex virus-1 encephalitis in adults, including a discussion of the most common complications and their treatment. While great progress has been made in the treatment of this life-threatening infection, a majority of patients will not return to their previous neurologic baseline, indicating the need for further research efforts aimed at improving the long-term sequelae.

  10. Update On Emerging Antivirals For The Management Of Herpes Simplex Virus Infections: A Patenting Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D.; Vadlapatla, Ramya K.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, some drugs are associated with dose-limiting toxicities which limit their further utility. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antiherpetic compounds with different mechanisms of action which will be safe and effective against emerging drug resistant viral isolates. Significant advances have been made towards the design and development of novel antiviral therapeutics during the last decade. As evident by their excellent antiviral activities, pharmaceutical companies are moving forward with several new compounds into various phases of clinical trials. This review provides an overview of structure and life cycle of HSV, progress in the development of new therapies, update on the advances in emerging therapeutics under clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of Herpes simplex virus infections. PMID:23331181

  11. Agents and strategies in development for improved management of herpes simplex virus infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Kleymann, Gerald

    2005-02-01

    The quiet pandemic of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections has plagued humanity since ancient times, causing mucocutaneous infection such as herpes labialis and herpes genitalis. Disease symptoms often interfere with every-day activities and occasionally HSV infections are the cause of life-threatening or sight-impairing disease, especially in neonates and the immuno-compromised patient population. After infection the virus persists for life in neurons of the host in a latent form, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently no cure is available. So far, vaccines, ILs, IFNs, therapeutic proteins, antibodies, immunomodulators and small-molecule drugs with specific or non-specific modes of action lacked either efficacy or the required safety profile to replace the nucleosidic drugs acyclovir, valacyclovir, penciclovir and famciclovir as the first choice of treatment. The recently discovered inhibitors of the HSV helicase-primase are the most potent development candidates today. These antiviral agents act by a novel mechanism of action and display low resistance rates in vitro and superior efficacy in animal models. This review summarises the current therapeutic options, discusses the potential of preclinical or investigational drugs and provides an up-to-date interpretation of the challenge to establish novel treatments for herpes simplex disease.

  12. Update on emerging antivirals for the management of herpes simplex virus infections: a patenting perspective.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani D; Vadlapatla, Ramya K; Mitra, Ashim K

    2013-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can be treated efficiently by the application of antiviral drugs. The herpes family of viruses is responsible for causing a wide variety of diseases in humans. The standard therapy for the management of such infections includes acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV) with their respective prodrugs valaciclovir and famciclovir. Though effective, long term prophylaxis with the current drugs leads to development of drug-resistant viral isolates, particularly in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, some drugs are associated with dose-limiting toxicities which limit their further utility. Therefore, there is a need to develop new antiherpetic compounds with different mechanisms of action which will be safe and effective against emerging drug resistant viral isolates. Significant advances have been made towards the design and development of novel antiviral therapeutics during the last decade. As evident by their excellent antiviral activities, pharmaceutical companies are moving forward with several new compounds into various phases of clinical trials. This review provides an overview of structure and life cycle of HSV, progress in the development of new therapies, update on the advances in emerging therapeutics under clinical development and related recent patents for the treatment of Herpes simplex virus infections.

  13. The Function of Herpes Simplex Virus Genes: A Primer for Genetic Engineering of Novel Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roizman, Bernard

    1996-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus vectors are being developed for delivery and expression of human genes to the central nervous system, selective destruction of cancer cells, and as carriers for genes encoding antigens that induce protective immunity against infectious agents. Vectors constructed to meet these objectives must differ from wild-type virus with respect to host range, reactivation from latency, and expression of viral genes. The vectors currently being developed are (i) helper free amplicons, (ii) replication defective viruses, and (iii) genetically engineered replication competent viruses with restricted host range. Whereas the former two types of vectors require stable, continuous cell lines expressing viral genes for their replication, the replication competent viruses will replicate on approved primary human cell strains.

  14. [Herpes simplex virus vaccine studies: from past to present].

    PubMed

    Us, Dürdal

    2006-10-01

    The dramatical increase in the prevalence of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections and the significant physical and psychosocial morbidity of HSV type 2 infections, generate the need for an efficacious HSV vaccine. The most important properties of HSVs that should be targeted for a successful vaccine are neuronal invasion, latency and reactivation in spite of specific host immune responses. The major expectation for an ideal HSV vaccine candidate is to induce sterilizing immunity, which must be effective at all portals of HSV entry; to prevent or reduce the symptomatic disease and to eliminate or at least to limit the asymptomatic viral shedding. The first vaccine studies have began in the 1920s and in the intervening eight decades there have been many attempts to develop an effective one. Although encouraging findings came from experiments in various animal models, human studies have been disappointing, unfortunately. The vaccine strategies that have undergone clinical evaluation until today included autoinoculation of live HSV, whole inactivated vaccines, attenuated live virus vaccines, modified live virus subunit vaccines, cell culture-derived subunit vaccines, recombinant subunit (glycoprotein) vaccines, DISC (Disabled Infectious Single Cycle) virus vaccines, viral vectors and naked DNA vaccines. In most of the clinical studies the failure of HSV vaccines in spite of inducing very high levels of specific neutralizing antibodies have emphasized that cell-mediated immune response, especially Thl type immunity is important in preventing both primary disease and recurrences with HSV, rather than humoral response. The most hopeful result was obtained with HSV-2 gD and alum/MPL vaccine in clinical studies. This vaccine was found 74% effective in preventing genital disease in HSV seronegative women but was not effective in men or seropositive women. In recent years it is possible to genetically engineer HSV to produce a vaccine strain that is protective without

  15. Enhanced viral production and virus-mediated mortality of bacterioplankton in a natural iron-fertilized bloom event above the Kerguelen Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malits, A.; Christaki, U.; Obernosterer, I.; Weinbauer, M. G.

    2014-07-01

    Above the Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean natural iron fertilization sustains a large phytoplankton bloom over three months during austral summer. During the KEOPS1 project (KErguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study1) we sampled this phytoplankton bloom during its declining phase along with the surrounding HNLC waters to study the effect of natural iron fertilization on the role of viruses in the microbial food web. Bacterial and viral abundances were 1.7 and 2.1 times, respectively, higher within the bloom than in HNLC waters. Viral production and virus-mediated mortality of bacterioplankton was 4.1 and 4.9 times, respectively, higher in the bloom, while the fraction of infected cells (FIC) and the fraction of lysogenic cells (FLC) showed no significant differences between environments. The present study suggests viruses to be more important for bacterial mortality within the bloom and dominate over protozoan grazing during the late bloom phase. As a consequence, at least at a late bloom stage, viral lysis shunts part of the photosynthetically fixed carbon in iron-fertilized regions into the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool with potentially less particulate organic carbon transfered to larger members of the food web or exported.

  16. Enhanced viral production and virus-mediated mortality of bacterioplankton in a natural iron-fertilized bloom event above the Kerguelen Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malits, A.; Christaki, U.; Obernosterer, I.; Weinbauer, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Above the Kerguelen Plateau in the Southern Ocean natural iron fertilization sustains a large phytoplankton bloom over 3 months during austral summer. During the KEOPS1 project (KErguelen Ocean and Plateau compared Study1) we sampled this phytoplankton bloom during its declining phase along with the surrounding high-nutrient-low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters to study the effect of natural iron fertilization on the role of viruses in the microbial food web. Bacterial and viral abundances were 1.7 and 2.1 times, respectively, higher within the bloom than in HNLC waters. Viral production and virus-mediated mortality of bacterioplankton were 4.1 and 4.9 times, respectively, higher in the bloom, while the fraction of infected cells (FIC) and the fraction of lysogenic cells (FLC) showed no significant differences between environments. The present study suggests viruses to be more important for bacterial mortality within the bloom and dominate over grazing of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNFs) during the late bloom phase. As a consequence, at least at a late bloom stage, viral lysis shunts part of the photosynthetically fixed carbon in iron-fertilized regions into the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool with potentially less particulate organic carbon transferred to larger members of the food web or exported.

  17. Methylenedioxy- and methoxyflavones from Melicope coodeana syn. Euodia simplex.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Henrik T; Larsen, Michael D; Nielsen, Merete W; Adsersen, Anne; Olsen, Carl Erik; Strasberg, Dominique; Smitt, Ulla W; Jaroszewski, Jerzy W

    2002-08-01

    Three new natural products, 3,8-dimethoxy-5,7-dihydroxy-3',4'-methylenedioxyflavone, 3,6,8-trimethoxy-5,7-dihydroxy-3',4'-methylenedioxyflavone and 3,6,8,3',4'-pentamethoxy-5,7-dihydroxyflavone were isolated from Melicope coodeana syn. Euodia simplex (Rutaceae) along with 3,6,3'-trimethoxy-5,7,4'-trihydroxyflavone and 3,3'-dimethoxy-5,7,4'-trihydroxyflavone. The structural assignments are based on (1)H and (13)C NMR data, including discussion of the chemical shifts of C-2 in 3,5-dihydroxy- and 3-methoxy-5-hydroxyflavones. The presence of highly methoxylated and methylenedioxyflavones is characteristic of the genus Melicope, and the present findings support the recent transfer of Euodia simplex to Melicope.

  18. Gerstmann's syndrome following an acute herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ilchevsky, S; Boev, I; Kazakova, T

    1998-01-01

    The authors present a rare clinical case of a woman who developed Gerstmann's syndrome following an acute Herpes simplex viral encephalitis. Clinical observation and laboratory evaluation were performed during the acute phase of the disease. After that the follow-up continued for one-year period. The localization of the pathologic process was determined by computerized tomography, conducted periodically. The characteristics of the clinical picture are interpreted in the context of the contemporary concepts of the topical diagnosis of Gerstmann's syndrome. The possibility of a sudden onset of acute Herpes simplex viral encephalitis without a preceding febrile-intoxication syndrome is worth noting. Conclusions are drawn stressing the need of an early etiologic treatment and the importance of the rehabilitation activities during the convalescence period.

  19. Oral Manifestations and Dental Management of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, Lisa; Sanabe, Mariane Emi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a group of hereditary chronic disorders, characterized by fragility of the skin and mucous membranes in response to minor mechanical trauma. The objective of this study was to report the case of a young girl diagnosed with epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), transmitted by an autosomal dominant gene. Cutaneous findings included blisters and dystrophy following minimal friction. Recurrent blisters and vesicle formation on the hard palate were the main oral findings. In conclusion, publications concerning the oral and clinical manifestations of EBS are important for providing knowledge and an early multidisciplinary approach that prevents blister formation and improves these patients’ quality of life, with the dentist playing an important role in oral health management. How to cite this article: Scheidt L, Sanabe ME, Diniz MB. Oral Manifestations and Dental Management of Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):239-241. PMID:26604545

  20. Pediatric herpes simplex virus encephalitis: a retrospective multicenter experience.

    PubMed

    Schleede, Lena; Bueter, Wolfgang; Baumgartner-Sigl, Sara; Opladen, Thomas; Weigt-Usinger, Katharina; Stephan, Susanne; Smitka, Martin; Leiz, Steffen; Kaiser, Olaf; Kraus, Verena; van Baalen, Andreas; Skopnik, Heino; Hartmann, Hans; Rostasy, Kevin; Lücke, Thomas; Schara, Ulrike; Häusler, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge on pediatric herpes simplex virus encephalitis is limited. Here we summarize 6 neonates and 32 children diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction (n = 37) or serological studies (n = 1), respectively. Diagnosis was difficult, as only 15 patients presented neurologic symptoms. Moreover, cerebrospinal fluid glucose, protein, and leukocytes were normal in 6 patients. Subsequently, all but 2 showed neurologic symptoms. Diffusion-weighted neuroimaging was the most sensitive early imaging method. Despite acyclovir treatment, 8 patients experienced early relapses, showing movement abnormalities, impaired vigilance, and seizures. Diffuse white matter changes, found in 3 of 5 relapse patients on neuroimaging, and a negative cerebrospinal fluid herpes simplex virus polymerase chain reaction suggested inflammatory processes. All relapse patients were again treated with acyclovir, and 3 responded to additional corticosteroid treatment. Whereas outcome after relapses was poor, overall outcome was good. No child died; 14 were asymptomatic at discharge, and neuroimaging remained normal in 7 of 30 patients studied.

  1. A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0434 TITLE: A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex ...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER A Fusogenic Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for Therapy of Advanced Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER...oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) can significantly enhance the anti-tumor effect of the virus. Three specific aims have been proposed and they are: 1

  2. The Broader Autism Phenotype in Simplex and Multiplex Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdts, Jennifer A.; Bernier, Raphael; Dawson, Geraldine; Estes, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Mothers, fathers, and siblings from 87 multiplex (M-mothers, M-fathers, and M-siblings) and 41 simplex (S-mothers, S-fathers, and S-siblings) Autism spectrum disorder families were assessed using the Broader Phenotype Autism Symptom Scale. S-mothers, S-fathers, and S-siblings showed more social interest and were more expressive in their use of…

  3. Relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis resulting in Kluver-Bucy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ku, Bon D; Yoon, Sung Sang

    2011-01-01

    Relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) rarely occurs after acyclovir treatment. We treated a patient with relapsing HSE of the contralateral temporal lobe, resulting in Klüver-Bucy syndrome, after a full-dose acyclovir treatment. This case suggests that physicians should consider sudden behavioral and emotional changes after HSE treatment as a possible indication of relapsing HSE, as well as possible temporal lobe epilepsy, and the need to administer longer acyclovir treatment for select patients.

  4. Burning mouth syndrome due to herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Choe, Alexander; Traktinskiy, Igor; Gilden, Don

    2015-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterised by chronic orofacial burning pain. No dental or medical cause has been found. We present a case of burning mouth syndrome of 6 months duration in a healthy 65-year-old woman, which was associated with high copy numbers of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA in the saliva. Her pain resolved completely after antiviral treatment with a corresponding absence of salivary HSV-1 DNA 4 weeks and 6 months later.

  5. Unusual Clinical Presentation and Role of Decompressive Craniectomy in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Kumar, Nuthan; Vyas, Sameer; Vasishta, Rakesh Kumar; Aggarwal, Ashish

    2015-08-01

    Decompressive craniectomy in pediatric central nervous infections with refractory intracranial hypertension is less commonly practiced. We describe improved outcome of decompressive craniectomy in a 7-year-old boy with severe herpes simplex encephalitis and medically refractory intracranial hypertension, along with a brief review of the literature. Timely recognition of refractory intracranial hypertension and surgical decompression in children with herpes simplex encephalitis can be life-saving. Additionally, strokelike atypical presentations are being increasingly recognized in children with herpes simplex encephalitis and should not take one away from the underlying herpes simplex encephalitis.

  6. Seronegative Herpes simplex Associated Esophagogastric Ulcer after Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Matevossian, Edouard; Doll, Dietrich; Weirich, Gregor; Burian, Maria; Knebel, Carolin; Thorban, Stefan; Hüser, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex infection is characterized by acute or subacute infection, often followed by a chronic carrier state. Consecutive recurrences may flare up if immunocompromise occurs. Herpes simplex associated esophagitis or duodenal ulcer have been reported in immunocompromised patients due to neoplasm, HIV/AIDS or therapeutically induced immune deficiency. Here we report the case of an HSV-DNA seronegative patient who developed grade III dysphagia 13 days after allogeneic liver transplantation. Endoscopy revealed an esophageal-gastric ulcer, and biopsy histopathology showed a distinct fibroplastic and capillary ulcer pattern highly suspicious for viral infection. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed a distinct nuclear positive anti-HSV reaction. Antiviral therapy with acyclovir and high-dose PPI led to a complete revision of clinical symptoms within 48 h. Repeat control endoscopy after 7 days showed complete healing of the former ulcer site at the gastroesophageal junction. Although the incidence of post-transplantation Herpes simplex induced gastroesophageal disease is low, the viral HSV ulcer may be included into a differential diagnosis if dysphagia occurs after transplantation even if HSV-DNA PCR is negative. PMID:21490847

  7. MOTIVATION INTERNALIZATION AND SIMPLEX STRUCTURE IN SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY.

    PubMed

    Ünlü, Ali; Dettweiler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    Self-determination theory, as proposed by Deci and Ryan, postulated different types of motivation regulation. As to the introjected and identified regulation of extrinsic motivation, their internalizations were described as "somewhat external" and "somewhat internal" and remained undetermined in the theory. This paper introduces a constrained regression analysis that allows these vaguely expressed motivations to be estimated in an "optimal" manner, in any given empirical context. The approach was even generalized and applied for simplex structure analysis in self-determination theory. The technique was exemplified with an empirical study comparing science teaching in a classical school class versus an expeditionary outdoor program. Based on a sample of 84 German pupils (43 girls, 41 boys, 10 to 12 years old), data were collected using the German version of the Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire. The science-teaching format was seen to not influence the pupils' internalization of identified regulation. The internalization of introjected regulation differed and shifted more toward the external pole in the outdoor teaching format. The quantification approach supported the simplex structure of self-determination theory, whereas correlations may disconfirm the simplex structure.

  8. MONSS: A multi-objective nonlinear simplex search approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapotecas-Martínez, Saúl; Coello Coello, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a novel methodology for dealing with continuous box-constrained multi-objective optimization problems (MOPs). The proposed algorithm adopts a nonlinear simplex search scheme in order to obtain multiple elements of the Pareto optimal set. The search is directed by a well-distributed set of weight vectors, each of which defines a scalarization problem that is solved by deforming a simplex according to the movements described by Nelder and Mead's method. Considering an MOP with n decision variables, the simplex is constructed using n+1 solutions which minimize different scalarization problems defined by n+1 neighbor weight vectors. All solutions found in the search are used to update a set of solutions considered to be the minima for each separate problem. In this way, the proposed algorithm collectively obtains multiple trade-offs among the different conflicting objectives, while maintaining a proper representation of the Pareto optimal front. In this article, it is shown that a well-designed strategy using just mathematical programming techniques can be competitive with respect to the state-of-the-art multi-objective evolutionary algorithms against which it was compared.

  9. A next step in adeno-associated virus-mediated gene therapy for neurological diseases: regulation and targeting

    PubMed Central

    Chtarto, Abdelwahed; Bockstael, Olivier; Tshibangu, Terence; Dewitte, Olivier; Levivier, Marc; Tenenbaum, Liliane

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors mediating long term transgene expression are excellent gene therapy tools for chronic neurological diseases. While rAAV2 was the first serotype tested in the clinics, more efficient vectors derived from the rh10 serotype are currently being evaluated and other serotypes are likely to be tested in the near future. In addition, aside from the currently used stereotaxy-guided intraparenchymal delivery, new techniques for global brain transduction (by intravenous or intra-cerebrospinal injections) are very promising. Various strategies for therapeutic gene delivery to the central nervous system have been explored in human clinical trials in the past decade. Canavan disease, a genetic disease caused by an enzymatic deficiency, was the first to be approved. Three gene transfer paradigms for Parkinson's disease have been explored: converting L-dopa into dopamine through AADC gene delivery in the putamen; synthesizing GABA through GAD gene delivery in the overactive subthalamic nucleus and providing neurotrophic support through neurturin gene delivery in the nigro-striatal pathway. These pioneer clinical trials demonstrated the safety and tolerability of rAAV delivery in the human brain at moderate doses. Therapeutic effects however, were modest, emphasizing the need for higher doses of the therapeutic transgene product which could be achieved using more efficient vectors or expression cassettes. This will require re-addressing pharmacological aspects, with attention to which cases require either localized and cell-type specific expression or efficient brain-wide transgene expression, and when it is necessary to modulate or terminate the administration of transgene product. The ongoing development of targeted and regulated rAAV vectors is described. PMID:23331189

  10. Herpes simplex virus NV1020 as a novel and promising therapy for hepatic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kaitlyn J; Wong, Joyce; Fong, Yuman

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with hepatic malignancy have a dismal prognosis with standard therapies. NV1020 is an oncolytic herpes simplex virus that has potential to be a safe and effective therapeutic agent for this disease. Objective We set out to discuss the development of NV1020 as an oncolytic agent and explore the potential role of this particular virus in the setting of human hepatic cancer. Methods The scope of this review includes an overview of preclinical experience with NV1020, as well as an examination of current standard and developing therapies for liver cancer. The primary focus, however, is on the safety and potential clinical efficacy of NV1020 against hepatic malignancy. Results/conclusion We have found that NV1020 is a safe, novel therapeutic agent for treatment of refractory hepatic malignancy. PMID:18549346

  11. Understanding natural herpes simplex virus immunity to inform next-generation vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Sandgren, Kerrie J; Bertram, Kirstie; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2016-01-01

    Incremental advances in our knowledge of how natural immune control of herpes simplex virus (HSV) develops have yielded insight as to why previous vaccine attempts have only been partially successful, however, our understanding of these pathways, particularly in humans, is still incomplete. Further elucidation of the innate immune events that are responsible for stimulating these effector responses is required to accurately inform vaccine design. An enhanced understanding of the mechanism of action of novel adjuvants will also facilitate the rational choice of adjuvant to optimise such responses. Here we review the reasons for the hitherto partial HSV vaccine success and align these with our current knowledge of how natural HSV immunity develops. In particular, we focus on the innate immune response and the role of dendritic cells in inducing protective T-cell responses and how these pathways might be recapitulated in a vaccine setting. PMID:27525067

  12. Recognition of herpes simplex viruses: toll-like receptors and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yijie; He, Bin

    2014-03-20

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are human pathogens that establish lytic and latent infections. Reactivation from latency occurs intermittently, which represents a lifelong source of recurrent infection. In this complex process, HSV triggers and neutralizes innate immunity. Therefore, a dynamic equilibrium between HSV and the innate immune system determines the outcome of viral infection. Detection of HSV involves pathogen recognition receptors that include Toll-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors, and cytosolic DNA sensors. Moreover, innate components or pathways exist to sense membrane fusion upon viral entry into host cells. Consequently, this surveillance network activates downstream transcription factors, leading to the induction of type I interferon and inflammatory cytokines. Not surprisingly, with the capacity to establish chronic infection HSV has evolved strategies that modulate or evade innate immunity. In this review, we describe recent advances pertinent to the interplay of HSV and the induction of innate immunity mediated by pathogen recognition receptors or pathways.

  13. Polyhydroxylated sulfated steroids derived from 5α-cholestanes as antiviral agents against herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Carlos A; Sepúlveda, Claudia S; Richmond, Victoria; Maier, Marta S; Damonte, Elsa B

    2016-07-01

    Twelve polyhydroxylated sulfated steroids synthesized from a 5α-cholestane skeleton with different substitutions in C-2, C-3 and C-6 were evaluated for cytotoxicity and antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV) by a virus plaque reduction assay. Four compounds elicited a selective inhibitory effect against HSV. The disodium salt of 2β,3α-dihydroxy-6E-hydroximine-5α-cholestane-2,3-disulfate, named compound 7, was the most effective inhibitor of HSV-1, HSV-2 and pseudorabies virus (PrV) strains, including acyclovir-resistant variants, in human and monkey cell lines. Preliminary mechanistic studies demonstrated that compound 7 did not affect the initial steps of virus entry but inhibited a subsequent event in the infection process of HSV.

  14. Ocular herpes simplex virus: how are latency, reactivation, recurrent disease and therapy interrelated?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dujaili, Lena J; Clerkin, Patrick P; Clement, Christian; McFerrin, Harris E; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Varnell, Emily D; Kaufman, Herbert E; Hill, James M

    2012-01-01

    Most humans are infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 in early childhood and remain latently infected throughout life. While most individuals have mild or no symptoms, some will develop destructive HSV keratitis. Ocular infection with HSV-1 and its associated sequelae account for the majority of corneal blindness in industrialized nations. Neuronal latency in the peripheral ganglia is established when transcription of the viral genome is repressed (silenced) except for the latency-associated transcripts and microRNAs. The functions of latency-associated transcripts have been investigated since 1987. Roles have been suggested relating to reactivation, establishment of latency, neuronal protection, antiapoptosis, apoptosis, virulence and asymptomatic shedding. Here, we review HSV-1 latent infections, reactivation, recurrent disease and antiviral therapies for the ocular HSV diseases. PMID:21861620

  15. Activity of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) essential oil against L3 larvae of Anisakis simplex.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Rincón, Carlota; Langa, Elisa; Murillo, Paula; Valero, Marta Sofía; Berzosa, César; López, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Nematicidal activity of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil, commonly known as tea tree oil (TTO), was assayed in vitro against L3 larvae of Anisakis simplex. The results showed a mortality of 100% for concentrations between 7 and 10 μL/mL after 48 h of incubation, obtaining an LD50 value of 4.53 μL/mL after 24 hours and 4.27 μL/mL after 48 hours. Concentration-dependent inhibition of acetylcholinesterase was observed for tea tree essential oil showing inhibition values of 100% at 100 μL/mL. This fact suggests that TTO may act as an AChE inhibitor. Terpinen-4-ol was discarded as main larvicide compound as it did not show larvicidal or anticholinesterase activity. The data obtained suggest that the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia may have a great therapeutic potential for the treatment of human anisakiasis.

  16. Occupational generalised urticaria and allergic airborne asthma due to anisakis simplex.

    PubMed

    Scala, E; Giani, M; Pirrotta, L; Guerra, E C; Cadoni, S; Girardelli, C R; De Pità, O; Puddu, P

    2001-01-01

    Anisakis simplex (AS), a fish and cephalopodes parasite, may cause allergic reactions in humans on eating and/or handling contaminated fish. We present a case of occupational hypersensitivity to AS in a woman employed in a frozen-fish factory. She showed both generalised urticarial rash and asthmatic symptoms after work place exposure. All these symptoms immediately disappeared after work place exposure was ceased. The presence of a positive skin prick test and high specific IgE values confirmed a hypersensitivity to anisakis. This is the first case reported of both occupational generalised urticaria and allergic airborne asthma due to AS in the same patient. We suggest that AS could be an important cause of occupational asthma and/or urticaria in the fish industry.

  17. Restarting Lytic Gene Transcription at the Onset of Herpes Simplex Virus Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Anna R; Wilson, Angus C

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) establishes a latent reservoir in neurons of human peripheral nerves. In this quiescent state, the viral genome persists as a circular, histone-associated episome, and transcription of viral lytic cycle genes is largely suppressed through epigenetic processes. Periodically, latent virus undergoes reactivation whereby lytic genes are activated and viral replication occurs. In this Gem, we review recent evidence that mechanisms governing the initial transcription of lytic genes are distinct from those of de novo infection and directly link reactivation to neuronal stress response pathways. We also discuss evidence that lytic cycle gene expression can be uncoupled from the full reactivation program, arguing for a less sharply bimodal definition of latency.

  18. Structure of the transporter associated with antigen processing trapped by herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Michael L; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Chen, Jue

    2016-12-09

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter essential to cellular immunity against viral infection. Some persistent viruses have evolved strategies to inhibit TAP so that they may go undetected by the immune system. The herpes simplex virus for example evades immune surveillance by blocking peptide transport with a small viral protein ICP47. In this study, we determined the structure of human TAP bound to ICP47 by electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) to 4.0 Å. The structure shows that ICP47 traps TAP in an inactive conformation distinct from the normal transport cycle. The specificity and potency of ICP47 inhibition result from contacts between the tip of the helical hairpin and the apex of the transmembrane cavity. This work provides a clear molecular description of immune evasion by a persistent virus. It also establishes the molecular structure of TAP to facilitate mechanistic studies of the antigen presentation process.

  19. Latent acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1 in trigeminal ganglia of immunocompetent individuals.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Monique; van Loenen, Freek B; Meesters, Roland J W; de Graaf, Miranda; Remeijer, Lies; Luider, Theo M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2012-05-15

    Specific mutations within the hypervariable herpes simplex virus (HSV) gene thymidine kinase (TK) gene lead to acyclovir (ACV) resistance. To uncover the existence of latent ACV-resistant (ACV(R)) HSV-1, we determined the genetic and functional variability of the HSV-1 TK gene pool in paired trigeminal ganglia (TG) of 5 immunocompetent individuals. The latent virus pool consisted of a donor-specific HSV-1 quasispecies, including one major ACV-sensitive (ACV(S)) and multiple phylogenetic-related minor ACV(S) and ACV(R) TK variants. Contrary to minor variants, major TK variants were shared between paired TG. The data demonstrate the coexistence of phylogenetic-related ACV(S) and ACV(R) latent HSV-1 in human TG.

  20. Vaccine potential of a herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant with an essential glycoprotein deleted.

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, H E; McLean, C S; Harley, C; Efstathiou, S; Inglis, S; Minson, A C

    1994-01-01

    Several approaches to the production of vaccines to human herpesviruses have been proposed. Subunit vaccines, subunits delivered by live vectors, and rationally attenuated vaccines have all been shown to be efficacious in animal models but suffer from uncertainties as to the roles of individual genes involved in pathogenesis and the most relevant components of the immune response required for protection in humans and the target antigens involved. With these problems in mind, we examined the vaccine potential of a fully disabled herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant that is capable of only a single round of replication, since a virus of this type should induce the full spectrum of immune responses but has no pathogenic potential. A virus has been described which lacks essential glycoprotein H (gH) and can be propagated in a cell line which supplies gH in trans (A. Forrester, H. Farrell, G. Wilkinson, J. Kaye, N. Davis-Poynter, and T. Minson, J. Virol. 66:341-348, 1992). Infection of normal cells with this mutant is indistinguishable from a wild-type infection, except that the resulting progeny are gH negative and noninfectious: the virus is self-limiting. Infection of mice by the ear pinna route was similarly self-limiting in that input infectivity decreased rapidly at the inoculation site and no infectivity was detected in sensory ganglia. Animals given a wide range of doses of the gH-negative mutant produced both humoral and T-cell responses to herpes simplex virus type 1 and proved solidly resistant to challenge with a high dose of wild-type virus. The gH-negative mutant is presumably capable of establishing a latent infection, but since no infectious virus was detected in numerous attempts to reactivate the mutant, the risk of a pathogenic outcome is minimal. Images PMID:8289395

  1. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevents type I diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Goudy, K; Campbell-Thompson, M; Wasserfall, C; Scott-Jorgensen, M; Wang, J; Tang, Q; Crawford, J M; Ellis, T M; Atkinson, M A; Flotte, T R

    2004-01-01

    Type I diabetes results from an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Although the exact immunologic processes underlying this disease are unclear, increasing evidence suggests that immunosuppressive, immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory agents can interrupt the progression of the disease. Alpha 1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) that also displays a wide range of anti-inflammatory properties. To test the ability of AAT to modulate the development of type I diabetes, we performed a series of investigations involving recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV)-mediated gene delivery of human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) to nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Recombinant AAV-expressing hAAT (rAAV2-CB-AT) was administered intramuscularly to 4-week-old female NOD mice (1 x 10(10) i.u./mouse). A single injection of this vector reduced the intensity of insulitis, the levels of insulin autoantibodies, and the frequency of overt type I diabetes (30% (3/10) at 32 weeks of age versus 70% (7/10) in controls). Transgene expression at the injection sites was confirmed by immunostaining. Interestingly, antibodies against hAAT were present in a majority of the vector-injected mice and circulating hAAT was undetectable when assessed 10 weeks postinjection. This study suggests a potential therapeutic role for AAT in preventing type I diabetes as well as the ability of AAV gene therapy-based approaches to ameliorate disease effectively.

  2. Correction of multiple striated muscles in murine Pompe disease through adeno-associated virus-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Young, Sarah P; Li, Ping; Di, Chunhui; Brown, Talmage; Salva, Maja Z; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Yan, Zhen; Auten, Richard; Hauschka, Stephen D; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2008-08-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease; MIM 232300) stems from the deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase; EC 3.2.1.20), which primarily involves cardiac and skeletal muscles. An adeno-associated virus 2/8 (AAV2/8) vector containing the muscle creatine kinase (MCK) (CK1) reduced glycogen content by approximately 50% in the heart and quadriceps in GAA-knockout (GAA-KO) mice; furthermore, an AAV2/8 vector containing the hybrid alpha-myosin heavy chain enhancer-/MCK enhancer-promoter (MHCK7) cassette reduced glycogen content by >95% in heart and >75% in the diaphragm and quadriceps. Transduction with an AAV2/8 vector was higher in the quadriceps than in the gastrocnemius. An AAV2/9 vector containing the MHCK7 cassette corrected GAA deficiency in the distal hindlimb, and glycogen accumulations were substantially cleared by human GAA (hGAA) expression therein; however, the analogous AAV2/7 vector achieved much lower efficacy. Administration of the MHCK7-containing vectors significantly increased striated muscle function as assessed by increased Rotarod times at 18 weeks after injection, whereas the CK1-containing vector did not increase Rotarod performance. Importantly, type IIb myofibers in the extensor digitalis longus (EDL) were transduced, thereby correcting a myofiber type that is unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy. In summary, AAV8 and AAV9-pseudotyped vectors containing the MHCK7 regulatory cassette achieved enhanced efficacy in Pompe disease mice.

  3. Comparison of washing and swabbing procedures for collecting genital fluids to assess cervicovaginal shedding of herpes simplex virus type 2 DNA.

    PubMed

    Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Ozouaki, Francis; Legoff, Jérôme; Mbopi-Kéou, François-Xavier; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Onas, Isabelle Ndombi; Avoune, Evelyne; Bélec, Laurent

    2003-06-01

    Asymptomatic genital shedding of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) DNA was evidenced by real-time PCR in 25 (13.2%) of 188 cervicovaginal lavage samples and in only 13 (6.9%) paired cervicovaginal samples from 188 HSV-2-seropositive, nonpregnant childbearing-aged human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative women living in Gabon. These observations demonstrate that cervicovaginal washing is more suitable than endocervicovaginal swabbing for detecting and quantifying HSV-2 DNA by PCR in female genital secretions.

