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Sample records for simulated curved canals

  1. Comparison of canal transportation in simulated curved canals prepared with ProTaper Universal and ProTaper Gold systems

    PubMed Central

    Muniz, Brenda Leite; Pires, Frederico; Belladonna, Felipe Gonçalves; Neves, Aline Almeida; Souza, Erick Miranda; De-Deus, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of ProTaper Gold (PTG, Dentsply Maillefer) in maintaining the original profile of root canal anatomy. For that, ProTaper Universal (PTU, Dentsply Maillefer) was used as reference techniques for comparison. Materials and Methods Twenty simulated curved canals manufactured in clear resin blocks were randomly assigned to 2 groups (n = 10) according to the system used for canal instrumentation: PTU and PTG groups, upto F2 files (25/0.08). Color stereomicroscopic images from each block were taken exactly at the same position before and after instrumentation. All image processing and data analysis were performed with an open source program (FIJI). Evaluation of canal transportation was obtained for two independent canal regions: straight and curved levels. Student's t test was used with a cut-off for significance set at α = 5%. Results Instrumentation systems significantly influenced canal transportation (p < 0.0001). A significant interaction between instrumentation system and root canal level (p < 0.0001) was found. PTU and PTG systems produced similar canal transportation at the straight part, while PTG system resulted in lower canal transportation than PTU system at the curved part. Canal transportation was higher at the curved canal portion (p < 0.0001). Conclusions PTG system produced overall less canal transportation in the curved portion when compared to PTU system. PMID:26877984

  2. Preparation of severely curved simulated root canals using engine-driven rotary and conventional hand instruments.

    PubMed

    Szep, S; Gerhardt, T; Leitzbach, C; Lüder, W; Heidemann, D

    2001-03-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy and safety of six different nickel-titanium engine-driven instruments used with a torque-controlled engine device and nickel-titanium hand and stainless steel hand instruments in preparation of curved canals. A total of 80 curved (36 degrees) simulated root canals were prepared. Images before and after were superimposed, and instrumentation areas were observed. Time of instrumentation, instrument failure, change in working length and weight loss were also recorded. Results show that stainless steel hand instruments cause significantly less transportation towards the inner wall of the canal than do nickel-titanium hand instruments. No instrument fracture occurred with hand instruments, but 30-60% breakage of instruments was recorded during instrumentation with the engine-driven devices. The working length was maintained by all types of instruments. Newly developed nickel-titanium rotary files were not able to prevent straightening of the severely curved canals when a torque-controlled engine-driven device was used.

  3. Apical transportation of manual NiTi instruments and a hybrid technique in severely curved simulated canals

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Aurenaila Nascimento; da Frota, Matheus Franco; Sponchiado Júnior, Emilio Carlos; de Carvalho, Fredson Marcio Acris; da Fonseca Roberti Garcia, Lucas; Franco Marques, André Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the apical transportation induced by two instrumentation techniques in severely curved simulated canals. Materials and Methods: Forty simulated canals were divided into two groups (n = 20), according to the following instrumentation techniques: ProTaper Universal Manual System and a hybrid technique. The simulated canals in the ProTaper group were prepared following the technique recommended by the manufacturer: SX files in the cervical third of the root canal and S1, S2, and F1 files up to the working length. In the hybrid group, preparation was performed with K-files sizes 15, 20, and 25 to the working length, followed by cervical preparation with Gates Glidden burs 1, 2, and 3. Apical finishing was performed with the ProTaper manual files S2 and F1. To analyze apical transportation, the simulated canals were photographed before and after preparation at ×8. The images of the root canals pre- and post-instrumentation were superimposed to measure the distance between the inner and outer walls along the first 3 mm of the apical third. Results: The hybrid group presented the highest apical transportation values; however, with no statistically significant difference in comparison with the ProTaper group (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Both techniques induced similar apical transportation in the original path of the simulated root canals. PMID:26752834

  4. In vitro comparison of passive and continuous ultrasonic irrigation in curved root canals

    PubMed Central

    Castelo-Baz, Pablo; Varela-Patiño, Purificación; Cantatore, Giuseppe; Domínguez-Perez, Ana; Ruíz-Piñón, Manuel; Martín-Biedma, Benjamín

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of endodontic irrigation procedures can be compromised by the complexity of the root canal system. Delivering irrigants to the apical third of curved canals presents a particular challenge to endodontists. This study compared the effects of two ultrasonic irrigation techniques on the penetration of sodium hypochlorite into the main canal and simulated lateral canals of curved roots in extracted teeth. Material and Methods Two sets of simulated lateral canals were created at 2, 4, and 6 mm from the working length in 60 single-rooted teeth (6 canals/tooth, n = 360 canals). The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental irrigation groups: group 1 (n = 20), positive pressure irrigation (PPI); group 2 (n = 20), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI); and group 3 (n = 20), continuous ultrasonic irrigation (CUI). To assess the irrigation solution penetration, 20% Chinese ink (Sanford Rotring GmbH, Hamburg, Germany) was added to a 5% sodium hypochlorite solution and delivered into the curved root canals. The penetration of contrast solution into the simulated lateral canals was scored by counting the number of lateral canals (0-2) penetrated to at least 50% of the total length. Results The CUI group showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) irrigant penetration into the lateral canals and into the apical third of the main canals. The PPI group showed significantly lower sodium hypochlorite penetration (P < 0.001) into the main and lateral canals compared with that in the CUI and PUI groups. Significantly higher irrigant penetration was observed in the PUI group than the PPI group. Conclusions Using CUI as the final rinse significantly increased the penetration of irrigant solution into the simulated lateral canals and apical third of curved roots. Key words:Continuous ultrasonic irrigation, curved root canals, passive ultrasonic irrigation, positive pressure irrigation, root canal irrigation. PMID:27703613

  5. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Even, Wesley Paul; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  6. Method for Constructing Standardized Simulated Root Canals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz-Bongert, Udo; Weine, Franklin S.

    1990-01-01

    The construction of visual and manipulative aids, clear resin blocks with root-canal-like spaces, for simulation of root canals is explained. Time, materials, and techniques are discussed. The method allows for comparison of canals, creation of any configuration of canals, and easy presentation during instruction. (MSE)

  7. Method for Constructing Standardized Simulated Root Canals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz-Bongert, Udo; Weine, Franklin S.

    1990-01-01

    The construction of visual and manipulative aids, clear resin blocks with root-canal-like spaces, for simulation of root canals is explained. Time, materials, and techniques are discussed. The method allows for comparison of canals, creation of any configuration of canals, and easy presentation during instruction. (MSE)

  8. Quantitative transportation assessment in curved canals prepared with an off-centered rectangular design system.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Vieira, Vania Cristina Gomes; Tameirão, Michele Dias Nunes; Belladonna, Felipe Gonçalves; Neves, Aline de Almeida; Souza, Erick Miranda; DE-Deus, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ability of an off-centered rectangular design system [ProTaper Next (PTN)] to maintain the original profile of the root canal anatomy. To this end, ProTaper Universal (PTU), Reciproc (R) and WaveOne (WO) systems were used as reference techniques for comparison. Forty clear resin blocks with simulated curved root canals were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 10) according to the instrumentation system used: PTN, PTU, R and WO. Color stereomicroscopic images of each block were taken before and after instrumentation. All image processing and data analysis were performed with an open source program (Fiji v.1.47n). Evaluation of canal transportation was obtained for two independent regions: straight and curved portions. Univariate analysis of variance and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test were performed, and a cut-off for significance was set at α = 5%. Instrumentation systems significantly influenced canal transportation (p = 0.000). Overall, R induced significantly lower canal transportation compared with WO, PTN and PTU (p = 0.000). The curved portion displayed superior canal transportation compared to the straight one (p = 0.000). The significance of the difference among instrumentation systems varied according to the canal level evaluated (p = 0.000). In its straight portion, R and WO exhibited significantly lower transportation than PTN; whereas in the curved portion, R produced the lowest deviation. PTU exhibited the highest canal transportation at both levels. It can be concluded that PTN produced less canal transportation than PTU and WO; however, R exhibited better centering ability than PTN.

  9. [Engine-driven preparation of curved root canals: a platform to assess physical parameters].

    PubMed

    Peters, O A; Kappeler, S; Bucher, W; Barbakow, F

    2001-01-01

    The number of engine-driven rotary instruments available on the market is steadily increasing. These instruments enable clinicians to prepare better shaped root canals, however, rotary instruments have a higher risk for fracture than hand instruments. Unfortunately, the stresses placed on engine-driven rotary instruments in curved canals are insufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to develop a device which could measure more accurately the physical parameters influencing rotary instruments in curved canals. For this purpose, a specially designed machine was constructed to measure the torque which develops between the rotary instrument and the motor. Apical forces and penetration depths could also be directly measured in real time. A variety of other measurements was also possible because of other special set-ups integrated into the device. In the current study torque was assessed for GT-Files, size 35 with a .12 and sizes 20 with a .12 to .06 taper. In additions to preparations in simulated canals in plastic blocks, the "ISO 3630-1 specification for fracture moment" and "number of cycles till fatigue fracture" was measured. The findings indicated that when instruments were used for preparations, torques up to 40 Nmm were present. This exceeded the static fracture load, which was less than than 13 Nmm for the size 20 with .12 taper. In contrast, the number of rotations were more than 10 times lower when shaping canals in plastic blocks with a 5 mm radius of curvature than the number of rotations to fracture in the "cyclic fatigue test". This suggests that a GT-instrument could be used in ten canals. The apical force was always greater than 1 N and occasionally, 8 N or more was recorded. Further studies on natural teeth with varying canal geometries are required using the specially developed torsional machine to reduce the incidence of instrument fracture. In this way an efficient clinical potential can be confirmed for engine-driven rotary instruments in

  10. Engine-driven preparation of curved root canals: measuring cyclic fatigue and other physical parameters.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ove A; Kappeler, Stefan; Bucher, Willi; Barbakow, Fred

    2002-04-01

    An increasing number of engine-driven rotary systems are marketed to shape root canals. Although these systems may improve the quality of canal preparations, the risk for instrument fracture is also increased. Unfortunately, the stresses generated in rotary instruments when shaping curved root canals have not been adequately studied. Consequently, the aim of an ongoing project was to develop a measurement platform that could more accurately detail physical parameters generated in a simulated clinical situation. Such a platform was constructed by fitting a torque-measuring device between the rotating endodontic instrument and the motor driving it. Apically directed force and instrument insertion depth were also recorded. Additional devices were constructed to assess cyclic fatigue and static fracture loads. The current pilot study evaluated GT rotary instruments during the shaping of curved canals in plastic blocks as well as "ISO 3630-1 torque to fracture" and number of rotations required for fatigue fracture. Results indicated that torques in excess of 40 Nmm were generated by rotary GT-Files, a significantly higher figure than static fracture loads (less than 13 Nmm for the size 20. 12 GT-File). Furthermore, the number of rotations needed to shape simulated canals with a 5 mm radius of curvature in plastic blocks was 10 times lower than the number of rotations needed to fracture instruments in a "cyclic fatigue test". Apical forces were always greater than 1 N, and in some specimens, scores of 8 N or more were recorded. Further studies are required using extracted natural teeth, with their wide anatomical variation, in order to reduce the incidence of fracture of rotary instruments. In this way, the clinical potential of engine-driven rotary instruments to safely prepare curved canals can be fully appreciated.

  11. Cyclic Fatigue Resistance and Force Generated by OneShape Instruments during Curved Canal Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cyclic fatigue resistance and the force generated by OneShape files during preparation of simulated curved canals. Methods Six OneShape files (the test) and six ProTaper F2 files (the control) were subject to the bending ability test. Another thirty files of each type were used to prepare artificial canals (n = 60), which were divided into 3 groups according to respective curvatures of the canals (30°, 60°, and 90°). The numbers of cycles to fatigue (NCF) as well as the positive and negative forces that were generated by files during canal preparation were recorded. The scanning electron microscopy was applied to detect the fracture surfaces. Results Compared with ProTaper F2 files, the bending loads of OneShape files were significantly lower at deflections of 45°(P < .05), 60° (P < .05) and 75° (P < .01). No significant difference was found at 30°. OneShape files presented a higher NCF in both 60° and 90° canals than the control (P < .01). No significant difference of NCF was found between OneShape and ProTaper files in 30° canals. During the preparation of 30° canals by both files, the negative forces were dominant. With the increase of the curvature, more positive forces were observed. When the OneShape Files were compared with the control, significant different forces were found at D3 and D2 (P < .05) in 30° canals, at D2 (P < .05), D1 (P < .01) and D0 (P < .01) in 60° canals, and at D4 and D3 (P < .01) in 90° canals. Conclusions OneShape files possessed a reliable flexibility and cyclic fatigue resistance. According to the assessments of the forces generated by files, OneShape instruments performed in a more fatigue-resistant way during curved canal preparation, compared with the ProTaper F2 files. PMID:27513666

  12. A comparison of Greater Taper files, ProFiles, and stainless steel files to shape curved root canals.

    PubMed

    Park, H

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of engine-driven nickel-titanium files to maintain the original curvature of root canals during canal preparation. A total of 36 simulated curved canals on resin blocks were instrumented with Greater Taper (GT) files, ProFiles, and stainless steel files. With the mounting device, which can reproduce the same position of the resin blocks and the camera, the unprepared and prepared canals were accurately compared by means of a double-exposure photographic technique. The analysis of variance test was used for the statistical analysis of data obtained. The canals prepared by means of a ProFile with a 6% taper up to the working length were excellent in taper and in maintaining the original curvature. The canals prepared with GT files were also found to be excellent in taper and in maintaining the original curvature; however, these canals showed a slight enlargement toward the inner side at the beginning of the curvature. The canals prepared with stainless steel files showed nontapered widening and severe transportation. The canals prepared with GT files and ProFiles were excellently tapered and maintained the original curvature of the canals in comparison with the ones prepared with stainless steel files.

  13. Comparative study of different novel nickel-titanium rotary systems for root canal preparation in severely curved root canals.

    PubMed

    Capar, Ismail Davut; Ertas, Huseyin; Ok, Evren; Arslan, Hakan; Ertas, Elif Tarim

    2014-06-01

    We compared the effects of 6 different rotary systems on transportation, canal curvature, centering ratio, surface area, and volumetric changes of curved mesial root canals of mandibular molar via cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging. Mesiobuccal root canals of 120 mandibular first molars with an angle of curvature ranging from 20°-40° were divided into 6 groups of 20 canals. Based on CBCT images taken before instrumentation, the groups were balanced with respect to the angle and radius of canal curvature. Root canals were shaped with the following systems with an apical size of 25: OneShape (OS) (MicroMega, Besancon, France), ProTaper Universal (PU) F2 (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), ProTaper Next X2 (Dentsply Maillefer), Reciproc (R) R25 (VDW, Munich, Germany), Twisted File Adaptive (TFA) SM2 (SybronEndo, Orange, CA), and WaveOne primary (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK). After root canal preparation, changes were assessed with CBCT imaging. The significance level was set at P = .05. The R system removed a significantly higher amount of dentin than the OS, PU, and TFA systems (P < .05). There was no significant difference among the 6 groups in transportation, canal curvature, changes of surface area, and centering ratio after instrumentation. The 6 different file systems straightened root canal curvature similarly and produced similar canal transportation in the preparation of mesial canals of mandibular molars. R instrumentation exhibited superior performance compared with the OS, TFA, and PU systems with respect to volumetric change. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Simulation of acid water movement in canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Truong, To; Tat Dac, Nguyen; Ngoc Phienc, Huynh

    1996-05-01

    An attempt to tackle the problem of the propagation of acid water in canals is described, and a mathematical model to simulate the acid water movement is developed, in which the jurbanite equilibrium is found to prevail. The processes of settling owing to sedimentation, precipitation and redissolution have been considered in the modelling. Data available from Tan Thanh, in the Plain of Reeds of the Mekong Delta in Viet Nam, are used as a case study.

  15. Sound fields in generally shaped curved ear canals.

    PubMed

    Hudde, H; Schmidt, S

    2009-05-01

    The sound field in the external ear can be subdivided into a distinctly three-dimensional part in front of pinna and concha, a fairly regular part in the core region of ear canals, and a less regular part in the drum coupling region near the tympanic membrane. The different parts of the sound field and their interaction have been studied using finite elements. A "pinna box" enclosing the pinna provides both a realistic coupling of the external space to the ear canal and the generation of sound. The sound field in the core region turns out to be not that regular as mostly assumed: near pressure minima and maxima "one-sided" isosurfaces (surfaces of equal pressure magnitude) occur, which are inconsistent with the notion of a middle axis, in principle. Nevertheless such isosurfaces can be seen as part of a "fundamental sound field," which is governed by the principle of minimum energy. Actually, the sound transformation through narrow ducts is little affected by one-sided isosurfaces in between. As expected, the beginning of the core region depends on frequency. If the full audio range up to 20 kHz is to be covered, a location in the first bend of the ear canal is found.

  16. Maxillary lateral incisors with two canals and two separate curved roots

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ajit George; Rajesh, Ebenezar A. V.; George, Liza; Sujathan; Josy, Susan Ann

    2012-01-01

    Variation in the roots and root canal anatomy seems to be the norm rather than an exception. For a successful endodontic treatment, a clinician should have a thorough knowledge of the internal and external dental anatomy and its variations. Maxillary lateral incisors usually exhibit single canal with a single root. In this case, clinical examination and radiographs clearly demonstrates the presence of two root canals with two separate curved roots. This case report emphasizes the need for attention during endodontic management of maxillary lateral incisors. PMID:23633825

  17. Simulations of Closed Timelike Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Todd A.; Wilde, Mark M.

    2017-03-01

    Proposed models of closed timelike curves (CTCs) have been shown to enable powerful information-processing protocols. We examine the simulation of models of CTCs both by other models of CTCs and by physical systems without access to CTCs. We prove that the recently proposed transition probability CTCs (T-CTCs) are physically equivalent to postselection CTCs (P-CTCs), in the sense that one model can simulate the other with reasonable overhead. As a consequence, their information-processing capabilities are equivalent. We also describe a method for quantum computers to simulate Deutschian CTCs (but with a reasonable overhead only in some cases). In cases for which the overhead is reasonable, it might be possible to perform the simulation in a table-top experiment. This approach has the benefit of resolving some ambiguities associated with the equivalent circuit model of Ralph et al. Furthermore, we provide an explicit form for the state of the CTC system such that it is a maximum-entropy state, as prescribed by Deutsch.

  18. The Use of a Reciprocating Handpiece to Create a Glide Path in Curved Canals: Comparison with Manual Glide Path Preparation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    counterclockwise. According to the manufacturer, the reciprocating motion keeps the file loose in the canal, reduces both torsional stress and metal fatigue...0.40; R2 =0.082). Discussion The introduction of rotary instrumentation has revolutionized the field of...dealing with severely curved canals or restricted canals due to the mechanical reciprocating movement all while minimizing torsional and flexural stresses

  19. Influence of cervical preflaring on apical transportation in curved root canals instrumented by reciprocating file systems.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Neisiana; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Baechtold, Marina Samara; Correr, Gisele Maria; Gabardo, Marilisa Carneiro Leão; Zielak, João César; Baratto-Filho, Flares

    2015-11-23

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of cervical preflaring on apical transportation in curved root canals prepared using the Reciproc and WaveOne reciprocating file systems. Sixty curved canals were instrumented using Reciproc R25 and WaveOne Primary files, with and without preflaring (n = 15). A double-digital technique was used to digitally superimpose the file before instrumentation (#15 K-file) on the final apical reciprocating file (#25/08). The angle between the tip of the initial and final file was measured and recorded. Groups were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test, and significance was set at p < 0.05. The mean and standard deviation for apical transportation was 0.93 ± 2.48 for the Reciproc Group, 0.84 ± 1.94 for the Preflaring + Reciproc Group, 0.40 ± 1.14 for the WaveOne Group, and 0.83 ± 2.20 for the Preflaring + WaveOne Group. No statistically significant differences were found among the groups (p = 0.9509). Under the conditions of this study, cervical preflaring did not influence apical transportation in curved root canals instrumented using Reciproc R25 and the WaveOne Primary files. Based on the in vitro measurements of apical transportation, the reciprocating files may be used without preflaring in curved root canals.

  20. Modifications in Canal Anatomy of Curved Canals of Mandibular First Molars by two Glide Path Instruments using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Nayasha

    2014-01-01

    Background: The creation of glide path reduces the risk of instrument breakage. Glide path is created before using NiTi rotary instrumentation Aim: This study compared the changes in the root canal anatomy after creation of glide path using Path Files (PF) and V Glide Path 2 (VGP2) using Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Hundred extracted mandibular first molars with curved mesial roots, curvature angles ranging within 20-30 degrees were assigned into two groups (n = 50 each). Glide path was prepared using PF (Group I) and VGP2 (Group II). CBCT images were obtained before and after instrumentation. The technical outcomes were compared at 0, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7mm intervals. The data was analyzed using t-test and Chi-square test. Result: There was a statistical difference between the root canal curvatures and working time between the two groups (p < 0.05). Canals transported towards the distal side in Group II but there was a slight mesial transportation in Group I at 0mm. Group I exhibited a better centric ability except at 1mm interval (p > 0.05). The changes in the volume were statistically significant only at 2mm interval (p < 0.05). The difference in the cross sectional area was not statistically significant at any interval (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Within the limits of this study the rotary Nickel Titanium Path Files appeared to be suitable instruments for safe and easy creation of glide path. PMID:25584304

  1. Spinal canal narrowing during simulated frontal impact.

    PubMed

    Ivancic, Paul C; Panjabi, Manohar M; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Pearson, Adam M; Elena Gimenez, S; Maak, Travis G

    2006-06-01

    Between 23 and 70% of occupants involved in frontal impacts sustain cervical spine injuries, many with neurological involvement. It has been hypothesized that cervical spinal cord compression and injury may explain the variable neurological profile described by frontal impact victims. The goals of the present study, using a biofidelic whole cervical spine model with muscle force replication, were to quantify canal pinch diameter (CPD) narrowing during frontal impact and to evaluate the potential for cord compression. The biofidelic model and a sled apparatus were used to simulate frontal impacts at 4, 6, 8, and 10 g horizontal accelerations of the T1 vertebra. The CPD was measured in the intact specimen in the neutral posture (neutral posture CPD), under static sagittal pure moments of 1.5 Nm (pre-impact CPD), during dynamic frontal impact (dynamic impact CPD), and again under static pure moments following each impact (post-impact CPD). Frontal impact caused significant (P<0.05) dynamic CPD narrowing at C0-dens, C2-C3, and C6-C7. The narrowest dynamic CPD was observed at C0-dens during the 10 g impact and was 25.9% narrower than the corresponding neutral posture CPD. Interpretation of the present results indicate that the neurological symptomatology reported by frontal impact victims is most likely not due to cervical spinal cord compression. Cord compression due to residual spinal instability is also not likely.

  2. Comparison of curved root canals preparation using reciprocating, continuous and an association of motions.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Carolina Bender; Böttcher, Daiana Elisabeth; Justo, Aline Martins; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Grecca, Fabiana Soares

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the rotary ProTaper Universal system, the single-file reciprocating WaveOne system and an association of motions assessing shaping ability, cleanliness, preparation time and instrument failures after preparation of curved root canals. Sixty root canals of extracted human molar teeth, with curvatures ranging between 20° and 40°, were divided into three groups, according with preparation system. Canals were prepared until apical size 25 using the ProTaper Universal system (G1), WaveOne (G2), or a hybrid technique (G3) associating reciprocating preparation with rotary glide path and cervical pre-enlargement. Teeth were scanned pre and post-operatively using computed tomography. Direction of transportation and centering ability of canals were measured using a computer image analysis program, and the results were analyzed statistically using one-way ANOVA. Preparation time was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey post hoc test. Instrument failures were recorded. The amounts of debris and smear layer were quantified based on a numerical evaluation scale by scanning electron microscopy and were analyzed statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis test. No difference in transportation and centering ratio was found between the systems. Instrumentation with WaveOne was significantly faster than with other instruments (p < 0.05). During preparation, no instruments fractured and three suffered deformations. For debris removal and remaining smear layer, the results for the three groups were similar. The single-file reciprocating instrument was capable of providing faster root canal preparation with similar transporting, centralization and cleaning ability when compared with continuous and an association of motions in curved canals. SCANNING 38:462-468, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Centering and transportation: in vitro evaluation of continuous and reciprocating systems in curved root canals

    PubMed Central

    Navós, Beatriz Vilas; Hoppe, Carolina Bender; Mestieri, Leticia Boldrin; Böttcher, Daiana Elizabeth; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; Grecca, Fabiana Soares

    2016-01-01

    Context: One of the goals of endodontic therapy is the shaping and cleaning of the root canal system. In recent years, there has been multiple systems instrumentation, and changes in their dynamics are central to maintain the original shape of the canal after preparation. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate centering and transportation in curved root canals after using ProTaper® and MTwo® in continuous rotation, Reciproc® in reciprocating motion, and a step-down manual instrumentation technique. Settings and Design: Mesiobuccal roots of human extracted the first and second maxillary molars were selected and the canals (n = 60) were divided into four groups according to the preparation techniques: PT-ProTaper®; MT-MTwo®; RE-Reciproc®; MI-manual instrumentation. Subjects and Methods: The final apical diameter was standardized to a size 25. Centering and transportation were evaluated by cone-beam computed tomography and Adobe Photoshop 8.0 software. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc. Results: Results of transportation showed no statistical differences (P > 0.05) between groups, and significantly, difference (P < 0.05) between ProTaper® and Reciproc® was found when evaluating centering ability in the apical third. Conclusions: We concluded that there were no differences in transportation between the evaluated systems for the preparation of curved root canals with an apical instrumentation diameter of #25. For centering ability, in the apical third, ProTaper® presented worst behavior when compared to Reciproc®. PMID:27656071

  4. Evaluation of a solvent-softened gutta-percha obturation technique in curved canals.

    PubMed

    Moyer, P W; Osetek, E M; Ashkenaz, P; Gilbert, J L

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of three obturation techniques in curved canals. Twenty-four sets of three (triplets) morphologically similar molars having root curvatures of 45 to 90+ degrees were assembled. Following canal preparation, one sample from each group was obturated by either a halothane-dipped, a chloroform-dipped, or an untreated lateral condensation technique. Twenty triplets were cleared, evaluated, and graded for homogeneity of fill, canal wall adaptation, and replication of internal anatomy. Four triplets had windows prepared to expose the apical 6 mm of filling and were viewed with scanning electron microscopy. Kruskal-Wallis test of cleared teeth indicated a significant difference in favor of the solvent-softened techniques (p = 0.01). There was no difference between chloroform- and halothane-dipped groups (p = 0.03). Scanning electron microscope evaluations of halothane-dipped samples revealed more homogeneous fills with greater canal replication than untreated gutta-percha. In addition, halothane-treated samples had appreciably less surface porosity than chloroform. Lateral condensation of halothane-treated gutta-percha was judged to be a viable obturation technique.

  5. Assessing apical transportation in curved canals: comparison between cross-sections and micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Freire, Laila Gonzales; Gavini, Giulio; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Santos, Marcelo dos

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two methods of assessing apical transportation in curved canals after rotary instrumentation, namely, cross-sections and micro-computed tomography (µCT). Thirty mandibular molars were divided into two groups and prepared according to the requirements of each method. In G1 (cross-sections), teeth were embedded in resin blocks and sectioned at 2.0, 3.5, and 5.0 mm from the anatomic apex. Pre- and postoperative sections were photographed and analyzed. In G2 (µCT), teeth were embedded in a rubber-base impression material and scanned before and after instrumentation. Mesiobuccal canals were instrumented with the Twisted File (TF) system (SybronEndo, Orange, USA), and mesiolingual canals, with the EndoSequence (ES) system (Brasseler, Savannah, USA). Images were reconstructed, and sections corresponding to distances 2.0, 3.5, and 5.0 mm from the anatomic apex were selected for comparison. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney's test at a 5% significance level. The TF and ES instruments produced little deviation from the root canal center, with no statistical difference between them (P > 0.05). The canal transportation results were significantly lower (0.056 mm) in G2 than in G1 (0.089 mm) (p = 0.0012). The µCT method was superior to the cross-section method, especially in view of its ability to preserve specimens and provide results that are more closely related to clinical situations.

  6. Canals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkleman, Michael

    1974-01-01

    In the mid-1800's, the canal system in the U.S. was thriving. But, by the end of that century, roads and railways had replaced these commercial thoroughfares. Renewed interest in the abandoned canals is now resulting in renovation and ecological site development in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. (MA)

  7. Canals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkleman, Michael

    1974-01-01

    In the mid-1800's, the canal system in the U.S. was thriving. But, by the end of that century, roads and railways had replaced these commercial thoroughfares. Renewed interest in the abandoned canals is now resulting in renovation and ecological site development in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. (MA)

  8. Real-time evaluation of two light delivery systems for photodynamic disinfection of Candida albicans biofilm in curved root canals

    PubMed Central

    Sabino, C. P.; Garcez, A. S.; Núñez, S. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.; Hamblin, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) combined with endodontic treatment has been recognized as an alternative approach to complement conventional root canal disinfection methods on bacterial biofilms. We developed an in vitro model of bioluminescent Candida albicans biofilm inside curved dental root canals and investigated the microbial reduction produced when different light delivery methods are employed. Each light delivery method was evaluated in respect to the light distribution provided inside curved root canals. After conventional endodontic preparation, teeth were sterilized before canals were contaminated by a bioluminescent strain of C. albicans (CEC789). Methylene blue (90 µM) was introduced into the canals and then irradiated (λ=660 nm, P=100 mW, beam diameter=2 mm) with laser tip either in contact with pulp chamber or within the canal using an optical diffuser fiber. Light distribution was evaluated by CCD camera, and microbial reduction was monitored through bioluminescence imaging. Our findings demonstrated that the bioluminescent C. albicans biofilm model had good reproducibility and uniformity. Light distribution in dental tissue was markedly dependent on the light delivery system, and this strategy was directly related to microbial destruction. Both light delivery systems performed significant fungal inactivation. However, when irradiation was performed with optical diffuser fiber, microbial burden reduction was nearly 100 times more effective. Bioluminescence is an interesting real-time analysis to endodontic C. albicans biofilm inactivation. APDT showed to be an effective way to inactivate C. albicans biofilms. Diffuser fibers provided optimized light distribution inside curved root canals and significantly increased APDT efficiency. PMID:25060900

  9. Irrigant flow beyond the insertion depth of an ultrasonically oscillating file in straight and curved root canals: visualization and cleaning efficacy.

    PubMed

    Malki, Maher; Verhaagen, Bram; Jiang, Lei-Meng; Nehme, Walid; Naaman, Alfred; Versluis, Michel; Wesselink, Paul; van der Sluis, Lucas

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of the insertion depth of an ultrasonically oscillating file on the ability to remove dentin debris from simulated canal irregularities in an extracted tooth model of a straight root canal and its influence on the flow of irrigant in both straight and curved canals. A tooth model with artificial depressions in 1 canal wall at 0.5, 2, 4, and 6 mm from the working length was used. Ultrasonic-activated irrigation was performed with the file inserted 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 mm short of the working length. Dye penetration and high-speed recordings of the flow in straight and curved canals showed the static and dynamic behavior of the flow during ultrasonic activation. The overall cleaning efficacy decreased with increasing distance between the file and the apex, with the depressions next to the file and within 3 mm in front of the file being the cleanest. The flow observed from the visualization experiments matched this distance, suggesting a direct relation between flow and cleaning. The observed flow depth increased with increasing power setting; the curvature of the root canal had no influence on the flow depth. High-speed imaging showed a start-up phase with deeper fluid activation than in the steady phase afterward. The ultrasonically oscillating file could remove dentin debris up to 3 mm in front of the file tip, coinciding with the extent of the observed flow. The root canal curvature had no influence on the irrigant flow. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative evaluation of shaping ability of different rotary NiTi instruments in curved canals using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Anshul; Taneja, Sonali; Kumar, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the canal transportation, canal centering ability, and time taken for preparation of curved root canals after instrumentation with ProFile GT Series X (GTX) files, Revo-S files, twisted files, and Mtwo files by using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Forty mesiobuccal canals of mandibular molars with an angle of curvature ranging from 20 to 40 were divided according to the instrument used in canal preparation into four groups of 10 samples each: GTX (group I), Revo-S (group II), twisted file (group III), and Mtwo (group IV). The teeth were instrumented according to manufacturer's guidelines, with all groups being prepared to size 30, 0.06 taper master apical file. Canals were scanned using an i-CAT CBCT scanner (Imaging Science International, Hatfield, PA, USA) before and after preparation to evaluate the transportation and centering ratio at 3 mm, 5 mm, 7 mm, 9 mm, and 11 mm from the apex. The data collected were evaluated using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test. Results: Twisted file system showed significantly least canal transportation and highest canal centering ability values as compared to GTX, Revo-S, and Mtwo file systems. Overall, GTX, Revo-S, and Mtwo showed comparable results with respect to canal transportation and centering ability. Conclusion: The innovative method of manufacturing the TF system resulted in superior shaping ability in curved canals, with the instruments remaining more centered and producing less canal transportation than GTX, Revo-S, and Mtwo file systems. PMID:24554858

  11. Influence of a glide path on apical extrusion of debris during canal preparation using single-file systems in curved canals.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, H S; Düzgün, S; Akpek, F; Topçuoğlu, G; Aktı, A

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of a glide path on the amount of apically extruded debris during canal preparation using single-file systems in curved canals. Ninety extracted mandibular molar teeth were randomly assigned to six groups (n = 15 for each group) for canal instrumentation. Endodontic access cavities were prepared in each tooth. In three of the six groups, a glide path was not created whereas a glide path was created using PathFile instruments on the mesial canals of all teeth in the remaining three groups. The mesial canals of the teeth were then instrumented with the following single-file instrument systems: WaveOne, Reciproc and OneShape. Debris extruded apically during instrumentation was collected into pre-weighed Eppendorf tubes. The tubes were then stored in an incubator at 70 °C for 5 days. The weight of the dry extruded debris was established by subtracting the pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation weight of the Eppendorf tubes for each group. The data obtained were analysed using one-way analysis of variance (anova) and Tukey's post hoc tests. The OneShape file was associated with less debris extrusion than the Reciproc and WaveOne files when canal instrumentation was performed without a glide path (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference was found between the Reciproc and WaveOne files (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference amongst the OneShape, Reciproc and WaveOne files when a glide path was created before canal preparation in curved root canals (P > 0.05). All systems extruded significantly less debris in groups with a glide path than in groups without a glide path (P < 0.05). All instruments were associated with apical extrusion of debris. Creating a glide path prior to canal instrumentation reduced the amount of apically extruded debris in curved canals. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Working length changes in curved canals after coronal flaring by using rotary files and hand file: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Khambete, Neha; Patil, Suvarna; Hoshing, Upendra; Medha, Ashish; Shetty, Roshan

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This in vitro investigation examined the effect of early coronal flaring (CF) and late CF on the working length (WL) in curved root canals. Background: The objective of this study was to determine if canal length is altered as a result of CF in curved canals of molar roots. Study Design: The conditions compared were combinations of (a) stainless steel hand files using Gates Glidden (G. G.) drills (SS) versus nickel-titanium rotary files (Ni-Ti); and (b) early CF (flaring completed before WL determination) versus late CF (flaring completed after WL determination). Selected were 90 canals of extracted maxillary or mandibular first molars (mesial root of mandibular molars and the mesiobuccal root of the maxillary molars) from three groups. CF was accomplished for the SS group using G. G. drills and for the Ni-Ti group using rotary ProTaper and Hero Shaper files. WL was determined by a digital vernier caliper before CF, immediately after CF, and again after canal preparation. Statistical Analysis: A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test and a Tukey's multiple prosthoc test were used for this study. Results: Results indicated that WL decreased for all canals as a result of canal preparation. The mean decrease in WL was significantly greater for the SS group (−0.77 ± 0.42 mm) than for the Ni-Ti groups (−0.33 mm ± 0.44). Less change in WL occurred in all groups when initial WL was determined after CF. Conclusion: WL in curved canals consistently decreases during the course of instrumentation. Clinician should keep this in mind for better treatment outcome. PMID:24082566

  13. Linear measurements to determine working length of curved canals with fine files: conventional versus digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Santos, Luis A N; Baleeiro, Erika N; Pêgo, Marisa M F; Eleutério, Núbia B; Camilo, Carla C

    2009-12-01

    This in vitro study compared conventional and digital radiographic linear measurements to determine the working length (WL) of curved canals with fine endodontic files. In total, 30 mesiobuccal root canals in molars were measured with a #06 K-file to a length 1 mm short of the apical foramen (WL1). Teeth were mounted in plastic blocks and standardized periapical radiographs were obtained by conventional and digital (Digora Optime) radiographic methods with #06, #08 and #10 K-files positioned in WL1. Two independent and calibrated examiners performed the conventional measurements with a millimeter ruler, from the file stop to the file tip (WL2). For the digital images, examiners used the linear measurement tool on the Digora software, in original mode (WL3). For comparison of WL1, WL2 and WL3, the Wilcoxon test (P < 0.05) was applied and the reproducibility of the measurements was assessed. There was no statistically significant difference between Wl2 and Wl3 for #06, #08 and #10 K-files (P = 0.341, 0.641 and 0.232, respectively), with an acceptable level of interexaminer agreement. The measurements of Wl2 and Wl3 were significantly (P < 0.05) larger than those of WL1. No difference was observed among the linear measures obtained with either radiographic method, which showed higher WL values than the direct measurements.

  14. Effect of Patency File on Transportation and Curve Straightening in Canal Preparation with ProTaper System.

    PubMed

    Hasheminia, Seyed Mohsen; Farhadi, Nastaran; Shokraneh, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the effect of using a patency file on apical transportation and curve straightening during canal instrumentation with the ProTaper rotary system. Seventy permanent mandibular first molars with mesiobuccal canals, measuring 18-23 mm in length and with a 25-40° curvature (according to the Schneider method), were selected. The working lengths were determined and the teeth were mounted and divided into two experimental groups: (A) prepared by the ProTaper system without using a patency file (n = 35) and (B) prepared by the ProTaper system using a patency file (n = 35). Radiographs taken before and after the preparation were imported into Photoshop software and the apical transportation, and curve straightening were measured. Data were analyzed using independent t-test. Partial correlation analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between the initial curvature, transportation, and curve straightening (α = 0.05). Using a patency file during canal preparation significantly decreased both apical transportation and curve straightening (P < 0.001). There were significant relationships between the angle of curvature, transportation and curve straightening in pairs (P < 0.001). Apical patency is recommended during root canal preparation with the ProTaper rotary system.

  15. Experimental simulation of closed timelike curves.

    PubMed

    Ringbauer, Martin; Broome, Matthew A; Myers, Casey R; White, Andrew G; Ralph, Timothy C

    2014-06-19

    Closed timelike curves are among the most controversial features of modern physics. As legitimate solutions to Einstein's field equations, they allow for time travel, which instinctively seems paradoxical. However, in the quantum regime these paradoxes can be resolved, leaving closed timelike curves consistent with relativity. The study of these systems therefore provides valuable insight into nonlinearities and the emergence of causal structures in quantum mechanics--essential for any formulation of a quantum theory of gravity. Here we experimentally simulate the nonlinear behaviour of a qubit interacting unitarily with an older version of itself, addressing some of the fascinating effects that arise in systems traversing a closed timelike curve. These include perfect discrimination of non-orthogonal states and, most intriguingly, the ability to distinguish nominally equivalent ways of preparing pure quantum states. Finally, we examine the dependence of these effects on the initial qubit state, the form of the unitary interaction and the influence of decoherence.

  16. Experimental simulation of closed timelike curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringbauer, Martin; Broome, Matthew A.; Myers, Casey R.; White, Andrew G.; Ralph, Timothy C.

    2014-06-01

    Closed timelike curves are among the most controversial features of modern physics. As legitimate solutions to Einstein’s field equations, they allow for time travel, which instinctively seems paradoxical. However, in the quantum regime these paradoxes can be resolved, leaving closed timelike curves consistent with relativity. The study of these systems therefore provides valuable insight into nonlinearities and the emergence of causal structures in quantum mechanics—essential for any formulation of a quantum theory of gravity. Here we experimentally simulate the nonlinear behaviour of a qubit interacting unitarily with an older version of itself, addressing some of the fascinating effects that arise in systems traversing a closed timelike curve. These include perfect discrimination of non-orthogonal states and, most intriguingly, the ability to distinguish nominally equivalent ways of preparing pure quantum states. Finally, we examine the dependence of these effects on the initial qubit state, the form of the unitary interaction and the influence of decoherence.

  17. Real-time evaluation of two light delivery systems for photodynamic disinfection of Candida albicans biofilm in curved root canals.

    PubMed

    Sabino, C P; Garcez, A S; Núñez, S C; Ribeiro, M S; Hamblin, M R

    2015-08-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT) combined with endodontic treatment has been recognized as an alternative approach to complement conventional root canal disinfection methods on bacterial biofilms. We developed an in  vitro model of bioluminescent Candida albicans biofilm inside curved dental root canals and investigated the microbial reduction produced when different light delivery methods are employed. Each light delivery method was evaluated in respect to the light distribution provided inside curved root canals. After conventional endodontic preparation, teeth were sterilized before canals were contaminated by a bioluminescent strain of C. albicans (CEC789). Methylene blue (90 μM) was introduced into the canals and then irradiated (λ = 660 nm, P = 100 mW, beam diameter = 2 mm) with laser tip either in contact with pulp chamber or within the canal using an optical diffuser fiber. Light distribution was evaluated by CCD camera, and microbial reduction was monitored through bioluminescence imaging. Our findings demonstrated that the bioluminescent C. albicans biofilm model had good reproducibility and uniformity. Light distribution in dental tissue was markedly dependent on the light delivery system, and this strategy was directly related to microbial destruction. Both light delivery systems performed significant fungal inactivation. However, when irradiation was performed with optical diffuser fiber, microbial burden reduction was nearly 100 times more effective. Bioluminescence is an interesting real-time analysis to endodontic C. albicans biofilm inactivation. APDT showed to be an effective way to inactivate C. albicans biofilms. Diffuser fibers provided optimized light distribution inside curved root canals and significantly increased APDT efficiency.

  18. Removal of Root Canal Fillings in Curved Canals Using Either Reciprocating Single- or Rotary Multi-instrument Systems and a Supplementary Step with the XP-Endo Finisher.

    PubMed

    Alves, Flávio R F; Marceliano-Alves, Marília F; Sousa, Júlio Cézar N; Silveira, Stephanie B; Provenzano, José C; Siqueira, José F

    2016-07-01

    This study compared the efficacy of a reciprocating single-instrument system and a rotary multi-instrument system followed by a supplementary approach with a finishing instrument in removing the filling material from curved canals during retreatment. Forty mesial canals from extracted mandibular molars were instrumented and filled. Then, each mesial canal was retreated by using either Reciproc (VDW, Munich, Germany) or Mtwo (VDW) instruments, alternating the technique used per canal from root to root. The working time was recorded, and the percentage of removed filling volume was assessed by means of micro-computed tomography imaging before and after retreatment. Canals still showing filling material remnants were subjected to an adjunctive approach with the XP-Endo Finisher (FKG Dentaire, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland), and another microCT scan was taken. Data were statistically analyzed with a significance level of 5%. The percentage of filling material removed with Mtwo instruments (96%) was significantly higher than Reciproc (89%) (P < .05), both used up to a final instrument size of 40. Mtwo required less time to remove the filling material than Reciproc (P < .05). Intragroup analysis in the Reciproc group showed that the R40 instrument removed significantly more filling material than R25 (P < .05). The supplementary approach with the XP-Endo Finisher was effective in significantly enhancing the removal of filling material (P < .05). The rotary multiple-instrument system was more effective and faster than the reciprocating single-instrument approach in removing previous root canal fillings. As for the Reciproc group, it was observed that the larger instrument promoted significantly better results. The adjunctive finishing instrument XP-Endo Finisher significantly improved filling material removal. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fracture strength of roots instrumented with three different single file systems in curved root canals

    PubMed Central

    Nur, Bilge Gulsum; Ok, Evren; Altunsoy, Mustafa; Tanriver, Mehmet; Capar, Ismail Davut

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the fracture strength of roots instrumented with three different single file rotary systems in curved mesial root canals of maxillary molars. Materials and Methods: Curvatures of 25°–35° on mesial roots of 60 maxillary molar teeth were sectioned below the cementoenamel junction to obtain roots 11 mm in length. The roots were balanced with respect to buccolingual and mesiodistal diameter and weight. They were distributed into three experimental groups and one control group (no instrumentation) (n = 15): Reciproc rotary file (R25, VDW, Munich, Germany), WaveOne Primary rotary file (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, UK) and OneShape (Micro-Mega, Besancon, France) rotary file. Vertical load was applied until fracture occurred. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance test (P < 0.05). Results: The mean fracture load was 412 ± 72 Newton (N) for the control group, 395 ± 69 N for the Reciproc group, 373 ± 63 N for the WaveOne group and 332 ± 68 N for the OneShape group. The fracture load differences among three experimental groups were not statistically significant (P > 0.05.) Whereas, the fracture loads of control and OneShape groups were significantly different (P = 0.012). Conclusions: Fracture resistance of the roots instrumented with WaveOne and Reciproc file systems were similar to the control group whereas it was observed that OneShape rotary file systems enhance the fracture strength of standardized curved roots when compared with the control group. PMID:26038648

  20. Fracture strength of roots instrumented with three different single file systems in curved root canals.

    PubMed

    Nur, Bilge Gulsum; Ok, Evren; Altunsoy, Mustafa; Tanriver, Mehmet; Capar, Ismail Davut

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fracture strength of roots instrumented with three different single file rotary systems in curved mesial root canals of maxillary molars. Curvatures of 25°-35° on mesial roots of 60 maxillary molar teeth were sectioned below the cementoenamel junction to obtain roots 11 mm in length. The roots were balanced with respect to buccolingual and mesiodistal diameter and weight. They were distributed into three experimental groups and one control group (no instrumentation) (n = 15): Reciproc rotary file (R25, VDW, Munich, Germany), WaveOne Primary rotary file (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, UK) and OneShape (Micro-Mega, Besancon, France) rotary file. Vertical load was applied until fracture occurred. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance test (P < 0.05). The mean fracture load was 412 ± 72 Newton (N) for the control group, 395 ± 69 N for the Reciproc group, 373 ± 63 N for the WaveOne group and 332 ± 68 N for the OneShape group. The fracture load differences among three experimental groups were not statistically significant (P > 0.05.) Whereas, the fracture loads of control and OneShape groups were significantly different (P = 0.012). Fracture resistance of the roots instrumented with WaveOne and Reciproc file systems were similar to the control group whereas it was observed that OneShape rotary file systems enhance the fracture strength of standardized curved roots when compared with the control group.

  1. Efficacy of different solvents in removing gutta-percha from curved root canals: a micro-computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Sağlam, Baran Can; Koçak, Mustafa Murat; Türker, Sevinç Aktemur; Koçak, Sibel

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the root filling material that remained after retreatment of curved root canals with chloroform and Endosolv R as solvents. The evaluation employed micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. Thirty-six extracted molar teeth with curved roots were selected. After preparation with ProTaper rotary instruments, the canals were filled with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups according to solvent used (n = 12) as follows: group 1: chloroform; group 2: Endosolv R; group 3: no solvent (negative control). ProTaper Universal Retreatment files were used to remove each root canal filling and then the self-adjusting file was applied for two minutes. Preoperative and postoperative micro-CT images were used to assess the percentage of residual filling material. The mean percentage of residual filling material was quantified. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of percentage volume of residual root canal filling.

  2. Matters of simulation of the semicircular canal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurfinkel, V. S.; Petukhov, S. V.

    1977-01-01

    A scale model of the human semicircular canal system was developed based on the theory of dynamic similitude. This enlarged model makes it convenient to conduct tests on the vestibular processes and dynamics in the semicircular canals. Tests revealed hydromechanical interaction between canals, with asymmetry of the conditions of movement of the endolymph in the canals in opposite directions. A type of vestibular reactions, occurring with angular oscillations of the head, was predicted and demonstrated using this model and human test subjects.

  3. Canal-otolith interactions and detection thresholds of linear and angular components during curved-path self-motion.

    PubMed

    MacNeilage, Paul R; Turner, Amanda H; Angelaki, Dora E

    2010-08-01

    Gravitational signals arising from the otolith organs and vertical plane rotational signals arising from the semicircular canals interact extensively for accurate estimation of tilt and inertial acceleration. Here we used a classical signal detection paradigm to examine perceptual interactions between otolith and horizontal semicircular canal signals during simultaneous rotation and translation on a curved path. In a rotation detection experiment, blindfolded subjects were asked to detect the presence of angular motion in blocks where half of the trials were pure nasooccipital translation and half were simultaneous translation and yaw rotation (curved-path motion). In separate, translation detection experiments, subjects were also asked to detect either the presence or the absence of nasooccipital linear motion in blocks, in which half of the trials were pure yaw rotation and half were curved path. Rotation thresholds increased slightly, but not significantly, with concurrent linear velocity magnitude. Yaw rotation detection threshold, averaged across all conditions, was 1.45 +/- 0.81 degrees/s (3.49 +/- 1.95 degrees/s(2)). Translation thresholds, on the other hand, increased significantly with increasing magnitude of concurrent angular velocity. Absolute nasooccipital translation detection threshold, averaged across all conditions, was 2.93 +/- 2.10 cm/s (7.07 +/- 5.05 cm/s(2)). These findings suggest that conscious perception might not have independent access to separate estimates of linear and angular movement parameters during curved-path motion. Estimates of linear (and perhaps angular) components might instead rely on integrated information from canals and otoliths. Such interaction may underlie previously reported perceptual errors during curved-path motion and may originate from mechanisms that are specialized for tilt-translation processing during vertical plane rotation.

  4. A comparative evaluation of gutta-percha filled areas in curved root canals obturated with different techniques.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Edgar; Nelius, Birthe; Bürklein, Sebastian

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different obturation techniques in severely curved canals in terms of the percentage of gutta-percha filled area and voids. The obturation times and the incidence of extrusion of filling material were also compared. Curved root canals (curvature, 25-35°) of 48 extracted human teeth were enlarged with Mtwo rotary NiTi instruments and obturated as follows: Group A: 0.04/35 matched-single-cone; Group B: cold lateral compaction with 0.04/35 gutta-percha master cone; Group C: warm vertical compaction; Group D: lateral compaction with standardized gutta-percha master cone. In all groups AHPlus was used as sealer. The teeth were sectioned horizontally at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 mm from the apex. The total area of each canal segment was measured and the areas of gutta-percha, sealer and voids were converted to percentages of the total area. Data were subjected to the Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc Dunn test. Obturation times were compared using ANOVA and post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls test. The matched-single-cone obturation (group A) was significantly the fastest method while warm vertical compaction (group C) required significantly more time than all other techniques (p < 0.05). No significant differences were obtained between the groups in terms of percentage of voids at any level (p > 0.05). At all levels, groups B, C, and D produced significantly higher gutta-percha filled areas (p < 0.05) and lower sealer-filled areas (p < 0.05) than group A. No significant differences were found between groups B, C, and D (p > 0.05) regarding gutta-percha and sealer-filled areas. Within the limitations of the in vitro study, it can be concluded that lateral compaction of greater taper gutta-percha cones is a fast and efficient method for obturation of curved canals.

  5. IERAPSI project: simulation of a canal wall-up mastoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Neri, E; Sellari Franceschini, S; Berrettini, S; Caramella, D; Bartolozzi, C

    2006-03-01

    Among the various EU research projects concerning the medical application of virtual reality, the project Ist-1999-12175, called IERAPSI (Integrated Environment for the Rehearsal and Planning of Surgical Interventions), specifically addressed the creation of a virtual and interactive surgical field for the temporal bone using three-dimensional images derived from CT data. We report on the experience obtained in the IERAPSI project in simulating a canal wall-up mastoidectomy. A surgeon with extensive experience in surgery of the petrous bone performed the mastoidectomy. The operative field included the mastoid, with its substantial differences in density between the cortex and the pneumatized bone, together with soft tissue structures, both on the border and inside the bone. The simulation is better in the first part of the operation than in the second part, suffering from a lack of haptic feedback from soft tissue and the surgical tool in deeper contexts, and under-representation of the variability inherent in pneumatized bone. This said, the excellent representation of dust production and removal, 3D simulation through color, and very good visual and haptic feedback in the early stage of the procedure are impressive. IERAPSI represents a potential surgical planning theater for the training of students and young surgeons, but is also expected to aid expert surgeons in the preoperative planning of difficult cases.

  6. Efficacy of Reciproc(®) and Profile(®) Instruments in the Removal of Gutta-Percha from Straight and Curved Root Canals ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Marfisi, Karem; Mercadé, Montserrat; Plotino, Gianluca; Clavel, Tatiana; Duran-Sindreu, Fernando; Roig, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of Reciproc(®) (VDW GmbH) and ProFile(®) (Dentsply Maillefer) instruments at removing gutta-percha from straight and curved root canals ex vivo filled using the cold lateral condensation and GuttaMaster(®) (VDW GmbH) techniques. Forty mesial roots of mandibular molars with two curved canals and 80 single-rooted teeth with straight root canals, a total of 160 root canals, were randomly assigned to eight groups (canals per group = 20) according to filling technique, retreatment instrument and root canal curvature as follows: Group I, cold lateral condensation/ProFile(®)/straight; Group II, cold lateral condensation/ProFile(®)/curved; Group III, cold lateral condensation/Reciproc(®)/straight; Group IV, cold lateral condensation/Reciproc(®)/curved; Group V, GuttaMaster(®)/ProFile(®)/straight; Group VI, GuttaMaster(®)/ProFile(®)/curved; Group VII, GuttaMaster(®)/Reciproc(®)/straight; and Group VIII, GuttaMaster(®)/Reciproc(®)/curved. The following data were recorded: procedural errors, retreatment duration and canal wall cleanliness. Means and standard deviations were calculated and analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). Reciproc(®) instruments were significantly faster than ProFile(®) instruments at removing GuttaMaster(®) from both straight (P = 0.0001) and curved (P = 0.0003) root canals. Reciproc(®) were statistically more effective than ProFile(®) instruments in removing GuttaMaster(®) from straight root canals (P = 0.021). Regardless of filling technique or retreatment instrument, gutta-percha was removed more rapidly from curved than from straight root canals (P = 0.0001). Neither system completely removed filling material from the root canals. Compared with ProFile(®) instruments, Reciproc(®) instruments removed GuttaMaster(®) filling material from straight and curved root canals more rapidly.

  7. Efficacy of Reciproc® and Profile® Instruments in the Removal of Gutta-Percha from Straight and Curved Root Canals ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Marfisi, Karem; Plotino, Gianluca; Clavel, Tatiana; Duran-Sindreu, Fernando; Roig, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To compare the efficacy of Reciproc® (VDW GmbH) and ProFile® (Dentsply Maillefer) instruments at removing gutta-percha from straight and curved root canals ex vivo filled using the cold lateral condensation and GuttaMaster® (VDW GmbH) techniques. Material and Methods Forty mesial roots of mandibular molars with two curved canals and 80 single-rooted teeth with straight root canals, a total of 160 root canals, were randomly assigned to eight groups (canals per group = 20) according to filling technique, retreatment instrument and root canal curvature as follows: Group I, cold lateral condensation/ProFile®/straight; Group II, cold lateral condensation/ProFile®/curved; Group III, cold lateral condensation/Reciproc®/straight; Group IV, cold lateral condensation/Reciproc®/curved; Group V, GuttaMaster®/ProFile®/straight; Group VI, GuttaMaster®/ProFile®/curved; Group VII, GuttaMaster®/Reciproc®/straight; and Group VIII, GuttaMaster®/Reciproc®/curved. The following data were recorded: procedural errors, retreatment duration and canal wall cleanliness. Means and standard deviations were calculated and analysed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, one-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s test (P < 0.05). Results Reciproc® instruments were significantly faster than ProFile® instruments at removing GuttaMaster® from both straight (P = 0.0001) and curved (P = 0.0003) root canals. Reciproc® were statistically more effective than ProFile® instruments in removing GuttaMaster® from straight root canals (P = 0.021). Regardless of filling technique or retreatment instrument, gutta-percha was removed more rapidly from curved than from straight root canals (P = 0.0001). Conclusions Neither system completely removed filling material from the root canals. Compared with ProFile® instruments, Reciproc® instruments removed GuttaMaster® filling material from straight and curved root canals more rapidly. PMID:26539283

  8. Computer simulation and capacity evaluation of Panama Canal alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Rosselli, A.T.; Bronzini, M.S.; Weekly, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    The Operating Characteristics and Capacity Evaluation (OCCE) Study was one of the components of a group of studies of future alternatives to the Panama Canal, sponsored by a study commission formed by the governments of Panama, the US and Japan. The basic tool in the conduct of the study was the Waterway Analysis Model (WAM), developed originally by the US Army Corps of Engineers for use on the US inland waterway system and adapted under OCCE for study of Panama Canal alternatives. The study synthesized the many alternative plans for the Canal proposed historically into four basic groups: High-Rise Lock Canal, Low-Rise Lock Canal, Sea-Level Canal and Status Quo Canal. For economy, the sea-level cases were based on, essentially, a single-lane canal, in conjunction with the status quo canal. Hydraulic and navigation studies indicted that to achieve safe navigation, tide gates or locks would be required to control currents that would otherwise be generated by the differences in tides between the two oceans. The alternatives studied in detail are illustrated in the body of the paper.