  4. Virus-mediated release of endosomal content in vitro: different behavior of adenovirus and rhinovirus serotype 2

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Endosomal penetration by nonenveloped viruses might be accomplished by either local breakdown of the endosomal membrane (e.g., adenovirus) or formation of a membrane-spanning pore by capsid proteins. Uncoating of the nonenveloped virus human rhinovirus serotype 2 (HRV2) has been shown to occur from late endosomes and to be entirely dependent on the acidic pH in this compartment (Prchla, E., E. Kuechler, D. Blaas, and R. Fuchs. 1994. J. Virol. 68: 3713-3723). To investigate further the mechanism of uncoating of HRV2, an in vitro assay was established to test viruses or virus-derived peptides for their capacity to release cointernalized biotin-dextran of different molecular mass (10 and 70 kD) from isolated endosomes. The suitability of the assay was demonstrated by use of a fusogenic peptide derived from influenza virus hemagglutinin (GALA-INF3). Whereas adenovirus induced a low pH- dependent release of up to 46% of the internalized biotin-dextran and did not show any significant size selectivity (as expected for endosome disruption), HRV2 mediated release of 27% of the 10 kD dextran and only traces of the 70-kD dextran. Similarly, GALA-INF3-induced release of biotin-dextran was also size dependent. The potential role of the capsid protein VP1 in HRV2 uncoating in vivo was also substantiated in our in vitro system using an amphipathic, NH2-terminal peptide of VP1. Taken together, these data favor the model of a specific pore-forming mechanism for HRV2 uncoating which is in contrast to the membrane- disrupting mechanism of adenovirus. PMID:7559769

  5. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase is dispensable for virus-mediated liver and skin tumor development in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tung; Xu, Jianliang; Chikuma, Shunsuke; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Pfister, Herbert; Honjo, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Maki

    2014-07-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) not only promotes immune diversity by initiating somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes but also provokes genomic instability by introducing translocations and mutations into non-immunoglobulin genes. To test whether AID is essential for virus-induced tumor development, we used two transgenic tumor models: mice expressing hepatitis C virus (HCV) core proteins (HCV-Tg), driven by the hepatitis B virus promoter, and mice expressing human papillomavirus type 8 proteins (HPV8-Tg), driven by the Keratin 14 promoter. Both strains were analyzed in the absence and presence of AID by crossing each with AID (-/-) mice. There was no difference in the liver tumor frequency between the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) and HCV-Tg/AID (-/-) mice at 20 months of age although the AID (+/+) mice showed more severe histological findings and increased cytokine expression. Furthermore, a low level of AID transcript was detected in the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) liver tissue that was not derived from hepatocytes themselves but from intra-hepatic immune cells. Although AID may not be the direct cause of HCV-induced oncogenesis, AID expressed in B cells, not in hepatocytes, may prolong steatosis and cause increased lymphocyte infiltration into HCV core protein-induced liver lesions. Similarly, there was no difference in the time course of skin tumor development between the HPV8-Tg/AID (-/-) and HPV8-Tg/AID (+/+) groups. In conclusion, AID does not appear to be required for tumor development in the two virus-induced tumor mouse models tested although AID expressed in infiltrating B cells may promote inflammatory reactions in HCV core protein-induced liver pathogenesis.

  6. Role for the αV Integrin Subunit in Varicella-Zoster Virus-Mediated Fusion and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arvin, Ann M.; Oliver, Stefan L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is an alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella and herpes zoster. Membrane fusion is essential for VZV entry and the distinctive syncytium formation in VZV-infected skin and neuronal tissue. Herpesvirus fusion is mediated by a complex of glycoproteins gB and gH-gL, which are necessary and sufficient for VZV to induce membrane fusion. However, the cellular requirements of fusion are poorly understood. Integrins have been implicated to facilitate entry of several human herpesviruses, but their role in VZV entry has not yet been explored. To determine the involvement of integrins in VZV fusion, a quantitative cell-cell fusion assay was developed using a VZV-permissive melanoma cell line. The cells constitutively expressed a reporter protein and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to knock down the expression of integrin subunits shown to be expressed in these cells by RNA sequencing. The αV integrin subunit was identified as mediating VZV gB/gH-gL fusion, as its knockdown by shRNAs reduced fusion levels to 60% of that of control cells. A comparable reduction in fusion levels was observed when an anti-αV antibody specific to its extracellular domain was tested in the fusion assay, confirming that the domain was important for VZV fusion. In addition, reduced spread was observed in αV knockdown cells infected with the VZV pOka strain relative to that of the control cells. This was demonstrated by reductions in plaque size, replication kinetics, and virion entry in the αV subunit knockdown cells. Thus, the αV integrin subunit is important for VZV gB/gH-gL fusion and infection. IMPORTANCE Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a highly infectious pathogen that causes chickenpox and shingles. A common complication of shingles is the excruciating condition called postherpetic neuralgia, which has proven difficult to treat. While a vaccine is now available, it is not recommended for immunocompromised individuals and its efficacy decreases with the

  7. Anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activities of the wild edible cruciferous: Diplotaxis simplex.

    PubMed

    Jdir, Hamida; Khemakham, Bassem; Najjaa, Hanen; Chakroun, Mouna; Jridi, Mourad; Ben Arfa, Abdelkarim; Ben Ali, Yassine; Zouari, Nacim

    2016-10-01

    Context The present study deals with new biological properties of the wild edible Diplotaxis simplex (Viv.) Spreng (Brassicaceae). Objectives The current study evaluates the antioxidant, the anti-inflammatory and the anti-cancer properties of ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts from D. simplex flowers. Materials and methods The anti-proliferative activity of the extracts (10-70 μg/mL) was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) against human colon cancer cell line Caco-2. The anti-inflammatory potential was evaluated by the inhibitory effect of the extracts (1.5-7.5 mg/mL) on phospholipase A2 activity as well as on carrageenan-induced paw oedema in mice. Extracts (200 mg/kg) or indomethacin (50 mg/kg) as positive control were injected intraperitoneally for albino mice prior to the induction of the oedema by carrageenan. Antioxidant activities were investigated using various complementary methods. Results Flower extracts contained a high level of polyphenolics (17.10-52.70 mg GAE/g) and flavonoids (74.20-100.60 mg QE/g), which correlate with its appreciable antioxidant potential in β-carotene peroxidation (IC50 value: 12.50-27.10 μg/mL), DPPH(•) radical-scavenging (IC50 value: 0.20-0.40 mg/mL), Fe(3+ )reducing (EC50 value: 0.10-0.14 mg/mL) and Fe(2+ )chelating (IC50 value: 0.20-0.60 mg/mL) assays. These extracts were effective in inhibiting cancer cell growth (IC50 value: 62.0-63.25 μg/mL). Besides, the ethyl acetate extract inhibited phospholipase A2 activity (IC50 value: 2.97 mg/mL) and reduced the paw oedema in mice (from 0.38 ± 0.01 to 0.24 ± 0.01 cm), 4 h post-carrageenan challenge. Conclusion These data suggest that D. simplex may be useful as a candidate in the treatment of inflammation and the colon cancer.

  8. Anisakis/Ascaris IgE ratio improves specificity for the diagnosis of Anisakis simplex sensitization in travellers and immigrants.

    PubMed

    Carballeda-Sangiao, N; Rodríguez-Mahillo, A I; Puente, S; Gutiérrez, M T; Moneo, I; González-Muñoz, M

    2014-10-01

    Anisakis simplex is a fish parasite responsible for human infection and is able to induce IgE-mediated reactions with several clinical manifestations. Laboratory diagnosis of Anisakis allergy is based on the detection of specific IgE using parasite whole antigen. Unfortunately, these diagnostic tools detect cross-reactivities with other nematodes and micro-organisms leading to low specificity of the diagnostic tests. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the diagnostic value of specific IgE to Anisakis for diagnosis of A. simplex-sensitization in native Spanish residents (IMM, n=766) and subjects coming from tropical and sub-tropical geographic areas (TRO, n=233). Since Ascaris is the human parasite most closely related to Anisakis, specific IgE to Ascaris was also determined to assess Anisakis cross-reaction with other nematodes and the diagnostic value of Anisakis/Ascaris IgE ratio for Anisakis allergy was examined. IMM and TRO groups showed similar specific IgE to Anisakis levels, while TRO had higher levels of specific IgE to Ascaris than IMM group (p=0.001). ROC curve analysis determined that an Anisakis specific IgE threshold of 0.71 kU/L yielded 93% and 82% specificities in IMM and TRO groups, respectively. A cut-off value ≥4.4 for Anisakis/Ascaris IgE ratio increased specificity to 95% for samples having IgE to Ascaris ≥0.35. In conclusion, the ratio of specific IgE to Anisakis and Ascaris improved remarkably the specificity and this parameter easily obtained from the commercially available system could be useful in the diagnosis of hypersensitivity to A. simplex.

  9. MicroRNA-19b-3p Modulates Japanese Encephalitis Virus-Mediated Inflammation via Targeting RNF11

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Usama; Zhu, Bibo; Ye, Jing; Wan, Shengfeng; Nie, Yanru; Chen, Zheng; Cui, Min; Wang, Chong; Duan, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Huanchun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) can invade the central nervous system and consequently induce neuroinflammation, which is characterized by profound neuronal cell damage accompanied by astrogliosis and microgliosis. Albeit microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as major regulatory noncoding RNAs with profound effects on inflammatory response, it is unknown how astrocytic miRNAs regulate JEV-induced inflammation. Here, we found the involvement of miR-19b-3p in regulating the JEV-induced inflammatory response in vitro and in vivo. The data demonstrated that miR-19b-3p is upregulated in cultured cells and mouse brain tissues during JEV infection. Overexpression of miR-19b-3p led to increased production of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5, after JEV infection, whereas knockdown of miR-19b-3p had completely opposite effects. Mechanistically, miR-19b-3p modulated the JEV-induced inflammatory response via targeting ring finger protein 11, a negative regulator of nuclear factor kappa B signaling. We also found that inhibition of ring finger protein 11 by miR-19b-3p resulted in accumulation of nuclear factor kappa B in the nucleus, which in turn led to higher production of inflammatory cytokines. In vivo silencing of miR-19b-3p by a specific antagomir reinvigorates the expression level of RNF11, which in turn reduces the production of inflammatory cytokines, abrogates gliosis and neuronal cell death, and eventually improves the survival rate in the mouse model. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-19b-3p positively regulates the JEV-induced inflammatory response. Thus, miR-19b-3p targeting may constitute a thought-provoking approach to rein in JEV-induced inflammation. IMPORTANCE Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is one of the major causes of acute encephalitis in humans worldwide. The pathological features of JEV-induced encephalitis are inflammatory reactions and

  10. JPLEX: Java Simplex Implementation with Branch-and-Bound Search for Automated Test Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Ryoungsun; Kim, Jiseon; Dodd, Barbara G.; Chung, Hyewon

    2011-01-01

    JPLEX, short for Java simPLEX, is an automated test assembly (ATA) program. It is a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) solver written in Java. It reads in a configuration file, solves the minimization problem, and produces an output file for postprocessing. It implements the simplex algorithm to create a fully relaxed solution and…

  11. Association between Psychopathic Disorder and Serum Antibody to Herpes Simplex Virus (Type 1)

    PubMed Central

    Cleobury, J. F.; Skinner, G. R. B.; Thouless, M. E.; Wildy, P.

    1971-01-01

    The sera of a small of patients has been examined for herpes simplex virus antibody. Three clinically-defined groups of patients were compared: (a) aggressive psychopaths, (b) psychiatric controls, and (c) general hospital patients. The first group had an unusually high average kinetic neutralization constant against type 1 herpes simplex virus. PMID:5543996

  12. Association between psychopathic disorder and serum antibody to herpes simplex virus (type 1).

    PubMed

    Cleobury, J F; Skinner, G R; Thouless, M E; Wildy, P

    1971-02-20

    The sera of a small of patients has been examined for herpes simplex virus antibody. Three clinically-defined groups of patients were compared: (a) aggressive psychopaths, (b) psychiatric controls, and (c) general hospital patients. The first group had an unusually high average kinetic neutralization constant against type 1 herpes simplex virus.

  13. Grover's disease secondarily infected with herpes simplex virus and Staphylococcus aureus: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Bunce, Penelope Am; Stanford, Duncan G

    2013-11-01

    The case of a 73-year old man with herpes simplex and staphylococcus aureus infection complicating established Grover's disease is presented. This was treated successfully with valaciclovir. While reports of bacterial and herpetic infections complicating other acantholytic diseases, such as Darier's disease, have been published previously, only one publication to date shows herpes simplex infection in Grover's disease.

  14. Herpes simplex virus reactivation after subtotal hemispherectomy in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tracie; Bingaman, William; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Tuxhorn, Ingrid; Goldfarb, Johanna

    2010-12-01

    We report herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) in a toddler after a subtotal hemispherectomy for seizures related to HSE 16 months earlier. Herpes simplex virus reactivation in the cerebrospinal fluid shortly after treatment of HSE has been described, but is extremely rare in other situations. HSE reactivation is a potential complication of epilepsy surgery after HSE in children.

  15. Central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection in afebrile children with seizures.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Indrajit; Hartley-McAndrew, Michelle E; Weinstock, Arie L

    2012-04-01

    Central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection is suspected in patients presenting with acute-onset seizures and lethargy. The potential neurologic sequelae from untreated herpes infection can prompt empirical acyclovir therapy, even in afebrile subjects. The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection in children presenting with afebrile seizures and to assess the need for empirical acyclovir therapy. Clinical and laboratory data of children with acute-onset afebrile seizures and children with central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection were compared. Polymerase chain reaction and viral cultures of the cerebrospinal fluid for herpes simplex virus infection were negative in all subjects with afebrile seizures; 32.7% of these subjects were empirically treated with acyclovir. In conclusion, central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection is uncommon in children presenting with afebrile seizures, and acyclovir therapy is rarely necessary in subjects with normal neurologic examination and cerebrospinal fluid analysis.

  16. Simplex GPS and InSAR Inversion Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnellan, Andrea; Parker, Jay W.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Pierce, Marlon E.

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the shape of the Earth's surface can be routinely measured with precisions better than centimeters. Processes below the surface often drive these changes and as a result, investigators require models with inversion methods to characterize the sources. Simplex inverts any combination of GPS (global positioning system), UAVSAR (uninhabited aerial vehicle synthetic aperture radar), and InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar) data simultaneously for elastic response from fault and fluid motions. It can be used to solve for multiple faults and parameters, all of which can be specified or allowed to vary. The software can be used to study long-term tectonic motions and the faults responsible for those motions, or can be used to invert for co-seismic slip from earthquakes. Solutions involving estimation of fault motion and changes in fluid reservoirs such as magma or water are possible. Any arbitrary number of faults or parameters can be considered. Simplex specifically solves for any of location, geometry, fault slip, and expansion/contraction of a single or multiple faults. It inverts GPS and InSAR data for elastic dislocations in a half-space. Slip parameters include strike slip, dip slip, and tensile dislocations. It includes a map interface for both setting up the models and viewing the results. Results, including faults, and observed, computed, and residual displacements, are output in text format, a map interface, and can be exported to KML. The software interfaces with the QuakeTables database allowing a user to select existing fault parameters or data. Simplex can be accessed through the QuakeSim portal graphical user interface or run from a UNIX command line.

  17. RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type 1 isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda Perse da; Lopes, Juliana Freitas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RNA interference to inhibit herpes simplex virus type-1 replication in vitro. For herpes simplex virus type-1 gene silencing, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 gene (sequence si-UL 39-1, si-UL 39-2, and si-UL 39-3) were used, which encode the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an essential enzyme for DNA synthesis. Herpes simplex virus type-1 was isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions from infected patients. All mucocutaneous lesions' samples were positive for herpes simplex virus type-1 by real-time PCR and by virus isolation; all herpes simplex virus type-1 from saliva samples were positive by real-time PCR and 50% were positive by virus isolation. The levels of herpes simplex virus type-1 DNA remaining after siRNA treatment were assessed by real-time PCR, whose results demonstrated that the effect of siRNAs on gene expression depends on siRNA concentration. The three siRNA sequences used were able to inhibit viral replication, assessed by real-time PCR and plaque assays and among them, the sequence si-UL 39-1 was the most effective. This sequence inhibited 99% of herpes simplex virus type-1 replication. The results demonstrate that silencing herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 expression by siRNAs effectively inhibits herpes simplex virus type-1 replication, suggesting that siRNA based antiviral strategy may be a potential therapeutic alternative.

  18. The inactivation of herpes simplex virus by some Solanaceae glycoalkaloids.

    PubMed

    Thorne, H V; Clarke, G F; Skuce, R

    1985-12-01

    The infectivity of herpes simplex virus Type I in tissue culture was inhibited by prior incubation with aqueous suspensions of glycoalkaloids in order of activity alpha-chaconine greater than alpha-tomatine greater than alpha-solasonine but not by the corresponding aglycones, solanidine, tomatidine and solasodine. However, inhibition was not only dependent on the presence of a sugar moiety since the glycone alpha-solanine was inactive under the conditions used. The glycones, but not the aglycones, showed cytopathic effects on cellular membranes of Vero cells and erythrocytes; therefore, it is suggested that inactivation of virus results from insertion of the glycones into the viral envelope.

  19. Celiac Crisis Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Linz, Christopher M.; Tsay, Julie L.; Jin, Ming; El-Dika, Samer S.

    2016-01-01

    Celiac crisis is a rare presentation of celiac disease that is characterized by life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, and diarrhea. Triggers for celiac crisis include major surgeries, pancreatitis, and infections of cytomegalovirus, and salmonella. A 24-year-old woman presented with celiac crisis associated with severe herpes simplex virus (HSV) esophagitis. This case demonstrates that nutritional deficiencies seen in celiac disease can result in a relative immunodeficiency, which may lead to other infectious complications. Additionally, early recognition of celiac crisis is imperative as the metabolic derangements may be life-threatening, and therapy with gluten restriction and nutritional repletion is effective. PMID:27921058

  20. Fulminant herpes simplex hepatitis in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed Central

    Shlien, R D; Meyers, S; Lee, J A; Dische, R; Janowitz, H D

    1988-01-01

    A 16 year old girl with ulcerative colitis developed hepatitis with a high fever, leukopenia and a marked rise in serum transaminases without jaundice. There were no skin, oral, or genital lesions. Liver biopsy was precluded by abnormalities in coagulation. Postmortem examination of the liver by light and electron microscopy, culture, immunoperoxidase and immunofluorescent staining confirmed the diagnosis of hepatitis due to type 1 herpes simplex virus. Despite the rarity, this viral aetiology should be included in the differential diagnosis of all patients with severe hepatitis. The absence of mucocutaneous lesions should not exclude the diagnosis, especially when other clinical features are compatible. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3345937

  1. Herpes Simplex Virus Oncolytic Therapy for Pediatric Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gregory K; Pressey, Joseph G; Reddy, Alyssa T; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2009-01-01

    Despite improving survival rates for children with cancer, a subset of patients exist with disease resistant to traditional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. These patients require newer, targeted treatments used alone or in combination with more traditional approaches. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) is one of these newer therapies that offer promise for several difficult to treat pediatric malignancies. The potential benefit of HSV therapy in pediatric solid tumors including brain tumors, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas is reviewed along with the many challenges that need to be addressed prior to moving oncolytic HSV therapy from the laboratory to the beside in the pediatric population. PMID:19367259

  2. Luxury perfusion phenomenon in acute herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Uesugi, M; Igeta, Y; Kondo, S; Sun, X; Hirai, S

    1995-02-01

    In a patient with acute herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis, positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated increased cerebral blood flow in the affected temporal lobe accompanied by reduction in the cerebral oxygen extraction fraction and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, i.e., luxury perfusion. Follow-up PET studies showed reduction in cerebral perfusion until it was more closely coupled with oxygen metabolism after the resolution of the acute inflammation. These findings support previous single photon emission computed tomographic data and provide a pathophysiological background for the occurrence of hyperperfusion in HSV encephalitis. This is an interesting example of the luxury perfusion phenomenon occurring in a disease other than cerebral ischemia.

  3. Herpes simplex infection in a juvenile orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus).

    PubMed

    Kik, Maria J L; Bos, Jan H; Groen, Jan; Dorrestein, Gerry M

    2005-03-01

    A juvenile orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus) died after 8 days of diarrhea and vomiting. Necropsy showed petechial hemorrhages in the skin, the myocardium, and the peritoneal membranes. The lungs were hyperemic and edematous, and the liver and spleen were enlarged. Histologic changes consisted of interstitial pneumonia, hepatitis, and splenic hyperplasia. Numerous eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies were visible in pulmonary epithelial cells, hepatocytes, and splenic endothelial cells. Electron microscopic examination revealed herpesvirus in hepatocyte nuclei. Polymerase chain reaction of liver tissue demonstrated the presence of a herpes simplex virus-1.

  4. Neonatal herpes simplex virus infection: epidemiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) are highly prevalent viruses capable of establishing lifelong infection. Genital herpes in women of childbearing age represents a major risk for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HSV infection, with primary and first-episode genital HSV infections posing the highest risk. The advent of antiviral therapy with parenteral acyclovir has led to significant improvement in neonatal HSV disease mortality. Further studies are needed to improve the clinician's ability to identify infants at increased risk for HSV infection and prevent MTCT, and to develop novel antiviral agents with increased efficacy in infants with HSV infection.

  5. Herpes simplex virus oncolytic therapy for pediatric malignancies.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Gregory K; Pressey, Joseph G; Reddy, Alyssa T; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey

    2009-07-01

    Despite improving survival rates for children with cancer, a subset of patients exist with disease resistant to traditional therapies such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. These patients require newer, targeted treatments used alone or in combination with more traditional approaches. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) is one of these newer therapies that offer promise for several difficult to treat pediatric malignancies. The potential benefit of HSV therapy in pediatric solid tumors including brain tumors, neuroblastomas, and sarcomas is reviewed along with the many challenges that need to be addressed prior to moving oncolytic HSV therapy from the laboratory to the beside in the pediatric population.

  6. The interaction between herpes simplex virus 1 genome and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) as a hallmark of the entry in latency

    PubMed Central

    Lomonte, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen that establishes latency in the nucleus of infected neurons in the PNS and the CNS. At the transcriptional level latency is characterized by a quasi-complete silencing of the extrachromosomal viral genome that otherwise expresses more than 80 genes during the lytic cycle. In neurons, latency is anticipated to be the default transcriptional program; however, limited information exists on the molecular mechanisms that force the virus to enter the latent state. Our recent study demonstrates that the interaction of the viral genomes with the nuclear architecture and specifically the promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) is a major determinant for the entry of HSV-1 into latency (Maroui MA, Callé A et al. (2016). Latency entry of herpes simplex virus 1 is determined by the interaction of its genome with the nuclear environment. PLoS Pathogens 12(9): e1005834.). PMID:28357326

  7. Anisakis simplex s.l. parasitization in mackerel (Scomber japonicus) caught in the North of Morocco--prevalence and analysis of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Abattouy, Naima; Valero, Adela; Benajiba, Mohamed Hassan; Lozano, Josefa; Martín-Sánchez, Joaquina

    2011-11-01

    Consumption of mackerel (Scomber japonicus) is very widespread in Morocco, where its production is an important economic pillar. We investigated the prevalence of infection by Anisakis spp. in mackerel caught in Moroccan waters, analyzing infection risk factors. The prevalence was generally higher in fish from the Atlantic (67.9%) than from the Mediterranean (57.0%), but they did not differ in the mean abundance, intensity, or prevalence of muscle parasitization. A. pegreffii was the predominant species (82.6% of larvae) followed by the hybrid A. simplex s.s./A. pegreffii (16.3%). Only one L3 of A. simplex s.s. was found in a specimen of S. japonicus from the Atlantic. Mackerel infection was associated with total fish weight, gonad weight, catch area, and catch season. However, muscle infection was associated solely with total weight and parasite loads. The consumption of lower-weight mackerel may be a good prophylactic measure against human anisakiasis.

  8. Reduced tumorigenicity of rodent tumour cells and tumour explants following infection with wild type and mutant herpes simplex virus, bovine mammillitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, G. R.; Cowan, M.; Davies, J.; Brookes, K.; Billstrom, M.; Buchan, A.

    1988-01-01

    The tumorigenicity of neoplastic hamster and mouse cell lines and tumour explants was reduced by infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), a thymidine-kinaseless mutant of herpes simplex virus, namely 'MDK', encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC) and bovine mammillitis virus (BMV). There was an approximate relationship between duration of virus infection in vitro and reduction in incidence and/or rate of tumour development. The rate of tumour development was also reduced by 'site inoculation' of virus (HSV-1) at various time intervals following inoculation of tumorigenic BHK 21 cells indicating that virus was capable of reducing the rate of tumour development in a situation where the neoplastic cells were already transplanted into the susceptible host species. It is suggested that the therapeutic role of wild type, mutant or recombinant viruses merits further exploration towards prevention and treatment of human cancer. PMID:2846027

  9. Reduced tumorigenicity of rodent tumour cells and tumour explants following infection with wild type and mutant herpes simplex virus, bovine mammillitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Cowan, M; Davies, J; Brookes, K; Billstrom, M; Buchan, A

    1988-08-01

    The tumorigenicity of neoplastic hamster and mouse cell lines and tumour explants was reduced by infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), a thymidine-kinaseless mutant of herpes simplex virus, namely 'MDK', encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC) and bovine mammillitis virus (BMV). There was an approximate relationship between duration of virus infection in vitro and reduction in incidence and/or rate of tumour development. The rate of tumour development was also reduced by 'site inoculation' of virus (HSV-1) at various time intervals following inoculation of tumorigenic BHK 21 cells indicating that virus was capable of reducing the rate of tumour development in a situation where the neoplastic cells were already transplanted into the susceptible host species. It is suggested that the therapeutic role of wild type, mutant or recombinant viruses merits further exploration towards prevention and treatment of human cancer.

  10. Delayed control of herpes simplex virus infection and impaired CD4(+) T-cell migration to the skin in mouse models of DOCK8 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Flesch, Inge E A; Randall, Katrina L; Hollett, Natasha A; Di Law, Hsei; Miosge, Lisa A; Sontani, Yovina; Goodnow, Christopher C; Tscharke, David C

    2015-07-01

    DOCK8 deficiency in humans and mice leads to multiple defects in immune cell numbers and function. Patients with this immunodeficiency have a high morbidity and mortality, and are distinguished by chronic cutaneous viral infections, including those caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV). The underlying mechanism of the specific susceptibility to these chronic cutaneous viral infections is currently unknown, largely because the effect of DOCK8 deficiency has not been studied in suitable models. A better understanding of these mechanisms is required to underpin the development of more specific therapies. Here we show that DOCK8-deficient mice have poor control of primary cutaneous herpes simplex lesions and this is associated with increased virus loads. Furthermore, DOCK8-deficient mice showed a lack of CD4(+) T-cell infiltration into HSV-infected skin.

  11. Knockdown of DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 by RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type I DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Muylaert, Isabella; Elias, Per

    2007-04-13

    Herpes simplex virus has a linear double-stranded DNA genome with directly repeated terminal sequences needed for cleavage and packaging of replicated DNA. In infected cells, linear genomes rapidly become endless. It is currently a matter of discussion whether the endless genomes are circles supporting rolling circle replication or arise by recombination of linear genomes forming concatemers. Here, we have examined the role of mammalian DNA ligases in the herpes simplex virus, type I (HSV-1) life cycle by employing RNA interference (RNAi) in human 1BR.3.N fibroblasts. We find that RNAi-mediated knockdown of DNA ligase IV and its co-factor XRCC4 causes a hundred-fold reduction of virus yield, a small plaque phenotype, and reduced DNA synthesis. The effect is specific because RNAi against DNA ligase I or DNA ligase III fail to reduce HSV-1 replication. Furthermore, RNAi against DNA ligase IV and XRCC4 does not affect replication of adenovirus. In addition, high multiplicity infections of HSV-1 in human DNA ligase IV-deficient cells reveal a pronounced delay of production of infectious virus. Finally, we demonstrate that formation of endless genomes is inhibited by RNAi-mediated depletion of DNA ligase IV and XRCC4. Our results suggests that DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 serves an important role in the replication cycle of herpes viruses and is likely to be required for the formation of the endless genomes early during productive infection.

  12. Alzheimer's disease: a pathogenetic autoimmune disorder caused by herpes simplex in a gene-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Carter, C J

    2010-12-29

    Herpes simplex is implicated in Alzheimer's disease and viral infection produces Alzheimer's disease like pathology in mice. The virus expresses proteins containing short contiguous amino acid stretches (5-9aa "vatches" = viralmatches) homologous to APOE4, clusterin, PICALM, and complement receptor 1, and to over 100 other gene products relevant to Alzheimer's disease, which are also homologous to proteins expressed by other pathogens implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Such homology, reiterated at the DNA level, suggests that gene association studies have been tracking infection, as well as identifying key genes, demonstrating a role for pathogens as causative agents. Vatches may interfere with the function of their human counterparts, acting as dummy ligands, decoy receptors, or via interactome interference. They are often immunogenic, and antibodies generated in response to infection may target their human counterparts, producing protein knockdown, or generating autoimmune responses that may kill the neurones in which the human homologue resides, a scenario supported by immune activation in Alzheimer's disease. These data may classify Alzheimer's disease as an autoimmune disorder created by pathogen mimicry of key Alzheimer's disease-related proteins. It may well be prevented by vaccination and regular pathogen detection and elimination, and perhaps stemmed by immunosuppression or antibody adsorption-related therapies.

  13. Herpes simplex keratitis: challenges in diagnosis and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Azher, Tayaba N; Yin, Xiao-Tang; Tajfirouz, Deena; Huang, Andrew Jw; Stuart, Patrick M

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is responsible for numerous ocular diseases, the most common of which is herpetic stromal keratitis. This is a recurrent infection of the cornea that typically begins with a subclinical infection of the cornea that establishes a latent infection of sensory ganglia, most often the trigeminal ganglia. Recurring infections occur when the virus is reactivated from latency and travels back to the cornea, where it restimulates an inflammatory response. This inflammatory response can lead to decreased corneal sensation, scarring, and blindness. The diagnosis of these lesions as the result of a recurrent herpes simplex virus infection can at times be problematic. Currently, herpetic stromal keratitis is diagnosed by its clinical presentation on the slit-lamp examination, but the literature does not always support the accuracy of these clinical findings. Other diagnostic tests such as polymerase chain reaction assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunofluorescent antibody, and viral cultures have provided more definitive diagnosis, but also have some limitations. That said, accurate diagnosis is necessary for proper treatment, in order to prevent serious consequences. Current treatment reduces the severity of lesions and controls further viral spread, but does not provide a cure.

  14. Herpes simplex keratitis: challenges in diagnosis and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Azher, Tayaba N; Yin, Xiao-Tang; Tajfirouz, Deena; Huang, Andrew JW; Stuart, Patrick M

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is responsible for numerous ocular diseases, the most common of which is herpetic stromal keratitis. This is a recurrent infection of the cornea that typically begins with a subclinical infection of the cornea that establishes a latent infection of sensory ganglia, most often the trigeminal ganglia. Recurring infections occur when the virus is reactivated from latency and travels back to the cornea, where it restimulates an inflammatory response. This inflammatory response can lead to decreased corneal sensation, scarring, and blindness. The diagnosis of these lesions as the result of a recurrent herpes simplex virus infection can at times be problematic. Currently, herpetic stromal keratitis is diagnosed by its clinical presentation on the slit-lamp examination, but the literature does not always support the accuracy of these clinical findings. Other diagnostic tests such as polymerase chain reaction assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunofluorescent antibody, and viral cultures have provided more definitive diagnosis, but also have some limitations. That said, accurate diagnosis is necessary for proper treatment, in order to prevent serious consequences. Current treatment reduces the severity of lesions and controls further viral spread, but does not provide a cure. PMID:28176902

  15. Concomitant herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis in a man with ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Varun K.; Friedman-Moraco, Rachel J.; Quigley, Brian C.; Farris, Alton B.; Norvell, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Herpesvirus infections often complicate the clinical course of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; however, invasive disease due to herpes simplex virus is distinctly uncommon. Methods: We present a case of herpes simplex virus colitis and hepatitis, review all the previously published cases of herpes simplex virus colitis, and discuss common clinical features and outcomes. We also discuss the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of herpes simplex virus infections, focusing specifically on patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Results: A 43-year-old man with ulcerative colitis, previously controlled with an oral 5-aminosalicylic agent, developed symptoms of a colitis flare that did not respond to treatment with systemic corticosteroid therapy. One week later he developed orolabial ulcers and progressive hepatic dysfunction, with markedly elevated transaminases and coagulopathy. He underwent emergent total colectomy when imaging suggested bowel micro-perforation. Pathology from both the colon and liver was consistent with herpes simplex virus infection, and a viral culture of his orolabial lesions and a serum polymerase chain reaction assay also identified herpes simplex virus. He was treated with systemic antiviral therapy and made a complete recovery. Conclusions: Disseminated herpes simplex virus infection with concomitant involvement of the colon and liver has been reported only 3 times in the published literature, and to our knowledge this is the first such case in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease. The risk of invasive herpes simplex virus infections increases with some, but not all immunomodulatory therapies. Optimal management of herpes simplex virus in patients with inflammatory bowel disease includes targeted prophylactic therapy for patients with evidence of latent infection, and timely initiation of antiviral therapy for those patients suspected to have invasive disease. PMID:27759636

  16. Isolation of a protein kinase induced by herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, W.T.; Stobbs, D.G.

    1981-04-01

    Researchers have isolated a new cyclic AMP-independent protein kinase activity induced in HeLa cells by infection with herpes simplex virus type 1. Induction of the enzyme does not occur in cells treated with cycloheximide at the time of infection, or in cells infected with UV-inactivated herpes simplex virus type 1. The amount of enzyme induced in infected cells is dependent upon the multiplicity of infection. An enzyme with identical properties to the appearing in infected HeLa cells is also induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 in BHK cells.