  9. Optimizing Indicator Choosing for Canal Control System and Simulation Study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One Key problem for canal system control is how to select appropriate performance indicators and how to tune the controller with these indicators. A canal system is a multi-input and multi-output (MIMO) system. The judging of control performance can be extremely complicated. In this paper, frequentl...

  10. Suitable Conditions of Reservoir Simulation for Searching Rule Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangrang, Anongrit; Chaleeraktrakoon, Chavalit

    The objective of this study is to carry out a suitable length of inflow record using in the simulation model. The second objective is to find an effect of initial reservoir capacity of reservoir simulation for searching the optimal rule curves. The reservoir simulation model was connected with genetic algorithms to search the optimal rule curves quickly. The model has been applied to determine the optimal rule curves of the Bhumibol and Sirikit Reservoirs (the Chao Phraya River Basin, Thailand). The optimal rule curves of each condition were used to assess by a Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that the shortest period of dry inflow record using in the simulation model in order to search the optimal rule curves is 10 year. Furthermore, the minimum initial capacity of reservoir for searching optimal rule curves is 10% of full capacity.

  11. In vitro Comparison of Apical Debris Extrusion Using Rotary and Reciprocating Systems in Severely Curved Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Delvarani, Abbas; Mohammadzadeh Akhlaghi, Nahid; Aminirad, Raana; Tour Savadkouhi, Sohrab; Vahdati, Seyed Aliakbar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the amount of apically extruded debris after root canal preparation using rotary and reciprocating systems in severely curved root canals. Methods and Materials: Thirty six extracted human mandibular first molars with 25-35° curvature in their mesiobuccal (MB) canal (according to Schneider’s method) were cleaned and shaped with ProTaper and WaveOne systems. The extruded debris was collected and their net weight was calculated. To compare the efficiency of the two systems, the operation time was also measured. The data were analyzed with t-test. Results: The amount of extruded debris in WaveOne group was significantly greater in comparison with ProTaper group (26%). The operating time for ProTaper was however, significantly longer than WaveOne. Conclusion: Both root preparation systems caused some degree of debris extrusion through the apical foramen. However, this amount was greater in WaveOne instruments. PMID:28179921

  12. Efficacy of laser-based irrigant activation methods in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities.

    PubMed

    Deleu, Ellen; Meire, Maarten A; De Moor, Roeland J G

    2015-02-01

    In root canal therapy, irrigating solutions are essential to assist in debridement and disinfection, but their spread and action is often restricted by canal anatomy. Hence, activation of irrigants is suggested to improve their distribution in the canal system, increasing irrigation effectiveness. Activation can be done with lasers, termed laser-activated irrigation (LAI). The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of different irrigant activation methods in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities. Twenty-five straight human canine roots were embedded in resin, split, and their canals prepared to a standardized shape. A groove was cut in the wall of each canal and filled with dentin debris. Canals were filled with sodium hypochlorite and six irrigant activation procedures were tested: conventional needle irrigation (CI), manual-dynamic irrigation with a tapered gutta percha cone (manual-dynamic irrigation (MDI)), passive ultrasonic irrigation, LAI with 2,940-nm erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser with a plain fiber tip inside the canal (Er-flat), LAI with Er:YAG laser with a conical tip held at the canal entrance (Er-PIPS), and LAI with a 980-nm diode laser moving the fiber inside the canal (diode). The amount of remaining debris in the groove was scored and compared among the groups using non-parametric tests. Conventional irrigation removed significantly less debris than all other groups. The Er:YAG with plain fiber tip was more efficient than MDI, CI, diode, and Er:YAG laser with PIPS tip in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities.

  13. Effect of glide path and apical preparation size on the incidence of apical crack during the canal preparation using Reciproc, WaveOne, and ProTaper Next systems in curved root canals: A stereomicroscope study.

    PubMed

    Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Düzgün, Salih; Akpek, Firdevs; Topçuoğlu, Gamze

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluated the effect of creating a glide path and apical preparation size on the incidence of apical cracks during canal preparation in mandibular molar teeth with curved canals. One hundred and forty extracted teeth were used. The teeth were randomly assigned to one control group or six experimental groups (n = 20 per group) for canal preparation. No preparation was performed on teeth in the control group. In three of the six experimental groups, a glide path was not created; a glide path was created on the curved mesial canals of all teeth in the remaining three experimental groups. All teeth in experimental groups were then instrumented with the following systems: Reciproc, WaveOne (WO), and ProTaper Next (PTN). Digital images of the apical root surfaces of these teeth were recorded before preparation, after instrumentation with size 25 files, and after instrumentation with size 40 files. The images were then inspected for the presence of any new apical cracks and propagation. There was no significant difference between the experimental groups during canal preparation using size 25 files (p > 0.05). Reciproc and WO caused more new apical cracks than did PTN during canal preparation using size 40 files (p < 0.05). However, canal preparation using size 40 files did not cause propagation of existing cracks (p > 0.05). Performing a glide path prior to canal preparation did not change the incidence of apical crack during preparation. Additionally, increasing apical preparation size may increase the incidence of apical crack during canal preparation. SCANNING 38:585-590, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Flute and Shank Dimensions of Reciprocating Instruments before and after Simulated Root Canal shaping.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Felipe C; Brito, Ana Pp; Veloso, Heloisa Hp; de Alencar, Ana Hg; Decurcio, Daniel de A; de Figueiredo, José Ap; Estrela, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    This study analyzed the effect of the dimensions of the flute and shank in the first 4 mm of instrument tips on the deformation and dimensional changes of reciprocating instruments after root canal shaping (RCS). The reciprocating instruments used were Reciproc(®) R25, R40, and R50; WaveOne(®) Small, Primary, and Large; and Unicone(®) #20, #25, and #40. Scanning electron microscopy images of the first 4 mm of the tip were acquired at 30× magnification before and after simulated curved root canals were shaped. Each instrument was used only once. The images were transferred to the AxioVision(®) software to measure the flute area (μm(2)), shank area (μm(2)), flute length (μm), and cross-sectional diameter (μm). Student's t test for paired samples was used to compare differences before and after RCS, and analysis of variance followed by the Tukey test, to compare differences between instruments of similar sizes. The instruments were classified according to deformations after RCS. Reciproc(®) instruments had larger flutes and smaller shanks. The Reciproc(®) R40 had significant differences in cross-sectional diameter at 0.5 mm from the tip. Reciproc(®) had no plastic deformations. Unicone(®) #20 instruments had significant differences in cross-sectional diameter at 1.5 and 3.0 mm from the tip, and #25 instruments had differences at 1.5 and 3.0 mm and in length of the second and third flutes. One #20 and three #40 instruments had plastic deformations. The differences in length of the first and fourth flutes of WaveOne(®) Primary and in cross-sectional diameter at 2.0 mm from the tip of WaveOne(®) Large were significant. Two of three WaveOne(®) Large instruments had plastic deformations. Reciproc(®) instruments had greater flute areas and lengths and smaller shanks than Unicone(®) and WaveOne(®) instruments of similar sizes. Reciproc(®) instruments had a greater flute-to-shank ratio. WaveOne(®) instruments had the lowest flute-to-shank ratio. Unicone

  15. Occurrence of Dentinal Microcracks in Severely Curved Root Canals with ProTaper Universal, WaveOne, and ProTaper Next File Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-hui; Lu, Ying; Song, Dongzhe; Zhou, Xuedong; Zheng, Qing-hua; Gao, Yuan; Huang, Ding-ming

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to compare the incidence of dentinal microcracks produced by the ProTaper Universal (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), WaveOne (Dentsply Maillefer), and ProTaper Next (Dentsply Maillefer) file systems during root canal procedures in severely curved canals using a dyeing technique. Sixty extracted human molars with 25° to 40° root curvatures were divided into 3 groups of 20 canals each. ProTaper Universal, WaveOne, and ProTaper Next file systems were used for root canal procedures. Untreated root canals of 60 molars served as negative controls. After preparation, all roots were stained with 1% methylene blue for 24 hours. Roots were then sectioned at the most curved plane and 2 mm below and above the most curved plane with a low-speed saw under cold water. A stereomicroscope was used to inspect dentinal microcracks at 60× magnification, and differences between these 3 instrument groups were analyzed using the chi-square test. The ProTaper Next system induced less complete and incomplete dentinal microcracks compared with the ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems (P < .05), and there were no significant differences between the ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems (P > .05). The ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems induced significantly more complete cracks in the plane 2 mm above the most curved plane compared with either of the other 2 planes (P = .004). The ProTaper Next system induces less dentinal microcracks during root canal procedures in severely curved root canals compared with the ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A novel image processing and measurement system applied to quantitative analysis of simulated tooth root canal shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Tao; Yong, Wei; Jin, Guofan; Gao, Xuejun

    2005-02-01

    Dental pulp is located in root canal of tooth. To modern root canal therapy, "Root canal preparation" is the main means to debride dental pulp infection. The shape of root canal will be changed after preparation, so, when assessing the preparation instruments and techniques, the root canal shaping ability especially the apical offset is very important factor. In this paper, a novel digital image processing and measurement system is designed and applied to quantitative analysis of simulated canal shape. By image pretreatment, feature extraction, registration and fusion, the variation of the root canals' characteristics (before and after preparation) can be accurately compared and measured, so as to assess the shaping ability of instruments. When the scanning resolution is 1200dpi or higher, the registration and measurement precision of the system can achieve 0.021mm or higher. The performance of the system is tested by a series of simulated root canals and stainless steel K-files.

  17. Glide Path Management with Single- and Multiple-instrument Rotary Systems in Curved Canals: A Micro-Computed Tomographic Study.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Alison Luís; Chu, Rene; Mello, Isabel; Garzon, Andres Dario Plazas; dos Santos, Marcelo; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches

    2015-11-01

    Securing a reproducible glide path before instrumentation is recommended to maintain the original geometry of the root canal system and to prevent file separation. Mechanical glide path management systems have been introduced to expedite this step. The aim of this study was to compare apical transportation, canal volume increase, and working time during glide path management with ProGlider (PG; Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK) and PathFiles (PF, Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties). Forty curved mesial canals of mandibular molars were randomly allocated into 2 experimental groups (n = 20) according to the glide path management system: PG or PF. A glide path was achieved according to the manufacturers' protocol. Micro-computed tomographic analysis was performed to assess apical transportation at 1, 3, and 5 mm and volume increase. The time required to achieve the glide path was measured. The overall apical transportation mean values (± standard error) were 13.33 ± 3.37 μm for PG and 19.21 ± 4.4 μm for PF (P > .05). The mean (± standard error) volume increase values were 0.49 ± 0.06 mm(3) for PG and 0.48 ± 0.06 mm(3) for PF (P > .05). A statistically significant difference in the working time was found between the groups (P < .0001) where the mean (± standard error) values for time were 7.38 ± 1.73 seconds for PG and 20.61 ± 5.54 seconds for PF. Similar apical transportation and volume increase occurred during glide path management with PG single-file and PF multi-file systems; however, PG achieved glide path faster than PF. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cleaning efficacy using two engine-driven systems versus manual instrumentation in curved root canals: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Zmener, Osvaldo; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Alvarez Serrano, Susana; Hernandez, Sandra R

    2011-09-01

    This ex vivo study evaluated the cleanliness of curved root canal walls after chemomechanical instrumentation using two automated systems versus manual instrumentation while using a standardized irrigation protocol. Thirty mesial root canals of extracted human first and second mandibular molars were prepared with the TiLOS hybrid engine-driven instrumentation system (Ultradent Products Inc, South Jordan, UT) (n = 10), ProTaper engine-driven file series (n = 10), and manual instrumentation (n = 10). Irrigation was performed using alternately 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA followed by rinsing with distilled water. After the roots were split longitudinally, the presence of debris and/or smear layer was visualized using serial scanning electron microscopic digital photomicrographs taken at 1, 5, and 10 mm from the working length. Mean scores for debris and the smear layer were calculated and statistically analyzed for significance (P < .05) between groups using the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric analysis of variance and Dunn tests. The data obtained at each evaluation level for each group were analyzed using the Friedman and Tukey multiple comparison tests. No significant differences (P > .05) were found between TiLOS and ProTaper (Dentsply/Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK) groups, whereas both performed significantly better than the manual instrumentation group. Engine-driven TiLOS and ProTaper instrumentation systems combined with a standardized irrigation protocol produced cleaner root canal walls than the manual instrumentation technique although complete cleanliness was not achieved. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Simulated Equating Using Several Item Response Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boldt, R. F.

    The comparison of item response theory models for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) was extended to an equating context as simulation trials were used to "equate the test to itself." Equating sample data were generated from administration of identical item sets. Equatings that used procedures based on each model (simple…

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Apical Sealing Ability of HEROfill® Obturator Versus Cold Lateral Condensation in Curved Root Canals.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mina; Javidi, Maryam; Kazemi, Zeinab; Afkhami, Farzaneh

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess and compare the apical sealing ability of HEROfill® Soft-Core system and lateral condensation technique in fine curved canals using the fluid filtration method. Forty human mesiobuccal root canals of mandibular first molars with 25° to 40° curvatures were instrumented to an apical size 30/0.04. Roots were randomly assigned to two experimental groups of 15, designated as groups A and B. Two control groups, each containing five teeth, served as positive and negative controls. Group A was obturated using lateral condensation technique and group B with the HEROfill® Soft-Core system. The groups were tested for microleakage using an in vitro fluid filtration apparatus with 0.5 atm pressure at zero, two, four, six, eight and 10 minutes. Independent t-test was used to analyze the microleakage data. The mean and standard deviation (SD) values for fluid microleakage in the lateral condensation group were 0.58±0.49 μL/min, 0.68±0.35 μL/min, 0.74±0.22 μL/min, 0.71±0.29 μL/min and 0.60± 0.29 μL/min at two, four, six, eight and 10 minutes, respectively. The mean and SD values for fluid microleakage in the HEROfill® group were 0.53±0.42 μL/min, 0.67±0.34 μL/min, 0.69±0.26 μL/min, 0.73±0.33 μL/min and 0.63±0.26 μL/min at two, four, six, eight and 10 minutes, respectively. The difference between the lateral condensation and HEROfill® groups was not statistically significant at two (P=0.776), four (P=0.909), six (P=0.562), eight (P=0.861) or 10 (P=0.765) minutes. The HEROfill® system and cold lateral condensation technique were equally effective for apical sealing of curved canals.

  1. Filling of simulated lateral canals with gutta percha or resilon when using thermomechanical compaction

    PubMed Central

    Anna-Júnior, Arnaldo Sant’; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Duarte, Marco Antônio Hungaro; da Silva, Guilherme Ferreira; Bosso, Roberta; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the filling of simulated lateral canals with gutta-percha or Resilon when using thermomechanical compaction. Setting and Design: Forty-five human single-rooted teeth were subjected to tooth decalcification and clearing. Materials and Methods: After root canal preparation, artificial lateral canals were made at 2, 5, and 8 mm from the working length (WL), corresponding to the apical, middle, and cervical thirds, respectively. The specimens were divided (n = 15) according to the filling material: Dentsply gutta-percha (GD), Odous gutta-percha (GO), and Resilon cones (RE). Root canals were obturated by thermomechanical compaction using a #45 compactor and no sealer. Lateral canals were analyzed by digital radiography and digital images after tooth decalcification and clearing using the Image Tool software. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were subjected to the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests at 5% significance. Results: In the coronal third, RE and GO presented more filling ability than GD (P < 0.05). In the middle and apical thirds, RE presented the best results. Conclusions: Resilon demonstrated filling ability as material for root canal obturation by using thermomechanical compaction. PMID:24944441

  2. Computed Tomography Evaluation of Canal Transportation and Volumetric Changes in Root Canal Dentin of Curved Canals Using Mtwo, ProTaper and ProTaper Next Rotary System-An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Shivashankar, Mayuri Biccodu; Jayasheel, Arun; Kenchanagoudra, Mallikarjun Goud

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Complete cleaning and shaping of root canal system is of paramount importance to achieve a successful root canal treatment. There are various rotary Ni-Ti systems available in the market to achieve mechanical goal of root canal preparation. But aggressive preparation of root canal with such systems would result in canal transportation and excess root dentin removal that would be one of the major reasons to decide the prognosis of root canal treated tooth. Aim The present study was conducted to compare the root canal preparation in terms of canal transportation and volumetric changes in the root canal dentin among three Ni-Ti file systems, namely Mtwo, ProTaper (PT) and ProTaper NEXT (PTN) file system, using Computed Tomography (CT). Materials and Methods A total of 45 mesiobuccal root canals of extracted first molar teeth with completely formed root apices and angle of curvature ranging between 10°- 35° were selected. These teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups containing 15 teeth each, based on rotary system used. Group-I: Mtwo files, Group-II: PT files and Group-III: PTN files. Pre-instrumentation CT images were obtained at three cross-sectional planes – 3mm, 7mm and 11mm from apical end of the root. Similarly, post-instrumentation images were obtained. Shortest distance from the edge of the canal to the periphery of the root was analyzed by using Analysis of Variance. Results All three file systems tested in the present study presented similar behaviour with respect to the root canal transportation. Lesser canal transportation was recorded in Mtwo. But no statistically significant difference was seen in terms of canal transportation and volume of dentin removed between all three rotary systems (p>0.05). Conclusion Mtwo, PT and PTN rotary systems have similar behaviour with respect to canal transportation and volume of dentin removed. PMID:28050495

  3. Comparison of Hero 642 and K3 rotary nickel-titanium files in curved canals of molars and a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    CAI, HUA-XIONG; CHENG, HUI-LING; SONG, JIE-WEN; CHEN, SU-YA

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the root canal preparation ability of rotary nickel-titanium (NiTi) Hero 642 and K3 files in curved mandibular or maxillary molars. A total of 40 extracted mandibular molars with two separate mesial canals, an apical width of approximately size ≤15 and a root canal curvature of 15–30° were randomly divided into two groups and instrumented using Hero 642 (n=20) or K3 files (n=20). Canal straightening, working length, transportation, cross-sectional area, minimum dentin thickness and the canal angle curvature degree were examined, and a systematic review of the literature was conducted. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups with regard to the mean degree of straightening, mean change in working length, mean transportation, amount of dentin removed or remaining minimum dentin thickness (P>0.05). The canal angle curvature decreased in the two groups postoperatively. The systematic review identified six studies, and overall the two files performed similarly in the majority of categories examined. Therefore, the rotary NiTi Hero 642 and K3 files demonstrated comparable shaping abilities and maintenance of working length. PMID:25187795

  4. 3D Analysis of D-RaCe and Self-Adjusting File in Removing Filling Materials from Curved Root Canals Instrumented and Filled with Different Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Simsek, Neslihan; Ahmetoglu, Fuat; Bulut, Elcin Tekin; Er, Kursat

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of D-RaCe files and a self-adjusting file (SAF) system in removing filling material from curved root canals instrumented and filled with different techniques by using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). The mesial roots of 20 extracted mandibular first molars were used. Root canals (mesiobuccal and mesiolingual) were instrumented with SAF or Revo-S. The canals were then filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer using cold lateral compaction or thermoplasticized injectable techniques. The root fillings were first removed with D-RaCe (Step 1), followed by Step 2, in which a SAF system was used to remove the residual fillings in all groups. Micro-CT scans were used to measure the volume of residual filling after root canal filling, reinstrumentation with D-RaCe (Step 1), and reinstrumentation with SAF (Step 2). Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. There were no statistically significant differences between filling techniques in the canals instrumented with SAF (P = 0.292) and Revo-S (P = 0.306). The amount of remaining filling material was similar in all groups (P = 0.363); all of the instrumentation techniques left filling residue inside the canals. However, the additional use of SAF was more effective than using D-RaCe alone. PMID:25114976

  5. Comparison of the shaping ability of RaCe, FlexMaster, and ProFile nickel-titanium instruments in severely curved root canals

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, Lea; Weidmann, Frank; Rüttermann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background This in vitro study compared the shaping ability of RaCe, FlexMaster, and ProFile rotary nickel-titanium instruments in severely curved root canals of extracted teeth. Material and Methods Sixty maxillary molars with curvatures ranging from 25° to 65° were embedded in a muffle system and portioned into five horizontal sections (thickness 1.2 mm), starting from the apex. Canals were divided into three groups (n = 20, each) and were prepared with RaCe, FlexMaster, or ProFile rotary nickel-titanium instruments and the TriAuto ZX handpiece using a crown-down preparation technique. We evaluated the difference between pre- and postoperative root canal cross-sections, loss of working length, instrument failure, and preparation time. The root canal area before and after the intervention was determined using an area-measuring software. The data were analyzed statistically using a one-way ANOVA followed by a Kruskal-Wallis multiple-comparison Z-value test. Results Specimens treated with FlexMaster showed the greatest change from preoperative cross-sections, followed by RaCe and ProFile. The cross-sectional changes induced by RaCe and FlexMaster preparation differed significantly from those produced by ProFile. Loss of working length, instrument failure, and preparation time did not differ significantly between the groups. Conclusions Root canal preparation with the three instruments did not lead to any significant alteration of the original root anatomy or working length. Thus, we conclude that RaCe, FlexMaster, and ProFile instruments are of comparable efficiency and usefulness in the preparation of severely curved root canals. Key words:Endodontics, root canal preparation, rotary, extracted teeth, nickel-titanium. PMID:27957264

  6. Influence of single-file endodontics on apical transportation in curved root canals: an ex vivo micro-computed tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Junaid, Alanna; Freire, Laila Gonzales; da Silveira Bueno, Carlos Eduardo; Mello, Isabel; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches

    2014-05-01

    More information regarding the ability of single files to maintain the original canal position is required before adopting a single-file approach to cleaning and shaping. This study compares apical transportation in curved root canals when instrumenting with a single WaveOne (WO) file (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK) in a reciprocating motion with that incurred when using a sequence of Twisted Files (TFs; SybronEndo, Orange, CA) in a continuous rotating motion. Forty mesial canals of mandibular molars were evenly allocated into 2 balanced groups (n = 20) with a 17-mm average canal length and 20° average curvature. Canals were accessed in a conventional manner and instrumentation was completed with a single WO file or a series of TFs. The canals were instrumented according to the manufacturers' protocol. Apical transportation was assessed on a comparison of the pre- and postinstrumentation micro-computed tomographic scans at 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-mm sections. One-way analysis of variance was performed to assess if a significant difference between systems exists. No significant difference (P > .05) was found between the WO and TF groups. Transportation in the mesial direction was of greater magnitude than distal transportation for both files systems. The mean transportation in the mesial direction was 100.1 ± 8.8 μm (WO group) and 101.0 ± 10.9 μm (TF group) (P = .5), whereas distal transportation was found to be 80.9 ± 14.6 μm (WO group) and 60.3 ± 11.0 μm (TF group) (P = .3). The results suggest that no difference exists between the WO file system and the conventional multifile TF system when considering apical transportation in curved canals. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evolution of dust extinction curves in galaxy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Kuan-Chou; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Nagamine, Kentaro; Aoyama, Shohei; Shimizu, Ikkoh

    2017-07-01

    To understand the evolution of extinction curve, we calculate the dust evolution in a galaxy using smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations incorporating stellar dust production, dust destruction in supernova shocks, grain growth by accretion and coagulation, and grain disruption by shattering. The dust species are separated into carbonaceous dust and silicate. The evolution of grain size distribution is considered by dividing grain population into large and small grains, which allows us to estimate extinction curves. We examine the dependence of extinction curves on the position, gas density and metallicity in the galaxy, and find that extinction curves are flat at t ≲ 0.3 Gyr because stellar dust production dominates the total dust abundance. The 2175 Å bump and far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise become prominent after dust growth by accretion. At t ≳ 3 Gyr, shattering works efficiently in the outer disc and low-density regions, so extinction curves show a very strong 2175 Å bump and steep FUV rise. The extinction curves at t ≳ 3 Gyr are consistent with the Milky Way extinction curve, which implies that we successfully included the necessary dust processes in the model. The outer disc component caused by stellar feedback has an extinction curve with a weaker 2175 Å bump and flatter FUV slope. The strong contribution of carbonaceous dust tends to underproduce the FUV rise in the Small Magellanic Cloud extinction curve, which supports selective loss of small carbonaceous dust in the galaxy. The snapshot at young ages also explains the extinction curves in high-redshift quasars.

  8. Driver performance approaching and departing curves: driving simulator study.

    PubMed

    Bella, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the outcomes of a driving simulator study on the driver performance approaching and departing curves. The study aimed to analyze driver performance in the tangent-curve-tangent transition and verify the assumption of constant speed in a curve that is commonly used in the operating speed profiles; test whether the 85th percentile of acceleration and deceleration rates experienced by drivers and the acceleration and acceleration rates obtained from the operating speeds are equivalent; find the explanatory variables associated with the 85th percentile of deceleration and acceleration rates experienced by drivers when approaching and departing horizontal curves and provide predicting models of these rates. A driving simulator study was carried out. Drivers' speeds were recorded on 26 configurations of the tangent-curve-tangent transition of 3 2-lane rural roads implemented in the CRISS (Inter-University Research Center for Road Safety) driving simulator; 856 speed profiles were analyzed. The main results were the following: The simplified assumption of the current operating speed profiles that the speed on the circular curve is constant and equal to that at midpoint can be considered admissible; The 85th percentile of deceleration and acceleration rates exhibited by each driver best reflect the actual driving performance in the tangent-curve-tangent transition; Two models that predict the expected 85th percentile of the deceleration and acceleration rates experienced by drivers were developed. The findings of the study can be used in drawing operating speed profiles that best reflect the actual driving performance and allow a more effective safety evaluation of 2-lane rural roads.

  9. Simulation and video animation of canal flushing created by a tide gate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A tide-gate algorithm was added to a one-dimensional unsteady flow model that was calibrated, verified, and used to determine the locations of as many as five tide gates that would maximize flushing in two canal systems. Results from the flow model were used to run a branched Lagrangian transport model to simulate the flushing of a conservative constituent from the canal systems both with and without tide gates. A tide gate produces a part-time riverine flow through the canal system that improves flushing along the flow path created by the tide gate. Flushing with no tide gates and with a single optimally located tide gate are shown with a video animation.

  10. A comparative evaluation of the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation in curved root canals by three rotary systems: A cone-beam computed tomographic study

    PubMed Central

    Prasanthi, Nalam NVD; Rambabu, Tanikonda; Sajjan, Girija S; Varma, K Madhu; Satish, R Kalyan; Padmaja, M

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to measure the increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation after biomechanical preparation at 1, 3, and 5 mm short of the apex with three different rotary systems in both continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary motions. Materials and Methods: Sixty freshly extracted human mandibular molars with mesial root canal curvatures between 20° and 30° were included in the study. Teeth were randomly distributed into three groups (n = 20). Biomechanical preparations were done in all the mesial canals. In Group 1, instrumentation was done with ProTaper universal rotary files, Group 2, with K3XF rotary files, and Group 3, with LSX rotary files. Each group was further subdivided into subgroups A and B (n = 10) where instrumentation was done by continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques, respectively. Increase in root canal surface area and canal transportation was measured using the preoperative and postoperative cone-beam computed tomography scans. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey pairwise multiple comparison tests. Results: Increase in root canal surface area was significantly more (P < 0.05) in ProTaper and K3XF groups when compared to LSX group. Canal transportation was significantly more (P < 0.05) in ProTaper group when compared to K3XF and LSX groups. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in increase of root canal surface area and canal transportation between continuous rotary and reciprocating rotary techniques for ProTaper Universal, K3XF and LSX groups. Conclusion: LSX rotary system showed minimal increase of root canal surface area and minimal canal transportation when compared to ProTaper and K3XF rotary systems. PMID:27656062

  11. Measurement and visualization of file-to-wall contact during ultrasonically activated irrigation in simulated canals.

    PubMed

    Boutsioukis, C; Verhaagen, B; Walmsley, A D; Versluis, M; van der Sluis, L W M

    2013-11-01

    (i) To quantify in a simulated root canal model the file-to-wall contact during ultrasonic activation of an irrigant and to evaluate the effect of root canal size, file insertion depth, ultrasonic power, root canal level and previous training, (ii) To investigate the effect of file-to-wall contact on file oscillation. File-to-wall contact was measured during ultrasonic activation of the irrigant performed by 15 trained and 15 untrained participants in two metal root canal models. Results were analyzed by two 5-way mixed-design anovas. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Additionally, high-speed visualizations, laser-vibrometer measurements and numerical simulations of the file oscillation were conducted. File-to-wall contact occurred in all cases during 20% of the activation time. Contact time was significantly shorter at high power (P < 0.001), when the file was positioned away from working length (P < 0.001), in the larger root canal (P < 0.001) and from coronal towards apical third of the root canal (P < 0.002), in most of the cases studied. Previous training did not show a consistent significant effect. File oscillation was affected by contact during 94% of the activation time. During wall contact, the file bounced back and forth against the wall at audible frequencies (ca. 5 kHz), but still performed the original 30 kHz oscillations. Travelling waves were identified on the file. The file oscillation was not dampened completely due to the contact and hydrodynamic cavitation was detected. Considerable file-to-wall contact occur-red during irrigant activation. Therefore, the term 'Passive Ultrasonic Irrigation' should be amended to 'Ultrasonically Activated Irrigation'. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effectiveness of XP-endo Finisher, EndoActivator, and File agitation on debris and smear layer removal in curved root canals: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Elnaghy, Amr M; Mandorah, Ayman; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of the XP-endo Finisher (FKG Dentaire SA, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland) file on debris and smear layer removal in curved root canals in comparison to different irrigation regimens. Seventy-five freshly extracted human mandibular molar teeth with mesial root curved more than 20° were used in this study. The mesial root canals were mechanically prepared using the BT-Race rotary system (FKG Dentaire) and divided into five groups (n = 15) according to the following irrigation techniques: positive control, non-agitated, File agitation, XP-endo Finisher, and EndoActivator (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialities, Tulsa, OK, USA). Root canals were split longitudinally and evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Five-grade scoring system was used to assess the presence of debris and smear layer at the coronal, middle, and apical regions. The XP-endo Finisher and EndoActivator groups revealed significantly lower debris and smear layer scores than the other groups at the coronal, middle, and apical regions (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between XP-endo Finisher and EndoActivator groups (P > 0.05). The apical region had higher debris and smear layer scores compared with the coronal regions in all groups (P < 0.05), except for the positive control group; there was no significant difference between the three regions of the root canal (P > 0.05). Irrigation of curved root canals using XP-endo Finisher and EndoActivator methods appears to be more effective on debris and smear layer removal than the other tested groups.

  13. A computational analysis of Canale-Smith syndrome: chronic lymphadenopathy simulating malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Gerhard R F; Brandt, Michael E; Wang, Guanyu; Berthold, Frank; Buja, L Maximilian

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to simulate changes in the human T cell system representing Canale-Smith syndrome using a dynamic computer model of T cell development and comparing with available human data. Physiological stepwise maturation and function of T lymphocytes in the computer model is altered by introducing functional disturbances following lymphotropic virus infection. In the present model, acute and chronic persistent infection with the human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) was simulated, and ensuing changes in T cell populations were compared with those measured in human patients. Using our computer model we previously found that simulated acute HHV-6 infection produced T cell computer data, which resembled an infectious mononucleosis-like disease in patients. Simulated chronic persistent infection, instead, resulted in variable cell changes comparing well to patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. In one setting, however, persistent immature lymphocytosis was observed similar to what initial has been described in this journal as Canale-Smith syndrome. Using a computer model developed by us we were able to produce simulations that resemble the immune system features of Canale-Smith syndrome. Further understanding of these simulation results may possibly guide future investigations into this disorder.

  14. Apical Extrusion of Debris after Canal Preparation with Hand-Files Used Manually or Installed on Reciprocating Air-Driven Handpiece in Straight and Curved Canals

    PubMed Central

    Labbaf, Hossein; Shakeri, Leila; Orduie, Reza; Bastami, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Apical debris extrusion (DE) subsequent to root canal instrumentation, is one of the most important causes of endodontic flare-ups. The aim of this study was to compare the amount of DE after root canal instrumentation using nickel-titanium (NiTi) hand files with step-back manual technique or installed on reciprocating handpiece. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted on mesiobuccal (MB) roots of extracted maxillary first molars (n=20) and roots of mandibular premolars (n=20) that were randomly divided into two groups (n=20) according to the armamentarium used for canal preparation (air-driven reciprocating handpiece or hand instrumentation). In each group, the MB and premolar roots were prepared with the main apical sizes of 35 and 40, respectively. The extruded debris were collected and weighed. Finally, the mean dry weights were compared using ANOVA and t-test, and Tukey’s Multiple Comparisons Procedures were used to determine the significant differences in amounts of DE. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Regardless of the type of teeth, the mean values of DE, were significantly lower in the handpiece group (P<0.0001). In addition, significantly lower amounts of DE was observed in premolars in similar group (P<0.001). However, this difference was not significant in MB roots of molars (P=0.20). Conclusion: Root canal preparation with reciprocating handpiece can lead to significantly lower debris extrusion than the manual step-back technique. In handpiece-prepared canals, the amount of extruded debris was significantly lower in premolar teeth. PMID:26213538

  15. Root Canal Surface Strain and Canal Center Transportation Induced by 3 Different Nickel-Titanium Rotary Instrument Systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenzhe; Wu, Buling

    2016-02-01

    Root canal anatomy and canal preparation instruments affect the outcome of endodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine the root surface strain (SS) generated and the extent of canal center transportation during canal shaping using 3 different nickel-titanium instruments. Simulated root canals in resin blocks (n = 10 per group) were prepared using adaptive rotary motion with twisted files (Twisted File Adaptive [TFA]; SybronEndo, Orange, CA), reciprocating rotary motion with WaveOne (WO; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) files, and continuous rotary motion with ProTaper Next files (PTN, Dentsply Maillefer). Electrical strain gauges at 3 sites recorded SS real time during canal shaping, and the blocks were scanned by micro-computed tomographic imaging to assess the canal center deviation at 3 sections after root canal instrumentation. The mean maximum SS and the canal center transportation for all groups and sites were derived and analyzed for a possible correlation between them. An overall increase in root SS was observed after root canal instrumentation. A significant difference in the induced mean maximum SS between TFA, WO, and PTN at specific sites of curved root canals was observed. A statistically significant difference in the mean distance of canal center transportation was observed among the 3 shaping techniques at the apical section. Finally, the mean maximum SS values induced during canal shaping strongly correlated with canal center transportation in the apical section and the coronal section. The curved canals prepared using TFA exhibited lower SS and less canal center transportation at the apical section than the WO and PTN systems. SS generated during canal shaping correlated with canal center transportation in a site-specific manner. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Deformations occurring in the apical third of curved root canals during biomechanical preparation using manual impulsion-traction techniques].

    PubMed

    Roig Cayón, M; Basilio Monné, J; Canalda Sahli, C

    1990-01-01

    Apical deformations, specially zips and elbows, during instrumentation of the root canals, are studied. The authors study why do they appear, their effect on endodontic therapy, and the way of avoiding them.

  17. Effect of early coronal flaring on working length change in curved canals using rotary nickel-titanium versus stainless steel instruments.

    PubMed

    Davis, R Dean; Marshall, J Gordon; Baumgartner, J Craig

    2002-06-01

    This in vitro investigation examined pre- and postinstrumentation working length (WL) measurements in curved root canals. The conditions compared were combinations of (a) stainless steel hand files + Gates Glidden drills (SS) versus nickel-titanium rotary files (Ni-Ti); and (b) early coronal flaring (flaring completed before WL determination) versus late coronal flaring (flaring completed after WL determination). Coronal flaring was accomplished for the SS group using Gates Glidden drills and for the Ni-Ti group using rotary Ni-Ti files (n = 15/group). WL was determined before coronal flaring, immediately after coronal flaring, and again after canal preparation. Results indicated that WL decreased for all canals as a result of canal preparation. The mean decrease in WL was significantly greater for the SS group (-0.48 mm +/- 0.32) than for the Ni-Ti group (-0.22 mm +/- 0.26). Less change in WL occurred in both groups when initial WL was determined after coronal flaring (SS: -0.12 mm +/- 0.13, Ni-Ti: -0.14 mm +/- 0.25).

  18. Visualization of removal of trapped air from the apical region in simulated root canals by laser-activated irrigation using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Harry Huiz; De Moor, Roeland J G; Suharto, Djoko

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this visualization study was to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism by which trapped air is removed from the apical region of simulated root canals by activation of an irrigant using an erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser during endodontic procedures. A high-speed imaging system with high temporal and spatial resolution was used to visualize laser-induced shock waves in a resin block model with a curved root canal (inner diameter at the apex 0.08 mm, taper 4 %, crown height 10 mm, overall length 40 mm) and a glass cylinder model with a straight root canal (inner diameter 1 mm, crown height 10 mm, overall length 40 mm). The study utilized MZ3 and RFT3 tips in each model, without water or air spray, and with an average power of 1 W at 35 Hz. Laser-activated irrigation overcame the airlock effect by releasing air trapped in the air column. The mechanism underlying the removal of trapped air from the apical region using an Er,Cr:YSGG laser in a dry root canal is via the disruption of the surface tension at the solution-air interface. This disruption, caused by bubble implosion (cavitation), displaces air in the form of bubbles from the apical region toward the solution, which allows the solution to travel apically.

  19. Cyclic stress-strain curve and springback simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kunmin

    The main objective of this dissertation is to generate cyclic stress-strain curves for sheet metals so that the springback can be simulated accurately. Material parameters are identified by an inverse method within a selected constitutive model (Chaboche model) that represents the hardening behavior of materials subjected to a cyclic loading. Three-point bending tests are conducted on sheet steels (mild steel and high strength steel) and sheet aluminum. Punch stroke, punch load, bending strain and bending angle are measured directly during the tests. Bending moments are then computed from these measured data. Bending moments are also calculated based on a constitutive model. Normal anisotropy and nonlinear isotropic/kinematic hardening are considered. Material parameters are identified by minimizing the normalized error between two bending moments. Micro genetic algorithm is used in the optimization procedure. Stress-strain curves are generated with the material parameters found in this way, which can be used with other plastic models. This dissertation contributes to the generation of cyclic stress-strain curves of sheet metals for more accurate simulation of forming process and especially for springback prediction when the process includes a cyclic loading.

  20. Simulating the value of El Niño forecasts for the Panama Canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Nicholas E.; Georgakakos, Konstantine P.; Vargas, Carlos; Echevers, Modesto

    2006-11-01

    The Panama Canal relies on rain-fed streamflow into Gatun Lake, the canal's primary storage facility, for operations—principally ship passage and hydropower generation. Precipitation in much of Panama has a strong negative relationship with eastern tropical Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) and this relationship is reflected in Gatun Lake inflows. For example, the correlation coefficient between wet season (July-December) inflow and NINO3 SST is -0.53 over the period 1914-1997. Operational capabilities to predict tropical Pacific SSTs have been demonstrated by several forecast systems during the past decade, and (as we show) such SST forecasts can be used to reduce the uncertainty of estimates of future inflows (compared with climatological expectations). Because substantial reductions in lake inflow negatively impact canal operations, we wondered whether these forecasts of future inflows, coupled with a method for translating that information into effective operational policy, might result in more efficient canal management. A combined simulation/optimization/assessment "virtual" canal system was implemented and exercised using operational El Niño forecasts over the period 1981-1998. The results show the following main points: At current demand levels, the canal system is relatively robust (insensitive to flow forecasts) unless flows are substantially reduced (i.e., during El Niño episodes) or forecasts are extremely accurate. The inclusion of accurately specified levels of forecast uncertainty is critical in developing economically beneficial policies. The situations in which imperfect forecast information can be useful lie between those where storage and future inflows are relatively high, and those where storage and inflows are relatively low. In the former case, demands can be met without the benefit of forecast information, and in the latter case even perfect forecast information cannot prevent operational curtailments. For a nominally configured

  1. Retracted: Micro-computed tomography evaluation of apical transportation and centring ability of Reciproc and WaveOne systems in severely curved root canals.

    PubMed

    de Meireles, D A; de Brito, T C C A; Marques, A A F; Garrido, A D B; Garcia, L F R; Sponchiado, E C

    2015-08-01

    The following article from International Endodontic Journal, 'Micro-computed tomography evaluation of apical transportation and centring ability of Reciproc and WaveOne systems in severely curved root canals' by D. A. de Meireles, T. C. C. A. de Brito, A. A. F. Marques, A. D. B. Garrido, L. F. R. Garcia & E. C. Sponchiado Jr, published online on 5 February 2015 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, Prof. Paul Dummer, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. The retraction has been agreed due to the use of techniques for crucial measurements in canal shaping and a lack of clarity regarding the measuring methodology. The use of inadequate measuring methodologies makes the findings of the paper invalid.

  2. Shaping ability of three ProFile rotary instrumentation techniques in simulated resin root canals.

    PubMed

    Kum, K Y; Spängberg, L; Cha, B Y; Il-Young, J; Msd; Seung-Jong, L; Chan-Young, L

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shaping ability of three ProFile rotary instrumentation techniques and a conventional step-back method in simulated root canals. Prevalence of canal aberrations, change in working length, and preparation time were measured. A total of 48 composite images were made from pre- and postcanal scanned images using Corel Photopaint 8.0 and then the amount of coronal substance the instruments removed was also calculated two-dimensionally on digitized images with the Brain C software to compare the enlarging efficiency. There were no significant differences between the three rotary groups in preparation time, change in working length, and the incidence of aberrations (p > 0.05). The amount of coronal substance the instruments removed in the ProFile .04 taper group was significantly smaller than the other three groups (p < 0.05).

  3. Simulation of the effects of proposed tide gates on circulation, flushing, and water quality in residential canals, Cape Coral Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, Carl R.

    1991-01-01

    Decades of dredging and filling of Florida's low-lying coastal wetlands have produced thousands of miles of residential tidal canals and adjacent waterfront property. Typically, these canals are poorly flushed, and over time, accumulated organic-rich bottom materials, contribute to an increasingly severe degraded water quality. One-dimensional hydrodynamic and constituent-transport models were applied to two dead-end canal systems to determine the effects of canal system interconnection using tide gates on water circulation and constituent flushing. The model simulates existing and possible future circulation and flushing conditions in about 29 miles of the approximately 130 miles of tidally influenced canals in Cape Coral, located on the central west coast of peninsular Florida. Model results indicate that tidal water-level differences between the two canal systems can be converted to kinetic energy, in the form of increased water circulation, but the use of one-way tide gate interconnections. Computations show that construction of from one to four tide gates will cause replacement of a volume of water equivalent to the total volume of canals in both systems in 15 to 9 days, respectively. Because some canals flush faster than others, 47 and 21 percent of the original canal water will remain in both systems 50 days after start of operation of one and four tide gates, respectively. Some of the effects that such increased flushing are expected to have include reduced density stratification and associated dissolved-oxygen depletion in canal bottom waters, increased localized reaeration, and more efficient discharge of stormwater runoff entering the canals.

  4. SIMULATED PERFORMANCE OF TIMESCALE METRICS FOR APERIODIC LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Findeisen, Krzysztof; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Cody, Ann Marie

    2015-01-10

    Aperiodic variability is a characteristic feature of young stars, massive stars, and active galactic nuclei. With the recent proliferation of time-domain surveys, it is increasingly essential to develop methods to quantify and analyze aperiodic variability. We develop three timescale metrics that have been little used in astronomy—Δm-Δt plots, peak-finding, and Gaussian process regression—and present simulations comparing their effectiveness across a range of aperiodic light curve shapes, characteristic timescales, observing cadences, and signal to noise ratios. We find that Gaussian process regression is easily confused by noise and by irregular sampling, even when the model being fit reflects the process underlying the light curve, but that Δm-Δt plots and peak-finding can coarsely characterize timescales across a broad region of parameter space. We make public the software we used for our simulations, both in the spirit of open research and to allow others to carry out analogous simulations for their own observing programs.

  5. Simulated Performance of Timescale Metrics for Aperiodic Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findeisen, Krzysztof; Cody, Ann Marie; Hillenbrand, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Aperiodic variability is a characteristic feature of young stars, massive stars, and active galactic nuclei. With the recent proliferation of time-domain surveys, it is increasingly essential to develop methods to quantify and analyze aperiodic variability. We develop three timescale metrics that have been little used in astronomy—Δm-Δt plots, peak-finding, and Gaussian process regression—and present simulations comparing their effectiveness across a range of aperiodic light curve shapes, characteristic timescales, observing cadences, and signal to noise ratios. We find that Gaussian process regression is easily confused by noise and by irregular sampling, even when the model being fit reflects the process underlying the light curve, but that Δm-Δt plots and peak-finding can coarsely characterize timescales across a broad region of parameter space. We make public the software we used for our simulations, both in the spirit of open research and to allow others to carry out analogous simulations for their own observing programs.

  6. Effectiveness of Four Different Final Irrigation Activation Techniques on Smear Layer Removal in Curved Root Canals : A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Puneet; Nandini, Suresh; Ballal, Suma; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of apical negative pressure (ANP), manual dynamic agitation (MDA), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) and needle irrigation (NI) as final irrigation activation techniques for smear layer removal in curved root canals. Materials and Methods: Mesiobuccal root canals of 80 freshly extracted maxillary first molars with curvatures ranging between 25° and 35° were used. A glide path with #08–15 K files was established before cleaning and shaping with Mtwo rotary instruments (VDW, Munich, Germany) up to size 35/0.04 taper. During instrumentation, 1 ml of 2.5% NaOCl was used at each change of file. Samples were divided into 4 equal groups (n=20) according to the final irrigation activation technique: group 1, apical negative pressure (ANP) (EndoVac); group 2, manual dynamic agitation (MDA); group 3, passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI); and group 4, needle irrigation (NI). Root canals were split longitudinally and subjected to scanning electron microscopy. The presence of smear layer at coronal, middle and apical levels was evaluated by superimposing 300-μm square grid over the obtained photomicrographs using a four-score scale with X1,000 magnification. Results: Amongst all the groups tested, ANP showed the overall best smear layer removal efficacy (p < 0.05). Removal of smear layer was least effective with the NI technique. Conclusion: ANP (EndoVac system) can be used as the final irrigation activation technique for effective smear layer removal in curved root canals. PMID:24910670

  7. Apical transportation associated with ProTaper® Universal F1, F2 and F3 instruments in curved canals prepared by undergraduate students

    PubMed Central

    BRITO-JÚNIOR, Manoel; FARIA-E-SILVA, André Luis; CAMILO, Carla Cristina; PEREIRA, Rodrigo Dantas; BRAGA, Neilor Mateus Antunes; SOUSA-NETO, Manoel Damião

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated apical transportation associated with ProTaper® Universal Fl, F2 and F3 rotary files in curved canais prepared by undergraduate students. Material and Methods Twenty mesial roots of mandibular molars with curvatures ranging between 25° and 35° were selected. Mesiobuccal canals were instrumented by twenty students with the ProTaper® system (Dentsply-Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) according to the manufacturer's instructions. Pre-fiaring was performed with Sl and SX files. A #15 K-file was inserted into the root canal up to the working length (WL), and an initial digital radiograph was taken in a buccolingual direction (baseline). Afterwards, the S1, S2, F1, F2, and F3 files were employed up to the WL. Other radiographies were taken in the same orientation of the baseline after the use of the Fl, F2, and F3 files, with each file inserted into the root canal. The radiographic images were overlapped, and the Image J software was used to measure the distance between the rotary files' ends and the #15 K-file's end, characterizing the apical transportation. Data were analyzed by Repeated Measure ANOVA and by the SNK post hoc test (P<0.05). Results It was verified that file size affected apical transportation significantly (P<0.001). The F3 file showed higher apical transportation than Fl and F2, while between these last files there was no difference. Conclusion The undergraduate students produced lower apical transportation in curved canals when they did not use the F3 rotary file. PMID:24676579

  8. Efficacy of ProTaper NEXT Compared with Reciproc in Removing Obturation Material from Severely Curved Root Canals: A Micro-Computed Tomography Study.

    PubMed

    Nevares, Giselle; de Albuquerque, Diana S; Freire, Laila G; Romeiro, Kaline; Fogel, Howard M; Dos Santos, Marcelo; Cunha, Rodrigo S

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the remaining root canal obturation, volume of dentin removed, and apical transportation after retreatment of severely curved root canals by using Reciproc (REC) or ProTaper NEXT (PTN) systems. Twenty-eight mesial canals of mandibular molars were instrumented and then obturated with gutta-percha and sealer and allocated into 2 balanced groups (n = 14), the REC group (R25 file) and the PTN group (X3 and X2 files). Micro-computed tomography analysis was performed to assess the percentage of residual obturation material, the amount of dentin removed, and apical transportation. The effective time for the removal of obturation and procedural errors were recorded. Obturation was effectively removed from the root canal in the REC and PTN groups (P ≤ .001), and the percentages of remaining obturation material were similar between both groups (84.8% PTN vs 86.5% REC) (P > .05). The amount of dentin removed (3.17 ± 2.64 mm(3) PTN versus 3.50 ± 2.82 mm(3) REC), apical transportation (at 1 mm: 0.096 ± 0.189 mm PTN versus 0.093 ± 0.186 mm REC; at 3 mm: 0.059 ± 0.069 mm PTN versus 0.082 ± 0.080 mm REC; at 5 mm: 0.097 ± 0.093 mm PTN versus 0.133 ± 0.138 mm REC), and the working time (269.69 ± 19.25 seconds PTN versus 268.62 ± 16.37 seconds REC) were also similar in both groups (P > .05). One file fractured in the REC group. Both systems were equally effective in the removal of obturation from severely curved canals and can be used for retreatment. Neither system could completely remove the obturation material; therefore, additional techniques are needed to improve cleaning of the root canal. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulations of (An)Isotropic Diffusion on Curved Biological Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Hayer, Arnold; Helenius, Ari; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-01-01

    We present a computational particle method for the simulation of isotropic and anisotropic diffusion on curved biological surfaces that have been reconstructed from image data. The method is capable of handling surfaces of high curvature and complex shape, which are often encountered in biology. The method is validated on simple benchmark problems and is shown to be second-order accurate in space and time and of high parallel efficiency. It is applied to simulations of diffusion on the membrane of endoplasmic reticula (ER) in live cells. Diffusion simulations are conducted on geometries reconstructed from real ER samples and are compared to fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments in the same ER samples using the transmembrane protein tsO45-VSV-G, C-terminally tagged with green fluorescent protein. Such comparisons allow derivation of geometry-corrected molecular diffusion constants for membrane components from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data. The results of the simulations indicate that the diffusion behavior of molecules in the ER membrane differs significantly from the volumetric diffusion of soluble molecules in the lumen of the same ER. The apparent speed of recovery differs by a factor of ∼4, even when the molecular diffusion constants of the two molecules are identical. In addition, the specific shape of the membrane affects the recovery half-time, which is found to vary by a factor of ∼2 in different ER samples. PMID:16284262

  10. Simulations of (an)isotropic diffusion on curved biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Hayer, Arnold; Helenius, Ari; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-02-01

    We present a computational particle method for the simulation of isotropic and anisotropic diffusion on curved biological surfaces that have been reconstructed from image data. The method is capable of handling surfaces of high curvature and complex shape, which are often encountered in biology. The method is validated on simple benchmark problems and is shown to be second-order accurate in space and time and of high parallel efficiency. It is applied to simulations of diffusion on the membrane of endoplasmic reticula (ER) in live cells. Diffusion simulations are conducted on geometries reconstructed from real ER samples and are compared to fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments in the same ER samples using the transmembrane protein tsO45-VSV-G, C-terminally tagged with green fluorescent protein. Such comparisons allow derivation of geometry-corrected molecular diffusion constants for membrane components from fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data. The results of the simulations indicate that the diffusion behavior of molecules in the ER membrane differs significantly from the volumetric diffusion of soluble molecules in the lumen of the same ER. The apparent speed of recovery differs by a factor of approximately 4, even when the molecular diffusion constants of the two molecules are identical. In addition, the specific shape of the membrane affects the recovery half-time, which is found to vary by a factor of approximately 2 in different ER samples.

  11. Removal of Gutta-Percha/Zinc-Oxide-Eugenol Sealer or Gutta-Percha/Epoxy Resin Sealer from Severely Curved Canals: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Santhoshini; Neelakantan, Prasanna; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Subbarao, Chandragiri Venkata; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Gutmann, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cleanliness of root canal walls after retreatment using two rotary retreatment files to hand instruments in severely curved canals obturated with gutta-percha and two different sealers. Single rooted mandibular premolars (n = 90) with root curvatures were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha and an epoxy resin (Group 1, n = 45) or zinc oxide eugenol sealer (Group 2, n = 45). Following retreatment of the specimens (n = 15 ProTaper Universal Retreatment Files (Subgroup B) or R-Endo retreatment files (Subgroup C) after 1 month, split specimens were examined under a stereomicroscope and the percentage of remaining root filling material was statistically compared using one way ANOVA with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons (P = 0.05). The R-Endo system performed significantly better than the other two file systems (P < 0.05). None of the systems used in this study cleaned root canals thoroughly. The R-Endo system did provide cleaner walls when compared to the other instruments used. The type of root filling materials had an impact on the outcomes with all techniques. PMID:22145001

  12. Histological evaluation of the cleaning effectiveness of two reciprocating single-file systems in severely curved root canals: Reciproc versus WaveOne.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Maira de Souza; Junior, Emílio Carlos Sponchiado; Bitencourt Garrido, Angela Delfina; Roberti Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca; Franco Marques, André Augusto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cleaning effectiveness achieved with two reciprocating single-file systems in severely curved root canals: Reciproc and WaveOne. Twenty-five mesial roots of mandibular molars were randomly separated into two groups, according to the instrumentation system used. The negative control group consisted of five specimens that were not instrumented. The mesial canals (buccal and lingual) in Reciproc Group were instrumented with file R25 and the WaveOne group with the Primary file. The samples were submitted to histological processing and analyzed under a digital microscope. The WaveOne group presented a larger amount of debris than the Reciproc Group, however, without statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). A larger amount of debris in the control group was observed, with statistically significant difference to Reciproc and WaveOne groups (P < 0.05). The two reciprocating single-file instrumentation systems presented similar effectiveness for root canal cleaning.

  13. Histological evaluation of the cleaning effectiveness of two reciprocating single-file systems in severely curved root canals: Reciproc versus WaveOne

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Maira de Souza; Junior, Emílio Carlos Sponchiado; Bitencourt Garrido, Angela Delfina; Roberti Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca; Franco Marques, André Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the cleaning effectiveness achieved with two reciprocating single-file systems in severely curved root canals: Reciproc and WaveOne. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five mesial roots of mandibular molars were randomly separated into two groups, according to the instrumentation system used. The negative control group consisted of five specimens that were not instrumented. The mesial canals (buccal and lingual) in Reciproc Group were instrumented with file R25 and the WaveOne group with the Primary file. The samples were submitted to histological processing and analyzed under a digital microscope. Results: The WaveOne group presented a larger amount of debris than the Reciproc Group, however, without statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). A larger amount of debris in the control group was observed, with statistically significant difference to Reciproc and WaveOne groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The two reciprocating single-file instrumentation systems presented similar effectiveness for root canal cleaning. PMID:25713489

  14. The effectiveness of syringe irrigation and ultrasonics to remove debris from simulated irregularities within prepared root canal walls.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-J; Wu, M-K; Wesselink, P R

    2004-10-01

    To compare the ability of syringe irrigation and ultrasonic irrigation to remove artificially placed dentine debris from simulated canal irregularities within prepared root canals. After canal enlargement, twelve canines were split longitudinally into two halves. On the wall of one half of each root canal a standard groove of 4 mm in length, 0.2 mm in width and 0.5 mm in depth was cut, 2-6 mm from the apex, to simulate uninstrumented canal extensions. On the wall of the other half, three standard saucer-shaped depressions of 0.3 mm in diameter and 0.5 mm in depth were cut at 2, 4 and 6 mm from the apex to simulate uninstrumented canal irregularities. Each groove and depression were filled with dentine debris mixed with 2% NaOCl to simulate a situation when dentine debris accumulates in uninstrumented canal extensions and irregularities during canal preparation. Each tooth was re-assembled by reconnecting the two halves, using wire and an impression putty material. Two per cent NaOCl was then delivered into each canal either using syringe irrigation (n = 8) or using ultrasonic irrigation (n = 8). Before and after irrigation, images of the two halves of the canal wall were taken, using a microscope and a digital camera, after which they were scanned into a PC as TIFF images. The amount of remaining dentine debris in the grooves and depressions was evaluated by using a scoring system between 0-3: the higher the score, the more the debris. The data were analysed by means of the Mann-Whitney U-test. Both forms of irrigation reduced the debris score significantly. The debris score was statistically significantly lower after ultrasonic irrigation than after syringe irrigation (P = 0.002 for grooves, P = 0.047 for depressions). Ultrasonic irrigation ex vivo is more effective than syringe irrigation in removing artificially created dentine debris placed in simulated uninstrumented extensions and irregularities in straight, wide root canals.