  17. Clinical and biological differences between recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections

    SciTech Connect

    Straus, S.E. )

    1989-12-01

    The major features that distinguish recurrent herpes simplex virus infections from zoster are illustrated in this article by two case histories. The clinical and epidemiologic features that characterize recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections are reviewed. It is noted that herpesvirus infections are more common and severe in patients with cellular immune deficiency. Each virus evokes both humoral and cellular immune response in the course of primary infection. DNA hybridization studies with RNA probes labelled with sulfur-35 indicate that herpes simplex viruses persist within neurons, and that varicella-zoster virus is found in the satellite cells that encircle the neurons.

  18. Limb hypoplasia resulting from intrauterine infection with herpes simplex virus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Carola, D; Skibo, M; Cannon, S; Cam, K M; Hyde, P; Aghai, Z H

    2014-11-01

    Intrauterine infection with herpes simplex virus, although very rare, has devastating effects on multiple organ systems in the fetus and can lead to in utero fetal demise. Neonates born following intrauterine herpes simplex virus infection commonly manifest with cutaneous lesions, ocular damage and/or brain abnormalities. We describe the case of a dichorionic, diamniotic twin gestation complicated by intrauterine herpes simplex virus infection. This infection led to the fetal demise of twin A and a very uncommon presentation of limb hypoplasia in twin B.

  19. The challenges and opportunities for the development of a T-cell epitope-based herpes simplex vaccine.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-11-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) infections have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a billion individuals worldwide. HSV-1 infections are predominant than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries, their development has been difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One "common denominator" among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or a whole viral protein, which contain both "pathogenic symptomatic" and "protective asymptomatic" antigens and epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate developing "asymptomatic" epitope-based sub-unit vaccine strategies that selectively incorporate "protective asymptomatic" epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized by effector memory CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells (TEM cells) from "naturally" protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models of ocular and genital herpes. We review the role of animal models in herpes vaccine development and discuss their current status, challenges, and prospects.

  20. Anisakis simplex complex: ecological significance of recombinant genotypes in an allopatric area of the Adriatic Sea inferred by genome-derived simple sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Mladineo, Ivona; Trumbić, Željka; Radonić, Ivana; Vrbatović, Anamarija; Hrabar, Jerko; Bušelić, Ivana

    2017-03-01

    The genus Anisakis includes nine species which, due to close morphological resemblance even in the adult stage, have previously caused many issues in their correct identification. Recently observed interspecific hybridisation in sympatric areas of two closely related species, Anisakis simplex sensu stricto (s.s.) and Anisakis pegreffii, has raised concerns whether a F1 hybrid generation is capable of overriding the breeding barrier, potentially giving rise to more resistant/pathogenic strains infecting humans. To assess the ecological significance of anisakid genotypes in the Adriatic Sea, an allopatric area for the two above-mentioned species, we analysed data from PCR-RFLP genotyping of the ITS region and the sequence of the cytochrome oxidase 2 (cox2) mtDNA locus to discern the parental genotype and maternal haplotype of the individuals. Furthermore, using in silico genome-wide screening of the A. simplex database for polymorphic simple sequence repeats or microsatellites in non-coding regions, we randomly selected potentially informative loci that were tested and optimised for multiplex PCR. The first panel of microsatellites developed for Anisakis was shown to be highly polymorphic, sensitive and amplified in both A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii. It was used to inspect genetic differentiation of individuals showing mito-nuclear mosaicism which is characteristic for both species. The observed low level of intergroup heterozygosity suggests that existing mosaicism is likely a retention of an ancestral polymorphism rather than a recent recombination event. This is also supported by allopatry of pure A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii in the geographical area under study.

  1. Binding site and subclass specificity of the herpes simplex virus type 1-induced Fc receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wiger, D; Michaelsen, T E

    1985-01-01

    Immunoglobulin Fc-binding activity was detected by indirect immunofluorescence employing fluorochrome conjugated F(ab')2 antibody fragments on acetone-fixed cell cultures infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Using this method the Fc receptor-like activity seemed to be restricted to the IgG class of human immunoglobulins. While IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4 myeloma proteins bind to this putative Fc gamma receptor at a concentration of 0.002 mg/ml, IgG3 myeloma proteins were without activity at 0.1 mg/ml. The binding activity was associated with the Fc fragments of IgG, while the pFc' fragments of IgG appeared to be unable to bind in this assay system. The reactivity and specificity of the HSV-1 Fc receptor was independent of both the type of tissue culture cells used and the strain of HSV-1 inducing the Fc receptor-like activity. The HSV-1-induced Fc receptor has a similar specificity for human immunoglobulin class and subclasses as staphylococcal Protein A. However, these two Fc receptors exhibit at least one striking difference. The IgG3 G3m(st) protein which binds to Protein A does not bind to HSV-1-induced Fc receptor. A possible reaction site for the HSV-1 Fc receptor on IgG could be at or near Asp 276. Images Figure 1 PMID:2982735

  2. In vitro assessment of the cell-mediated immune response to herpes simplex virus in man

    SciTech Connect

    Clouse, K.A.B.

    1986-01-01

    These studies demonstrated that human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals sensitized to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were capable of producing interleukin 2 (IL 2) following in vitro stimulation with HSV antigen. IL 2 activity was detected by the direct addition of the murine IL 2-dependent cell line, CTLL-20, to ..gamma..-irradiated cultures of HSV-1 antigen-stimulated PBMC. It was found that PBMC from sensitized individuals produced IL 2 in a dose-dependent manner after in vitro stimulation with HSV antigen. Furthermore, IL 2 production in response to viral antigen correlated with viral antigen-induced proliferation of PBMC. It was also shown that contact with HSV-1 antigen induced the expression of IL 2 receptors on a small percentage of human PBMC. While this suggested that IL 2 receptor expression was associated with viral antigen-induced proliferation responses, the level of induced IL 2 receptor expression remained close to the lower limit of detectability for cytofluorographic analysis. Experiments to elucidate the role of the macrophage (MO) in the response to viral antigen revealed that HSV antigen-induced IL 2 production by sensitized T lymphocytes was dependent on the presence of an accessory MO. To investigate the signals provided to T lymphocytes by accessory cells, MOs were pulsed with HSV antigen and treated with paraformaldehyde. This allowed HSV antigen display, but prevented monokine (IL 1) secretion. The treated MOs could no longer induce sensitized lymphocytes to produce IL 2.

  3. The molecular basis of herpes simplex virus latency.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Michael P; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is a neurotropic herpesvirus that establishes latency within sensory neurones. Following primary infection, the virus replicates productively within mucosal epithelial cells and enters sensory neurones via nerve termini. The virus is then transported to neuronal cell bodies where latency can be established. Periodically, the virus can reactivate to resume its normal lytic cycle gene expression programme and result in the generation of new virus progeny that are transported axonally back to the periphery. The ability to establish lifelong latency within the host and to periodically reactivate to facilitate dissemination is central to the survival strategy of this virus. Although incompletely understood, this review will focus on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of latency that centre on the functions of the virus-encoded latency-associated transcripts (LATs), epigenetic regulation of the latent virus genome and the molecular events that precipitate reactivation.

  4. Effect of alkaloids isolated from Amaryllidaceae on herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Renard-Nozaki, J; Kim, T; Imakura, Y; Kihara, M; Kobayashi, S

    1989-01-01

    Studies were carried out on the effects of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids and their derivatives upon herpes simplex virus (type 1), the relationship between their structure and antiviral activity and the mechanism of this activity. All alkaloids used in these experiments were biosynthesized from N-benzylphenethylamine; the apogalanthamine group was synthesized in our laboratory; those which may eventually prove to be antiviral agents had a hexahydroindole ring with two functional hydroxyl groups. Benzazepine compounds were neither cytotoxic nor antiviral, but many structures containing dibenzazocine were toxic at low concentrations. It was established that the antiviral activity of alkaloids is due to the inhibition of multiplication and not to the direct inactivation of extracellular viruses. The mechanism of the antiviral effect could be partly explained as a blocking of viral DNA polymerase activity.

  5. Proposal of Evolutionary Simplex Method for Global Optimization Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yoshiaki

    To make an agile decision in a rational manner, role of optimization engineering has been notified increasingly under diversified customer demand. With this point of view, in this paper, we have proposed a new evolutionary method serving as an optimization technique in the paradigm of optimization engineering. The developed method has prospects to solve globally various complicated problem appearing in real world applications. It is evolved from the conventional method known as Nelder and Mead’s Simplex method by virtue of idea borrowed from recent meta-heuristic method such as PSO. Mentioning an algorithm to handle linear inequality constraints effectively, we have validated effectiveness of the proposed method through comparison with other methods using several benchmark problems.

  6. Lytic Promoters Express Protein during Herpes Simplex Virus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tiffany A.; Tscharke, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has provided the prototype for viral latency with previously well-defined acute or lytic and latent phases. More recently, the deep quiescence of HSV latency has been questioned with evidence that lytic genes can be transcribed in this state. However, to date the only evidence that these transcripts might be translated has come from immunological studies that show activated T cells persist in the nervous system during latency. Here we use a highly sensitive Cre-marking model to show that lytic and latent phases are less clearly defined in two significant ways. First, around half of the HSV spread leading to latently infected sites occurred beyond the initial acute infection and second, we show direct evidence that lytic promoters can drive protein expression during latency. PMID:27348812

  7. Autophagy interaction with herpes simplex virus type-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Douglas; Liang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    abstract More than 50% of the U.S. population is infected with herpes simplex virus type-I (HSV-1) and global infectious estimates are nearly 90%. HSV-1 is normally seen as a harmless virus but debilitating diseases can arise, including encephalitis and ocular diseases. HSV-1 is unique in that it can undermine host defenses and establish lifelong infection in neurons. Viral reactivation from latency may allow HSV-1 to lay siege to the brain (Herpes encephalitis). Recent advances maintain that HSV-1 proteins act to suppress and/or control the lysosome-dependent degradation pathway of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) and consequently, in neurons, may be coupled with the advancement of HSV-1-associated pathogenesis. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that HSV-1 infection may constitute a gradual risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders. The relationship between HSV-1 infection and autophagy manipulation combined with neuropathogenesis may be intimately intertwined demanding further investigation. PMID:26934628

  8. Chromatin dynamics during herpes simplex virus-1 lytic infection.

    PubMed

    Placek, Brandon J; Berger, Shelley L

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is a DNA virus that can establish lytic infections in epithelial cells and latent infections in sensory neurons. Upon entry into the nucleus the genome of HSV-1 rapidly associates with histone proteins. Similar to the genomes of the cellular host, HSV-1 is subject to chromatin-based regulation of transcription and replication. However, unlike the host genome, nucleosomes appear to be underrepresented on the HSV genome. During lytic infection, when the genome is transcribed, the HSV-1 chromatin structure appears to be disorganized, and characterized by histone variant sub-types and post-translational modifications representative of active chromatin. In contrast, during latency, when the majority of the viral genome is transcriptionally silent, the chromatin is compacted into a regularly repeating, compact heterochromatic structure. Here we discuss recent studies that underscore the importance of chromatin regulation during the lytic phase of the HSV-1 life-cycle.

  9. Analysis of test data on the simplex strapdown navigation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study of test data taken on the simplex strapdown navigation system were presented. That system consisted of the following components: strapdown platform, altimeter, digital computer, tape recorder, typewriter, and power source. The objective of these tests was to isolate error sources which may cause degradation of the system's accuracy and to recommend appropriate changes to the system test procedures or computer software. The following recommendations were made: (1) addition of a gyro compassing alignment program into the navigation program, (2) addition of line drivers at the signal processor end of the transmission line, (3) need for extensive laboratory testing to determine sensor misalignments, biases, and scale factors, (4) need to stabilize the power source to prevent transients during power transfer, (5) need to isolate and eliminate the source of the large noise inputs.

  10. Basal Autophagy Is Required for Herpes simplex Virus-2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yakoub, Abraam M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process of the cell, which plays an important role in regulating plethora of infections. The role of autophagy in Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection is unknown. Here, we found that HSV-2 does not allow induction of an autophagic response to infection, but maintains basal autophagy levels mostly unchanged during productive infection. Thus, we investigated the importance of basal autophagy for HSV-2 infection, using pharmacological autophagy suppression or cells genetically deficient in an autophagy-essential gene (ATG5). Interference with basal autophagy flux in cells significantly reduced viral replication and diminished the infection. These results indicate that basal autophagy plays an indispensable role required for a productive infection. Importantly, this study draws a sharp distinction between induced and basal autophagy, where the former acts as a viral clearance mechanism abrogating infection, while the latter supports infection. PMID:26248741

  11. Autophagy Stimulation Abrogates Herpes simplex Virus-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yakoub, Abraam M.; Shukla, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that causes life-long infections. HSV-1 infections may lead to herpetic stromal keratitis that may advance to corneal blindness. HSV-1 infections can also cause fatal conditions, such as herpes encephalitis, or neonatal disease. A major virulence mechanism of HSV-1 is the control of autophagy, an innate immune defense strategy that could otherwise degrade viral particles. Here, to investigate a new mechanism for antiviral therapy, we tested the effect of various autophagy inducers (physiological and pharmacological) on infection. Autophagy stimulation was confirmed to significantly suppress HSV-1 infection in various cell types, without affecting cell viability. This study establishes the importance of autophagy for regulating HSV-1 infection, and provides a proof-of-principle evidence for a novel antiviral mechanism. PMID:25856282

  12. Autophagy interaction with herpes simplex virus type-1 infection.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Douglas; Liang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of the U.S. population is infected with herpes simplex virus type-I (HSV-1) and global infectious estimates are nearly 90%. HSV-1 is normally seen as a harmless virus but debilitating diseases can arise, including encephalitis and ocular diseases. HSV-1 is unique in that it can undermine host defenses and establish lifelong infection in neurons. Viral reactivation from latency may allow HSV-1 to lay siege to the brain (Herpes encephalitis). Recent advances maintain that HSV-1 proteins act to suppress and/or control the lysosome-dependent degradation pathway of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) and consequently, in neurons, may be coupled with the advancement of HSV-1-associated pathogenesis. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that HSV-1 infection may constitute a gradual risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders. The relationship between HSV-1 infection and autophagy manipulation combined with neuropathogenesis may be intimately intertwined demanding further investigation.

  13. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, Esther; Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Sonda, Sabrina; Kaech, Andres; Lucas, Miriam S.; Ackermann, Mathias; Wild, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  14. Fatal Neonatal Herpes Simplex Infection Likely from Unrecognized Breast Lesions.

    PubMed

    Field, Scott S

    2016-02-01

    Type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is very prevalent yet in rare circumstances can lead to fatal neonatal disease. Genital acquisition of type 2 HSV is the usual mode for neonatal herpes, but HSV-1 transmission by genital or extragenital means may result in greater mortality rates. A very rare scenario is presented in which the mode of transmission was likely through breast lesions. The lesions were seen by nurses as well as the lactation consultant and obstetrician in the hospital after delivery of the affected baby but not recognized as possibly being caused by herpes. The baby died 9 days after birth with hepatic failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Peripartum health care workers need to be aware of potential nongenital (including from the breast[s]) neonatal herpes acquisition, which can be lethal.

  15. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis is a trigger of brain autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Armangue, Thaís; Leypoldt, Frank; Málaga, Ignacio; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Marti, Itxaso; Nichter, Charles; Pugh, John; Vicente-Rasoamalala, Monica; Lafuente-Hidalgo, Miguel; Macaya, Alfons; Ke, Michael; Titulaer, Maarten J; Höftberger, Romana; Sheriff, Heather; Glaser, Carol; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-02-01

    In 5 prospectively diagnosed patients with relapsing post-herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibodies were identified. Antibody synthesis started 1 to 4 weeks after HSE, preceding the neurological relapse. Three of 5 patients improved postimmunotherapy, 1 spontaneously, and 1 has started to improve. Two additional patients with NMDAR antibodies, 9 with unknown neuronal surface antibodies, and 1 with NMDAR and unknown antibodies, were identified during retrospective assessment of 34 HSE patients; the frequency of autoantibodies increased over time (serum, p=0.004; cerebrospinal fluid, p=0.04). The 3 retrospectively identified NMDAR antibody-positive patients also had evidence of relapsing post-HSE. Overall, these findings indicate that HSE triggers NMDAR antibodies and potentially other brain autoimmunity.

  16. Gasification of Simplex briquets: briquet production. Vol. 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    A 7-ton/hr briquetting plant was installed at International Briquetting in Baltimore, Maryland, and used to produce 360 tons of Simplex briquets from Pittsburgh No. 8 seam, Champion No. 1 mine caking coal and shredded, air-classified Baltimore County refuse. The production of these briquets was funded by the Department of Energy, through the US Bureau of Mines, and a consortium comprised of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and the Empire State Electric Energy Research Company. This report describes the briquetting plant and discusses the problems that were encountered in producing the briquets. The following modifications are recommended for future Simplex briquetting plants: drying equipment should be installed on the RDF feed system to ensure that the RDF moisture is below 18%; the crushed coal must be dried to less than 4% moisture to ensure its free flow in the bins; magnets should be installed above the coal and RDF feed conveyors to remove any tramp metal; a 3/4-inch screen should be installed over the coal feed bin to remove any oversize rocks or lump coal; the RDF handling system and turbulizer discharge to the press should all be enclosed for dust control (the enclosures should be vented to a baghouse); only heavy duty apron conveyors should be used where belt conveyors are needed; briquetts should be cured if they are going to be stored in containers where they might sweat; and a screen with 1 1/4-inch openings should be used to remove the fines from 2 1/4-inch briquets (this screen should be sufficiently large to prevent briquets from crowding together on the screen).

  17. Difficulty Factors, Distribution Effects, and the Least Squares Simplex Data Matrix Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ten Berge, Jos M. F.

    1972-01-01

    In the present article it is argued that the Least Squares Simplex Data Matrix Solution does not deal adequately with difficulty factors inasmuch as the theoretical foundation is insufficient. (Author/CB)

  18. Bionomics of Orasema simplex (Hymenoptera: Eucharitidae) a parasitoid of Solenopsis fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biological characteristics of the parasitoid Orasema simplex Heraty (Hymenoptera: Eucharitidae), a potential candidate for the biological control of fire ants in the United States were investigated. Female survivorship, fertility and oviposition preferences were studied in the laboratory. Naturally ...

  19. Transient lingual papillitis associated with confirmed herpes simplex virus 1 in a patient with kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Kim, Silvia S; Burns, Jane C

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of transient lingual papillitis associated with confirmed herpes simplex virus 1 that developed after a child received intravenous immunoglobulin and infliximab for acute Kawasaki disease.

  20. Design and optimization of color lookup tables on a simplex topology.

    PubMed

    Monga, Vishal; Bala, Raja; Mo, Xuan

    2012-04-01

    An important computational problem in color imaging is the design of color transforms that map color between devices or from a device-dependent space (e.g., RGB/CMYK) to a device-independent space (e.g., CIELAB) and vice versa. Real-time processing constraints entail that such nonlinear color transforms be implemented using multidimensional lookup tables (LUTs). Furthermore, relatively sparse LUTs (with efficient interpolation) are employed in practice because of storage and memory constraints. This paper presents a principled design methodology rooted in constrained convex optimization to design color LUTs on a simplex topology. The use of n simplexes, i.e., simplexes in n dimensions, as opposed to traditional lattices, recently has been of great interest in color LUT design for simplex topologies that allow both more analytically tractable formulations and greater efficiency in the LUT. In this framework of n-simplex interpolation, our central contribution is to develop an elegant iterative algorithm that jointly optimizes the placement of nodes of the color LUT and the output values at those nodes to minimize interpolation error in an expected sense. This is in contrast to existing work, which exclusively designs either node locations or the output values. We also develop new analytical results for the problem of node location optimization, which reduces to constrained optimization of a large but sparse interpolation matrix in our framework. We evaluate our n -simplex color LUTs against the state-of-the-art lattice (e.g., International Color Consortium profiles) and simplex-based techniques for approximating two representative multidimensional color transforms that characterize a CMYK xerographic printer and an RGB scanner, respectively. The results show that color LUTs designed on simplexes offer very significant benefits over traditional lattice-based alternatives in improving color transform accuracy even with a much smaller number of nodes.

  1. Herpes simplex hepatitis after liver transplantation: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Côté-Daigneault, J; Carrier, F M; Toledano, K; Wartelle-Bladu, C; Willems, B

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) hepatitis is an uncommon cause of liver failure, but may have a dramatic outcome. We herein present a case report of a liver graft infection by HSV-1 associated with liver failure and encephalitis. A complete hospital chart review of the case and a literature search were undertaken. Literature review suggests that herpes simplex acute liver failure is rare and associated with a poor prognosis, even with early treatment. Novel diagnostic and preventive approaches need to be instituted.

  2. Herpes simplex type 1 encephalitis restricted to the brainstem in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Arita, Juliana Harumi; Lin, Jaime; Peruchi, Mirella Maccarini; Rodrigues, Marcelo Masruha; Vilanova, Luiz Celso Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis is a potentially fatal infection of central nervous system that typically involves frontal and temporal lobes. Occasionally, it presents an extratemporal involvement and in rarer cases, it is limited to the brainstem. We describe a case of an adolescent who presented with fever, sore throat, and vertigo. Clinical picture evolved to lethargy, tetraparesis, consciousness impairment, and respiratory failure. MRI showed lesions restricted to the brainstem. PCR of CSF was positive for herpes simplex type 1.

  3. Anisakis simplex only provokes allergic symptoms when the worm parasitises the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Gómez, Alicia; Moreno-Ancillo, Alvaro; López-Serrano, M Concepción; Suarez-de-Parga, Jose M; Daschner, Alvaro; Caballero, M Teresa; Barranco, Pilar; Cabañas, Rosario

    2004-08-01

    We analysed patients with allergic or digestive symptoms after seafood ingestion in order to assess a correct diet in Anisakis simplex sensitised individuals. A total of 120 patients who suffered allergic and/or digestive symptoms after marine food ingestion were studied. We performed skin prick tests for A. simplex and seafood, total serum and specific serum immunoglobulin E to A. simplex in the acute stage and 1 month later. A gastroscopy was carried out to find larvae in those patients with persistent abdominal pain. A challenge with non-infective larvae was performed to assess a correct diet. Some 96 patients were sensitised to A. simplex. Gastroscopy was performed in 47 and we detected larvae in 24. We compared symptoms, skin tests, total and specific IgE and the latency of appearance of symptoms in patients positive for Anisakis larvae, patients without larvae at gastroscopy and patients without digestive symptoms. There was no difference among the groups. We challenged 22 patients with frozen A. simplex larvae. After allowing deep-frozen seafood in the diet for more than 2 years, no patient suffered a reaction. At this time, we allowed all our patients well-frozen seafood without any allergic reaction occurring. Allergic symptoms are the most frequent manifestation of A. simplex parasitism. We could not find any patient allergic to the thermostable proteins of parasite.

  4. Paraneoplastic pemphigus and Castleman's disease in the setting of herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Koch, Laine H; Layton, Christle J; Pilichowska, Monika; Stadecker, Miguel J; Barak, Orr

    2012-01-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a 3-week history of mucosal erosions, injected conjunctiva, dehydration, and respiratory distress. She had been treated with intravenous acyclovir for herpes simplex infection with positive herpes simplex virus immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G. Physical examination and imaging revealed a large abdominal mass. Incisional biopsy was obtained, and pathology demonstrated angiofollicular hyperplasia with hyalinized germinal centers and Castleman's syndrome-like features. Based on the mucosal erosions, herpes simplex virus serology and positive herpes simplex virus-1 direct fluorescent antibody, Castleman's disease secondary to overwhelming herpes simplex virus infection was the initial impression. The poor response to antivirals and subsequent development of a bullous eruption on the hands resulted in dermatology consultation. Skin biopsy was obtained from a bullae and revealed suprabasilar acantholysis with necrosis as well as upper dermal, perivascular, and interface infiltrate of lymphocytes and eosinophils. No viropathic changes were present. Direct immunofluorescence was significant for immunoglobulin G deposition intercellularly and along the dermoepidermal junction and focal trace C3 deposition along the dermoepidermal junction consistent with paraneoplastic pemphigus, later confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. We report this case of paraneoplastic pemphigus secondary to Castleman's syndrome confounded by herpes simplex virus-1 positive mucosal erosions.

  5. Choreoathetosis after herpes simplex encephalitis with basal ganglia involvement on MRI.

    PubMed

    Kullnat, Megan Wills; Morse, Richard P

    2008-04-01

    Children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis have a relapse in approximately 25% of cases, which rarely may present as a movement disorder, most often choreoathetosis. The anatomic basis for herpes simplex virus encephalitis-associated movement disorders has been poorly understood, because neuroimaging, to date, has not been able to show the direct involvement of the areas of the brain that typically govern such movements. We present a patient with abnormal involuntary movements after herpes simplex virus encephalitis, with new lesions on MRI between the time of initial presentation and the development of choreoathetosis. To our knowledge, this is the first patient with a post-herpes simplex virus encephalitis movement disorder with neuroradiographic evidence of thalamic involvement correlating with the onset of abnormal involuntary movements. We describe this patient and review the literature on movement disorders and herpes simplex virus encephalitis. Current understanding of the pathophysiology of post-herpes simplex virus encephalitis movement disorders proposes 2 possible mechanisms that may be responsible: reinfection with the resumption of viral replication, or a postinfectious, immune-mediated process.

  6. Inhibition of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) Kinase Suppresses Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Oleg; Donovan, Kelly; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Herpes keratitis (HK) remains the leading cause of cornea-derived blindness in the developed world, despite the availability of effective antiviral drugs. Treatment toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance highlight the need for additional therapeutic approaches. This study examined ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), an apical kinase in the host DNA damage response, as a potential new target for the treatment of HK. Methods. Small molecule inhibitor of ATM (KU-55933) was used to treat herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection in three experimental models: (1) in vitro—cultured human corneal epithelial cells, hTCEpi, (2) ex vivo—organotypically explanted human and rabbit corneas, and (3) in vivo—corneal infection in young C57BL/6J mice. Infection productivity was assayed by plaque assay, real-time PCR, Western blot, and disease scoring. Results. Robust ATM activation was detected in HSV-1-infected human corneal epithelial cells. Inhibition of ATM greatly suppressed viral replication in cultured cells and in explanted human and rabbit corneas, and reduced the severity of stromal keratitis in mice. The antiviral effect of KU-55933 in combination with acyclovir was additive, and KU-55933 suppressed replication of a drug-resistant HSV-1 strain. KU-55933 caused minimal toxicity, as monitored by clonogenic survival assay and fluorescein staining. Conclusions. This study identifies ATM as a potential target for the treatment of HK. ATM inhibition by KU-55933 reduces epithelial infection and stromal disease severity without producing appreciable toxicity. These findings warrant further investigations into the DNA damage response as an area for therapeutic intervention in herpetic ocular diseases. PMID:24370835

  7. Temporal and pontine involvement in a case of herpes simplex encephalitis, presenting as kluver bucy syndrome - a case report.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukarasu, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral temporal and frontal lobe involvement is a common characteristic of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). Clinical sequelae of herpes simplex encephalitis may manifest sometimes as Kluver Bucy syndrome (KBS). In herpes simplex encephalitis, apart from frontal lobe, extra temporal involvement is rare and uncommon. We report a case of HSE manifesting clinically as KBS with a rare radiological finding of temporal and extratemporal involvement of pons.

  8. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antibody Mediated Neurologic Relapse Post Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Sarah; Walsh, Aoibhinn; King, Mary D; Lynch, Bryan; Webb, David; Twomey, Eilish; Ronan Leahy, T; Butler, Karina; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Despite the advent of antiviral therapy, herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) remains a devastating condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Neurologic relapse after initial improvement is generally attributed to herpes simplex virus reactivation. In 2013, inflammation caused by anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies was reported in association with cases of neurologic relapse after herpes simplex encephalitis. We present 3 such cases and discuss diagnostic and management dilemmas.

  9. Structure of the transporter associated with antigen processing trapped by herpes simplex virus

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Michael L; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Chen, Jue

    2016-01-01

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter essential to cellular immunity against viral infection. Some persistent viruses have evolved strategies to inhibit TAP so that they may go undetected by the immune system. The herpes simplex virus for example evades immune surveillance by blocking peptide transport with a small viral protein ICP47. In this study, we determined the structure of human TAP bound to ICP47 by electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) to 4.0 Å. The structure shows that ICP47 traps TAP in an inactive conformation distinct from the normal transport cycle. The specificity and potency of ICP47 inhibition result from contacts between the tip of the helical hairpin and the apex of the transmembrane cavity. This work provides a clear molecular description of immune evasion by a persistent virus. It also establishes the molecular structure of TAP to facilitate mechanistic studies of the antigen presentation process. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21829.001 PMID:27935481

  10. Herpes simplex viral-vector design for efficient transduction of nonneuronal cells without cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Marino, Pietro; Verlengia, Gianluca; Uchida, Hiroaki; Goins, William F.; Yokota, Shinichiro; Geller, David A.; Yoshida, Osamu; Mester, Joseph; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    The design of highly defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors for transgene expression in nonneuronal cells in the absence of toxic viral-gene activity has been elusive. Here, we report that elements of the latency locus protect a nonviral promoter against silencing in primary human cells in the absence of any viral-gene expression. We identified a CTCF motif cluster 5′ to the latency promoter and a known long-term regulatory region as important elements for vigorous transgene expression from a vector that is functionally deleted for all five immediate-early genes and the 15-kb internal repeat region. We inserted a 16.5-kb expression cassette for full-length mouse dystrophin and report robust and durable expression in dystrophin-deficient muscle cells in vitro. Given the broad cell tropism of HSV, our design provides a nontoxic vector that can accommodate large transgene constructs for transduction of a wide variety of cells without vector integration, thereby filling an important void in the current arsenal of gene-therapy vectors. PMID:25775541

  11. Infected cell protein 0 functional domains and their coordination in herpes simplex virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen that establishes latent infection in ganglia neurons. Its unique life cycle requires a balanced “conquer and compromise” strategy to deal with the host anti-viral defenses. One of HSV-1 α (immediate early) gene products, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a multifunctional protein that interacts with and modulates a wide range of cellular defensive pathways. These pathways may locate in different cell compartments, which then migrate or exchange factors upon stimulation, for the purpose of a concerted and effective defense. ICP0 is able to simultaneously attack multiple host pathways by either degrading key restrictive factors or modifying repressive complexes. This is a viral protein that contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates among different cell compartments and interacts with major defensive complexes. The multiple functional domains of ICP0 can work independently and at the same time coordinate with each other. Dissecting the functional domains of ICP0 and delineating the coordination of these domains will help us understand HSV-1 pathogenicity as well as host defense mechanisms. This article focuses on describing individual ICP0 domains, their biochemical properties and their implication in HSV-1 infection. By putting individual domain functions back into the picture of host anti-viral defense network, this review seeks to elaborate the complex interactions between HSV-1 and its host. PMID:26870669

  12. Role of the small GTPase Rab27a during Herpes simplex virus infection of oligodendrocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The morphogenesis of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) comprises several events, of which some are not completely understood. It has been shown that HSV-1 glycoproteins accumulate in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and in TGN-derived vesicles. It is also accepted that HSV-1 acquires its final morphology through a secondary envelopment by budding into TGN-derived vesicles coated with viral glycoproteins and tegument proteins. Nevertheless, several aspects of this process remain elusive. The small GTPase Rab27a has been implicated in regulated exocytosis, and it seems to play a key role in certain membrane trafficking events. Rab27a also seems to be required for human cytomegalovirus assembly. However, despite the involvement of various Rab GTPases in HSV-1 envelopment, there is, to date, no data reported on the role of Rab27a in HSV-1 infection. Results Herein, we show that Rab27a colocalized with GHSV-UL46, a tegument-tagged green fluorescent protein-HSV-1, in the TGN. In fact, this small GTPase colocalized with viral glycoproteins gH and gD in that compartment. Functional analysis through Rab27a depletion showed a significant decrease in the number of infected cells and viral production in Rab27a-silenced cells. Conclusions Altogether, our results indicate that Rab27a plays an important role in HSV-1 infection of oligodendrocytic cells. PMID:23164453

  13. Inhibitory activity and mechanism of two scorpion venom peptides against herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Li, Tian; Song, Yu; Zhang, Runhong; Zeng, Zhengyang; Han, Shisong; Zhang, Xianzheng; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2014-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a widespread human pathogen that causes severe diseases, but there are not effective and safe drugs in clinical therapy besides acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogs. In this study, two new venom peptides from the scorpion Heterometrus petersii were identified with effective inhibitory effect on HSV-1 infection in vitro. Both Hp1036 and Hp1239 peptides exhibited potent virucidal activities against HSV-1 (EC50=0.43±0.09 and 0.41±0.06μM, respectively) and effective inhibitory effects when added at the viral attachment (EC50=2.87±0.16 and 5.73±0.61μM, respectively), entry (EC50=4.29±0.35 and 4.32±0.47μM, respectively) and postentry (EC50=7.86±0.80 and 8.41±0.73μM, respectively) steps. Both Hp1036 and Hp1239 peptides adopted α-helix structure in approximate membrane environment and resulted in the destruction of the viral morphology. Moreover, Hp1036 and Hp1239 peptides entered Vero cells and reduced the intracellular viral infectivity. Taken together, Hp1036 and Hp1239 peptides are two anti-viral peptides with effective inhibitory effect on multiple steps of HSV-1 life cycle and therefore are good candidate for development as virucides.