  15. Comparison of irrigant penetration up to working length and into simulated lateral canals using various irrigating techniques.

    PubMed

    Spoorthy, E; Velmurugan, N; Ballal, S; Nandini, S

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of an apical negative pressure system, a passive ultrasonic irrigation system and a combination of both apical negative pressure and passive ultrasonic irrigation on the penetration of the irrigating contrast solution (ICS) up to working length and into simulated lateral canals. The root canals of 64 single-rooted teeth were instrumented using the ProTaper rotary system. In each sample, three simulated lateral canals were created at 2, 4 and 6 mm levels from the root apex using a 06-size C+ file (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland). Samples were randomly assigned into 4 experimental groups (n = 16): group I - conventional needle irrigation, group II - passive ultrasonic irrigation, group III - apical negative irrigation system and group IV - combination of passive ultrasonic irrigation and apical negative pressure irrigation system. To examine irrigating solution penetration, Indian ink was mixed with 5.25% NaOCl and delivered into the root canals. Samples were then assessed by direct observation of the images taken using Canon EOS rebel T3. The depth of penetration of ICS up to the working length and into the simulated lateral canals was analysed using chi-squared tests. The combination (ANP and PUI) and ANP group had significantly deeper ICS penetration up to the working length (P < 0.001). The combination (ANP and PUI) and the PUI group exhibited significantly greater ICS penetration into lateral canals at the 6 mm level (P < 0.001). At the 4 and 2 mm levels, the combination of ANP and PUI had significantly greater ICS penetration into the lateral canals than the other groups (P < 0.001). The combination of ANP and PUI was the only group able to achieve irrigating contrast solution penetration both up to the working length and into lateral canals. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Residual Smear Layer Following Preparation of Curved Root Canals Using Hand Instrumentation or Two Engine-Driven Systems

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Abbasali; Saatchi, Masoud; Shokouhi, Mohammad Mehdi; Baghaei, Badri

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this experimental study, the amount of smear layer (SL) remnants in curved root canals after chemomechanical instrumentation with two engine-driven systems or hand instrumentation was evaluated. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight mesiobuccal roots of mandibular first molars with curvatures ranging between 25 and 35 degrees (according to Schneider’s method) were divided into three groups (n=16) which were prepared by either the ProTaper Universal file series, Reciproc single file system or hand instrumentation. The canals were intermittently irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl and 17% (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) EDTA, followed by distilled water as the final rinse. The roots were split longitudinally and the apical third of the specimens were evaluated under 2500× magnification with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mean scores of the SL were calculated and analyzed using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The mean scores of the SL were 2.00±0.73, 1.94±0.68 and 1.44±0.63 µm for the ProTaper Universal, Reciproc and hand instrumentation, respectively. Mean score of SL was significantly less in the hand instrumentation group than the ProTaper (P=0.027) and Reciproc (P=0.035) groups. The difference between the two engine-driven systems, however, was not significant (P=0.803). Conclusion: The amount of smear layer in the apical third of curved root canals prepared with both engine-driven systems was similar and greater than the hand instrumentation technique. Complete cleanliness was not attained. PMID:26523137

  17. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Residual Smear Layer Following Preparation of Curved Root Canals Using Hand Instrumentation or Two Engine-Driven Systems.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Abbasali; Saatchi, Masoud; Shokouhi, Mohammad Mehdi; Baghaei, Badri

    2015-01-01

    In this experimental study, the amount of smear layer (SL) remnants in curved root canals after chemomechanical instrumentation with two engine-driven systems or hand instrumentation was evaluated. Forty-eight mesiobuccal roots of mandibular first molars with curvatures ranging between 25 and 35 degrees (according to Schneider's method) were divided into three groups (n=16) which were prepared by either the ProTaper Universal file series, Reciproc single file system or hand instrumentation. The canals were intermittently irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl and 17% (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) EDTA, followed by distilled water as the final rinse. The roots were split longitudinally and the apical third of the specimens were evaluated under 2500× magnification with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mean scores of the SL were calculated and analyzed using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The mean scores of the SL were 2.00±0.73, 1.94±0.68 and 1.44±0.63 µm for the ProTaper Universal, Reciproc and hand instrumentation, respectively. Mean score of SL was significantly less in the hand instrumentation group than the ProTaper (P=0.027) and Reciproc (P=0.035) groups. The difference between the two engine-driven systems, however, was not significant (P=0.803). The amount of smear layer in the apical third of curved root canals prepared with both engine-driven systems was similar and greater than the hand instrumentation technique. Complete cleanliness was not attained.

  18. The fitting of radial velocity curves using Adaptive Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Marzoa, R.; López-Morales, M.; Arévalo Morales, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    We present a new code for fitting radial velocities of stellar binaries and exoplanets using an Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA) global minimisation method. ASA belongs to the family of Monte Carlo methods and its main advantages are that it only needs evaluations of the objective function, it does not rely on derivatives, and the parameters space can be periodically redefined and rescaled for individual parameters. ASA is easily scalable since the physics is concentrated in only one function and can be modified to account for more complex models. Our ASA code minimises the χ^2 function in the multidimensional parameters space to obtain the full set of parameters (P, T_p, e, ω, γ, K_1, K_2) of the keplerian radial velocity curves which best represent the observations. As a comparison we checked our results with the published solutions for several binary stars and exoplanets with available radial velocities data. We achieve good agreement within the limits imposed by the uncertainties.

  19. [The effect of curvature of simulated root canal and location of fragment on removal of broken file from simulated root canal].

    PubMed

    Fu, Mei; Hou, Ben-Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate effect of root canal curvature and location of the fragment on the removal of broken file from root canal. Sixty extracted mandibular premolars were divided equally into six groups according to location of fragment (2 mm or 8 mm below root canal orifice) and root canal curvature (20 degrees, 30 degrees or 40 degrees). Broken files were removed using ultrasonic tips combined with dental operating microscope. Number of successfully removed case and operating time were recorded. Pre- and post-operative digital radiographs were input into image analyzing software to calculate diameter variance of root canal at the level of tip of broken file. All the 6 groups of broken files were successfully removed with out perforation. Among same fragment location groups, diameter variance was increased in greater curvature groups and the difference was significant (P < 0.05), while operation time was not significantly different (P > 0.05). Among same root canal curvature groups, the deeper the fragment, the longer operation time, difference being significant (P < 0.05), while difference of diameter variance was not significant (P > 0.05). The more curvature of root canal, the more dentine removal amount at the level of broken file tip. Location of fragment has no effect on dentine removal amount. Safe straight-line access and adequate thickness of dentine are essential to removal of broken file from root canal.

  20. [Hardness development of self-adhesive resin cement in simulated root canal].

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Lan, Weidong; Meng, Xiangfeng

    2012-06-01

    To compare the hardness development of dual-cured self-adhesive and universal resin cement in simulated root canal. The light-proof half-cylinder steel slot with one end open were syringed and filled respectively by self-adhesive A (RelyX Unicem), B (BisCem) and universal C (DUOLINK) resin cements, then the open end of slot was irradiated directly by a light unit for 20 s. Specimens were stored in a light-proof box for 0.5 h, Knoop microhardness was measured along the vertical surfaces of specimens from 1 mm to 10mm depth at 1 mm intervals. The same measurements were taken at 24 h and 120 h after irradiation. Data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA. Hardness of each group decreased with the increase of simulated canal depth (P<0.001), however hardness showed no significant change between 5 mm and more depth of group A, between 4 mm and more depth of group B and C. The increase of hardness for each group was more rapid within 0.5 h after irradiation, thereafter the hardness increased gradually to maximum at 24 h. At 120 h after irradiation, hardness of group C was greater than that of other two groups at more than 1 mm depth (P<0.001). Under dual-cured condition, hardness has significant difference between self-adhesive and universal resin cements, however their hardness development is similar.

  1. SHG simulations of plasmonic nanoparticles using curved elements.

    PubMed

    Kullock, René; Hille, Andreas; Haussmann, Alexander; Grafström, Stefan; Eng, Lukas M

    2011-07-18

    We demonstrate that simulating plasmonic nanostructures by means of curved elements (CEs) significantly increases the accuracy and computation speed not only in the linear but also in the nonlinear regime. We implemented CEs within the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method and, as an example of a nonlinear effect, investigated second-harmonic generation (SHG) at a silver nanoparticle. The second-harmonic response of the material is simulated by an extended Lorentz model (ELM). In the linear regime the CEs are ≈ 9 times faster than ordinary elements for the same accuracy, provide a much better convergence and show fewer unphysical field artifacts. For DG-SHG calculations CEs are almost indispensable to obtain physically reasonable results at all. Additionally, their boundary approximation has to be of the same order as their polynomial degree to achieve artifact-free field distributions. In return, the use of such CEs with the DG method pays off more than evidently, since the additional computation time is only 1%.

  2. Simulated Radio Images and Light Curves of Young Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, V. V.; Mioduszewski, A. J.; Ball, L.

    2002-12-01

    We present calculations of the radio emission from supernovae based on high-resolution simulations of the hydrodynamics and radiation transfer, using simple energy density relations which link the properties of the radiating electrons and the magnetic field to the hydrodynamics. As a specific example we model the emission from SN1993J, which cannot be adequately fitted with the often-used analytic mini-shell model, and present a good fit to the radio evolution at a single frequency. Both free-free absorption and synchrotron self-absorption are needed to fit the light curve at early times and a circumstellar density profile of ρ ~ r -1.7 provides the best fit to the later data. We discuss the use of high-resolution radio images of supernovae to distinguish between different absorption mechanisms and determine the origin of specific light curve features. Comparisons of VLBI images of SN1993J with synthetic model images suggest that internal free-free absorption completely obscures emission at 8.4 GHz passing through the center of the supernova for the first few tens of years after explosion. We predict that at 8.4 GHz the internal free-free absorption is currently declining, and that over the next ~ 40 years the surface brightness of the center of the source should increase relative to the bright ring of emission seen in VLBI images. Similar absorption in a nearby supernova would make the detection of a radio pulsar at 1 GHz impossible for ~ 150 years after explosion. VVD is supported by the US. Department of Energy under grant number B341495 to the ASCI Flash Center at the University of Chicago.

  3. Assessment of the Learning Curve for Microendoscopic Decompression Surgery for Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis through an Analysis of 480 Cases Involving a Single Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazunori; Yoshida, Munehito

    2017-02-01

     Retrospective study.  To assess the learning curve of microendoscopic decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS).  Four hundred eighty LSCS cases involving 753 stenotic lesions limited to the intraspinal canal were treated with microendoscopic decompression by a single surgeon at an institution between November 2006 and January 2015. They were numbered chronologically, and the operating time, intraoperative blood loss, and perioperative complications were investigated. Surgical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score for low back pain before and 1 year after the operation.  The mean operating time per level was 66.1 minutes. There was a progressive reduction in the operating time through the case series, and the approximate curve seemed to be y =  - 9.4Ln(x) + 115.0. The blood loss per level, which showed a mean value of 15.0 mL, was more than 50 mL in only 2.7% of the cases after case no. 30 and in 20% of the cases before it. There were 10 (2.1%) cases of perioperative complications, which occurred even after the surgeon had gained mastery of the procedure. The median JOA score improved significantly from 17 points preoperatively to 26 points postoperatively.  The learning curve of microendoscopic decompression surgery for LSCS has been defined with data for a single surgeon in an institution. The operating time seems to decrease along a natural logarithmic function. The intraoperative blood loss stabilizes after the first 30 cases, whereas perioperative complications can occur at any time even after mastery of the technique.

  4. The reamer/irrigator/aspirator reduces femoral canal pressure in simulated TKA.

    PubMed

    Van Gorp, Cornel C; Falk, James V; Kmiec, Stanley J; Siston, Robert A

    2009-03-01

    Inserting the femoral intramedullary alignment rod during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can generate high intramedullary pressure, which increases the risk of intraoperative complications caused by fat embolism. Despite modifications to the surgical procedure, the best method to prevent this increase in pressure remains unknown. The reamer/irrigator/aspirator is a surgical instrument designed for use during femoral canal entry to increase the canal size and remove intramedullary fat and may prevent this pressure increase. We posed two hypotheses: (1) using the reamer/irrigator/aspirator system will result in lower maximum femoral intramedullary pressure than using only conventional instrumentation during the initial steps of a TKA; and (2) using the reamer/irrigator/aspirator system in the initial steps of TKA will result in a mean maximum intramedullary pressure less than 200 mm Hg. We simulated a TKA on 14 cadaveric femurs to compare the femoral intramedullary pressure using both methods. Considerable decreases in femoral intramedullary pressure of 86% proximally and 87% distally were obtained by using the reamer/irrigator/aspirator system. The mean maximum pressure using the reamer/irrigator/aspirator system was less than 200 mm Hg. Additional clinical studies are needed to confirm any reduction in complications using the reamer/irrigator/aspirator system.

  5. The Reamer/Irrigator/Aspirator Reduces Femoral Canal Pressure in Simulated TKA

    PubMed Central

    Van Gorp, Cornel C.; Falk, James V.; Kmiec, Stanley J.

    2008-01-01

    Inserting the femoral intramedullary alignment rod during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can generate high intramedullary pressure, which increases the risk of intraoperative complications caused by fat embolism. Despite modifications to the surgical procedure, the best method to prevent this increase in pressure remains unknown. The reamer/irrigator/aspirator is a surgical instrument designed for use during femoral canal entry to increase the canal size and remove intramedullary fat and may prevent this pressure increase. We posed two hypotheses: (1) using the reamer/irrigator/aspirator system will result in lower maximum femoral intramedullary pressure than using only conventional instrumentation during the initial steps of a TKA; and (2) using the reamer/irrigator/aspirator system in the initial steps of TKA will result in a mean maximum intramedullary pressure less than 200 mm Hg. We simulated a TKA on 14 cadaveric femurs to compare the femoral intramedullary pressure using both methods. Considerable decreases in femoral intramedullary pressure of 86% proximally and 87% distally were obtained by using the reamer/irrigator/aspirator system. The mean maximum pressure using the reamer/irrigator/aspirator system was less than 200 mm Hg. Additional clinical studies are needed to confirm any reduction in complications using the reamer/irrigator/aspirator system. PMID:18425558

  6. Irrigation Management, Evolving Canal Systems and Social Simulation in Hohokam Society, Central Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertsen, Maurits; Murphy, John; Purdue, Louise

    2015-04-01

    As may societies that rely on irrigation, the Hohokam civilization in South West Arizona faced challenges arising from the variability and unpredictability of water supply and the physics underlying the flow of water through open channels. Such challenges can be overcome through cooperation and other forms of structured social interactions and institutions ranging from simple to complex. These interactions are influenced by and are influenced themselves by environmental conditions, including hydrology, soils and vegetation. At the same time, the environmental record provides clues to these interactions. To better understand these past interactions we combine geoarchaeological studies with flow simulations and Agent Based Modeling. Fieldwork conducted on Hohokam irrigation revealed new details about canal morphology, including shape, size, elevation, slope, and cleaning events. Micromorphological study of the sediments in these structures allow finer resolution in discerning the performance (velocity, discharge, etc.) of the canal channels and their evolution through time. We couple this with basic agent-based modeling to explore how these constraints might have required alternative strategies for cooperation. The combination of both approaches is key to discerning both broad differences between periods and fine variation within major chronological periods. We show that the coupling of social and physical models on very fine time scales can offer insight into the social arrangements and day-to-day life of people in the prehistoric past and inform our understanding of those societies' long-term changes.

  7. Hardness gradients of dual-polymerized flowable composite resins in simulated root canals.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Meng, Xiangfeng; Luo, Xiaoping

    2014-11-01

    Information is lacking of the polymerization depth of dual-polymerized flowable composite resin foundation materials in simulated root canals. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hardness gradients and the polymerization depth of dual-polymerized flowable composite resin foundation materials in simulated root canals. Slots in steel split cylinders with 1 open end were filled with the following 6 materials: Luxa Core, Para Core, Clearfil DC Core, Multi Core Flow, Gradia Core, and Core-Flo DC. After filling, they were subjected to a light intensity of 1250 mWcm(-2) with a light-emitting diode light through their open ends for 20 seconds. The resulting specimens were stored in a light-proof box at 37°C, and the Knoop hardness gradients of each polymerized material were measured after 0.5 hour, 24 hours, and 120 hours. The surface readings were obtained in 1-mm intervals at 1 mm to 10 mm away from the open ends. The collected data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α=.05). Before the Knoop hardness numbers of the 6 materials became stable, they decreased gradually in depth at each time point (P<.001). However, the depths at which they became stable differed. The Knoop hardness numbers of Luxa Core and Core-Flo DC reached stability at a depth of 3 mm, Para Core at 4 mm, and Clearfil DC Core, Multi Core Flow, and Gradia Core at 5 mm. Additionally, at 120 hours after exposure, the ratios of the Knoop hardness numbers at a depth of 5 mm to those at 1 mm were 63.08% for Luxa Core, 70.48% for Clearfil DC Core, 81.38% for Para Core, 80.49% for Gradia Core, 86.30% for Multi Core Flow, and 96.28% for Core-Flo DC. In simulated root canals, the flowable composite resin foundation materials tested had better polymerization under dual polymerizing than under chemical polymerizing, and their chemical-polymerized capabilities could determine the definitive polymerization depth. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of

  8. Direct numerical simulation of curved turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, R. D.; Moin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Low Reynolds number, mildly curved, turbulent channel flow has been simulated numerically without subgrid scale models. A new spectral numerical method developed for this problem was used, and the computations were performed with 2 million degrees of freedom. A variety of statistical and structural information has been extracted from the computed flow fields. These include mean velocity, turbulence stresses, velocity skewness, and flatness factors, space time correlations and spectra, all the terms in the Reynolds stress balance equations, and contour and vector plots of instantaneous velocity fields. The effects of curvature on this flow were determined by comparing the concave and convex sides of the channel. The observed effects are consistent with experimental observations for mild curvature. The most significant difference in the turbulence statistics between the concave and convex sides was in the Reynolds shear stress. This was accompanied by significant differences in the terms of the Reynolds shear stress balance equations. In addition, it was found that stationary Taylor-Gortler vortices were present and that they had a significant effect on the flow by contributing to the mean Reynolds shear stress, and by affecting the underlying turbulence.

  9. Numerical simulation of laminar flow in a curved duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes numerical simulations that were performed to study laminar flow through a square duct with a 900 bend. The purpose of this work was two fold. First, an improved understanding was desired of the flow physics involved in the generation of secondary vortical flows in three-dimensions. Second, adaptive gridding techniques for structured grids in three- dimensions were investigated for the purpose of determining their utility in low Reynolds number, incompressible flows. It was also of interest to validate the commercial computer code CFD-ACE. Velocity predictions for both non-adaptive and adaptive grids are compared with experimental data. Flow visualization was used to examine the characteristics of the flow though the curved duct in order to better understand the viscous flow physics of this problem. Generally, moderate agreement with the experimental data was found but shortcomings in the experiment were demonstrated. The adaptive grids did not produce the same level of accuracy as the non-adaptive grid with a factor of four more grid points.

  10. Alterations of the Danger Zone after Preparation of Curved Root Canals Using WaveOne with Reverse Rotation or Reciprocation Movements

    PubMed Central

    Shantiaee, Yazdan; Dianat, Omid; Paymanpour, Payam; Nahvi, Golnaz; Ketabi, Mohammad Ali; Kolahi Ahari, Golbarg

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the changes that occur in the danger zone (DZ) after preparation of curved mesiobuccal (MB) canals of mandibular first molars with WaveOne instruments in two different movements [reciprocation (RCP) and counter-clockwise rotation (CCWR)] by means of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods and Materials: MB canals of 30 mandibular molars were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=15); WaveOne/RCP and WaveOne/CCWR. Pre- and post-instrumentation CBCT images were assessed for changes in the dentin thickness in DZ (2 and 4 mm below the highest point of the root furcation) in both groups. Data was analyzed using the repeated measures ANOVA test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between two experimental groups in terms of remaining dentin thickness at 2 and 4 mm levels below the highest point of the furcation (P>0.05). Conclusion: The efficacy of WaveOne instrument on changes of the dentin thickness in the DZ was not affected by different file movements. PMID:26213536

  11. Shaping ability of Reciproc and TF Adaptive systems in severely curved canals of rapid microCT-based prototyping molar replicas

    PubMed Central

    ORDINOLA-ZAPATA, Ronald; BRAMANTE, Clovis Monteiro; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Húngaro; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; JARAMILLO, David; VERSIANI, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the shaping ability of Reciproc and Twisted-File Adaptive systems in rapid prototyping replicas. Material and Methods: Two mandibular molars showing S-shaped and 62-degree curvatures in the mesial root were scanned by using a microcomputed tomography (μCT) system. The data were exported in the stereolitograhic format and 20 samples of each molar were printed at 16 µm resolution. The mesial canals of 10 replicas of each specimen were prepared with each system. Transportation was measured by overlapping radiographs taken before and after preparation and resin thickness after instrumentation was measured by μCT. Results: Both systems maintained the original shape of the apical third in both anatomies (P>0.05). Overall, considering the resin thickness in the 62-degree replicas, no statistical difference was found between the systems (P>0.05). In the S-shaped curvature replica, Reciproc significantly decreased the thickness of the resin walls in comparison with TF Adaptive. Conclusions: The evaluated systems were able to maintain the original shape at the apical third of severely curved mesial canals of molar replicas. PMID:24918662

  12. Simulating cartilage conduction sound to estimate the sound pressure level in the external auditory canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokura, Ryota; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tadashi; Iwakura, Takashi; Yamanaka, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    When the aural cartilage is made to vibrate it generates sound directly into the external auditory canal which can be clearly heard. Although the concept of cartilage conduction can be applied to various speech communication and music industrial devices (e.g. smartphones, music players and hearing aids), the conductive performance of such devices has not yet been defined because the calibration methods are different from those currently used for air and bone conduction. Thus, the aim of this study was to simulate the cartilage conduction sound (CCS) using a head and torso simulator (HATS) and a model of aural cartilage (polyurethane resin pipe) and compare the results with experimental ones. Using the HATS, we found the simulated CCS at frequencies above 2 kHz corresponded to the average measured CCS from seven subjects. Using a model of skull bone and aural cartilage, we found that the simulated CCS at frequencies lower than 1.5 kHz agreed with the measured CCS. Therefore, a combination of these two methods can be used to estimate the CCS with high accuracy.

  13. An In vitro Comparison of Apically Extruded Debris Using Reciproc, ProTaper Universal, Neolix and Hyflex in Curved Canals.

    PubMed

    Labbaf, Hossein; Nazari Moghadam, Kiumars; Shahab, Shahriar; Mohammadi Bassir, Mahshid; Fahimi, Mohammad Amin

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of root canal preparation, dentinal chips, irrigants and pulp remnants are extruded into preradicular space. This phenomenon may lead to post endodontic flare-ups. The purpose of this study was to compare the amount of extruded debris with four endodontic NiTi engine-driven systems. Sixty mesiobuccal roots of maxillary molars with 15-30˚ curvature were divided randomly into four groups (n=15). Each group was instrumented up to apical size of 25 using Reciproc, ProTaper Universal, Neolix and Hyflex. Bidistilled water was used as irrigant and extruded debris was collected in pre-weighted Eppendorf tubes. Tubes were stored in incubator for drying the debris. Extruded debris were weighted in electronic microbalance with accuracy of 0.0001 g. The raw data was analyzed with one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD post hoc test. Level of significance was set at 0.05. The debris extrusion with Reciproc files was significantly higher than the other groups (P<0.05). Hyflex significantly extruded less debris than other files (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between ProTaper Universal and Neolix regarding the amount of extruded debris (P=0.98). All systems extruded debris during the instrumentation. Reciproc system significantly extruded more debris. Caution should be taken when interpreting the results of this study and applying it to the real clinical situation.

  14. An In vitro Comparison of Apically Extruded Debris Using Reciproc, ProTaper Universal, Neolix and Hyflex in Curved Canals

    PubMed Central

    Labbaf, Hossein; Nazari Moghadam, Kiumars; Shahab, Shahriar; Mohammadi Bassir, Mahshid; Fahimi, Mohammad Amin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: As a consequence of root canal preparation, dentinal chips, irrigants and pulp remnants are extruded into preradicular space. This phenomenon may lead to post endodontic flare-ups. The purpose of this study was to compare the amount of extruded debris with four endodontic NiTi engine-driven systems. Methods and Materials: Sixty mesiobuccal roots of maxillary molars with 15-30˚ curvature were divided randomly into four groups (n=15). Each group was instrumented up to apical size of 25 using Reciproc, ProTaper Universal, Neolix and Hyflex. Bidistilled water was used as irrigant and extruded debris was collected in pre-weighted Eppendorf tubes. Tubes were stored in incubator for drying the debris. Extruded debris were weighted in electronic microbalance with accuracy of 0.0001 g. The raw data was analyzed with one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s HSD post hoc test. Level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The debris extrusion with Reciproc files was significantly higher than the other groups (P<0.05). Hyflex significantly extruded less debris than other files (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between ProTaper Universal and Neolix regarding the amount of extruded debris (P=0.98). Conclusion: All systems extruded debris during the instrumentation. Reciproc system significantly extruded more debris. Caution should be taken when interpreting the results of this study and applying it to the real clinical situation. PMID:28808456

  15. Mechanical Behavior of a NiTi Endodontic File During Insertion in an Anatomic Root Canal Using Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, V.; Moyne, S.; Pino, L.; Arbab Chirani, S.; Calloch, S.; Chevalier, V.; Arbab Chirani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Superelastic NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) have biomedical applications including rotary endodontic files. These alloys are used thanks to their flexibility, which is due to solid-solid martensitic transformation. Unfortunately, the intracanal file separation can occur during canal preparation. To avoid this problem and to have a good idea of the mechanical behavior of these instruments, finite elements simulations taking into account the real shape of root canals are proposed in this study. This is possible by using a well-adapted model describing all the particularities of SMA and representative limit conditions. The behavior model has been validated in previous studies under complex loadings. It is implemented in ABAQUS® finite elements software. The anatomic shapes of root canals are extracted by microtomography using a real tooth. They are applied as limit conditions in realized simulations to be as near as possible to clinical conditions. The mechanical behavior of an endodontic file is then simulated during insertion in a root canal without and with rotation. This permits to obtain different information like the loading applied to the instrument during its use, the stress, and the phase transformation fields through the file. This is useful not only for clinical use but also for new NiTi endodontic instruments design.

  16. Simulations of curved assemblies in soft matter and biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Cong

    Viruses are small infectious agents that replicate only inside living cells of other organisms. In the viral life cycle, the self-assembly of the outer protein shell (capsid) is an essential step. We study this process in the hope of shedding light on development of antiviral drugs, gene therapy and other virus-related technologies that can benefit the humankind. More fundamentally, learning about the process of viral capsid assembly can elucidate the assembly mechanisms of a wide range of complex structures. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations and coarse-grained computational models to study viral capsid assembly in several situations where geometric constraints play a role in dictating assembly outcomes. We first focus on icosahedral viruses with single-stranded RNA genomes, in which case the capsid usually assembles around the genomic RNA. It is consistently observed in experiments that such viral particles are ''overcharged'', meaning the net negative charge on the viral genome is greater than the net positive charge on the viral capsid. We computationally investigate the mechanisms that lead to ``overcharging'', and more broadly, how the encapsidated genome length is influenced by the capsid. We perform both dynamical simulations of the assembly process and equilibrium calculations to determine the optimal genome length (meaning that which maximizes the assembly yield and/or minimizes the free energy of the assembled virus). We find that the optimal genome length is determined by the interplay between capsid size, net capsid charge, distribution of capsid charge and nucleic acid structures. Our simulations demonstrate that overcharging results from a combination of electrostatic screening and the geometric constraints associated with encapsulating a nucleic acid inside of a spherical virus. We then study the assembly of the immature HIV. In contrast to icosahedral viruses, the immature HIV forms an asymmetric particle, consisting of continuous

  17. Simulator evaluation of manually flown curved instrument approaches. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, D.

    1973-01-01

    Pilot performance in flying horizontally curved instrument approaches was analyzed by having nine test subjects fly curved approaches in a fixed-base simulator. Approaches were flown without an autopilot and without a flight director. Evaluations were based on deviation measurements made at a number of points along the curved approach path and on subject questionnaires. Results indicate that pilots can fly curved approaches, though less accurately than straight-in approaches; that a moderate wind does not effect curve flying performance; and that there is no performance difference between 60 deg. and 90 deg. turns. A tradeoff of curve path parameters and a paper analysis of wind compensation were also made.

  18. The role of stenosis ratio as a predictor of surgical satisfaction in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis: a receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hassanreza R; Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate independent factors that predict surgical satisfaction in lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) patients. Patients who underwent surgery were grouped based on the age, gender, duration of symptoms, walking distance, Neurogenic Claudication Outcome Score (NCOS) and the stenosis ratio (SR) described by Lurencin. We recorded on 2-year patient satisfaction using standardized measure. The optimal cut-off points in SR, NCOS and walking distance for predicting surgical satisfaction were estimated from sensitivity and specificity calculations and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. One hundred fifty consecutive patients (51 male, 99 female, mean age 62.4±10.9 years) were followed up for 34±13 months (range 24-49). One, two, three and four level stenosis was observed in 10.7%, 39.3%, 36.0 % and 14.0% of patients, respectively. Post-surgical satisfaction was 78.5% at the 2 years follow up. In ROC curve analysis, the asymptotic significance is less than 0.05 in SR and the optimal cut-off value of SR to predict worsening surgical satisfaction was measured as more than 0.52, with 85.4% sensitivity and 77.4% specificity (AUC 0.798, 95% CI 0.73-0.90; P<0.01). The present study suggests that the SR, with a cut-off set a 0.52 cross-sectional area, may be superior to walking distance and NCOS in patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis considered for surgical treatment. Using a ROC curve analysis, a radiological feature, the SR, demonstrated superiority in predicting patient satisfaction, compared to functional and clinical characteristics such as walking distance and NCOS.

  19. Sound propagation in the ear canal and coupling to the eardrum, with measurements on model systems.

    PubMed

    Stinson, M R; Khanna, S M

    1989-06-01

    A theoretical model of sound propagation in the ear canal is described, which takes into account both the complicated geometry of real ear canals and the distributed acoustical load presented by the eardrum. The geometry of the ear canal enters the theory in the form of a cross-sectional area function relative to a curved axis that follows the center of the ear canal. The tympanic membrane forms part of the ear canal wall and absorbs acoustical energy over its surface. Its motion leads to a driving term that must be added to the horn equation describing the pressure distribution in the ear canal. The sound field within the canal is assumed to be effectively one dimensional, depending only on longitudinal position along the canal. Experiments using model ear canals of uniform cross section were performed to test the ability of the theory to handle distributed loads. Sound-pressure distributions within each model canal were measured using a probe microphone. The behavior of the eardrum was simulated using either a distributed, locally reacting impedance or a mechanically driven piston. The agreement between theory and experiment is good up to a nominal upper frequency limit at which the ratio of canal width to wavelength is 0.25. It is estimated that the theory is applicable in ear canals of cats for frequencies at least as high as 25 kHz and in human ear canals to at least 15 kHz.

  20. Study on the algorithm for Newton-Rapson iteration interpolation of NURBS curve and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wanjun; Gao, Shanping; Cheng, Xiyan; Zhang, Feng

    2017-04-01

    In order to solve the problems of Newton-Rapson iteration interpolation method of NURBS Curve, Such as interpolation time bigger, calculation more complicated, and NURBS curve step error are not easy changed and so on. This paper proposed a study on the algorithm for Newton-Rapson iteration interpolation method of NURBS curve and simulation. We can use Newton-Rapson iterative that calculate (xi, yi, zi). Simulation results show that the proposed NURBS curve interpolator meet the high-speed and high-accuracy interpolation requirements of CNC systems. The interpolation of NURBS curve should be finished. The simulation results show that the algorithm is correct; it is consistent with a NURBS curve interpolation requirements.

  1. Reconstruction of quadratic curves in 3D using two or more perspective views: simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Sukavanam, N.; Balasubramanian, R.

    2006-01-01

    The shapes of many natural and man-made objects have planar and curvilinear surfaces. The images of such curves usually do not have sufficient distinctive features to apply conventional feature-based reconstruction algorithms. In this paper, we describe a method of reconstruction of a quadratic curve in 3-D space as an intersection of two cones containing the respective projected curve images. The correspondence between this pair of projections of the curve is assumed to be established in this work. Using least-square curve fitting, the parameters of a curve in 2-D space are found. From this we are reconstructing the 3-D quadratic curve. Relevant mathematical formulations and analytical solutions for obtaining the equation of reconstructed curve are given. The result of the described reconstruction methodology are studied by simulation studies. This reconstruction methodology is applicable to LBW decision in cricket, path of the missile, Robotic Vision, path lanning etc.

  2. Simulator evaluation of manually flown curved MLS approaches. [Microwave Landing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, D.

    1974-01-01

    Pilot performance in flying horizontally curved instrument approaches was analyzed by having nine test subjects fly curved approaches in a fixed-base simulator. Approaches were flown without an autopilot and without a flight director. Evaluations were based on deviation measurements made at a number of points along the curved approach path and on subject questionnaires. Results indicate that pilots can fly curved approaches, though less accurately than streight-in approaches; that a moderate wind does not seriously affect curve flying performance; and that there is no major performance difference between 60 and 90 deg turns.

  3. Shaping ability and cleaning effectiveness of two single-file systems in severely curved root canals of extracted teeth: Reciproc and WaveOne versus Mtwo and ProTaper.

    PubMed

    Bürklein, S; Hinschitza, K; Dammaschke, T; Schäfer, E

    2012-05-01

    To compare shaping ability and cleaning effectiveness of two reciprocating single-file systems with Mtwo and ProTaper rotary instruments during the preparation of curved root canals in extracted teeth. A total of 80 root canals with curvatures ranging between 25° and 39° were divided into four groups of 20 canals. Based on radiographs taken prior to instrumentation, the groups were balanced with respect to the angle and the radius of canal curvature. Canals were prepared to the following apical sizes: Mtwo: size 35 using the single-length technique; ProTaper: F3, instruments were used in a modified crown-down manner; Reciproc and WaveOne: size 25. Using pre- and post-instrumentation radiographs, straightening of the canal curvatures was determined with a computer image analysis program. Preparation time and instrument failures were also recorded. These data were analysed statistically using anova and Student-Newman-Keuls test. The amounts of debris and smear layer were quantified on the basis of a numerical evaluation scale and were analysed statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis test. During preparation no file fractured. All instruments maintained the original canal curvature well with no significant differences between the different files (P = 0.382). Instrumentation with Reciproc was significantly faster than with all other instruments (P < 0.05), while WaveOne was significantly faster than Mtwo and ProTaper (P < 0.05). For debris removal, Mtwo and Reciproc instruments achieved significantly better results (P < 0.05) than the other instruments in the apical third of the canals. In the middle and coronal parts, no significant differences were obtained between Mtwo, Reciproc and WaveOne (P > 0.05), while ProTaper showed significantly more residual debris (P < 0.05). The results for remaining smear layer were similar and not significantly different for the different parts of the canals (P > 0.05). Under the conditions of this study, all instruments maintained

  4. Numerical Simulation of Ballistic Limit Curves for Orbital Debris Shielding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-01

    conducted to evaluate the use of this new code for orbital debris shielding design. Two sets of simulations, one for a single bumper Whipple shield and...experiment. The results show that EXOS provides an accurate and computationally tractable approach to simulate orbital debris shield performance.

  5. The effect of pavement markings on driving behaviour in curves: a simulator study.

    PubMed

    Ariën, Caroline; Brijs, Kris; Vanroelen, Giovanni; Ceulemans, Wesley; Jongen, Ellen M M; Daniels, Stijn; Brijs, Tom; Wets, Geert

    2017-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of two pavement markings (transverse rumble strips (TRS) and a backward pointing herringbone pattern (HP)) on speed and lateral control in and nearby curves. Two real-world curves with strong indications of a safety problem were replicated as realistic as possible in the simulator. Results show that both speed and lateral control differ between the curves. These behavioural differences are probably due to curve-related dissimilarities with respect to geometric alignment, cross-sectional design and speed limit. TRS and HP both influenced mean speed and mean acceleration/deceleration but not lateral control. TRS generated an earlier and more stable speed reduction than HP which induced significant speed reductions along the curve. The TRS gives drivers more time to generate the right expectations about the upcoming curve. When accidents occur primarily near the curve entry, TRS is recommended. The HP has the potential to reduce accidents at the curve end. Practitioner Summary: Two pavement markings (transversal rumble strips and HP) nearby dangerous curves were investigated in the driving simulator. TRS generated an earlier and more stable speed reduction than HP which induced speed reductions along the curve. The TRS gives drivers more time to generate right expectations about the upcoming curve.

  6. Shaping ability of reciprocating motion of WaveOne and HyFlex in moderate to severe curved canals: A comparative study with cone beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Simpsy, Gurram Samuel; Sajjan, Girija S.; Mudunuri, Padmaja; Chittem, Jyothi; Prasanthi, Nalam N. V. D.; Balaga, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: M-Wire and reciprocating motion of WaveOne and controlled memory (CM) wire) of HyFlex were the recent innovations using thermal treatment. Therefore, a study was planned to evaluate the shaping ability of reciprocating motion of WaveOne and HyFlex using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methodology: Forty-five freshly extracted mandibular teeth were selected and stored in saline until use. All teeth were scanned pre- and post-operatively using CBCT (Kodak 9000). All teeth were accessed and divided into three groups. (1) Group 1 (control n = 15): Instrumented with ProTaper. (2) Group 2 (n = 15): Instrumented with primary file (8%/25) WaveOne. (3) Group 3 (n = 15): Instrumented with (4%/25) HyFlex CM. Sections at 1, 3, and 5 mm were obtained from the pre- and post-operative scans. Measurement was done using CS3D software and Adobe Photoshop software. Apical transportation and degree of straightening were measured and statistically analyzed. Results: HyFlex showed lesser apical transportation when compared to other groups at 1 and 3 mm. WaveOne showed lesser degree of straightening when compared to other groups. Conclusion: This present study concluded that all systems could be employed in routine endodontics whereas HyFlex and WaveOne could be employed in severely curved canals. PMID:27994323

  7. Microhardness of composites in simulated root canals cured with light transmitting posts and glass-fiber reinforced composite posts.

    PubMed

    Yoldas, Oguz; Alaçam, Tayfun

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the depth of cure of composite resin cured within simulated root canals by means of light-transmitting plastic posts, glass-fiber-reinforced composite posts, and conventional light curing method. Thirty black plastic cylinders measuring 15 mm in length and 4 mm in internal diameter were divided into three groups. The composite resin was packed into simulated canals. The light-transmitting plastic posts and glass-fiber-reinforced composite posts were inserted into simulated canals and light cured for 90 seconds. The control group was light cured directly. To ensure continual change of material properties by increasing the length of material, a surface microhardness test was done 2 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm, 8 mm, 10 mm, 12 mm, and 14 mm from the light exposure surface. The results showed a significant increase in microhardness of composite resin (depth of cure) for both light-transmitting plastic posts and glass-fiber-reinforced composite posts compared with the control group. The microhardness of composite resin was also significantly higher with light-transmitting plastic posts than glass-fiber-reinforced composite posts after 8 mm.

  8. An improved algorithm of three B-spline curve interpolation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wanjun; Xu, Dongmei; Meng, Xinhong; Zhang, Feng

    2017-03-01

    As a key interpolation technique in CNC system machine tool, three B-spline curve interpolator has been proposed to change the drawbacks caused by linear and circular interpolator, Such as interpolation time bigger, three B-spline curves step error are not easy changed,and so on. This paper an improved algorithm of three B-spline curve interpolation and simulation is proposed. By Using MATALAB 7.0 computer soft in three B-spline curve interpolation is developed for verifying the proposed modification algorithm of three B-spline curve interpolation experimentally. The simulation results show that the algorithm is correct; it is consistent with a three B-spline curve interpolation requirements.

  9. Thermoluminescence curves simulation using genetic algorithm with factorial design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popko, E. A.; Weinstein, I. A.

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary approach is an effective optimization tool for numeric analysis of thermoluminescence (TL) processes to assess the microparameters of kinetic models and to determine its effects on the shape of TL peaks. In this paper, the procedure for tuning of genetic algorithm (GA) is presented. This approach is based on multifactorial experiment and allows choosing intrinsic mechanisms of evolutionary operators which provide the most efficient algorithm performance. The proposed method is tested by considering the “one trap-one recombination center” (OTOR) model as an example and advantages for approximation of experimental TL curves are shown.

  10. Particle sedimentation in curved tubes: A 3D simulation and optimization for treatment of vestibular vertigo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Brian; Squires, Todd M.; Hain, Timothy C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2003-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a mechanical disorder of the vestibular system where micron-size crystals abnormally drift into the semicircular canals of the inner ear that sense angular motion of the head. Sedimentation of these crystals causes sensation of motion after true head motion has stopped: vertigo results. The usual clinical treatment is through a series of head maneuvers designed to move the particles into a less sensitive region of the canal system. We present a three-dimensional model to simulate treatment of BPPV by determining the complete hydrodynamic motion of the particles through the course of a therapeutic maneuver while using a realistic representation of the actual geometry. Analyses of clinical maneuvers show the parameter range for which they are effective, and indicate inefficiencies in current practice. In addition, an optimization process determines the most effective head maneuver, which significantly differs from those currently in practice.

  11. Photodynamic Inactivation of Root Canal Bacteria by Light Activation through Human Dental Hard and Simulated Surrounding Tissue.

    PubMed

    Cieplik, Fabian; Pummer, Andreas; Leibl, Christoph; Regensburger, Johannes; Schmalz, Gottfried; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Maisch, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation of bacteria (PIB) may be a supportive antimicrobial approach for use in endodontics, but sufficient activation of photosensitizers (PS) in root canals is a critical point. Therefore, aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of PS absorbing blue (TMPyP) or red light (Methylene Blue; MB) for light activation through human dental hard and simulated surrounding tissue to inactivate root canal bacteria. A tooth model was fabricated with a human premolar and two molars in an acrylic resin bloc simulating the optical properties of a porcine jaw. The distal root canal of the first molar was enlarged to insert a glass tube (external diameter 2 mm) containing PS and stationary-phase Enterococcus faecalis. Both PS (10 μM) were irradiated for 120 s with BlueV (20 mW/cm(2); λem = 400-460 nm) or PDT 1200L (37.8 mW/cm(2); λem = 570-680 nm; both: Waldmann Medizintechnik), respectively. Irradiation parameters ensured identical numbers of photons absorbed by each PS. Three setups were chosen: irradiating the glass pipette only (G), the glass pipette inside the single tooth without (GT) and with (GTM) simulated surrounding tissues. Colony forming units (CFU) were evaluated. Transmission measurements of the buccal halves of hemisected mandibular first molars were performed by means of a photospectrometer. PIB with both PS led to reduction by ≥ 5 log10 of E. faecalis CFU for each setup. From transmission measurements, a threshold wavelength λth for allowing an amount of light transmission for sufficient activation of PS was determined to be 430 nm. This study can be seen as proof of principle that light activation of given intra-canal PS from outside a tooth may be possible at wavelengths ≥ 430 nm, facilitating clinical application of PIB in endodontics.

  12. Photodynamic Inactivation of Root Canal Bacteria by Light Activation through Human Dental Hard and Simulated Surrounding Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cieplik, Fabian; Pummer, Andreas; Leibl, Christoph; Regensburger, Johannes; Schmalz, Gottfried; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Maisch, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Photodynamic inactivation of bacteria (PIB) may be a supportive antimicrobial approach for use in endodontics, but sufficient activation of photosensitizers (PS) in root canals is a critical point. Therefore, aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of PS absorbing blue (TMPyP) or red light (Methylene Blue; MB) for light activation through human dental hard and simulated surrounding tissue to inactivate root canal bacteria. Methods: A tooth model was fabricated with a human premolar and two molars in an acrylic resin bloc simulating the optical properties of a porcine jaw. The distal root canal of the first molar was enlarged to insert a glass tube (external diameter 2 mm) containing PS and stationary-phase Enterococcus faecalis. Both PS (10 μM) were irradiated for 120 s with BlueV (20 mW/cm2; λem = 400–460 nm) or PDT 1200L (37.8 mW/cm2; λem = 570–680 nm; both: Waldmann Medizintechnik), respectively. Irradiation parameters ensured identical numbers of photons absorbed by each PS. Three setups were chosen: irradiating the glass pipette only (G), the glass pipette inside the single tooth without (GT) and with (GTM) simulated surrounding tissues. Colony forming units (CFU) were evaluated. Transmission measurements of the buccal halves of hemisected mandibular first molars were performed by means of a photospectrometer. Results: PIB with both PS led to reduction by ≥ 5 log10 of E. faecalis CFU for each setup. From transmission measurements, a threshold wavelength λth for allowing an amount of light transmission for sufficient activation of PS was determined to be 430 nm. Conclusion: This study can be seen as proof of principle that light activation of given intra-canal PS from outside a tooth may be possible at wavelengths ≥ 430 nm, facilitating clinical application of PIB in endodontics. PMID:27379059

  13. The Simulation of an Oxidation-Reduction Titration Curve with Computer Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteley, Richard V., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Although the simulation of an oxidation/reduction titration curve is an important exercise in an undergraduate course in quantitative analysis, that exercise is frequently simplified to accommodate computational limitations. With the use of readily available computer algebra systems, however, such curves for complicated systems can be generated…

  14. The Simulation of an Oxidation-Reduction Titration Curve with Computer Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteley, Richard V., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Although the simulation of an oxidation/reduction titration curve is an important exercise in an undergraduate course in quantitative analysis, that exercise is frequently simplified to accommodate computational limitations. With the use of readily available computer algebra systems, however, such curves for complicated systems can be generated…

  15. A Comparative SEM Investigation of Smear Layer Remaining on Dentinal Walls by Three Rotary NiTi Files with Different Cross Sectional Designs in Moderately Curved Canals

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Pooja; Vats, Asit

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the smear layer formed on root canal walls during canal preparation of extracted human teeth by Twisted, Mtwo, and ProTaper rotary nickel titanium instruments. Materials and Methods: Sixty single rooted human premolar teeth with root curvature <250 were selected and randomly divided into three Groups (n= 20 teeth per Group). Three types of rotary nickel titanium instruments were used, Twisted (SybronEndo, Orange, CA, USA), Mtwo (VDW, Munich, Germany) and ProTaper (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) according to manufacturer’s instructions to instrument the root canals. Irrigation for all groups was performed after each instrument change with 3ml of 3% sodium hypochlorite followed by Glyde (File Prep, Dentsply, Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) as chelator paste and lubricant. Three different areas (coronal, middle and apical thirds) of the root canal were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The canal wall of each sample was assessed and compared using a predefined scale for the presence or absence of smear layer. Data were analysed statistically using ANOVA and Tukey HSD test Results: All three groups showed statistically significant more smear layer in the apical thirds of the canal as compared to the coronal and middle thirds (p<0.001). Mtwo rotary file system produced significantly less smear layer (p<0.001) compared to Twisted and ProTaper rotary instruments in the apical portion. Twisted Files resulted in less smear layer formation in the apical thirds of the canal compared to ProTaper rotary instruments but were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Completely clean root canals were not found after instrumentation with any of the three instruments. Under the confines of this study Mtwo instruments produced significantly cleaner dentin wall surfaces throughout the canal length in comparison to Twisted and ProTaper rotary files. Twisted Files proved to be comparable to Pro

  16. Modeling and eddy simulation of rotating and curved turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arolla, Sunil Kumar

    In the first part of this work, two different approaches to incorporate the effects of rotation and curvature in scalar eddy viscosity models have been explored. One is the "Modified coefficients approach"---to parameterize the model coefficients such that the growth rate of turbulent kinetic energy is suppressed or enhanced. The other is the "Bifurcation approach"---to parameterize eddy-viscosity coefficient such that the equilibrium solution bifurcates from healthy to decaying solution branches. Simple, yet, predictive models in each of these two approaches are proposed and validated on some benchmark test cases characterized by profound effects of system rotation and/or streamline curvature. The results obtained with both the models are encouraging. Application of the models to some practically relevant flow configurations is also discussed. In the second part, a computational framework is developed with recycling and rescaling method of inflow generation to perform eddy simulation of turbomachinery flows. A systematic validation is carried out on a spatially developing boundary layer on flat plate, flow through a channel and an annulus. Then, large eddy simulation of turbine transition duct is performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this methodology.

  17. Methods for simulating solute breakthrough curves in pumping groundwater wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starn, J. Jeffrey; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C.; Robbins, Gary A.

    2012-01-01

    In modeling there is always a trade-off between execution time and accuracy. For gradient-based parameter estimation methods, where a simulation model is run repeatedly to populate a Jacobian (sensitivity) matrix, there exists a need for rapid simulation methods of known accuracy that can decrease execution time, and thus make the model more useful without sacrificing accuracy. Convolution-based methods can be executed rapidly for any desired input function once the residence-time distribution is known. The residence-time distribution can be calculated efficiently using particle tracking, but particle tracking can be ambiguous near a pumping well if the grid is too coarse. We present several embedded analytical expressions for improving particle tracking near a pumping well and compare them with a finely gridded finite-difference solution in terms of accuracy and CPU usage. Even though the embedded analytical approach can improve particle tracking near a well, particle methods reduce, but do not eliminate, reliance on a grid because velocity fields typically are calculated on a grid, and additional error is incurred using linear interpolation of velocity. A dilution rate can be calculated for a given grid and pumping well to determine if the grid is sufficiently refined. Embedded analytical expressions increase accuracy but add significantly to CPU usage. Structural error introduced by the numerical solution method may affect parameter estimates.

  18. Preparation time and perceptions of Brazilian specialists and dental students regarding simulated root canals for endodontic teaching: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    dos S Luz, Diandra; de S Ourique, Fernanda; Scarparo, Roberta K; Vier-Pelisser, Fabiana V; Morgental, Renata D; Waltrick, Silvana B G; de Figueiredo, José A P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the desirability of alternative models of artificial teeth versus extracted natural teeth for use in preclinical dental education. Specifically, the study was designed to compare the preparation time and perceptions of difficulty of undergraduate dental students and endodontists in carrying out root canal preparations on resin models (both clear and opaque) and extracted natural teeth. Twenty participants-ten fifth-year students at a Brazilian dental school and ten endodontists with at least five years' experience in the specialty-performed root canal instrumentation on two samples of each model. Preparation times were recorded, and the participants completed a questionnaire about the anatomical and physical characteristics of these models. The results showed that the time required for performing endodontic procedures in the natural teeth was higher than in the alternative models. The perceptions of the students and specialists regarding some topics on the questionnaire were significantly different. The students had more positive opinions about artificial teeth made of opaque resin, while the specialists had more positive opinions about simulated root canals in clear resin blocks. This study suggests that neither of the alternative models fulfilled requirements to replace natural teeth in endodontic teaching; improvements are still necessary to accomplish this goal.

  19. Panama Canal capacity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bronzini, M.S.

    1995-04-27

    Predicting the transit capacities of the various Panama Canal alternatives required analyzing data on present Canal operations, adapting and extending an existing computer simulation model, performing simulation runs for each of the alternatives, and using the simulation model outputs to develop capacity estimates. These activities are summarized in this paper. A more complete account may be found in the project final report (TAMS 1993). Some of the material in this paper also appeared in a previously published paper (Rosselli, Bronzini, and Weekly 1994).

  20. Simulation of a G-tolerance curve using the pulsatile cardiovascular model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, M.; Srinivasan, R.

    1985-01-01

    A computer simulation study, performed to assess the ability of the cardiovascular model to reproduce the G tolerance curve (G level versus tolerance time) is reported. A composite strength duration curve derived from experimental data obtained in human centrifugation studies was used for comparison. The effects of abolishing automomic control and of blood volume loss on G tolerance were also simulated. The results provide additional validation of the model. The need for the presence of autonomic reflexes even at low levels of G is pointed out. The low margin of safety with a loss of blood volume indicated by the simulation results underscores the necessity for protective measures during Shuttle reentry.

  1. On a framework for generating PoD curves assisted by numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subair, S. Mohamed; Agrawal, Shweta; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Kumar, Anish; Rao, Purnachandra B.; Tamanna, Jayakumar

    2015-03-01

    The Probability of Detection (PoD) curve method has emerged as an important tool for the assessment of the performance of NDE techniques, a topic of particular interest to the nuclear industry where inspection qualification is very important. The conventional experimental means of generating PoD curves though, can be expensive, requiring large data sets (covering defects and test conditions), and equipment and operator time. Several methods of achieving faster estimates for PoD curves using physics-based modelling have been developed to address this problem. Numerical modelling techniques are also attractive, especially given the ever-increasing computational power available to scientists today. Here we develop procedures for obtaining PoD curves, assisted by numerical simulation and based on Bayesian statistics. Numerical simulations are performed using Finite Element analysis for factors that are assumed to be independent, random and normally distributed. PoD curves so generated are compared with experiments on austenitic stainless steel (SS) plates with artificially created notches. We examine issues affecting the PoD curve generation process including codes, standards, distribution of defect parameters and the choice of the noise threshold. We also study the assumption of normal distribution for signal response parameters and consider strategies for dealing with data that may be more complex or sparse to justify this. These topics are addressed and illustrated through the example case of generation of PoD curves for pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection of vertical surface-breaking cracks in SS plates.

  2. On a framework for generating PoD curves assisted by numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Subair, S. Mohamed Agrawal, Shweta Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Kumar, Anish; Rao, Purnachandra B.; Tamanna, Jayakumar

    2015-03-31

    The Probability of Detection (PoD) curve method has emerged as an important tool for the assessment of the performance of NDE techniques, a topic of particular interest to the nuclear industry where inspection qualification is very important. The conventional experimental means of generating PoD curves though, can be expensive, requiring large data sets (covering defects and test conditions), and equipment and operator time. Several methods of achieving faster estimates for PoD curves using physics-based modelling have been developed to address this problem. Numerical modelling techniques are also attractive, especially given the ever-increasing computational power available to scientists today. Here we develop procedures for obtaining PoD curves, assisted by numerical simulation and based on Bayesian statistics. Numerical simulations are performed using Finite Element analysis for factors that are assumed to be independent, random and normally distributed. PoD curves so generated are compared with experiments on austenitic stainless steel (SS) plates with artificially created notches. We examine issues affecting the PoD curve generation process including codes, standards, distribution of defect parameters and the choice of the noise threshold. We also study the assumption of normal distribution for signal response parameters and consider strategies for dealing with data that may be more complex or sparse to justify this. These topics are addressed and illustrated through the example case of generation of PoD curves for pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection of vertical surface-breaking cracks in SS plates.

  3. Water pollution risk simulation and prediction in the main canal of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Caihong; Yi, Yujun; Yang, Zhifeng; Cheng, Xi

    2014-11-01

    The middle route of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project (MRP) will divert water to Beijing Tuancheng Lake from Taocha in the Danjiangkou reservoir located in the Hubei province of China. The MRP is composed of a long canal and complex hydraulic structures and will transfer water in open channel areas to provide drinking water for Beijing, Shijiazhuang and other cities under extremely strict water quality requirements. A large number of vehicular accidents, occurred on the many highway bridges across the main canal would cause significant water pollution in the main canal. To ensure that water quality is maintained during the diversion process, the effects of pollutants on water quality due to sudden pollution accidents were simulated and analyzed in this paper. The MIKE11 HD module was used to calculate the hydraulic characteristics of the 42-km Xishi-to-Beijuma River channel of the MRP. Six types of hydraulic structures, including inverted siphons, gates, highway bridges, culverts and tunnels, were included in this model. Based on the hydrodynamic model, the MIKE11 AD module, which is one-dimensional advection dispersion model, was built for TP, NH3-N, CODMn and F. The validated results showed that the computed values agreed well with the measured values. In accordance with transportation data across the Dianbei Highway Bridge, the effects of traffic accidents on the bridge on water quality were analyzed. Based on simulated scenarios with three discharge rates (ranged from 12 m3/s to 17 m3/s, 40 m3/s, and 60 m3/s) and three pollution loading concentration levels (5 t, 10 t and 20 t) when trucks spill their contents (i.e., phosphate fertilizer, cyanide, oil and chromium solution) into the channel, emergency measures were proposed. Reasonable solutions to ensure the water quality with regard to the various types of pollutants were proposed, including treating polluted water, maintaining materials, and personnel reserves.