  14. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed. PMID:23320014

  15. Antiviral Action of Synthetic Stigmasterol Derivatives on Herpes Simplex Virus Replication in Nervous Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Petrera, Erina; Níttolo, Analía G.; Alché, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Polyfunctionalized stigmasterol derivatives, (22S,23S)-22,23-dihydroxystigmast-4-en-3-one (compound 1) and (22S,23S)-3β-bromo-5α,22,23-trihydroxystigmastan-6-one (compound 2), inhibit herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) replication and spreading in human epithelial cells derived from ocular tissues. Both compounds reduce the incidence and severity of lesions in a murine model of herpetic stromal keratitis when administered in different treatment modalities. Since encephalitis caused by HSV-1 is another immunopathology of viral origin, we evaluate here the antiviral effect of both compounds on HSV-1 infected nervous cell lines as well as their anti-inflammatory action. We found that both stigmasterol derivatives presented low cytotoxicity in the three nervous cell lines assayed. Regarding the antiviral activity, in all cases both compounds prevented HSV-1 multiplication when added after infection, as well as virus propagation. Additionally, both compounds were able to hinder interleukin-6 and Interferon-gamma secretion induced by HSV-1 infection in Neuro-2a cells. We conclude that compounds 1 and 2 have exerted a dual antiviral and anti-inflammatory effect in HSV-1 infected nervous cell lines, which makes them interesting molecules to be further studied. PMID:25147828

  16. Low seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 among pregnant women in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Diawara, Silman; Toure Kane, Coumba; Legoff, Jérôme; Gaye, Astou Gueye; Mboup, Souleymane; Bélec, Laurent

    2008-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is considered as a major co-factor of both sexual transmission and acquisition of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The HIV epidemic in Senegal is characterized by a remarkable and stable low prevalence. Whether HSV-2 may also constitute a possible co-factor favouring the spreading of HIV epidemic in Senegal is yet unknown. This prompted us to evaluate the HSV-2 seroprevalence in the sentinel population of pregnant women in Senegal. Two hundred and sixty pregnant women attending Roi Baudouin maternity in the capital city Dakar (n = 14; 135) and the antenatal clinic in Kaolack (n = 125), the third city of Senegal, were prospectively recruited between March and August 2003. Fifty-six women (22%) were positive for HSV-2 serology. The prevalence of HSV-2 seropositivity was higher in women living in Dakar (26%) than in those living in Kaolack (16%) (P < 0.01). Only two women from Dakar and two other from Kaolack were found to be HIV-1-infected. Our observations suggest a seemingly low seroprevalence of HSV-2 infection in adult women Senegal, comparable with those usually reported in Western countries. Further, epidemiological surveys are needed to confirm these results in the general population.

  17. Distinct Impact of Two Keratin Mutations Causing Epidermolysis Bullosa Simplex on Keratinocyte Adhesion and Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Homberg, Melanie; Ramms, Lena; Schwarz, Nicole; Dreissen, Georg; Leube, Rudolf E; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Magin, Thomas M

    2015-10-01

    Keratin filaments constitute the major component of the epidermal cytoskeleton from heterodimers of type I and type II keratin subunits. Missense mutations in keratin 5 or keratin 14, highly expressed in the basal epidermis, cause the severe skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) in humans by rendering the keratin cytoskeleton sensitive to mechanical stress; yet, the mechanisms by which individual mutations cause cell fragility are incompletely understood. Here, we compared the K14p.Arg125Pro with the K5p.Glu477Asp mutation, both giving rise to severe generalized EBS, by stable expression in keratin-free keratinocytes. This revealed distinctly different effects on keratin cytoskeletal organization, in agreement with in vivo observations, thus validating the cell system. Although the K14p.Arg125Pro mutation led to impaired desmosomes, downregulation of desmosomal proteins, and weakened epithelial sheet integrity upon shear stress, the K5p.Glu477Asp mutation did not impair these functions, although causing EBS with squamous cell carcinoma in vivo. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated that K14 mutant cells were even less resistant against deformation compared with keratin-free keratinocytes. Thus, a keratin mutation causing EBS compromises cell stiffness to a greater extent than the lack of keratins. Finally, re-expression of K14 in K14 mutant cells did not rescue the above defects. Collectively, our findings have implications for EBS therapy approaches.

  18. Structural analysis of herpes simplex virus by optical super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Laine, Romain F; Albecka, Anna; van de Linde, Sebastian; Rees, Eric J; Crump, Colin M; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2015-01-22

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is one of the most widespread pathogens among humans. Although the structure of HSV-1 has been extensively investigated, the precise organization of tegument and envelope proteins remains elusive. Here we use super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) in combination with a model-based analysis of single-molecule localization data, to determine the position of protein layers within virus particles. We resolve different protein layers within individual HSV-1 particles using multi-colour dSTORM imaging and discriminate envelope-anchored glycoproteins from tegument proteins, both in purified virions and in virions present in infected cells. Precise characterization of HSV-1 structure was achieved by particle averaging of purified viruses and model-based analysis of the radial distribution of the tegument proteins VP16, VP1/2 and pUL37, and envelope protein gD. From this data, we propose a model of the protein organization inside the tegument.

  19. Visualization of DNA G-quadruplexes in herpes simplex virus 1-infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Artusi, Sara; Perrone, Rosalba; Lago, Sara; Raffa, Paolo; Di Iorio, Enzo; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that clusters of guanine quadruplex (G4) structures can form in the human herpes simplex-1 (HSV-1) genome. Here we used immunofluorescence and immune-electron microscopy with a G4-specific monoclonal antibody to visualize G4 structures in HSV-1 infected cells. We found that G4 formation and localization within the cells was virus cycle dependent: viral G4s peaked at the time of viral DNA replication in the cell nucleus, moved to the nuclear membrane at the time of virus nuclear egress and were later found in HSV-1 immature virions released from the cell nucleus. Colocalization of G4s with ICP8, a viral DNA processing protein, was observed in viral replication compartments. G4s were lost upon treatment with DNAse and inhibitors of HSV-1 DNA replication. The notable increase in G4s upon HSV-1 infection suggests a key role of these structures in the HSV-1 biology and indicates new targets to control both the lytic and latent infection. PMID:27794039

  20. Fusogenic oncolytic herpes simplex viruses as a potent and personalized cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi-Xiang; Liu, Guohong; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2012-07-01

    The recent FDA approval of Sipuleucel-T for the treatment of prostate cancer represents an important milestone of cancer immunotherapy, which, for the first time, validates the concept of bringing true clinical benefit to cancer patients by stimulating patients' own anti-tumor immunity. Among the different experimental cancer immunotherapies, oncolytic virotherapy may represent a low-cost yet potent and personalized cancer vaccine for the treatment of solid tumors. This review describes the constructions of several human herpes simplex virus (HSV)-derived oncolytic viruses as candidate cancer vaccines, which induce specific and potent anti-tumor immunity in pre-clinical models, and thus resulting in stronger overall anti-tumor efficacy as compared to oncolytic effect alone. This article also describes the approaches to enhance the antitumor immunity of oncolytic HSVs, and in particular, the key role played by integrating membrane-fusion activity into these viruses. Additionally, this article reviews the potential effect of certain chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. cyclophosphamide) in boosting antitumor immunity induced by oncolytic HSV, and the mechanisms behind it. In summary, all the preclinical and clinical data have suggested that HSV-based oncolytic virotherapies could likely be developed as a new generation of cancer vaccines for the treatment of solid tumors.

  1. Rapid screening tests for determining in vitro susceptibility of herpes simplex virus clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, P; Melón, S; López, B; Rodriguez, M; Blanco, M I; Mellado, P; de Oña, M

    1998-08-01

    The susceptibility of human herpes simplex virus (HSV) to acyclovir (ACV) was determined with the use of a single dose of the drug (1 and 2 micrograms of ACV per ml for HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively) in two rapid assays: a rapid cytopathic effect inhibitory assay (Rapid CIA) and a rapid dye uptake assay (Rapid DUA). These tests allow the simultaneous determination of virus titer and susceptibility to ACV at a determined viral concentration (100 50% tissue culture infective doses and 100 50% dye uptake units). These tests were compared with a conventional susceptibility assay (dye uptake assay) and showed similar results. Indeterminate results with the Rapid CIA appeared in 3 of 30 samples. With the use of both Rapid CIA and Rapid DUA, we were able to determine the susceptibility of 100% of the isolates. The rapid tests, unlike conventional assays, are able to provide susceptibility results within 3 days after the virus has been isolated from a clinical specimen and could thus play a direct role in therapeutic decisions.

  2. Herpes simplex viral-vector design for efficient transduction of nonneuronal cells without cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Yoshitaka; Marino, Pietro; Verlengia, Gianluca; Uchida, Hiroaki; Goins, William F; Yokota, Shinichiro; Geller, David A; Yoshida, Osamu; Mester, Joseph; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2015-03-31

    The design of highly defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors for transgene expression in nonneuronal cells in the absence of toxic viral-gene activity has been elusive. Here, we report that elements of the latency locus protect a nonviral promoter against silencing in primary human cells in the absence of any viral-gene expression. We identified a CTCF motif cluster 5' to the latency promoter and a known long-term regulatory region as important elements for vigorous transgene expression from a vector that is functionally deleted for all five immediate-early genes and the 15-kb internal repeat region. We inserted a 16.5-kb expression cassette for full-length mouse dystrophin and report robust and durable expression in dystrophin-deficient muscle cells in vitro. Given the broad cell tropism of HSV, our design provides a nontoxic vector that can accommodate large transgene constructs for transduction of a wide variety of cells without vector integration, thereby filling an important void in the current arsenal of gene-therapy vectors.

  3. Potential role of tenofovir vaginal gel for reduction of risk of herpes simplex virus in females

    PubMed Central

    Tan, DHS

    2012-01-01

    A surprising result of the groundbreaking CAPRISA-004 trial, which demonstrated the efficacy of vaginal tenofovir 1% gel in reducing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection by 39% in heterosexual women, was the added benefit of this microbicide in reducing acquisition of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) by 51%. HSV-2 is the most common cause of genital ulcer disease worldwide, and is responsible for considerable morbidity among women and neonates. The virus is further implicated in increasing the risk of both HIV acquisition and transmission, and may have additional adverse consequences in HIV-coinfected persons, making HSV-2 prevention an important clinical and public health objective. While tenofovir had not previously been widely considered to be an anti-herpes drug, in vitro activity against HSV is well documented, raising interest in potential future applications of tenofovir and its prodrugs in HSV-2 control. This article reviews the currently available data for tenofovir as an anti-herpes agent, as well as unanswered questions about delivery systems, drug formulation, rectal administration, drug resistance, and clinical applications. PMID:22927765

  4. Functional IRF3 deficiency in a patient with herpes simplex encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Line Lykke; Mørk, Nanna; Reinert, Line S.; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Narita, Ryo; Jørgensen, Sofie E.; Skipper, Kristian A.; Höning, Klara; Gad, Hans Henrik; Østergaard, Lars; Ørntoft, Torben F.; Hornung, Veit; Paludan, Søren R.; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Fujita, Takashi; Christiansen, Mette; Hartmann, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) in children has previously been linked to defects in type I interferon (IFN) production downstream of Toll-like receptor 3. Here, we describe a novel genetic etiology of HSE by identifying a heterozygous loss-of-function mutation in the IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) gene, leading to autosomal dominant (AD) IRF3 deficiency by haploinsufficiency, in an adolescent female patient with HSE. IRF3 is activated by most pattern recognition receptors recognizing viral infections and plays an essential role in induction of type I IFN. The identified IRF3 R285Q amino acid substitution results in impaired IFN responses to HSV-1 infection and particularly impairs signaling through the TLR3–TRIF pathway. In addition, the R285Q mutant of IRF3 fails to become phosphorylated at S386 and undergo dimerization, and thus has impaired ability to activate transcription. Finally, transduction with WT IRF3 rescues the ability of patient fibroblasts to express IFN in response to HSV-1 infection. The identification of IRF3 deficiency in HSE provides the first description of a defect in an IFN-regulating transcription factor conferring increased susceptibility to a viral infection in the CNS in humans. PMID:26216125

  5. Biosafety of gene therapy vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Lim, Filip; Khalique, Hena; Ventosa, Maria; Baldo, Aline

    2013-12-01

    The majority of humans have been infected with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) and harbor its viral DNA in the latent form within neurons for lifetime. This, combined with the absence of serious adverse effects due to HSV-1 derived vectors in clinical trials so far, highlight the potential to use this virus to develop neuronal gene transfer vectors which are transparent to the host, allowing the effects of the transgene to act without interference from the transfer system eg., for functional genomics in basic neuroscience or gene therapy of neurological disorders. On the other hand, other HSV-1 derived vectors which also have a promising perspective in the clinic, are designed to have enhanced cytotoxicity in certain cell types, as in the case of oncolytic vectors. Understanding virus-host interactions is fundamental not only to the success of these gene therapy vectors but also with respect to identifying and minimizing biohazards associated with their use. In this review we discuss characteristics of HSV-1 and gene therapy vectors derived from this virus which are useful to consider in the context of biosafety risk assessment and risk management.

  6. Alternative Entry Receptors for Herpes Simplex Virus and Their Roles in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Joann M.; Lin, Erick; Susmarski, Nanette; Yoon, Miri; Zago, Anna; Ware, Carl F.; Pfeffer, Klaus; Miyoshi, Jun; Takai, Yoshimi; Spear, Patricia G.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Either herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM, TNFRSF14) or nectin-1 (PVRL1) is sufficient for herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection of cultured cells. The contribution of individual receptors to infection in vivo and to disease is less clear. To assess this, Tnfrsf14 −/− and/or Pvrl1 −/− mice were challenged intravaginally with HSV-2. Infection of the vaginal epithelium occurred in the absence of either HVEM or nectin-1, but was virtually undetectable when both receptors were absent, indicating that either HVEM or nectin-1 was necessary. Absence of nectin-1 (but not HVEM) reduced efficiency of infection of the vaginal epithelium and viral spread to the nervous system, attenuating neurological disease and preventing external lesion development. While nectin-1 proved not to be essential for infection of the nervous system, it is required for the full manifestations of disease. This study illustrates the value of mutant mice for understanding receptor contributions to disease caused by a human virus. PMID:18005714

  7. Infected cell protein 0 functional domains and their coordination in herpes simplex virus replication.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haidong

    2016-02-12

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen that establishes latent infection in ganglia neurons. Its unique life cycle requires a balanced "conquer and compromise" strategy to deal with the host anti-viral defenses. One of HSV-1 α (immediate early) gene products, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a multifunctional protein that interacts with and modulates a wide range of cellular defensive pathways. These pathways may locate in different cell compartments, which then migrate or exchange factors upon stimulation, for the purpose of a concerted and effective defense. ICP0 is able to simultaneously attack multiple host pathways by either degrading key restrictive factors or modifying repressive complexes. This is a viral protein that contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates among different cell compartments and interacts with major defensive complexes. The multiple functional domains of ICP0 can work independently and at the same time coordinate with each other. Dissecting the functional domains of ICP0 and delineating the coordination of these domains will help us understand HSV-1 pathogenicity as well as host defense mechanisms. This article focuses on describing individual ICP0 domains, their biochemical properties and their implication in HSV-1 infection. By putting individual domain functions back into the picture of host anti-viral defense network, this review seeks to elaborate the complex interactions between HSV-1 and its host.

  8. Structural analysis of herpes simplex virus by optical super-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Romain F.; Albecka, Anna; van de Linde, Sebastian; Rees, Eric J.; Crump, Colin M.; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is one of the most widespread pathogens among humans. Although the structure of HSV-1 has been extensively investigated, the precise organization of tegument and envelope proteins remains elusive. Here we use super-resolution imaging by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) in combination with a model-based analysis of single-molecule localization data, to determine the position of protein layers within virus particles. We resolve different protein layers within individual HSV-1 particles using multi-colour dSTORM imaging and discriminate envelope-anchored glycoproteins from tegument proteins, both in purified virions and in virions present in infected cells. Precise characterization of HSV-1 structure was achieved by particle averaging of purified viruses and model-based analysis of the radial distribution of the tegument proteins VP16, VP1/2 and pUL37, and envelope protein gD. From this data, we propose a model of the protein organization inside the tegument.

  9. Genetic studies of cell fusion induced by herpes simplex virus type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Read, G.S.; Person, S.; Keller, P.M.

    1980-07-01

    Eight cell fusion-causing syn mutants were isolated from the KOS strain of herpes simplex virus type 1. Unlike the wild-type virus, the mutants produced plaques containing multinucleated cells, or syncytia. Fusion kinetics curves were established with a Coulter Counter assay for the mutants and wild-type virus in single infections of human embryonic lung (HEL) cells, for the mutants and wild-type virus in mixed infections (dominance test), and for pairs of mutants in mixed infection and proceeded with an exponential decrease in the number of small single cells. At some later time that was characteristic of the mutant, there was a significant reduction in the rate of fusion for all but possibly one of the mutants. Although the wild-type virus did not produce syncytial plaques, it did induce a small amount of fusion that stopped abruptly about 2 h after it started. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that both mutants and wild type induce an active fusion inducer and that the activity of this inducer is subsequently inhibited. The extent of fusion is apparently determined by the length of the interval during which the fusion inducer is active. That fusion is actively inhibited in wild-type infections is indicated by the observation that syn mutant-infected cells fused more readily with uninfected cells than with wild type-infected cells.

  10. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of herpes simplex virus encephalitis with a radiolabeled antiviral drug

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Y.; Price, R.W.; Rottenberg, D.A.; Fox, J.J.; Su, T.L.; Watanabe, K.A.; Philips, F.S.

    1982-09-17

    2'-Fluoro-5-methyl-1-..beta..-D-arabinosyluracil (FMAU) labeled with carbon-14 was used to image herpes simplex virus type 1-infected regions of rat brain by quantitative autoradiography. FMAU is a potent antiviral pyrimidine nucleoside which is selectively phosphorylated by virus-coded thymidine kinase. When the labeled FMAU was administered 6 hours before the rats were killed, the selective uptake and concentration of the drug and its metabolites by infected cells (defined by immunoperoxidase staining of viral antigens) allowed quantitative definition and mapping of HSV-1-infected structures in autoradiograms of brain sections. These results shown that quantitative autoradiography can be used to characterize the local metabolism of antiviral drugs by infected cells in vivo. They also suggest that the selective uptake of drugs that exploit viral thymidine kinase for their antiviral effect can, by appropriate labeling, be used in conjunction with clinical neuroimaging techniques to define infected regions of human brain, thereby providing a new approach to the diagnosis of herpes encephalitis in man.

  11. Oligonucleotides designed to inhibit TLR9 block Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection at multiple steps.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Monica M; Gauger, Joshua J L; Brandt, Curtis R

    2014-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is an important human pathogen which requires activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) during its replication cycle. The persistent nature of HSV-1 infection, and the emergence of drug-resistant strains, highlights the importance of research to develop new antiviral agents. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a prominent role during the early antiviral response by recognizing viral nucleic acid and gene products, activating NFκB, and stimulating the production of inflammatory cytokines. We demonstrate a significant effect on HSV-1 replication in ARPE-19 and Vero cells when oligonucleotides designed to inhibit TLR9 are added 2h prior to infection. A greater than 90% reduction in the yield of infectious virus was achieved at oligonucleotide concentrations of 10-20 μM. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides prevented expression of essential immediate early herpes gene products as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy and Western blotting. TLR9 oligonucleotides also interfered with viral attachment and entry. A TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide containing five adjacent guanosine residues (G-ODN) exhibited virucidal activity and inhibited HSV-1 replication when added post-infection. The antiviral effect of the TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides did not depend on the presence of TLR9 protein, suggesting a mechanism of inhibition that is not TLR9 specific. TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotides also reduced NFκB activity in nuclear extracts. Studies using these TLR inhibitors in the context of viral infection should be interpreted with caution.

  12. Isolation of virus from brain after immunosuppression of mice with latent herpes simplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastrukoff, Lorne; Long, Carol; Doherty, Peter C.; Wroblewska, Zofia; Koprowski, Hilary

    1981-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is usually present in a latent form in the trigeminal ganglion of man1-3. Various stress factors may induce virus reactivation, which is manifest by a lip lesion (innervated from the trigeminal ganglion) and the production of infectious virus. The considerable experimental efforts to define the conditions that lead to the reactivation of latent HSV have concentrated on isolating virus either from the original extraneural site of virus inoculation, or from cell-free homogenates of sensory ganglia from latently infected animals4-15. Recent DNA hybridization experiments resulted in the demonstration of the presence of HSV genomes in the brain tissue of both latently infected mice, and of humans who showed no clinical symptoms of HSV (ref. 16 and N. Fraser, personal communication). This led us to consider the possibility that HSV may be present in brain tissue as the result of either reactivation of the virus in brain cells or the passage of reactivated virus from trigeminal ganglia through the brain stem to the brain. The presence of infectious HSV in brain tissue has not previously been demonstrated; yet this could be a factor in chronic, relapsing neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis. We have now shown experimentally that mice carrying latent HSV in their trigeminal ganglia may, following massive immunosuppression, express infectious virus in the central nervous system (CNS).

  13. Preclinical evaluation of engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus for the treatment of pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Megison, Michael L; Gillory, Lauren A; Stewart, Jerry E; Nabers, Hugh C; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth; Waters, Alicia M; Coleman, Jennifer M; Kelly, Virginia; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey; Friedman, Gregory K; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Recently, investigators showed that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas that were treated with a neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV), M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ134.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal cells. Previous studies have shown antitumor effects of other oHSV against a number of adult tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of M002 against difficult to treat pediatric liver and kidney tumors. We showed that the oHSV, M002, infected, replicated, and decreased cell survival in hepatoblastoma, malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor, and renal sarcoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly increased survival and decreased tumor growth. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 (nectin-1) was present in human hepatoblastoma and malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted these rare aggressive tumor types and that M002 may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed pediatric solid tumors.

  14. Effect of Repeat Dosing of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus on Preclinical Models of Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Waters, Alicia M; Stafman, Laura L; Garner, Evan F; Mruthyunjayappa, Smitha; Stewart, Jerry E; Friedman, Gregory K; Coleman, Jennifer M; Markert, James M; Gillespie, G Yancey; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a tumor of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common sarcoma of childhood. Despite multidrug chemotherapy regimens, surgical intervention, and radiation treatment, outcomes remain poor, especially in advanced disease, and novel therapies are needed for the treatment of these aggressive malignancies. Genetically engineered oncolytic viruses, such as herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV), are currently being explored as treatments for pediatric tumors. M002, an oncolytic HSV, has both copies of the γ134.5 gene deleted, enabling replication in tumor cells but thwarting infection of normal, postmitotic cells. We hypothesized that M002 would infect human RMS tumor cells and lead to decreased tumor cell survival in vitro and impede tumor growth in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrated that M002 could infect, replicate in, and decrease cell survival in both embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) cells. Additionally, M002 reduced xenograft tumor growth and increased animal survival in both ARMS and ERMS. Most importantly, we showed for the first time that repeated dosing of oncolytic virus coupled with low-dose radiation provided improved tumor response in RMS. These findings provide support for the clinical investigation of oncolytic HSV in pediatric RMS.

  15. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-derived recombinant vectors for gene transfer and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Marconi, Peggy; Fraefel, Cornel; Epstein, Alberto L

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153-kilobase pair (kbp) double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes the approach most commonly used to prepare recombinant HSV-1 vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria.

  16. Viral forensic genomics reveals the relatedness of classic herpes simplex virus strains KOS, KOS63, and KOS79.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Christopher D; Renner, Daniel W; Shreve, Jacob T; Tafuri, Yolanda; Payne, Kimberly M; Dix, Richard D; Kinchington, Paul R; Gatherer, Derek; Szpara, Moriah L

    2016-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a widespread global pathogen, of which the strain KOS is one of the most extensively studied. Previous sequence studies revealed that KOS does not cluster with other strains of North American geographic origin, but instead clustered with Asian strains. We sequenced a historical isolate of the original KOS strain, called KOS63, along with a separately isolated strain attributed to the same source individual, termed KOS79. Genomic analyses revealed that KOS63 closely resembled other recently sequenced isolates of KOS and was of Asian origin, but that KOS79 was a genetically unrelated strain that clustered in genetic distance analyses with HSV-1 strains of North American/European origin. These data suggest that the human source of KOS63 and KOS79 could have been infected with two genetically unrelated strains of disparate geographic origins. A PCR RFLP test was developed for rapid identification of these strains.

  17. Clinical and virologic efficacy of herpes simplex virus type 2 suppression by acyclovir in a multicontinent clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jonathan; Celum, Connie; Wang, Jing; Hughes, James; Sanchez, Jorge; Cowan, Frances; Reid, Stewart; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna

    2010-04-15

    Acyclovir suppressive therapy (400 mg twice daily) reduces herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2-associated genital ulcer disease and lesional HSV shedding. In an international trial of acyclovir for suppression of HSV type 2 to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition (HIV Prevention Trials Network 039), acyclovir had a smaller effect on the frequency of genital ulcer disease as well as a smaller effect on the frequency and quantity of lesional HSV DNA in African women and Peruvian men, compared with its effects in men in the United States. The observed regional variation in the clinical and virologic efficacy of acyclovir for HSV suppression warrants further evaluation of determinants of responses to acyclovir. (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00076232.).

  18. [Cytotoxicity of cytosine deaminase and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase genes in melanoma cells is independent on promoter strength].

    PubMed

    Alekseenko, I V; Kuz'min, D V; Pleshkan, V V; Zinov'eva, M V; Sverdlov, E D

    2013-01-01

    In preparation of the therapeutic genetic constructs aimed to the gene-programmed enzymatic transformation of the non-toxic prodrug into toxin within cancer cells the right choice of regulatory elements (promoters and enhancers) is essential. This is widely accepted that the efficiency of the gene therapy constructions is dependent, in particular, on the strength of promoters driving the expression of the therapeutic genes. In this work we demonstrated, using the melanoma-specific promoters and enhancers of human melanoma inhibitory activity and mouse tyrosinase gene, that for the development of cytotoxic effect the promoter strength is not of primary importance. In the case of HSVtk, coding for the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, and FCU1, coding for cytosine deaminase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase hybrid protein genes, their cytotoxic activity was determined by the quantity of the added prodrug.

  19. HVint: A Strategy for Identifying Novel Protein-Protein Interactions in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1*

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Anna; Buch, Anna; Sodeik, Beate; Cristea, Ileana Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesviruses are widespread human pathogens with a remarkable impact on worldwide public health. Despite intense decades of research, the molecular details in many aspects of their function remain to be fully characterized. To unravel the details of how these viruses operate, a thorough understanding of the relationships between the involved components is key. Here, we present HVint, a novel protein-protein intraviral interaction resource for herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) integrating data from five external sources. To assess each interaction, we used a scoring scheme that takes into consideration aspects such as the type of detection method and the number of lines of evidence. The coverage of the initial interactome was further increased using evolutionary information, by importing interactions reported for other human herpesviruses. These latter interactions constitute, therefore, computational predictions for potential novel interactions in HSV-1. An independent experimental analysis was performed to confirm a subset of our predicted interactions. This subset covers proteins that contribute to nuclear egress and primary envelopment events, including VP26, pUL31, pUL40, and the recently characterized pUL32 and pUL21. Our findings support a coordinated crosstalk between VP26 and proteins such as pUL31, pUS9, and the CSVC complex, contributing to the development of a model describing the nuclear egress and primary envelopment pathways of newly synthesized HSV-1 capsids. The results are also consistent with recent findings on the involvement of pUL32 in capsid maturation and early tegumentation events. Further, they open the door to new hypotheses on virus-specific regulators of pUS9-dependent transport. To make this repository of interactions readily accessible for the scientific community, we also developed a user-friendly and interactive web interface. Our approach demonstrates the power of computational predictions to assist in the design of

  20. Nelfinavir Inhibits Maturation and Export of Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Kalu, Nene N.; Desai, Prashant J.; Shirley, Courtney M.; Gibson, Wade; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nelfinavir (NFV) is an HIV-1 protease inhibitor with demonstrated antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and several other herpesviruses. However, the stages of HSV-1 replication inhibited by NFV have not been explored. In this study, we investigated the effects of NFV on capsid assembly and envelopment. We confirmed the inhibitory effects of NFV on HSV-1 replication by plaque assay and found that treatment with NFV did not affect capsid assembly, activity of the HSV-1 maturational protease, or formation of DNA-containing capsids in the nucleus. Confocal and electron microscopy studies showed that these capsids were transported to the cytoplasm but failed to complete secondary envelopment and subsequent exit from the cell. Consistent with the microscopy results, a light-scattering band corresponding to enveloped virions was not evident following sucrose gradient rate-velocity separation of lysates from drug-treated cells. Evidence of a possibly related effect of NFV on viral glycoprotein maturation was also discovered. NFV also inhibited the replication of an HSV-1 thymidine kinase mutant resistant to nucleoside analogues such as acyclovir. Given that NFV is neither a nucleoside mimic nor a known inhibitor of nucleic acid synthesis, this was expected and suggests its potential as a coinhibitor or alternate antiviral therapeutic agent in cases of resistance. IMPORTANCE Nelfinavir (NFV) is a clinically important antiviral drug that inhibits production of infectious HIV. It was reported to inhibit herpesviruses in cell culture. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections are common and often associated with several diseases. The studies we describe here confirm and extend earlier findings by investigating how NFV interferes with HSV-1 replication. We show that early steps in virus formation (e.g., assembly of DNA-containing capsids in the nucleus and their movement into the cytoplasm) appear to be unaffected by NFV, whereas later steps (e

  1. Comparison of Washing and Swabbing Procedures for Collecting Genital Fluids To Assess Cervicovaginal Shedding of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ndjoyi-Mbiguino, Angélique; Ozouaki, Francis; Legoff, Jérôme; Mbopi-Kéou, François-Xavier; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Onas, Isabelle Ndombi; Avoune, Evelyne; Bélec, Laurent

    2003-01-01

    Asymptomatic genital shedding of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) DNA was evidenced by real-time PCR in 25 (13.2%) of 188 cervicovaginal lavage samples and in only 13 (6.9%) paired cervicovaginal samples from 188 HSV-2-seropositive, nonpregnant childbearing-aged human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative women living in Gabon. These observations demonstrate that cervicovaginal washing is more suitable than endocervicovaginal swabbing for detecting and quantifying HSV-2 DNA by PCR in female genital secretions. PMID:12791898

  2. Quantification of Anisakis simplex allergens in fresh, long-term frozen, and cooked fish muscle.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mahillo, Ana Isabel; González-Muñoz, Miguel; de las Heras, Cristina; Tejada, Margarita; Moneo, Ignacio

    2010-08-01

    Fish-borne parasitic zoonoses such as Anisakiasis were once limited to people living in countries where raw or undercooked fish is traditionally consumed. Nowadays, several factors, such as the growing international markets, the improved transportation systems, the population movements, and the expansion of ethnic ways of cooking in developed countries, have increased the population exposed to these parasites. Improved diagnosis technology and a better knowledge of the symptoms by clinicians have increased the Anisakiasis cases worldwide. Dietary recommendations to Anisakis-sensitized patients include the consumption of frozen or well-cooked fish, but these probably do not defend sensitized patients from allergen exposure. The aim of our work was to develop a sensitive and specific method to detect and quantify Anisakis simplex allergens in fish muscle and its derivatives. Protein extraction was made in saline buffer followed by preparation under acid conditions. A. simplex antigens were detected by IgG immunoblot and quantified by dot blot. The allergenic properties of the extracts were assessed by IgE immunoblotting and basophil activation test. We were able to detect less than 1 ppm of A. simplex antigens, among them the allergen Ani s 4, in fish muscle with no cross-reactions and with a recovery rate of 82.5%. A. simplex antigens were detected in hakes and anchovies but not in sardines, red mullets, or shellfish. We detected A. simplex allergens in cooked hakes and also in hake stock. We proved that A. simplex allergens are preserved in long-term frozen storage (-20 degrees C +/- 2 degrees C for 11 months) of parasitized hakes. Basophil activation tests have proven the capability of the A. simplex-positive fish extracts to induce allergic symptoms.

  3. Clinical Correlates of Herpes Simplex Virus Viremia Among Hospitalized Adults

    PubMed Central

    Berrington, William R.; Jerome, Keith R.; Cook, Linda; Wald, Anna; Corey, Lawrence; Casper, Corey

    2009-01-01

    Background The quantification of herpes simplex virus (HSV) DNA from the peripheral blood is often used to evaluate patients suspected of having disseminated HSV infection. Few studies have examined the clinical correlates of HSV viremia among adults. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of blood samples sent to a reference molecular virology diagnostic facility at a university hospital for quantification of HSV DNA between October 2001 and June 2006. Medical records of patients with detectable HSV DNA were reviewed to abstract relevant clinical characteristics. Results HSV DNA was detected in 37 (4.0%) of 951 samples from 29 individual patients. 19 (65.5%) were >16 years of age, and detailed medical records were available for review from 13 (68.4%) of 19 adults patients. Of the 10 patients whose HSV infection was typed, 6 (60%) had HSV-2, 3 (30%) had HSV-1, and one had evidence of both HSV-1 and HSV-2 infection. All viremic patients were treated with antiviral medications. The most common clinical findings were hepatitis (62%), fever (54%), CNS alterations (46%), skin lesions (38%), abdominal pain (31%), and sepsis (31%). Respiratory failure (23%) was uncommon. Patients with HSV viremia were observed to have a high mortality rate (6 of 10 immunocompromised and 1 of 3 immunocompetent individuals). Conclusions HSV viremia may be associated with a variety of morbid signs and symptoms in hospitalized immunocompetent and immunocompromised adults, and is associated with high rates of mortality, though causality can only be determined by additional studies. PMID:19807272

  4. Simplex-in-cell technique for collisionless plasma simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kates-Harbeck, Julian; Totorica, Samuel; Zrake, Jonathan; Abel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We extend the simplex-in-cell (SIC) technique recently introduced in the context of collisionless dark matter fluids [1,2] to the case of collisionless plasmas. The six-dimensional phase space distribution function f (x , v) is represented by an ensemble of three-dimensional manifolds, which we refer to as sheets. The electric potential field is obtained by solving the Poisson equation on a uniform mesh, where the charge density is evaluated by a spatial projection of the phase space sheets. The SIC representation of phase space density facilitates robust, high accuracy numerical evolution of the Vlasov-Poisson system using significantly fewer tracer particles than comparable particle-in-cell (PIC) approaches by reducing the numerical shot-noise associated with the latter. We introduce the SIC formulation and describe its implementation in a new code, which we validate using standard test problems including plasma oscillations, Landau damping, and two stream instabilities in one dimension. Merits of the new scheme are shown to include higher accuracy and faster convergence rates in the number of particles. We finally motivate and outline the efficient application of SIC to higher dimensional problems.