  4. Development of theoretical oxygen saturation calibration curve based on optical density ratio and optical simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumadi, Nur Anida; Beng, Gan Kok; Ali, Mohd Alauddin Mohd; Zahedi, Edmond; Morsin, Marlia

    2017-09-01

    The implementation of surface-based Monte Carlo simulation technique for oxygen saturation (SaO2) calibration curve estimation is demonstrated in this paper. Generally, the calibration curve is estimated either from the empirical study using animals as the subject of experiment or is derived from mathematical equations. However, the determination of calibration curve using animal is time consuming and requires expertise to conduct the experiment. Alternatively, an optical simulation technique has been used widely in the biomedical optics field due to its capability to exhibit the real tissue behavior. The mathematical relationship between optical density (OD) and optical density ratios (ODR) associated with SaO2 during systole and diastole is used as the basis of obtaining the theoretical calibration curve. The optical properties correspond to systolic and diastolic behaviors were applied to the tissue model to mimic the optical properties of the tissues. Based on the absorbed ray flux at detectors, the OD and ODR were successfully calculated. The simulation results of optical density ratio occurred at every 20 % interval of SaO2 is presented with maximum error of 2.17 % when comparing it with previous numerical simulation technique (MC model). The findings reveal the potential of the proposed method to be used for extended calibration curve study using other wavelength pair.

  5. Comparison of the shaping ability of GT® Series X, Twisted Files and AlphaKite rotary nickel-titanium systems in simulated canals.

    PubMed

    Ba-Hattab, Raidan; Pröhl, Anne-Kathrin; Lang, Hermann; Pahncke, Dieter

    2013-12-17

    Efforts to improve the performance of rotary NiTi instruments by enhancing the properties of NiTi alloy, or their manufacturing processes rather than changes in instrument geometries have been reported. The aim of this study was to compare in-vitro the shaping ability of three different rotary nickel-titanium instruments produced by different manufacturing methods. Thirty simulated root canals with a curvature of 35˚ in resin blocks were prepared with three different rotary NiTi systems: AK- AlphaKite (Gebr. Brasseler, Germany), GTX- GT® Series X (Dentsply, Germany) and TF- Twisted Files (SybronEndo, USA).The canals were prepared according to the manufacturers' instructions. Pre- and post-instrumentation images were recorded and assessment of canal curvature modifications was carried out with an image analysis program (GSA, Germany).The preparation time and incidence of procedural errors were recorded. Instruments were evaluated under a microscope with 15 × magnifications (Carl Zeiss OPMI Pro Ergo, Germany) for signs of deformation. The Data were statistically analyzed using SPSS (Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney U-tests, at a confidence interval of 95%). Less canal transportation was produced by TF apically, although the difference among the groups was not statistically significant. GTX removed the greatest amount of resin from the middle and coronal parts of the canal and the difference among the groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The shortest preparation time was registered with TF (444 s) and the longest with GTX (714 s), the difference among the groups was statistically significant (p < 0.05). During the preparation of the canals no instrument fractured. Eleven instruments of TF and one of AK were deformed. Under the conditions of this study, all rotary NiTi instruments maintained the working length and prepared a well-shaped root canal. The least canal transportation was produced by AK. GTX displayed the greatest cutting efficiency. TF prepared the

  6. Shaping ability of ProTaper NEXT, ProTaper Universal and iRace files in simulated S-shaped canals.

    PubMed

    Hiran-us, Sirawut; Pimkhaokham, Somsinee; Sawasdichai, Jirapat; Ebihara, Arata; Suda, Hideaki

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the shaping ability of three nickel-titanium endodontic file systems by comparing three parameters: canal deviation, apical foramen position and instrumentation time. A glide path was established in 30 simulated S-shaped canal blocks that were randomly assigned into three groups (n = 10): ProTaper Universal, ProTaper NEXT and iRace. Each group was instrumented per its manufacturer's directions. Pre- and postoperative images were superimposed to determine any canal deviation or change in apical foramen position. The instrumentation times were recorded. The iRace system resulted in the least mean canal deviation. The apical foramen position was least shifted by the iRace system. The iRace system also required the least instrumentation time. The iRace system demonstrated the most favourable shaping ability in all three parameters.

  7. New software: comparison between three software programs for root canal length measurement.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi Pour, D; Razmi, H; Jabedar Maralani, S; Zeighami, S

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a software program to estimate the curved root canal working length by using curved line software and comparing its accuracy with Trophy and Cygnus software programs. 120 simulated curved canals were divided into 12 groups based on the radius and the angle of the curvature. The true canal length was measured from the orifice to the terminus. Canals were filled with urographin and were imaged by a digital radiographic system. Canal length was measured with newly developed software that uses a curved line, as well as with Cygnus and Trophy software, both of which use a sequence of straight lines, and their accuracies were compared. The proposed software was significantly more accurate than other software with respect to the gold standard (P < 0.001). However, the error was less than 0.5 mm in over 99% of the cases with all software with three clicks, and over 96% of the cases with six clicks in Trophy, which was not statistically significant (P = 0.99). The studied software programs were not significantly different and their statistically significant difference compared with the gold standard is not clinically significant. The suggested software has to be studied more regarding its capabilities in the utilization of curved lines in measuring curved canals and calibration of the measurements.

  8. Analysis and Simulation of Long-Range Correlations in Curved Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, Ali Reza; Sahimi, Muhammad

    Numerical simulation and analysis of long-range correlations in curved space are studied. The study is motivated by the problem of constructing accurate models of large-scale porous media which usually contain long-range correlations in their various properties (such as their permeability, porosity, and elastic moduli) within and between their strata that are typically curved layers. The problem is, however, relevant to many other important models and phenomena in which extended correlations in curved space play a prominent role. Examples include the nonlinear σ-model in a curved space, models for describing the long-range structural correlations of amorphous semiconductors that consist of polytopes (tilings of positively-curved three-dimensional space), long-range correlations in the extrapolar total zone, and models in which the Universe is created by bubble nucleations and contain long-range correlations in the fluctuations in the curved spacetime. The study is also relevant to the important industrial problem of designing highly curved objects, such as cars and ships, which use composite materials that contain extended correlations in their property values. We study such correlations along two- and three-dimensional curves, as well as curved surfaces. We show that such correlations are well-defined only on developable surfaces, i.e. those that can be flattened to form planar surfaces without any stretching or distortion, and preserve the distance between two points on such surfaces after the stretching. If a given curved surface is not developable, but can be approximated as piecewise developable, one may still define and analyze extended correlations on it. Representative examples are presented and analyzed.

  9. In vitro assessment of torque and force generated by novel ProTaper Next Instruments during simulated canal preparation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Erika S J; Singh, Rupinderpal; Arias, Ana; Peters, Ove A

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess torque and force for simulated canal preparation with a new root canal instrument, ProTaper Next. Six sets of ProTaper Next Instruments (X1-X5) were used to prepare 36 artificial canals. Files were divided into 6 groups. Different settings of rotations per minute (250, 300, and 350 rpm) and numbers of in-and-out movements to reach working length (3 or 4 insertions [ins]) were applied in each group (250 rpm/3 ins, 250 rpm/4 ins, 300 rpm/3 ins, 300 rpm/4 ins, 350 rpm/3 ins, and 350 rpm/4 ins) by using an automated torque bench. Peak torques (Ncm) as well as positive and negative forces (N) were registered. Analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were applied. Preliminary data for angle and stationary torque at failure were also obtained and compared with peak torque for each instrument. Significant differences in peak torque (P < .0001), positive force (P < .002), and negative force (P < .0001) were found for ProTaper Next instruments overall. X2 showed the highest torque with all settings. X5 showed the highest positive force in all groups. X1 and X2 showed the highest negative forces for all groups except for 350 rpm/4 ins. Significantly lower torque (P < .0001) and positive force (P < .007) were measured in the group 350 rpm/4 ins for all instruments except for X4. In contrast, X1 showed a significantly lower negative force for 350 rpm/4 ins. Torque at failure according to American Dental Association no. 28/ISO 36030-1 was lower for X1, X2, and X3 than torque during simulated canal preparation (P < .0001). Under the conditions of this study, using ProTaper Next at 350 rpm and with 4 in-and-out movements resulted in lowest levels of peak torque as well as positive and negative forces. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. GERLUMPH Data Release 2: 2.5 Billion Simulated Microlensing Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernardos, G.; Fluke, C. J.; Bate, N. F.; Croton, D.; Vohl, D.

    2015-04-01

    In the upcoming synoptic all-sky survey era of astronomy, thousands of new multiply imaged quasars are expected to be discovered and monitored regularly. Light curves from the images of gravitationally lensed quasars are further affected by superimposed variability due to microlensing. In order to disentangle the microlensing from the intrinsic variability of the light curves, the time delays between the multiple images have to be accurately measured. The resulting microlensing light curves can then be analyzed to reveal information about the background source, such as the size of the quasar accretion disk. In this paper we present the most extensive and coherent collection of simulated microlensing light curves; we have generated \\gt 2.5 billion light curves using the GERLUMPH high resolution microlensing magnification maps. Our simulations can be used to train algorithms to measure lensed quasar time delays, plan future monitoring campaigns, and study light curve properties throughout parameter space. Our data are openly available to the community and are complemented by online eResearch tools, located at http://gerlumph.swin.edu.au.

  11. Micro-Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Hard Tissue Debris Removal after Different Irrigation Methods and Its Influence on the Filling of Curved Canals.

    PubMed

    Freire, Laila Gonzales; Iglecias, Elaine Faga; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches; Dos Santos, Marcelo; Gavini, Giulio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) and the EndoVac (EV) System (Discus Dental, Culver City, CA) in hard tissue debris removal and its influence on the quality of the root canal filling with the aid of micro-computed tomographic scanner. Twenty-four mandibular molars were subjected to 4 microtomographic scannings (ie, before and after instrumentation, after final irrigation, and after obturation) using the SkyScan 1176 X-ray microtomograph (Bruker microCT, Kontich, Belgium) at a resolution of 17.42 μm. Mesial canals were prepared using R25 Reciproc instruments (VDW GmbH, Munich, Germany) and divided into 2 groups according to the final irrigation method: the PUI group (n = 12) and the EV group (n = 12). All specimens were filled with the continuous wave of condensation technique. CTAn and CTvol software (Bruker microCT) were used for volumetric analysis and 3-dimensional model reconstruction of the root canals, hard tissue debris, and the filling material. Data were statistically analyzed using the Student t test. Analysis of the micro-computed tomographic scans revealed debris accumulated inside the root canals, occupying an average of 3.4% of the canal's volume. Irrigation with PUI and the EV system reduced the volume of hard tissue debris in 55.55% and 53.65%, respectively, with no statistical difference between them (P > .05). Also, there was no difference among the groups with regard to the volume of filling material and voids (P > .05). PUI and the EV system were equally efficient in the removal of hard tissue debris and the quality of root canal filling was similar in both groups, with no influence from the irrigation method. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Digital simulation of scanning electrochemical microscopy approach curves to enzyme films with Michaelis-Menten kinetics.

    PubMed

    Burchardt, Malte; Träuble, Markus; Wittstock, Gunther

    2009-06-15

    The formalism for simulating scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) experiments by boundary element methods in three space coordinates has been extended to allow consideration of nonlinear boundary conditions. This is achieved by iteratively refining the boundary conditions that are encoded in a boundary condition matrix. As an example, the simulations are compared to experimental approach curves in the SECM feedback mode toward samples modified with glucose oxidase (GOx). The GOx layer was prepared by the layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolytes using glucose oxidase as one of the polyelectrolytes. The comparison of the simulated and experimental curves showed that under a wide range of experimentally accessible conditions approximations of the kinetics at the sample by first order models yield misleading results. The approach curves differ also qualitatively from curves calculated with first order models. As a consequence, this may lead to severe deviations when such curves are fitted to first order kinetic models. The use of linear approximations to describe the enzymatic reaction in SECM feedback experiments is justified only if the ratio of the mediator and Michaelis-Menten constant is equal to or smaller than 0.1 (deviation less than 10%).

  13. 3D Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Buoyant Flow and Heat Transport in a Curved Open Channel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A three-dimensional buoyancy-extended version of kappa-epsilon turbulence model was developed for simulating the turbulent flow and heat transport in a curved open channel. The density- induced buoyant force was included in the model, and the influence of temperature stratification on flow field was...

  14. Hysteroscopic sterilization using a virtual reality simulator: assessment of learning curve.

    PubMed

    Janse, Juliënne A; Goedegebuure, Ruben S A; Veersema, Sebastiaan; Broekmans, Frank J M; Schreuder, Henk W R

    2013-01-01

    To assess the learning curve using a virtual reality simulator for hysteroscopic sterilization with the Essure method. Prospective multicenter study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). University and teaching hospital in the Netherlands. Thirty novices (medical students) and five experts (gynecologists who had performed >150 Essure sterilization procedures). All participants performed nine repetitions of bilateral Essure placement on the simulator. Novices returned after 2 weeks and performed a second series of five repetitions to assess retention of skills. Structured observations on performance using the Global Rating Scale and parameters derived from the simulator provided measurements for analysis. The learning curve is represented by improvement per procedure. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to analyze learning curves. Effect size (ES) was calculated to express the practical significance of the results (ES ≥ 0.50 indicates a large learning effect). For all parameters, significant improvements were found in novice performance within nine repetitions. Large learning effects were established for six of eight parameters (p < .001; ES, 0.50-0.96). Novices approached expert level within 9 to 14 repetitions. The learning curve established in this study endorses future implementation of the simulator in curricula on hysteroscopic skill acquisition for clinicians who are interested in learning this sterilization technique. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Monte Carlo Simulations for the Purpose of Efficiency Curve Calibration for the Fastscan Whole Body Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Hannah Robyn

    In order to be able to qualify and quantify radiation exposure in terms of dose, a Fastscan whole body counter must be calibrated correctly. Current calibration methods do not take the full range of body types into consideration when creating efficiency curve calibrations. The goal of this work is the creation of a Monte Carlo (MCNP) model, that allows the simulation of efficiency curves for a diverse population of subjects. Models were created for both the Darlington and the Pickering Fastscan WBCs, and the simulations were benchmarked against experimental results with good agreement. The Pickering Fastscan was found to have agreement to within +/-9%, and the Darlington Fastscan had agreement to within +/-11%. Further simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of increased body fat on the detected activity, as well as locating the position of external contamination using front/back ratios of activity. Simulations were also conducted to create efficiency calibrations that had good agreement with the manufacturer's efficiency curves. The work completed in this thesis can be used to create efficiency calibration curves for unique body compositions in the future.

  16. The Impact of Grading on a Curve: Assessing the Results of Kulick and Wright's Simulation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Gary L.; Steed, Ronald C.

    2012-01-01

    Kulick and Wright concluded, based on theoretical mathematical simulations of hypothetical student exam scores, that assigning exam grades to students based on the relative position of their exam performance scores within a normal curve may be unfair, given the role that randomness plays in any given student's performance on any given exam.…

  17. Light Curve Simulation Using Spacecraft CAD Models and Empirical Material Spectral BRDFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willison, A.; Bedard, D.

    This paper presents a Matlab-based light curve simulation software package that uses computer-aided design (CAD) models of spacecraft and the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (sBRDF) of their homogenous surface materials. It represents the overall optical reflectance of objects as a sBRDF, a spectrometric quantity, obtainable during an optical ground truth experiment. The broadband bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), the basis of a broadband light curve, is produced by integrating the sBRDF over the optical wavelength range. Colour-filtered BRDFs, the basis of colour-filtered light curves, are produced by first multiplying the sBRDF by colour filters, and integrating the products. The software package's validity is established through comparison of simulated reflectance spectra and broadband light curves with those measured of the CanX-1 Engineering Model (EM) nanosatellite, collected during an optical ground truth experiment. It is currently being extended to simulate light curves of spacecraft in Earth orbit, using spacecraft Two-Line-Element (TLE) sets, yaw/pitch/roll angles, and observer coordinates. Measured light curves of the NEOSSat spacecraft will be used to validate simulated quantities. The sBRDF was chosen to represent material reflectance as it is spectrometric and a function of illumination and observation geometry. Homogeneous material sBRDFs were obtained using a goniospectrometer for a range of illumination and observation geometries, collected in a controlled environment. The materials analyzed include aluminum alloy, two types of triple-junction photovoltaic (TJPV) cell, white paint, and multi-layer insulation (MLI). Interpolation and extrapolation methods were used to determine the sBRDF for all possible illumination and observation geometries not measured in the laboratory, resulting in empirical look-up tables. These look-up tables are referenced when calculating the overall sBRDF of objects, where

  18. Influence of Operator's Experience on the Shaping Ability of Protaper Universal and Waveone Systems: A Comparative Study on Simulated Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Troiano, Giuseppe; Dioguardi, Mario; Cocco, Armando; Giannatempo, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Ciavarella, Domenico; Berutti, Elio; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of operator experience on: shaping and centering ability, mean preparation time and presence of canal aberrations of ProTaper Universal and WaveOne systems on simulated root canals. Materials and Methods: Sixty S-shaped canals in resin blocks were assigned to four groups (n=15 for each group). Group1 (Experienced operator, ProTaper), Group2 (Experienced operator, WaveOne), Group3 (Inexperienced operator, ProTaper), Group4 (Inexperienced operator, WaveOne). Photographic method was used to record pre- and post-instrumentations images. After superimposition, it has been evaluated presence of canal aberrations and differences in shaping and centering ability between groups. Results: WaveOne system produced a lower amount of canal aberrations both in the hand of expert than inexpert operators. However, a WaveOne instrument breakage occurred in the hands of an inexperienced operator. No differences have been found in the evaluation of shaping ability with both systematics. Operator’s experience doesn't influence the shaping ability of ProTaper and WaveOne systems. Conclusion: Experience factor could influence the centering ability in the use of both the systematics. However, WaveOne Primary reduce the mean preparation time and the presence of canal aberrations. PMID:27843508

  19. The Predictive Value of Ultrasound Learning Curves Across Simulated and Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Mette E; Nørgaard, Lone N; Tabor, Ann; Konge, Lars; Ringsted, Charlotte; Tolsgaard, Martin G

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore whether learning curves on a virtual-reality (VR) sonographic simulator can be used to predict subsequent learning curves on a physical mannequin and learning curves during clinical training. Twenty midwives completed a simulation-based training program in transvaginal sonography. The training was conducted on a VR simulator as well as on a physical mannequin. A subgroup of 6 participants underwent subsequent clinical training. During each of the 3 steps, the participants' performance was assessed using instruments with established validity evidence, and they advanced to the next level only after attaining predefined levels of performance. The number of repetitions and time needed to achieve predefined performance levels were recorded along with the performance scores in each setting. Finally, the outcomes were correlated across settings. A good correlation was found between time needed to achieve predefined performance levels on the VR simulator and the physical mannequin (Pearson correlation coefficient .78; P < .001). Performance scores on the VR simulator correlated well to the clinical performance scores (Pearson correlation coefficient .81; P = .049). No significant correlations were found between numbers of attempts needed to reach proficiency across the 3 different settings. A post hoc analysis found that the 50% fastest trainees at reaching proficiency during simulation-based training received higher clinical performance scores compared to trainees with scores placing them among the 50% slowest (P = .025). Performances during simulation-based sonography training may predict performance in related tasks and subsequent clinical learning curves. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  20. Centering Ability of ProTaper Next and WaveOne Classic in J-Shape Simulated Root Canals.

    PubMed

    Troiano, Giuseppe; Dioguardi, Mario; Cocco, Armando; Giuliani, Michele; Fabiani, Cristiano; D'Alessandro, Alfonso; Ciavarella, Domenico; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shaping and centering ability of ProTaper Next (PTN; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and WaveOne Classic systems (Dentsply Maillefer) in simulated root canals. Methods. Forty J-shaped canals in resin blocks were assigned to two groups (n = 20 for each group). Photographic method was used to record pre- and postinstrumentation images. After superimposition, centering and shaping ability were recorded at 9 different levels from the apex using the software Autocad 2013 (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, USA). Results. Shaping procedures with ProTaper Next resulted in a lower amount of resin removed at each reference point level. In addition, the pattern of centering ability improved after the use of ProTaper Next in 8 of 9 measurement points. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, shaping procedures with ProTaper Next instruments demonstrated a lower amount of resin removed and a better centering ability than WaveOne Classic system.

  1. Centering Ability of ProTaper Next and WaveOne Classic in J-Shape Simulated Root Canals

    PubMed Central

    Dioguardi, Mario; Cocco, Armando; Giuliani, Michele; Fabiani, Cristiano; D'Alessandro, Alfonso; Ciavarella, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shaping and centering ability of ProTaper Next (PTN; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and WaveOne Classic systems (Dentsply Maillefer) in simulated root canals. Methods. Forty J-shaped canals in resin blocks were assigned to two groups (n = 20 for each group). Photographic method was used to record pre- and postinstrumentation images. After superimposition, centering and shaping ability were recorded at 9 different levels from the apex using the software Autocad 2013 (Autodesk Inc., San Rafael, USA). Results. Shaping procedures with ProTaper Next resulted in a lower amount of resin removed at each reference point level. In addition, the pattern of centering ability improved after the use of ProTaper Next in 8 of 9 measurement points. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, shaping procedures with ProTaper Next instruments demonstrated a lower amount of resin removed and a better centering ability than WaveOne Classic system. PMID:28054031

  2. Canalization effect in the coagulation cascade and the interindividual variability of oral anticoagulant response. a simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Increasing the predictability and reducing the rate of side effects of oral anticoagulant treatment (OAT) requires further clarification of the cause of about 50% of the interindividual variability of OAT response that is currently unaccounted for. We explore numerically the hypothesis that the effect of the interindividual expression variability of coagulation proteins, which does not usually result in a variability of the coagulation times in untreated subjects, is unmasked by OAT. Results We developed a stochastic variant of the Hockin-Mann model of the tissue factor coagulation pathway, using literature data for the variability of coagulation protein levels in the blood of normal subjects. We simulated in vitro coagulation and estimated the Prothrombin Time and the INR across a model population. In a model of untreated subjects a "canalization effect" can be observed in that a coefficient of variation of up to 33% of each protein level results in a simulated INR of 1 with a clinically irrelevant dispersion of 0.12. When the mean and the standard deviation of vitamin-K dependent protein levels were reduced by 80%, corresponding to the usual Warfarin treatment intensity, the simulated INR was 2.98 ± 0.48, a clinically relevant dispersion, corresponding to a reduction of the canalization effect. Then we combined the Hockin-Mann stochastic model with our previously published model of population response to Warfarin, that takes into account the genetical and the phenotypical variability of Warfarin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We used the combined model to evaluate the coagulation protein variability effect on the variability of the Warfarin dose required to reach an INR target of 2.5. The dose variance when removing the coagulation protein variability was 30% lower. The dose was mostly related to the pretreatment levels of factors VII, X, and the tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). Conclusions It may be worth exploring in experimental

  3. Manual flying of curved precision approaches to landing with electromechanical instrumentation. A piloted simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted to examine the requirements for using electromechanical flight instrumentation to provide situation information and flight guidance for manually controlled flight along curved precision approach paths to a landing. Six pilots were used as test subjects. The data from these tests indicated that flight director guidance is required for the manually controlled flight of a jet transport airplane on curved approach paths. Acceptable path tracking performance was attained with each of the three situation information algorithms tested. Approach paths with both multiple sequential turns and short final path segments were evaluated. Pilot comments indicated that all the approach paths tested could be used in normal airline operations.

  4. Rational quadratic Bézier curve fitting by simulated annealing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Najihah; Abd Majid, Ahmad; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni

    2013-04-01

    A metaheuristic algorithm, which is an approximation method called simulated annealing is implemented in order to have the best rational quadratic Bézier curve from a given data points. This technique is used to minimize sum squared errors in order to improve the middle control point position and the value of weight. As a result, best fitted rational quadratic Bézier curve and its mathematical function that represents all the given data points is obtained. Numerical and graphical examples are also presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  5. Apical Transportation, Centering Ratio, and Volume Increase after Manual, Rotary, and Reciprocating Instrumentation in Curved Root Canals: Analysis by Micro-computed Tomographic and Digital Subtraction Radiography.

    PubMed

    Zanesco, Caroline; Só, Marcus Vinicius Reis; Schmidt, Sabrina; Fontanella, Vania Regina Camargo; Grazziotin-Soares, Renata; Barletta, Fernando Branco

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate apical transportation (AT), centering ratio (CR), and volume increase (VI) produced after instrumentation of mesiobuccal canals of maxillary molars with hand files, rotary, and reciprocating instruments using micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging and to demonstrate the ability of digital subtraction radiography (DSR) to evaluate AT. Forty-five canals were randomly assigned to either group K, manual K-files; PTN, ProTaper Next (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland); or Rec, Reciproc (n = 15 for each group) for preparation. Master apical files were #25, X2 (#25/06), and R25 (#25/08), respectively. Micro-CT imaging was used to measure AT (mm) and CR (mm) at 3 different locations (1, 4, and 7 mm from the apex). VI (mm(3)) was measured for each root third and for the whole canal. DSR (mesiodistal and buccolingual projections) was used to measure AT at 1 mm from the apex. AT and CR values were statistically similar across the groups at 1, 4, and 7 mm. AT results obtained for the different locations were similar within each group; CR, in turn, showed statistically lower values at 1 mm. VI was statistically similar in all groups. Both DSR and micro-CT imaging showed that AT always occurred on the outside of canal curvature. The highest mean value obtained for AT was 0.215 mm. AT, CR, and VI were similar for the K, PTN, and Rec groups. AT results were clinically irrelevant. DSR was as effective as micro-CT imaging in AT analysis and could be considered as an alternative method for assessing this outcome. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cyclic fatigue resistance tests of Nickel-Titanium rotary files using simulated canal and weight loading conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ok-In; Versluis, Antheunis; Cheung, Gary SP; Ha, Jung-Hong; Hur, Bock

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study compared the cyclic fatigue resistance of nickel-titanium (NiTi) files obtained in a conventional test using a simulated canal with a newly developed method that allows the application of constant fatigue load conditions. Materials and Methods ProFile and K3 files of #25/.06, #30/.06, and #40/.04 were selected. Two types of testing devices were built to test their fatigue performance. The first (conventional) device prescribed curvature inside a simulated canal (C-test), the second new device exerted a constant load (L-test) whilst allowing any resulting curvature. Ten new instruments of each size and brand were tested with each device. The files were rotated until fracture and the number of cycles to failure (NCF) was determined. The NCF were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Duncan's post-hoc test for each method. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was computed to examine any association between methods. Results Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (ρ = -0.905) showed a significant negative correlation between methods. Groups with significant difference after the L-test divided into 4 clusters, whilst the C-test gave just 2 clusters. From the L-test, considering the negative correlation of NCF, K3 gave a significantly lower fatigue resistance than ProFile as in the C-test. K3 #30/.06 showed a lower fatigue resistance than K3 #25/.06, which was not found by the C-test. Variation in fatigue test methodology resulted in different cyclic fatigue resistance rankings for various NiTi files. Conclusions The new methodology standardized the load during fatigue testing, allowing determination fatigue behavior under constant load conditions. PMID:23493583

  7. Efficacy of CM-Wire, M-Wire, and Nickel-Titanium Instruments for Removing Filling Material from Curved Root Canals: A Micro-Computed Tomography Study.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Clarissa Teles; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; de Almeida, Marcela Milanezi; de Andrade, Flaviana Bombarda; Bernardineli, Norberti

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the removal of filling material after using CM-wire, M-wire, and nickel-titanium instruments in both reciprocating and rotary motions in curved canals. Thirty maxillary lateral incisors were divided into 9 groups according to retreatment procedures: Reciproc R25 followed by Mtwo 40/.04 and ProDesign Logic 50/.01 files; ProDesign R 25/.06 followed by ProDesign Logic 40/.05 and ProDesign Logic 50/.01 files; and Gates-Glidden drills, Hedström files, and K-files up to apical size 30 followed by K-file 40 and K-file 50 up to the working length. Micro-computed tomography scans were performed before and after each reinstrumentation procedure to evaluate root canal filling removal. Statistical analysis was performed with Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman, and Wilcoxon tests (P < .05). No significant differences in filling material removal were found in the 3 groups of teeth. The use of Mtwo and ProDesign Logic 40/.05 rotary files did not enhance filling material removal after the use of reciprocating files. The use of ProDesign Logic 50/.01 files significantly reduced the amount of filling material at the apical levels compared with the use of reciprocating files. Association of reciprocating and rotary files was capable of removing a large amount of filling material in the retreatment of curved canals, irrespective of the type of alloy of the instruments. The use of a ProDesign Logic 50/.01 file for apical preparation significantly reduced the amount of remnant material in the apical portion when compared with reciprocating instruments. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The X-ray Variability of NGC 4945: Characterizing the Power Spectrum through Light Curve Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, M

    2003-12-17

    For light curves sampled on an uneven grid of observation times, the shape of the power density spectrum (PDS) includes severe distortion effects due to the window function, and simulations of light curves are indispensable to recover the true PDS. We present an improved method for comparing light curves generated from a PDS model to the measured data and apply it to a 50-day long RXTE observations of NGC 4945, a Seyfert 2 galaxy with well-determined mass from megamaser observations. The improvements over previously reported investigations include the adjustment of the PDS model normalization for each simulated light curve in order to directly investigate how well the chosen PDS shape describes the source data. We furthermore implement a robust goodness-of-fit measure that does not depend on the form of the variable used to describe the power in the periodogram. We conclude that a knee-type function (smoothly broken power law) describes the data better than a simple power law; the best-fit break frequency is {approx} 10{sup -6} Hz.

  9. Projectile shape influence on ballistic limit curves as determined by computational simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S. Jr.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1995-09-01

    A requirement for an effective debris shield is that it must protect a spacecraft from impacts by irregularly shaped particles. A series of numerical simulations has been performed using the multi-dimensional shock physics code CTH to numerically determine the ballistic limit curve for a Whipple bumper shield. Two different projectile shapes are considered for the numerical simulations, flat plates of varying diameters with a constant thickness and spheres of varying diameters. The critical diameter of ballistic limit was determined over a velocity range from 4 km/s to 15 km/s. We have found both experimentally and numerically that the particle shape has a significant effect on the debris cloud distribution, ballistic limit curve, and penetration capability.

  10. Dispersion curves from short-time molecular dynamics simulation. 1. Diatomic chain results

    SciTech Connect

    Noid, D.W.; Broocks, B.T.; Gray, S.K.; Marple, S.L.

    1988-06-16

    The multiple signal classification method (MUSIC) for frequency estimation is used to compute the frequency dispersion curves of a diatomic chain from the time-dependent structure factor. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that MUSIC can accurately determine the frequencies from very short time trajectories. MUSIC is also used to show how the frequencies can vary in time, i.e., along a trajectory. The method is ideally suited for analyzing molecular dynamics simulations of large systems.

  11. Comparative Study on Two Melting Simulation Methods: Melting Curve of Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhong-Li; Sun, Jun-Sheng; Li, Rui; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-05-01

    Melting simulation methods are of crucial importance to determining melting temperature of materials efficiently. A high-efficiency melting simulation method saves much simulation time and computational resources. To compare the efficiency of our newly developed shock melting (SM) method with that of the well-established two-phase (TP) method, we calculate the high-pressure melting curve of Au using the two methods based on the optimally selected interatomic potentials. Although we only use 640 atoms to determine the melting temperature of Au in the SM method, the resulting melting curve accords very well with the results from the TP method using much more atoms. Thus, this shows that a much smaller system size in SM method can still achieve a fully converged melting curve compared with the TP method, implying the robustness and efficiency of the SM method. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 41574076 and the NSAF of China under Grant No. U1230201/A06, and the Young Core Teacher Scheme of Henan Province under Grant No. 2014GGJS-108

  12. Flow and transport simulation models for prediction of chlorine contact tank flow-through curves.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Shao, Xuejun; Falconer, Roger A

    2003-01-01

    Turbulent flow, solute transport, and chemical and biological decay are some of the basic processes encountered in water treatment plants. This paper presents recent developments in the numerical simulation of turbulent flow and disinfection processes in disinfection contact tanks. Simulation runs have been conducted for various tank design alternatives and in different grid resolutions. The accuracy of simulated contact tank flow and the disinfection process depends largely on calculations of the hydrodynamic and solute transport characteristics in the tanks. A key factor of this is the accuracy of advection and shear stress term computations, which can be affected by the use of different hydrodynamic submodels and numerical schemes. The performance of a simulation model relies to a great extent on the right combination of such submodels and numerical schemes. In this study, a number of simulation models were tested against realistic tank configurations and measurements to evaluate the various combinations of turbulence models and difference schemes by analyzing predicted flow and solute transport patterns, as well as the corresponding flow-through curves. Models for disinfection tank simulations are recommended based on comparisons of simulation results with measurements. These models may also be applied to other water treatment processes such as wastewater treatment.

  13. 2D PIC simulations of a curved supercritical shock: dynamics of the whistler precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stienlet, Joël.; Savoini, Philippe; Lembege, Bertrand

    2010-05-01

    The whistler precursor emitted from the curved terrestrial shock front plays an important role in pre-decelerating and heating the incoming solar wind. Most previous works have mainly analyzed the features of the whistler precursor emission for a 1D planar shock where it is forced to propagate along the shock normal (Liewer and al, 1991) or to propagate obliquely with respect to a fixed shock normal direction in 2D planar shock simulation (Krauss-Varban et al., 1995). In the present case, the dynamics of the precursor is analyzed with the help of a 2D full particle simulation for a continuously curved shock within the angular range 90o ≥ ?Bn ≥ 45o where ?Bn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetostatic field. Both electrons and ions dynamics are described by a self consistent approach. Our results show that (i) the whistler precursor extends far from the shock front mainly along the magnetostatic field (projected on the simulation plane) and not along the shock normal; (ii) the width of these curved wave fronts (precursor) strongly decreases when moving far from the shock front; (iii) at the shock front, the precursor is emitted within an angular range much larger than that predicted by linear theory; (iv) the damping rate of the whistler precursor is analyzed for different directions of the shock normal. Wave particle energy transfer is analysed, and these results will be discussed and compared with previous 1D and 2D simulations of planar shocks; (v) the whistler precursor is not monochromatic, and interferences between modes are evidenced by beats and wave-packets in front of the shock. The impact of this effect on damping rate measurements will be discussed.

  14. Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of the influence of manual and mechanical glide path on the surface of nickel-titanium rotary instruments in moderately curved root canals: An in-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dishant; Bashetty, Kusum; Srirekha, A.; Archana, S.; Savitha, B.; Vijay, R.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of manual versus mechanical glide path (GP) on the surface changes of two different nickel-titanium rotary instruments used during root canal therapy in a moderately curved root canal. Materials and Methods: Sixty systemically healthy controls were selected for the study. Controls were divided randomly into four groups: Group 1: Manual GP followed by RaCe rotary instruments, Group 2: Manual GP followed by HyFlex rotary instruments, Group 3: Mechanical GP followed by RaCe rotary instruments, Group 4: Mechanical GP followed by HyFlex rotary instruments. After access opening, GP was prepared and rotary instruments were used according to manufacturer's instructions. All instruments were evaluated for defects under standard error mean before their use and after a single use. The scorings for the files were given at apical and middle third. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-squared test was used. Results: The results showed that there is no statistical difference between any of the groups. Irrespective of the GP and rotary files used, more defects were present in the apical third when compared to middle third of the rotary instrument. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that there was no effect of manual or mechanical GP on surface defects of subsequent rotary file system used. PMID:27994317

  15. IGBT Switching Characteristic Curve Embedded Half-Bridge MMC Modelling and Real Time Simulation Realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhengang, Lu; Hongyang, Yu; Xi, Yang

    2017-05-01

    The Modular Multilevel Converter (MMC) is one of the most attractive topologies in recent years for medium or high voltage industrial applications, such as high voltage dc transmission (HVDC) and medium voltage varying speed motor drive. The wide adoption of MMCs in industry is mainly due to its flexible expandability, transformer-less configuration, common dc bus, high reliability from redundancy, and so on. But, when the sub module number of MMC is more, the test of MMC controller will cost more time and effort. Hardware in the loop test based on real time simulator will save a lot of time and money caused by the MMC test. And due to the flexible of HIL, it becomes more and more popular in the industry area. The MMC modelling method remains an important issue for the MMC HIL test. Specifically, the VSC model should realistically reflect the nonlinear device switching characteristics, switching and conduction losses, tailing current, and diode reverse recovery behaviour of a realistic converter. In this paper, an IGBT switching characteristic curve embedded half-bridge MMC modelling method is proposed. This method is based on the switching curve referring and sample circuit calculation, and it is sample for implementation. Based on the proposed method, a FPGA real time simulation is carried out with 200ns sample time. The real time simulation results show the proposed method is correct.

  16. Supernova Shock Breakout Light Curves and Spectra from CASTRO Multigroup Radiation Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Woosley, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of supernova shock breakout with the new multigroup radiation transport version of the CASTRO simulation code. Shock breakout occurs when the outgoing shockwave of a supernova explosion reaches the surface of the progenitor star and produces a bright flash. The breakout flash's spectral temperature, duration, and luminosity carry information about the progenitor star that may otherwise be very difficult to recover. To aid in detection and understanding of this phenomenon, we present integrated light curves and spectra of breakouts from a range of progenitors and explosions, including very low energy supernovae and pair-instability supernovae.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of the melting curve of NiAl alloy under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjin; Peng, Yufeng; Liu, Zhongli

    2014-05-15

    The melting curve of B2-NiAl alloy under pressure has been investigated using molecular dynamics technique and the embedded atom method (EAM) potential. The melting temperatures were determined with two approaches, the one-phase and the two-phase methods. The first one simulates a homogeneous melting, while the second one involves a heterogeneous melting of materials. Both approaches reduce the superheating effectively and their results are close to each other at the applied pressures. By fitting the well-known Simon equation to our melting data, we yielded the melting curves for NiAl: 1783(1 + P/9.801){sup 0.298} (one-phase approach), 1850(1 + P/12.806){sup 0.357} (two-phase approach). The good agreement of the resulting equation of states and the zero-pressure melting point (calc., 1850 ± 25 K, exp., 1911 K) with experiment proved the correctness of these results. These melting data complemented the absence of experimental high-pressure melting of NiAl. To check the transferability of this EAM potential, we have also predicted the melting curves of pure nickel and pure aluminum. Results show the calculated melting point of Nickel agrees well with experiment at zero pressure, while the melting point of aluminum is slightly higher than experiment.

  18. Effects of visual fidelity on curve negotiation, gaze behaviour and simulator discomfort.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Peter M; Gómez i Subils, Carla; Jimenez, Arnau Ramon; Happee, Riender; de Winter, Joost C F

    2015-01-01

    Technological developments have led to increased visual fidelity of driving simulators. However, simplified visuals have potential advantages, such as improved experimental control, reduced simulator discomfort and increased generalisability of results. In this driving simulator study, we evaluated the effects of visual fidelity on driving performance, gaze behaviour and subjective discomfort ratings. Twenty-four participants drove a track with 90° corners in (1) a high fidelity, textured environment, (2) a medium fidelity, non-textured environment without scenery objects and (3) a low-fidelity monochrome environment that only showed lane markers. The high fidelity level resulted in higher steering activity on straight road segments, higher driving speeds and higher gaze variance than the lower fidelity levels. No differences were found between the two lower fidelity levels. In conclusion, textures and objects were found to affect steering activity and driving performance; however, gaze behaviour during curve negotiation and self-reported simulator discomfort were unaffected. In a driving simulator study, three levels of visual fidelity were evaluated. The results indicate that the highest fidelity level, characterised by a textured environment, resulted in higher steering activity, higher driving speeds and higher variance of horizontal gaze than the two lower fidelity levels without textures.

  19. Prior-knowledge-based feedforward network simulation of true boiling point curve of crude oil.

    PubMed

    Chen, C W; Chen, D Z

    2001-11-01

    Theoretical results and practical experience indicate that feedforward networks can approximate a wide class of functional relationships very well. This property is exploited in modeling chemical processes. Given finite and noisy training data, it is important to encode the prior knowledge in neural networks to improve the fit precision and the prediction ability of the model. In this paper, as to the three-layer feedforward networks and the monotonic constraint, the unconstrained method, Joerding's penalty function method, the interpolation method, and the constrained optimization method are analyzed first. Then two novel methods, the exponential weight method and the adaptive method, are proposed. These methods are applied in simulating the true boiling point curve of a crude oil with the condition of increasing monotonicity. The simulation experimental results show that the network models trained by the novel methods are good at approximating the actual process. Finally, all these methods are discussed and compared with each other.

  20. Heritability of growth curve parameters and heritability of final size: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt-Henrich, S G

    1992-01-01

    Simulations of nestling growth in Great Tits (Parus major) were used to show the consequences genetic variation in the parameters of growth curves could have on the amount of genetic variation in final body weight. This was done for the case of good environmental conditions (i.e. adequate food supply), and for poor environmental conditions (food limitation). A three-parameter process-error growth model based on the Richards curve (Brisbin et al., 1986) was used. The three parameters were the asymptote, the shape, and the time to complete approximately 95% of growth. In simulations, where only the asymptotic value was heritable, genetic variation in final weight was larger under good conditions than under poor conditions. Food limitations decreased the amount of genetic variation and the heritability estimate of final size. Similarly, sib competition, (based on body size differences of nestlings within broods) combined with food limitations lowered heritabilities. Sib competition under good conditions had no effect on heritabilities. In contrast, when the time to complete approximately 95% of growth was heritable, heritabilities for final size were not lower under poor conditions either without or in the presence of sib competition. This model suggests that different amounts of genetic variation in final size under good and poor conditions could be linked to the amount of genetic variation present in the growth curve parameters. The results agreed with an empirical study on body weight in a passerine bird, the Great Tit, where only the asymptote displayed heritable variation and more genetic variance was expressed under good conditions.

  1. Comparison of two warning concepts of an intelligent Curve Warning system for motorcyclists in a simulator study.

    PubMed

    Huth, Véronique; Biral, Francesco; Martín, Oscar; Lot, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Curve crashes are a particular matter of concern regarding motorcycle riding safety. For this reason, an intelligent Curve Warning system has been designed that gives the riders support when negotiating a curve. The system has been tested in a simulator study carried out with 20 test riders. The subjects performed three rides: one without the system (baseline) and two experimental rides using a version of the Curve Warning system, one providing the warnings by a force feedback throttle and one by a haptic glove. The effects of the two system versions were evaluated both in terms of the simulated riding performance and the subjective assessment by the riders. A descriptive analysis of the riders' reactions to the warnings shows that the warnings provided by both system versions provoke an earlier and stronger adaptation of the motorcycle dynamics to the curve than when the riders do not use the system. Riding with the Curve Warning system with the haptic glove furthermore leads to a reduction of critical curve events. The riders' subjective workload level was not affected by the system use, whereas the Curve Warning system with the force feedback throttle required an increased attention. The comparison of the riders' opinions about the system reveals a preference of the Curve Warning system with the haptic glove. The better acceptance of this system version suggests a higher potential in the enhancement of riding safety. 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Confocal laser scanning, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy investigation of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm degradation using passive and active sodium hypochlorite irrigation within a simulated root canal model.

    PubMed

    Mohmmed, Saifalarab A; Vianna, Morgana E; Penny, Matthew R; Hilton, Stephen T; Mordan, Nicola; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2017-08-01

    Root canal irrigation is an important adjunct to control microbial infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 2.5% (wt/vol) sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) agitation on the removal, killing, and degradation of Enterococcus faecalis biofilm. A total of 45 root canal models were manufactured using 3D printing with each model comprising an 18 mm length simulated root canal of apical size 30 and taper 0.06. E. faecalis biofilms were grown on the apical 3 mm of the models for 10 days. A total of 60 s of 9 ml of 2.5% NaOCl irrigation using syringe and needle was performed, the irrigant was either left stagnant in the canal or agitated using manual (Gutta-percha), sonic, and ultrasonic methods for 30 s. Following irrigation, the residual biofilms were observed using confocal laser scanning, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with Dunnett post hoc tests at a level of significance p ≤ .05. Consequence of root canal irrigation indicate that the reduction in the amount of biofilm achieved with the active irrigation groups (manual, sonic, and ultrasonic) was significantly greater when compared with the passive and untreated groups (p < .05). Collectively, finding indicate that passive irrigation exhibited more residual biofilm on the model surface than irrigant agitated by manual or automated (sonic, ultrasonic) methods. Total biofilm degradation and nonviable cells were associated with the ultrasonic group. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. 2D PIC simulations of a curved supercritical shock: dynamics of the whistler precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stienlet, J.; Lembege, B.; Savoini, P.

    2009-12-01

    The whistler precursor emitted from the curved terrestrial shock front plays an important role in pre-decelerating and heating the incoming solar wind. Most previous works have mainly analyzed the features of the whistler precursor emission for a 1D planar shock where it is forced to propagate along the shock normal (Liewer and al, 1991) or to propagate obliquely with respect to a fixed shock normal direction in 2D planar shock simulation (Krauss-Varban et al., 1995). In the present case, the dynamics of the precursor is analyzed for a full curved shock with the help of a 2D full particle simulation where full curvature effects and both electrons and ions dynamics are described by a self consistent approach. Curvature effects continously cover all shock normal directions within the angular range 90° ≤ θBn ≤ 45° where θBn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetostatic field. This approach allows a free accessibility of the whistler precursor to a large angular range without any constraint. Preliminary results show that : (i) the whistler precursor strongly extends far from the shock front mainly along the magnetostatic field (projected on the simulation plane) but this extension is progressively reduced outside this privileged direction; (ii) wave fronts of the whistler precursor have a curvature similar to that of the main curved shock front but the width of these curved wave fronts strongly decreases when moving far from the shock front; (iii) near the shock front, the precursor is emitted within an angular range much larger than that predicted by linear theory; (iv) the critical angle of occurrence of the precursor fits with the theoretical value expected from Krasnoselskikh et al. (2002) model but this angle is not associated to a transition between stationary and non-stationary shocks in contrast with a statement announced by this theoretical model; and (v) the damping rate of the whistler precursor is analyzed for different

  4. The Role of Simulation in Boosting the Learning Curve in EVAR Procedures.

    PubMed

    Vento, Vincenzo; Cercenelli, Laura; Mascoli, Chiara; Gallitto, Enrico; Ancetti, Stefano; Faggioli, Gianluca; Freyrie, Antonio; Marcelli, Emanuela; Gargiulo, Mauro; Stella, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Simulation may be a useful tool for training in endovascular procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) simulation in boosting trainees' learning curve. Ten vascular surgery residents were recruited and divided in 2 groups (Trainee Group and Control group). At a first session (t0), each resident performed 2 simulated EVAR procedures using an endovascular simulator. After 2 weeks, each participant simulated other 2 EVAR procedures in a final session (t1). In the period between t0 and t1, each resident in the Trainee Group performed 6 simulated EVAR procedures, whereas the Control Group did not perform any other simulation. Both quantitative and qualitative performance evaluations were performed at t0 and t1. Quantitative evaluation from simulator metrics included total procedural time (TP), total fluoroscopy time (TF), time for contralateral gate cannulation (TG), and contrast medium volume (CM) injected. Qualitative evaluation was based on a Likert scale used to calculate a total performance score referred to skills involving major EVAR procedural steps. All residents in the Trainee Group significantly reduced TP (48 ± 12 vs 32 ± 8 minutes, t0 vs t1, p < 0.05), TF (18 ± 7 vs 11 ± 6 minutes, p < 0.05), and CM used over time (121 ± 37 vs 85 ± 26ml, p < 0.05), but not TG (5 ± 5 vs 3 ± 4 minutes, p = 0.284). In the Control Group metrics did not change significantly in any field (TP = 55 ± 11 vs 46 ± 10 minutes; TF = 25 ± 9 vs 21 ± 4 minutes; CM = 132 ± 51 vs 102 ± 42ml; TG = 6 ± 4 vs 8 ± 5 minutes, all p > 0.05). The average Trainee Group qualitative total performance score improved significantly (p < 0.05) after rehearsal sessions when compared with the Control Group. Simulation is an effective method to improve competence of vascular surgery residents with EVAR procedures. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. Rupture Dynamics Simulation for Non-Planar fault by a Curved Grid Finite Difference Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zhu, G.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    We first implement the non-staggered finite difference method to solve the dynamic rupture problem, with split-node, for non-planar fault. Split-node method for dynamic simulation has been used widely, because of that it's more precise to represent the fault plane than other methods, for example, thick fault, stress glut and so on. The finite difference method is also a popular numeric method to solve kinematic and dynamic problem in seismology. However, previous works focus most of theirs eyes on the staggered-grid method, because of its simplicity and computational efficiency. However this method has its own disadvantage comparing to non-staggered finite difference method at some fact for example describing the boundary condition, especially the irregular boundary, or non-planar fault. Zhang and Chen (2006) proposed the MacCormack high order non-staggered finite difference method based on curved grids to precisely solve irregular boundary problem. Based upon on this non-staggered grid method, we make success of simulating the spontaneous rupture problem. The fault plane is a kind of boundary condition, which could be irregular of course. So it's convinced that we could simulate rupture process in the case of any kind of bending fault plane. We will prove this method is valid in the case of Cartesian coordinate first. In the case of bending fault, the curvilinear grids will be used.

  6. Pair-instability Supernova Simulations: Progenitor Evolution, Explosion, and Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmer, Matthew S.; Kozyreva, Alexandra; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla; Yusof, Norhasliza

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, the viability of the pair-instability supernova (PISN) scenario for explaining superluminous supernovae has all but disappeared except for a few slowly-evolving examples. However, PISNe are not predicted to be superluminous throughout the bulk of their mass range. In fact, it is more likely that the first PISN we see (if we have not seen one already) will not be superluminous. Here, we present hydrodynamic simulations of PISNe for four stellar models with unique envelope properties spanning the PISN mass range. In addition, we compute synthetic light curves (LCs) for comparison with current and future observations. We also investigate, in the context of our most massive model, the prospect of mixing in the supernova ejecta, alleviating discrepancies between current PISN models and the remaining superluminous candidate events. To this end, we present the first published 3D hydrodynamic simulations of PISNe. After achieving convergence between 1D, 2D, and 3D simulations, we examine mixing in the supernova ejecta and its affect on the bolometric LC. We observe slight deviations from spherical symmetry, which increase with the number of dimensions. We find no significant effects on the bolometric LC; however, we conclude that mixing between the silicon and oxygen rich layers caused by the Rayleigh–Taylor instability may affect spectra.

  7. Numerical simulation of flow and aquaculture organic waste dispersion in a curved channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Alfatih; Thiem, Øyvind; Berntsen, Jarle

    2013-10-01

    The dispersion and deposition of particulate organic matter from a fish cage located in an idealized curved channel with a 90° bend are studied for different horizontal grid resolutions. The model system consists of a three-dimensional, random-walk particle tracking model coupled to a terrain-following ocean model. The particle tracking model is a Lagrangian particle tracking simulator which uses the local flow field, simulated by the ocean model, for advection of the particles and random walk to simulate the turbulent diffusion. The sinking of particles is modeled by imposing an individual particle settling velocity. As the homogeneous water flows through the bend in the channel, the results show that a cross-channel secondary circulation is developed. The motion of this flow is similar to a helical motion where the water in the upper layers moves towards the outer bank and towards the inner bank in the lower layers. The intensity of the secondary circulation will depend on the viscosity scheme and increases as the horizontal grid resolution decreases which significantly affects the distribution of the particles on the seabed. The presence of the secondary circulation leads to that most of the particles that settle, settle close to the inner bank of the channel.

  8. Effects of the offset term in experimental simulation on afterglow decay curve.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chi-Yang; Lin, Jeng-Wen; Huang, Yih-Ping; Huang, Yung-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect of the offset term in a multiple single exponential equation that fits into experimental afterglow decay curve data for material applications. For afterglow materials applied and attached to structures, the inclusion of this offset term may reduce the values of the calculated decay times, τ i , and enlarge the time invariant constants, A i , in the associated equation compared to theoretically perfect test conditions. Using a set of experimental data obtained from a lab under dim light, adjustments can be made to calculate the required parameters for an equation without the offset term. This study uses mathematical simulations and lab tests to support our thesis and crosslink test results generated from different ambient light conditions. This paper defines the offset ratio as the ratio of the offset value, I 0, versus the initial light intensity in an equation. This ratio can be used to evaluate possible effects on the calculated parameters of an equation in an associated numerical simulation. The most reliable parameters will have consistent results from the use of multiple single exponential equations, with and without the offset term, in simulations to obtain them in an equation to model a set of data.

  9. "Alarm-corrected" ergonomic armrest use could improve learning curves of novices on robotic simulator.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Perez, Manuela; Hossu, Gabriela; Hubert, Nicolas; Perrenot, Cyril; Hubert, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    In robotic surgery, the professional ergonomic habit of using an armrest reduces operator fatigue and increases the precision of motion. We designed and validated a pressure surveillance system (PSS) based on force sensors to investigate armrest use. The objective was to evaluate whether adding an alarm to the PSS system could shorten ergonomic training and improve performance. Twenty robot and simulator-naïve participants were recruited and randomized in two groups (A and B). The PSS was installed on a robotic simulator, the dV-Trainer, to detect contact with the armrest. The Group A members completed three tasks on the dV-Trainer without the alarm, making 15 attempts at each task. The Group B members practiced the first two tasks with the alarm and then completed the final tasks without the alarm. The simulator provided an overall score reflecting the trainees' performance. We used the new concept of an "armrest load" score to describe the ergonomic habit of using the armrest. Group B had a significantly higher performance score (p < 0.001) and armrest load score (p < 0.001) than Group A from the fifth attempt of the first task to the end of the experiment. Based on the conditioned reflex effect, the alarm associated with the PSS rectified ergonomic errors and accelerated professional ergonomic habit acquisition. The combination of the PSS and alarm is effective in significantly shortening the learning curve in the robotic training process.

  10. A fixed-base simulation study of two STOL aircraft flying curved, descending instrument approach paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, M. S.; Sawyer, R. H.; Mclaughlin, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    A real-time, fixed-base simulation study has been conducted to determine the curved, descending approach paths (within passenger-comfort limits) that would be acceptable to pilots, the flight-director-system logic requirements for curved-flight-path guidance, and the paths which can be flown within proposed microwave landing system (MLS) coverage angles. Two STOL aircraft configurations were used in the study. Generally, no differences in the results between the two STOL configurations were found. The investigation showed that paths with a 1828.8 meter turn radius and a 1828.8 meter final-approach distance were acceptable without winds and with winds up to at least 15 knots for airspeeds from 75 to 100 knots. The altitude at roll-out from the final turn determined which final-approach distances were acceptable. Pilots preferred to have an initial straight leg of about 1 n. mi. after MLS guidance acquisition before turn intercept. The size of the azimuth coverage angle necessary to meet passenger and pilot criteria depends on the size of the turn angle: plus or minus 60 deg was adequate to cover all paths execpt ones with a 180 deg turn.

  11. Toward computer simulation of high-LET in vitro survival curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuskin, A.-C.; Michiels, C.; Lucas, S.

    2013-09-01

    We developed a Monte Carlo based computer program called MCSC (Monte Carlo Survival Curve) able to predict the survival fraction of cells irradiated in vitro with a broad beam of high linear energy transfer particles. Three types of cell responses are studied: the usual high dose response, the bystander effect and the low-dose hypersensitivity (HRS). The program models the broad beam irradiation and double strand break distribution following Poisson statistics. The progression of cells through the cell cycle is taken into account while the repair takes place. Input parameters are experimentally determined for A549 lung carcinoma cells irradiated with 10 and 20 keV µm-1 protons, 115 keV µm-1 alpha particles and for EAhy926 endothelial cells exposed to 115 keV µm-1 alpha particles. Results of simulations are presented and compared with experimental survival curves obtained for A549 and EAhy296 cells. Results are in good agreement with experimental data for both cell lines and all irradiation protocols. The benefits of MCSC are several: the gain of time that would have been spent performing time-consuming clonogenic assays, the capacity to estimate survival fraction of cell lines not forming colonies and possibly the evaluation of radiosensitivity parameters of given individuals.

  12. Spectral optimization simulation of white light based on the photopic eye-sensitivity curve

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Qi; Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe

    2016-02-07

    Spectral optimization simulation of white light is studied to boost maximum attainable luminous efficacy of radiation at high color-rendering index (CRI) and various color temperatures. The photopic eye-sensitivity curve V(λ) is utilized as the dominant portion of white light spectra. Emission spectra of a blue InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) and a red AlInGaP LED are added to the spectrum of V(λ) to match white color coordinates. It is demonstrated that at the condition of color temperature from 2500 K to 6500 K and CRI above 90, such white sources can achieve spectral efficacy of 330–390 lm/W, which is higher than the previously reported theoretical maximum values. We show that this eye-sensitivity-based approach also has advantages on component energy conversion efficiency compared with previously reported optimization solutions.

  13. Reducing spurious gravitational radiation in binary-black-hole simulations by using conformally curved initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelace, Geoffrey

    2009-06-01

    At early times in numerical evolutions of binary black holes, current simulations contain an initial burst of spurious gravitational radiation (also called 'junk radiation') which is not astrophysically realistic. The spurious radiation is a consequence of how the binary-black-hole initial data are constructed: the initial data are typically assumed to be conformally flat. In this paper, I adopt a curved conformal metric that is a superposition of two boosted, non-spinning black holes that are approximately 15 orbits from merger. I compare junk radiation of the superposed-boosted-Schwarzschild (SBS) initial data with the junk of corresponding conformally flat, maximally sliced (CFMS) initial data. The SBS junk is smaller in amplitude than the CFMS junk, with the junk's leading-order spectral modes typically being reduced by a factor of order 2 or more.

  14. Spectral optimization simulation of white light based on the photopic eye-sensitivity curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Qi; Hao, Luoxi; Lin, Yi; Cui, Zhe

    2016-02-01

    Spectral optimization simulation of white light is studied to boost maximum attainable luminous efficacy of radiation at high color-rendering index (CRI) and various color temperatures. The photopic eye-sensitivity curve V(λ) is utilized as the dominant portion of white light spectra. Emission spectra of a blue InGaN light-emitting diode (LED) and a red AlInGaP LED are added to the spectrum of V(λ) to match white color coordinates. It is demonstrated that at the condition of color temperature from 2500 K to 6500 K and CRI above 90, such white sources can achieve spectral efficacy of 330-390 lm/W, which is higher than the previously reported theoretical maximum values. We show that this eye-sensitivity-based approach also has advantages on component energy conversion efficiency compared with previously reported optimization solutions.

  15. The Water Retention Curves in THF Hydrate-Bearing Sediments - Experimental Measurement and Pore Scale Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabadi, N.; Zheng, X.; Dai, S.; Seol, Y.; Zapata, C.; Yun, T.; Jang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The water retention curve (WRC) of hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behaviour of hydrate dissociation for gas production. Most gas hydrates in marine environment have been formed from an aqueous phase (gas-dissolved water). However, the gas hydrate formation from an aqueous phase in a laboratory requires long period due to low gas solubility in water and is also associated with many experimental difficulties such as hydrate dissolution, difficult hydrate saturation control, and dynamic hydrate dissolution and formation. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is chosen to form THF hydrate because the formation process is faster than gas hydrate formation and hydrate saturation is easy to control. THF hydrate is formed at water-excess condition. Therefore, there is only water in the pore space after a target THF hydrate saturation is obtained. The pore habit of THF hydrate is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel and X-ray computed tomography images; and the water retention curves are obtained under different THF hydrate saturation conditions. Targeted THF hydrate saturations are Sh=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8. Results shown that at a given water saturation the capillary pressure increases as THF hydrate saturation increases. And the gas entry pressure increases with increasing hydrate saturation. The WRC obtained by experiments is also compared with the results of a pore-network model simulation and Lattice Boltzmann Method. The fitting parameters of van Genuchten equation for different hydrate saturation conditions are suggested for the use as input parameters of reservoir simulators.

  16. Tsunami Simulation using CIP Method with Characteristic Curve Equations and TVD-MacCormack Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukazawa, Souki; Tosaka, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    After entering 21st century, we already had two big tsunami disasters associated with Mw9 earthquakes in Sumatra and Japan. To mitigate the damages of tsunami, the numerical simulation technology combined with information technologies could provide reliable predictions in planning countermeasures to prevent the damage to the social system, making safety maps, and submitting early evacuation information to the residents. Shallow water equations are still solved not only for global scale simulation of the ocean tsunami propagation but also for local scale simulation of overland inundation in many tsunami simulators though three-dimensional model starts to be used due to improvement of CPU. One-dimensional shallow water equations are below: partial bm{Q}/partial t+partial bm{E}/partial x=bm{S} in which bm{Q}=( D M )), bm{E}=( M M^2/D+gD^2/2 )), bm{S}=( 0 -gDpartial z/partial x-gn2 M|M| /D7/3 )). where D[m] is total water depth; M[m^2/s] is water flux; z[m] is topography; g[m/s^2] is the gravitational acceleration; n[s/m1/3] is Manning's roughness coefficient. To solve these, the staggered leapfrog scheme is used in a lot of wide-scale tsunami simulator. But this scheme has a problem that lagging phase error occurs when courant number is small. In some practical simulation, a kind of diffusion term is added. In this study, we developed two wide-scale tsunami simulators with different schemes and compared usual scheme and other schemes in practicability and validity. One is a total variation diminishing modification of the MacCormack method (TVD-MacCormack method) which is famous for the simulation of compressible fluids. The other is the Cubic Interpolated Profile (CIP) method with characteristic curve equations transformed from shallow water equations. Characteristic curve equations derived from shallow water equations are below: partial R_x±/partial t+C_x±partial R_x±/partial x=∓ g/2partial z/partial x in which R_x±=√{gD}± u/2, C_x±=u± √{gD}. where u

  17. Light Curves from an MHD Simulation of a Black Hole Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnittman, Jeremy D.; Krolik, Julian H.; Hawley, John F.

    2006-11-01

    We use a relativistic ray-tracing code to calculate the light curves observed from a global, general relativistic, magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an accretion flow onto a Schwarzschild black hole. We apply three basic emission models to sample different properties of the time-dependent accretion disk. With one of these models, which assumes thermal blackbody emission and free-free absorption, we can predict qualitative features of the high-frequency power spectrum from stellar-mass black holes in the ``thermal dominant'' state. The simulated power spectrum is characterized by a power law of index Γ~3 and total rms fractional variance of <~2% above 10 Hz. For each emission model, we find that the variability amplitude should increase with increasing inclination angle. On the basis of a newly developed formalism for quantifying the significance of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in simulation data, we find that these simulations are able to identify any such features with (rms/mean) amplitudes >~1% near the orbital frequency at the innermost stable orbit. Initial results indicate the existence of transient QPO peaks with frequency ratios of nearly 2:3 at a 99.9% confidence limit, but they are not generic features, because at any given time they are seen only from certain observer directions. In addition, we present detailed analysis of the azimuthal structure of the accretion disk and the evolution of density perturbations in the inner disk. These ``hot-spot'' structures appear to be roughly self-similar over a range of disk radii, with a single characteristic size δφ=25deg and δr/r=0.3, and typical lifetimes Tl~0.3Torb.

  18. Rotation curve fitting and its fatal attraction to cores in realistically simulated galaxy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Juan C. B.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Springel, Volker; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    We study the role of systematic effects in observational studies of the cusp-core problem under the minimum disc approximation using a suite of high-resolution (25-pc softening length) hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf galaxies. We mimic realistic kinematic observations and fit the mock rotation curves with two analytic models commonly used to differentiate cores from cusps in the dark matter distribution. We find that the cored pseudo-isothermal sphere (ISO) model is strongly favoured by the reduced χ ^2_ν of the fits in spite of the fact that our simulations contain cuspy Navarro-Frenk-White profiles (NFW). We show that even idealized measurements of the gas circular motions can lead to the incorrect answer if velocity underestimates induced by pressure support, with a typical size of order ∼5 km s-1 in the central kiloparsec, are neglected. Increasing the spatial resolution of the mock observations leads to more misleading results because the inner region, where the effect of pressure support is most significant, is better sampled. Fits to observations with a spatial resolution of 100 pc (2 arcsec at 10 Mpc) favour the ISO model in 78-90 per cent of the cases, while at 800-pc resolution, 41-77 per cent of the galaxies indicate the fictitious presence of a dark matter core. The coefficients of our best-fitting models agree well with those reported in observational studies; therefore, we conclude that NFW haloes cannot be ruled out reliably from this type of analysis.

  19. High-order numerical simulations of pulsatile flow in a curved artery model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Christopher; Liang, Chunlei; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular flows are pulsatile, incompressible and occur in complex geometries with compliant walls. Together, these factors can produce an environment that can affect the progression of cardiovascular disease by altering wall shear stresses. Unstructured high-order CFD methods are well suited for capturing unsteady vortex-dominated viscous flows, and these methods provide high accuracy for similar cost as low-order methods. We use an in-house three-dimensional flux reconstruction Navier-Stokes solver to simulate secondary flows and vortical structures within a rigid 180-degree curved artery model under pulsatile flow of a Newtonian blood-analog fluid. Our simulations use a physiological flowrate waveform taken from the carotid artery. We are particularly interested in the dynamics during the deceleration phase of the waveform, where we observe the deformed-Dean, Dean, Lyne and Wall vortices. Our numerical results reveal the complex nature of these vortices both in space and time and their effect on overall wall shear stress. Numerical results agree with and complement experimental results obtained in our laboratory using particle image velocimetry. Supported by the GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  20. Laboratory investigation and simulation of breakthrough curves in karst conduits with pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoer; Chang, Yong; Wu, Jichun; Peng, Fu

    2017-07-01

    A series of laboratory experiments are performed under various hydrological conditions to analyze the effect of pools in pipes on breakthrough curves (BTCs). The BTCs are generated after instantaneous injections of NaCl tracer solution. In order to test the feasibility of reproducing the BTCs and obtain transport parameters, three modeling approaches have been applied: the equilibrium model, the linear graphical method and the two-region nonequilibrium model. The investigation results show that pools induce tailing of the BTCs, and the shapes of BTCs depend on pool geometries and hydrological conditions. The simulations reveal that the two-region nonequilibrium model yields the best fits to experimental BTCs because the model can describe the transient storage in pools by the partition coefficient and the mass transfer coefficient. The model parameters indicate that pools produce high dispersion. The increased tailing occurs mainly because the partition coefficient decreases, as the number of pools increases. When comparing the tracer BTCs obtained using the two types of pools with the same size, the more appreciable BTC tails that occur for symmetrical pools likely result mainly from the less intense exchange between the water in the pools and the water in the pipe, because the partition coefficients for the two types of pools are virtually identical. Dispersivity values decrease as flow rates increase; however, the trend in dispersion is not clear. The reduced tailing is attributed to a decrease in immobile water with increasing flow rate. It provides evidence for hydrodynamically controlled tailing effects.

  1. Impact of truncated area under the curve on failed bioequivalence studies: a computer simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Iftekhar

    2004-01-01

    The common measures used in a bioequivalence study are area under the curve (AUC) and the maximum plasma concentration. Estimation of AUC requires frequent blood samples. For long half-life drugs, sampling for long periods of time may become cumbersome. To resolve this issue some investigators have suggested the use of truncated AUC in bioequivalence studies for long half-life drugs. The suggested length of time for the truncated AUC is 72 hours. Many studies have been conducted to show that truncated AUC till 72 hours is a suitable approach. However, the suitability of truncated AUC for failed bioequivalence study has not been demonstrated. This report of simulated plasma concentration versus time data evaluates the suitability of truncated AUC for failed bioequivalence study of two hypothetical drugs. The results of the study indicate that the truncated approach for the estimation of the AUC for long half-life drugs in bioequivalence studies may be useful but it also increases the probability of accepting drugs as being bioequivalent when they are not.

  2. Analog-model simulations for secondary canal controls and forward pumping water-management schemes in southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cordes, E.H.; Gardner, Richard Alfred

    1976-01-01

    The analog model of the Biscayne aquifer of southeast Florida was used to approximate the effects of two proposed water-management schemes. One involved adding a secondary control structure in a major canal which is controlled near the coast. In the model the controls were operated in accordance with canal water level both above and below the secondary control. Although the model could not differentiate between control openings of 1 foot or 5 feet, it showed that the secondary control is a viable method of conserving ground water. The second scheme involved pumping ground water ('forward pumping') from the Biscayne aquifer in inland areas during the dry season to: (1) augment canal flows toward the coast to sustain ground-water levels there, and (2) generate additional ground-water storage space for recharge in the wet season. Several sites on the model were programmed for forward pumping wells and the storage change was noted as a percentage of the ground-water withdrawal. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Preparation of Synthetic Earthquake Catalogue and Tsunami Hazard Curves in Marmara Sea using Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayraktar, Başak; Özer Sözdinler, Ceren; Necmioǧlu, Öcal; Meral Özel, Nurcan

    2017-04-01

    The Marmara Sea and its surrounding is one of the most populated areas in Turkey. Many densely populated cities, such as megacity Istanbul with a population of more than 14 million, a great number of industrial facilities in largest capacity and potential, refineries, ports and harbors are located along the coasts of Marmara Sea. The region is highly seismically active. There has been a wide range of studies in this region regarding the fault mechanisms, seismic activities, earthquakes and triggered tsunamis in the Sea of Marmara. The historical documents reveal that the region has been experienced many earthquakes and tsunamis in the past. According to Altinok et al. (2011), 35 tsunami events happened in Marmara Sea between BC 330 and 1999. As earthquakes are expected in Marmara Sea with the break of segments of North Anatolian Fault (NAF) in the future, the region should be investigated in terms of the possibility of tsunamis by the occurrence of earthquakes in specific return periods. This study aims to make probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis in Marmara Sea. For this purpose, the possible sources of tsunami scenarios are specified by compiling the earthquake catalogues, historical records and scientific studies conducted in the region. After compiling all this data, a synthetic earthquake and tsunami catalogue are prepared using Monte Carlo simulations. For specific return periods, the possible epicenters, rupture lengths, widths and displacements are determined with Monte Carlo simulations assuming the angles of fault segments as deterministic. For each earthquake of synthetic catalogue, the tsunami wave heights will be calculated at specific locations along Marmara Sea. As a further objective, this study will determine the tsunami hazard curves for specific locations in Marmara Sea including the tsunami wave heights and their probability of exceedance. This work is supported by SATREPS-MarDim Project (Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in the

  4. Ultrasonic cleaning of root canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaagen, Bram; Boutsioukis, Christos; Jiang, Lei-Meng; Macedo, Ricardo; van der Sluis, Luc; Versluis, Michel

    2011-11-01

    A crucial step during a dental root canal treatment is irrigation, where an antimicrobial fluid is injected into the root canal system to eradicate all bacteria. Agitation of the fluid using an ultrasonically vibrating miniature file has shown significant improvement in cleaning efficacy over conventional syringe irrigation. However, the physical mechanisms underlying the cleaning process, being acoustic streaming, cavitation or chemical activity, and combinations thereof, are not fully understood. High-speed imaging allows us to visualize the flow pattern and cavitation in a root canal model at microscopic scales, at timescales relevant to the cleaning processes (microseconds). MicroPIV measurements of the induced acoustic streaming are coupled to the oscillation characteristics of the file as simulated numerically and measured with a laser vibrometer. The results give new insight into the role of acoustic streaming and the importance of the confinement for the cleaning of root canals.

  5. Photometric Identification of Population III Core-Collapse Supernovae: Multicolor Light Curve Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Ishigaki, Miho N.; Blinnikov, Sergey; Suzuki, Tomoharu

    We study the multicolor light curves for a number of metal-free core-collapse supernova (SN) models (25-100 ȯ ) to determine the indicators for the detection and identification of first generation SNe. We use mixing-fallback supernova explosion models that explain the observed abundance patterns of metal-poor stars. Numerical calculations of the multicolor light curves are performed using the multigroup radiation hydrodynamic code STELLA. The calculated light curves of metal-free SNe are compared with solar-metallicity models and observed SNe. We conclude that the multicolor light curves could be used to identify first-generation SNe in current (Subaru/HSC) and future transient surveys (LSST, James Webb Space Telescope). They are also suitable for identifying low-metallicity SNe in the nearby universe (PTF, Pan-STARRS, Gaia).

  6. 68. CANAL PLAN 5 EAST. CANAL BED IS VISIBLE WHILE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. CANAL PLAN 5 EAST. CANAL BED IS VISIBLE WHILE FOOT OF CANAL IS UNDERGOING MAINTAINANCE. NOTE HOW LARGE AMOUNTS OF DIRT ARE HAULED FROM PLACE TO PLACE USING A CANAL BOAT AND CRADLE. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  7. 3. ELEVATION. FROM SOUTH WITH CANAL PRISM. Canal Road ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ELEVATION. FROM SOUTH WITH CANAL PRISM. - Canal Road Bridge, Canal Road spanning Delaware Canal Diversion, Locks 22 & 23 in Delaware Canal State Park in Williams Township, Raubsville, Northampton County, PA

  8. Accretion disc time lag distributions: applying CREAM to simulated AGN light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, D. A.; Horne, Keith; Villforth, C.

    2016-02-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) vary in their brightness across all wavelengths. Moreover, longer wavelength ultraviolet-optical continuum light curves appear to be delayed with respect to shorter wavelength light curves. A simple way to model these delays is by assuming thermal reprocessing of a variable point source (a lamp post) by a blackbody accretion disc. We introduce a new method, CREAM (Continuum REprocessed AGN Markov Chain Monte Carlo), that models continuum variations using this lamp post model. The disc light curves lag the lamp post emission with a time delay distribution sensitive to the disc temperature-radius profile and inclination. We test CREAM's ability to recover both inclination and product of black hole mass and accretion rate {Mdot{M}}, and show that the code is also able to infer the shape of the driving light curve. CREAM is applied to synthetic light curves expected from 1000 s exposures of a 17th magnitude AGN with a 2-m telescope in Sloan g and i bands with Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of 500-900 depending on the filter and lunar phase. We also test CREAM on poorer quality g and i light curves with SNR = 100. We find in the high-SNR case that CREAM can recover the accretion disc inclination to within an uncertainty of 5° and an {Mdot{M}} to within 0.04 dex.

  9. Diagnosing Hydrologic Flow Paths in Forest and Pasture Land Uses within the Panama Canal Watershed Using Simulated Rainfall and Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, F. L.; Mojica, A.; Kempema, E. W.; Briceno, J. C.; Regina, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrological processes in the humid tropics are poorly understood and an important topic when it comes to water management in the seasonal tropics. The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama Canal Watershed Experiment, Agua Salud Project, seeks to understand these processes and quantify the long-term effects of different land cover and use across the Panama Canal Watershed. In this study we used an ARS-type rainfall simulator to apply rainfall rates up to 200 mm per hour over a 2m by 6m area on deep saprolitic soils in forest and pasture land covers. A salinity contrast added to the applied rainwater allowed observation of bulk flow paths and velocities in the subsurface. The observed effects of land cover and land use on hydrological response were striking. In the forest site, we were unable to produce surface runoff even after the application of 600 mm of rainfall in three hours, and observed flow in soils down to approximately 2 m depth, and no downslope macropore flow. In the pasture site, surface runoff was produced, and we measured the permeability of the area with applied rainfall. Observed flow paths were much shallower, less than 1 m depth, with significant macropore flow observed at downslope positions. We hypothesize that land use and land cover have significant impacts on flow paths as they affect creation, connectivity, and function of biologically created macropores in the soil.

  10. Simulation of ultrasonic inspection of curved composites using a hybrid semi-analytical/numerical code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverdy, Frédéric; Mahaut, Steve; Dominguez, Nicolas; Dubois, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Carbon Fiber reinforced composites are increasingly used in structural parts in the aeronautics industry, as they allow to reduce the weight of aircrafts while maintaining high mechanical performances. However, such structures can be complicated to inspect due to their complex geometries and complex composite properties, leading to highly heterogeneous and anisotropic materials. Different potential damages and manufacturing flaws related to these parts are to be detected: porosities, ply waviness, delaminations after impact. Ultrasonic inspection, which is commonly used to test the full volume of composite panels, thus has to cope with both complex wave propagation (within anisotropic parts whose crystallographic orientation varies according to the layers structure) and flaw interaction (local distortion of plies such as ply waviness, small pores, structural noise due to periodicity patterns…). Developing NDT procedures for those parts therefore requires simulation tools to help for understanding those phenomena, and to optimize probes and techniques. Within the CIVA multi-techniques platform, CEA-LIST has developed semi-analytical tools for ultrasonic techniques, which have the advantages of high computational efficiency (fast calculations), but with limited range of application due to some hypothesis (for instance, homogenization approaches which don't allow to take account of structural noise). On the other hand, numerical methods such as finite element (FEM) or finite difference in time domain (FDTD) are more suitable to compute ultrasonic wave propagation and defect scattering in complex materials such as composite but require more computational efforts. Hybrid methods couple semi-analytical solutions and numerical computations in limited spatial domains to handle complex cases with high computation performances. In CIVA we have integrated a hybrid model that combines the semi-analytical methods developed at CEA to FDTD codes developed at Airbus Group

  11. Use of the Learning Curve-Cumulative Summation Test for Leopold Maneuvers Assessment in a Simulator: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Díez-Goñi, Nieves; Guillén, Sergio; Rodríguez-Díez, María C; Pineda, Laura; Alcázar, Juan L

    2015-10-01

    Simulation enables medical students to practice clinical skills in a safe environment. Graduates in medicine must be able to correctly perform an examination on a pregnant woman using Leopold maneuvers. Learning curves-cumulative summation (LC-CUSUM) may help determine when the student has achieved a specific skill. Our objective was to perform the LC-CUSUM test regarding the ability of students to correctly carry out Leopold maneuvers; a pregnancy simulator was used, transferring the results to a clinical setting. Five medical students were trained to carry out Leopold maneuvers using the simulator. Each student performed maneuvers for 50 cases of different fetus positions; a LC-CUSUM was plotted for each student. Afterward, the students performed the Leopold maneuvers on 5 pregnant women. Of the 5 students, 3 achieved a level of proficiency; the attempts needed for reaching this level were 13, 13, and 37, respectively. The other 2 students did not reach proficiency level. Of the students who became successfully proficient with the simulator, one of them attained a 100% success rate in pregnant patients, whereas the other two had success rates of 80%. The students who did not achieve a level of competency with the simulator had only a 60% success rate with patients. Because of the differences observed between students in the number of attempts needed for achieving proficiency in Leopold maneuvers, we believe that each student should build his/her own learning curve. Achieving competency in carrying out Leopold maneuvers using the simulator could be transferable to patients.

  12. Stochastic simulation of soil particle-size curves in heterogeneous aquifer systems through a Bayes space approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menafoglio, A.; Guadagnini, A.; Secchi, P.

    2016-08-01

    We address the problem of stochastic simulation of soil particle-size curves (PSCs) in heterogeneous aquifer systems. Unlike traditional approaches that focus solely on a few selected features of PSCs (e.g., selected quantiles), our approach considers the entire particle-size curves and can optionally include conditioning on available data. We rely on our prior work to model PSCs as cumulative distribution functions and interpret their density functions as functional compositions. We thus approximate the latter through an expansion over an appropriate basis of functions. This enables us to (a) effectively deal with the data dimensionality and constraints and (b) to develop a simulation method for PSCs based upon a suitable and well defined projection procedure. The new theoretical framework allows representing and reproducing the complete information content embedded in PSC data. As a first field application, we demonstrate the quality of unconditional and conditional simulations obtained with our methodology by considering a set of particle-size curves collected within a shallow alluvial aquifer in the Neckar river valley, Germany.

  13. An evidence-based laparoscopic simulation curriculum shortens the clinical learning curve and reduces surgical adverse events.

    PubMed

    De Win, Gunter; Van Bruwaene, Siska; Kulkarni, Jyotsna; Van Calster, Ben; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Allen, Christopher; Lissens, Ann; De Ridder, Dirk; Miserez, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Surgical simulation is becoming increasingly important in surgical education. However, the method of simulation to be incorporated into a surgical curriculum is unclear. We compared the effectiveness of a proficiency-based preclinical simulation training in laparoscopy with conventional surgical training and conventional surgical training interspersed with standard simulation sessions. In this prospective single-blinded trial, 30 final-year medical students were randomized into three groups, which differed in the way they were exposed to laparoscopic simulation training. The control group received only clinical training during residency, whereas the interval group received clinical training in combination with simulation training. The Center for Surgical Technologies Preclinical Training Program (CST PTP) group received a proficiency-based preclinical simulation course during the final year of medical school but was not exposed to any extra simulation training during surgical residency. After 6 months of surgical residency, the influence on the learning curve while performing five consecutive human laparoscopic cholecystectomies was evaluated with motion tracking, time, Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills, and number of adverse events (perforation of gall bladder, bleeding, and damage to liver tissue). The odds of adverse events were 4.5 (95% confidence interval 1.3-15.3) and 3.9 (95% confidence interval 1.5-9.7) times lower for the CST PTP group compared with the control and interval groups. For raw time, corrected time, movements, path length, and Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills, the CST PTP trainees nearly always started at a better level and were never outperformed by the other trainees. Proficiency-based preclinical training has a positive impact on the learning curve of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy and diminishes adverse events.

  14. An evidence-based laparoscopic simulation curriculum shortens the clinical learning curve and reduces surgical adverse events

    PubMed Central

    De Win, Gunter; Van Bruwaene, Siska; Kulkarni, Jyotsna; Van Calster, Ben; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Allen, Christopher; Lissens, Ann; De Ridder, Dirk; Miserez, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical simulation is becoming increasingly important in surgical education. However, the method of simulation to be incorporated into a surgical curriculum is unclear. We compared the effectiveness of a proficiency-based preclinical simulation training in laparoscopy with conventional surgical training and conventional surgical training interspersed with standard simulation sessions. Materials and methods In this prospective single-blinded trial, 30 final-year medical students were randomized into three groups, which differed in the way they were exposed to laparoscopic simulation training. The control group received only clinical training during residency, whereas the interval group received clinical training in combination with simulation training. The Center for Surgical Technologies Preclinical Training Program (CST PTP) group received a proficiency-based preclinical simulation course during the final year of medical school but was not exposed to any extra simulation training during surgical residency. After 6 months of surgical residency, the influence on the learning curve while performing five consecutive human laparoscopic cholecystectomies was evaluated with motion tracking, time, Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills, and number of adverse events (perforation of gall bladder, bleeding, and damage to liver tissue). Results The odds of adverse events were 4.5 (95% confidence interval 1.3–15.3) and 3.9 (95% confidence interval 1.5–9.7) times lower for the CST PTP group compared with the control and interval groups. For raw time, corrected time, movements, path length, and Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills, the CST PTP trainees nearly always started at a better level and were never outperformed by the other trainees. Conclusion Proficiency-based preclinical training has a positive impact on the learning curve of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy and diminishes adverse events. PMID:27512343

  15. A Laboratory Simulation of Urban Runoff and the Potential for Hydrograph Prediction with Curve Numbers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Urban drainages are mosaics of pervious and impervious surfaces, and prediction of runoff hydrology with a lumped modeling approach using the NRCS curve number may be appropriate. However, the prognostic capability of such a lumped approach is complicated by routing and connectivity amongst infiltra...

  16. COMPARING THE LIGHT CURVES OF SIMULATED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE WITH OBSERVATIONS USING DATA-DRIVEN MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Diemer, Benedikt; Kessler, Richard; Graziani, Carlo; Jordan, George C. IV; Lamb, Donald Q.; Long, Min; Van Rossum, Daniel R.

    2013-08-20

    We propose a robust, quantitative method to compare the synthetic light curves of a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion model with a large set of observed SNe Ia, and derive a figure of merit for the explosion model's agreement with observations. The synthetic light curves are fit with the data-driven model SALT2 which returns values for stretch, color, and magnitude at peak brightness, as well as a goodness-of-fit parameter. Each fit is performed multiple times with different choices of filter bands and epoch range in order to quantify the systematic uncertainty on the fitted parameters. We use a parametric population model for the distribution of observed SN Ia parameters from large surveys, and extend it to represent red, dim, and bright outliers found in a low-redshift SN Ia data set. We discuss the potential uncertainties of this population model and find it to be reliable given the current uncertainties on cosmological parameters. Using our population model, we assign each set of fitted parameters a likelihood of being observed in nature, and a figure of merit based on this likelihood. We define a second figure of merit based on the quality of the light curve fit, and combine the two measures into an overall figure of merit for each explosion model. We compute figures of merit for a variety of one-, two-, and three-dimensional explosion models and show that our evaluation method allows meaningful inferences across a wide range of light curve quality and fitted parameters.

  17. 21. 1934 aerial of Tempe Canal, Sections 19 and 30 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. 1934 aerial of Tempe Canal, Sections 19 and 30 (T1N R5E) and Sections 24 and 25 (T1N R4E) (top of page is north). The main canal enters the picture at upper right and curves out of picture at lower right. The Hayden Branch (thin dark line) runs from top of picture to the southwest, then curves to the west. The Western Branch enters picture running parallel to main canal, then angles off to southwest. Photographer: Unknown, 1934. Source: SRP Cartographic Drafting - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. Flow Curve Determination at Large Plastic Strain Levels to Accurately Constitutive Equations of AHSS in Forming Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, X.; Sriram, S.; Kergen, R.

    2011-05-01

    ArcelorMittal continuously develops new steel grades (AHSS) with high performance for the automotive industry to improve the weight reduction and the passive safety. The wide market introduction of AHSS raises a new challenge for manufacturers in terms of material models in the prediction of forming—especially formability and springback. The relatively low uniform elongation, the high UTS and the low forming limit curve of these AHSS may cause difficulties in forming simulations. One of these difficulties is the consequence of the relatively low uniform elongation on the parameters identification of isotropic hardening model. Different experimental tests allow to reach large plastic strain levels (hydraulic bulge test, stack compression test, shear test…). After a description on how to determine the flow curve in these experimental tests, a comparison of the different flow curves is made for different steel grades. The ArcelorMittal identification protocol for hardening models is only based on stress-strain curves determined in uniaxial tension. Experimental tests where large plastic strain levels are reached are used to validate our identification protocol and to recommend some hardening models. Finally, the influence of isotropic hardening models and yield loci in forming prediction for AHSS steels will be presented.

  19. Micromagnetic simulations of demagnetization curves for single-phase nanocrystalline PrFeB magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. P.; Zhao, S. F.; Han, X. F.

    2006-06-01

    The Gauss-Seidel projection method developed in [E. Weinan, X.P. Wang, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 38 (2000) 1647-1665 and X.P. Wang, C.J. Garcia-Cervera, E. Weinan, J. Comp. Phys. 171 (2001) 357] is used to calculate the demagnetization curves for the single-phase nanocrystalline PrFeB magnet. It is observed that magnetic reversal for PrFeB magnet starts near the grain boundary where the angle between the external magnetic field and easy direction of the magnet can be as large as 90[ring operator]. We also calculated the demagnetization curves, coercivity [mu]0Hc and remanence Jr for different temperatures. The numerical results are consistent with the experimental observations.

  20. New approaches to the simulation of heat-capacity curves and phase diagrams of pseudobinary phospholipid mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Johann, C; Garidel, P; Mennicke, L; Blume, A

    1996-01-01

    A simulation program using least-squares minimization was developed to calculate and fit heat capacity (cp) curves to experimental thermograms of dilute aqueous dispersions of phospholipid mixtures determined by high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry. We analyzed cp curves and phase diagrams of the pseudobinary aqueous lipid systems 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol/ 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3phosphatidylcholine (DMPG/DPPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidic acid/1, 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPA/DPPC) at pH 7. The simulation of the cp curves is based on regular solution theory using two nonideality parameters rho g and rho l for symmetric nonideal mixing in the gel and the liquid-crystalline phases. The broadening of the cp curves owing to limited cooperativity is incorporated into the simulation by convolution of the cp curves calculated for infinite cooperativity with a broadening function derived from a simple two-state transition model with the cooperative unit size n = delta HVH/delta Hcal as an adjustable parameter. The nonideality parameters and the cooperative unit size turn out to be functions of composition. In a second step, phase diagrams were calculated and fitted to the experimental data by use of regular solution theory with four different model assumptions. The best fits were obtained with a four-parameter model based on nonsymmetric, nonideal mixing in both phases. The simulations of the phase diagrams show that the absolute values of the nonideality parameters can be changed in a certain range without large effects on the shape of the phase diagram as long as the difference of the nonideality parameters for rho g for the gel and rho l for the liquid-crystalline phase remains constant. The miscibility in DMPG/DPPC and DMPA/DPPC mixtures differs remarkably because, for DMPG/DPPC, delta rho = rho l -rho g is negative, whereas for DMPA/DPPC this difference is positive. For DMPA/DPPC, this

  1. Light-curve Analysis of Ordinary Type IIP Supernovae Based on Neutrino-driven Explosion Simulations in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Wongwathanarat, A.; Janka, H.-Th.; Müller, E.

    2017-09-01

    Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) are the most numerous subclass of core-collapse SNe originating from massive stars. In the framework of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, we study the properties of the SN outburst for a red supergiant progenitor model and compare the corresponding light curves with observations of the ordinary Type IIP SN 1999em. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of (parametrically triggered) neutrino-driven explosions are performed with the (explicit, finite-volume, Eulerian, multifluid hydrodynamics) code Prometheus, using a presupernova model of a 15 M ⊙ star as initial data. On approaching homologous expansion, the hydrodynamic and composition variables of the 3D models are mapped to a spherically symmetric configuration, and the simulations are continued with the (implicit, Lagrangian, radiation hydrodynamics) code Crab to follow the evolution of the blast wave during the SN outburst. Our 3D neutrino-driven explosion model with an explosion energy of about 0.5× {10}51 erg produces 56Ni in rough agreement with the amount deduced from fitting the radioactively powered light-curve tail of SN 1999em. The considered presupernova model, 3D explosion simulations, and light-curve calculations can explain the basic observational features of SN 1999em, except for those connected to the presupernova structure of the outer stellar layers. Our 3D simulations show that the distribution of 56Ni-rich matter in velocity space is asymmetric with a strong dipole component that is consistent with the observations of SN 1999em. The monotonic decline in luminosity from the plateau to the radioactive tail in ordinary SNe IIP is a manifestation of the intense turbulent mixing at the He/H composition interface.

  2. Dynamic simulation of friction-induced vibrations in a light railway bogie while curving compared with measurement results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzeck, Bernhard; Hecht, Markus

    2010-12-01

    It is a frequently observed phenomenon that curving of railway vehicles can involve friction-induced oscillations. The study presented in this paper investigates vibrations with a frequency of 80 Hz occurring at a light rail vehicle in Stuttgart in curves with radii between 50 and 200 m. The aim of the investigation was to identify the oscillation and transmission mechanism, and the dominant parameters within this. As the cause could not be clearly identified from the measurements, a multi-body simulation in the time domain was used. The model consisted of both vehicle and track and considered the structural dynamics of the wheelset and bogie frame up to 200 Hz. The system was modelled using the commercial MBS software SIMPACK. The identified model describes the oscillations observed at the real vehicle. The results proved to be useful in minimising the vibrations at the real vehicles.

  3. Crash testing difference-smoothing algorithm on a large sample of simulated light curves from TDC1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathna Kumar, S.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we propose refinements to the difference-smoothing algorithm for the measurement of time delay from the light curves of the images of a gravitationally lensed quasar. The refinements mainly consist of a more pragmatic approach to choose the smoothing time-scale free parameter, generation of more realistic synthetic light curves for the estimation of time delay uncertainty and using a plot of normalized χ2 computed over a wide range of trial time delay values to assess the reliability of a measured time delay and also for identifying instances of catastrophic failure. We rigorously tested the difference-smoothing algorithm on a large sample of more than thousand pairs of simulated light curves having known true time delays between them from the two most difficult 'rungs' - rung3 and rung4 - of the first edition of Strong Lens Time Delay Challenge (TDC1) and found an inherent tendency of the algorithm to measure the magnitude of time delay to be higher than the true value of time delay. However, we find that this systematic bias is eliminated by applying a correction to each measured time delay according to the magnitude and sign of the systematic error inferred by applying the time delay estimator on synthetic light curves simulating the measured time delay. Following these refinements, the TDC performance metrics for the difference-smoothing algorithm are found to be competitive with those of the best performing submissions of TDC1 for both the tested 'rungs'. The MATLAB codes used in this work and the detailed results are made publicly available.

  4. MCRaT Simulations of Long Gamma Ray Burst Spectra and Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsotan, T.; Lazzati, D.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of the Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer, MCRaT, simulations of long gamma ray bursts from a variety of stellar progenitors and jet properties, including variable engines. We also compare the resulting spectra to observed data.

  5. Simulation of tissue activity curves of 64Cu-ATSM for sub-target volume delineation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalah, E.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2010-02-01

    There is much interest in positron emission tomography (PET) for measurements of regional tracer concentration in hypoxic tumour-bearing tissue, focusing on the need for accurate radiotherapy treatment planning. Generally, relevant data are taken over multiple time frames in the form of tissue activity curves (TACs), thus providing an indication of vasculature structure and geometry. This is a potential key in providing information on cellular perfusion and limited diffusion. A number of theoretical studies have attempted to describe tracer uptake in tissue cells in an effort to understand such complicated behaviour of cellular uptake and the mechanism of washout. More recently, a novel computerized reaction diffusion equation method was developed by Kelly and Brady (2006 A model to simulate tumour oxygenation and dynamic [18F]-FMISO PET data Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5859-73), where they managed to simulate the realistic dynamic TACs of 18F-FMISO. The model was developed over a multi-step process. Here we present a refinement to the work of Kelly and Brady, such that the model allows simulation of a realistic tissue activity curve (TAC) of any hypoxia selective PET tracer, in a single step process. In this work we show particular interest in simulating the TAC of perhaps the most promising hypoxia selective tracer, 64Cu-ATSM. In addition, we demonstrate its potential role in tumour sub-volume delineation for radiotherapy treatment planning. Simulation results have demonstrated the significant high contrast of imaging using ATSM, with a tumour to blood ratio ranging from 2.24 to 4.1.

  6. 27. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADGATE WITH CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADGATE WITH CANAL BRIDGE IN DISTANCE; LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  7. 2. CANAL BOAT ENTERING THE DELAWARE CANAL FROM OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CANAL BOAT ENTERING THE DELAWARE CANAL FROM OF THE LEHIGH RIVER. BOATS COULD BE FERRIED ACROSS THE DELAWARE RIVER TO THE MORRIS CANAL BY A CABLE SUPPORTED TROLLEY. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  8. A new approach to canal surface with parallel transport frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiṣi, Ilim; Öztürk, Günay

    In the present study, we attend to the canal surfaces with the spine curve γ according to the parallel transport frame in Euclidean 4-space 𝔼4. We give an example of these surfaces and obtain some results about curvature conditions in 𝔼4. Moreover, the visualizations of projections of canal surfaces are presented. Lastly, we give the necessary and sufficient conditions for canal surfaces to become weak superconformal.

  9. Research on the Integration of Bionic Geometry Modeling and Simulation of Robot Foot Based on Characteristic Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, G.; Zhu, H.; Xu, J.; Gao, K.; Zhu, D.

    2017-09-01

    The bionic research of shape is an important aspect of the research on bionic robot, and its implementation cannot be separated from the shape modeling and numerical simulation of the bionic object, which is tedious and time-consuming. In order to improve the efficiency of shape bionic design, the feet of animals living in soft soil and swamp environment are taken as bionic objects, and characteristic skeleton curve, section curve, joint rotation variable, position and other parameters are used to describe the shape and position information of bionic object’s sole, toes and flipper. The geometry modeling of the bionic object is established by using the parameterization of characteristic curves and variables. Based on this, the integration framework of parametric modeling and finite element modeling, dynamic analysis and post-processing of sinking process in soil is proposed in this paper. The examples of bionic ostrich foot and bionic duck foot are also given. The parametric modeling and integration technique can achieve rapid improved design based on bionic object, and it can also greatly improve the efficiency and quality of robot foot bionic design, and has important practical significance to improve the level of bionic design of robot foot’s shape and structure.

  10. Large-eddy simulation of curved-geometry flows using contravariant components of velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Weixing; Xu, Hongyi; Khalid, Mahmood

    2011-01-01

    The current large-eddy simulation (LES) research makes use of the contravariant components as the dependent variables on a staggered grid system for the discretisation of the governing equations in curvilinear coordinates. This technology provides a possibility to investigate efficiently turbulent flows in complex geometries. To test and validate the recently developed in-house LES code, LESSGA (Large-Eddy Simulation on a Staggered Grid Arrangement), numerical simulations were performed for turbulent flows in a concentric annular pipe and transitional flows past an airfoil. In this article, the computed results of flows in a concentric annular pipe with a radius ratio of a = R inner/Router = 0.5 at ? and flows past an SD7003 airfoil at Rec = 60,000 and angle of attack α = 4° are compared with available experimental and DNS data. Technical difficulties experienced are also discussed.

  11. Simulations of peristaltic slip-flow of hydromagnetic bio-fluid in a curved channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, N.; Javid, K.; Sajid, M.

    2016-02-01

    The influence of slip and magnetic field on transport characteristics of a bio-fluid are analyzed in a curved channel. The problem is modeled in curvilinear coordinate system under the assumption that the wavelength of the peristaltic wave is larger in magnitude compared to the width of the channel. The resulting nonlinear boundary value problem (BVP) is solved using an implicit finite difference technique (FDT). The flow velocity, pressure rise per wavelength and stream function are illustrated through graphs for various values of rheological and geometrical parameters of the problem. The study reveals that a thin boundary layer exists at the channel wall for strong magnetic field. Moreover, small values of Weissenberg number counteract the curvature and make the velocity profile symmetric. It is also observed that pressure rise per wavelength in pumping region increases (decreases) by increasing magnetic field, Weissenberg number and curvature of the channel (slip parameter).

  12. Numerical simulations of the charged-particle flow dynamics for sources with a curved emission surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altsybeyev, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    The implementation of numerical methods for studying the dynamics of particle flows produced by pulsed sources is discussed. A particle tracking method with so-called gun iteration for simulations of beam dynamics is used. For the space charge limited emission problem, we suggest a Gauss law emission model for precise current-density calculation in the case of a curvilinear emitter. The results of numerical simulations of particle-flow formation for cylindrical bipolar diode and for diode with elliptical emitter are presented.

  13. FORCinel Version 3.0: An Integrated Environment for Processing, Analysis and Simulation of First-Order Reversal Curve Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascu, I.; Harrison, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    First-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams are a powerful method to characterise the hysteresis properties of magnetic grain ensembles. Methods of processing, analysis and simulation of FORC diagrams have developed rapidly over the past few years, dramatically expanding their utility within rock magnetic research. Here we announce the latest release of FORCinel (Version 3.0), which integrates many of these developments into a unified, user-friendly package running within Igor Pro (www.wavemetrics.com). FORCinel v. 3.0 can be downloaded from https://wserv4.esc.cam.ac.uk/nanopaleomag/. The release will be accompanied by a series of video tutorials outlining each of the new features, including: i) improved work flow, with unified smoothing approach; ii) increased processing speed using multiple processors; iii) control of output resolution, enabling large datasets (> 500 FORCs) to be smoothed in a matter of seconds; iv) load, process, analyse and average multiple FORC diagrams; v) load and process non-gridded data and data acquired on non-PMC systems; vi) improved method for exploring optimal smoothing parameters; vii) interactive and un-doable data-pretreatments; viii) automated detection and removal of measurement outliers; ix) improved interactive method for the generation and optimisation of colour scales; x) full integration with FORCem1 - supervised quantitative unmixing of FORC diagrams using principle component analysis (PCA); xi) full integration with FORCulator2 - micromagnetic simulation of FORC diagrams; xiii) simulate TRM acquisition using the kinetic Monte Carlo simulation algorithm of Shcherbakov3. 1. Lascu, I., Harrison, R.J., Li, Y., Muraszko, J.R., Channell, J.E.T., Piotrowski, A.M., Hodell, D.A., 2015. Magnetic unmixing of first-order reversal curve diagrams using principal component analysis. Geochemistry, Geophys. Geosystems 16, 2900-2915. 2. Harrison, R.J., Lascu, I., 2014. FORCulator: A micromagnetic tool for simulating first-order reversal

  14. Application of software for automated canal management (SacMan) to the WM lateral canal

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Simulation studies have demonstrated that automatic control of canals is more effective when feedforward scheduling, or routing of know demand changes, is combined with centralized, automatic, distant, downstream-water-level control. In practice, few canals use this approach. To help further develop...

  15. PARAMETER ESTIMATION AND CONFIDENCE REGIONS IN THE METHOD OF LIGHT-CURVE SIMULATIONS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF POWER DENSITY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Martin; Madejski, Greg

    2009-07-20

    The method of light-curve simulations is a tool that has been applied to X-ray monitoring observations of active galactic nuclei for the characterization of the power density spectrum (PDS) of temporal variability and measurement of associated break frequencies (which appear to be an important diagnostic for the mass of the black hole in these systems as well as their accretion state). It relies on a model for the PDS that is fitted to the observed data. The determination of confidence regions on the fitted model parameters is of particular importance, and we show how the Neyman construction based on distributions of estimates may be implemented in the context of light-curve simulations. We believe that this procedure offers advantages over the method used in earlier reports on PDS model fits, not least with respect to the correspondence between the size of the confidence region and the precision with which the data constrain the values of the model parameters. We plan to apply the new procedure to existing RXTE and XMM-Newton observations of Seyfert I galaxies as well as RXTE observations of the Seyfert II galaxy NGC 4945.

  16. Parameter Estimation and Confidence Regions in the Method of Light-Curve Simulations for the Analysis of Power Density Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Martin; Madejski, Greg

    2009-07-01

    The method of light-curve simulations is a tool that has been applied to X-ray monitoring observations of active galactic nuclei for the characterization of the power density spectrum (PDS) of temporal variability and measurement of associated break frequencies (which appear to be an important diagnostic for the mass of the black hole in these systems as well as their accretion state). It relies on a model for the PDS that is fitted to the observed data. The determination of confidence regions on the fitted model parameters is of particular importance, and we show how the Neyman construction based on distributions of estimates may be implemented in the context of light-curve simulations. We believe that this procedure offers advantages over the method used in earlier reports on PDS model fits, not least with respect to the correspondence between the size of the confidence region and the precision with which the data constrain the values of the model parameters. We plan to apply the new procedure to existing RXTE and XMM-Newton observations of Seyfert I galaxies as well as RXTE observations of the Seyfert II galaxy NGC 4945.

  17. Parameter Estimation and Confidence Regions in the Method of Light Curve Simulations for the Analysis of Power Density Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, M.; Madejski, G.

    2009-05-20

    The Method of Light Curve Simulations is a tool that has been applied to X-ray monitoring observations of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) for the characterization of the Power Density Spectrum (PDS) of temporal variability and measurement of associated break frequencies (which appear to be an important diagnostic for the mass of the black hole in these systems as well as their accretion state). It relies on a model for the PDS that is fit to the observed data. The determination of confidence regions on the fitted model parameters is of particular importance, and we show how the Neyman construction based on distributions of estimates may be implemented in the context of light curve simulations. We believe that this procedure offers advantages over the method used in earlier reports on PDS model fits, not least with respect to the correspondence between the size of the confidence region and the precision with which the data constrain the values of the model parameters. We plan to apply the new procedure to existing RXTE and XMM observations of Seyfert I galaxies as well as RXTE observations of the Seyfert II galaxy NGC 4945.

  18. Atrioventricular Canal Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... birth (congenital). The condition is often associated with Down syndrome. Atrioventricular canal defect allows extra blood to flow ... baby's heart is developing. Some factors, such as Down syndrome, might increase the risk of atrioventricular canal defect. ...

  19. 25. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of photograph (original print at Gage Canal Company Office), photographer unknown, March 1954. VIEW OF THE GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL, CONCRETE 'COVERING COMPLETED & BACKFILLED TO WATERMAN AVENUE...CURVING TOWARD NO. 1 TUNNEL' - California Citrus Heritage Recording Project, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  20. Effect of motion cues during complex curved approach and landing tasks: A piloted simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted to examine the effect of motion cues using a high fidelity simulation of commercial aircraft during the performance of complex approach and landing tasks in the Microwave Landing System (MLS) signal environment. The data from these tests indicate that in a high complexity MLS approach task with moderate turbulence and wind, the pilot uses motion cues to improve path tracking performance. No significant differences in tracking accuracy were noted for the low and medium complexity tasks, regardless of the presence of motion cues. Higher control input rates were measured for all tasks when motion was used. Pilot eye scan, as measured by instrument dwell time, was faster when motion cues were used regardless of the complexity of the approach tasks. Pilot comments indicated a preference for motion. With motion cues, pilots appeared to work harder in all levels of task complexity and to improve tracking performance in the most complex approach task.

  1. Simulations of incompressible Navier Stokes equations on curved surfaces using discrete exterior calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samtaney, Ravi; Mohamed, Mamdouh; Hirani, Anil

    2015-11-01

    We present examples of numerical solutions of incompressible flow on 2D curved domains. The Navier-Stokes equations are first rewritten using the exterior calculus notation, replacing vector calculus differential operators by the exterior derivative, Hodge star and wedge product operators. A conservative discretization of Navier-Stokes equations on simplicial meshes is developed based on discrete exterior calculus (DEC). The discretization is then carried out by substituting the corresponding discrete operators based on the DEC framework. By construction, the method is conservative in that both the discrete divergence and circulation are conserved up to machine precision. The relative error in kinetic energy for inviscid flow test cases converges in a second order fashion with both the mesh size and the time step. Numerical examples include Taylor vortices on a sphere, Stuart vortices on a sphere, and flow past a cylinder on domains with varying curvature. Supported by the KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds under Award No. URF/1/1401-01.

  2. Impact of sample geometry on the measurement of pressure-saturation curves: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, M.; Fiorentino, E.-A.; Mâløy, K. J.; Schäfer, G.; Toussaint, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of sample geometry on the measurement of pressure-saturation relationships, by analyzing the drainage of a two-phase flow from a quasi-2-D random porous medium. The medium is transparent, which allows for the direct visualization of the invasion pattern during flow, and is initially saturated with a viscous liquid (a dyed glycerol-water mix). As the pressure in the liquid is gradually reduced, air penetrates from an open inlet, displacing the liquid which leaves the system from an outlet on the opposite side. Pressure measurements and images of the flow are recorded and the pressure-saturation relationship is computed. We show that this relationship depends on the system size and aspect ratio. The effects of the system's boundaries on this relationship are measured experimentally and compared with simulations produced using an invasion percolation algorithm. The pressure build up at the beginning and end of the invasion process are particularly affected by the boundaries of the system whereas at the central part of the model (when the air front progresses far from these boundaries), the invasion happens at a statistically constant capillary pressure. These observations have led us to propose a much simplified pressure-saturation relationship, valid for systems that are large enough such that the invasion is not influenced by boundary effects. The properties of this relationship depend on the capillary pressure thresholds distribution, sample dimensions, and average pore connectivity and its applications may be of particular interest for simulations of two-phase flow in large porous media.

  3. Estimating screening-mammography receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves from stratified random samples of screening mammograms: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zur, Richard M; Pesce, Lorenzo L; Jiang, Yulei

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate stratified random sampling (SRS) of screening mammograms by (1) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessment categories, and (2) the presence of breast cancer in mammograms, for estimation of screening-mammography receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves in retrospective observer studies. We compared observer study case sets constructed by (1) random sampling (RS); (2) SRS with proportional allocation (SRS-P) with BI-RADS 1 and 2 noncancer cases accounting for 90.6% of all noncancer cases; (3) SRS with disproportional allocation (SRS-D) with BI-RADS 1 and 2 noncancer cases accounting for 10%-80%; and (4) SRS-D and multiple imputation (SRS-D + MI) with missing BI-RADS 1 and 2 noncancer cases imputed to recover the 90.6% proportion. Monte Carlo simulated case sets were drawn from a large case population modeled after published Digital Mammography Imaging Screening Trial data. We compared the bias, root-mean-square error, and coverage of 95% confidence intervals of area under the ROC curve (AUC) estimates from the sampling methods (200-2000 cases, of which 25% were cancer cases) versus from the large case population. AUC estimates were unbiased from RS, SRS-P, and SRS-D + MI, but biased from SRS-D. AUC estimates from SRS-P and SRS-D + MI had 10% smaller root-mean-square error than RS. Both SRS-P and SRS-D + MI can be used to obtain unbiased and 10% more efficient estimate of screening-mammography ROC curves. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Anterior canal BPPV and apogeotropic posterior canal BPPV: two rare forms of vertical canalolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Califano, L; Salafia, F; Mazzone, S; Melillo, M G; Califano, M

    2014-06-01

    Posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most frequent form of BPPV. It is characterized by a paroxysmal positioning nystagmus evoked through Dix-Hallpike and Semont positioning tests. Anterior canal BPPV (AC) is more rare than posterior canal BPPV; it presents a prevalent down beating positioning nystagmus, with a torsional component clockwise for the left canal, counterclockwise for the right canal. Due to the possible lack of the torsional component, it is sometimes difficult to identify the affected ear. An apogeotropic variant of posterior BPPV (APC) has recently been described, characterised by a paroxysmal positional nystagmus in the opposite direction to the one evoked in posterior canal BPPV: the linear component is down-beating, the torsional component is clockwise for the right canal, counter-clockwise for the left canal, so that a contra-lateral anterior canal BPPV could be simulated. During a 16 month period, of 934 BPPV patients observed, the authors identified 23 (2.5%) cases of apogeotropic posterior canal BPPV and 11 (1.2%) cases of anterior canal BPPV, diagnosed using the specific oculomotor patterns described in the literature. Anterior canal BPPV was treated with the repositioning manoeuvre proposed by Yacovino, which does not require identification of the affected side, whereas apogeotropic posterior canal BPPV was treated with the Quick Liberatory Rotation manoeuvre for the typical posterior canal BPPV, since in the Dix-Hallpike position otoliths are in the same position if they come either from the ampullary arm or from the non-ampullary arm. The direct resolution of BPPV (one step therapy) was obtained in 12/34 patients, 8/23 patients with APC and 4/11 patients with AC; canalar conversion into typical posterior canal BPPV, later treated through Quick Liberatory Rotation (two-step therapy), was obtained in 19 patients,14/23 with APC and 5/11 with AC. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Considering the effects of

  5. Large-Eddy Simulation of a katabatic jet along a convexly curved slope: 2. Evidence of Görtler vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Christophe

    2017-05-01

    This paper is the second part of a study of katabatic jet along a convexly curved slope with a maximum angle of about 35.5°. Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) is performed with a special focus on the outer-layer shear of the katabatic jet. In the first part, a basic statistical quantitative analysis of the flow was performed. Here a qualitative and quantitative description of vortical structures is used to gain insight in the present 3-D turbulent flow. It is shown that Görtler vortices oriented in the streamwise downslope direction develop in the shear layer. They spread with a specific mushroom shape in the vertical direction up to about 100 m height. They play a main role with respect to local turbulent mixing in the ground surface boundary layer. The present curved slope configuration constitutes a realistic model for alpine orography. This paper provides a procedure based on local turbulence anisotropy to track Görtler vortices for in situ measurements, which has never been proposed in the literature.

  6. Anisotropic post-yield response of cancellous bone simulated by stress-strain curves of bulk equivalent structures.

    PubMed

    Tsouknidas, Alexander; Maliaris, Georgios; Savvakis, Savvas; Michailidis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, finite element (FE) modelling has become ubiquitous in understanding complex mechanobiological phenomena, e.g. bone-implant interactions. The extensive computational effort required to achieve biorealistic results when modelling the post-yield behaviour of microstructures like cancellous bone is a major limitation of these techniques. This study describes the anisotropic biomechanical response of cancellous bone through stress-strain curves of equivalent bulk geometries. A cancellous bone segment, reverse engineered by micro computed tomography, was subjected to uniaxial compression. The material's constitutive law, obtained by nano-indentations, was considered during the simulation of the experimental process. A homodimensionally bulk geometry was employed to determine equivalent properties, resulting in a similar anisotropic response to the trabecular structure. The experimental verification of our model sustained that the obtained stress-strain curves can adequately reflect the post-yield behaviour of the sample. The introduced approach facilitates the consideration of nonlinearity and anisotropy of the tissue, while reducing the geometrical complexity of the model to a minimum.

  7. A novel method based on maximum likelihood estimation for the construction of seismic fragility curves using numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Cong-Thuat; Le, Thien-Phu; Ray, Pascal

    2017-10-01

    Seismic fragility curves presenting some probability of failure or of a damage state exceedance versus seismic intensity can be established by engineering judgment, empirical or numerical approaches. This paper focuses on the latter issue. In recent studies, three popular methods based on numerical simulations, comprising scaled seismic intensity, maximum likelihood estimation and probabilistic seismic demand/capacity models, have been studied and compared. The results obtained show that the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method is in general better than other ones. However, previous publications also indicated the dependence of the MLE method on the ground excitation input. The objective of this paper is thus to propose a novel method improving the existing MLE one. Improvements are based on probabilistic ground motion information, which is taken into account in the proposed procedure. The validity of this new approach is verified by analytical tests and numerical examples.

  8. Amino acid tautomerization reactions in aqueous solution via concerted and assisted mechanisms using free energy curves from MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Tolosa, Santiago; Hidalgo, Antonio; Sansón, Jorge A

    2012-11-01

    A theoretical study is described of chemical reactions in solution by means of molecular dynamics simulations, with solute-solvent interaction potentials derived from AMBER van der Waals parameters and QM/MM electrostatic charges in solution. The solvent is used as the reaction coordinate, and the free energy curves to calculate the properties related to the reaction mechanism. The proposed scheme is applied to the tautomerization process in aqueous solution for some amino acids H(2)NCHR-COOH (with R = H being glycine, R = CH(3) alanine, R = CH(2)OH serine, and R = CH(2)COOH aspartic acid), focusing on the role of the solvent in the reaction (assisted versus unassisted mechanisms) and on the effect of the hydrophilic/hydrophobic character of the radical R on the activation and reaction energies.