  5. Unravelling the genetic basis of simplex Retinitis Pigmentosa cases

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Gil, Nereida; González-del Pozo, María; Martín-Sánchez, Marta; Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; Rodríguez-de la Rúa, Enrique; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is the most common form of inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD) characterized ultimately by photoreceptors degeneration. Exhibiting great clinical and genetic heterogeneity, RP can be inherited as an autosomal dominant (ad), autosomal recessive (ar) and X-linked (xl) disorder. Although the relative prevalence of each form varies somewhat between populations, a major proportion (41% in Spain) of patients represent simplex cases (sRP) in which the mode of inheritance is unknown. Molecular genetic diagnostic is crucial, but also challenging, for sRP patients because any of the 81 RP genes identified to date may be causative. Herein, we report the use of a customized targeted gene panel consisting of 68 IRD genes for the molecular characterization of 106 sRP cases. The diagnostic rate was 62.26% (66 of 106) with a proportion of clinical refinements of 30.3%, demonstrating the high efficiency of this genomic approach even for clinically ambiguous cases. The high number of patients diagnosed here has allowed us to study in detail the genetic basis of the sRP. The solved sRP cohort is composed of 62.1% of arRP cases, 24.2% of adRP and 13.6% of xlRP, which implies consequences for counselling of patients and families. PMID:28157192

  6. Subassemblies and Asymmetry in Assembly of Herpes Simplex Virus Procapsid

    PubMed Central

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Newcomb, William W.; Cheng, Naiqian; Winkler, Dennis C.; Fontana, Juan; Heymann, J. Bernard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) capsid is a massive particle (~200 MDa; 1,250-Å diameter) with T=16 icosahedral symmetry. It initially assembles as a procapsid with ~4,000 protein subunits of 11 different kinds. The procapsid undergoes major changes in structure and composition as it matures, a process driven by proteolysis and expulsion of the internal scaffolding protein. Assembly also relies on an external scaffolding protein, the triplex, an α2β heterotrimer that coordinates neighboring capsomers in the procapsid and becomes a stabilizing clamp in the mature capsid. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate its assembly, we developed a novel isolation procedure for the metastable procapsid and collected a large set of cryo-electron microscopy data. In addition to procapsids, these preparations contain maturation intermediates, which were distinguished by classifying the images and calculating a three-dimensional reconstruction for each class. Appraisal of the procapsid structure led to a new model for assembly; in it, the protomer (assembly unit) consists of one triplex, surrounded by three major capsid protein (MCP) subunits. The model exploits the triplexes’ departure from 3-fold symmetry to explain the highly skewed MCP hexamers, the triplex orientations at each 3-fold site, and the T=16 architecture. These observations also yielded new insights into maturation. PMID:26443463

  7. Subcell resolution in simplex stochastic collocation for spatial discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witteveen, Jeroen A. S.; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2013-10-01

    Subcell resolution has been used in the Finite Volume Method (FVM) to obtain accurate approximations of discontinuities in the physical space. Stochastic methods are usually based on local adaptivity for resolving discontinuities in the stochastic dimensions. However, the adaptive refinement in the probability space is ineffective in the non-intrusive uncertainty quantification framework, if the stochastic discontinuity is caused by a discontinuity in the physical space with a random location. The dependence of the discontinuity location in the probability space on the spatial coordinates then results in a staircase approximation of the statistics, which leads to first-order error convergence and an underprediction of the maximum standard deviation. To avoid these problems, we introduce subcell resolution into the Simplex Stochastic Collocation (SSC) method for obtaining a truly discontinuous representation of random spatial discontinuities in the interior of the cells discretizing the probability space. The presented SSC-SR method is based on resolving the discontinuity location in the probability space explicitly as function of the spatial coordinates and extending the stochastic response surface approximations up to the predicted discontinuity location. The applications to a linear advection problem, the inviscid Burgers' equation, a shock tube problem, and the transonic flow over the RAE 2822 airfoil show that SSC-SR resolves random spatial discontinuities with multiple stochastic and spatial dimensions accurately using a minimal number of samples.

  8. Unravelling the genetic basis of simplex Retinitis Pigmentosa cases.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Gil, Nereida; González-Del Pozo, María; Martín-Sánchez, Marta; Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; Rodríguez-de la Rúa, Enrique; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2017-02-03

    Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is the most common form of inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD) characterized ultimately by photoreceptors degeneration. Exhibiting great clinical and genetic heterogeneity, RP can be inherited as an autosomal dominant (ad), autosomal recessive (ar) and X-linked (xl) disorder. Although the relative prevalence of each form varies somewhat between populations, a major proportion (41% in Spain) of patients represent simplex cases (sRP) in which the mode of inheritance is unknown. Molecular genetic diagnostic is crucial, but also challenging, for sRP patients because any of the 81 RP genes identified to date may be causative. Herein, we report the use of a customized targeted gene panel consisting of 68 IRD genes for the molecular characterization of 106 sRP cases. The diagnostic rate was 62.26% (66 of 106) with a proportion of clinical refinements of 30.3%, demonstrating the high efficiency of this genomic approach even for clinically ambiguous cases. The high number of patients diagnosed here has allowed us to study in detail the genetic basis of the sRP. The solved sRP cohort is composed of 62.1% of arRP cases, 24.2% of adRP and 13.6% of xlRP, which implies consequences for counselling of patients and families.

  9. Sunlight is an important causative factor of recurrent herpes simplex.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Masamitsu; Nagai, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the role of exposure to solar UV radiation (UVR) in primary and recurrent herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infections, we investigated the self-reported cause of infection among diagnosed patients in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. Among 4295 infected patients, 3678 had HSV-1, and 2656 of those patients (72.2%) had a recurrent flare-up. Fatigue was the most commonly reported cause of a flare-up among all patients, followed by the common cold and sun exposure. Sun-induced HSV-1 flare-up was reported by 10.4% of the total study population. However, this increased to 19.7% among patients diagnosed in July and August, to 28% among patients younger than 30 years diagnosed in July and August, and to 40% among patients younger than 30 years diagnosed in July and August with a recurrent infection. These results suggest the important role of solar UVR in the development of recurrent HSV-1, possibly due to UVR-induced immunosuppression or direct reactivation of HSV-1 in the neural ganglia.

  10. GPU implementation of the simplex identification via split augmented Lagrangian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla, Jorge; Nascimento, José M. P.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral imaging can be used for object detection and for discriminating between different objects based on their spectral characteristics. One of the main problems of hyperspectral data analysis is the presence of mixed pixels, due to the low spatial resolution of such images. This means that several spectrally pure signatures (endmembers) are combined into the same mixed pixel. Linear spectral unmixing follows an unsupervised approach which aims at inferring pure spectral signatures and their material fractions at each pixel of the scene. The huge data volumes acquired by such sensors put stringent requirements on processing and unmixing methods. This paper proposes an efficient implementation of a unsupervised linear unmixing method on GPUs using CUDA. The method finds the smallest simplex by solving a sequence of nonsmooth convex subproblems using variable splitting to obtain a constraint formulation, and then applying an augmented Lagrangian technique. The parallel implementation of SISAL presented in this work exploits the GPU architecture at low level, using shared memory and coalesced accesses to memory. The results herein presented indicate that the GPU implementation can significantly accelerate the method's execution over big datasets while maintaining the methods accuracy.

  11. Herpes Simplex Virus Latency: The DNA Repair-Centered Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Like all herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) is able to produce lytic or latent infections depending on the host cell type. Lytic infections occur in a broad range of cells while latency is highly specific for neurons. Although latency suggests itself as an attractive target for novel anti-HSV1 therapies, progress in their development has been slowed due in part to a lack of agreement about the basic biochemical mechanisms involved. Among the possibilities being considered is a pathway in which DNA repair mechanisms play a central role. Repair is suggested to be involved in both HSV1 entry into latency and reactivation from it. Here I describe the basic features of the DNA repair-centered pathway and discuss some of the experimental evidence supporting it. The pathway is particularly attractive because it is able to account for important features of the latent response, including the specificity for neurons, the specificity for neurons of the peripheral compared to the central nervous system, the high rate of genetic recombination in HSV1-infected cells, and the genetic identity of infecting and reactivated virus. PMID:28255301

  12. Antiviral activity of Undaria pinnatifida against herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kenneth D; Dragar, Charles

    2004-07-01

    The major component of an aqueous extract of the seaweed Undaria pinnati fi da has been identified previously as a galactofucan (GFS), a sulfated polysaccharide. The galactofucan was partially purified and the material tested in this study is 75% pure galactofucan sulfate. GFS was evaluated for antiviral activity against 32 clinical strains of herpes simplex virus (HSV): 14 strains of HSV-1 and 18 strains of HSV-2. Twelve strains (four HSV-1 and eight HSV-2) were resistant to acyclovir (ACV-R) and 20 strains (10 HSV-1 and 10 HSV-2) were susceptible to ACV (ACV-S). The median IC(50) of GFS for the 14 strains of HSV-1 was 32 micro g/mL. The median IC(50) of GFS for the 18 strains of HSV-2 was 0.5 micro g/mL. GFS is significantly more active against clinical strains of HSV-2 than HSV-1, p < 0.001. The mode of action of the GFS was shown to be the inhibition of viral binding and entry into the host cell. The cytotoxicity of GFS was >4.0 mg/mL in the neutral red dye uptake assay indicating that GFS is non-toxic in this assay.

  13. Bioreactor production of recombinant herpes simplex virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Knop, David R; Harrell, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Serotypical application of herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors to gene therapy (type 1) and prophylactic vaccines (types 1 and 2) has garnered substantial clinical interest recently. HSV vectors and amplicons have also been employed as helper virus constructs for manufacture of the dependovirus adeno-associated virus (AAV). Large quantities of infectious HSV stocks are requisite for these therapeutic applications, requiring a scalable vector manufacturing and processing platform comprised of unit operations which accommodate the fragility of HSV. In this study, production of a replication deficient rHSV-1 vector bearing the rep and cap genes of AAV-2 (denoted rHSV-rep2/cap2) was investigated. Adaptation of rHSV production from T225 flasks to a packed bed, fed-batch bioreactor permitted an 1100-fold increment in total vector production without a decrease in specific vector yield (pfu/cell). The fed-batch bioreactor system afforded a rHSV-rep2/cap2 vector recovery of 2.8 x 10(12) pfu. The recovered vector was concentrated by tangential flow filtration (TFF), permitting vector stocks to be formulated at greater than 1.5 x 10(9) pfu/mL.

  14. "Armed" oncolytic herpes simplex viruses for brain tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tomoki

    2008-01-01

    Genetically engineered, conditionally replicating herpes simplex viruses type 1 (HSV-1) are promising therapeutic agents for brain tumors and other solid cancers. They can replicate in situ, spread and exhibit oncolytic activity via a direct cytocidal effect. One of the advantages of HSV-1 is the capacity to incorporate large and/or multiple transgenes within the viral genome. Oncolytic HSV-1 can therefore be "armed" to add certain functions. Recently, the field of armed oncolytic HSV-1 has drastically advanced, due to development of recombinant HSV-1 generation systems that utilize bacterial artificial chromosome and multiple DNA recombinases. Because antitumor immunity is induced in the course of oncolytic activities of HSV-1, transgenes encoding immunomodulatory molecules have been most frequently used for arming. Other armed oncolytic HSV-1 include those that express antiangiogenic factors, fusogenic membrane glycoproteins, suicide gene products, and proapoptotic proteins. Provided that the transgene product does not interfere with viral replication, such arming of oncolytic HSV-1 results in augmentation of antitumor efficacy. Immediate-early viral promoters are often used to control the arming transgenes, but strict-late viral promoters have been shown useful to restrict the expression in the late stage of viral replication when desirable. Some armed oncolytic HSV-1 have been created for the purpose of noninvasive in vivo imaging of viral infection and replication. Development of a wide variety of armed oncolytic HSV-1 will lead to an establishment of a new genre of therapy for brain tumors as well as other cancers.

  15. Herpes simplex virus induces the replication of foreign DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Danovich, R.M.; Frenkel, N.

    1988-08-01

    Plasmids containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) DNA replication origin and the large T gene are replicated in Vero monkey cells but not in rabbit skin cells. Efficient replication of the plasmids was observed in rabbit cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. The HSV-induced replication required the large T antigen and the SV40 replication origin. However, it produced concatemeric molecules resembling replicative intermediates of HSV DNA and was sensitive to phosphonoacetate at concentrations known to inhibit the HSV DNA polymerase. Therefore, it involved the HSV DNA polymerase itself or a viral gene product(s) which was expressed following the replication of HSV DNA. Analyses of test plasmids lacking SV40 or HSV DNA sequences showed that, under some conditions. HSV also induced low-level replication of test plasmids containing no known eucaryotic replication origins. Together, these results show that HSV induces a DNA replicative activity which amplifies foreign DNA. The relevance of these findings to the putative transforming potential of HSV is discussed.

  16. Stabilising the Herpes Simplex Virus capsid by DNA packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuite, Gijs; Radtke, Kerstin; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter

    2009-03-01

    Three different types of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) nuclear capsids can be distinguished, A, B and C capsids. These capsids types are, respectively, empty, contain scaffold proteins, or hold DNA. We investigate the physical properties of these three capsids by combining biochemical and nanoindentation techniques. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments show that A and C capsids are mechanically indistinguishable whereas B capsids already break at much lower forces. By extracting the pentamers with 2.0 M GuHCl or 6.0 M Urea we demonstrate an increased flexibility of all three capsid types. Remarkably, the breaking force of the B capsids without pentamers does not change, while the modified A and C capsids show a large drop in their breaking force to approximately the value of the B capsids. This result indicates that upon DNA packaging a structural change at or near the pentamers occurs which mechanically reinforces the capsids structure. The reported binding of proteins UL17/UL25 to the pentamers of the A and C capsids seems the most likely candidate for such capsids strengthening. Finally, the data supports the view that initiation of DNA packaging triggers the maturation of HSV-1 capsids.

  17. Mother-to-Child Transmission of Herpes Simplex Virus.

    PubMed

    James, Scott H; Sheffield, Jeanne S; Kimberlin, David W

    2014-09-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or type 2 (HSV-2), both alpha herpesviruses, are highly prevalent worldwide. Both HSV types commonly cause genital infection, which, when acquired or reactivated during pregnancy, carries with it the risk of transmission to the fetus or neonate. Women who acquire primary or first-episode genital herpes during pregnancy are at greater risk for transmitting the infection than are women with recurrent genital herpes. Because viral infection and reactivation are frequently asymptomatic, many affected women are unaware of their infection and risk of transmission to their infants. Neonatal HSV infection can have devastating long-term consequences, especially when the central nervous system (CNS) is involved. Treatment of affected neonates with intravenous acyclovir has improved outcomes but there is room for further improvement, especially in regard to CNS disease. Working with pregnant women to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HSV is an important component in reducing the overall disease burden of neonatal HSV infections.

  18. Herpes simplex virus hepatitis after pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hori, T; Ogura, Y; Okamoto, S; Nakajima, A; Kami, K; Iwasaki, J; Yonekawa, Y; Ogawa, K; Oike, F; Takada, Y; Egawa, H; Nguyen, J H; Uemoto, S

    2010-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) hepatitis has a fatal impact on the outcome of organ transplanted recipients. Here, we present a thought-provoking case of HSV hepatitis in a high-risk recipient after living-related liver transplantation (LRLT). A 1-month-old female newborn infant was affected by HSV encephalitis. Fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) of unknown etiology occurred suddenly at 4.4 years of age. Viral infections were ruled out as the cause of FHF. Intensive care including plasma exchange (PE) was started, and the preoperative treatments for ABO incompatibility were performed. Thereafter, LRLT was performed emergently. Although strong immunosuppression for ABO incompatibility was continued after LRLT, antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) occurred on postoperative day (POD) 4. PE was repeated and improvements were obtained. However, liver dysfunction appeared on POD 8. Histopathological findings of liver needle biopsy clearly revealed HSV hepatitis, although the results of HSV DNA and antibody titer in blood sample did not clearly indicate HSV infection. On POD 21, thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) occurred and the plasma and immunoglobulin were replenished. Our pediatric recipient recovered successfully from AMR, HSV hepatitis, TMA, and repeated sepsis. We conclude that well considered therapy based on the real-time detection of HSV hepatitis is indispensable for the further improvements of outcome in HSV hepatitis after LRLT.

  19. Effect of preexisting anti-herpes immunity on the efficacy of herpes simplex viral therapy in a murine intraperitoneal tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lambright, E S; Kang, E H; Force, S; Lanuti, M; Caparrelli, D; Kaiser, L R; Albelda, S M; Molnar-Kimber, K L

    2000-10-01

    HSV-1716, a replicating nonneurovirulent herpes simplex virus type 1, has shown efficacy in treating multiple types of human tumors in immunodeficient mice. Since the majority of the human population has been previously exposed to herpes simplex virus, the efficacy of HSV-based oncolytic therapy was investigated in an immunocompetent animal tumor model. EJ-6-2-Bam-6a, a tumor cell line derived from h-ras-transformed murine fibroblast, exhibit a diffuse growth pattern in the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c mice and replicate HSV-1716 to titers observed in human tumors. An established intraperitoneal (ip) tumor model of EJ-6-2-Bam-6a in naive and HSV-immunized mice was used to evaluate the efficacy of single or multiple ip administrations of HSV-1716 (4 x 10(6) pfu/treatment) or of carrier cells, which are irradiated, ex vivo virally infected EJ-6-2-Bam-6a cells that can amplify the viral load in situ. All treated groups significantly prolonged survival versus media control with an approximately 40% long-term survival rate (cure) in the multiply treated, HSV-naive animals. Prior immunization of the mice with HSV did not significantly decrease the median survival of the single or multiply treated HSV-1716 or the carrier cell-treated groups. These studies support the development of replication-selective herpes virus mutants for use in localized intraperitoneal malignancies.

  20. Laboratory diagnosis and epidemiology of herpes simplex 1 and 2 genital infections.

    PubMed

    Glinšek Biškup, Urška; Uršič, Tina; Petrovec, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 are the main cause of genital ulcers worldwide. Although herpes simplex virus type 2 is the major cause of genital lesions, herpes simplex virus type 1 accounts for half of new cases in developed countries. Herpes simplex virus type 2 seroprevalence rises with sexual activity from adolescence through adulthood. Slovenian data in a high-risk population shows 16% seroprevalence of HSV-2. HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA in genital swabs was detected in 19% and 20.7%, respectively. In most cases, genital herpes is asymptomatic. Primary genital infection with herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 can be manifested by a severe clinical picture, involving the vesicular skin and mucosal changes and ulcerative lesions of the vulva, vagina, and cervix in women and in the genital region in men. Direct methods of viral genome detection are recommended in the acute stage of primary and recurrent infections when manifest ulcers or lesions are evident. Serological testing is recommended as an aid in diagnosing genital herpes in patients with reinfection in atypical or already healed lesions. When herpes lesions are present, all sexual activities should be avoided to prevent transmission of infection. Antiviral drugs can reduce viral shedding and thus reduce the risk of sexual transmission of the virus.

  1. The ATP-Dependent RNA Helicase DDX3X Modulates Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Khadivjam, Bita; Stegen, Camille; Hogue-Racine, Marc-Aurèle; El Bilali, Nabil; Döhner, Katinka; Sodeik, Beate; Lippé, Roger

    2017-04-15

    The human protein DDX3X is a DEAD box ATP-dependent RNA helicase that regulates transcription, mRNA maturation, and mRNA export and translation. DDX3X concomitantly modulates the replication of several RNA viruses and promotes innate immunity. We previously showed that herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), a human DNA virus, incorporates DDX3X into its mature particles and that DDX3X is required for optimal HSV-1 infectivity. Here, we show that viral gene expression, replication, and propagation depend on optimal DDX3X protein levels. Surprisingly, DDX3X from incoming viral particles was not required for the early stages of the HSV-1 infection, but, rather, the protein controlled the assembly of new viral particles. This was independent of the previously reported ability of DDX3X to stimulate interferon type I production. Instead, both the lack and overexpression of DDX3X disturbed viral gene transcription and thus subsequent genome replication. This suggests that in addition to its effect on RNA viruses, DDX3X impacts DNA viruses such as HSV-1 by an interferon-independent pathway.IMPORTANCE Viruses interact with a variety of cellular proteins to complete their life cycle. Among them is DDX3X, an RNA helicase that participates in most aspects of RNA biology, including transcription, splicing, nuclear export, and translation. Several RNA viruses and a limited number of DNA viruses are known to manipulate DDX3X for their own benefit. In contrast, DDX3X is also known to promote interferon production to limit viral propagation. Here, we show that DDX3X, which we previously identified in mature HSV-1 virions, stimulates HSV-1 gene expression and, consequently, virion assembly by a process that is independent of its ability to promote the interferon pathway.

  2. Environmental influence on immune inhibition of release of herpes simplex virus from cells.

    PubMed

    Benitez, J; Ahmad, A; Davies, J; Skinner, G R

    1998-01-01

    Immune inhibition of virus release (IVR) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) from baby hamster kidney cells (BHK-21) was mediated by antisera against BHK cells, HSV-1, human fibronectin and mouse heparan sulphate proteoglycan and was irreversible for at least 24 h following removal of antiserum. Enhancement of IVR by calf serum depletion of growth media was obtained in varying measure using each of these antisera and also by treatment of virus-infected cells by the lectin concanavalin A. Enhancement was reversible by replenishment of growth media with bovine serum components larger than 12 kD but this only occurred when replenishment was instituted prior to virus infection. There was also reversibility to varying degree following replenishment by ovine, equine and human serum which indicates that this phenomenon is not species specific. In addition to the presence of relevant antigens on the cell surface, IVR may also require an alteration in the cell membrane; this is evidenced by the absence of anticellular serum-mediated IVR when treatment was introduced less than 6 h after virus infection, suggesting that a certain level of alteration or possibly cell damage - in this case virus induced - is necessary. Enhancement of IVR by calf serum depletion would seem to operate through a specific alteration in the virus-infected cell membrane as serum-depleted cells did not show histological alteration and were able to replicate HSV-1 to usual titres; it is possible that this enhancement may represent an as yet unidentified host defence mechanism whereby extracellular release of virus will be reduced in ischaemic or necrotic tissue in the course of infectious inflammatory processes.

  3. Time-resolved global and chromatin proteomics during herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) infection.

    PubMed

    Kulej, Katarzyna; Avgousti, Daphne C; Sidoli, Simone; Herrmann, Christin; Della Fera, Ashley N; Kim, Eui Tae; Garcia, Benjamin A; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2017-02-08

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) lytic infection results in global changes to the host cell proteome and the proteins associated with host chromatin. We present a system level characterization of proteome dynamics during infection by performing a multi-dimensional analysis during HSV-1 lytic infection of human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Our study includes identification and quantification of the host and viral proteomes, phosphoproteomes, chromatin bound proteomes and post-translational modifications (PTMs) on cellular histones during infection. We analyzed proteomes across six time points of virus infection (0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 hours post-infection) and clustered trends in abundance using fuzzy c-means. Globally, we accurately quantified more than 4,000 proteins, 200 differently modified histone peptides and 9,000 phosphorylation sites on cellular proteins. In addition, we identified 67 viral proteins and quantified 571 phosphorylation events (465 with high confidence site localization) on viral proteins, which is currently the most comprehensive map of HSV-1 phosphoproteome. We investigated chromatin bound proteins by proteomic analysis of the high-salt chromatin fraction and identified 510 proteins that were significantly different in abundance during infection. We found 53 histone marks significantly regulated during virus infection, including a steady increase of histone H3 acetylation (H3K9ac and H3K14ac). Our data provide a resource of unprecedented depth for human and viral proteome dynamics during infection. Collectively, our results indicate that the proteome composition of the chromatin of HFF cells is highly affected during HSV-1 infection, and that phosphorylation events are abundant on viral proteins. We propose that our epi-proteomics approach will prove to be important in the characterization of other model infectious systems that involve changes to chromatin composition.

  4. DNA mismatch repair proteins are required for efficient herpes simplex virus 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Mohni, Kareem N; Mastrocola, Adam S; Bai, Ping; Weller, Sandra K; Heinen, Christopher D

    2011-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a double-stranded DNA virus that replicates in the nucleus of its human host cell and is known to interact with many cellular DNA repair proteins. In this study, we examined the role of cellular mismatch repair (MMR) proteins in the virus life cycle. Both MSH2 and MLH1 are required for efficient replication of HSV-1 in normal human cells and are localized to viral replication compartments. In addition, a previously reported interaction between MSH6 and ICP8 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and extended to show that UL12 is also present in this complex. We also report for the first time that MLH1 associates with ND10 nuclear bodies and that like other ND10 proteins, MLH1 is recruited to the incoming genome. Knockdown of MLH1 inhibits immediate-early viral gene expression. MSH2, on the other hand, which is generally thought to play a role in mismatch repair at a step prior to that of MLH1, is not recruited to incoming genomes and appears to act at a later step in the viral life cycle. Silencing of MSH2 appears to inhibit early gene expression. Thus, both MLH1 and MSH2 are required but appear to participate in distinct events in the virus life cycle. The observation that MLH1 plays an earlier role in HSV-1 infection than does MSH2 is surprising and may indicate a novel function for MLH1 distinct from its known MSH2-dependent role in mismatch repair.

  5. Insights into pediatric herpes simplex encephalitis from a cohort of 21 children from the California Encephalitis Project, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    To, Tu M; Soldatos, Ariane; Sheriff, Heather; Schmid, D Scott; Espinosa, Natasha; Cosentino, Giorgio; Preas, Christopher P; Glaser, Carol A

    2014-12-01

    Twenty-one children with confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were identified in the California Encephalitis Project.Noteworthy features included 6 (29%) patients with an initial negative herpes simplex virus cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction test and 13 (62%) patients with extratemporal lobe involvement identified by neuroimaging [corrected]. Eleven cases were <4 years of age, but all 4 fatal cases occurred in adolescents.

  6. Valacyclovir for the prevention of recurrent herpes simplex virus eye disease after excimer laser photokeratectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Asbell, P A

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: A variety of factors have been reported as inducing the reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV), among them stress, trauma, and UV radiation. Excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is a surgical procedure utilizing a 193 nm ultraviolet light to alter the curvature of the cornea and hence correct vision. Reactivation of ocular herpes simplex keratitis following such excimer laser PRK has been reported. All published cases of HSV reactivation following excimer laser treatment in humans are reviewed. The present study evaluates whether stress, trauma of the corneal de-epithelialization prior to the laser, or the excimer laser treatment itself to the stromal bed induces this ocular reactivation of the latent HSV, and whether a systemic antiviral agent, valacyclovir, would prevent such laser PRK-induced reactivation of the HSV. METHODS: Forty-three normal 1.5- to 2.5-kg New Zealand white rabbits were infected on the surface of the cornea with HSV-1, strain RE. The animals were monitored until resolution, and then all animals were divided into 5 treatment groups: (1) de-epithelialization only, intraperitoneal (i.p.) saline for 14 days; (2) de-epithelialization plus laser, i.p. saline for 14 days; (3) de-epithelialization plus laser, valacyclovir 50 mg/kg per day i.p. for 14 days; (4) de-epithelialization plus laser, valacyclovir 100 mg/kg per day i.p. for 14 days; (5) de-epithelialization plus laser, valacyclovir 150 mg/kg per day i.p. for 14 days. Animals were evaluated in a masked fashion by clinical examination biweekly and viral cultures biweekly through day 28. RESULTS: The reactivation rates were as follows: group 1, 0%; group 2, 67%; group 3, 50%; group 4, 17%; and group 5, 0%. Viral titers were negative in animals that had no reactivation but persistently positive in those that had reactivation (day 6 through day 28). CONCLUSIONS: Excimer laser (193 nm) treatment can trigger reactivation of ocular herpes disease (67%) and viral

  7. A Highly Efficacious Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Vaccine Blocks Viral Pathogenesis and Prevents Corneal Immunopathology via Humoral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Derek J.; Gurung, Hem R.; Jinkins, Jeremy K.; Geltz, Joshua J.; Wu, Jennifer L.; Halford, William P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Correlates of immunologic protection requisite for an efficacious herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) vaccine remain unclear with respect to viral pathogenesis and clinical disease. In the present study, mice were vaccinated with a novel avirulent, live attenuated virus (0ΔNLS) or an adjuvanted glycoprotein D subunit (gD-2) similar to that used in several human clinical trials. Mice vaccinated with 0ΔNLS showed superior protection against early viral replication, neuroinvasion, latency, and mortality compared to that of gD-2-vaccinated or naive mice following ocular challenge with a neurovirulent clinical isolate of HSV-1. Moreover, 0ΔNLS-vaccinated mice exhibited protection against ocular immunopathology and maintained corneal mechanosensory function. Vaccinated mice also showed suppressed T cell activation in the draining lymph nodes following challenge. Vaccine efficacy correlated with serum neutralizing antibody titers. Humoral immunity was identified as the correlate of protection against corneal neovascularization, HSV-1 shedding, and latency through passive immunization. Overall, 0ΔNLS affords remarkable protection against HSV-1-associated ocular sequelae by impeding viral replication, dissemination, and establishment of latency. IMPORTANCE HSV-1 manifests in a variety of clinical presentations ranging from a rather benign “cold sore” to more severe forms of infection, including necrotizing stromal keratitis and herpes simplex encephalitis. The present study was undertaken to evaluate a novel vaccine to ocular HSV-1 infection not only for resistance to viral replication and spread but also for maintenance of the visual axis. The results underscore the necessity to reconsider strategies that utilize attenuated live virus as opposed to subunit vaccines against ocular HSV-1 infection. PMID:27030264

  8. The Challenges and Opportunities for Development of a T-Cell Epitope-Based Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tiffany; Wang, Christine; Badakhshan, Tina; Chilukuri, Sravya; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 & HSV-2) have been prevalent since the ancient Greek times. To this day, they still affect a staggering number of over a half billion individuals worldwide. HSV-2 infections cause painful genital herpes, encephalitis, and death in newborns. HSV-1 infections are more prevalent than HSV-2 infections and cause potentially blinding ocular herpes, oro-facial herpes and encephalitis. While genital herpes in mainly caused by HSV-2 infections, in recent years, there is an increase in the proportion of genital herpes caused by HSV-1 infections in young adults, which reach 50% in some western societies. While prophylactic and therapeutic HSV vaccines remain urgently needed for centuries their development has been notoriously difficult. During the most recent National Institute of Health (NIH) workshop titled "Next Generation Herpes Simplex Virus Vaccines: The Challenges and Opportunities", basic researchers, funding agencies, and pharmaceutical representatives gathered: (i) to assess the status of herpes vaccine research; and (ii) to identify the gaps and propose alternative approaches in developing a safe and efficient herpes vaccine. One “common denominator” among previously failed clinical herpes vaccine trials is that they either used a whole virus or whole viral proteins, which contain both pathogenic “symptomatic” and protective “asymptomatic” antigens/epitopes. In this report, we continue to advocate that using an “asymptomatic” epitope-based vaccine strategy that selectively incorporates protective epitopes which: (i) are exclusively recognized, in vitro, by effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells from “naturally” protected seropositive asymptomatic individuals; and (ii) protect, in vivo, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) transgenic animal models from ocular and genital herpes infections and diseases, could be the answer to many of the scientific challenges facing HSV vaccine

  9. Thrust efficiency optimization of the pulsed plasma thruster SIMP-LEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Albertoni, Riccardo; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika

    2010-08-01

    The effect of electric parameters on the thrust efficiency of an ablative pulsed plasma thruster was studied. Analytically, it was shown that a higher efficiency can be obtained by increasing energy of a bank of capacitors. This can be achieved by changing the inductance per distance of the plasma sheet, or reducing the resistance of the circuit and the mass bit. Further, an optimum discharge time was found when the capacitance and the inductance were varied. A low initial inductance increases the thrust efficiency. Experimentally, these trends can be verified by comparing two thrusters: SIMP-LEX and ADD SIMP-LEX, with their different initial inductances. For ADD SIMP-LEX, the optimal thrust efficiency for different capacities was determined to be 31% at 60μF for a 17 J configuration.

  10. Anterior opercular syndrome as a first presentation of herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    De Kleermaeker, Floriaan G C M; Bouwmans, Angela E P; Nicolai, Joost; Klinkenberg, Sylvia

    2014-04-01

    We report a 5-year-old girl who presented with fever, drooling, dysphagia, and anarthria. Moreover, voluntary facial movements were disturbed, but the emotional facial movements were completely normal. This clinical phenomenon is known as the anterior opercular syndrome. There was a positive polymerase chain reaction for herpes simplex in the cerebrospinal fluid. The diagnosis herpes simplex encephalitis was supported by both magnetic resonance images (MRI) as by electroencephalogram (EEG). Herpes simplex encephalitis is a rare, but severe, cause of the anterior opercular syndrome that demands treatment as soon as possible in order to prevent high morbidity or mortality. The phenomenon of autonomic-voluntary dissociation, associated with other clinical and radiologic findings related to an underlying neurologic disorder, alerts clinicians to the anterior opercular syndrome as a critical diagnostic observation with time-dependent therapeutic consequences.

  11. [Atypical case of acute retinal necrosis secondary to the primary herpes simplex infection].