  9. Determination of root canal curvatures before and after canal preparation (part II): A method based on numeric calculus.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, D; Stachniss-Carp, S; Stachniss, C; Stachniss, V

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a new method based on numeric calculus to provide data on any type of root canal curvature at any point of the long axis of the canal. Twenty severely curved, simulated root canals were prepared with rotary FlexMaster and Profile instruments in the crown-down technique and manually in the step-back technique. The inner and outer curvatures were registered in a system of coordinates before and after preparation in increments of 0.5 mm. Using an equalising function, the curvatures were first represented in graphic and algebraic form. The maximum and the mean curvature as well as the length of the arc from the apical foramen to the point of maximum curvature were determined mathematically. An increase in maximum curvature was registered for all four shaping systems investigated. The radius of the inner curvature decreased by 0.5-1.2 mm in the manual systems as a result of the preparation. The Profile system displayed the smallest changes in radius (-0.9 mm) even with the outer curvature, and manual preparation with stainless steel files the most pronounced change (-1.8 mm). The point of maximum curvature at the inner curvature was displaced by 1.6 mm to the apical foramen through manual preparation with Ni-Ti files. At the outer curvature, the maximum displacement (1.8 mm) recorded was also the result of preparation with Ni-Ti hand files, while a displacement of only 0.3 mm to the apical foramen was recorded with the other systems. The method offers a means of determining curvatures precisely without random specification of reference points. The method is also capable of registering only minor changes in curvature in the two-dimensional long axis of the canal.

  10. Root canal irrigants.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-10-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were 'root canal irrigants' and 'endodontic irrigants.' The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance.

  11. Root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were ‘root canal irrigants’ and ‘endodontic irrigants.’ The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:21217955

  12. The Comparative Efficacy of Different Files in The Removal of Different Sealers in Simulated Root Canal Retreatment- An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kanaparthy, Aruna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Root canal treatment enjoys a high success rate all over the world and has saved billions of teeth from extraction. However, there are instances of failure, the main causes being insufficient cleaning and inadequate obturation. In such cases the most conservative treatment option would be non-surgical retreatment. It requires regaining access to the entire root canal system through removal of the original root canal filling thus permitting further cleaning and re- obturation. Removal of gutta-percha and sealer becomes a critical step to gain access to the root canal system, remove necrotic tissue debris, bacteria and infected dentin. Aim To compare and evaluate the efficacy of manual hand Hedstrom files and two rotary retreatment file systems ProTaper Universal retreatment files and MtwoR (retreatment) files in the removal of root canal filling material during root canal retreatment and the influence of the type of sealers zinc oxide eugenol and AH plus on the presence of remaining debris in the reinstrumented canals in the apical, middle and coronal third. Materials and Methods Sixty single rooted human premolar teeth were divided into 3 Groups of 20 teeth each Group I (20 Teeth): prepared using hand K Files, Group II (20 Teeth): prepared using ProTaper rotary system and Group III (20 Teeth): prepared using Mtwo rotary system. In Groups- IA, IIA, IIIA: (10 teeth each) Obturation was done using Zinc Oxide Eugenol sealer and gutta percha. In Groups- IB, IIB, IIIB: (10 teeth each) obturation was done with AH Plus sealer and gutta percha. All the teeth were subjected to retreatment. Groups IA and IB with Hedstrom files, Groups IIA and IIB with ProTaper retreatment files and for Groups IIIA and IIIB with Mtwo retreatment Files. The roots were longitudinally split and were observed under a stereomicroscope for remaining amount of filling material on the canal walls. Statistical analysis was done using One–way ANOVA (Analysis of variance) test and Tukey

  13. Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section (canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bitter Root Irrigation district canal, looking east, typical section (canal full) - Bitter Root Irrigation Project, Bitter Root Irrigation Canal, Heading at Rock Creek Diversion Dam, West of U.S. Highway 93, Darby, Ravalli County, MT

  14. 14. Junction of the Tempe Canal and Western Canal, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Junction of the Tempe Canal and Western Canal, looking north. Photographer: Mark Durben, February 1989. Source: SRPA - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  15. An In Vitro Comparative Study of Intracanal Fluid Motion and Wall Shear Stress Induced by Ultrasonic and Polymer Rotary Finishing Files in a Simulated Root Canal Model

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Jon; Borg, John; Mattson, Abby; Olsen, Kris; Bahcall, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study compared the flow pattern and shear stress of an irrigant induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file activation in an acrylic root canal model. Flow visualization analysis was performed using an acrylic canal filled with a mixture of distilled water and rheoscopic fluid. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file were separately tested in the canal and activated in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion (up and down). Particle movement in the fluid was captured using a high-speed digital camera and DaVis 7.1 software. The fluid shear stress analysis was performed using hot film anemometry. A hot-wire was placed in an acrylic root canal and the canal was filled with distilled water. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files were separately tested in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion. Positive needle irrigation was also tested separately for fluid shear stress. The induced wall shear stress was measured using LabVIEW 8.0 software. PMID:22461994

  16. An in vitro comparative study of intracanal fluid motion and wall shear stress induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files in a simulated root canal model.

    PubMed

    Koch, Jon; Borg, John; Mattson, Abby; Olsen, Kris; Bahcall, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study compared the flow pattern and shear stress of an irrigant induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file activation in an acrylic root canal model. Flow visualization analysis was performed using an acrylic canal filled with a mixture of distilled water and rheoscopic fluid. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file were separately tested in the canal and activated in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion (up and down). Particle movement in the fluid was captured using a high-speed digital camera and DaVis 7.1 software. The fluid shear stress analysis was performed using hot film anemometry. A hot-wire was placed in an acrylic root canal and the canal was filled with distilled water. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing files were separately tested in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion. Positive needle irrigation was also tested separately for fluid shear stress. The induced wall shear stress was measured using LabVIEW 8.0 software.

  17. Analysis of the terrestrial ion foreshock: 2D Full-Particle simulation of a curved supercritical shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lembege, B.; Savoini, P.; Stienlet, J.

    2013-05-01

    Two distinct ion populations backstreaming into the solar wind have been clearly evidenced by various space missions within the quasi-perpendicular region of the ion foreshock located upstream of the Earth's Bow shock (i.e. for 45° ≤ Theta_Bn ≤ 90°, where Theta_Bn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetostatic field): (i) field-aligned ion beams (« FAB ») characterized by a gyrotropic distribution, and (ii) gyro-phase bunched ions («GPB »), characterized by a NON gyrotropic distribution. The origin of these backstreaming ions has not been clearly identified and is presently analyzed with the help of 2D PIC simulation of a curved shock, where full curvature effects, time of flight effects and both electrons and ions dynamics are fully described within a self consistent approach. Present simulations evidence that these two populations can be effectively created directly by the shock front without invoking microinstabilities. The analysis of both individual and statistical ion trajectories evidences that: (i) two new parameters, namely the interaction time DT_inter and distance of penetration L_depth into the shock wave, play a key role and allow to discriminate these two populations. "GPB" population is characterized by a very short interaction time (DT_inter = 1 to 2 Tci) in comparison to the "FAB" population (DT_inter = 2 Tci to 10 Tci) which moves back and forth between the upstream edge of the shock front and the overshoot, where tci is the upstream ion gyroperiod. (ii) the importance of the injection angle (i.e. the angle between the normal of the shock front and the gyration velocity when ions reach the shock) to understand how the reflection process takes place. (iii) "FAB" population drifts along the curved shock front scanning a large Theta_Bn range from 90°. (iv) "GPB" population is embedded within the "FAB" population near the shock front which explains the difficulty to identify such a population in the experimental

  18. Documenting a learning curve and test-retest reliability of two tasks on a virtual reality training simulator in laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hogle, Nancy J; Briggs, William M; Fowler, Dennis L

    2007-01-01

    Virtual reality simulators are a component of the armamentarium for training surgical residents. No one knows exactly how to incorporate virtual reality simulators into a curriculum. The purpose of this study was to document and show the learning curve and test-retest reliability of 2 tasks on a virtual reality-training simulator (LapSim; Surgical Science, Göteborg, Sweden) in laparoscopic surgery. Twenty-nine medical students participated in 8 iterations of 7 virtual reality tasks ("camera navigation" (CN), "instrument navigation," "coordination," "grasping," "lifting and grasping" (LG), "cutting," and "clip applying") Learning curves for each outcome variable of the CN and LG tasks were generated. Using ANOVA, we evaluated the differences between each score from attempt number 7 to attempt number 8 to document test-retest reliability. A plateau in the learning curve occurred within 8 sessions for CN misses, CN tissue damage, CN maximum damage, and LG maximum damage. Over the course of 8 sessions, a plateau in the learning curve was nearly reached for CN time, CN drift, CN path, CN angular path, and LG left and right path. The following variables had a downward trend to the mean learning curve over 8 sessions, but they did not reach a plateau: LG time, LG left and right miss, LG left and right angular path, and LG tissue damage. Using the LapSim virtual reality simulator, we documented a learning curve and test-retest reliability for each outcome variable for CN and LG for rank novices. The modeling of the general learning curve is useful in designing training program. These results may be important in developing standards for technical evaluation in a surgical training curriculum.

  19. Numerical simulation of peristaltic flow of a biorheological fluid with shear-dependent viscosity in a curved channel.

    PubMed

    Ali, N; Javid, K; Sajid, M; Anwar Bég, O

    2016-01-01

    Peristaltic motion of a non-Newtonian Carreau fluid is analyzed in a curved channel under the long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions, as a simulation of digestive transport. The flow regime is shown to be governed by a dimensionless fourth-order, nonlinear, ordinary differential equation subject to no-slip wall boundary conditions. A well-tested finite difference method based on an iterative scheme is employed for the solution of the boundary value problem. The important phenomena of pumping and trapping associated with the peristaltic motion are investigated for various values of rheological parameters of Carreau fluid and curvature of the channel. An increase in Weissenberg number is found to generate a small eddy in the vicinity of the lower wall of the channel, which is enhanced with further increase in Weissenberg number. For shear-thinning bio-fluids (power-law rheological index, n < 1) greater Weissenberg number displaces the maximum velocity toward the upper wall. For shear-thickening bio-fluids, the velocity amplitude is enhanced markedly with increasing Weissenberg number.

  20. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. This narrowing is called “stenosis.” As the lumbar spinal canal narrows, the nerves that go through it are squeezed. This squeezing ... chest). It’s thought that these positions “open” the lumbar canal and take the pressure off the nerves that go to the legs. In severe cases, ...

  1. The anomalous canal between two accessory foramina on the mandibular ramus: the temporal crest canal

    PubMed Central

    Han, S-S; Hwang, J-J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The temporal crest canal (TCC) is a variation of the bony canal with two accessory foramina that correspond to an entrance and an exit on the mandibular ramus. This study investigated the anatomical characteristics of the TCC using CBCT. Methods: The study population consisted 446 patients who had undergone CBCT. Sagittal, cross-sectional and three-dimensional images were evaluated for the presence of a TCC. The canals were classified into two types according to the configuration, and the location of the posterior accessory foramen of the TCC was also recorded. Results: 6 TCCs were present in 4 of 446 patients (0.90% of the total population). All of the TCCs were observed in males, and all of the posterior foramina were located superior to the mandibular foramina on the medial aspect of the mandibular ramus. There were five noticeably curved and increasingly narrow canals (Type 1) and one slightly curved and uniformly wide canal (Type 2). Conclusions: Precise knowledge of the TCC is clinically important for suitable local anaesthetic nerve block and the planning of surgical procedures that involve the mandibular ramus. Three-dimensional images of CBCT data are particularly effective for confirming the presence of this variation. PMID:24959708

  2. Bush Canal Floodgate Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -0 9 -9 Bush Canal Floodgate Study Tate O. McAlpin, Rutherford C. Berger, and Amena M. Henville July 2009 C oa st...al a n d H yd ra u lic s La b or at or y Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-09-9 July 2009 Bush Canal ...LA 70118-3651 Under Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request (MIPR) W42HEM60734548, “H&H Modeling of Bush Canal /Morganza to the Gulf” ERDC/CHL

  3. Influence of size and taper of artificial canals on the trajectory of NiTi rotary instruments in cyclic fatigue studies.

    PubMed

    Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola M; Mazza, Ciro; Petrovic, Renata; Testarelli, Luca; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the shape of 3 different artificial canals on the trajectory followed by different nickel-titanium rotary instruments. Ten ProFile and Mtwo instruments, tip sizes 20 and 25, taper .06, were tested in 3 simulated root canals with an angle of curvature of 60 degrees and radius of curvature of 5 mm but with different shapes. Geometric analysis of the trajectory that each instrument followed inside the 3 different artificial canals was performed on digital images, determining 3 parameters: angle and radius of the curvature and the position of the center of the curvature. Mean values were then calculated for each instrument size in all of the artificial canals. Data were analysed using 1-way analysis of variance, Holm t test, and Student t test to determine any statistical difference (P < .05). In all instrument sizes, a statistically significant difference was noted among the artificial canals for the radius and angle of curvature. No statistically significant difference was noted between instruments of the same size for the radius and angle of curvature and the position of the center of the curve when measured in the canal constructed on the dimension of the instruments. Different instruments follow different trajectories in artificial canals constructed with the same parameters of curvature but different shapes, depending on their different bending properties. All of the instruments respected the established parameters of curvature only when the artificial canal is designed on the dimension of the instruments. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Simulation of dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand, Plantation Canal, Broward County, Florida with an evaluation of the QUAL-I model for use in south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russo, Thomas N.; McQuivey, Raul S.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model; QUAL-I, developed by the Texas Water Development Board, was evaluated as a management tool in predicting the spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand in Plantation Canal. Predictions based on the QUAL-I model, which was verified only against midday summer-flow conditions, showed that improvement of quality of inflows from sewage treatment plants and use of at least 130 cubic feet per second of dilution water would improve water quality in the canal significantly. The model was not fully amenable to use on Plantation Canal because: (1) it did not consider photosynthetic production, nitrification, and benthic oxygen demand as sources and sinks of oxygen; (2) the model assumptions of complete mixing, transport, and steady state were not met; and (3) the data base was inadequate because it consisted of only one set of data for each case. However, it was felt that meaningful results could be obtained for some sets of conditions. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Experimental depth dose curves of a 67.5 MeV proton beam for benchmarking and validation of Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Faddegon, Bruce A. Ramos-Méndez, José; Daftari, Inder K.; Shin, Jungwook; Castenada, Carlos M.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To measure depth dose curves for a 67.5 ± 0.1 MeV proton beam for benchmarking and validation of Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: Depth dose curves were measured in 2 beam lines. Protons in the raw beam line traversed a Ta scattering foil, 0.1016 or 0.381 mm thick, a secondary emission monitor comprised of thin Al foils, and a thin Kapton exit window. The beam energy and peak width and the composition and density of material traversed by the beam were known with sufficient accuracy to permit benchmark quality measurements. Diodes for charged particle dosimetry from two different manufacturers were used to scan the depth dose curves with 0.003 mm depth reproducibility in a water tank placed 300 mm from the exit window. Depth in water was determined with an uncertainty of 0.15 mm, including the uncertainty in the water equivalent depth of the sensitive volume of the detector. Parallel-plate chambers were used to verify the accuracy of the shape of the Bragg peak and the peak-to-plateau ratio measured with the diodes. The uncertainty in the measured peak-to-plateau ratio was 4%. Depth dose curves were also measured with a diode for a Bragg curve and treatment beam spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) on the beam line used for eye treatment. The measurements were compared to Monte Carlo simulation done with GEANT4 using TOPAS. Results: The 80% dose at the distal side of the Bragg peak for the thinner foil was at 37.47 ± 0.11 mm (average of measurement with diodes from two different manufacturers), compared to the simulated value of 37.20 mm. The 80% dose for the thicker foil was at 35.08 ± 0.15 mm, compared to the simulated value of 34.90 mm. The measured peak-to-plateau ratio was within one standard deviation experimental uncertainty of the simulated result for the thinnest foil and two standard deviations for the thickest foil. It was necessary to include the collimation in the simulation, which had a more pronounced effect on the peak-to-plateau ratio for the

  6. Experimental depth dose curves of a 67.5 MeV proton beam for benchmarking and validation of Monte Carlo simulation

    PubMed Central

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Shin, Jungwook; Castenada, Carlos M.; Ramos-Méndez, José; Daftari, Inder K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure depth dose curves for a 67.5 ± 0.1 MeV proton beam for benchmarking and validation of Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: Depth dose curves were measured in 2 beam lines. Protons in the raw beam line traversed a Ta scattering foil, 0.1016 or 0.381 mm thick, a secondary emission monitor comprised of thin Al foils, and a thin Kapton exit window. The beam energy and peak width and the composition and density of material traversed by the beam were known with sufficient accuracy to permit benchmark quality measurements. Diodes for charged particle dosimetry from two different manufacturers were used to scan the depth dose curves with 0.003 mm depth reproducibility in a water tank placed 300 mm from the exit window. Depth in water was determined with an uncertainty of 0.15 mm, including the uncertainty in the water equivalent depth of the sensitive volume of the detector. Parallel-plate chambers were used to verify the accuracy of the shape of the Bragg peak and the peak-to-plateau ratio measured with the diodes. The uncertainty in the measured peak-to-plateau ratio was 4%. Depth dose curves were also measured with a diode for a Bragg curve and treatment beam spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) on the beam line used for eye treatment. The measurements were compared to Monte Carlo simulation done with geant4 using topas. Results: The 80% dose at the distal side of the Bragg peak for the thinner foil was at 37.47 ± 0.11 mm (average of measurement with diodes from two different manufacturers), compared to the simulated value of 37.20 mm. The 80% dose for the thicker foil was at 35.08 ± 0.15 mm, compared to the simulated value of 34.90 mm. The measured peak-to-plateau ratio was within one standard deviation experimental uncertainty of the simulated result for the thinnest foil and two standard deviations for the thickest foil. It was necessary to include the collimation in the simulation, which had a more pronounced effect on the peak-to-plateau ratio for the

  7. Microstructure based simulations for prediction of flow curves and selection of process parameters for inter-critical annealing in DP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepu, M. J.; Farivar, H.; Prahl, U.; Phanikumar, G.

    2017-04-01

    Dual phase steels are versatile advanced high strength steels that are being used for sheet metal applications in automotive industry. It also has the potential for application in bulk components like gear. The inter-critical annealing in dual phase steels is one of the crucial steps that determine the mechanical properties of the material. Selection of the process parameters for inter-critical annealing, in particular, the inter-critical annealing temperature and time is important as it plays a major role in determining the volume fractions of ferrite and martensite, which in turn determines the mechanical properties. Selection of these process parameters to obtain a particular required mechanical property requires large number of experimental trials. Simulation of microstructure evolution and virtual compression/tensile testing can help in reducing the number of such experimental trials. In the present work, phase field modeling implemented in the commercial software Micress® is used to predict the microstructure evolution during inter-critical annealing. Virtual compression tests are performed on the simulated microstructure using finite element method implemented in the commercial software, to obtain the effective flow curve of the macroscopic material. The flow curves obtained by simulation are experimentally validated with physical simulation in Gleeble® and compared with that obtained using linear rule of mixture. The methodology could be used in determining the inter-critical annealing process parameters required for achieving a particular flow curve.

  8. ASTER Suez Canal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-06

    One of the most important waterways in the world, the Suez Canal runs north to south across the Isthmus of Suez in northeastern Egypt. This image of the canal covers an area 36 kilometers (22 miles) wide and 60 kilometers (47 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. It shows the northern part of the canal, with the Mediterranean Sea just visible in the upper right corner. The Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Gulf of Suez, an arm of the Red Sea. The artificial canal provides an important shortcut for ships operating between both European and American ports and ports located in southern Asia, eastern Africa, and Oceania. With a length of about 195 kilometers (121 miles) and a minimum channel width of 60 meters (197 feet), the Suez Canal is able to accommodate ships as large as 150,000 tons fully loaded. Because no locks interrupt traffic on this sea level waterway, the transit time only averages about 15 hours. ASTER acquired this scene on May 19, 2000. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02661

  9. Curved Beam Computed Tomography based Structural Rigidity Analysis of Bones with Simulated Lytic Defect: A Comparative Study with Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Oftadeh, R.; Karimi, Z.; Villa-Camacho, J.; Tanck, E.; Verdonschot, N.; Goebel, R.; Snyder, B. D.; Hashemi, H. N.; Vaziri, A.; Nazarian, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a CT based structural rigidity analysis (CTRA) method that incorporates bone intrinsic local curvature is introduced to assess the compressive failure load of human femur with simulated lytic defects. The proposed CTRA is based on a three dimensional curved beam theory to obtain critical stresses within the human femur model. To test the proposed method, ten human cadaveric femurs with and without simulated defects were mechanically tested under axial compression to failure. Quantitative computed tomography images were acquired from the samples, and CTRA and finite element analysis were performed to obtain the failure load as well as rigidities in both straight and curved cross sections. Experimental results were compared to the results obtained from FEA and CTRA. The failure loads predicated by curved beam CTRA and FEA are in agreement with experimental results. The results also show that the proposed method is an efficient and reliable method to find both the location and magnitude of failure load. Moreover, the results show that the proposed curved CTRA outperforms the regular straight beam CTRA, which ignores the bone intrinsic curvature and can be used as a useful tool in clinical practices. PMID:27585495

  10. A Molecular Dynamics simulation of Hugoniot curves of HMX using ReaxFF and its application in SPH modeling of macroscale terminal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gui-Rong; Wang, Gangyu; Peng, Qing; de, Suvranu

    2015-06-01

    HMX is a widely used high explosive. Hugoniot curve is a valuable tool for analyzing the equations of state, and is of importance for all energetic materials including HMX. The Hugoniot curves serve as one of the key character in continuum modeling of high explosives. It can be obtained from experimental measurements, and recently also from computational studies. In this study, the Hugoniot curve of HMX is calculated using a multi-scale shock technique via Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, where the reactive force field ReaxFF is obtained from Quantum Mechanics calculations and tailored for HMX. It is found that our MD Hugoniot curve of HMX from the optimized ReaxFF potential agree well with experiments. The MD Hugoniot curve of HMX is also incorporated in our in-house Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) code for the modeling of the macro-scale explosive behaviors of HMX explosives and HMX cased in a 3D cylinder. The authors would like to acknowledge the generous financial support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Grant HDTRA1-13-1-0025.

  11. Numerical simulations of rubber networks at moderate to high tensile strains using a purely enthalpic force extension curve for individual chains

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David Edward

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of numerical simulations of random, three-dimensional, periodic, tetrafunctional networks in response to a volume-preserving tensile strain. For the intranode force, we use a polynomial fit to a purely enthalpic ab initio force extension curve for extended polyisoprene. The simulation includes a relaxation procedure to minimize the node forces and enforces chain rupture when the extension of a network chain reaches the ab initio rupture strain. For the reasonable assumption that the distribution of network chain lengths is Gaussian, we find that the calculated snap-back velocity, temperature increase due to chain ruptures and predicted tensile stress versus strain curve are consistent with experimental data in the moderate to high extension regime. Our results show that a perfect tetrafunctional polyisoprene network is extremely robust, capable of supporting tensile stresses at least a factor of 10 greater than what is observed experimentally.

  12. Effect of semicircular canal dehiscence on contralateral canal bone thickness.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Tello, Borja; Cisneros, Ana; Crovetto, Rafael; Martinez, Claudio; Rodriguez, Olívia; Lecumberri, Iñigo; Crovetto, Miguel Ángel; Whyte, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to determine if the existence of dehiscence in the superior or posterior semicircular canal was associated with the thinning of the bone roof in the rest of the vertical canals (superior or posterior). The thickness of the superior and posterior semicircular canals contralateral to a dehiscence was studied using computerized tomography and compared statistically. When a superior semicircular canal had a dehiscence, the contralateral canal showed a significant mean decrease in its thickness of 0.5mm (SD: 0.3 mm). This was not the case if the dehiscence was in the posterior semicircular canal, where the thickness of 2.1 mm remained unchanged (SD: 1.2 mm; P=.49). When a posterior semicircular canal showed dehiscence, no significant thinning was shown in the superior semicircular (1 mm; SD: 0.4) or in the posterior contralateral (1.3 mm; SD: 0.3) canals. The existence of a dehiscence in the superior semicircular canal is associated with bone thinning in the canal on the opposite side, but not with the posterior semicircular canal. In contrast, if the dehiscence is in the posterior semicircular canal, contralateral and superior canal thickness is not modified. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. The Semicircular Canal Microphonic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbitt, R. D.; Boyle, R.; Highstein, S. M.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Present experiments were designed to quantify the alternating current (AC) component of the semicircular canal microphonic for angular motion stimulation as a function of stimulus frequency and amplitude. The oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau, was used as the experimental model. Calibrated mechanical indentation of the horizontal canal duct was used as a stimulus to generate hair-cell and afferent responses reproducing those present during head rotation. Sensitivity to polarization of the endolymph DC voltage re: perilymph was also investigated. Modulation of endolymph voltage was recorded using conventional glass electrodes and lock-in amplification over the frequency range 0.2-80 Hz. Access to the endolymph for inserting voltage recording and current passing electrodes was obtained by sectioning the anterior canal at its apex and isolating the cut ends in air. For sinusoidal stimulation below approx.10 Hz, the horizontal semicircular canal AC microphonic was nearly independent of stimulus frequency and equal to approximately 4 microV per micron indent (equivalent to approx. 1 microV per deg/s). A saturating nonlinearity decreasing the microphonic gain was present for stimuli exceeding approx.3 micron indent (approx. 12 deg/s angular velocity). The phase was not sensitive to the saturating nonlinearity. The microphonic exhibited a resonance near 30Hz consistent with basolateral current hair cell resonance observed previously in voltage-clamp records from semicircular canal hair cells. The magnitude and phase of the microphonic exhibited sensitivity to endolymphatic polarization consistent with electro-chemical reversal of hair cell transduction currents.

  14. The Semicircular Canal Microphonic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbitt, R. D.; Boyle, R.; Highstein, S. M.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Present experiments were designed to quantify the alternating current (AC) component of the semicircular canal microphonic for angular motion stimulation as a function of stimulus frequency and amplitude. The oyster toadfish, Opsanus tau, was used as the experimental model. Calibrated mechanical indentation of the horizontal canal duct was used as a stimulus to generate hair-cell and afferent responses reproducing those present during head rotation. Sensitivity to polarization of the endolymph DC voltage re: perilymph was also investigated. Modulation of endolymph voltage was recorded using conventional glass electrodes and lock-in amplification over the frequency range 0.2-80 Hz. Access to the endolymph for inserting voltage recording and current passing electrodes was obtained by sectioning the anterior canal at its apex and isolating the cut ends in air. For sinusoidal stimulation below approx.10 Hz, the horizontal semicircular canal AC microphonic was nearly independent of stimulus frequency and equal to approximately 4 microV per micron indent (equivalent to approx. 1 microV per deg/s). A saturating nonlinearity decreasing the microphonic gain was present for stimuli exceeding approx.3 micron indent (approx. 12 deg/s angular velocity). The phase was not sensitive to the saturating nonlinearity. The microphonic exhibited a resonance near 30Hz consistent with basolateral current hair cell resonance observed previously in voltage-clamp records from semicircular canal hair cells. The magnitude and phase of the microphonic exhibited sensitivity to endolymphatic polarization consistent with electro-chemical reversal of hair cell transduction currents.

  15. 26. SPILLWAY DISCHARGE DATA. CURVE NO. 3 AND NO. 4. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. SPILLWAY DISCHARGE DATA. CURVE NO. 3 AND NO. 4. April 1928 Reference No. 108.2 - Cushman No. 1 Hydroelectric Power Plant, Spillway, North Fork of Skokomish River, 5 miles West of Hood Canal, Hoodsport, Mason County, WA

  16. 25. SPILLWAY DISCHARGE DATA. CURVE NO. 1 AND NO. 2. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. SPILLWAY DISCHARGE DATA. CURVE NO. 1 AND NO. 2. April 1928 Reference No. BT-108.1 - Cushman No. 1 Hydroelectric Power Plant, Spillway, North Fork of Skokomish River, 5 miles West of Hood Canal, Hoodsport, Mason County, WA

  17. 55. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    55. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, looking southwest. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  18. 54. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. View of junction of unlined canal and lined canal, looking southwest. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  19. Polyacrylamide Transport in Water Delivery Canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Zhu, J.; Young, M.

    2007-12-01

    Linear, anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) is being considered in the western United States as a technology to reduce seepage in unlined water delivery canals. A broad laboratory and field testing program has been undertaken to understand the benefits and potential environmental impacts of PAM use. The ability to predict the fate and transport of PAM in water delivery canals could prove to be a useful planning tool for PAM application. However, one key area of uncertainty of this type of canal treatment is the hydration, reaction, and settling rates of PAM after the dry powder is added to the canal water. In this study, we have developed a model that incorporates a number of known physical and chemical processes that can affect PAM transport, such as convection, dispersion, dissolution, flocculation, and settling, while solving the governing convection-dispersion transport equation. The model uses a mixed analytical and advanced numerical approach, and implements a transient partitioning of PAM mass between the canal water, the substrate soil, and potentially to open water bodies downstream of the application point. All source terms are modeled based on physical and chemical mechanisms as well as laboratory or field determined parameters. To more closely simulate field treatment of some canals, where PAM application moves upstream in time, the model is capable of implementing either a fixed or mobile upper boundary. In the latter treatment, the PAM can be added discretely or continuously in both time and space. A number of test situations have been simulated thus far, including theoretical and hypothetical cases for a wide range of conditions. The model also performed well when predicting PAM concentrations from a full-scale canal treatment experiment. The model provides a useful tool for predicting PAM fate and transport in water delivery canals, and therefore can play an important role in evaluating the efficacy of PAM application for water resources management

  20. A novel approach in assessment of root canal curvature

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Shiva; Poryousef, Vahideh

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this in vitro study was to introduce a new method to describe root canal curvatures and to assess the degree of curvature of human permanent mandibular teeth with curved root canals. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty five mesial root canals of mandibular first and second molar teeth were selected. Access cavities were prepared. After inserting a K-file size #10 into each canal, radiographs were taken. Canal curvature was determined by measuring the Schneider angle, canal access angle, as well as the canal radius, length, height and curvature starting distance on scanned radiographs using a computerized image processing system. Data was evaluated statistically using Pearson correlation. Results: The mean canal access angle (CAA) and Schneider angle (S) were 8.04◦ (3.46) and 19◦ (6.99), respectively. The Pearson correlation analysis found significant positive correlation between S and CAA (r=0.826, P<0.0001). Negative correlations were found between radius and length (r= –0.4, P<0.0001), radius and Schneider angle (r= –0.4, P<0.0001), radius and CAA (r= –0.24, P=0.004) and CAA and curvature starting distance (r= 0.4, P<0.0001). There was no correlation between height and distance (r=0.013, P=0.789), as well as CAA and height (r=0.654, P=0.001). Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, the results indicated that the shape of root canal curvature can be more accurately described using two angles, Schneider in combination with Canal access angle. The related parameters included radius, length, distance and height of curvature. [Iranian Endodontic Journal 2009;4(4):131-4] PMID:24019833

  1. Effectiveness of conventional syringe irrigation, vibringe, and passive ultrasonic irrigation performed with different irrigation regimes in removing triple antibiotic paste from simulated root canal irregularities

    PubMed Central

    Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Aktı, Ahmet; Topçuoğlu, Gamze; Düzgün, Salih; Ulusan, Özge; Akpek, Firdevs

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the efficacy of a sonic device (Vibringe), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI), and conventional syringe irrigation (CSI) in the removal of triple antibiotic paste (TAP) from artificial standardized grooves in the apical and coronal thirds of a root canal. Materials and Methods: One-hundred eighteen root canals were prepared using the ProTaper system. The roots were split longitudinally, and a standardized groove was prepared in the apical and coronal parts of one segment. The grooves were filled with TAP, and the roots were reassembled. The roots were randomly divided into nine experimental groups and two control groups, according to the following irrigation methods: (1) CSI with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) + ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), (2) CSI/EDTA, (3) CSI/NaOCl, (4) PUI/NaOCl + EDTA, (5) PUI/EDTA, (6) PUI/NaOCl, (7) Vibringe/NaOCl + EDTA, (8) Vibringe/EDTA, and (9) Vibringe/NaOCl. The amount of remaining medicament was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Results: In the apical third, Vibringe/NaOCl + EDTA and PUI/NaOCl + EDTA were superior to the other groups (P < 0.05); there was no significant difference between the other experimental groups (P > 0.05). In the coronal third, there was no significant difference between the experimental groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The use of the NaOCl/EDTA combination together with sonic or ultrasonic agitation improved the removal of TAP from the apical third. PMID:27563179

  2. 56. View of lined canal looking east toward unlined canal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. View of lined canal looking east toward unlined canal, from road bridge crossing lined canal. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  3. Love canal questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a 3-month monitoring study of the Love Canal area near Niagara Falls, N.Y., after the federal government pronounced that a potential health risk existed due to chemical waste dumps. In 1982 the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) decided that the area was habitable, subject to implementation of effective safeguards against leakage from the canal and to cleaning up of the contaminants. Now, the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) has announced that, with the information available, it is not possible to demonstrate with certainty that unsafe levels do not exist within the so-called “emergency declaration area” (EDA).

  4. Establishing the minimal number of virtual reality simulator training sessions necessary to develop basic laparoscopic skills competence: evaluation of the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Ricardo Jordão; Cury, José; Oliveira, Luis Carlos Neves; Srougi, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Medical literature is scarce on information to define a basic skills training program for laparoscopic surgery (peg and transferring, cutting, clipping). The aim of this study was to determine the minimal number of simulator sessions of basic laparoscopic tasks necessary to elaborate an optimal virtual reality training curriculum. Eleven medical students with no previous laparoscopic experience were spontaneously enrolled. They were submitted to simulator training sessions starting at level 1 (Immersion Lap VR, San Jose, CA), including sequentially camera handling, peg and transfer, clipping and cutting. Each student trained twice a week until 10 sessions were completed. The score indexes were registered and analyzed. The total of errors of the evaluation sequences (camera, peg and transfer, clipping and cutting) were computed and thereafter, they were correlated to the total of items evaluated in each step, resulting in a success percent ratio for each student for each set of each completed session. Thereafter, we computed the cumulative success rate in 10 sessions, obtaining an analysis of the learning process. By non-linear regression the learning curve was analyzed. By the non-linear regression method the learning curve was analyzed and a r2 = 0.73 (p < 0.001) was obtained, being necessary 4.26 (∼five sessions) to reach the plateau of 80% of the estimated acquired knowledge, being that 100% of the students have reached this level of skills. From the fifth session till the 10th, the gain of knowledge was not significant, although some students reached 96% of the expected improvement. This study revealed that after five simulator training sequential sessions the students' learning curve reaches a plateau. The forward sessions in the same difficult level do not promote any improvement in laparoscopic basic surgical skills, and the students should be introduced to a more difficult training tasks level.

  5. Laboratory Simulation of Urban Runoff and Estimation of Runoff Hydrographs with Experimental Curve Numbers Implemented in USEPA SWMM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The prognostic capabilities of a lumped hydrologic modeling approach may be complicated by routing and connectivity among infiltrative and impervious surfaces. We used artificial rainfall to generate runoff from impervious and bare soil boxes arranged in series to simulate differ...

  6. Laboratory Simulation of Urban Runoff and Estimation of Runoff Hydrographs with Experimental Curve Numbers Implemented in USEPA SWMM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The prognostic capabilities of a lumped hydrologic modeling approach may be complicated by routing and connectivity among infiltrative and impervious surfaces. We used artificial rainfall to generate runoff from impervious and bare soil boxes arranged in series to simulate differ...

  7. Derivation of a Provisional, Age-dependent, AIS2+ Thoracic Risk Curve for the THOR50 Test Dummy via Integration of NASS Cases, PMHS Tests, and Simulation Data.

    PubMed

    Laituri, Tony R; Henry, Scott; El-Jawahri, Raed; Muralidharan, Nirmal; Li, Guosong; Nutt, Marvin

    2015-11-01

    A provisional, age-dependent thoracic risk equation (or, "risk curve") was derived to estimate moderate-to-fatal injury potential (AIS2+), pertaining to men with responses gaged by the advanced mid-sized male test dummy (THOR50). The derivation involved two distinct data sources: cases from real-world crashes (e.g., the National Automotive Sampling System, NASS) and cases involving post-mortem human subjects (PMHS). The derivation was therefore more comprehensive, as NASS datasets generally skew towards younger occupants, and PMHS datasets generally skew towards older occupants. However, known deficiencies had to be addressed (e.g., the NASS cases had unknown stimuli, and the PMHS tests required transformation of known stimuli into THOR50 stimuli). For the NASS portion of the analysis, chest-injury outcomes for adult male drivers about the size of the THOR50 were collected from real-world, 11-1 o'clock, full-engagement frontal crashes (NASS, 1995-2012 calendar years, 1985-2012 model-year light passenger vehicles). The screening for THOR50-sized men involved application of a set of newly-derived "correction" equations for self-reported height and weight data in NASS. Finally, THOR50 stimuli were estimated via field simulations involving attendant representative restraint systems, and those stimuli were then assigned to corresponding NASS cases (n=508). For the PMHS portion of the analysis, simulation-based closure equations were developed to convert PMHS stimuli into THOR50 stimuli. Specifically, closure equations were derived for the four measurement locations on the THOR50 chest by cross-correlating the results of matched-loading simulations between the test dummy and the age-dependent, Ford Human Body Model. The resulting closure equations demonstrated acceptable fidelity (n=75 matched simulations, R2≥0.99). These equations were applied to the THOR50-sized men in the PMHS dataset (n=20). The NASS and PMHS datasets were combined and subjected to survival

  8. Applications of Sphere Geometry in Canal Surface Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    surface, the problem was solved by Pottmann and Peternell [11]. They proved the surprising result that any canal surface with rational spine curve m(t) and... Peternell [11]. In this paper we will follow the second option. It results in the concept of Minkowski Pythagorean Hodograph curves. §5. Minkowski...Boehm, General cyclides, Comput. Aided Geom. Design 15 (1998), 699-710. 11. Peternell , M., and H. Pottmann, Computing rational parametrizations of

  9. Performance of medical students on a virtual reality simulator for knee arthroscopy: an analysis of learning curves and predictors of performance.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Stefan; Wieser, Karl; Wicki, Ilhui; Holenstein, Livia; Fucentese, Sandro F; Gerber, Christian

    2016-03-25

    Ethical concerns for surgical training on patients, limited working hours with fewer cases per trainee and the potential to better select talented persons for arthroscopic surgery raise the interest in simulator training for arthroscopic surgery. It was the purpose of this study to analyze learning curves of novices using a knee arthroscopy simulator and to correlate their performance with potentially predictive factors. Twenty medical students completed visuospatial tests and were then subjected to a simulator training program of eight 30 min sessions. Their test results were quantitatively correlated with their simulator performance at initiation, during and at the end of the program. The mean arthroscopic performance score (z-score in points) at the eight test sessions were 1. -35 (range, -126 to -5) points, 2. -16 (range, -30 to -2), 3. -11 (range, -35 to 4), 4. -3 (range, -16 to 5), 5. -2 (range, -28 to 7), 6. 1 (range, -18 to 8), 7. 2 (range, -9 to 8), 8. 2 (range, -4 to 7). Scores improved significantly from sessions 1 to 2 (p = 0.001), 2 to 3 (p = 0.052) and 3 to 4 (p = 0.001) but not thereafter. None of the investigated parameters predicted performance or development of arthroscopic performance. Novices improve significantly within four 30 min test virtual arthroscopy knee simulator training but not thereafter within the setting studied. No factors, predicting talent or speed and magnitude of improvement of skills could be identified.

  10. Application of wavelet analysis in variable star research. I. Properties of the wavelet map of simulated variable star light curves.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szatmary, K.; Vinko, J.; Gal, J.

    1994-12-01

    A type of the relatively new time-frequency method, the wavelet analysis is studied. Some results of testing this method are presented. The test data series were defined so that they show similarities with the light variations of variable stars. The effects of observational noise and irregularities in data sampling are pointed out. The wavelet analysis seems to be a suitable method for detecting the local behaviour of the light curves, e.g. phase jump or mode switching. The investigation of time-dependent phenomena, e.g. amplitude or frequency modulation, is more available than in the case of standard Fourier analysis. In order to interpret the real wavelet maps of variable stars it is necessary to take into account the properties of the method presented by similar tests.

  11. Simulation of the shape of chaperonins using the small-angle x-ray scattering curves and torus form factor

    SciTech Connect

    Amarantov, S. V.; Naletova, I. N.; Kurochkina, L. P.

    2011-08-15

    The inverse scattering problem has been solved for protein complexes whose surfaces can be described by a set of the simplest doubly connected surfaces in the uniform approximation (a scattering potential inside the molecule is a constant). Solutions of two proteins-well-known GroEL bacterial chaperonin and poor-studied bacteriophage chaperonin, which is a product of 146 gene (gp146)-were taken for the experiment. The shapes of protein complexes have been efficiently reconstructed from the experimental scattering curves. The shell method, the method of the rotation of amino acid sequences with the use of the form factor of an amino acid, and the method of seeking the model parameters of a protein complex with the preliminarily obtained form factor of the model have been used to reconstruct the shape of these particles.

  12. Numerical simulation for peristalsis of Carreau-Yasuda nanofluid in curved channel with mixed convection and porous space

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Anum; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.; Ahmad, B.

    2017-01-01

    Main theme of present investigation is to model and analyze the peristaltic activity of Carraeu-Yasuda nanofluid saturating porous space in a curved channel. Unlike the traditional approach, the porous medium effects are characterized by employing modified Darcy’s law for Carreau-Yasuda fluid. To our knowledge this is first attempt in this direction for Carreau-Yasuda fluid. Heat and mass transfer are further considered. Simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer are examined in presence of mixed convection, viscous dissipation and thermal radiation. The compliant characteristics for channel walls are taken into account. The resulting complex mathematical system has been discussed for small Reynolds number and large wavelength concepts. Numerical approximation to solutions are thus plotted in graphs and the physical description is presented. It is concluded that larger porosity in a medium cause an enhancement in fluid velocity and reduction in concentration. PMID:28151968

  13. Simulation of current-voltage curves for inverted planar structure perovskite solar cells using equivalent circuit model with inductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojocaru, Ludmila; Uchida, Satoshi; Jayaweera, Piyankarage V. V.; Kaneko, Shoji; Toyoshima, Yasutake; Nakazaki, Jotaro; Kubo, Takaya; Segawa, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    Physical modeling of hysteretic behavior in current-voltage (I-V) curves of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) is necessary for further improving their power conversion efficiencies (PCEs). The reduction of hysteresis in inverted planar structure PSCs (p-PSCs) has been achieved by using a [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) layer. In the cases, the opposite trend of the I-V hysteresis has been observed where the forward scan shows slightly higher efficiency than the reverse scan. In this paper, an equivalent circuit model with inductance is proposed. This model consists of a Schottky diode involving a parasitic inductance focusing PCBM/Al(Ca) interface and accurately represents the opposite trend of the I-V hysteresis of the p-PSC with an inverted structure.

  14. BINSYN: A Publicly Available Program for Simulating Spectra and Light Curves of Binary Systems with or without Accretion Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnell, Albert P.; DeStefano, Paul; Hubeny, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The BINSYN program suite, a collection of programs for analysis of binary star systems with or without an optically thick accretion disk, is available for download from a wiki. This article describes the package, including download instructions. BINSYN produces synthetic spectra of individual binary star components plus a synthetic spectrum of the system. If the system includes an accretion disk, BINSYN also produces a separate synthetic spectrum of the disk face and rim. A system routine convolves the synthetic spectra with filter profiles of several photometric standards to produce absolute synthetic photometry output. The package generates synthetic light curves and determines an optimized solution for system parameters. This article includes illustrative literature references that have used the suite, including mass transfer rates in several cataclysmic binary systems.

  15. Numerical simulation for peristalsis of Carreau-Yasuda nanofluid in curved channel with mixed convection and porous space.

    PubMed

    Tanveer, Anum; Hayat, T; Alsaedi, A; Ahmad, B

    2017-01-01

    Main theme of present investigation is to model and analyze the peristaltic activity of Carraeu-Yasuda nanofluid saturating porous space in a curved channel. Unlike the traditional approach, the porous medium effects are characterized by employing modified Darcy's law for Carreau-Yasuda fluid. To our knowledge this is first attempt in this direction for Carreau-Yasuda fluid. Heat and mass transfer are further considered. Simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer are examined in presence of mixed convection, viscous dissipation and thermal radiation. The compliant characteristics for channel walls are taken into account. The resulting complex mathematical system has been discussed for small Reynolds number and large wavelength concepts. Numerical approximation to solutions are thus plotted in graphs and the physical description is presented. It is concluded that larger porosity in a medium cause an enhancement in fluid velocity and reduction in concentration.

  16. Investigating inter-segmental connections between thoracic ganglia in the stick insect by means of experimental and simulated phase response curves.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Tibor I; Grabowska, Martyna; Rosjat, Nils; Hellekes, Katja; Borgmann, Anke; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    The neuronal networks that control the motion of the individual legs in insects, in particular in the stick insect, are located in the pro-, meso- and meta-thoracic ganglia. They ensure high flexibility of movement control. Thus, the legs can move in an apparently independent way, e.g., during search movements, but also in tight coordination during locomotion. The latter is evidently a very important behavioural mode. It has, therefore, inspired a large number of studies, all aiming at uncovering the nature of the inter-leg coordination. One of the basic questions has been as to how the individual control networks in the three thoracic ganglia are connected to each other. One way to study this problem is to use phase response curves. They can reveal properties of the coupling between oscillatory systems, such as the central pattern generators in the control networks in the thoracic ganglia. In this paper, we report results that we have achieved by means of a combined experimental and modelling approach. We have calculated phase response curves from data obtained in as yet unpublished experiments as well as from those in previously published ones. By using models of the connected pro- and meso-thoracic control networks of the protractor and retractor neuromuscular systems, we have also produced simulated phase response curves and compared them with the experimental ones. In this way, we could gain important information of the nature of the connections between the aforementioned control networks. Specifically, we have found that connections from both the protractor and the retractor "sides" of the pro-thoracic network to the meso-thoracic one are necessary for producing phase response curves that show close similarity to the experimental ones. Furthermore, the strength of the excitatory connections has been proven to be crucial, while the inhibitory connections have essentially been irrelevant. We, thus, suggest that this type of connection might also be present in

  17. Using a High-Fidelity Patient Simulator with First-Year Medical Students to Facilitate Learning of Cardiovascular Function Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, David M.; Ryan, Kathleen; Rabuck, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Students are relying on technology for learning more than ever, and educators need to adapt to facilitate student learning. High-fidelity patient simulators (HFPS) are usually reserved for the clinical years of medical education and are geared to improve clinical decision skills, teamwork, and patient safety. Finding ways to incorporate HFPS into…

  18. Using a High-Fidelity Patient Simulator with First-Year Medical Students to Facilitate Learning of Cardiovascular Function Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, David M.; Ryan, Kathleen; Rabuck, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Students are relying on technology for learning more than ever, and educators need to adapt to facilitate student learning. High-fidelity patient simulators (HFPS) are usually reserved for the clinical years of medical education and are geared to improve clinical decision skills, teamwork, and patient safety. Finding ways to incorporate HFPS into…

  19. Panama: Owning the Canal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    47 Herbert Knapp and Mary Knapp, Red, White and Blue Paradise : The American Canal Zone in Panama (New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich...1984), 54–55. 48 Knapp and Knapp, Red, White and Blue Paradise , 55–56. 49 Conniff, Panama and The United States, 122. 20 legislatures and thus...Czechoslovakia, during the Cold War, while the United States still treated the small nation of Panama as an imperialistic conquest, was not lost on Carter

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of dynamic phase transitions and frequency dispersions of hysteresis curves in core/shell ferrimagnetic cubic nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatansever, Erol

    2017-05-01

    By means of Monte Carlo simulation method with Metropolis algorithm, we elucidate the thermal and magnetic phase transition behaviors of a ferrimagnetic core/shell nanocubic system driven by a time dependent magnetic field. The particle core is composed of ferromagnetic spins, and it is surrounded by an antiferromagnetic shell. At the interface of the core/shell particle, we use antiferromagnetic spin-spin coupling. We simulate the nanoparticle using classical Heisenberg spins. After a detailed analysis, our Monte Carlo simulation results suggest that present system exhibits unusual and interesting magnetic behaviors. For example, at the relatively lower temperature regions, an increment in the amplitude of the external field destroys the antiferromagnetism in the shell part of the nanoparticle, leading to a ground state with ferromagnetic character. Moreover, particular attention has been dedicated to the hysteresis behaviors of the system. For the first time, we show that frequency dispersions can be categorized into three groups for a fixed temperature for finite core/shell systems, as in the case of the conventional bulk systems under the influence of an oscillating magnetic field.

  1. Simulations of Gamma-Ray Burst Jets in a Stratified External Medium: Dynamics, Afterglow Light Curves, Jet Breaks, and Radio Calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Lopez-Camara, Diego

    2012-05-01

    The dynamics of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets during the afterglow phase is most reliably and accurately modeled using hydrodynamic simulations. All published simulations so far, however, have considered only a uniform external medium, while a stratified external medium is expected around long duration GRB progenitors. Here, we present simulations of the dynamics of GRB jets and the resulting afterglow emission for both uniform and stratified external media with ρextvpropr -k for k = 0, 1, 2. The simulations are performed in two dimensions using the special relativistic version of the Mezcal code. Common to all calculations is the initiation of the GRB jet as a conical wedge of half-opening angle θ0 = 0.2 whose radial profile is taken from the self-similar Blandford-McKee solution. The dynamics for stratified external media (k = 1, 2) are broadly similar to those derived for expansion into a uniform external medium (k = 0). The jet half-opening angle is observed to start increasing logarithmically with time (or radius) once the Lorentz factor Γ drops below θ-1 0. For larger k values, however, the lateral expansion is faster at early times (when Γ > θ-1 0) and slower at late times with the jet expansion becoming Newtonian and slowly approaching spherical symmetry over progressively longer timescales. We find that, contrary to analytic expectations, there is a reasonably sharp jet break in the light curve for k = 2 (a wind-like external medium), although the shape of the break is affected more by the viewing angle (for θobs <= θ0) than by the slope of the external density profile (for 0 <= k <= 2). Steeper density profiles (i.e., increasing k values) are found to produce more gradual jet breaks while larger viewing angles cause smoother and later appearing jet breaks. The counterjet becomes visible as it becomes sub-relativistic, and for k = 0 this results in a clear bump-like feature in the light curve. However, for larger k values the jet decelerates more

  2. Comparison of Curved Root Canals Prepared with Various Chelating Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontics Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services...Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Bethesda, Maryland CERTIFICATE OF APPROVAL MASTER’S THESIS...Master of Science degree in Oral Biology at the June 2012 graduation. Thesis Committee: /t Associate Dean, Graduate Dental Program Navy Medicine

  3. Canal plane dynamic visual acuity in superior canal dehiscence.

    PubMed

    Janky, Kristen L; Zuniga, M Geraldine; Ward, Bryan; Carey, John P; Schubert, Michael C

    2014-06-01

    1) To characterize normal, horizontal active dynamic visual acuity (DVA) and passive canal plane head thrust DVA (htDVA) across ages to establish appropriate control data and 2) to determine whether horizontal active DVA and passive canal plane htDVA are significantly different in individuals with superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) before and after surgical repair in the acute (within 10 d) and nonacute stage (>6 wk). Prospective study. Tertiary referral center Patients diagnosed with SCDS (n = 32) and healthy control subjects (n = 51). Surgical canal plugging on a subset of patients. Static visual acuity (SVA), active horizontal DVA, and canal plane htDVA. Visual acuity (SVA, active DVA, and htDVA) declines with age. In SCDS, SVA and active DVA are not significantly affected in individuals after surgical canal plugging; however, htDVA in the plane of the affected canal is significantly worse after canal plugging. Age-based normative data are necessary for DVA testing. In SCDS, htDVA in the plane of the affected canal is normal before surgery but permanently reduced afterward.

  4. Modeling and measurement of root canal using stereo digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Analoui, Mostafa; Krisnamurthy, Satthya; Brown, Cecil

    2000-04-01

    Determining root canal length is a crucial step in success of root canal treatment. Root canal length is commonly estimated based on pre-operation intraoral radiography. 2D depiction of a 3D object is the primary source of error in this approach. Techniques based on impedance measurement are more accurate than radiographic approaches, but do not offer a method for depicting the shape of canal. In this study, we investigated a stererotactic approach for modeling and measurement of root canal of human dentition. A weakly perspective model approximated the projectional geometry. A series of computer-simulated objects was used to test accuracy of this model as the first step. The, to assess the clinical viability of such an approach, endodontic files inserted in the root canal phantoms were fixed on an adjustable platform between a radiographic cone and an image receptor. Parameters of projection matrix were computed based on the relative positions of image receptors, focal spot, and test objects. Rotating the specimen platform from 0 to 980 degrees at 5-degree intervals set relative angulations for stereo images. Root canal is defined as the intersection of two surfaces defined by each projection. Computation of error for length measurement indicates that for angulations greater than 40 degrees the error is within clinically acceptable ranges.

  5. [Assessment of learning in blind orotracheal intubation with Fastrach masks using a cumulative sum curves (CuSum) in the SimMan Universal Simulator].

    PubMed

    Alonso Manzano, A; Sistac Ballarín, J M; Ruiz Casellas, M M; Ortiz Enciso, M; Montero Matamala, A

    2012-02-01

    To assess training in blind intubation with the Fastrach laryngeal mask in a simulation model by applying the cumulative sums (CuSum) method. Six anaesthesiology resident doctors, with no previous experience of the technique, participated, three in their first year, and three in the second. The study was conducted with the help of the SimMan Universal Simulator. Fifty attempts by each one of them over a four month period, divided into two stages: the first 20 with minimum airway difficulty, and the next 30 with limitations of flexion-extension movements to <80°. An unacceptable failure rate was set at 10% after a second failed attempt. The time limit set to be considered a success was 60seconds. A total of 120 attempts in the first stages, and the remaining 180 in the second were analysed individually, all managing to achieve acceptable success rates of 90%: 84% in the first attempt and 13.33% in the second. A total of 2.66% failures were recorded. The learning curve showed that the residents began to achieve an acceptable 90% success rate in case number 25±11.76 of the 50 attempts. This statistical method and the SimMan simulator, used together, have demonstrated to be very useful tools in assessing learning curves in this technique. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Models to Estimate Lactation Curves of Milk Yield and Somatic Cell Count in Dairy Cows at the Herd Level for the Use in Simulations and Predictive Models

    PubMed Central

    Græsbøll, Kaare; Kirkeby, Carsten; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Halasa, Tariq; Toft, Nils; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo

    2016-01-01

    Typically, central milk recording data from dairy herds are recorded less than monthly. Over-fitting early in lactation periods is a challenge, which we explored in different ways by reducing the number of parameters needed to describe the milk yield and somatic cell count of individual cows. Furthermore, we investigated how the parameters of lactation models correlate between parities and from dam to offspring. The aim of the study was to provide simple and robust models for cow level milk yield and somatic cell count for fitting to sparse data to parameterize herd- and cow-specific simulation of dairy herds. Data from 610 Danish Holstein herds were used to determine parity traits in milk production regarding milk yield and somatic cell count of individual cows. Parity was stratified in first, second, and third and higher for milk, and first to sixth and higher for somatic cell count. Fitting of herd level parameters allowed for cow level lactation curves with three, two, or one parameters per lactation. Correlations of milk yield and somatic cell count were estimated between lactations and between dam and offspring. The shape of the lactation curves varied markedly between farms. The correlation between lactations for milk yield and somatic cell count was 0.2–0.6 and significant on more than 95% of farms. The variation in the daily milk yield was observed to be a source of variation to the somatic cell count, and the total somatic cell count was less correlated with the milk production than somatic cells per milliliter. A positive correlation was found between relative levels of the total somatic cell count and the milk yield. The variation of lactation and somatic cell count curves between farms highlights the importance of a herd level approach. The one-parameter per cow model using a herd level curve allows for estimating the cow production level from first the recording in the parity, while a two-parameter model requires more recordings for a credible

  7. Distributed control at Love canal

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, G.; Rider, G.J.; Sadowski, B.; Moore, M.

    1994-09-01

    Love Canal is known worldwide as the site of one of the worst non-nuclear environmental disasters in modern history. For 12 years, a Niagara Falls, New York chemical company used the canal bed as a chemical dump. This article discusses the computerized control of equipment used to remove the toxic materials from the ground under Love Canal, and how the minimization of maintenance is reducing maintenance costs and increasing operator safety.