    PubMed

    Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Krzyźewska-Niedzialek, Aldona; Jamrozy-Witkowska, Agnieszka; Borkowski, Piotr K; Ulińska, Magdalena; Grabska-Liberek, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a rare manifestation of viral chorioretinitis, accompanied by occlusive vasculitis, which is associated with poor visual prognosis. The main causal factors include varicella-zoster virus in older patients and herpes simplex in younger ones. The disease typically manifests as a reactivation of latent infections. We present a case of a 57-year-old female with atypical clinical manifestation of acute retinal necrosis secondary to the primary viral infection with herpes simplex. The serology panel of vitreous tap and blood sample confirmed viral aetiology (H. simplex). The initial clinical signs included optic disc edema with retinitis presenting as self-limiting, slowly progressing, peripheral lesions, later followed by uveitis. The antiviral therapy resolved the symptoms of uveitis and enabled healing of retinal lesions, however the natural course of disease was later complicated with retinal detachment. It was successfully treated with vitreoretinal surgery. Despite aggressive treatment, the final visual outcome was unfavourable, due to optic nerve atrophy.

  12. Latency of Herpes Simplex Virus in Absence of Neutralizing Antibody: Model for Reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekizawa, Tsuyoshi; Openshaw, Harry; Wohlenberg, Charles; Notkins, Abner Louis

    1980-11-01

    Mice inoculated with herpes simplex virus (type 1) by the lip or corneal route and then passively immunized with rabbit antibody to herpes simplex virus developed a latent infection in the trigeminal ganglia within 96 hours. Neutralizing antibody to herpes simplex virus was cleared from the circulation and could not be detected in most of these mice after 2 months. Examination of ganglia from the antibody-negative mice revealed latent virus in over 90 percent of the animals, indicating that serum neutralizing antibody is not necessary to maintain the latent state. When the lips or corneas of these mice were traumatized, viral reactivation occurred in up to 90 percent of the mice, as demonstrated by the appearance of neutralizing antibody. This study provides a model for identifying factors that trigger viral reactivation.

  13. Pediatric herpes simplex virus infections: an evidence-based approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jennifer E; Garcia, Sylvia E

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is a common virus that causes a variety of clinical presentations ranging from mild to life-threatening. Orolabial and genital herpes are common disorders that can often be managed in an outpatient setting; however, some patients do present to the emergency department with those conditions, and emergency clinicians should be aware of possible complications in the pediatric population. Neonatal herpes is a rare disorder, but prompt recognition and initiation of antiviral therapy is imperative, as the morbidity and mortality of the disease is high. Herpes encephalitis is an emergency that also requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose. Herpes simplex virus is also responsible for a variety of other clinical presentations, including herpes gladiatorum, herpetic whitlow, eczema herpeticum, and ocular herpes. This issue reviews the common clinical presentations of the herpes simplex virus, the life-threatening infections that require expedient identification and management, and recommended treatment regimens.

  14. A comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus latency and reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Peter G. E.; Rovnak, Joel; Badani, Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1; human herpesvirus 1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV; human herpesvirus 3) are human neurotropic alphaherpesviruses that cause lifelong infections in ganglia. Following primary infection and establishment of latency, HSV-1 reactivation typically results in herpes labialis (cold sores), but can occur frequently elsewhere on the body at the site of primary infection (e.g. whitlow), particularly at the genitals. Rarely, HSV-1 reactivation can cause encephalitis; however, a third of the cases of HSV-1 encephalitis are associated with HSV-1 primary infection. Primary VZV infection causes varicella (chickenpox) following which latent virus may reactivate decades later to produce herpes zoster (shingles), as well as an increasingly recognized number of subacute, acute and chronic neurological conditions. Following primary infection, both viruses establish a latent infection in neuronal cells in human peripheral ganglia. However, the detailed mechanisms of viral latency and reactivation have yet to be unravelled. In both cases latent viral DNA exists in an ‘end-less’ state where the ends of the virus genome are joined to form structures consistent with unit length episomes and concatemers, from which viral gene transcription is restricted. In latently infected ganglia, the most abundantly detected HSV-1 RNAs are the spliced products originating from the primary latency associated transcript (LAT). This primary LAT is an 8.3 kb unstable transcript from which two stable (1.5 and 2.0 kb) introns are spliced. Transcripts mapping to 12 VZV genes have been detected in human ganglia removed at autopsy; however, it is difficult to ascribe these as transcripts present during latent infection as early-stage virus reactivation may have transpired in the post-mortem time period in the ganglia. Nonetheless, low-level transcription of VZV ORF63 has been repeatedly detected in multiple ganglia removed as close to death as possible. There is

  15. A comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus latency and reactivation.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Peter G E; Rovnak, Joel; Badani, Hussain; Cohrs, Randall J

    2015-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1; human herpesvirus 1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV; human herpesvirus 3) are human neurotropic alphaherpesviruses that cause lifelong infections in ganglia. Following primary infection and establishment of latency, HSV-1 reactivation typically results in herpes labialis (cold sores), but can occur frequently elsewhere on the body at the site of primary infection (e.g. whitlow), particularly at the genitals. Rarely, HSV-1 reactivation can cause encephalitis; however, a third of the cases of HSV-1 encephalitis are associated with HSV-1 primary infection. Primary VZV infection causes varicella (chickenpox) following which latent virus may reactivate decades later to produce herpes zoster (shingles), as well as an increasingly recognized number of subacute, acute and chronic neurological conditions. Following primary infection, both viruses establish a latent infection in neuronal cells in human peripheral ganglia. However, the detailed mechanisms of viral latency and reactivation have yet to be unravelled. In both cases latent viral DNA exists in an 'end-less' state where the ends of the virus genome are joined to form structures consistent with unit length episomes and concatemers, from which viral gene transcription is restricted. In latently infected ganglia, the most abundantly detected HSV-1 RNAs are the spliced products originating from the primary latency associated transcript (LAT). This primary LAT is an 8.3 kb unstable transcript from which two stable (1.5 and 2.0 kb) introns are spliced. Transcripts mapping to 12 VZV genes have been detected in human ganglia removed at autopsy; however, it is difficult to ascribe these as transcripts present during latent infection as early-stage virus reactivation may have transpired in the post-mortem time period in the ganglia. Nonetheless, low-level transcription of VZV ORF63 has been repeatedly detected in multiple ganglia removed as close to death as possible. There is increasing

  16. Electron Tomography of Nascent Herpes Simplex Virus Virions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Joel D.; Hsieh, Chyong-Ere; Wills, Elizabeth; Mannella, Carmen; Marko, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were conventionally embedded or freeze substituted after high-pressure freezing and stained with uranyl acetate. Electron tomograms of capsids attached to or undergoing envelopment at the inner nuclear membrane (INM), capsids within cytoplasmic vesicles near the nuclear membrane, and extracellular virions revealed the following phenomena. (i) Nucleocapsids undergoing envelopment at the INM, or B capsids abutting the INM, were connected to thickened patches of the INM by fibers 8 to 19 nm in length and ≤5 nm in width. The fibers contacted both fivefold symmetrical vertices (pentons) and sixfold symmetrical faces (hexons) of the nucleocapsid, although relative to the respective frequencies of these subunits in the capsid, fibers engaged pentons more frequently than hexons. (ii) Fibers of similar dimensions bridged the virion envelope and surface of the nucleocapsid in perinuclear virions. (iii) The tegument of perinuclear virions was considerably less dense than that of extracellular virions; connecting fibers were observed in the former case but not in the latter. (iv) The prominent external spikes emanating from the envelope of extracellular virions were absent from perinuclear virions. (v) The virion envelope of perinuclear virions appeared denser and thicker than that of extracellular virions. (vi) Vesicles near, but apparently distinct from, the nuclear membrane in single sections were derived from extensions of the perinuclear space as seen in the electron tomograms. These observations suggest very different mechanisms of tegumentation and envelopment in extracellular compared with perinuclear virions and are consistent with application of the final tegument to unenveloped nucleocapsids in a compartment(s) distinct from the perinuclear space. PMID:17215293

  17. The genetic basis of epidermolysis bullosa simplex with mottled pigmentation.

    PubMed Central

    Uttam, J; Hutton, E; Coulombe, P A; Anton-Lamprecht, I; Yu, Q C; Gedde-Dahl, T; Fine, J D; Fuchs, E

    1996-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS) is a group of autosomal dominant skin diseases characterized by blistering, due to mechanical stress-induced degeneration of basal epidermal cells. It is now well-established that the three major subtypes of EBS are genetic disorders of the basal epidermal keratins, keratin 5 (K5) and keratin 14 (K14). Here we show that a rare subtype, referred to as EBS with mottled pigmentation (MP), is also a disorder of these keratins. Affected members of two seemingly unrelated families with EBS-MP had a C to T point mutation in the second base position of codon 24 of one of two K5 alleles, leading to a Pro: Leu mutation. This mutation was not present in unaffected members nor in 100 alleles from normal individuals. Linkage analyses mapped the defect to this type II keratin gene (peak logarithm of odds score at phi = 0 of 3.9), which is located on chromosome 12q11-q13. This provides strong evidence that this mutation is responsible for the EBS-MP phenotype. Only conserved between K5 and K6, and not among any of the other type II keratins, Pro-24 is in the nonhelical head domain of K5, and only mildly perturbs the length of 10-nm keratin filaments assembled in vitro. However, this part of the K5 head domain is likely to protrude on the filament surface, perhaps leading to additional aberrations in intermediate filament architecture and/or in melanosome distribution that are seen ultrastructurally in patients with the mutation. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8799157

  18. Autoimmune post–herpes simplex encephalitis of adults and teenagers

    PubMed Central

    Armangue, Thaís; Moris, Germán; Cantarín-Extremera, Verónica; Conde, Carlos Enrique; Rostasy, Kevin; Erro, Maria Elena; Portilla-Cuenca, Juan Carlos; Turón-Viñas, Eulàlia; Málaga, Ignacio; Muñoz-Cabello, Beatriz; Torres-Torres, Carmen; Llufriu, Sara; González-Gutiérrez-Solana, Luis; González, Guillermo; Casado-Naranjo, Ignacio; Rosenfeld, Myrna; Graus, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report 14 patients with immune-mediated relapsing symptoms post–herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and to compare the clinical and immunologic features of the teenage and adult group with those of young children. Methods: Prospective observational study of patients diagnosed between June 2013 and February 2015. Immunologic techniques have been reported previously. Results: Among the teenage and adult group (8 patients, median age 40 years, range 13–69; 5 male), 3 had an acute symptom presentation suggesting a viral relapse, and 5 a presentation contiguous with HSE suggesting a recrudescence of previous deficits. Seven patients developed severe psychiatric/behavioral symptoms disrupting all social interactions, and one refractory status epilepticus. Blepharospasm occurred in one patient. Five patients had CSF antibodies against NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and 3 against unknown neuronal cell surface proteins. In 5/6 patients, the brain MRI showed new areas of contrast enhancement that decreased after immunotherapy and clinical improvement. Immunotherapy was useful in 7/7 patients, sometimes with impressive recoveries, returning to their baseline HSE residual deficits. Compared with the 6 younger children (median age 13 months, range 6–20, all with NMDAR antibodies), the teenagers and adults were less likely to develop choreoathetosis (0/8 vs 6/6, p < 0.01) and decreased level of consciousness (2/8 vs 6/6, p < 0.01) and had longer delays in diagnosis and treatment (interval relapse/antibody testing 85 days, range 17–296, vs 4 days, range 0–33, p = 0.037). Conclusion: In teenagers and adults, the immune-mediated relapsing syndrome post-HSE is different from that known in young children as choreoathetosis post-HSE and is underrecognized. Prompt diagnosis is important because immunotherapy can be highly effective. PMID:26491084

  19. Herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chrétien, F; Bélec, L; Hilton, D A; Flament-Saillour, M; Guillon, F; Wingertsmann, L; Baudrimont, M; de Truchis, P; Keohane, C; Vital, C; Love, S; Gray, F

    1996-10-01

    Herpes simplex (HSV) infection of the central nervous system is uncommon in AIDS and usually has an atypical topography. This review is centred around the case of a 49-year-old homosexual patient with AIDS who died from diffuse encephalopathy. Neuropathological examination revealed necrotic and haemorrhagic changes involving both temporal lobes, insulae and cingulate gyri. Cowdry type A intranuclear inclusion bodies were abundant but inflammation was minimal. Electron microscopy confirmed characteristic herpes virus particles. Immunocyto-chemistry was positive for HSV type 1 and 2. In situ hybridization and PCR, however, were positive for HSV type 1 but excluded HSV type 2. There was associated cytomegalovirus ventriculitis but clearly separated from HSV encephalitis. There were no histological features of HIV encephalitis and HIV could not be demonstrated by immunocytochemistry or by PCR to demonstrate proviral DNA. Apoptotic neurons were numerous in areas with a severe macrophage reaction. Only two pathological cases with characteristic limbic distribution and necrotic haemorrhagic histologic have been reported previously. The rarity of these reports suggests that in advanced AIDS, the immune reaction causing a typical necrotizing encephalitis cannot be mounted. Distinction between HSV type 1 and 2 infection may be difficult by immunocytochemistry and usually requires in situ hybridization, tissue culture or PCR. In AIDS patients, HSV-1 has been identified as responsible for encephalitis whereas HSV-2 has been more responsible for myelitis. Associated productive HIV infection of the CNS was found in none of the cases. In contrast, cytomegalovirus encephalitis was found in nine of 11 cases of AIDS-associated HSV encephalitis.

  20. Treatment of mucocutaneous presentations of herpes simplex virus infections.

    PubMed

    Nikkels, Arjen F; Pièrard, Gérald E

    2002-01-01

    Infections by herpes simplex virus (HSV) types I and II are diverse and quite frequent. After primary infection, the virus establishes a life-long latency in the sensory ganglia and recrudescences may occur at an unpredictable rate. Recurrent labial and genital herpes infections represent the majority of clinical manifestations of HSV infections. Their management is currently well established using evidence-based medicine data. Primary labial herpes is generally not treated with antivirals in otherwise healthy children, although intravenous aciclovir may be offered in severe primary infections, particularly in the immunocompromised patient. The decision whether or not to treat recurrent labial herpes should be evaluated individually and depends on the frequency and severity of relapses, the impairment of the quality of life, and the cost of therapy. Patients with mild disease may benefit from topical therapy, and those with severe and frequent recurrences may be considered for intermittent or long-term oral antiviral therapy. Primary genital herpes is treated with oral or intravenous antivirals, depending on the severity of the infection and associated symptoms. Recurrent genital herpes can be managed with episodic short courses of oral antivirals in patients whose recurrences are moderate to severe and rare, and have a clear prodrome. Patients with >5 episodes/year, severe recurrences or unrecognisable prodromes may be best managed with long-term suppressive antiviral prophylaxis. HSV is also responsible for a variety of other clinical manifestations, including herpetic whitlow, neonatal infection, disseminated and atypical cutaneous infections, traumatic herpes, eczema herpeticum, and HSV-associated erythema multiforme. HSV infection may also represent a complication following cosmetic procedures of the oro-facial region, surgical and dental interventions, sun exposure and burns. Precise treatment guidelines for these HSV infections are not firmly established.

  1. Oral shedding of herpes simplex virus type 2

    PubMed Central

    Wald, A; Ericsson, M; Krantz, E; Selke, S; Corey, L

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 reactivate preferentially in the oral and genital area, respectively. We aimed to define frequency and characteristics associated with oral shedding of HSV-2. Methods: Demographic, clinical and laboratory data of patients with documented HSV-2 infection and at least one oral viral culture obtained were selected from the University of Washington Virology Research Clinic database. Results: Of 1388 people meeting the entry criteria, 44 (3.2%) had HSV-2 isolated at least once from their mouths. In comparison with the 1344 people who did not have HSV-2 isolated from their mouth, participants with oral HSV-2 were more likely to be male (OR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.0 to 3.7), HIV positive (OR = 2.9, 95% CI 1.4 to 6.0), and homosexual (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.2), and to have collected a larger number of oral specimens (median 32 v 4, p<0.001). Of the 58 days with oral HSV-2 isolation, 15 (25%) occurred during newly acquired HSV-2 infection, 12 (21%) during a recurrence with genital lesions, three (5%) during a recurrence with oral lesions, and three (5%) during a recurrence with oral and genital lesions; 25 (43%) occurred during asymptomatic shedding. Oral HSV-2 was found less frequently than oral HSV-1 (0.06% v 1%, p<0.001) in people with HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibody, and less frequently than genital HSV-2 (0.09% v 7%, p<0.001). Conclusions: Oral reactivation of HSV-2 as defined by viral isolation is uncommon and usually occurs in the setting of first episode of genital HSV-2 or during genital recurrence of HSV-2. PMID:15295123

  2. Herpes simplex virus 2 infection impacts stress granule accumulation.

    PubMed

    Finnen, Renée L; Pangka, Kyle R; Banfield, Bruce W

    2012-08-01

    Interference with stress granule (SG) accumulation is gaining increased appreciation as a common strategy used by diverse viruses to facilitate their replication and to cope with translational arrest. Here, we examined the impact of infection by herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) on SG accumulation by monitoring the localization of the SG components T cell internal antigen 1 (TIA-1), Ras-GTPase-activating SH3-domain-binding protein (G3BP), and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP). Our results indicate that SGs do not accumulate in HSV-2-infected cells and that HSV-2 can interfere with arsenite-induced SG accumulation early after infection. Surprisingly, SG accumulation was inhibited despite increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), implying that HSV-2 encodes previously unrecognized activities designed to maintain translation initiation downstream of eIF2α. SG accumulation was not inhibited in HSV-2-infected cells treated with pateamine A, an inducer that works independently of eIF2α phosphorylation. The SGs that accumulated following pateamine A treatment of infected cells contained G3BP and PABP but were largely devoid of TIA-1. We also identified novel nuclear structures containing TIA-1 that form late in infection. These structures contain the RNA binding protein 68-kDa Src-associated in mitosis (Sam68) and were noticeably absent in infected cells treated with inhibitors of viral DNA replication, suggesting that they arise as a result of late events in the virus replicative cycle.

  3. Purification and structural characterization of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, G.E.; Baker, S.A.; Merajver, S.D.; Coligan, J.E.; Levine, M.; Glorioso, J.C.; Nairn, R.

    1987-01-27

    Purification of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C (gC) in microgram amounts yielded sufficient material for an analysis of its secondary structure. Purification was facilitated by using the mutant virus gC-3, which bears a point mutation that interrupts the putative hydrophobic membrane anchor sequence, causing the secretion of gC-3 protein into the cell culture medium. gC-3 protein was purified by size fractionation of concentrated culture medium from infected cells on a gel filtration column of Sephacryl S-200, followed by immunoaffinity chromatography on a column constructed of gC-specific monoclonal antibodies cross-linked to a protein A-Sepharose CL-4B matrix. Purified gC-3 had a molecular weight of 130,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the size expected for gC, was reactive with gC-specific monoclonal antibodies in protein immunoblots, and contained amino acid sequences characteristic of gC as determined by radiochemical amino acid microsequence analyses. Polyclonal antisera obtained from a rabbit immunized with gC-3 reacted with wild-type gC in immunoprecipitation, enzyme immunoassay, and immunoelectroblot (western blot) assays. Deglycosylation by treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid reduced the molecular weight of gC-3 by approximately 35%. Analyses of both native and deglycosylated gC-3 by Raman spectroscopy showed that the native molecule consists of about 17%..cap alpha..-helix, 24% ..beta..-sheet, and 60% disordered secondary structures, whereas deglycosylated gC-3 consists of about 8% ..cap alpha..-helix, 10% ..beta..-sheet, 81% disordered structures. These data were in good agreement with the 11% ..cap alpha..-helix, 18% ..beta..-sheet, 61% ..beta..-turn, and 9% disordered structures calculated from Chou-Fasman analysis of the primary sequence of gC-3.

  4. The life cycle of Anisakis simplex in the Norwegian Deep (northern North Sea).

    PubMed

    Klimpel, Sven; Palm, Harry W; Rückert, Sonja; Piatkowski, Uwe

    2004-09-01

    Copepoda (Calanus finmarchicus n = 1,722, Paraeuchaeta norvegica n = 1,955), Hyperiidae (n = 3,019), Euphausiacea (Meganyctiphanes norvegica n = 4,780), and the fishes Maurolicus muelleri (n = 500) and Pollachius virens (n = 33) were collected in the Norwegian Deep (northern North Sea) during summer 2001 to examine the importance of pelagic invertebrates and vertebrates as hosts of Anisakis simplex and their roles in the transfer of this nematode to its final hosts (Cetaceans). Third stage larvae (L3) of A. simplex were found in P. norvegica, M. muelleri and P. virens. The prevalence of A. simplex in dissected P. norvegica was 0.26%, with an intensity of 1. Prevalences in M. muelleri and P. virens were 49.6% and 100.0%, with mean intensities of 1.1-2.6 (total fish length >or=6.0-7.2) and 193.6, respectively. All specimens of C. finmarchicus and M. norvegica examined were free of anisakid nematode species and no other parasites were detected. P. norvegica, which harboured the third stage larvae, is the obligatory first intermediate host of A. simplex in the investigated area. Though there was no apparent development of larvae in M. muelleri, this fish can be considered as the obligatory second intermediate host of A. simplex in the Norwegian Deep. However, it is unlikely that the larva from P. norvegica can be successfully transmitted into the cetacean or pinniped final hosts, where they reach the adult stage. An additional growth phase and a second intermediate host is the next phase in the life cycle. Larger predators such as P. virens serve as paratenic hosts, accumulating the already infective stage from M. muelleri. The oceanic life cycle of A. simplex in the Norwegian Deep is very different in terms of hosts and proposed life cycle patterns of A. simplex from other regions, involving only a few intermediate hosts. In contrast to earlier suggestions, euphausiids have no importance at all for the successful transmission of A. simplex in the Norwegian Deep. This

  5. [Kluver Bucy syndrome and central diabetes insipidus: two uncommon complications of herpes simplex encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Locatelli, C; Vergine, G; Ciambra, R; Leone, V; Facchini, S; Suprani, T; Casadei, G; Pocecco, M

    2003-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE) is an uncommon but severe disease with high mortality and morbidity. The major clinical manifestations are deteriorating consciousness with confusion, drowsiness or coma, altered behaviour, convulsions and a variety of neurological signs (hemiplegia, aphasia, ataxia, etc.). An uncommon complication of HSE is Kluver Bucy syndrome (KBS), characterized by hyperorality, bulimia and changes in emotional behaviour. Neuroimaging studies frequently show an involvement of the temporal lobes and limbic areas. Another uncommon complication of HSE is central diabetes insipidus as a result of herpes simplex infection of the hypothalamus. We report two pediatric cases of HSE complicated with Kluver Bucy syndrome and central diabetes insipidus.

  6. Immune inhibition of virus release from herpes simplex virus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Mushi, E Z; Whitney, J E

    By treatment of herpes simplex virus-infected cells with virus antiserum with or without complement, the yield of infectious extracellular virus was significantly reduced. This was shown to be due to an immune alteration of the cell membrane which inhibited release of virus particles from the infected cells and not due to neutralization; both type-common and type-specific antigens of herpes simplex virus were involved. The phenomenon was also evident with antisera directed against cell determinants. The experimental findings are presented and their significance in the immunological defense mechanisms of the body and in viral immunotherapy is discussed.

  7. Simplex didactics: A non-linear trajectory for research in education.

    PubMed

    Sibilio, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    The concept of simplexity, as proposed by Alain Berthoz, is based on the assumption that solutions elaborated by living organisms to decipher and face complexity could be applicable to all complex adaptive systems. Within the pedagogical and didactic context the proposal of the French physiologist could provide a scientific research trajectory aiming at solving the tension between theory, praxis, descriptive approaches and practical needs. Thus, simplexity seems to be an operational strategy based on the identification of the principles that rule and guide the didactic action through patterns of adaptation, which allow to decipher complexity in terms of data elaboration and decision making among different opportunities.

  8. Clinical and neuroimaging findings in neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Monika; Mody, Swati; Natarajan, Girija

    2014-08-01

    In a retrospective review of infants with neonatal herpes simplex virus disease (n=29), we found bilateral multilobar (n=8), pontine (n=3), thalamic (n=6), and internal capsule and corticospinal tract (n=5) involvement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Diffusion-weighted imaging (n=6) performed early revealed additional involvement than detected by conventional MRI. Neurodevelopmental sequelae were correlated with MRI abnormalities. Our findings demonstrate that MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging, is a valuable prognostic adjunct in neonatal herpes simplex virus disease.

  9. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and Bell's palsy-a current assessment of the controversy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Peter Ge

    2010-02-01

    Bell's palsy causes about two thirds of cases of acute peripheral facial weakness. Although the majority of cases completely recover spontaneously, about 30% of cases do not and are at risk from persisting severe facial paralysis and pain. It has been suggested that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) may be the etiological agent that causes Bell's palsy. Although corticosteroid therapy is now universally recognized as improving the outcome of Bell's palsy, the question as to whether or not a combination of antiviral agents and corticosteroids result in a better rate of complete facial recovery compared with corticosteroids alone is now a highly contentious issue. The evidence obtained from laboratory studies of animals and humans that HSV-1 may be linked to facial nerve paralysis is first outlined. The discussion then focuses on the results of different clinical trials of the efficacy of antiviral agents combined with corticosteroids in increasing the rate of complete recovery in Bell's palsy. These have often given different results leading to opposite conclusions as to the efficacy of antivirals. Of three recent meta-analyses of previous trials, two concluded that antivirals produce no added benefit to corticosteroids alone in producing complete facial recovery, and one concluded that such combined therapy may be associated with additional benefit. Although it is probably not justified at the present time to treat patients with Bell's palsy with antiviral agents in addition to corticosteroids, it remains to be shown whether antivirals may be beneficial in treating patients who present with severe or complete facial paralysis.

  10. Systemic therapy of spontaneous prostate cancer in transgenic mice with oncolytic herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Susan; Rabkin, Samuel D; Nielsen, G Petur; MacGarvey, Usha; Liu, Renbin; Martuza, Robert L

    2007-10-01

    Oncolytic viruses are an innovative therapeutic strategy for cancer, wherein viral replication and cytotoxicity are selective for tumor cells. Here we show the efficacy of systemically administered oncolytic viruses for the treatment of spontaneously arising tumors, specifically the use of oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (HSV) administered i.v. to treat spontaneously developing primary and metastatic prostate cancer in the transgenic TRAMP mouse, which recapitulates human prostate cancer progression. Four administrations of systemically delivered NV1023 virus, an HSV-1/HSV-2 oncolytic recombinant, to TRAMP mice at 12 or 18 weeks of age (presence of prostate adenocarcinoma or metastatic disease, respectively) inhibited primary tumor growth and metastases to lymph nodes. Expression of interleukin 12 (IL-12) from NV1042 virus, a derivative of NV1023, was additionally effective, significantly reducing the frequency of development of prostate cancer and lung metastases, even when the mice were treated after the onset of metastasis at 18 weeks of age. NV1042-infected cells, as detected by 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-d-galactopyranoside staining for Lac Z expressed by the virus, were present in prostate tumors 1 week after the final virus injection and viral DNA was detected at 2 weeks after final virus injection by real-time PCR in primary and metastatic tumors but not in liver or blood. No toxicity was observed in any of the treated mice. The efficacy of the IL-12-expressing NV1042 virus in this aggressive prostate cancer model using a clinically relevant treatment paradigm merits its consideration for clinical studies.

  11. Targeted oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 eradicates experimental pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Gayral, Marion; Lulka, Hubert; Hanoun, Naima; Biollay, Coline; Sèlves, Janick; Vignolle-Vidoni, Alix; Berthommé, Hervé; Trempat, Pascal; Epstein, Alberto L; Buscail, Louis; Béjot, Jean-Luc; Cordelier, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    As many other cancers, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) progression is associated with a series of hallmark changes for cancer cells to secure their own growth success. Yet, these very changes render cancer cells highly sensitive to viral infection. A promising strategy may rely on and exploit viral replication for tumor destruction, whereby infection of tumor cells by a replication-conditional virus may lead to cell destruction and simultaneous release of progeny particles that can spread and infect adjacent tumor cells, while sparing healthy tissues. In the present study, we used Myb34.5, a second-generation replication-conditional herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) mutant in which ICP6 gene expression is defective and expression of the HSV-1 γ134.5 gene is regulated by the cellular B-myb promoter. We found that B-myb is present in experimental PDAC and tumors, and is overexpressed in patients' tumors, as compared with normal adjacent pancreas. Myb34.5 replicates to high level in human PDAC cell lines and is associated with cell death by apoptosis. In experimental models of PDAC, mice receiving intratumoral Myb34.5 injections appeared healthy and tumor progression was inhibited, with evidence of tumor necrosis, hemorrhage, viral replication, and cancer cell death by apoptosis. Combining standard-of-care chemotherapy with Myb34.5 successfully led to a very impressive antitumoral effect that is rarely achieved in this experimental model, and resulted in a greater reduction in tumor growth than chemotherapy alone. These promising results warrant further evaluation in early phase clinical trial for patients diagnosed with PDAC for whom no effective treatment is available.

  12. Prophylactic and therapeutic modulation of innate and adaptive immunity against mucosal infection of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Uyangaa, Erdenebileg; Patil, Ajit Mahadev; Eo, Seong Kug

    2014-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are the most common cause of genital ulceration in humans worldwide. Typically, HSV-1 and 2 infections via mucosal route result in a lifelong latent infection after peripheral replication in mucosal tissues, thereby providing potential transmission to neighbor hosts in response to reactivation. To break the transmission cycle, immunoprophylactics and therapeutic strategies must be focused on prevention of infection or reduction of infectivity at mucosal sites. Currently, our understanding of the immune responses against mucosal infection of HSV remains intricate and involves a balance between innate signaling pathways and the adaptive immune responses. Numerous studies have demonstrated that HSV mucosal infection induces type I interferons (IFN) via recognition of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and activates multiple immune cell populations, including NK cells, conventional dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs. This innate immune response is required not only for the early control of viral replication at mucosal sites, but also for establishing adaptive immune responses against HSV antigens. Although the contribution of humoral immune response is controversial, CD4(+) Th1 T cells producing IFN-γ are believed to play an important role in eradicating virus from the hosts. In addition, the recent experimental successes of immunoprophylactic and therapeutic compounds that enhance resistance and/or reduce viral burden at mucosal sites have accumulated. This review focuses on attempts to modulate innate and adaptive immunity against HSV mucosal infection for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic strategies. Notably, cells involved in innate immune regulations appear to shape adaptive immune responses. Thus, we summarized the current evidence of various immune mediators in response to mucosal HSV infection, focusing on the importance of innate immune responses.

  13. Glioma-specific and cell cycle-regulated herpes simplex virus type 1 amplicon viral vector.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ivy A W; Hui, Kam M; Lam, Paula Y P

    2004-05-01

    We have engineered a novel herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based amplicon viral vector, whereby gene expression is controlled by cell cycle events. In nondividing cells, trans-activation of the cyclin A promoter via interaction of the Gal4/NF-YA fusion protein with the Gal4-binding sites is prevented by the presence of a repressor protein, cell cycle-dependent factor 1 (CDF-1). CDF-1 is specifically expressed during the G(0)/G(1) phase of the cell cycle and its binding site is located within the cyclin A promoter. In actively proliferating cells, trans-activation could take place because of the absence of CDF-1. Our results showed that when all these cell cycle-specific regulatory elements are incorporated in cis into a single HSV-1 amplicon plasmid vector backbone (pC8-36), reporter luciferase activity is greatly enhanced. Transgene expression mediated by this series of HSV-1 amplicon plasmid vectors and amplicon viral vectors could be regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner in a variety of cell lines. In a further attempt to target transgene expression to a selected group of actively proliferating cells such as glial cells, we have replaced the cytomegalovirus promoter of the pC8-36 amplicon plasmid with the glial cell-specific GFAP enhancer element. With this latter viral construct, cell type-specific and cell cycle-dependent transgene expression could subsequently be demonstrated specifically in glioma-bearing animals. Taken together, our results suggest that this series of cell cycle-regulatable HSV-1 amplicon viral vectors could potentially be adapted as useful tools for the treatment of human cancers.

  14. A subset of herpes simplex virus replication genes induces DNA amplification within the host cell genome

    SciTech Connect

    Heilbronn, R.; zur Hausen, H. )

    1989-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces DNA amplification of target genes within the host cell chromosome. To characterize the HSV genes that mediate the amplification effect, combinations of cloned DNA fragments covering the entire HSV genome were transiently transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells. This led to amplification of the integrated SV40 DNA sequences to a degree comparable to that observed after transfection of intact virion DNA. Transfection of combinations of subclones and of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-driven expression constructs for individual open reading frames led to the identification of sic HSV genes which together were necessary and sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification: UL30 (DNA polymerase), UL29 (major DNA-binding protein), UL5, UL8, UL42, and UL52. All of these genes encode proteins necessary for HSV DNA replication. However, an additional gene coding for an HSV origin-binding protein (UL9) was required for origin-dependent HSV DNA replication but was dispensable for SV40 DNA amplification. The results show that a subset of HSV replication genes is sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification. This opens the possibility that HSV expresses functions sufficient for DNA amplification but separate from those responsible for lytic viral growth. HSV infection may thereby induce DNA amplification within the host cell genome without killing the host by lytic viral growth. This may lead to persistence of a cell with a new genetic phenotype, which would have implications for the pathogenicity of the virus in vivo.

  15. Induction of lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus by herpes simplex virus type 1: involvement of IL-10 and IL-4.

    PubMed

    Qin, Di; Zeng, Yi; Qian, Chao; Huang, Zan; Lv, Zhigang; Cheng, Lin; Yao, Shuihong; Tang, Qiao; Chen, Xiuying; Lu, Chun

    2008-03-01

    Previously, we identified that both human herpesvirus 6 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat were important cofactors that activated lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Here, we further investigated the potential of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to influence KSHV replication. We demonstrated that HSV-1 was a potentially important factor in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, as determined by production of lytic phase mRNA transcripts, viral proteins and infectious viral particles in BCBL-1 cells. These results were further confirmed by an RNA interference experiment using small interfering RNA targeting KSHV ORF50 and a luciferase reporter assay testing ORF50 promoter-driven luciferase activity. Finally, we discovered that production of human interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-4 partially contributed to HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. Our data present the first direct evidence that HSV-1 can activate KSHV lytic replication and suggest a role of HSV-1 in KSHV pathogenesis.

  16. Non-nucleosidic inhibition of Herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase: mechanistic insights into the anti-herpetic mode of action of herbal drug withaferin A

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 causes several infections in humans including cold sores and encephalitis. Previous antiviral studies on herpes viruses have focussed on developing nucleoside analogues that can inhibit viral polymerase and terminate the replicating viral DNA. However, these drugs bear an intrinsic non-specificity as they can also inhibit cellular polymerase apart from the viral one. The present study is an attempt to elucidate the action mechanism of naturally occurring withaferin A in inhibiting viral DNA polymerase, thus providing an evidence for its development as a novel anti-herpetic drug. Results Withaferin A was found to bind very similarly to that of the previously reported 4-oxo-DHQ inhibitor. Withaferin A was observed binding to the residues Gln 617, Gln 618, Asn 815 and Tyr 818, all of which are crucial to the proper functioning of the polymerase. A comparison of the conformation obtained from docking and the molecular dynamics simulations shows that substantial changes in the binding conformations have occurred. These results indicate that the initial receptor-ligand interaction observed after docking can be limited due to the receptor rigid docking algorithm and that the conformations and interactions observed after simulation runs are more energetically favoured. Conclusions We have performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies to elucidate the binding mechanism of prospective herbal drug withaferin A onto the structure of DNA polymerase of Herpes simplex virus. Our docking simulations results give high binding affinity of the ligand to the receptor. Long de novo MD simulations for 10 ns performed allowed us to evaluate the dynamic behaviour of the system studied and corroborate the docking results, as well as identify key residues in the enzyme-inhibitor interactions. The present MD simulations support the hypothesis that withaferin A is a potential ligand to target/inhibit DNA polymerase of the Herpes simplex

  17. Efficacy Results of a Trial of a Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Belshe, Robert B.; Leone, Peter A.; Bernstein, David I.; Wald, Anna; Levin, Myron J.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Gorfinkel, Iris; Morrow, Rhoda L. Ashley; Ewell, Marian G.; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Dubin, Gary; Heineman, Thomas C.; Schulte, Joann M.; Deal, Carolyn D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Two previous studies of a herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) subunit vaccine containing glycoprotein D in HSV-discordant couples revealed 73% and 74% efficacy against genital disease in women who were negative for both HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 antibodies. Efficacy was not observed in men or HSV-1 seropositive women. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind efficacy field trial involving 8323 women 18 to 30 years of age who were negative for antibodies to HSV-1 and HSV-2. At months 0, 1, and 6, some subjects received the investigational vaccine, consisting of 20 μg of glycoprotein D from HSV-2 with alum and 3-O-deacylated monophosphoryl lipid A as an adjuvant; control subjects received the hepatitis A vaccine, at a dose of 720 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) units. The primary end point was occurrence of genital herpes disease due to either HSV-1 or HSV-2 from month 2 (1 month after dose 2) through month 20. Results The HSV vaccine was associated with an increased risk of local reactions as compared with the control vaccine, and it elicited ELISA and neutralizing antibodies to HSV-2. Overall, the vaccine was not efficacious; vaccine efficacy was 20% (95% confidence interval [CI], −29 to 50) against genital herpes disease. However, efficacy against HSV-1 genital disease was 58% (95% CI, 12 to 80). Vaccine efficacy against HSV-1 infection (with or without disease) was 35% (95% CI, 13 to 52), but efficacy against HSV-2 infection was not observed (−8%; 95% CI, −59 to 26). Conclusions In a study population that was representative of the general population of HSV-1– and HSV-2–seronegative women, the investigational vaccine was effective in preventing HSV-1 genital disease and infection but not in preventing HSV-2 disease or infection. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00057330.) PMID:22216840

  18. Design and Implementation of a Primal Simplex Network Optimizer in C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    of connectivity, exogenaity , and capacitance. Each variable assumed five different values, for a combination of 125 tl’roc-tuples. Each tuple was fed...THE BOUNDED VARIABLE SIMPLEX ALGORITHM ............. .4 B. THE SYMBOLIC ALGORITHM ................................. 5 I. Dual Prices and Reduced Costs...5 2. Entering Variable ......................................... 6 3. Exiting Variable

  19. Population- and Family-Based Studies Associate the "MTHFR" Gene with Idiopathic Autism in Simplex Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xudong; Solehdin, Fatima; Cohen, Ira L.; Gonzalez, Maripaz G.; Jenkins, Edmund C.; Lewis, M. E. Suzanne; Holden, Jeanette J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene ("MTHFR") functional polymorphisms were studied in 205 North American simplex (SPX) and 307 multiplex (MPX) families having one or more children with an autism spectrum disorder. Case-control comparisons revealed a significantly higher frequency of the low-activity 677T allele, higher prevalence of the…

  20. Serologic Screening for Herpes Simplex Virus among University Students: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Hayley; Nanda, Joy P.; Joffe, Alain; Roberts, Jessica; Rompalo, Anne; Melendez, Johan; Zenilman, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the feasibility of conducting serologic testing for the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) among university students and assessed the psychosocial impact of an HSV-2 diagnosis. Methods: The authors recruited a convenience sample of 100 students (aged 18-39 years) without a history of genital herpes from 1 university…

  1. Dermatopathology in historical perspective: the Montgomery giant cell of lichen simplex chronicus.

    PubMed

    Rubakovic, Svetlana; Steffen, Charles

    2010-01-01

    In this short historical review, we will discuss the origin and references to the giant cell that is sometimes histopathologically present in the dermis of lichen simplex chronicus that was first described by Hamilton Montgomery, MD. A photomicrograph of the giant cell was included by Montgomery in his text Dermatopathology published in 1967. We will then provide a short biography of Montgomery.

  2. Ficus whitefly, Singhiella simplex, and its predation by a coccinellid beetle, Delphastus catalinae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ficus whitefly, Singhiella simplex, is a pest of ficus plant such as Ficus benjamina, F. altissima, F. bengalensis and others. This invasive pest causes plants to exhibit leaf yellowing, wilting, and eventually, leaf drop. There is little information on the effectiveness of insect predators to contr...

  3. Simultaneous Metabolite, Protein, Lipid Extraction (SIMPLEX): A Combinatorial Multimolecular Omics Approach for Systems Biology*

    PubMed Central

    Solari, Fiorella Andrea; Sickmann, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Interconnected molecular networks are at the heart of signaling pathways that mediate adaptive plasticity of eukaryotic cells. To gain deeper insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms, a comprehensive and representative analysis demands a deep and parallel coverage of a broad spectrum of molecular species. Therefore, we introduce a simultaneous metabolite, protein, lipid extraction (SIMPLEX) procedure, a novel strategy for the quantitative investigation of lipids, metabolites, and proteins. Compared with unimolecular workflows, SIMPLEX offers a fundamental turn in study design since multiple molecular classes can be accessed in parallel from one sample with equal efficiency and reproducibility. Application of this method in mass-spectrometry-based workflows allowed the simultaneous quantification of 360 lipids, 75 metabolites, and 3327 proteins from 106 cells. The versatility of this method is shown in a model system for adipogenesis— peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) signaling in mesenchymal stem cells—where we utilized SIMPLEX to explore cross-talk within and between all three molecular classes and identified novel potential molecular entry points for interventions, indicating that SIMPLEX provides a superior strategy compared with conventional workflows. PMID:26814187

  4. Long-range BOTDA sensor over 50 km distance employing pre-pumped Simplex coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiao; Tu, Xiaobo; Sun, Shilin; Meng, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a long-range Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) sensor based on the pre-pumped Simplex coding technique. This approach combines Simplex coding with the pulse pre-pump technique, which takes full advantage of the signal-to-noise ratio enhancement provided by optical pulse coding and achieves meter-scale spatial resolution with an unbroadened Brillouin gain spectrum by the use of pre-pumped short pump pulse. Compared to the widely used differential pulse-width pair technique, a comparable performance can be realized while the measurement time is reduced by half. The theoretical analysis of pre-pumped Simplex coding applied to BOTDA systems is presented and a proof-of-concept experiment is carried out along a ∼51 km single-mode fiber composed of two fiber segments with slightly different Brillouin frequency shift values. With the proposed technique, Brillouin frequency shifts of the two different fiber sections at the end of the sensing fiber are clearly distinguished, and the obtained spatial resolution and temperature/strain accuracy along the sensing fiber are respectively 1 m and {0.4}\\circ {{C}}/8μ \\varepsilon . According to the experimental results, we believe that the BOTDA employing pre-pumped Simplex coding is able to realize extra-long distance sensing without Raman amplification, while keeping a high spatial resolution and measurement accuracy.

  5. Case report: symptomatic oral herpes simplex virus type 2 and asymptomatic genital shedding.

    PubMed

    Olin, Laura; Wald, Anna

    2006-05-01

    A 42-year-old bisexual man with a history of recurrent oral herpes and no history of genital herpes was noted to have antibody to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) only. During a symptomatic oral recurrence, HSV-2 was found in a perioral lesion as well as in the genital area.

  6. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  7. Does the Cognitive Architecture of Simplex and Multiplex ASD Families Differ?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oerlemans, Anoek M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Rommelse, Nanda N. J.

    2016-01-01

    Children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their unaffected siblings from 54 simplex (SPX, one individual in the family affected) and 59 multiplex (MPX, two or more individuals affected) families, and 124 controls were assessed on intelligence, social cognition and executive functions. SPX and MPX ASD probands displayed similar cognitive…

  8. Purification and cDNA cloning of a new heat-stable allergen from Anisakis simplex.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Shimakura, Kuniyoshi; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji; Shiomi, Kazuo

    2007-10-01

    The nematode Anisakis simplex is a representative parasite for marine animals and occasionally causes not only anisakiasis but also allergic reactions in sensitized subjects. Besides the known allergens, a number of unidentified allergens have been suggested to still exist in A. simplex. In this study, a new heat-stable allergen of 15kDa (named Ani s 8) was purified from the third stage larvae of A. simplex by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300, anion-exchange HPLC on Mono Q and reverse-phase HPLC on TSKgel Phenyl-5PW RP. Analysis by fluorescence ELISA showed that 7 of 28 Anisakis-allergic patients had elevated serum levels of IgE to Ani s 8. On the basis of the determined partial amino acid sequence, the complete sequence of Ani s 8 (composed of 150 amino acid residues) was elucidated by cDNA cloning, in which as many as 32 homologs of the cDNA encoding 10 isoforms of Ani s 8 were detected. Ani s 8 shares amino acid sequence homology (up to 36%) with several members of the SXP/RAL-2 protein family, including Ani s 5 (15kDa) previously identified as an A. simplex allergen. Inhibition ELISA data demonstrated the IgE cross-reactivity between Ani s 8 and Ani s 5.

  9. The effect of lithium chloride on the replication of herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Hartley, C; Buchan, A; Harper, L; Gallimore, P

    1980-01-01

    Lithium chloride inhibited the replication of type 1 and type 2 Herpes simplex virus at concentrations which permitted host cell replication. Virus polypeptide and antigen synthesis were unaffected while viral DNA synthesis was inhibited. The replication of two other DNA viruses, pseudorabies and vaccinia virus, was inhibited but there was no inhibition of two RNA viruses, namely, EMC and influenze virus.

  10. Predation of the ficus whitefly, Singhiella simplex by the coccinellid beetle, Delphastus catalinae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ficus Whitefly (Singhiella simplex) was first reported in Miami-Dade County in August 2007. This invasive pest causes infested plants to exhibit leaf yellowing, followed by leaf drop. The pest has been recorded on multiple ficus hosts including Ficus benjamina, F. altissima, F. bengalensis, F. micro...

  11. FECUNDITY OF FICUS WHITEFLY, SINGHIELLA SIMPLEX (HEMIPTERA: ALEYRODIDAE), AND ITS PREDATION BY DELPHASTUS CATALINAE (COLEOPTERA: COCCINELLIDAE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ficus Whitefly (Singhiella simplex) was first reported in Miami-Dade County in August 2007. This invasive pest causes infested plants to exhibit leaf yellowing, followed by leaf drop. The pest has been recorded on multiple ficus hosts including Ficus benjamina, F. altissima, F. bengalensis, F. micro...

  12. REPRODUCTION OF THE FICUS WHITEFLY, SINGHIELLA SIMPLEX (HEMIPTERA: ALEYRODIDAE): A NEW INVASIVE PEST IN THE USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ficus Whitefly (Singhiella simplex) was first reported in Miami-Dade County in August 2007. This invasive pest causes infested plants to exhibit leaf yellowing, followed by leaf drop. The pest has been recorded on multiple ficus hosts including Ficus benjamina, F. altissima, F. bengalensis, F. micro...

  13. Several allergens from Anisakis simplex are highly resistant to heat and pepsin treatments.

    PubMed

    Caballero, María Luisa; Moneo, Ignacio

    2004-06-01

    Ingestion of raw or undercooked fish can lead to infection with Anisakis simplex. Sensitized patients show specific IgE to proteins from this parasite. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of specific IgE recognition directed to heat and/or pepsin-resistant allergens from A. simplex among sensitized patients. Twenty-seven patients with positive specific IgE and immunoblotting with a crude parasite extract were included in the study. Specific IgE detection against allergens resistant to boiling for 30 min and/or a pepsin digestion of an A. simplex extract was performed by immunoblotting. A total of 81% of the patients showed specific IgE to pepsin-resistant allergens and 67% had specific IgE to heat-resistant allergens. Thirty percent of patients recognized allergens after both treatments, one being the allergen detected by 75% of the patients of this group. Heat- and/or pepsin-resistant allergens from A. simplex could explain reactions and symptoms after the ingestion of well-cooked or canned fish.

  14. Quantitative autoradiographic mapping of focal herpes simplex virus encephalitis using a radiolabeled antiviral drug

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.

    1984-12-18

    A method of mapping herpes simplex viral infection comprising administering a radiolabeled antiviral active 5-substituted 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-substituted-D-arabinofuranosyl) pyrimidine nucleoside to the infected subject, and scanning the area in which the infection is to be mapped for the radiolabel.

  15. Molecular requirement for sterols in herpes simplex virus entry and infectivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) required cholesterol for virion-induced membrane fusion. HSV successfully entered DHCR24-/-cells, which lack a desmosterol-to-cholesterol conversion enzyme, indicating entry can occur independently of cholesterol. Depletion of desmosterol from these cells resulted in d...

  16. Amino-terminal sequence of glycoprotein D of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.J.; Long, D.; Hogue-Angeletti, R.; Cohen, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    Glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus is a structural component of the virion envelope which stimulates production of high titers of herpes simplex virus type-common neutralizing antibody. The authors caried out automated N-terminal amino acid sequencing studies on radiolabeled preparations of gD-1 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 1) and gD-2 (gD of herpes simplex virus type 2). Although some differences were noted, particularly in the methionine and alanine profiles for gD-1 and gD-2, the amino acid sequence of a number of the first 30 residues of the amino terminus of gD-1 and gD-2 appears to be quite similar. For both proteins, the first residue is a lysine. When we compared out sequence data for gD-1 with those predicted by nucleic acid sequencing, the two sequences could be aligned (with one exception) starting at residue 26 (lysine) of the predicted sequence. Thus, the first 25 amino acids of the predicted sequence are absent from the polypeptides isolated from infected cells.

  17. Chronic active herpes simplex type 2 encephalitis in an asymptomatic immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Brown, William D; Bearer, Elaine L; Donahue, John E

    2010-07-01

    A unique form of chronic, active, granulomatous herpes simplex type 2 encephalitis is described in an asymptomatic, immunocompetent 8-year-old girl who acquired the virus as a neonate. The extensive, bilateral cerebral parenchymal involvement was discovered incidentally. Diagnosis was confirmed by a combination of serial neuroimaging, brain biopsy, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction targeted to DNA sequences in the glycoprotein G gene, allowing differentiation between herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2. The clinical course over a 5-year period, treatment with intermittent intravenous steroids, and daily valacyclovir, diagnostic imaging, and laboratory studies are reviewed in detail. This form of herpes simplex virus type 2 encephalitis hasn't been described previously and is significant because of its prolonged indolent course, absence of neurological findings or suggestive history, and benign behavior in this child, who is now 14 years old. The authors believe this entity can be unsuspected and underdiagnosed in the general pediatric population, especially in those with a prior maternal history of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection.

  18. Pediatric Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Complicated by N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Antibody Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Alasdair; Crowe, Belinda H A; Hacohen, Yael; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Clarke, Antonia; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming; Pullaperuma, Sunil P

    2015-06-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies (NMDAR-Abs) can contribute to neurological relapse after herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE). We describe a child with NMDAR-Ab encephalitis after HSE, which was recognized and treated early. We discuss the case in the context of existing reports, and we propose a modified immunotherapy strategy to minimize risk of viral reactivation.

  19. Inhibition of host protein synthesis and degradation of cellular mRNAs during infection by influenza and herpes simplex virus

    SciTech Connect

    Inglis, S.C.

    1982-12-01

    Cloned DNA copies of two cellular genes were used to monitor, by blot hybridization, the stability of particular cell mRNAs after infection by influenza virus and herpes virus. The results indicated that the inhibition of host cell protein synthesis that accompanied infection by each virus could be explained by a reduction in the amounts of cellular mRN As in the cytoplasm, and they suggested that this decrease was due to virus-mediated mRNA degradation.

  20. [Postoperative therapy after penetrating keratoplasty in herpes simplex keratitis].

    PubMed

    Süveges, Ildikó; Füst, Ágnes; Imre, László

    2013-12-29

    Bevezetés: A herpes simplex vírus által okozott szaruhártya-gyulladás a leggyakoribb oka a cornea centrumában kialakuló hegnek, amely látásvesztést okozhat. Célkitűzés: A szerzők célul tűzték ki a perforáló keratoplasztika eredményességének felmérését a szisztémás antiherpeses és immunszuppresszív terápia alkalmazásának tükrében. Módszer: Perforáló keratoplasztikán átesett 12 betegen végezték a retrospektív randomizált vizsgálatot. A műtéti beavatkozásig eltelt idő az első keratitis megjelenésétől számítva átlag 18 év volt (5–40 év). A műtéti indikáció 9 esetben a látás javítása, 3 esetben a cornea perforációjának megelőzése volt. Szisztémás kezelésként 9 beteg herpeszvírus elleni (acyclovir) és immunszuppresszív (mycophenolat mofetil), 2 beteg csak herpeszvírus elleni kezelést kapott, egy betegnél nem alkalmaztak szisztémás terápiát. Az átlagos követési idő 53,1 hónap volt (16–84 hó). Eredmények: A látásjavító célú 9 műtét közül 8 esetben a transzplantátum átlátszóan, ereződés nélkül gyógyult. Mind a 8 beteg acyclovir és mycophenolat mofetil kezelésben részesült. Egy esetben – amikor a beteg szisztémás kezelést nem kapott – recidíva és rejectio is fellépett. Az akut gyulladásos tünetekben végzett műtétek közül egyben gyógyult a transzplantátum átlátszóan, recidíva- és rejectiomentesen; a beteg acyclovir és mycophenolat mofetil terápiában részesült. Két esetben recidíva és rejectio is fellépett. Ezek közül egyben a beteg acyclovir és mycophenolat mofetil, egyben csak acyclovirkezelést kapott. A látóélesség minden esetben javult, 3 esetben a látást egyéb tényezők befolyásolták. Következtetések: A szisztémás acyclovir és mycophenolat mofetil terápia sikerrel alkalmazható herpes simplex keratitisben végzett perforáló keratoplasztikák után. Az acyclovir csökkenti a recidívák számát, a

  1. Double encephalitis with herpes simplex virus type II and cytomegalovirus in an elder Chinese: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chaobiao; Chen, Shaoxian; Lin, Qi; Zhou, Houshi; Huang, Chuming; Lin, Jiyuan; Xie, Weihang; Chen, Kai; Zhou, Dongming; Ma, Wan; Ma, Feiyu; Xu, Haiyun

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis is a rare disease. In adults, most of the reported cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections are seen in immunocompromised patients. We present a case of 67-year-old Chinese male with the coinfection of CMV and herpes simplex virus type II (HSV-II). He had no history of being treated with immunosuppressants, showed symptoms of psychosis and was scored 109 on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. This patient presented with a rare case of coinfection of CMV and herpes simplex virus type II with psychotic symptoms. PMID:26586947

  2. Herpes simplex virus keratitis: an update of the pathogenesis and current treatment with oral and topical antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Tsatsos, Michael; MacGregor, Cheryl; Athanasiadis, Ioannis; Moschos, Marilita M; Hossain, Parwez; Anderson, David

    2016-12-01

    Ophthalmic herpes simplex viral keratitis is responsible for a range of ocular manifestations from superficial epithelial disease to stromal keratitis and endotheliitis. The Herpetic Eye Disease Study has guided the management of herpetic eye disease for almost twenty years, but newer medications such as valacyclovir are now available and are considered to have better bioavailability than acyclovir. In this review, we examine the existing evidence on the pathogenesis of different ophthalmic herpes simplex viral keratitis disease modalities and the role of oral and topically administered antiviral drugs in the treatment of herpes simplex viral keratitis.

  3. Mycosis Inhibits Cannibalism by Melanoplus sanguinipes, M. differentialis, Schistocerca americana, and Anabrus simplex

    PubMed Central

    Jaronski, Stefan T.

    2013-01-01

    Cannibalism is common among the Acrididae and the Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex Haldeman (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae). This behavior has been proposed as a mechanism for the horizontal transmission of Microsporida and entomopathogenic fungi. Aanecdotal observations suggested that the migratory grasshopper, Melanoplus sanguinipes Fabricius (Acrididae), and A. simplex did not eat cadavers that had been killed by insect pathogenic fungi. The hypothesis tested was that A. simplex or M. sanguinipes would not cannibalize individuals freshly killed by the entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana Bals.-Criv. (Vuill.) (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae), or Metarhizium acridum (Driver and Milner) Bischoff, Rehner, and Humber. Cannibalism was examined in a series of no-choice tests with individual insects. Test insects included healthy adults of M. sanguinipes; the differential grasshopper, M. differentialis (Thomas); the American grasshopper, Schistocerca americana (Drury) (Acrididae); and A. simplex. Individual, starved Acrididae or A. simplex were confined in small cages with either a fungus-killed (but unsporulated) or uninfected cadaver. The insects were then observed periodically for the first 4 hr. After 24 hr, the cadavers were scored for the degree to which they had been consumed. Very few mycotic cadavers were fed upon by the healthy insects, and, at most only the tarsi were eaten. All four species generally refused to eat fungus-infected cadavers. In contrast, freeze-killed cadavers were partly or entirely consumed by most of the test insects, often within a few hours. Transmission of infection through contact in these tests was between 0–18.9%, depending upon the fungus and insect species, and was lower than the prevalence of cannibalism in all cases. PMID:24786183

  4. Criteria to Screen Molecular Tests for the Diagnosis of Herpes Simplex Virus in the Central Nervous System have no Propensity to Harm

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Ronald George; Brandt, Cynthia A.; Martinello, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Investigators have ruled out herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection without the detection of herpes simplex deoxyribonucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (i.e., HSV polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) by laboratory (normal CSF white blood cell count and protein) and clinical criteria (age ≥2 years, no history of human immunodeficiency virus or solid-organ transplant). Compared to HSV PCR of all samples, the algorithm saves money in test costs and may decrease exposure to acyclovir by illustrating the low probability that the patient has HSV. Concern exists that algorithm use may cause harm through alteration of empiric acyclovir treatment in patients with true HSV central nervous system infection. Methods: All Department of Veterans Affair's patients with a positive HSV PCR of the CSF between 2000 and 2013 were identified and their medical records reviewed to determine the extent and possible impact of omitted HSV PCR testing by the algorithm. Results: Of 6357 total results, 101 patients had a positive CSF HSV PCR in the study period. Among the positive CSF HSV PCR results, the algorithm excluded 7 (7%) from PCR testing. Record review indicated these seven patients not tested by the algorithm with a positive CSF HSV PCR were considered by their attending physician not to have active HSV. Conclusion: The algorithm to screen HSV tests had no propensity to harm.

  5. Brazilein from Caesalpinia sappan L. Antioxidant Inhibits Adipocyte Differentiation and Induces Apoptosis through Caspase-3 Activity and Anthelmintic Activities against Hymenolepis nana and Anisakis simplex.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chia-Hua; Chan, Leong-Perng; Chou, Tzung-Han; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Yen, Chuan-Min; Chen, Pin-Ju; Ding, Hsiou-Yu; Lin, Rong-Jyh

    2013-01-01

    Brazilein, a natural, biologically active compound from Caesalpinia sappan L., has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and to inhibit the growth of several cancer cells. This study verifies the antioxidant and antitumor characteristics of brazilein in skin cancer cells and is the first time to elucidate the inhibition mechanism of adipocyte differentiation, cestocidal activities against Hymenolepis nana, and reduction of spontaneous movement in Anisakis simplex. Brazilein exhibits an antioxidant capacity as well as the ability to scavenge DPPH(•) and ABTS(•+) free radicals and to inhibit lipid peroxidation. Brazilein inhibited intracellular lipid accumulation during adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells and suppressed the induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR γ ), the master regulator of adipogenesis, suggesting that brazilein presents the antiobesity effects. The toxic effects of brazilein were evaluated in terms of cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and the activity of caspase-3 in BCC cells. The inhibition of the growth of skin cancer cells (A431, BCC, and SCC25) by brazilein is greater than that of human skin malignant melanoma (A375) cells, mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage (RAW 264.7 cells), and noncancerous cells (HaCaT and BNLCL2 cells). The anthelmintic activities of brazilein against Hymenolepis nana are better than those of Anisakis simplex.

  6. Molecular mimicry and myasthenia gravis. An autoantigenic site of the acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit that has biologic activity and reacts immunochemically with herpes simplex virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schwimmbeck, P L; Dyrberg, T; Drachman, D B; Oldstone, M B

    1989-01-01

    The large majority of patients with the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis characteristically have detectable antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). We used synthetic peptides to identify antibodies in sera of myasthenia gravis patients reactive with the human acetylcholine receptor (HuAChR) alpha-subunit, residues 160-167. Affinity purification of these antibodies, using the HuAChR alpha-subunit 157-170 peptide immobilized on thiopropyl-Sepharose, yielded IgG antibodies that bound to the native AChR and inhibited the binding of alpha-bungarotoxin to the receptor. The HuAChR alpha-subunit 160-167 peptide demonstrated specific immunological cross-reactivity with a shared homologous domain on herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D, residues 286-293, by both binding and inhibition studies. Thus, HuAChR alpha-subunit, residues 160-167, elicits antibodies in myasthenic patients that binds to the native AChR protein and is capable of eliciting a biologic effect. Immunologic cross-reactivity of this "self" epitope with herpes simplex virus suggest that this virus may be associated with the initiation of some cases of myasthenia. Images PMID:2551924

  7. Brazilein from Caesalpinia sappan L. Antioxidant Inhibits Adipocyte Differentiation and Induces Apoptosis through Caspase-3 Activity and Anthelmintic Activities against Hymenolepis nana and Anisakis simplex

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chia-Hua; Chan, Leong-Perng; Chou, Tzung-Han; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Yen, Chuan-Min; Chen, Pin-Ju; Ding, Hsiou-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Brazilein, a natural, biologically active compound from Caesalpinia sappan L., has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and to inhibit the growth of several cancer cells. This study verifies the antioxidant and antitumor characteristics of brazilein in skin cancer cells and is the first time to elucidate the inhibition mechanism of adipocyte differentiation, cestocidal activities against Hymenolepis nana, and reduction of spontaneous movement in Anisakis simplex. Brazilein exhibits an antioxidant capacity as well as the ability to scavenge DPPH• and ABTS•+ free radicals and to inhibit lipid peroxidation. Brazilein inhibited intracellular lipid accumulation during adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells and suppressed the induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), the master regulator of adipogenesis, suggesting that brazilein presents the antiobesity effects. The toxic effects of brazilein were evaluated in terms of cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and the activity of caspase-3 in BCC cells. The inhibition of the growth of skin cancer cells (A431, BCC, and SCC25) by brazilein is greater than that of human skin malignant melanoma (A375) cells, mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage (RAW 264.7 cells), and noncancerous cells (HaCaT and BNLCL2 cells). The anthelmintic activities of brazilein against Hymenolepis nana are better than those of Anisakis simplex. PMID:23554834

  8. Characterization and detection of Vero cells infected with Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 using Raman spectroscopy and advanced statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Salman, A; Shufan, E; Zeiri, L; Huleihel, M

    2014-07-01

    Herpes viruses are involved in a variety of human disorders. Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) is the most common among the herpes viruses and is primarily involved in human cutaneous disorders. Although the symptoms of infection by this virus are usually minimal, in some cases HSV-1 might cause serious infections in the eyes and the brain leading to blindness and even death. A drug, acyclovir, is available to counter this virus. The drug is most effective when used during the early stages of the infection, which makes early detection and identification of these viral infections highly important for successful treatment. In the present study we evaluated the potential of Raman spectroscopy as a sensitive, rapid, and reliable method for the detection and identification of HSV-1 viral infections in cell cultures. Using Raman spectroscopy followed by advanced statistical methods enabled us, with sensitivity approaching 100%, to differentiate between a control group of Vero cells and another group of Vero cells that had been infected with HSV-1. Cell sites that were "rich in membrane" gave the best results in the differentiation between the two categories. The major changes were observed in the 1195-1726 cm(-1) range of the Raman spectrum. The features in this range are attributed mainly to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids.

  9. Cultured corneas show dendritic spread and restrict herpes simplex virus infection that is not observed with cultured corneal cells

    PubMed Central

    Thakkar, Neel; Jaishankar, Dinesh; Agelidis, Alex; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Mangano, Kyle; Patel, Shrey; Tekin, Sati Zeynep; Shukla, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) causes life-long morbidities in humans. While fever blisters are more common, occasionally the cornea is infected resulting in vision loss. A very intriguing aspect of HSV-1 corneal infection is that the virus spread is normally restricted to only a small fraction of cells on the corneal surface that connect with each other in a dendritic fashion. Here, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the susceptibility of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells to HSV-1 infection, we infected HCE cells at three different dosages of HSV-1 and measured the outcomes in terms of viral entry, gene and protein expression, viral replication and cytokine induction. In cultured cells, infectivity and cytokine induction were observed even at the minimum viral dosage tested, while a more pronounced dose-restricted infectivity was seen in ex vivo cultures of porcine corneas. Use of fluorescent HSV-1 virions demonstrated a pattern of viral spread ex vivo that mimics clinical findings. We conclude that HCE cell cultures are highly susceptible to infection whereas the cultured corneas demonstrate a higher ability to restrict the infection even in the absence of systemic immune system. The restriction is helped in part by local interferon response and the unique cellular architecture of the cornea. PMID:28198435

  10. Computational modeling and functional analysis of Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jufeng; Wang, Zhanli; Wei, Fang; Qiu, Wei; Zhang, Liangren; Huang, Qian . E-mail: qhuang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2007-08-17

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1TK) and Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase (CD) fusion protein was designed using InsightII software. The structural rationality of the fusion proteins incorporating a series of flexible linker peptide was analyzed, and a suitable linker peptide was chosen for further investigated. The recombinant plasmid containing the coding regions of HSV-1TK and CD cDNA connected by this linker peptide coding sequence was generated and subsequently transfected into the human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293). The Western blotting indicated that the recombinant fusion protein existed as a dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa. The toxicity of the prodrug on the recombinant plasmid-transfected human lung cancer cell line NCIH460 was evaluated, which showed that TKglyCD-expressing cells conferred upon cells prodrug sensitivities equivalent to that observed for each enzyme independently. Most noteworthy, cytotoxicity could be enhanced by concurrently treating TKglyCD-expressing cells with prodrugs GCV and 5-FC. The results indicate that we have successfully constructed a HSV-1TKglyCD fusion gene which might have a potential application for cancer gene therapy.

  11. Zinc oxide tetrapods inhibit herpes simplex virus infection of cultured corneas

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Neil; Jaishankar, Dinesh; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Hadigal, Satvik; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Adelung, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Infection of the human cornea by herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) can cause significant vision loss. The purpose of this study was to develop an ex vivo model to visualize viral growth and spread in the cornea. The model was also used to analyze cytokine production and study the antiviral effects of zinc oxide tetrapods. Methods A β-galactosidase-expressing recombinant virus, HSV-1(KOS)tk12, was used to demonstrate the ability of the virus to enter and develop blue plaques on human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells and corneal tissues. Freshly obtained porcine corneas were cultured and then scratched before infection with HSV-1(KOS)tk12. The blue plaques on the corneas were imaged using a stereomicroscope. Western blot analysis for HSV-1 proteins was performed to verify HSV-1 infection of the cornea. Using the ex vivo model, zinc oxide tetrapods were tested for their anti-HSV-1 potential, and a cytokine profile was developed to assess the effects of the treatment. Results Cultured corneas and the use of β-galactosidase-expressing HSV-1(KOS)tk12 virus can provide an attractive ex vivo model to visualize and study HSV-1 entry and spread of the infection in tissues. We found that unlike cultured HCE cells, which demonstrated nearly 100% infectivity, HSV-1 infection of the cultured cornea was more restrictive and took longer to develop. We also found that the zinc oxide tetrapod–shaped nano- and microstructures inhibited HSV infection of the cultured cells, as well as the cultured corneas. The cytokine profile of the infected samples was consistent with previous studies of HSV-1 corneal infection. Conclusions The ability to visualize HSV-1 growth and spread in corneal tissues can provide new details about HSV-1 infection of the cornea and the efficacy of new cornea-specific antiviral drug candidates. The ex vivo model also demonstrates antiviral effects of zinc oxide tetrapods and adequately portrays the drug delivery issues that cornea-specific treatments

  12. Impact of the MRN Complex on Adeno-Associated Virus Integration and Replication during Coinfection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Rachel; Jolinon, Nelly; Nguyen, Xuan-Nhi; Berger, Gregory; Cimarelli, Andrea; Greco, Anna; Bertrand, Pascale; Odenthal, Margarete; Büning, Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a helper-dependent parvovirus that requires coinfection with adenovirus (AdV) or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) to replicate. In the absence of the helper virus, AAV can persist in an episomal or integrated form. Previous studies have analyzed the DNA damage response (DDR) induced upon AAV replication to understand how it controls AAV replication. In particular, it was shown that the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex, a major player of the DDR induced by double-stranded DNA breaks and stalled replication forks, could negatively regulate AdV and AAV replication during coinfection. In contrast, MRN favors HSV-1 replication and is recruited to AAV replication compartments that are induced in the presence of HSV-1. In this study, we examined the role of MRN during AAV replication induced by HSV-1. Our results indicated that knockdown of MRN significantly reduced AAV DNA replication after coinfection with wild-type (wt) HSV-1 or HSV-1 with the polymerase deleted. This effect was specific to wt AAV, since it did not occur with recombinant AAV vectors. Positive regulation of AAV replication by MRN was dependent on its DNA tethering activity but did not require its nuclease activities. Importantly, knockdown of MRN also negatively regulated AAV integration within the human AAVS1 site, both in the presence and in the absence of HSV-1. Altogether, this work identifies a new function of MRN during integration of the AAV genome and demonstrates that this DNA repair complex positively regulates AAV replication in the presence of HSV-1. IMPORTANCE Viral DNA genomes trigger a DNA damage response (DDR), which can be either detrimental or beneficial for virus replication. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a defective parvovirus that requires the help of an unrelated virus such as adenovirus (AdV) or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for productive replication. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cellular Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex, a

  13. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer for the potential therapy of adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency.