  8. Bradford Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of informetric distributions shows that generalized Leimkuhler functions give proper fits to a large variety of Bradford curves, including those exhibiting a Groos droop or a rising tail. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to test goodness of fit, and least-square fits are compared with Egghe's method. (Contains 53 references.) (LRW)

  9. ASTER Suez Canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important waterways in the world, the Suez Canal runs north to south across the Isthmus of Suez in northeastern Egypt. This image of the canal covers an area 36 kilometers (22 miles) wide and 60 kilometers (47 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. It shows the northern part of the canal, with the Mediterranean Sea just visible in the upper right corner. The Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Gulf of Suez, an arm of the Red Sea. The artificial canal provides an important shortcut for ships operating between both European and American ports and ports located in southern Asia, eastern Africa, and Oceania. With a length of about 195 kilometers (121 miles) and a minimum channel width of 60 meters (197 feet), the Suez Canal is able to accommodate ships as large as 150,000 tons fully loaded. Because no locks interrupt traffic on this sea level waterway, the transit time only averages about 15 hours. ASTER acquired this scene on May 19, 2000.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five

  10. ASTER Suez Canal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important waterways in the world, the Suez Canal runs north to south across the Isthmus of Suez in northeastern Egypt. This image of the canal covers an area 36 kilometers (22 miles) wide and 60 kilometers (47 miles) long in three bands of the reflected visible and infrared wavelength region. It shows the northern part of the canal, with the Mediterranean Sea just visible in the upper right corner. The Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea with the Gulf of Suez, an arm of the Red Sea. The artificial canal provides an important shortcut for ships operating between both European and American ports and ports located in southern Asia, eastern Africa, and Oceania. With a length of about 195 kilometers (121 miles) and a minimum channel width of 60 meters (197 feet), the Suez Canal is able to accommodate ships as large as 150,000 tons fully loaded. Because no locks interrupt traffic on this sea level waterway, the transit time only averages about 15 hours. ASTER acquired this scene on May 19, 2000.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five

  11. GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES FROM A LORENTZ-BOOSTED SIMULATION FRAME AND THE SHAPE OF THE JET BREAK

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2013-04-20

    The early stages of decelerating gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow jets have been notoriously difficult to resolve numerically using two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations even at very high resolution, due to the extreme thinness of the blast wave and high outflow Lorentz factors. However, these resolution issues can be avoided by performing the simulations in a boosted frame, which makes it possible to calculate afterglow light curves from numerically computed flows in sufficient detail to accurately quantify the shape of the jet break and the post-break steepening of the light curve. Here, we study afterglow jet breaks for jets with opening angles of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 radians decelerating in a surrounding medium of constant density, observed at various angles ranging from on-axis to the edge of the jet. A single set of scale-invariant functions describing the time evolution of afterglow synchrotron spectral break frequencies and peak flux, depending only on jet opening angle and observer angle, are all that is needed to reconstruct light curves for arbitrary explosion energy, circumburst density and synchrotron particle distribution power law slope p. These functions are presented in the paper. Their time evolutions change directly following the jet break, although an earlier reported temporary post-break steepening of the cooling break is found to have been resolution-induced. We compare synthetic light curves to fit functions using sharp power law breaks as well as smooth power law transitions. We confirm our earlier finding that the measured jet break time is very sensitive to the angle of the observer and can be postponed significantly. We find that the difference in temporal indices across the jet break is larger than theoretically anticipated and is about -(0.5 + 0.5p) below the cooling break and about -(0.25 + 0.5p) above the cooling break, both leading to post-break slopes of roughly about 0.25 - 1.3p, although different observer angles, jet opening

  12. A mathematical approach towards simulating a realistic tissue activity curve of 64Cu-ATSM for the purpose of sub-target volume delineation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalah, E.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2010-07-01

    One unique feature of positron emission tomography (PET) is that it allows measurements of regional tracer concentration in hypoxic tumour-bearing tissue, supporting the need for accurate radiotherapy treatment planning. Generally the data are taken over multiple time frames, in the form of tissue activity curves (TACs), providing an indication of the presence of hypoxia, the degree of oxygen perfusion, vascular geometry and hypoxia fraction. In order to understand such a complicated phenomenon a number of theoretical studies have attempted to describe tracer uptake in tissue cells. More recently, a novel computerized reaction diffusion equation method developed by Kelly and Brady has allowed simulation of the realistic TACs of 18F-FMISO, with representation of physiological oxygen heterogeneity and tracer kinetics. We present a refinement to the work of Kelly and Brady, with a particular interest in simulating TACs of the most promising hypoxia selective tracer, 64Cu-ATSM, demonstrating its potential role in tumour sub-volume delineation for radiotherapy treatment planning. Simulation results have demonstrated the high contrast of imaging using ATSM, with a tumour to blood ratio ranging 2.24-4.1. Similarly, results of tumour sub-volumes generated using three different thresholding methods were all well correlated.

  13. Controversy at Love Canal.

    PubMed

    Paigen, B

    1982-06-01

    A cancer researcher reviews the events surrounding the toxic waste contamination at Love Canal with emphasis on the political nature of the controversy about its health impact. Antagonism between the community and the New York State Department of Health was fueled by several factors: the state's awareness that it gained from delay in investigation, disagreement on health problems to be studied, control over the information gathering process, silencing of opposition opinion, and the violation of norms of scientific behavior. The author calls for the establishment of standards of ethical behavior for scientists in such situations, standards for conflict resolution, and means of appeal for those injured.

  14. 15. ROUTE OF CANAL NORTHWEST OF THE DILLON CEMETERY. CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. ROUTE OF CANAL NORTHWEST OF THE DILLON CEMETERY. CANAL PASSES BELOW HILLSIDE IN FOREGROUND, THROUGH THE LOWER EDGE OF THE TREES ON LEFT, ON FAR SIDE OF SMALL VALLEY JUST RIGHT OF CENTER, AND AROUND THE PROMINENT POINT ON THE RIGHT. VIEW IS TO THE EAST-SOUTHEAST. - Snake River Ditch, Headgate on north bank of Snake River, Dillon, Summit County, CO

  15. Kinetic analysis of enzyme systems with suicide substrate in the presence of a reversible competitive inhibitor, tested by simulated progress curves.

    PubMed

    Moruno-Dávila, M A; Garrido-del Solo, C; García-Moreno, M; Havsteen, B H; Garcia-Sevilla, F; Garcia-Cánovas, F; Varón, R

    2001-02-01

    The use of suicide substrates remains a very important and useful method in enzymology for studying enzyme mechanisms and designing potential drugs. Suicide substrates act as modified substrates for the target enzymes and bind to the active site. Therefore the presence of a competitive reversible inhibitor decreases the rate of substrate-induced inactivation and protects the enzyme from this inactivation. This lowering on the inactivation rate has evident physiological advantages, since it allows the easy acquisition of experimental data and facilitates kinetic data analysis by providing another variable (inhibitor concentration). However despite the importance of the simultaneous action of a suicide substrate and a competitive reversible inhibition, to date no corresponding kinetic analysis has been carried out. Therefore we present a general kinetic analysis of a Michaelis-Menten reaction mechanism with double inhibition caused by both, a suicide substrate and a competitive reversible inhibitor. We assume rapid equilibrium of the reversible reaction steps involved, while the time course equations for the reaction product have been derived with the assumption of a limiting enzyme. The goodness of the analytical solutions has been tested by comparison with the simulated curves obtained by numerical integration. A kinetic data analysis to determine the corresponding kinetic parameters from the time progress curve of the product is suggested. In conclusion, we present a complete kinetic analysis of an enzyme reaction mechanism as described above in an attempt to fill a gap in the theoretical treatment of this type of system.

  16. Osmolarity and root canal antiseptics.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Fedele, G; Guastalli, A R

    2014-04-01

    Antiseptics used in endodontics for disinfection purposes include root canal dressings and irrigants. Osmotic shock is known to cause the alteration of microbial cell viability and might have a role in the mechanism of action of root canal antiseptics. The aim of this review was to determine the role of osmolarity on the performance of antiseptics in root canal treatment. A literature search using the Medline electronic database was conducted up to 30 May 2013 using the following search terms and combinations: 'osmolarity AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmolality AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmotic AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; osmosis AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm; sodium chloride AND root canal or endodontic or antiseptic or irrigation or irrigant or medication or dressing or biofilm'. Publications were included if the effects of osmolarity on the clinical performance of antiseptics in root canal treatment were stated, if preparations with different osmolarities values were compared and if they were published in English. A hand search of articles published online, 'in press' and 'early view', and in the reference list of the included papers was carried out following the same criteria. A total of 3274 publications were identified using the database, and three were included in the review. The evidence available in endodontics suggests a possible role for hyperosmotic root canal medicaments as disinfectants, and that there is no influence of osmolarity on the tissue dissolution capacity of sodium hypochlorite. There are insufficient data to obtain a sound conclusion regarding the role of hypo-osmosis in root canal disinfection, or osmosis in any further desirable

  17. Your baby in the birth canal

    MedlinePlus

    ... lie; Fetal attitude; Fetal descent; Fetal station; Cardinal movements; Labor-birth canal; Delivery-birth canal ... are used to describe your baby's position and movement through the birth canal. FETAL STATION Fetal station ...

  18. A Review and Comparison of Methods for Recreating Individual Patient Data from Published Kaplan-Meier Survival Curves for Economic Evaluations: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiaomin; Peng, Liubao; Li, Yuanjian

    2015-01-01

    Background In general, the individual patient-level data (IPD) collected in clinical trials are not available to independent researchers to conduct economic evaluations; researchers only have access to published survival curves and summary statistics. Thus, methods that use published survival curves and summary statistics to reproduce statistics for economic evaluations are essential. Four methods have been identified: two traditional methods 1) least squares method, 2) graphical method; and two recently proposed methods by 3) Hoyle and Henley, 4) Guyot et al. The four methods were first individually reviewed and subsequently assessed regarding their abilities to estimate mean survival through a simulation study. Methods A number of different scenarios were developed that comprised combinations of various sample sizes, censoring rates and parametric survival distributions. One thousand simulated survival datasets were generated for each scenario, and all methods were applied to actual IPD. The uncertainty in the estimate of mean survival time was also captured. Results All methods provided accurate estimates of the mean survival time when the sample size was 500 and a Weibull distribution was used. When the sample size was 100 and the Weibull distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method was almost as accurate as the Hoyle and Henley method; however, more biases were identified in the traditional methods. When a lognormal distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method generated noticeably less bias and a more accurate uncertainty compared with the Hoyle and Henley method. Conclusions The traditional methods should not be preferred because of their remarkable overestimation. When the Weibull distribution was used for a fitted model, the Guyot et al. method was almost as accurate as the Hoyle and Henley method. However, if the lognormal distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method was less biased compared with the Hoyle and Henley method. PMID:25803659

  19. A review and comparison of methods for recreating individual patient data from published Kaplan-Meier survival curves for economic evaluations: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaomin; Peng, Liubao; Li, Yuanjian

    2015-01-01

    In general, the individual patient-level data (IPD) collected in clinical trials are not available to independent researchers to conduct economic evaluations; researchers only have access to published survival curves and summary statistics. Thus, methods that use published survival curves and summary statistics to reproduce statistics for economic evaluations are essential. Four methods have been identified: two traditional methods 1) least squares method, 2) graphical method; and two recently proposed methods by 3) Hoyle and Henley, 4) Guyot et al. The four methods were first individually reviewed and subsequently assessed regarding their abilities to estimate mean survival through a simulation study. A number of different scenarios were developed that comprised combinations of various sample sizes, censoring rates and parametric survival distributions. One thousand simulated survival datasets were generated for each scenario, and all methods were applied to actual IPD. The uncertainty in the estimate of mean survival time was also captured. All methods provided accurate estimates of the mean survival time when the sample size was 500 and a Weibull distribution was used. When the sample size was 100 and the Weibull distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method was almost as accurate as the Hoyle and Henley method; however, more biases were identified in the traditional methods. When a lognormal distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method generated noticeably less bias and a more accurate uncertainty compared with the Hoyle and Henley method. The traditional methods should not be preferred because of their remarkable overestimation. When the Weibull distribution was used for a fitted model, the Guyot et al. method was almost as accurate as the Hoyle and Henley method. However, if the lognormal distribution was used, the Guyot et al. method was less biased compared with the Hoyle and Henley method.

  20. Bilateral internal acoustic canal mass.

    PubMed

    Nazim, Korkut; Mehmet, Yilmaz; Tuna, Edizer Deniz; Marlen, Mamanov Asanbekovich

    2013-01-01

    We reported a case of bilateral internal acoustic canal mass. A 42-year-old man patient was previously treated for colon cancer. After surgery during chemotherapy signs as severe vertigo and bilateral sudden hearing loss occurred. Temporal bone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) had bilateral internal acoustic canal masses.

  1. [Difficulties and misunderstandings of root canal filling].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Root canal filling is performed as the final and most important procedure of root canal treatment. The superior 3D filling is the key determinant of endodontic success. However, such procedure remains a challenge because of the complexity of the root canal system and the limitation of root canal filling materials and methods. This paper provides an overview of current principles and practices in root canal filling, focusing on advantages, disadvantages and indications. The process errors and countermeasures in various root canal filling methods are also discussed. This review provides guidance and help for clinical and practice to achieve a satisfactory root canal filling and improve root canal treatment outcome.

  2. An Approach for a Mathematical Description of Human Root Canals by Means of Elementary Parameters.

    PubMed

    Dannemann, Martin; Kucher, Michael; Kirsch, Jasmin; Binkowski, Alexander; Modler, Niels; Hannig, Christian; Weber, Marie-Theres

    2017-04-01

    Root canal geometry is an important factor for instrumentation and preparation of the canals. Curvature, length, shape, and ramifications need to be evaluated in advance to enhance the success of the treatment. Therefore, the present study aimed to design and realize a method for analyzing the geometric characteristics of human root canals. Two extracted human lower molars were radiographed in the occlusal direction using micro-computed tomographic imaging. The 3-dimensional geometry of the root canals, calculated by a self-implemented image evaluation algorithm, was described by 3 different mathematical models: the elliptical model, the 1-circle model, and the 3-circle model. The different applied mathematical models obtained similar geometric properties depending on the parametric model used. Considering more complex root canals, the differences of the results increase because of the different adaptability and the better approximation of the geometry. With the presented approach, it is possible to estimate and compare the geometry of natural root canals. Therefore, the deviation of the canal can be assessed, which is important for the choice of taper of root canal instruments. Root canals with a nearly elliptical cross section are reasonably approximated by the elliptical model, whereas the 3-circle model obtains a good agreement for curved shapes. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Virtual reality simulator for training on photoselective vaporization of the prostate with 980 nm diode laser and learning curve of the technique.

    PubMed

    Angulo, J C; Arance, I; García-Tello, A; Las Heras, M M; Andrés, G; Gimbernat, H; Lista, F; Ramón de Fata, F

    2014-09-01

    The utility of a virtual reality simulator for training of the photoselective vaporization of the prostate with diode laser was studied. Two experiments were performed with a simulator (VirtaMed AG, Zürich, Switzerland) with software for specific training in prostate vaporization in contact mode with Twister fiber (Biolitec AG, Jena, German). Eighteen surgeons performed ablation of the prostate (55 cc) twice and compared the score obtained (190 points efficacy and 80 safety) in the second one of them by experience groups (medical students, residents, specialists). They also performed a spatial orientation test with scores of 0 to 6. After, six of these surgeons repeated 15 ablations of the prostate (55 and 70 ml). Improvement of the parameters obtained was evaluated to define the learning curve and how experience, spatial orientation skills and type of sequences performed affects them. Global efficacy and safety score was different according to the grade of experience (P=.005). When compared by pairs, specialist-student differences were detected (p=0.004), but not specialist-resident (P=.12) or resident-student (P=.2). Regarding efficacy of the procedure, specialist-student (p=0.0026) and resident-student (P=.08) differences were detected. The different partial indicators in terms of efficacy were rate of ablation (P=.01), procedure time (P=.03) and amount of unexposed capsule (p=0.03). Differences were not observed between groups in safety (P=.5). Regarding the learning curve, percentage median on the total score exceeded 90% after performing 4 procedures for prostates of 55 ml and 10 procedures for prostate glands of 70 ml. This course was not modified by previous experience (resident-specialist; P=.6). However, it was modified according to the repetition sequence (progressive-random; P=.007). Surgeons whose spatial orientation was less than the median of the group (value 2.5) did not surpass 90% of the score in spite of repetition of the procedure. Simulation

  4. 173. CANAL TENDER OPERATING LOCK MACHINERY ON THE MORRIS CANAL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    173. CANAL TENDER OPERATING LOCK MACHINERY ON THE MORRIS CANAL. AS THE LOCK TENDER TURNS THE CRANK, A SMALL COGGED WHEEL (PINION) ON THE CRANK TURNS A LARGER COGGED WHEEL, (MAIN GEAR). MAIN GEAR ENGAGES A COGGED BAR CALLED A TRAVELLER WHICH MOVES FORWARD OR BACK DEPENDING ON WHICH WAY THE CRANK IS TURNED. CONNECTED TO THE TRAVELLER ARE TO LONG RODS (GATE ARMS) WHICH IN TURN ARE CONNECTED TO THE GATE'S TOP BEAM (ONE FOR EACH GATE). AS THE TRAVELLER MOVES FORWARD THE GATE ARMS EXTEND PUSHING THE GATES OPEN. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  5. Phase transition of Boolean networks with partially nested canalizing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Kayse; Matache, Mihaela Teodora

    2013-07-01

    We generate the critical condition for the phase transition of a Boolean network governed by partially nested canalizing functions for which a fraction of the inputs are canalizing, while the remaining non-canalizing inputs obey a complementary threshold Boolean function. Past studies have considered the stability of fully or partially nested canalizing functions paired with random choices of the complementary function. In some of those studies conflicting results were found with regard to the presence of chaotic behavior. Moreover, those studies focus mostly on ergodic networks in which initial states are assumed equally likely. We relax that assumption and find the critical condition for the sensitivity of the network under a non-ergodic scenario. We use the proposed mathematical model to determine parameter values for which phase transitions from order to chaos occur. We generate Derrida plots to show that the mathematical model matches the actual network dynamics. The phase transition diagrams indicate that both order and chaos can occur, and that certain parameters induce a larger range of values leading to order versus chaos. The edge-of-chaos curves are identified analytically and numerically. It is shown that the depth of canalization does not cause major dynamical changes once certain thresholds are reached; these thresholds are fairly small in comparison to the connectivity of the nodes.

  6. Panama City and Canal

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-30

    STS068-237-099 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- This 70mm frame shows the Panama Canal (center, between the two dark green belts) the main ship way to travel from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean. Also seen is a great deal of detail in Panama City (left center, on the Pacific Ocean coastline). Geologists studying the photography returned by Shuttle astronauts feel this picture is the best ever of the city. Agricultural fields can be seen on the east side of Panama City and on both sides of the Pan American Highway (the straight thin line extending to the left). Sedimentation in the Chepo River (upper left) is thought to be due to eroded soil from the agricultural lands near the sea. This river is surrounded by swamps lying along the Pacific coastline.

  7. Cleaning of Root Canal System by Different Irrigation Methods.

    PubMed

    Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Miano, Lucas Martinati; Chávez-Andrade, Gisselle Moraima; Torres, Fernanda Ferrari Esteves; Leonardo, Renato de Toledo; Guerreiro-Tanomaru, Juliane Maria

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cleaning of main and lateral canals using the irrigation methods: negative pressure irrigation (EndoVac system), passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) and manual irrigation (MI). Resin teeth were used. After root canal preparation, four lateral canals were made at 2 and 7 mm from the apex. Root canals were filled with contrast solution and radiographed pre- and post-irrigation using digital radiographic system [radiovisiography (RVG)]. The irrigation protocols were: MI1-manual irrigation [22 G needle at 5 mm short of working length-WL]; MI2-manual irrigation (30G needle at 2 mm short of WL); PUI; EV1-EndoVac (microcannula at 1 mm short of WL); EV2-Endovac (microcannula at 3 mm short of WL). The obtained images, initial (filled with contrast solution) and final (after irrigation) were analyzed by using image tool 3.0 software. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests (5% significance level). EV1 and EV2, followed by PUI showed better cleaning capacity than manual irrigation (MI1 and MI2) (p < 0.05). Negative pressure irrigation and PUI promoted better cleaning of main and simulated lateral canals. Conventional manual irrigation technique may promote less root canal cleaning in the apical third. For this reason, the search for other irrigation protocols is important, and EndoVac and PUI are alternatives to contribute to irrigation effectiveness.

  8. Long-term cytotoxic effects of contemporary root canal sealers

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; SANTOS, Carolina Carvalho; ZAIA, Alexandre Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of root canal sealers on the cytotoxicity of 3T3 fibroblasts during a period of 5 weeks. Material and Methods: Fibroblasts (3T3, 1x105 cells per well) were incubated with elutes of fresh specimens from eight root canal sealers (AH Plus, Epiphany, Endomethasone N, EndoReZ, MTA Fillapex, Pulp Canal Sealer EWT, RoekoSeal and Sealapex) and with elutes of the same specimens for 5 succeeding weeks after immersing in simulated body fluid. The cytotoxicity of all root canal sealers was determined using the MTT assay. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. Results: RoekoSeal was the only sealer that did not show any cytotoxic effects (p<0.05). All the other tested sealers exhibited severe toxicity initially (week 0). MTA Fillapex remained moderately cytotoxic after the end of experimental period. Toxicity of the other tested sealers decreased gradually over time. The evaluated root canal sealers presented varying degrees of cytotoxicity, mainly in fresh mode. Conclusions: RoekoSeal had no cytotoxic effect both freshly mixed and in the other tested time points. MTA Fillapex was associated with significantly less cell viability when compared to the other tested root canal sealers. PMID:23559111

  9. Identification of possible factors impacting dental students' ability to locate MB2 canals in maxillary molars.

    PubMed

    Park, Ellen; Chehroudi, Babak; Coil, Jeffrey M

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the effect of the access size and straight-line path of access on third-year dental students' ability to locate a second mesiobuccal (MB2) canal in maxillary first and second molars. One hundred and six third-year dental students at one Faculty of Dentistry performed simulated root canal treatment with the aid of 2x magnification loupes on extracted teeth. A postgraduate endodontic student subsequently made a reasonable search for an untreated MB2 canal with the aid of a dental operating microscope. The mesiobuccal roots were then sectioned horizontally for determination of the canal configuration. The dental students were able to treat an MB2 canal in 15.8 percent of the teeth, but this was not associated with satisfactory access criteria. The postgraduate endodontic student identified an MB2 canal in 54.7 percent of the remaining tooth samples excluding those where the MB2 canal was found by the dental students; this represented 94.3 percent of those teeth confirmed by horizontal sectioning of the root to have an MB2 canal. The postgraduate student troughed, on average, 2.6 mm before negotiating the MB2 canal. As satisfactory access criteria and straight-line path of access did not correlate with the dental students' ability to find a second mesiobuccal canal, this result has important implications for educational goals with respect to endodontic treatment of maxillary molar teeth.

  10. The X-ray Power Density Spectrum of the Seyfert 2 Galaxy NGC 4945: Analysis and Application of the Method of Light Curve Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Martin; /SLAC

    2010-12-16

    The study of the power density spectrum (PDS) of fluctuations in the X-ray flux from active galactic nuclei (AGN) complements spectral studies in giving us a view into the processes operating in accreting compact objects. An important line of investigation is the comparison of the PDS from AGN with those from galactic black hole binaries; a related area of focus is the scaling relation between time scales for the variability and the black hole mass. The PDS of AGN is traditionally modeled using segments of power laws joined together at so-called break frequencies; associations of the break time scales, i.e., the inverses of the break frequencies, with time scales of physical processes thought to operate in these sources are then sought. I analyze the Method of Light Curve Simulations that is commonly used to characterize the PDS in AGN with a view to making the method as sensitive as possible to the shape of the PDS. I identify several weaknesses in the current implementation of the method and propose alternatives that can substitute for some of the key steps in the method. I focus on the complications introduced by uneven sampling in the light curve, the development of a fit statistic that is better matched to the distributions of power in the PDS, and the statistical evaluation of the fit between the observed data and the model for the PDS. Using archival data on one AGN, NGC 3516, I validate my changes against previously reported results. I also report new results on the PDS in NGC 4945, a Seyfert 2 galaxy with a well-determined black hole mass. This source provides an opportunity to investigate whether the PDS of Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies differ. It is also an attractive object for placement on the black hole mass-break time scale relation. Unfortunately, with the available data on NGC 4945, significant uncertainties on the break frequency in its PDS remain.

  11. Response curves for phosphorus plume lengths from reactive-solute-transport simulations of onland disposal of wastewater in noncarbonate sand and gravel aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, John A.

    2005-01-01

    infiltration bed after disposal cessation. Duration of disposal before cessation was assumed to be 50 years into an infiltration bed of 20,000 square feet at the rate of 3 gallons per square foot per day. Time for the maximum extent of the phosphorus plume to develop is on the order of 100 years after disposal cessation. Simulations indicated that phosphorus transport beyond the extent of the 0.015 milligram-per-liter concentration contour was never more than 0.18 kilogram per year, an amount that would likely not alter the ecology of most surface water. Simulations of phosphorus plume lengths were summarized in a series of response curves. Simulated plume lengths ranged from 200 feet for low phosphorus-concentration effluents (0.25 milligram per liter) and thick (50 feet) unsaturated zones to 3,400 feet for high phosphorus-concentration effluents (14 milligrams per liter) discharged directly into the aquifer (unsaturated-zone thickness of 0 feet). Plume length was nearly independent of unsaturated-zone thickness at phosphorus concentrations in the wastewater that were less than 2 milligrams per liter because little or no phosphorus mineral formed at low phosphorus concentrations. For effluents of high phosphorus concentration, plume length varied from 3,400 feet for unsaturated-zone thickness of 0 to 2,550 feet for unsaturated-zone thickness of 50 feet. Model treatments of flow and equilibrium-controlled chemistry likely were more accurate than rates of kinetically controlled reactions, notably precipitation of iron-phosphate minerals; the kinetics of such reactions are less well known and thus less well defined in the model. Sensitivity analysis indicated that many chemical and physical aquifer properties, such as hydraulic gradient and model width, did not affect the simulated plume length appreciably, but duration of discharge, size of infiltration bed, amount of dispersion, and number of sorption sites on the aquifer sediments did affect plume length ap

  12. S-Shaped Canals: A Series of Cases Performed by Four Specialists around the World

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Ricardo; Chaniottis, Antonis; Vera, Jorge; Saucedo, Carlos; Vansan, Luiz Pascoal; Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of anatomical variations is a real challenge for clinicians undertaking therapy regardless of the teeth that are to be treated. The extent of the curvature is one of the most important variables that could lead to instrument fracture. In clinical conditions, two curves can be present in the same root canal trajectory. This type of geometry is denoted as the “S” shape, and it is a challenging condition. This report describes a different clinical and educational scenario where four specialists around the world present different approaches for the treatment of root canals with double curvatures or S-shaped canals. Endodontic therapy is a very nuanced and challenging science and art. The clinical and teaching experience of the authors show different approaches that can be successfully employed to treat challenging teeth having roots with multiple curves. The necessity of precise knowledge of the root canal morphology and its variation is also underlined. PMID:25143838

  13. 38. James River and Kanawha Canal Locks. The canal, which ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. James River and Kanawha Canal Locks. The canal, which operated between 1835 to 1880, serves as the focal point of the area's interpretation. The Battery Creek Lock was reconstructed between 1961 and 1965. Severe flooding in 1985 damaged the lock gates which were reconstructed in 1987-88. The view is to the south. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  14. Geometric analysis of root canals prepared by four rotary NiTi shaping systems.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Ahmed Abdel Rahman; Ghoneim, Angie Galal; Lutfy, Reem Ahmed; Foda, Manar Yehia; Omar, Gihan Abdel Fatah

    2012-07-01

    A great number of nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary systems with noncutting tips, different cross-sections, superior resistance to torsional fracture, varying tapers, and manufacturing method have been introduced to the market. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of 4 rotary NiTi preparation systems, Revo-S (RS; Micro-Mega, Besancon Cedex, France), Twisted file (TF; SybronEndo, Amersfoort, The Netherlands), ProFile GT Series X (GTX; Dentsply, Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK), and ProTaper (PT; Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), on volumetric changes and transportation of curved root canals. Forty mesiobuccal canals of mandibular molars with an angle of curvature ranging from 25° to 40° were divided according to the instrument used in canal preparation into 4 groups of 10 samples each: group RS, group TF, group GTX, and group PT. Canals were scanned using an i-CAT CBCT scanner (Imaging Science International, Hatfield, PA) before and after preparation to evaluate the volumetric changes. Root canal transportation and centering ratio were evaluated at 1.3, 2.6, 5.2, and 7.8 mm from the apex. The significance level was set at P ≤ .05. The PT system removed a significantly higher amount of dentin than the other systems (P = .025). At the 1.3-mm level, there was no significant difference in canal transportation and centering ratio among the groups. However, at the other levels, TF maintained the original canal curvature recording significantly the least degree of canal transportation as well as the highest mean centering ratio. The TF system showed superior shaping ability in curved canals. Revo-S and GTX were better than ProTaper regarding both canal transportation and centering ability. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An In Vitro Comparison of Root Canal Transportation by Reciproc File With and Without Glide Path

    PubMed Central

    Nazarimoghadam, Kiumars; Daryaeian, Mohammad; Ramazani, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of ideal canal preparation is to prevent iatrogenic aberrations such as transportation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the root canal transportation by Reciproc file with and without glide path. Materials and Methods: Thirty acrylic-resin blocks with a curvature of 60° and size#10 (2% taper) were assigned into two groups (n= 15). In group 1, the glide path was performed using stainless steel k-files size#10 and 15 at working length In group 2, canals were prepared with Reciproc file system at working length. By using digital imaging software (AutoCAD 2008), the pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation digital images were superimposed over, taking the landmarks as reference points. Then the radius of the internal and external curve of the specimens was calculated at three α, β and γ points (1mm to apex as α, 3mm to apex as β, and 5mm to apex as γ). The data were statically analyzed using the independent T-test and Mann-Whitney U test by SPSS version 16. Results: Glide path was found significant for only external curve in the apical third of the canal; that is, 5mm to apex (P=0.005). But in the other third, canal modification was not significant (P> 0.008). Conclusion: Canal transportation in the apical third of the canal seems to be significantly reduced when glide path is performed using reciprocating files. PMID:25628682

  16. The Love Canal: Beyond science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    When in 1978, the New York State Department of Health issued the report, ‘Love Canal—Public Health Time Bomb,’ the serious effects of chemical waste contamination in the Love Canal area became an issue of national concern. A few ‘studies’ since then have produced results in concert with those of initial reports that described ‘conditions of acute health effects’ as being linked to hazardous wastes incorporated in landfill in the Love Canal site near Niagara Falls, New York. Now that a ‘blue ribbon’ panel of experts from the medical sciences has reviewed the problems of Love Canal, however, a different view has emerged. The ‘Report of the Governors' Panel to Review Scientific Studies and the Development of Public Policy on Problems Resulting from Hazardous Wastes,’ transmitted in October of this year, identifies the following factors about the health effects at Love Canal:

  17. Superior Semicircular Canal Dehiscence (SSCD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... canal that is being activated. Analysis of the eye movements evoked by sound and pressure stimuli in patients ... to the identification of this syndrome. These evoked eye movements often align with the plane of the superior ...

  18. A comparison of maintenance of canal curvature using balanced-force instrumentation with three different file types.

    PubMed

    Royal, J R; Donnelly, J C

    1995-06-01

    Forty-five extracted human molar teeth with curved facial or mesial canals were instrumented to a #45 file with three different file types using balanced-force (BF) instrumentation. Pre- and postoperative X-rays were taken, projected, and file location traced to determine the canal curvature according to the method of Schneider. Results showed statistically less reduction in canal curvature with nickel-titanium (NT) files compared with either Flex-R (FR) (p < 0.05) or K-Flex (KF) files (p < 0.0021). There was no significant difference comparing FR with KF files (p > 0.05). Under the conditions of this study, NT files used with the BF technique were significantly less likely to change canal curvature than either FR or KF files when instrumenting curved root canals.

  19. Looking back at Love Canal

    SciTech Connect

    Deegan, J. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    In the first part of this series (ES and T, April 1987, pp. 328-31) it was pointed out that the methods and conclusions of EPA's Love Canal Study were the subject of some controversy in the environmental community. Others defended the agency's approaches and methods. Part 2 makes no attempt to resolve the controversy; its purpose is to present the results and conclusions of the Love Canal.

  20. Method for Simulating the Thickness Distribution of a Cubic Boron Nitride Film Deposited on a Curved Substrate using Ion-beam-assisted Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Valizadeh, R.; Colligon, J. S.; Kanematsu, H.; Morisato, K.

    A method for simulating the thickness distribution of cubic boron nitride (cBN) films deposited on a curved substrate using ion-beam-assisted vapor deposition (IBAD) is established and discussed. The deposition conditions are (i) boron arriving rate is 3.2 Å/s, (ii) ion current density is in the range 600-1600 μA/cm2, and (iii) gas composition fed into the ion source is 36% N2 + Ar. It was found that, due to simultaneous deposition and sputtering, the boron resputtering yield (which depends on the ion incident angle during cBN deposition) estimated from experimental data was higher than that of the boron sputtering yield of the BN films with a density of 3.482 g/cm3 calculated by the TRIM code. Using the above empirical boron resputtering yield, it is estimated that in the case of static coating, cBN films would not be formed when the incident angle is more than 40°. However, with continuous waving, the distribution of film thickness improves and the results are consistent with the experimental results. This estimation also agrees with the experimental results of discrete waving deposition within an allowable margin of error

  1. New insights into the reaction mechanism catalyzed by the glutamate racemase enzyme: pH titration curves and classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Puig, Eduard; Garcia-Viloca, Mireia; Gonzalez-Lafont, Angels; Lluch, José M; Field, Martin J

    2007-03-08

    The mechanism of the reactions catalyzed by the pyridoxal-phosphate-independent amino acid racemases and epimerases faces the difficult task of deprotonating a relatively low acidicity proton, the amino acid's alpha-hydrogen, with a relatively poor base, a cysteine. In this work, we propose a mechanism for one of these enzymes, glutamate racemase (MurI), about which many controversies exist, and the roles that its active site residues may play. The titration curves and the pK1/2 values of all of the ionizable residues for different structures leading from reactants to products have been analyzed. From these results a concerted mechanism has been proposed in which the Cys70 residue would deprotonate the alpha-hydrogen of the substrate while, at the same time, being deprotonated by the Asp7 residue. To study the consistency of this mechanism classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out along with pK1/2 calculations on the MD-generated structures.

  2. Mimamata and Love Canal: A Pollution Tale of Two Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Mary Louise

    1993-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan about case studies of the environmental disasters of Minamata, Japan and Love Canal, New York. Compares how the legal cases were handled in two constitutional democracies. Provides six handouts that include maps, role descriptions for simulations, and student readings. (CFR)

  3. A novel model for testing the efficiency of removal of calcium hydroxide from complex root canal anatomies.

    PubMed

    Küçükkaya Eren, Selen; Aksel, Hacer; Parashos, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of several irrigation protocols in the removal of calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2 ] from simulated internal root resorption cavities in a complex root canal anatomy model. The 20° to 35° curved mesiobuccal roots of 94 maxillary molars were sectioned longitudinally; internal resorption cavities were prepared in the apical third of the canal walls. Calcium hydroxide was placed into the cavities and the root halves reassembled. Four teeth were used as controls, and 90 teeth were randomly divided into six experimental groups (n = 15), according to the irrigation protocols used: syringe irrigation; H2 O2 (HP); Navitip FX; Vibringe-syringe; Vibringe-NaviTip FX; ultrasonically activated irrigation (UAI) using an ultrasonic K-file. In the HP group, 2.5% NaOCl and 3% H2 O2 were used, while 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA were used in the remaining groups. Stereomicroscope images and radiographs were used to measure the remaining Ca(OH)2 . The model proved to be suitable for simulating complex anatomy. Positive correlation was found between stereomicroscope and radiographic analyses (P < 0.05). UAI removed significantly more Ca(OH)2 than the other experimental groups (P < 0.05). The HP group was the least efficient protocol (P < 0.05). It would appear that a reliable model has been developed that simulates complex root canal anatomy. Irrigant activation protocols enhanced Ca(OH)2 removal. © 2017 Australian Society of Endodontology Inc.

  4. Effect of EDTA preparations on rotary root canal instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Whitbeck, Evan R; Swenson, Kelli; Tordik, Patricia A; Kondor, Shayne A; Webb, Terry D; Sun, Jirun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether rotary instrumentation using saline, EDTA 17% solution, or RC-Prep (Premier Dental, Philadelphia, PA) resulted in differences in root canal transportation. The secondary objective was to assess if instrumentation using these agents caused changes in the working length and canal volume. Moderately curved mesiobuccal roots of 24 maxillary molars were standardized in length and randomized into 1 control and 2 experimental groups. The canals were instrumented with 0.04 taper rotary files to size #30. All groups were irrigated with saline. Group 1 was also irrigated using EDTA 17% solution (Pulpdent Corp, Watertown, MA), and in group 2, RC-Prep was used. X-ray micro-computed tomographic scans and working length measurements were made before and after instrumentation. Three-dimensional models were created from the pre- and postinstrumentation scan data and compared for volume changes. Centroid points were calculated in cross-sectional slices of the canals, and transportation was determined by measuring the distance between the pre- and postinstrumentation points. The data were analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance (α = 0.05) and the Tukey post hoc test. Less transportation was observed in group 2 than in group 1 (P = .001) and the control group (P = .014). Transportation in group 1 and the control group was not significantly different. Canal volume in group 1 was increased relative to group 2 (P = .004) and the control group (P = .022). No significant differences in the working length were observed. The use of chelating agents during root canal instrumentation did not significantly increase apical transportation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Optodynamic Phenomena During Laser-Activated Irrigation Within Root Canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukač, Nejc; Gregorčič, Peter; Jezeršek, Matija

    2016-07-01

    Laser-activated irrigation is a powerful endodontic treatment for smear layer, bacteria, and debris removal from the root canal. In this study, we use shadow photography and the laser-beam-transmission probe to examine the dynamics of laser-induced vapor bubbles inside a root canal model and compare ultrasonic needle irrigation to the laser method. Results confirm important phenomenological differences in the two endodontic methods with the laser method resulting in much deeper irrigation. Observations of simulated debris particles show liquid vorticity effects which in our opinion represents the major cleaning mechanism.

  6. Root Canal Shaping by Single-File Systems and Rotary Instruments: a Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Bane, Khaly; Faye, Babacar; Sarr, Mouhamed; Niang, Seydina O; Ndiaye, Diouma; Machtou, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the shaping ability of two single-file systems and conventional rotary instruments in severely curved root canals of extracted human molars. Methods and Materials: Mesiobuccal canals of 120 mandibular molars with angles of curvature ranging between 25° and 35° and radii of curvature from 5 to 9 mm, were divided into three groups (n=40). In each group the canals were instrumented with either WaveOne (W), Reciproc (R) or ProTaper (P). The time required for canal shaping and the frequency of broken instruments were recorded. The standardized pre and post-instrumentation radiographs were taken to determine changes in working length (WL) and straightening of canal curvature. The presence of blockage or perforation was also evaluated. Data were analyzed using the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post-hoc Tukey’s test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Both single-instrument systems reduced the canal preparation time by approximately 50% (P<0.05). No incidence of broken instruments from single-file systems was reported; however, two F2 instruments in the P group were broken (P<0.05). Reduction in WL and straightening of canal curvature was observed in all three systems with the highest scores belonging to P system (P<0.05). No case of blockage or perforation was found during shaping in any group. Conclusion: Single-file systems shaped curved canals with substantial saving in time and a significant decrease in incidence of instrument separation, change in WL, and straightening of canal curvature. PMID:25834600

  7. Computed tomography evaluation of rotary systems on the root canal transportation and centering ability.

    PubMed

    Pagliosa, André; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Versiani, Marco Aurélio; Raucci-Neto, Walter; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa; Alfredo, Edson

    2015-01-01

    The endodontic preparation of curved and narrow root canals is challenging, with a tendency for the prepared canal to deviate away from its natural axis. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by cone-beam computed tomography, the transportation and centering ability of curved mesiobuccal canals in maxillary molars after biomechanical preparation with different nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary systems. Forty teeth with angles of curvature ranging from 20° to 40° and radii between 5.0 mm and 10.0 mm were selected and assigned into four groups (n = 10), according to the biomechanical preparative system used: Hero 642 (HR), Liberator (LB), ProTaper (PT), and Twisted File (TF). The specimens were inserted into an acrylic device and scanned with computed tomography prior to, and following, instrumentation at 3, 6 and 9 mm from the root apex. The canal degree of transportation and centering ability were calculated and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The results demonstrated no significant difference (p > 0.05) in shaping ability among the rotary systems. The mean canal transportation was: -0.049 ± 0.083 mm (HR); -0.004 ± 0.044 mm (LB); -0.003 ± 0.064 mm (PT); -0.021 ± 0.064 mm (TF). The mean canal centering ability was: -0.093 ± 0.147 mm (HR); -0.001 ± 0.100 mm (LB); -0.002 ± 0.134 mm (PT); -0.033 ± 0.133 mm (TF). Also, there was no significant difference among the root segments (p > 0.05). It was concluded that the Hero 642, Liberator, ProTaper, and Twisted File rotary systems could be safely used in curved canal instrumentation, resulting in satisfactory preservation of the original canal shape.

  8. Depolarization canals and interstellar turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, A.; Shukurov, A.

    Recent radio polarization observations have revealed a plethora of unexpected features in the polarized Galactic radio background that arise from propagation effects in the random (turbulent) interstellar medium. The canals are especially striking among them, a random network of very dark, narrow regions clearly visible in many directions against a bright polarized Galactic synchrotron background. There are no obvious physical structures in the ISM that may have caused the canals, and so they have been called Faraday ghosts. They evidently carry information about interstellar turbulence but only now is it becoming clear how this information can be extracted. Two theories for the origin of the canals have been proposed; both attribute the canals to Faraday rotation, but one invokes strong gradients in Faraday rotation in the sky plane (specifically, in a foreground Faraday screen) and the other only relies on line-of-sight effects (differential Faraday rotation). In this review we discuss the physical nature of the canals and how they can be used to explore statistical properties of interstellar turbulence. This opens studies of magnetized interstellar turbulence to new methods of analysis, such as contour statistics and related techniques of computational geometry and topology. In particular, we can hope to measure such elusive quantities as the Taylor microscale and the effective magnetic Reynolds number of interstellar MHD turbulence.

  9. Modeling of sound transmission from ear canal to cochlea.

    PubMed

    Gan, Rong Z; Reeves, Brian P; Wang, Xuelin

    2007-12-01

    A 3-D finite element (FE) model of the human ear consisting of the external ear canal, middle ear, and cochlea is reported in this paper. The acoustic-structure-fluid coupled FE analysis was conducted on the model which included the air in the ear canal and middle ear cavity, the fluid in the cochlea, and the middle ear and cochlea structures (i.e., bones and soft tissues). The middle ear transfer function such as the movements of tympanic membrane, stapes footplate, and round window, the sound pressure gain across the middle ear, and the cochlear input impedance in response to sound stimulus applied in the ear canal were derived and compared with the published experimental measurements in human temporal bones. The frequency sensitivity of the basilar membrane motion and intracochlear pressure induced by sound pressure in the ear canal was predicted along the length of the basilar membrane from the basal turn to the apex. The satisfactory agreements between the model and experimental data in the literature indicate that the middle ear function was well simulated by the model and the simplified cochlea was able to correlate sound stimulus in the ear canal with vibration of the basilar membrane and pressure variation of the cochlear fluid. This study is the first step toward the development of a comprehensive FE model of the entire human ear for acoustic-mechanical analysis.

  10. Curve Boxplot: Generalization of Boxplot for Ensembles of Curves.

    PubMed

    Mirzargar, Mahsa; Whitaker, Ross T; Kirby, Robert M

    2014-12-01

    In simulation science, computational scientists often study the behavior of their simulations by repeated solutions with variations in parameters and/or boundary values or initial conditions. Through such simulation ensembles, one can try to understand or quantify the variability or uncertainty in a solution as a function of the various inputs or model assumptions. In response to a growing interest in simulation ensembles, the visualization community has developed a suite of methods for allowing users to observe and understand the properties of these ensembles in an efficient and effective manner. An important aspect of visualizing simulations is the analysis of derived features, often represented as points, surfaces, or curves. In this paper, we present a novel, nonparametric method for summarizing ensembles of 2D and 3D curves. We propose an extension of a method from descriptive statistics, data depth, to curves. We also demonstrate a set of rendering and visualization strategies for showing rank statistics of an ensemble of curves, which is a generalization of traditional whisker plots or boxplots to multidimensional curves. Results are presented for applications in neuroimaging, hurricane forecasting and fluid dynamics.

  11. Straight line access and coronal flaring: effect on canal length.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Kyle P; Walton, Richard E; Rivera, Eric M

    2002-06-01

    The object of this study was to determine if canal length is altered as a result of straight-line access (SLA) and coronal flaring (CF). Selected were 86 canals of extracted molars and premolars from two groups: straight or severely curved (Schneider curvature <5 degrees and >20 degrees). The reference cusp tip and root-end were flattened to produce reproducible measurements. A #10 file was placed such that the tip extended slightly beyond the apex, with the handle on the referenced cusp. The amount of file protrusion was measured with a stereomicroscope. Then, SLA and CF were performed and the corresponding file replaced to the same coronal reference position. Apical file protrusion was measured again. The change in canal length was determined by the difference in the pre- and post-SLA/CF measurements. A Wilcoxon signed rank test statistically verified that there was a measurable, significant (p < 0.001) change in canal length after SLA and CF. The mean change overall was slight, with a decrease of 0.17 mm. Severe curvature had a slightly greater, significant effect on the amount of change. Tooth type had no significant effect. Changes in working length from SLA and CF, although statistically significant, were very small and clinically unimportant.

  12. Corinth Canal, Greece

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Isthmus of Corinth has played a very important role in the history of Greece. It is the only land bridge between the country's north (Attica) and south (Peloponnese). It is a 6 km wide tongue of land separating the Gulf of Corinth from the Saronic Sea. Populations, armies and commodities have got to move through it. In the 6th century BCE, the Greeks built the Diolkos, a 10 meter-wide stone roadway to pull ships across the Isthmus on wooden cylinders and wheeled vehicles. In 1882, a canal was started and completed 11 years later. It is 6343 meters long, 25 meters wide, and 8 meters deep.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 25.3 by 37.7 kilometers (15.7 by 23.4 miles) Location: 37.9 degrees North latitude, 23 degrees East longitude

  13. Curves and Their Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Robert C.

    This volume, a reprinting of a classic first published in 1952, presents detailed discussions of 26 curves or families of curves, and 17 analytic systems of curves. For each curve the author provides a historical note, a sketch or sketches, a description of the curve, a discussion of pertinent facts, and a bibliography. Depending upon the curve,…

  14. Ship canals and aquatic ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aron, William I.; Smith, Stanford H.

    1971-01-01

    Through a combination of ecosystem homeostasis and the perversity of man and nature, oftentimes the significant biological changes effected by environmental modifications are not detected until long after the initial change has taken place. The immediate impact, which may range from the spectacular to the undetectable, is a deceptive measure of the long-term and often more important changes in the ecosystem. Two major engineering achievements illustrate this premise: (i) construction of the Erie Canal, which provided access from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes, and the Welland Canal, which bypasses the block between Lakes Ontario and Erie created by Niagara Falls (Fig. 1), and (ii) construction of the Suez Canal between the Red Sea and the Mediterranean Sea.

  15. 32. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM VICINITY OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM VICINITY OF PROPOSED POWER CANAL, LOOKING UPSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  16. 23. VIEW OF PREEXISTING LINNIE CANAL COURT PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE OVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW OF PRE-EXISTING LINNIE CANAL COURT PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE OVER EASTERN CANAL, LOOKING SOUTH FROM THE EAST SIDE OF EASTERN CANAL - Venice Canals, Community of Venice, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. The effect of four different irrigation systems in the removal of a root canal sealer.

    PubMed

    Grischke, J; Müller-Heine, A; Hülsmann, M

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of sonic, ultrasonic, and hydrodynamic devices in the removal of a root canal sealer from the surface and from simulated irregularities of root canals. Fifty-three root canals with two standardized grooves in the apical and coronal parts of longitudinally split roots were covered with AH Plus root canal sealer. Compared were the effects of (control) syringe irrigation, (1) CanalBrush, (2) passive ultrasonic irrigation, (3) EndoActivator, and (4) RinsEndo on the removal of the sealer. The specimens were divided into four groups (N = 12) and one control group (N = 5) via randomization. The amount of remaining sealer in the root canal irregularities was evaluated under a microscope using a 4-grade scoring system, whereas the remaining sealer on the root canal surface was evaluated with a 7-grade scoring system. Passive ultrasonic irrigation is more effective than the other tested irrigation systems or syringe irrigation in removing sealer from root canal walls (p < 0.01). None of the techniques had a significant effect on cleaning the lateral grooves. Within the limitations of this study protocol ultrasonic irrigation shows a superior effect on sealer removal from the root canal surface during endodontic retreatment. Cleaning of lateral grooves seems not to be possible with one of the techniques investigated. Incomplete removal of root canal sealer during re-treatment may cause treatment failure. Passive Ultrasonic irrigation seems to be the most effective system to remove sealer from a root canal.

  18. Wavelength dependence of photon-induced photoacoustic streaming technique for root canal irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukač, Nejc; Zadravec, Jure; Gregorčič, Peter; Lukač, Matjaž; Jezeršek, Matija

    2016-07-01

    Laser-enhanced irrigation of complex root canals appears to be a very promising technique to improve the outcome of root canal treatment. This applies, in particular, if the technique can be effective at very low laser energies in irrigating not only the main canal but also the small lateral canals. This is important in order to avoid potential undesirable effects at higher laser energies such as temperature increase, dentin ablation, or extrusion of irrigating solution beyond the apical foramen. An improved understanding of the role of laser parameters, such as laser wavelength and pulse duration, in irrigation of lateral canals is therefore desired in order to optimize treatment efficacy. The influence of laser wavelength and pulse duration on cavitation phenomena was studied using shadow photography and a method of measuring fluid flow in lateral canals based on tracking of movements of small air bubbles naturally forming in liquid as a result of laser agitation. A simulated model of a root canal including a narrow lateral canal designed to represent typical root canal morphology was used for the water flow measurements. The following three laser wavelengths with relatively high absorption in water were studied: Er:YAG (2.94 μm), Er,Cr:YSGG (2.73 μm), and Nd:YAP (1.34 μm). Among the three wavelengths studied, the Er:YAG laser wavelength was found to be the most effective in formation of cavitation bubbles and in generating fluid motions within narrow lateral canals. A comparison between the shadow photography and fluid motion data indicates that it is the bubble's radius and not the bubble's volume that predominantly influences the fluid motion within lateral canals. Based on the results of our study, it appears that effective minimally invasive laser-assisted irrigation can be performed with low Er:YAG laser pulse energies below 10 mJ.

  19. Full-particle 2-D Simulations of the Ion Foreshock associated to a Supercritical Quasi-perpendicular Curved Collisionless Shock : Origin of Backstreaming Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoini, P.; Lembege, B.

    2014-12-01

    The ion foreshock located upstream of the Earth's bow shock is populated with ions reflected back by the shock front. In-situ spacecraft measurements have clearly established the existence of two distinct populations in the upstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock region (i.e. for 45o ≤ ΘBn≤ 90o, where ΘBn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetostatic field): (i) field-aligned ion beams (or 'FAB') characterized by a gyrotropic distribution, and (ii) gyro-phase bunched ions (or 'GPB') characterized by a NON gyrotropic distribution, which exhibits a non-vanishing perpendicular bulk velocity. The use of 2D PIC simulations where full curvature effects, time of flight effects and both electrons and ions dynamics are fully described, has evidenced that the shock front itself can be the possible source of these two characteristic populations. A recent analysis has evidenced that both populations can be discriminated in terms of interaction time (Δtinter) with the shock front. 'GPB' and 'FAB' populations are characterized by a short (Δtinter ~ 1 τci) and much larger (Δtinter ≥ 2 τci) interaction time respectively, where τci is the ion upstream gyroperiod. In addition, present statistical results evidence that: (i) backstreaming ions are splitted into 'FAB' and 'GPB' populations depending on their injection angle when hitting the shock front (defined between the local normal to the shock front and the gyration velocity vector). (ii) As a consequence, ion trajectories strongly differ between the 'FAB' and 'GPB' populations at the shock front. In particular, 'FAB' ions suffer multi-bounces along the curved front whereas 'GPB' ions make only one bounce. Such differences may explain why the 'FAB' population loses their gyro-phase coherency and become gyrotropic which is not the case for the 'GPB'. Then, the differences observed between 'FAB' and 'GPB' populations do not involve some distinct reflection processes as often claimed in the

  20. [Anatomical variations in the hypoglossal canal].

    PubMed

    De Francisco, M; Lemos, J L; Liberti, E A; Adamo, J; Jácomo, A L; Matson, E

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, 492 human dried skulls grouped according to sex and race (White and no White) were examined and the presence of a double hypoglossal canal was observed in 97 skulls. The statistical analysis allowed us to conclude that no significative difference exists in race X canal type; sex X canal type; race X side and sex X side interations.

  1. Sonic instruments in root canal therapy.

    PubMed

    Waplington, M; Lumley, P J; Walmsley, A D

    1995-10-01

    Although hand instrumentation is considered the most acceptable method of preparing root canals, sonic instruments may be useful additions to the endodontic armamentarium. Sonic instrumentation may be incorporated as an adjunct to traditional techniques for shaping the root canal. The use of such instruments may assist the practitioner during root canal treatment in general practice.

  2. The influence of canal curvature on the mechanical efficacy of root canal irrigation in vitro using real-time imaging of bioluminescent bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nguy, Donald; Sedgley, Christine

    2006-11-01

    There are no quantitative data on the mechanical efficacy of irrigation in the removal of bacteria from curved canals. This study quantitatively analyzed the effects of root canal curvature and preparation size on the mechanical efficacy of irrigation using 33 mandibular single-rooted bicuspids allocated to groups according to root canal curvatures, group 1 (straight) 4 to 8 degrees, group 2 (intermediate curvature) 15 to 19 degrees, and group 3 (greatest curvature) 24 to 28 degrees. Teeth were sequentially instrumented to sizes 27/.04, 36/.04, and 46/.04 using a crown-down technique. Suspensions of the bioluminescent reporter strain Pseudomonas fluorescens 5RL (1.5 x 10(6) cells) were inoculated into canals of sterilized teeth after each sequential instrumentation. Canals were irrigated with 6 ml of irrigant delivered 1 mm from working length using a 30-gauge needle. Remaining bacteria were quantified using real-time bioluminescent imaging. Irrigation was significantly less effective in 24 to 28 degrees curvature canals prepared to size 27/.04 compared to 46/.04 (p < 0.007, repeated-measures ANOVA).

  3. Erie Canal Technology: Stump Pullers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Many years ago I saw a picture of a huge set of wheels that was used to remove tree stumps during the construction of the Erie Canal (1817-1825) and was intrigued by its use of leverage, mechanical advantage, and torque. Figure 1 is a scale model of the device based on my memory of the (lost) picture and published accounts.

  4. Erie Canal Technology: Stump Pullers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2013-10-01

    Many years ago I saw a picture of a huge set of wheels that was used to remove tree stumps during the construction of the Erie Canal (1817-1825) and was intrigued by its use of leverage, mechanical advantage, and torque. Figure 1 is a scale model of the device based on my memory of the (lost) picture and published accounts.

  5. The analysis of ear canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Gen

    In this thesis complex 3-D ear canal finite element models are simplified using transfer matrices to 1-D models. This simplification allows analysis on the sound propagation in the ear, which results in potentially using a non-invasive probe to determine the acoustical properties of the ear.

  6. Erie Canal Technology: Stump Pullers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Many years ago I saw a picture of a huge set of wheels that was used to remove tree stumps during the construction of the Erie Canal (1817-1825) and was intrigued by its use of leverage, mechanical advantage, and torque. Figure 1 is a scale model of the device based on my memory of the (lost) picture and published accounts.

  7. [Endodontic microbiology: antimicrobial canal medications].

    PubMed

    Seltzer, S; Farber, P A

    1989-06-01

    Medicaments used for reducing or eliminating microorganisms from infected root canals include: irrigating solutions, such as sodium hypochlorite, urea peroxide and hydrogen peroxide, chloramine, iodine-potassium-iodide solution, and chlorhexidine solution. In addition, various intracanal drugs, such as calcium hydroxide and antibiotics, are in use. The characteristics of these drugs are discussed.