    PubMed

    Silver, Jared N; Elder, Melissa; Conlon, Thomas; Cruz, Pedro; Wright, Amy J; Srivastava, Arun; Flotte, Terence R

    2011-08-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare, potentially fatal pediatric disease, which results from mutations within the ADA gene, leading to metabolic abnormalities and ultimately profound immunologic and nonimmunologic defects. In this study, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors based on serotypes 1 and 9 were used to deliver a secretory version of the human ADA (hADA) gene to various tissues to promote immune reconstitution following enzyme expression in a mouse model of ADA deficiency. Here, we report that a single-stranded rAAV vector, pTR2-CB-Igκ-hADA, (1) facilitated successful gene delivery to multiple tissues, including heart, skeletal muscle, and kidney, (2) promoted ectopic expression of hADA, and (3) allowed enhanced serum-based enzyme activity over time. Moreover, the rAAV-hADA vector packaged in serotype 9 capsid drove partial, prolonged, and progressive immune reconstitution in ADA-deficient mice. Overview Summary Gene therapies for severe combined immune deficiency due to adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency (ADA-SCID) over two decades have exclusively involved retroviral vectors targeted to lymphocytes and hematopoietic progenitor cells. These groundbreaking gene therapies represented an unprecedented revolution in clinical medicine but in most cases did not fully correct the immune deficiency and came with the potential risk of insertional mutagenesis. Alternatively, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have gained attention as valuable tools for gene transfer, having demonstrated no pathogenicity in humans, minimal immunogenicity, long-term efficacy, ease of administration, and broad tissue tropism (Muzyczka, 1992 ; Flotte et al., 1993 ; Kessler et al., 1996 ; McCown et al., 1996 ; Lipkowitz et al., 1999 ; Marshall, 2001 ; Chen et al., 2003 ; Conlon and Flotte, 2004 ; Griffey et al., 2005 ; Pacak et al., 2006 ; Stone et al., 2008 ; Liu et al., 2009 ; Choi et al., 2010

  14. Schizophrenia susceptibility genes directly implicated in the life cycles of pathogens: cytomegalovirus, influenza, herpes simplex, rubella, and Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Carter, C J

    2009-11-01

    Many genes implicated in schizophrenia can be related to glutamatergic transmission and neuroplasticity, oligodendrocyte function, and other families clearly related to neurobiology and schizophrenia phenotypes. Others appear rather to be involved in the life cycles of the pathogens implicated in the disease. For example, aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA), PLA2, SIAT8B, GALNT7, or B3GAT1 metabolize chemical ligands to which the influenza virus, herpes simplex, cytomegalovirus (CMV), rubella, or Toxoplasma gondii bind. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGR/EGFR) is used by the CMV to gain entry to cells, and a CMV gene codes for an interleukin (IL-10) mimic that binds the host cognate receptor, IL10R. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR1) is used by herpes simplex. KPNA3 and RANBP5 control the nuclear import of the influenza virus. Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) controls the microtubule network that is used by viruses as a route to the nucleus, while DTNBP1, MUTED, and BLOC1S3 regulate endosomal to lysosomal routing that is also important in viral traffic. Neuregulin 1 activates ERBB receptors releasing a factor, EBP1, known to inhibit the influenza virus transcriptase. Other viral or bacterial components bind to genes or proteins encoded by CALR, FEZ1, FYN, HSPA1B, IL2, HTR2A, KPNA3, MED12, MED15, MICB, NQO2, PAX6, PIK3C3, RANBP5, or TP53, while the cerebral infectivity of the herpes simplex virus is modified by Apolipoprotein E (APOE). Genes encoding for proteins related to the innate immune response, including cytokine related (CCR5, CSF2RA, CSF2RB, IL1B, IL1RN, IL2, IL3, IL3RA, IL4, IL10, IL10RA, IL18RAP, lymphotoxin-alpha, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF]), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antigens (HLA-A10, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1), and genes involved in antigen processing (angiotensin-converting enzyme and tripeptidyl peptidase 2) are all concerned with defense against invading pathogens. Human microRNAs (Hsa-mir-198 and Hsa-mir-206) are predicted to bind

  15. Host Anti-antibody Responses Following Adeno-associated Virus-mediated Delivery of Antibodies Against HIV and SIV in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Navio, José M; Fuchs, Sebastian P; Pedreño-López, Sònia; Rakasz, Eva G; Gao, Guangping; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2016-02-01

    Long-term delivery of antibodies against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is a promising approach for the prevention or treatment of HIV infection. However, host antibody responses to the delivered antibody are a serious concern that could significantly limit the applicability of this approach. Here, we describe the dynamics and characteristics of the anti-antibody responses in monkeys that received either rhesus anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) antibodies (4L6 or 5L7) in prevention trials or a combination of rhesusized human anti-HIV antibodies (1NC9/8ANC195/3BNC117 or 10-1074/10E8/3BNC117) in therapy trials, all employing AAV1 delivery of IgG1. Eight out of eight monkeys that received the anti-HIV antibodies made persisting antibody responses to all three antibodies in the mix. Six out of six uninfected monkeys that received the anti-SIV antibody 4L6 and three out of six of those receiving anti-SIV antibody 5L7 also generated anti-antibodies. Both heavy and light chains were targeted, predominantly or exclusively to variable regions, and reactivity to complementarity-determining region (CDR)-H3 peptide could be demonstrated. There was a highly significant correlation of the magnitude of anti-antibody responses with the degree of sequence divergence of the delivered antibody from germline. Our results suggest the need for effective strategies to counteract the problem of antibody responses to AAV-delivered antibodies.

  16. Acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex encephalitis in a patient treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Kinda; Hernandez, Antonio; Andrei, Graciela; Gillemot, Sarah; Fiten, Pierre; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Bier, Jean-Christophe; David, Philippe; Delforge, Marie-Luce; Jacobs, Frédérique; Snoeck, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus is the most common cause of severe sporadic encephalitis. We report a case of herpes simplex type 1-encephalitis in a 50-year-old woman receiving anti-tumor necrosis factor-α monoclonal antibodies adalimumab. Although she was an acyclovir naïve patient, a mixed viral population (wild-type and acyclovir-resistant bearing a thymidine-kinase mutation) was identified in the cerebrospinal fluid. The virus in cerebrospinal fluid evolved and a second thymidine-kinase mutant virus emerged. Combined foscavir and acyclovir treatment resolved the herpes simplex encephalitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex encephalitis in a patient treated with adalimumab.

  17. Atypical presentations of genital herpes simplex virus in HIV-1 and HIV-2 effectively treated by imiquimod.

    PubMed

    McKendry, Anna; Narayana, Srinivasulu; Browne, Rita

    2015-05-01

    Atypical presentations of genital herpes simplex virus have been described in HIV. We report two cases with hypertrophic presentations which were effectively treated with imiquimod, one of which is the first reported case occurring in a patient with HIV-2.

  18. Molecular epidemiology and risk factors for Anisakis simplex s.l. infection in blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) in a confluence zone of the Atlantic and Mediterranean: Differences between A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Mateos, Magdalena; Valero, Adela; Morales-Yuste, Manuel; Martín-Sánchez, Joaquina

    2016-09-02

    Our study determined parameters of parasitization of Anisakis simplex s.l. in Micromesistius poutassou in a confluence zone of the Atlantic and Mediterranean, with a total prevalence of 82%. Also, in the three seasons analyzed, high prevalence's values were found, reaching 100% in spring; however mean intensity and abundance values were higher in winter. The use of molecular techniques to differentiate between Anisakis genotypes of the larvae characterized allowed obtaining values of 99.7% Anisakis simplex s.l. (50.1% A. simplex s.s., 42.9% A. pegreffii, 7.0% A. simplex s.s. - A. pegreffii hybrids) and 0.3% A. typica. The infections found in the fish were of both single and mixed species, in all the different possible combinations. The presence of A. simplex s.l. in the viscera varied according to genotype and season. Likewise, factors associated with the presence of the parasite in the ventral or dorsal musculature were different, where A. simplex s.s. proportion was double than that of A. pegreffii. The ecology of the two sibling species with regard to their location in fish and the influence of the season were different.

  19. Effect of Prior Immunization on Induction of Cervical Cancer in Mice by Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd Wentz, W.; Heggie, Alfred D.; Anthony, Donald D.; Reagan, James W.

    1983-12-01

    Previous studies at this laboratory showed that repeated application of inactivated herpes simplex virus type 2 to the mouse cervix produces premalignant and malignant lesions. In the present study mice were inoculated with inactivated herpes simplex virus type 2 or control solution and Freund's adjuvant by intraperitoneal and subcutaneous routes before exposure of the cervix to inactivated virus. It appears that immunization with inactivated virus conferred a protection against the induction of cervical carcinoma.

  20. Equation-of-State Based Tie-Simplex Parameterization for Multiphase Thermal-Compositional Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iranshahr, A.; Voskov, D.; Tchelepi, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) processes usually involve complex phase behaviors between the injected fluid (e.g., steam, hydrocarbon, CO2, sour) and the in-situ rock-fluid system. Several fundamental questions remain regarding equation-of-state computations for mixtures than can form three, or more, phases at equilibrium. In addition, numerical and computational issues related to proper coupling of the thermodynamic phase-behavior with multiphase flow multi-component transport must be resolved in order to model the behaviors of large-scale EOR processes accurately and efficiently. We describe a general negative-flash method for multi-component, thermal systems that can form three, or more, fluid phases. We prove that the new method is convergent to the unique solution. Based on our multiphase negative-flash technique, we have developed an adaptive tie-simplex parameterization framework for thermal-compositional simulation. We also prove that the tie-simplexes change continuously as a function of pressure, temperature, and composition. The continuity of the parameterized compositional space allows for interpolation in pressure and temperature using a limited number of tie-simplexes. We show that the tie-simplex framework constrains thermodynamic computations, and converges to the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The extended negative-flash approach accounts rigorously for tie-simplex degeneration (critical behavior) across phase boundaries. We study the behaviors of thermal-compositional reservoir displacement processes across a wide range of fluid mixtures, pressures, and temperatures. The focus is on the complex behaviors of the tie-triangles and tie-lines associated with three-phase, thermal steam-injection problems in heterogeneous formations. The algorithms that capture the complex combinations of the appearance and disappearance of multiple phases are described in detail. This tie-simplex based parameterization framework is integrated with a general

  1. Reversal of the malignant phenotype of cervical cancer CaSki cells through adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of HPV16 E7 antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sufang; Meng, Li; Wang, Shixuan; Wang, Wei; Xi, Ling; Tian, Xun; Chen, Gang; Wu, Ying; Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Gang; Lu, Yunping; Ma, Ding

    2006-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most important risk factor for the development of cervical cancer. The oncogene E7 from high-risk HPV strains has the ability to immortalize epithelial cells and increase cellular transformation in culture. In this study, we explored the possibility of preventing cervical cancer growth by inhibiting HPV16 E7 expression through gene transfer of an antisense construct. A recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector was chosen for the transfer, based on its transfection efficiency, in vivo stability, and lack of detectable pathology. In vitro transfer of an rAAV vector expressing antisense HPV16 E7 (AAV-HPV16E7AS) inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, reduced cell migration, and restrained in vivo proliferation of HPV16/HPV18-positive cervical cancer CaSki cells. These results indicate that down-regulation of HPV16 E7 with antisense RNA is beneficial in reducing the tumorigenicity of CaSki cells, and rAAV vectors ought to be a new efficient approach for delivering the expression of therapeutic genes.

  2. Chronic urticaria associated with recurrent genital herpes simplex infection and success of antiviral therapy--a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zawar, Vijay; Godse, Kiran; Sankalecha, Sudhir

    2010-06-01

    The role of infectious agents as a cause of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is uncertain. The objective of this study was to investigate whether genital herpes simplex infection is causally related to CIU. We identified two patients with recurrent genital herpes simplex infections associated with CIU. Episodes of genital herpes were especially associated with acute exacerbation of urticaria. Anti-herpes simplex 2 antibodies and Tzanck smears were done in both patients, along with other relevant investigations for CIU. Acyclovir was added to antihistamine therapy. Both patients were apparently in good health and appeared clinically immunologically stable, though one of them was found to be diabetic. Clinical and laboratory investigations for genital lesions supported a diagnosis of herpes simplex. Anti-herpes simplex 2 antibodies were markedly raised in both patients. The Tzanck smear was positive in one case and negative in the other, despite a definitive clinical diagnosis of herpes progenitalis. CIU, which was inadequately controlled with antihistamines alone, responded dramatically to the addition of acyclovir therapy. Our results may not be applicable to other patients with CIU, especially when there is inadequate evidence of an association with genital herpes. CIU may be associated with recurrent genital herpes simplex infection. In such situations, the addition of acyclovir to therapy may be beneficial.

  3. Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Glycoprotein B by a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus and Protection of Mice against Lethal Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantin, Edouard M.; Eberle, Richard; Baldick, Joseph L.; Moss, Bernard; Willey, Dru E.; Notkins, Abner L.; Openshaw, Harry

    1987-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) strain F gene encoding glycoprotein gB was isolated and modified at the 5' end by in vitro oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. The modified gB gene was inserted into the vaccinia virus genome and expressed under the control of a vaccinia virus promoter. The mature gB glycoprotein produced by the vaccinia virus recombinant was glycosylated, was expressed at the cell surface, and was indistinguishable from authentic HSV-1 gB in terms of electrophoretic mobility. Mice immunized intradermally with the recombinant vaccinia virus produced gB-specific neutralizing antibodies and were resistant to a lethal HSV-1 challenge.

  4. The Autism Simplex Collection: an international, expertly phenotyped autism sample for genetic and phenotypic analyses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need for expanding and enhancing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) samples, in order to better understand causes of ASD. Methods In a unique public-private partnership, 13 sites with extensive experience in both the assessment and diagnosis of ASD embarked on an ambitious, 2-year program to collect samples for genetic and phenotypic research and begin analyses on these samples. The program was called The Autism Simplex Collection (TASC). TASC sample collection began in 2008 and was completed in 2010, and included nine sites from North America and four sites from Western Europe, as well as a centralized Data Coordinating Center. Results Over 1,700 trios are part of this collection, with DNA from transformed cells now available through the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (ADOS-G) measures are available for all probands, as are standardized IQ measures, Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales (VABS), the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT), and physical measures (height, weight, and head circumference). At almost every site, additional phenotypic measures were collected, including the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire (BAPQ) and Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised (RBS-R), as well as the non-word repetition scale, Communication Checklist (Children’s or Adult), and Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC). Moreover, for nearly 1,000 trios, the Autism Genome Project Consortium (AGP) has carried out Illumina 1 M SNP genotyping and called copy number variation (CNV) in the samples, with data being made available through the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Whole exome sequencing (WES) has been carried out in over 500 probands, together with ancestry matched controls, and this data is also available through the NIH. Additional WES is being carried out by the Autism Sequencing Consortium (ASC), where the

  5. Macrophages and cytokines in the early defence against herpes simplex virus

    PubMed Central

    Ellermann-Eriksen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and 2 are old viruses, with a history of evolution shared with humans. Thus, it is generally well-adapted viruses, infecting many of us without doing much harm, and with the capacity to hide in our neurons for life. In rare situations, however, the primary infection becomes generalized or involves the brain. Normally, the primary HSV infection is asymptomatic, and a crucial element in the early restriction of virus replication and thus avoidance of symptoms from the infection is the concerted action of different arms of the innate immune response. An early and light struggle inhibiting some HSV replication will spare the host from the real war against huge amounts of virus later in infection. As far as such a war will jeopardize the life of the host, it will be in both interests, including the virus, to settle the conflict amicably. Some important weapons of the unspecific defence and the early strikes and beginning battle during the first days of a HSV infection are discussed in this review. Generally, macrophages are orchestrating a multitude of anti-herpetic actions during the first hours of the attack. In a first wave of responses, cytokines, primarily type I interferons (IFN) and tumour necrosis factor are produced and exert a direct antiviral effect and activate the macrophages themselves. In the next wave, interleukin (IL)-12 together with the above and other cytokines induce production of IFN-γ in mainly NK cells. Many positive feed-back mechanisms and synergistic interactions intensify these systems and give rise to heavy antiviral weapons such as reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. This results in the generation of an alliance against the viral enemy. However, these heavy weapons have to be controlled to avoid too much harm to the host. By IL-4 and others, these reactions are hampered, but they are still allowed in foci of HSV replication, thus focusing the activity to only relevant sites. So, no hero does it alone

  6. Dynamic Response of IFI16 and Promyelocytic Leukemia Nuclear Body Components to Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intrinsic immunity is an aspect of antiviral defense that operates through diverse mechanisms at the intracellular level through a wide range of constitutively expressed cellular proteins. In the case of herpesviruses, intrinsic resistance involves the repression of viral gene expression during the very early stages of infection, a process that is normally overcome by viral tegument and/or immediate-early proteins. Thus, the balance between cellular repressors and virus-counteracting proteins determines whether or not a cell becomes productively infected. One aspect of intrinsic resistance to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is conferred by components of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs), which respond to infection by accumulating at sites that are closely associated with the incoming parental HSV-1 genomes. Other cellular proteins, including IFI16, which has been implicated in sensing pathogen DNA and initiating signaling pathways that lead to an interferon response, also respond to viral genomes in this manner. Here, studies of the dynamics of the response of PML NB components and IFI16 to invading HSV-1 genomes demonstrated that this response is extremely rapid, occurring within the first hour after addition of the virus, and that human Daxx (hDaxx) and IFI16 respond more rapidly than PML. In the absence of HSV-1 regulatory protein ICP0, which counteracts the recruitment process, the newly formed, viral-genome-induced PML NB-like foci can fuse with existing PML NBs. These data are consistent with a model involving viral genome sequestration into such structures, thereby contributing to the low probability of initiation of lytic infection in the absence of ICP0. IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses have intimate interactions with their hosts, with infection leading either to the productive lytic cycle or to a quiescent infection in which viral gene expression is suppressed while the viral genome is maintained in the host cell nucleus. Whether a cell

  7. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Reactivates from Autonomic Ciliary Ganglia Independently from Sensory Trigeminal Ganglia To Cause Recurrent Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungseok; Ives, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 establish latency in sensory and autonomic neurons after ocular or genital infection, but their recurrence patterns differ. HSV-1 reactivates from latency to cause recurrent orofacial disease, and while HSV-1 also causes genital lesions, HSV-2 recurs more efficiently in the genital region and rarely causes ocular disease. The mechanisms regulating these anatomical preferences are unclear. To determine whether differences in latent infection and reactivation in autonomic ganglia contribute to differences in HSV-1 and HSV-2 anatomical preferences for recurrent disease, we compared HSV-1 and HSV-2 clinical disease, acute and latent viral loads, and viral gene expression in sensory trigeminal and autonomic superior cervical and ciliary ganglia in a guinea pig ocular infection model. HSV-2 produced more severe acute disease, correlating with higher viral DNA loads in sensory and autonomic ganglia, as well as higher levels of thymidine kinase expression, a marker of productive infection, in autonomic ganglia. HSV-1 reactivated in ciliary ganglia, independently from trigeminal ganglia, to cause more frequent recurrent symptoms, while HSV-2 replicated simultaneously in autonomic and sensory ganglia to cause more persistent disease. While both HSV-1 and HSV-2 expressed the latency-associated transcript (LAT) in the trigeminal and superior cervical ganglia, only HSV-1 expressed LAT in ciliary ganglia, suggesting that HSV-2 is not reactivation competent or does not fully establish latency in ciliary ganglia. Thus, differences in replication and viral gene expression in autonomic ganglia may contribute to differences in HSV-1 and HSV-2 acute and recurrent clinical disease. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 establish latent infections, from which the viruses reactivate to cause recurrent disease throughout the life of the host. However, the viruses exhibit different manifestations and frequencies of recurrent

  8. Herpes simplex virus γ34.5 interferes with autophagosome maturation and antigen presentation in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gobeil, Philipe A M; Leib, David A

    2012-10-16

    The cellular autophagy response induced by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is countered by the viral γ34.5 protein. γ34.5 modulates autophagy by binding to the host autophagy protein Beclin-1 and through this binding inhibits the formation of autophagosomes in fibroblasts and neurons. In contrast, in this study dendritic cells (DCs) infected with HSV-1 showed an accumulation of autophagosomes and of the long-lived protein p62. No such accumulations were observed in DCs infected with a γ34.5-null virus or a virus lacking the Beclin-binding domain (BBD) of γ34.5. To explore this further, we established stably transduced DC lines to show that γ34.5 expression alone induced autophagosome accumulation yet prevented p62 degradation. In contrast, DCs expressing a BBD-deleted mutant of γ34.5 were unable to modulate autophagy. DCs expressing γ34.5 were less capable of stimulating T-cell activation and proliferation in response to intracellular antigens, demonstrating an immunological consequence of inhibiting autophagy. Taken together, these data show that in DCs, γ34.5 antagonizes the maturation of autophagosomes and T cell activation in a BBD-dependent manner, illustrating a unique interface between HSV and autophagy in antigen-presenting cells. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a highly prevalent pathogen causing widespread morbidity and some mortality. HSV infections are lifelong, and there are no vaccines or antivirals to cure HSV infections. The ability of HSV to modulate host immunity is critical for its virulence. HSV inhibits host autophagy, a pathway with importance in many areas of health and disease. Autophagy is triggered by many microbes, some of which harness autophagy for replication; others evade autophagy or prevent it from occurring. Autophagy is critical for host defense, either by directly degrading the invading pathogen ("xenophagy") or by facilitating antigen presentation to T cells. In this study, we show that HSV manipulates

  9. Functional Characterization of Glycoprotein H Chimeras Composed of Conserved Domains of the Pseudorabies Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Sebastian W.; Backovic, Marija; Klupp, Barbara G.; Rey, Felix A.; Fuchs, Walter

    2015-01-01

    herpesviruses can serve as tools to elucidate the molecular basis of gH function. The present study shows that the C-terminal part of human herpesvirus 1 (herpes simplex virus 1) gH can functionally substitute for the corresponding part of suid herpesvirus 1 (pseudorabies virus) gH, whereas other tested combinations proved to be nonfunctional. Interestingly, the exchangeable fragment included the membrane-proximal end of the gH ectodomain (domain IV), which is most conserved in sequence and structure and might be capable of transient membrane interaction during fusion. PMID:26491153

  10. Immune responses in mice against herpes simplex virus: mechanisms of protection against facial and ganglionic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Zweerink, H J; Martinez, D; Lynch, R J; Stanton, L W

    1981-01-01

    We performed experiments with mice to determine the nature of the immune response(s) that prevents primary infections of the skin and the trigeminal ganglia with herpes simplex virus. Immunization with infectious herpes simplex virus, inactivated virus, or material enriched for viral glycoproteins protected hairless mice against primary facial and ganglionic infections. Live and inactivated viruses induced neutralizing antibodies, whereas glycoprotein material did not. Instead, glycoprotein material induced antibodies that were largely directed against two glycopolypeptides with molecular weights of 120,000 to 130,000. Hairless mice immunized with glycoprotein material responded faster than control mice in the synthesis of neutralizing antibodies after challenge with infectious virus. Congenital athymic BALB/c (nu/nu) mice were protected against primary facial infections after immunization with glycoprotein material, but glycoprotein-specific antibodies were not induced. Images PMID:6260662

  11. Psoralen inactivation of influenza and herpes simplex viruses and of virus-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Redfield, D C; Richman, D D; Oxman, M N; Kronenberg, L H

    1981-01-01

    Psoralen compounds covalently bind to nucleic acids when irradiated with long-wavelength ultraviolet light. This treatment can destroy the infectivity of deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid viruses. Two psoralen compounds, 4'-hydroxymethyltrioxsalen and 4'-aminomethyltrioxsalen, were used with long-wavelength ultraviolet light to inactivate cell-free herpes simplex and influenza viruses and to render virus-infected cells noninfectious. This method of inactivation was compared with germicidal (short-wavelength) ultraviolet light irradiation. The antigenicity of the treated, virus-infected, antigen-bearing cells was examined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay and by measuring the capacity of the herpes simplex virus-infected cells to stimulate virus-specific lymphocyte proliferation. The infectivity of the virus-infected cells could be totally eliminated without altering their viral antigenicity. The use of psoralen plus long-wavelength ultraviolet light is well suited to the preparation of noninfectious virus antigens and virus antigen-bearing cells for immunological assays. PMID:6265375

  12. Largest lyapunov-exponent estimation and selective prediction by means of simplex forecast algorithms

    PubMed

    Dunki

    2000-11-01

    Limited predictability is one of the remarkable features of deterministic chaos and this feature may be quantized in terms of Lyapunov exponents. Accordingly, Lyapunov-exponent estimates may be expected to follow in a natural way from forecast algorithms. Exploring this idea, we propose a method estimating the largest Lyapunov exponent from a time series which uses the behavior of so-called simplex forecasts. The method considers the estimation of properties of the distribution of local simplex expansion coefficients. These are also used for the definition of error bars for the Lyapunov-exponent estimates and allows for selective forecasts with improved prediction accuracy. We demonstrate these concepts on standard test examples and three realistic applications to time series concerning largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation of an experimentally obtained hyperchaotic NMR signal, brain state differentiation, and stock-market prediction.

  13. Largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation and selective prediction by means of simplex forecast algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dünki, Rudolf M.

    2000-11-01

    Limited predictability is one of the remarkable features of deterministic chaos and this feature may be quantized in terms of Lyapunov exponents. Accordingly, Lyapunov-exponent estimates may be expected to follow in a natural way from forecast algorithms. Exploring this idea, we propose a method estimating the largest Lyapunov exponent from a time series which uses the behavior of so-called simplex forecasts. The method considers the estimation of properties of the distribution of local simplex expansion coefficients. These are also used for the definition of error bars for the Lyapunov-exponent estimates and allows for selective forecasts with improved prediction accuracy. We demonstrate these concepts on standard test examples and three realistic applications to time series concerning largest Lyapunov-exponent estimation of an experimentally obtained hyperchaotic NMR signal, brain state differentiation, and stock-market prediction.

  14. Physical and functional domains of the herpes simplex virus transcriptional regulatory protein ICP4.

    PubMed Central

    DeLuca, N A; Schaffer, P A

    1988-01-01

    A characteristic common to DNA animal viruses is the expression early in infection of viral proteins that act in trans to regulate subsequent RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription of the remainder of the viral genome. The predominant transcriptional regulatory protein specified by herpes simplex virus type 1 is the immediate-early protein ICP4. ICP4 is a complex multifunctional protein required for the activation of many herpes simplex virus type 1 transcriptional units and for repression of its own transcription. In the present study we have introduced nonsense and deletion mutations into both genome copies of the ICP4 gene such that the resulting mutants express only defined subsets of the primary ICP4 amino acid sequence. The partial peptides retain activities and physical properties of the intact ICP4 molecule, permitting one to attribute individual activities and properties to defined amino acid sequences. Images PMID:2828668

  15. Preparation of herpes simplex virus-infected primary neurons for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Saksena, Monica; Boadle, Ross; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides the resolution necessary to identify both viruses and subcellular components of cells infected with many types of viruses, including herpes simplex virus. Recognized as a powerful tool in both diagnostic and research-based virology laboratories, TEM has made possible the identification of new viruses and has contributed to the elucidation of virus life cycle and virus-host cell interaction. Whilst there are many sample preparation techniques for TEM, conventional processing using chemical fixation and resin embedding remains a useful technique, available in virtually all EM laboratories, for studying virus/cell ultrastructure. In this chapter, we describe the preparation of herpes simplex virus-infected primary neurons, grown on plastic cover slips, to allow sectioning of neurons and axons in their growth plane. This technique allows TEM examination of cell bodies, axons, growth cones, and varicosities, providing powerful insights into virus-cell interaction.

  16. A system for isolation, transport and storage of herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Billstrom, M A; Randall, S; Ahmad, A; Patel, S; Davies, J; Deane, A

    1997-04-01

    A major difficulty with diagnostic virus isolation concerns the relative thermolability of certain viruses, e.g. herpes simplex virus type 2, which may, therefore, lose infectivity during transport to the laboratory. This study describes a system of virus isolation and transport, which depends on direct inoculation at the bedside or clinic, to a monolayer or suspension of susceptible cells with subsequent incubation for 10 h at approximately 32 degrees C, whereupon the newly synthesised virus becomes very stable if the cells are subsequently maintained at room temperature. This system was found to increase the sensitivity of isolation of herpes simplex virus, particularly under conditions of asymptomatic virus excretion or if there was significant delay in transportation of clinical samples to the virus laboratory. It is envisaged that this system will allow clinical self-sampling by the patient with application to epidemiological surveys in both the developed and underdeveloped world.

  17. Which plant for which skin disease? Part 1: Atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, condyloma and herpes simplex.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Juliane; Wölfle, Ute; Weckesser, Steffi; Schempp, Christoph

    2010-10-01

    Plant extracts and isolated compounds are increasingly used in cosmetics and food supplements to improve skin conditions. We first introduce the positive plant monographs with dermatological relevance of the former German Commission E. Subsequently clinical studies with botanicals for atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, acne, condylomata acuminata and herpes simplex are discussed. The best studies have been conducted with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients. Mahonia aquifolium, Hypericum perforatum, Glycyrrhiza glabra and certain traditional Chinese therapies have been shown to be effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis. Mahonia aquifolium, Indigo naturalis and Capsicum frutescens are effective treatments for psoriasis. Green tea extract and tea tree oil have been investigated in the treatment of acne. Podophyllin and green tea extract are effective treatments for condylomata acuminata. Balm mint and a combination of sage and rhubarb have been shown to be effective in the treatment of herpes simplex in proof of concept studies.

  18. Simplex SU(3) quantum antiferromagnets on the kagome and hyperkagome lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Yury Yu.; Parameswaran, Siddharth A.; Arovas, Daniel P.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate SU(3) ``simplex solid'' antiferromagnets on the kagome and hyperkagome lattices. The ground states of these systems are annihilated by certain local projectors acting on triples of sites, and are analogous to the valence bond solid wavefunctions constructed by Affleck, Kennedy, Lieb, and Tasaki. Using a coherent state representation, we map to a classical model of CP2 spins with 3-spin interactions, which we analyze via single-spin Monte Carlo simulations and a cluster algorithm for the three-body interactions. We compute the static structure factor and short-range correlations encoded by the simplex solid wavefunction and rationalize the results in terms of the ``order by disorder'' mechanism. We acknowledge support from NSF grant DMR-1007028 (YYK and DPA) and from the Simons Foundation (SAP).

  19. Gene expression of herpes simplex virus. II. Uv radiological analysis of viral transcription units

    SciTech Connect

    Millette, R. L.; Klaiber, R.

    1980-06-01

    The transcriptional organization of the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by measuring the sensitivity of viral polypeptide synthesis to uv irradiation of the infecting virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was irradiated with various doses of uv light and used to infect xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. Immediate early transcription units were analyzed by having cycloheximide present throughout the period of infection, removing the drug at 8 h postinfection, and pulse-labeling proteins with (355)methionine. Delayed early transcription units were analyzed in similar studies by having 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine present during the experiment to block replication of the input irradiated genome. The results indicate that none of the immediate early genes analyzed can be cotranscribed, whereas some of the delayed early genes might be cotranscribed. No evidence was found for the existence of large, multigene transcription units.

  20. Psoralen inactivation of influenza and herpes simplex viruses and of virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Redfield, D.C.; Richman, D.D.; Oxman, M.N.; Kronenberg, L.H.

    1981-06-01

    Psoralen compounds covalently bind to nucleic acids when irradiated with long-wavelength ultraviolet light. This treatment can destroy the infectivity of deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid viruses. Two psoralen compounds, 4'-hydroxymethyltrioxsalen and 4'-aminomethyltrioxsalen, were used with long-wavelength ultraviolet light to inactivate cell-free herpes simplex and influenza viruses and to render virus-infected cells noninfectious. This method of inactivation was compared with germicidal (short-wavelength) ultraviolet light irradiation. The antigenicity of the treated, virus-infected, antigen-bearing cells was examined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay and by measuring the capacity of the herpes simplex virus-infected cells to stimulate virus-specific lymphocyte proliferation. The infectivity of the virus-infected cells could be totally eliminated without altering their viral antigenicity. The use of psoralen plus long-wavelength ultraviolet light is well suited to the preparation of noninfectious virus antigens and virus antigen-bearing cells for immunological assays.