  8. Position and course of the mandibular canal in skulls.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Ayla; Potluri, Anitha; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine and describe the topography of the mandibular canal (MC) in both vertical and occlusal dimensions. Fifty-two adult skulls deposited in the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine skull collection were evaluated in this study. Cone-beam computerized tomographic scans of each skull were obtained. The vertical course of MC was classified into 3 types: straight projection (12.2%), catenary-like configuration (51.1%), and progressive descent from posterior to anterior (36.7%). The evaluation of the buccolingual dimension showed that the mandibular canal was located either in contact with or close to the lingual cortical plate (≤ 2 mm) in the molar region of the majority of the cases. As it proceeds anteriorly it moves toward the buccal aspect of the mandible, where it finally emerges through the mental foramen. Three emerging patterns of mandibular canal were observed: sharp turn (53.2%), soft curved exit (28.8%), and straight path (17.4%). The examination of the vertical dimension showed that the canal was located almost 1 cm above the inferior border of the mandible and then ascended to reach the mental foramen, which is located ~16 mm (range 13.4-20.3 mm) above the inferior border of the mandible. We found a strong correlation between height of the mandible and location of the mental foramen (r = 0.64; P < .0001). The course of mandibular canal described in vertical and axial dimensions and variation in its path have been classified. In addition to variation in location of MC, it has different anatomic configurations which clinicians should be familiar with in any surgical procedures involving the posterior mandible. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pressure-volume curves: revisiting the impact of negative turgor during cell collapse by literature review and simulations of cell micromechanics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yiting; Zhang, Yanxiang; Zheng, Quan-Shui; Tyree, Melvin T

    2014-07-01

    The Scholander-Hammel pressure chamber has been used in thousands of papers to measure osmotic pressure, πc , turgor pressure, Pt , and bulk modulus of elasticity, ε, of leaf cells by pressure-volume (PV) curve analysis. PV analysis has been questioned in the past. In this paper we use micromechanical analysis of leaf cells to examine the impact on PV curve analysis of negative turgor in living cells (Pt ). Models predict negative Pt (-0.1 to -1.8 MPa) depending on leaf cell size and shape in agreement with experimental values reported by J. J. Oertli. Modeled PV curves have linear regions even when Pt is quite negative, contrary to the arguments of M.T. Tyree. Negative Pt is totally missed by PV curve analysis and results in large errors in derived πc and Pt but smaller errors in ε. A survey of leaf cell sizes vs habitat (arid, temperate, and rainforest), suggests that the majority of published PV curves result in errors of 0.1-1.8 MPa in derived πc and Pt , whereby the error increases with decreasing cell size. We propose that small cell size in leaves is an ecological adaptation that permits plants to endure negative values of water potential with relatively little water loss. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. The effect of working length and root canal preparation technique on crack development in the apical root canal wall.

    PubMed

    Adorno, C G; Yoshioka, T; Suda, H

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of working length and root canal preparation technique on crack development in the apical root canal wall. Seventy extracted mandibular premolars were mounted in a resin block with simulated periodontal ligaments and divided into seven groups according to preparation technique and working length: group A, step-back preparation with stainless steel files with working length set at the apical foramen and defined as root canal length (CL); group B, same as for A, except that the working length was CL-1 mm; group C, crown-down preparation with Profile instruments followed by an apical enlargement sequence with CL as working length and group D, same as for C, except that the working length was CL-1 mm. Groups E, F and G served as controls. Groups E and F were prepared only with the crown-down sequence up to CL and CL-1 mm, respectively. Group G was left unprepared. Digital images of the apical root surface (AS) were recorded before preparation, immediately after instrumentation and after removing the apical 1 mm (AS-1 mm) and 2 mm (AS-2 mm) of the root end. Working length significantly affected crack development at AS (P < 0.05). Preparation technique significantly affected crack development at AS-1 mm (P < 0.05). At AS-2 mm, there was no significant difference between preparation technique and working length in terms of crack development on the canal wall. Root canal preparation alone, regardless of the technique used, can potentially generate cracks on the apical root canal wall as well as the apical surface. Working 1- mm short of the apical foramen might produce fewer cracks in the apical region.

  11. A Low-Cost Teaching Model of Inguinal Canal: A Useful Method to Teach Surgical Concepts in Hernia Repair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansaloni, Luca; Catena, Fausto; Coccolini, Frederico; Ceresoli, Marco; Pinna, Antonio Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Inguinal canal anatomy and hernia repair is difficult for medical students and surgical residents to comprehend. Methods: Using low-cost material, a 3-dimensional inexpensive model of the inguinal canal was created to allow students to learn anatomical details and landmarks and to perform their own simulated hernia repair. In order to…

  12. Dynamic intratubular biomineralization following root canal obturation with pozzolan‐based mineral trioxide aggregate sealer cement

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeon‐Jee; Baek, Seung‐Ho; Kum, Kee‐Yeon; Shon, Won‐Jun; Woo, Kyung‐Mi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA) cement during the root canal obturation is gaining concern due to its bioactive characteristic to form an apatite in dentinal tubules. In this regard, this study was to assess the biomineralization of dentinal tubules following root canal obturation by using pozzolan‐based (Pz‐) MTA sealer cement (EndoSeal MTA, Maruchi). Sixty curved roots (mesiobuccal, distobuccal) from human maxillary molars were instrumented and prepared for root canal obturation. The canals were obturated with gutta‐percha (GP) and Pz‐MTA sealer by using continuous wave of condensation technique. Canals obturated solely with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental) or Pz‐MTA sealer were used for comparison. In order to evaluate the biomineralization ability under different conditions, the PBS pretreatment before the root canal obturation was performed in each additional samples. At dentin‐material interfaces, the extension of intratubular biomineralization was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy. When the root canal was obturated with GP and Pz‐MTA sealer, enhanced biomineralization of the dentinal tubules beyond the penetrated sealer tag was confirmed under the SEM observation (p < 0.05). Mineralized apatite structures (calcium/phosphorous ratio, 1.45–1.89) connecting its way through the dentinal tubules were detected at 350–400 μm from the tubule orifice, and the pre‐crystallization seeds were also observed along the intra‐ and/or inter‐tubular collagen fiber. Intratubular biomineralization depth was significantly enhanced in all PBS pretreated canals (p < 0.05). Pz‐MTA cement can be used as a promising bioactive root canal sealer to enhance biomineralization of dentinal tubules under controlled environment. SCANNING 38:50–56, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Scanning Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26179659

  13. Root canal shaping using rotary nickel-titanium files in preclinical dental education in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Gül Çelik; Maden, Murat; Orhan, Ekim Onur; Sarıtekin, Erdal; Teke, Anıl

    2012-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the ability of a group of third-year dental students without any endodontic clinical experience to use the ProTaper Instruments (Dentsply Maillefer) to decrease the amount of straightening of curved canals on human molar teeth and to determine the incidence of instrument fractures and instrumentation time. Thirty-one undergraduate dental students in Turkey received a training session. The students prepared a total of 144 root canals in human mandibular or maxillary molar teeth with ProTaper. Fifty-six teeth were excluded due to unreadable image, misinformation, or straight or severe curve. Using pre- and post-preparation digital radiographs, the straightening of curved root canals was investigated. Loss of working length and incidence of fracture were also noted. A total of eighty-eight curved root canals were selected. Mesiobuccal or mesiolingual roots with curvatures of between 20° and 43° as assessed by Schneider's method and working length of between 15 mm and 22.5 mm were included in the study. The means of the curved root canals before and after the instrumentation were 29.5° ± 6° and 27° ± 6.3°, respectively. The means of the working length before and after the instrumentation were 19 mm ± 2.1 mm and 18.3 mm ± 1.9 mm, respectively. A statistically significant difference between straightening of curved root canals and loss of working length was found between before and after instrumentation (p<0.000). The mean straightening of curved root canals and loss of working length after preparation with the size F1 ProTaper file were 2.5 mm ± 3.6 mm and 0.7 mm ± 0.6 mm, respectively. Only two F1 ProTaper instruments fractured at the apical level. The study concluded that rotary instruments performed adequately with inexperienced operators who received a brief structured training session.

  14. 12. CONCRETE LINING ON A CURVING SEGMENT OF THE LATERAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. CONCRETE LINING ON A CURVING SEGMENT OF THE LATERAL NEAR THE NORTHEAST END OF LAKE LADORA (SECTION 2). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  15. Algae control for hydrogeneration canals

    SciTech Connect

    Grahovac, P.

    1997-02-16

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to assess and develop control practices for nuisance algae growth in power canal that delivers water to hydro-generation facilities. This growth results in expenditures related not only to lost generation but also labor and materials costs associated with implementing remediation procedures. On an industry-wide basis these costs associated with nuisance algal growth are estimated to be several million dollars per year.

  16. Curved Finite Elements and Curve Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baart, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The approximation of parameterized curves by segments of parabolas that pass through the endpoints of each curve segment arises naturally in all quadratic isoparametric transformations. While not as popular as cubics in curve design problems, the use of parabolas allows the introduction of a geometric measure of the discrepancy between given and approximating curves. The free parameters of the parabola may be used to optimize the fit, and constraints that prevent overspill and curve degeneracy are introduced. This leads to a constrained optimization problem in two varibles that can be solved quickly and reliably by a simple method that takes advantage of the special structure of the problem. For applications in the field of computer-aided design, the given curves are often cubic polynomials, and the coefficient may be calculated in closed form in terms of polynomial coefficients by using a symbolic machine language so that families of curves can be approximated with no further integration. For general curves, numerical quadrature may be used, as in the implementation where the Romberg quadrature is applied. The coefficient functions C sub 1 (gamma) and C sub 2 (gamma) are expanded as polynomials in gamma, so that for given A(s) and B(s) the integrations need only be done once. The method was used to find optimal constrained parabolic approximation to a wide variety of given curves.

  17. The effect of chloroform, orange oil and eucalyptol on root canal transportation in endodontic retreatment.

    PubMed

    Karataş, Ertuğrul; Kol, Elif; Bayrakdar, İbrahim Şevki; Arslan, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of solvents on root canal transportation in endodontic retreatment. Sixty extracted human permanent mandibular first molars with curved root canals were selected. All of the root canals were prepared using Twisted File Adaptive instruments (SybronEndo, Orange, CA, USA) and filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany) using the cold lateral compaction technique. The teeth were assigned to four retreatment groups as follows (n = 15): eucalyptol, chloroform, orange oil and control. The canals were scanned using cone-beam computed tomography scanning before and after instrumentation. The chloroform group showed a significantly higher mean transportation value than the orange oil and control groups at the 3 and 5 mm levels (P = 0.011 and P = 0.003, respectively). There was no significant difference among the orange oil, eucalyptol and control groups in terms of canal transportation (P > 0.61). The chloroform led to more canal transportation than the eucalyptol and orange oil during endodontic retreatment. © 2015 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  18. Management of Six Root Canals in Mandibular First Molar

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Fabio de Almeida; Sousa, Bruno Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough cleaning, shaping, and obturation of the root canal system. This clinical case describes conventional root canal treatment of an unusual mandibular first molar with six root canals. The prognosis for endodontic treatment in teeth with abnormal morphology is unfavorable if the clinician fails to recognize extra root canals. PMID:25685156

  19. 179. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    179. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, September, 1912. Photographer unknown. VIEW OF LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY; VIEW OF LOW LINE CANAL IN PETE LINK'S FIELD. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  20. Mechanized instrumentation of root canals oscillating systems.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, Renato de Toledo; Puente, Carlos Garcia; Jaime, Alejandro; Jent, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Cleaning and shaping are important steps in the root canal treatment. Despite the technological advances in endodontics, K and Hedstroen files are still widely used. In an attempt to be more effective in preparing the root canals, faster and more cutting efficient kinematic, alloys and design alternatives utilizing mechanically oscillating or rotary files are proposed. Even with all these technological innovating alternatives, the preparation of root canals remains a challenge.

  1. Love Canal: environmental and toxicological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    The New York State Department of Health has been involved at the Love Canal since 1978. The State has carried out numerous environmental and toxicological studies. The major purposes for these studies were to define how Love Canal contaminants might be escaping into the environment at large, what paths contaminant migration might take, and what toxicological effects Love Canal chemicals might have individually and together. Although underground contaminant migration was hypothesized along swales and underground utility bedding, these mechanisms have been proven not to be operative except for some migration along the utility bedding under Frontier Avenue. In general no underground migration has occurred outside the confines of the three city blocks that contain the Love Canal referred to as the ''first ring''. Studies have been confused by apparent burial of waste materials in areas proximate but not directly connected to the Love Canal. Migration of Love Canal leachate has occurred through storm sewers. Love Canal contaminants have reached creeks to the north and the Niagara River to the south through storm sewer transport. In spite of finding 2, 3, 7, 8 tetrachlorodibenzoparadioxin (TCDD), toxicological studies in situ and through exposure to volatile components in Love Canal soils do not indicate unusual toxicity. Animal studies continue in an attempt to determine the teratogenic and fetotoxic potential of Love Canal chemicals under different routes of exposure.

  2. The primate semicircular canal system and locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Spoor, Fred; Garland, Theodore; Krovitz, Gail; Ryan, Timothy M.; Silcox, Mary T.; Walker, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The semicircular canal system of vertebrates helps coordinate body movements, including stabilization of gaze during locomotion. Quantitative phylogenetically informed analysis of the radius of curvature of the three semicircular canals in 91 extant and recently extinct primate species and 119 other mammalian taxa provide support for the hypothesis that canal size varies in relation to the jerkiness of head motion during locomotion. Primate and other mammalian species studied here that are agile and have fast, jerky locomotion have significantly larger canals relative to body mass than those that move more cautiously. PMID:17576932

  3. Sediment loads in canals 18, 23, and 24 in southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitt, William A. J.

    1971-01-01

    Suspended-sediment concentrations and suspended-sediment discharges were determined in selected canals in St. Lucie, Martin, and Palm Beach Counties, in southeastern Florida. Sediment rating curves were developed to relate water discharge to sediment concentration at the three sites sampled. An evaluation of the concentration and sediment loads shows that larger amounts of suspended sediment were being carried into the St. Lucie River estuary than were being carried into the Loxahatchee River estuary. Peat and muck soils in areas drained for agricultural planting and citrus cultivation are readily carried by runoff water into major canals that traverse the region.

  4. 5 CFR 315.601 - Appointment of former employees of the Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System. 315.601 Section 315.601 Administrative... employees of the Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System. (a) Agency authority. This... Zone Merit System, which was in effect before March 31, 1982, or under the Panama Canal Employment...

  5. 5 CFR 315.601 - Appointment of former employees of the Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System. 315.601 Section 315.601 Administrative... employees of the Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System. (a) Agency authority. This... Zone Merit System, which was in effect before March 31, 1982, or under the Panama Canal Employment...

  6. 5 CFR 315.601 - Appointment of former employees of the Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System. 315.601 Section 315.601 Administrative... employees of the Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System. (a) Agency authority. This... Zone Merit System, which was in effect before March 31, 1982, or under the Panama Canal Employment...

  7. 5 CFR 315.601 - Appointment of former employees of the Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System. 315.601 Section 315.601 Administrative... employees of the Canal Zone Merit System or Panama Canal Employment System. (a) Agency authority. This... Zone Merit System, which was in effect before March 31, 1982, or under the Panama Canal Employment...

  8. Evaluating Pending Decisions in a Large Introductory Course: The Panama Canal Treaties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Stuart C.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a simulation for an introductory American government course. It was based on the Panama Canal treaties ratification process, a decision pending in the Senate which was due to culminate before the end of the course. By keying the simulation to a real event, participants obtained real-world feedback on how closely their roles approximated…

  9. Evaluating Pending Decisions in a Large Introductory Course: The Panama Canal Treaties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Stuart C.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a simulation for an introductory American government course. It was based on the Panama Canal treaties ratification process, a decision pending in the Senate which was due to culminate before the end of the course. By keying the simulation to a real event, participants obtained real-world feedback on how closely their roles approximated…

  10. Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  11. 15. VIEW OF GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL NEAR HILLTOP DRIVE AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF GAGE IRRIGATION CANAL NEAR HILLTOP DRIVE AND BARTON ROAD, SHOWING END OF SIPHON. CANAL FOLLOWS CONTOUR OF HILL UNDER DIRT ROAD - Gage Irrigation Canal, Running from Santa Ana River to Arlington Heights, Riverside, Riverside County, CA

  12. OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF 2195 SOUTHWEST CANAL STREET, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF NORTHWEST SIDE OF 2195 SOUTHWEST CANAL STREET, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST - St. Lucie Canal, Lock No. 1, Attendant's Quarters, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  13. OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF 2195 SOUTHWEST CANAL STREET, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF SOUTHEAST SIDE OF 2195 SOUTHWEST CANAL STREET, VIEW TOWARDS NORTH - St. Lucie Canal, Lock No. 1, Attendant's Quarters, St. Lucie, Cross State Canal, Okeechobee Intracoastal Waterway, Stuart, Martin County, FL

  14. 2. General view of site from south side of canal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. General view of site from south side of canal, showing south (Canal Street) side of structures; view to northeast. - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  15. 1. General view of site from head of canal, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. General view of site from head of canal, showing south (Canal Street) side of structures; view to northwest. - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  16. 5. Division Gates of the Consolidated Canal, looking northeast. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Division Gates of the Consolidated Canal, looking northeast. The Tempe Canal heads here (left). Photographer: Mark Durben, February 1989. Source: SRPA - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. 22. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN DISTANCE; LOOKING EAST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  18. 31. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM DOWNSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM DOWNSTREAM LOOKING UPSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  19. 29. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM UPSTREAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL BRIDGE FROM UPSTREAM LOOKING DOWNSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  20. 24. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS, DOWNSTREAM LOOKING TOWARD THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS, DOWNSTREAM LOOKING TOWARD THE EAST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  1. 30. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM BRIDGE LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. VIEW OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL FROM BRIDGE LOOKING WEST DOWNSTREAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  2. 23. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH MILNER DAM IN DISTANCE; LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  3. 26. DETAIL OF HEADGATE HOIST MACHINERY, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DETAIL OF HEADGATE HOIST MACHINERY, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  4. 3. August, 1971. VIEW ALONG CANAL SHOWING BORDER PATH AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. August, 1971. VIEW ALONG CANAL SHOWING BORDER PATH AND BRIDGE FOR INSPECTION - ABOUT ONE MILE FROM CANAL HEAD. - Hurricane Irrigation Canal, State Route 15 Vicinity, Hurricane, Washington County, UT

  5. 10. DETAIL, SOUTHEAST SPAN THROUGH CANAL, VIEW BLOCKED BY STEEL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL, SOUTHEAST SPAN THROUGH CANAL, VIEW BLOCKED BY STEEL, CLAD COUNTER WEIGHT, WATER SPAN RAISED OUT OF VIEW - Cape Cod Canal Lift Bridge, Spanning Cape Cod Canal, Buzzards Bay, Barnstable County, MA

  6. 11. 'Y' CONNECTOR TO PICACHO RESERVOIR ON MAIN CANAL. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 'Y' CONNECTOR TO PICACHO RESERVOIR ON MAIN CANAL. VIEW LOOKING WEST FROM MAIN CANAL - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Marin Canal, Amhurst-Hayden Dam to Picacho Reservoir, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  7. Comparison of the time required to create secondary fracture of separated file fragments by using ultrasonic vibration under various canal conditions.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Yoshitsugu; O'Leary, Le; Yoshioka, Takatomo; Suda, Hideaki

    2013-10-01

    Nickel-titanium files often separate because of mechanical fatigue. The purpose of this study was to determine safe preparation techniques for separated file removal by using ultrasonics. Fifty nickel-titanium file fragments were divided into 5 groups. An ultrasonic tip was activated on a file fragment positioned between dentin blocks simulating several canal conditions: Group 1 consisted of the fragment protruding from a pair of straight dentin blocks. For group 2, the fragment was also positioned between 2 straight dentin blocks except one block was positioned 1 mm more apically than the other block, simulating a troughed area that is often created during file removal attempts. For groups 3-5, the fragment was positioned similarly as group 2 but between blocks with 30°, 45°, and 60° curvatures, respectively. The time it took for secondary fracture to occur was recorded, and the data were statistically analyzed. Fragments with dentin wall supporting on the opposite side of ultrasonic activation site resisted fracture significantly longer than those without it. Fragments in 30° and 45° curved blocks took significantly longer to fracture than the other groups (Fisher protected least significant difference, P < .05). Secondary fracture of separated files appeared to be reduced when the ultrasonic tip was applied to the inner curvature of the canal. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. From principal curves to granular principal curves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyun; Pedrycz, Witold; Miao, Duoqian; Wei, Zhihua

    2014-06-01

    Principal curves arising as an essential construct in dimensionality reduction and data analysis have recently attracted much attention from theoretical as well as practical perspective. In many real-world situations, however, the efficiency of existing principal curves algorithms is often arguable, in particular when dealing with massive data owing to the associated high computational complexity. A certain drawback of these constructs stems from the fact that in several applications principal curves cannot fully capture some essential problem-oriented facets of the data dealing with width, aspect ratio, width change, etc. Information granulation is a powerful tool supporting processing and interpreting massive data. In this paper, invoking the underlying ideas of information granulation, we propose a granular principal curves approach, regarded as an extension of principal curves algorithms, to improve efficiency and achieve a sound accuracy-efficiency tradeoff. First, large amounts of numerical data are granulated into C intervals-information granules developed with the use of fuzzy C-means clustering and the two criteria of information granulation, which significantly reduce the amount of data to be processed at the later phase of the overall design. Granular principal curves are then constructed by determining the upper and the lower bounds of the interval data. Finally, we develop an objective function using the criteria of information confidence and specificity to evaluate the granular output formed by the principal curves. We also optimize the granular principal curves by adjusting the level of information granularity (the number of clusters), which is realized with the aid of the particle swarm optimization. A number of numeric studies completed for synthetic and real-world datasets provide a useful quantifiable insight into the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  9. Single curved fiber sedimentation under gravity

    Treesearch

    Xiaoying Rong; Dewei Qi; Guowei He; Jun Yong Zhu; Tim Scott

    2008-01-01

    Dynamics of single curved fiber sedimentation under gravity are simulated by using the lattice Boltzmann method. The results of migration and rotation of the curved fiber at different Reynolds numbers are reported. The results show that the rotation and migration processes are sensitive to the curvature of the fiber.

  10. Single curved fiber sedimentation under gravity

    Treesearch

    Xiaoying Rong; Dewei Qi; Junyong Zhu

    2005-01-01

    Dynamics of single curved fiber sedimentation under the gravity are simulated by using lattice Boltzmann method. The results of migration and rotation of the curved fiber at different Reynolds numbers are reported. The results show that the rotation and migration processes are sensitive to the curvature of the fiber.

  11. Root Canal Treatment of a Maxillary Second Premolar with Two Palatal Root Canals: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Golmohammadi, Maryam; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of the root canal morphology and anatomy is essential for thorough shaping and cleaning of the entire root canal system and consequent successful treatment. This report describes a case of maxillary second premolar with two roots and three root canals (two mesial and distal palatal canals). The case report underlines the importance of complete knowledge about root canal morphology and possible variations, coupled with clinical and radiographic examination in order to increase the ability of clinicians to treat difficult cases. PMID:27471538

  12. A mathematical model of epiphyseal development: hypothesis on the cartilage canals growth.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Alvarado, Diego Alexander; Peinado Cortes, Liliana Mabel; Cardenas Sandoval, Rosy Paola

    2010-12-01

    The role of cartilage canals is to transport nutrients and biological factors that cause the appearance of the secondary ossification centre (SOC). The SOC appears in the centre of the epiphysis of long bones. The canal development is a complex interaction between mechanical and biological factors that guide its expansion into the centre of the epiphysis. This article introduces the 'Hypothesis on the growth of cartilage canals'. Here, we have considered that the development of these canals is an essential event for the appearance of SOC. Moreover, it is also considered to be important for the transport of molecular factors (RUNX2 and MMP9) at the ends of such canals. Once the canals are merged in the centre of the epiphysis, these factors are released causing hypertrophy of adjacent cells. This RUNX2 and MMP9 release occurs due to the action of mechanical loads that supports the epiphysis. In order to test this hypothesis, we use a hybrid approach using the finite element method to simulate the mechanical stresses present in the epiphysis and the cellular automata to simulate the expansion of the canals and the hypertrophy factors pathway. By using this hybrid approach, we have obtained as a result the spatial-temporal patterns for the growth of cartilage canals and hypertrophy factors within the epiphysis. The model is in qualitative agreement with experimental results previously reported by other authors. Thus, we conclude that this model may be used as a methodological basis to present a complete mathematical model of the processes involved in epiphyseal development.

  13. 33 CFR 117.438 - Company Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Company Canal. 117.438 Section 117.438 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.438 Company Canal. (a) The draw of...

  14. 33 CFR 117.438 - Company Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Company Canal. 117.438 Section 117.438 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.438 Company Canal. (a) The draw of...

  15. 33 CFR 117.438 - Company Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Company Canal. 117.438 Section 117.438 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.438 Company Canal. (a) The draw of...

  16. 33 CFR 117.438 - Company Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Company Canal. 117.438 Section 117.438 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.438 Company Canal. (a) The draw of...

  17. 33 CFR 117.438 - Company Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Company Canal. 117.438 Section 117.438 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.438 Company Canal. (a) The draw of...

  18. 33 CFR 117.285 - Grand Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Grand Canal. 117.285 Section 117.285 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.285 Grand Canal. (a) The draw of the Lansing...

  19. 33 CFR 117.285 - Grand Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grand Canal. 117.285 Section 117.285 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.285 Grand Canal. (a) The draw of the Lansing...

  20. 33 CFR 117.285 - Grand Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Grand Canal. 117.285 Section 117.285 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.285 Grand Canal. (a) The draw of the Lansing...

  1. 33 CFR 117.444 - Falgout Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Falgout Canal. 117.444 Section 117.444 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.444 Falgout Canal. The draw of the...

  2. [Upper lateral incisor with 2 canals].

    PubMed

    Fabra Campos, H

    1991-01-01

    Clinical case summary of the patient with an upper lateral incisor with two root canals. The suspicion that there might be an anatomic anomaly in the root that includes a complex root canal system was made when an advanced radicular groove was detected in the lingual surface or an excessively enlarged cingulum.

  3. 33 CFR 117.1045 - Hood Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hood Canal. 117.1045 Section 117.1045 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1045 Hood Canal. The draw of the Washington...

  4. 33 CFR 117.1045 - Hood Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hood Canal. 117.1045 Section 117.1045 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Washington § 117.1045 Hood Canal. The draw of the Washington...

  5. Benign lesions of the external auditory canal.

    PubMed

    Tran, L P; Grundfast, K M; Selesnick, S H

    1996-10-01

    Benign mass lesions of the external auditory canal, such as exostoses and osteomas, are common findings on physical examination but most often do not require treatment. The differential diagnosis of lesions in the external auditory canal, however, should not be limited to those benign processes discussed here, but should also include infectious, dermatologic, congenital, and malignant processes.

  6. 33 CFR 117.445 - Franklin Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Franklin Canal. 117.445 Section 117.445 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.445 Franklin Canal. The draw of the Chatsworth Bridge, mile 4.8 at Franklin, shall...

  7. 33 CFR 117.285 - Grand Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grand Canal. 117.285 Section 117.285 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.285 Grand Canal. (a) The draw of the Lansing Island bridge, mile 0.7, shall open on...

  8. 33 CFR 117.787 - Gowanus Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gowanus Canal. 117.787 Section 117.787 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New York § 117.787 Gowanus Canal. The draws of the Ninth Street Bridge, mile 1.4, the Third...

  9. 33 CFR 117.453 - Houma Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Houma Canal. 117.453 Section 117.453 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Louisiana § 117.453 Houma Canal. The draw of the S3197 bridge, mile 1.7 at Houma, shall open on signal...

  10. Metoptic canal, duplication of the optic canal and Warwick’s foramen in human orbits.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The region of the optic strut is sometimes traversed by some minor canals whose incidence and general characteristics have never been studied. As such canals could be the route for vessels that could interfere in the surgery of the orbital apex, we undertook a detailed anatomical study on a vast collection of dry skulls. The examination of 943 dry adult skulls and 360 foetal skulls was carried out to precise the anatomy of canals in the optic strut area, their development and relationships with the optic canal. A canal traversing the optic strut was present in 8.54 % of the orbits. Based on diameter, position within the optic strut, and thickness of the bony plate separating it from the optic canal or from the superior orbital fissure, the canals piercing the optic strut were classified into four types, which include the well-known duplication of the optic canal, different aspects of the metoptic canal and a type of canal that to our knowledge has never been reported. Warwick’s foramen was found in 0.74 % of orbits. The area of the optic strut is the frequent site of canals joining the orbit with the middle cranial fossa. Some of them can host the ophthalmic artery; others could be run by minor vessels which, however, could be the source of annoying bleedings in surgical procedures.

  11. Improvement of Water Quality at Dongbin Harbor with Construction of an Inland Canal, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Sik

    2014-01-01

    The behaviors of the water body of Dongbin Harbor located at Pohang City, Gyongpook Province, in Korea were numerically simulated in this study. A canal was planned to connect the harbor and the Hyeongsan River to improve water quality inside the harbor. The current system was first simulated by using a commercial program RMA2, with respect to both tidal currents and river flow. The progress inside the harbor from a supply of fresh water from the Hyeongsan River was then predicted by using RMA4. Both the present and future conditions (before and after construction of an inland canal) were taken into consideration in numerical simulations. It is concluded that the water quality inside the harbor can be improved considerably after construction of the canal. PMID:25003149

  12. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  13. Tissue engineering in endodontics: root canal revascularization.

    PubMed

    Palit Madhu Chanda; Hegde, K Sundeep; Bhat, Sham S; Sargod, Sharan S; Mantha, Somasundar; Chattopadhyay, Sayan

    2014-01-01

    Root canal revascularization attempts to make necrotic tooth alive by the use of certain simple clinical protocols. Earlier apexification was the treatment of choice for treating and preserving immature permanent teeth that have lost pulp vitality. This procedure promoted the formation of apical barrier to seal the root canal of immature teeth and nonvital filling materials contained within root canal space. However with the success of root canal revascularization to regenerate the pulp dentin complex of necrotic immature tooth has made us to rethink if apexification is at the beginning of its end. The objective of this review is to discuss the new concepts of tissue engineering in endodontics and the clinical steps of root canal revascularization.

  14. Properties of water along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve via molecular dynamics simulations using the polarizable TIP4P-QDP-LJ water model

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Brad A.; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    We present an extension of the TIP4P-QDP model, TIP4P-QDP-LJ, that is designed to couple changes in repulsive and dispersive nonbond interactions to changes in polarizability. Polarizability is intimately related to the dispersion component of classical force field models of interactions, and we explore the effect of incorporating this connection explicitly on properties along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve of pure water. Parametrized to reproduce condensed-phase liquid water properties at 298 K, the TIP4P-QDP-LJ model predicts density, enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, and the dielectric constant at ambient conditions to about the same accuracy as TIP4P-QDP but shows remarkable improvement in reproducing the liquid-vapor coexistence curve. TIP4P-QDP-LJ predicts critical constants of Tc=623 K, ρc=0.351 g∕cm3, and Pc=250.9 atm, which are in good agreement with experimental values of Tc=647.1 K, ρc=0.322 g∕cm3, and Pc=218 atm, respectively. Applying a scaling factor correction (obtained by fitting the experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data to the law of rectilinear diameters using a three-term Wegner expansion) the model predicts critical constants (Tc=631 K and ρc=0.308 g∕cm3). Dependence of enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, surface tension, and dielectric constant on temperature are shown to reproduce experimental trends. We also explore the interfacial potential drop across the liquid-vapor interface for the temperatures studied. The interfacial potential demonstrates little temperature dependence at lower temperatures (300–450 K) and significantly enhanced (exponential) dependence at elevated temperatures. Terms arising from the decomposition of the interfacial potential into dipole and quadrupole contributions are shown to monotonically approach zero as the temperature approaches the critical temperature. Results of this study suggest that self-consistently treating the coupling of phase

  15. Properties of water along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve via molecular dynamics simulations using the polarizable TIP4P-QDP-LJ water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Brad A.; Patel, Sandeep

    2009-08-01

    We present an extension of the TIP4P-QDP model, TIP4P-QDP-LJ, that is designed to couple changes in repulsive and dispersive nonbond interactions to changes in polarizability. Polarizability is intimately related to the dispersion component of classical force field models of interactions, and we explore the effect of incorporating this connection explicitly on properties along the liquid-vapor coexistence curve of pure water. Parametrized to reproduce condensed-phase liquid water properties at 298 K, the TIP4P-QDP-LJ model predicts density, enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, and the dielectric constant at ambient conditions to about the same accuracy as TIP4P-QDP but shows remarkable improvement in reproducing the liquid-vapor coexistence curve. TIP4P-QDP-LJ predicts critical constants of Tc=623 K, ρc=0.351 g/cm3, and Pc=250.9 atm, which are in good agreement with experimental values of Tc=647.1 K, ρc=0.322 g/cm3, and Pc=218 atm, respectively. Applying a scaling factor correction (obtained by fitting the experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium data to the law of rectilinear diameters using a three-term Wegner expansion) the model predicts critical constants (Tc=631 K and ρc=0.308 g/cm3). Dependence of enthalpy of vaporization, self-diffusion constant, surface tension, and dielectric constant on temperature are shown to reproduce experimental trends. We also explore the interfacial potential drop across the liquid-vapor interface for the temperatures studied. The interfacial potential demonstrates little temperature dependence at lower temperatures (300-450 K) and significantly enhanced (exponential) dependence at elevated temperatures. Terms arising from the decomposition of the interfacial potential into dipole and quadrupole contributions are shown to monotonically approach zero as the temperature approaches the critical temperature. Results of this study suggest that self-consistently treating the coupling of phase-dependent polarizability with

  16. Growth of Intracranial Aneurysms Arised from Curved Vessels under the Influence of Elevated Wall Shear Stress ─ A Computer Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yixiang; Wada, Shigeo; Tsubota, Ken-Ichi; Yamaguchi, Takami

    Recent studies have suggested that long standing elevated wall shear stress might degenerate the arterial wall and be involved in the pathogenesis of intracranial aneurysm formation and development. The present study focuses on the interplay between the hemodynamic stresses, arterial wall degeneration and deformation. By constructing a computational model and examining the hypotheses that govern the rules to grow an intracranial aneurysm, we simulate the formation and development of intracranial aneurysms. The high wall shear stress is found to propagate towards the proximal and distal end of the formed aneurysm, which becomes the key factor for the expansion of wall degeneration and aneurysm progression. The development of aneurysm is influenced by the wall shear stress threshold, the Reynolds number and the rate of wall degeneration. Our preliminary results indicate that computer simulation can be used in the study of aneurysm mechanics and yields new insight into the mechanism of aneurysm pathophysiology.

  17. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains more than 500 fatigue curves for industrial ferrous and nonferrous alloys. It also includes a thorough explanation of fatigue testing and interpretation of test results. Each curve is presented independently and includes an explanation of its particular importance. The curves are titled by standard industrial designations (AISI, CDA, AA, etc.) of the metals, and a complete reference is given to the original source to facilitate further research. The collection includes standard S-N curves, curves showing effect of surface hardening on fatigue strength, crack growth-rate curves, curves comparing the fatigue strengths of various alloys, effect of variables (i,e, temperature, humidity, frequency, aging, environment, etc.) and much, much more. This one volume consolidates the fatigue data in a single source.

  18. [Comparative study of root canal morphology of mandibular incisors by cone-beam CT and canal staining and clearing technique].

    PubMed

    Wen, Shan-hui; Lin, Zi-tong; Zhu, Min; Ge, Jiu-yu; Wang, Tie-mei

    2016-02-01

    To compare the root canal morphology of mandibular incisors by using cone-beam CT (CBCT) and canal staining and clearing technique. Sixty-one extracted mandibular incisors with complete dental root and apex which received no endodontic treatment and no post crown restoration were selected. Each tooth was radiographed with CBCT, and the root canal system was stained by canal staining and clearing technique. The consistency of the number of root canal, root canal Vertucci type of mandibular permanent incisors between the two methods were compared, and the differences of the detection rate on root canal branch structure between the two methods were analyzed. The results were statistically analyzed with SPSS 17.0 software package. The Kappa value of single and double root canal types between CBCT and canal staining and clearing technique was 0.847 (P<0.001). The Kappa value of Vertucci root canal types between CBCT and canal staining and clearing technique was 0.861 (P<0.001). The detection rates of root canal branch structure were 8.19% and 22.95%, respectively, with significant difference between the two methods (P=0.025). The canal staining and clearing technique was significantly better than CBCT in detection of root canal branch structure. CBCT can reflect the root canal types nearly perfectly, but inferior to canal staining and clearing technique in detection of root canal branch structure, CBCT is a relatively accurate clinical diagnosis tool of root canal morphology.

  19. Are Driving and Overtaking on Right Curves More Dangerous than on Left Curves?

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Sarbaz; Thomson, Robert; Lannér, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that crashes on horizontal curves are a cause for concern in all countries due to the frequency and severity of crashes at curves compared to road tangents. A recent study of crashes in western Sweden reported a higher rate of crashes in right curves than left curves. To further understand this result, this paper reports the results of novel analyses of the responses of vehicles and drivers during negotiating and overtaking maneuvers on curves for right hand traffic. The overall objectives of the study were to find road parameters for curves that affect vehicle dynamic responses, to analyze these responses during overtaking maneuvers on curves, and to link the results with driver behavior for different curve directions. The studied road features were speed, super-elevation, radius and friction including their interactions, while the analyzed vehicle dynamic factors were lateral acceleration and yaw angular velocity. A simulation program, PC-Crash, has been used to simulate road parameters and vehicle response interaction in curves. Overtaking maneuvers have been simulated for all road feature combinations in a total of 108 runs. Analysis of variances (ANOVA) was performed, using two sided randomized block design, to find differences in vehicle responses for the curve parameters. To study driver response, a field test using an instrumented vehicle and 32 participants was reviewed as it contained longitudinal speed and acceleration data for analysis. The simulation results showed that road features affect overtaking performance in right and left curves differently. Overtaking on right curves was sensitive to radius and the interaction of radius with road condition; while overtaking on left curves was more sensitive to super-elevation. Comparisons of lateral acceleration and yaw angular velocity during these maneuvers showed different vehicle response configurations depending on curve direction and maneuver path. The field test experiments also showed

  20. Are driving and overtaking on right curves more dangerous than on left curves?

    PubMed

    Othman, Sarbaz; Thomson, Robert; Lannér, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that crashes on horizontal curves are a cause for concern in all countries due to the frequency and severity of crashes at curves compared to road tangents. A recent study of crashes in western Sweden reported a higher rate of crashes in right curves than left curves. To further understand this result, this paper reports the results of novel analyses of the responses of vehicles and drivers during negotiating and overtaking maneuvers on curves for right hand traffic. The overall objectives of the study were to find road parameters for curves that affect vehicle dynamic responses, to analyze these responses during overtaking maneuvers on curves, and to link the results with driver behavior for different curve directions. The studied road features were speed, super-elevation, radius and friction including their interactions, while the analyzed vehicle dynamic factors were lateral acceleration and yaw angular velocity. A simulation program, PC-Crash, has been used to simulate road parameters and vehicle response interaction in curves. Overtaking maneuvers have been simulated for all road feature combinations in a total of 108 runs. Analysis of variances (ANOVA) was performed, using two sided randomized block design, to find differences in vehicle responses for the curve parameters. To study driver response, a field test using an instrumented vehicle and 32 participants was reviewed as it contained longitudinal speed and acceleration data for analysis. The simulation results showed that road features affect overtaking performance in right and left curves differently. Overtaking on right curves was sensitive to radius and the interaction of radius with road condition; while overtaking on left curves was more sensitive to super-elevation. Comparisons of lateral acceleration and yaw angular velocity during these maneuvers showed different vehicle response configurations depending on curve direction and maneuver path. The field test experiments also showed

  1. Carpal canal pressure of the distracted wrist.

    PubMed

    Baechler, Martin F; Means, Kenneth R; Parks, Brent G; Nguyen, Augustine; Segalman, Keith A

    2004-09-01

    This study was conducted to study the effect of distraction across the wrist joint on carpal canal pressure. Ten cadaver specimens were mounted vertically in neutral forearm rotation by 2 half pins that transfixed the radius and ulna. The wrist joint was distracted by suspending weights from the middle finger. A balloon-tipped catheter, percutaneously introduced into the carpal canal and connected to a transducer, was used to measure carpal canal pressure. The carpal canal pressure was measured at 0 to 4.54 kg of distraction in 0.45-kg increments and at 6.81 kg and 9.08 kg of distraction. Three wrist positions were tested: neutral, 30 degrees of flexion, and 30 degrees of extension. Highly linear direct relationships between wrist distraction force and carpal canal pressure over baseline were observed in all positions of the wrist. Statistically significant increases in carpal canal pressure over baseline were observed at a wrist distraction force of 2.27 kg or more with the wrist in neutral position, at 1.82 kg or more with the wrist in 30 degrees of extension, and at 4.09 kg or more with the wrist in 30 degrees of flexion. At each level of wrist distraction force of 3.63 kg or less the carpal canal pressure of the extended wrist was significantly higher than that of the wrist in neutral position. At each level of wrist distraction force 4.54 kg or less the carpal canal pressure of the extended wrist was significantly higher than that of the flexed wrist. No statistically significant differences were observed at any level of wrist distraction force between carpal canal pressures in the neutral and flexed positions of the wrist. Distraction across the wrist joint causes a statistically significant highly linear increase in carpal canal pressure. The position of the distracted wrist also has a considerable effect on carpal canal pressure, with the extended position associated with the largest increases in carpal canal pressure and the flexed position with the

  2. Remote sensing used for power curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Jørgensen, H. E.; Paulsen, U. S.; Larsen, T. J.; Antoniou, I.; Thesbjerg, L.

    2008-05-01

    : Power curve measurement for large wind turbines requires taking into account more parameters than only the wind speed at hub height. Based on results from aerodynamic simulations, an equivalent wind speed taking the wind shear into account was defined and found to reduce the power standard deviation in the power curve significantly. Two LiDARs and a SoDAR are used to measure the wind profile in front of a wind turbine. These profiles are used to calculate the equivalent wind speed. The comparison of the power curves obtained with the three instruments to the traditional power curve, obtained using a cup anemometer measurement, confirms the results obtained from the simulations. Using LiDAR profiles reduces the error in power curve measurement, when these are used as relative instrument together with a cup anemometer. Results from the SoDAR do not show such promising results, probably because of noisy measurements resulting in distorted profiles.

  3. Looking back at Love Canal

    SciTech Connect

    Deegan, J. Jr.

    1987-04-01

    The comprehensive environmental study which describes the results of a monitoring program conducted by EPA at Love Canal is evaluated by EPA's former study director. Attention is focused on the episode's history and the agency's study methods. The aim of the program was to constitute a study team, design a monitoring study, reprogram and reallocate the financial resources needed to conduct the study, and identify and employ contractors who would collect and analyze environmental samples. The agency was directed to ensure the quality of the data acquired from various environmental media and analyzed by numerous laboratories; to integrate, interpret, and report the data; and to assess, from an environmental perspective, the habitability of the area.

  4. Micro-computerized tomographic analysis of radicular and canal morphology of premolars with long oval canals.

    PubMed

    Grande, Nicola M; Plotino, Gianluca; Pecci, Raffaella; Bedini, Rossella; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Somma, Francesco

    2008-09-01

    The aims of this in vitro study were to measure root and canal diameters, root and canal diameter ratios, mean taper of the root canal and of each root canal section, and radicular wall thickness at different levels in premolars with long oval root canals. Thirty human premolars, with single long oval canals were selected for this study. The specimens were analyzed with micro-computerized tomography. The cross-sections corresponding to 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13 mm from the radiologic apex were analyzed to measure the mesiodistal (MD) and buccolingual (BL) diameters of the canals and the thickness of the root and the walls. The BL/MD ratios of the canal (DeltaC) and the root (DeltaR) diameters were calculated, as was as the mean taper in both a BL and an MD dimension. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed with a level of significance of P = .05. At all levels of analysis, the BL diameter was greater than the MD diameter for both the canal and the root. Generally, DeltaC and DeltaR increased coronally. Buccal and lingual wall thicknesses were greater than mesial and distal at all levels. Canal diameters at 1 mm from the apex were >0.30 mm in the shorter-oval diameter and >0.40 mm in the longer-oval diameter. In all root segments the BL taper was greater than the MD taper. An oval canal anatomy was frequently present even in the most apical sections of the root canals. A high correlation was established between the shape of the root canal and the corresponding root.

  5. How to bond to root canal dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  6. Canal and isthmus debridement efficacies of two irrigant agitation techniques in a closed system

    PubMed Central

    Susin, L.; Yoon, J. C.; Liu, Y.; Parente, J. M.; Loushine, R. J.; Ricucci, D.; Bryan, T.; Weller, R. N.; Pashley, D. H.; Tay, F. R.

    2010-01-01

    Aim To compare canal and isthmus debris debridement efficacies of the manual dynamic irrigation (MDI) and apical negative pressure (ANP) techniques in the mesial root of mandibular first molars with narrow isthmi, using a closed canal design. Methodology Micro-computed tomography was employed to select 20 teeth, each containing a narrow isthmus. Each root was sealed at the apex with hot glue and embedded in polyvinylsiloxane to simulate a closed canal system. The teeth were submitted to a standardised instrumentation protocol. Final irrigation was performed with either the MDI or the ANP technique using the EndoVac system (N=10). Masson trichrome-stained sections were prepared from completely demineralised roots at ten canal levels between 1–2.8 mm of the anatomical apices. Areas occupied by canals and isthmus of each root and debris in the corresponding regions were digitised by the NIH Image J software and statistically analysed using two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Results For the instrumented canals, there were no differences between the two groups (p=0.131) in the area occupied by debris at all canal levels (p=0.343). Conversely, for the isthmus, less debris was found in the ANP group (p<0.001) but no differences were seen in each group with respect to the ten canal levels (p=0.352). Conclusion Neither technique produce completely removed debris from the isthmus regions. However the EndoVac system, which encompasses the ANP concept, removed considerably more debris from narrow isthmi of the mandibular mesial roots. PMID:20726910

  7. Mandibular Canal Enlargement: Clinical and Radiological Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Chong Jun; Jabar, Nazimi Abd; Lan, Tan Huann; Ramli, Roszalina

    2017-01-01

    Enlargement of the mandibular canal is a rare radiological finding. Clinically, it may or may not be associated with sensory deficits. We report four cases of widening of the mandibular canal observed with various methods of imaging with different clinical characteristics. We describe this unique radiological finding and elaborate the importance of quality assessment of the imaging that is vital for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. Clinicians should be mindful when assessing the imaging whenever the size of the mandibular canal is implicated. The case ranged from a benign tumor to malignancy, radiological errors, and artifacts. A more superior imaging or treatment modality was necessary to ascertain the diagnosis. PMID:28781925

  8. Origin of the Ion Foreshock in a Quasi-perpendicular Curved Collisionless Shock: Particles Trajectory Analysis in 2D PIC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoini, P.; Lembege, B.

    2015-12-01

    The ion foreshock located upstream of the Earth's shock wave is populated with ions having interacted with the shock, and then, reflected back with an high energy gain. Spacecrafts have clearly established the existence of two distinct populations in the quasi-perpendicular shock region (i.e. for 45° ≤ ΘBn ≤ 90°, where ΘBn is the angle between the shock normal and the upstream magnetic field) : (i) field-aligned ion beams or « FAB » characterized by a gyrotropic distribution, and (ii) gyro-phase bunched ions or « GPB » characterized by a NON gyrotropic distribution. One of the important unresolved problem is the exact origin of the particles contributing to these two populations. To our knowledge, it was the first time that full-particle simulations have been performed including self-consistently the shock front curvature and nonstationarity, and the time-of-flight effects. Our analysis evidences that these two backstreaming populations may be reflected by the front itself and can be differentiated both in terms of interaction time and trajectory within the shock front. In particular, simulations evidence that "GPB" population is characterized by a short interaction time (ΔTinter = 1 to 2 τci) while the "FAB" population corresponds to a much larger time range (from 1 τci to 10 τci), where tci is the upstream ion gyroperiod. Present individual ion trajectories evidence that "FAB" population shows a strong perpendicular drift at the shock front (i.e. strong dependence of the pitch angle to the perpendicular velocity) whereas the "GPB" population shows no perpendicular drift (i.e. its pitch angle is mainly driven by the parallel velocity). Such differences explain why the "FAB" population loses their gyro-phase coherency and become gyrotropic which is not the case for the "GPB". This important result was not expected and greatly simplifies the question of their origin.

  9. Soil Water Retention Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. E.; Kim, J.; Cifelli, R.; Chandra, C. V.

    2016-12-01

    Potential water retention, S, is one of parameters commonly used in hydrologic modeling for soil moisture accounting. Physically, S indicates total amount of water which can be stored in soil and is expressed in units of depth. S can be represented as a change of soil moisture content and in this context is commonly used to estimate direct runoff, especially in the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number (CN) method. Generally, the lumped and the distributed hydrologic models can easily use the SCS-CN method to estimate direct runoff. Changes in potential water retention have been used in previous SCS-CN studies; however, these studies have focused on long-term hydrologic simulations where S is allowed to vary at the daily time scale. While useful for hydrologic events that span multiple days, the resolution is too coarse for short-term applications such as flash flood events where S may not recover its full potential. In this study, a new method for estimating a time-variable potential water retention at hourly time-scales is presented. The methodology is applied for the Napa River basin, California. The streamflow gage at St Helena, located in the upper reaches of the basin, is used as the control gage site to evaluate the model performance as it is has minimal influences by reservoirs and diversions. Rainfall events from 2011 to 2012 are used for estimating the event-based SCS CN to transfer to S. As a result, we have derived the potential water retention curve and it is classified into three sections depending on the relative change in S. The first is a negative slope section arising from the difference in the rate of moving water through the soil column, the second is a zero change section representing the initial recovery the potential water retention, and the third is a positive change section representing the full recovery of the potential water retention. Also, we found that the soil water moving has traffic jam within 24 hours after finished first

  10. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3810 - Root canal post.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal post. 872.3810 Section 872.3810 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3810 Root canal post. (a) Identification. A root canal... of the platinum group intended to be cemented into the root canal of a tooth to stabilize and...

  15. Planer orientation of the bilateral semicircular canals in dizzy patients.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Sachiko; Takei, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Kazufumi; Masukawa, Ai; Arai, Yasuko

    2012-10-01

    Recent development of 3-dimensional analysis of eye movement enabled to detect the eye rotation axis, which is used to determine the responsible semicircular canal(s) in dizzy patients. Therefore, the knowledge of anatomical orientation of bilateral semicircular canals is essential, as all 6 canals influence the eye movements. Employing the new head coordinate system suitable for MR imaging, we calculated the angles of semicircular canal planes of both ears in 11 dizzy patients who had normal caloric response in both ears. The angles between adjacent canal pairs were nearly perpendicular in both ears. The angle between the posterior canal planes and head sagittal plane was 51° and significantly larger the angle between the anterior canal planes and head sagittal plane, which was 35°. The angle between the horizontal canal plane and head sagittal plane was almost orthogonal. Pairs of contralateral synergistic canal planes were not parallel, forming 10° between right and left horizontal canal planes, 17° between right anterior and left posterior canal planes and 19° between the right posterior and left anterior canal planes. Our measurement of the angles of adjacent canal pairs and the angle between each semicircular canal and head sagittal plane coincided with those of previous reports obtained from CT images and skull specimens. However, the angles between contralateral synergistic canal planes were more parallel than those of previous reports. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 6. VIEW SHOWING WOODEN FLUMES ACROSS MARICOPA CANAL. SUCH FLUMES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW SHOWING WOODEN FLUMES ACROSS MARICOPA CANAL. SUCH FLUMES WERE USED TO CARRY WATER FROM ONE CANAL TO ANOTHER, BEFORE THE CANAL COMPANIES WERE BOUGHT BY THE GOVERNMENT, AND THE SYSTEM UNIFIED. Photographer unknown, no date - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  17. Seepage investigations of Noyes Canal, Menard County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, Ivan Dale

    1953-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, and the Menard Irrigation Company, a seepage investigation was made on Noyes Canal (Menard Irrigation Company Canal) in Menard County, Texas, from the headgates of the canal to where the canal empties back into the San Saba River.

  18. Looking west at lift bridge, canal, and tow path, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking west at lift bridge, canal, and tow path, with U.S. Rt. 11 bridge in background. Remnant of spur track to R. Paul Smith Power Station is at left, and abandoned Western Maryland Railway right of way parallels canal at right. - Potomac Edison Company, Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Bridge, Spanning C & O Canal South of U.S. 11, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  19. 149. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    149. TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL DIVERSION, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER DAM; CLOSE-UP OF MAIN CANAL GATES, SOUTH VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  20. 97. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. POINT SPILL, TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY NORTHWEST OF MURTAUGH, IDAHO; OVERALL WEST VIEW FROM CANAL SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  1. 91. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    91. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; NORTHEAST VIEW OF CANAL AND GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  2. 28. VIEW FROM IMMEDIATELY DOWNSTREAM OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW FROM IMMEDIATELY DOWNSTREAM OF TWIN FALLS MAIN CANAL HEADWORKS WITH CANAL BRIDGE IN DISTANCE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  3. 150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    150. Photocopy of drawing (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Book #363, Page 42, entitled, 'Diversion Tunnels', located in Twin Falls Canal Company office, Twin Falls, Idaho). PLAN OF DIVERSION TUNNELS, MILNER DAM. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  4. 180. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. E. Pettygro, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    180. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company. E. Pettygro, Photographer, date unknown. BLASTING TWIN FALLS CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY; BLASTING COTTONWOOD AREA TO REPLACE FLUME BY RUNNING HIGH LINE THROUGH SOLID ROCK. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  5. 88. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    88. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; WEST VIEW OF CANAL AND GATES. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  6. 94. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    94. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; CLOSE-UP OF GATES FROM THE CANAL SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  7. 123. MCMULLEN CREEK, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. MCMULLEN CREEK, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; SOUTH VIEW OF THE CREEK EMPTYING INTO THE HIGH LINE CANAL. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  8. 131. FORKS DIVERSION, HIGH LINE AND LOW LINE CANALS, TWIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    131. FORKS DIVERSION, HIGH LINE AND LOW LINE CANALS, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF HANSEN, IDAHO; INLET SIDE OF LOW LINE CANAL, WEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  9. 177. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    177. Photocopy of Photograph, Twin Falls Canal Company, Bisbee Photo, September, 1912. Photographer unknown. COTTONWOOD FLUME, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; SOUTH VIEW FROM UPPER SIDE. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  10. 189. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    189. Photocopy of drawing, Twin Falls Canal Company, date unknown. ROCK CREEK CROSSING, LOW LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF KIMBERLY, IDAHO; BLUEPRINT. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  11. 89. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. CEDAR DRAW SPILL, HIGH LINE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, SOUTH OF FILER, IDAHO; OUTLET SIDE OF CANAL, SOUTHWEST VIEW. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  12. 158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    158. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Transit Book #404T, Page 3, #46, Division One). START OF MAIN CANAL SURVEY, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  13. 154. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    154. Photocopy of transit book (taken from Twin Falls Canal Company Surveyor's Transit Book #405T, Page 2, #46 Division One). STATEMENT OF SIGHT-SETTING FOR 1903 SURVEY TO ALIGN SOUTH SIDE CANAL, TWIN FALLS COUNTY, MILNER, IDAHO. - Milner Dam & Main Canal: Twin Falls Canal Company, On Snake River, 11 miles West of city of Burley, Idaho, Twin Falls, Twin Falls County, ID

  14. 3. Dundee Canal looking northwest from north of Dundee Textile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Dundee Canal looking northwest from north of Dundee Textile Company Mill - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  15. [Scanning electron microscopy investigation of canal cleaning after canal preparation with nickel titanium files].

    PubMed

    Brkanić, Tatjana; Ivana, Stojsin; Vukoje, Karolina; Zivković, Slavoljub

    2010-01-01

    Root canal preparation is the most important phase of endodontic procedure and it consists of adequate canal space cleaning and shaping. In recent years, rotary instruments and techniques have gained importance because of the great efficacy, speed and safety of the preparation procedure. The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of different NiTi files on the canal wall cleaning quality, residual dentine debris and smear layer. The research was conducted on extracted human teeth in vitro conditions. Teeth were divided in 7 main groups depending on the kind of instruments used for root canal preparation: ProTaper, GT, ProFile, K-3, FlexMaster, hand ProTaper and hand GT. Root canal preparation was accomplished by crown-down technique. Prepared samples were assessed on scanning electron microscopy JEOL, JSM-6460 LV. The evaluation of dentine debris was done with 500x magnification, and the evaluation of smear layer with 1,000 times magnification. Quantitive assessment of dentine debris and smear layer was done according to the criteria of Hulsmann. The least amount of debris and smear layer has been found in canals shaped with ProFile instruments, and the largest amount in canals shaped with FlexMaster instruments. Canal cleaning efficacy of hand GTand ProTaperfiles has been similar to cleaning efficacy of rotary NiTi files. Statistic analysis has shown a significant difference in amount of dentine debris and smear layer on the canal walls between sample groups. shaped with different instruments. Completely clean canals have not been found in any tested group of instruments. The largest amount of debris and smear layer has been found in the apical third of all canals. The design and the type of endodontic instruments influence the efficacy of the canal cleaning.

  16. 7. View north at back (canal side) of culvert inlet, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View north at back (canal side) of culvert inlet, with canal bank completely removed. Background to foreground: back of inlet headwall with tops of high inlet barrels exposed; vertical transition wall between high inlet barrels and low, interior, inlet barrels; tops of low interior barrels; vertical heartening planks and low cutoff wall at site of former canal edge of canal bank; dewatered canal bed and plank sheathing on top of culvert barrels beneath canal bed. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Ten Mile Run Culvert, 1.5 miles South of Blackwells Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  17. Application of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modelling and simulation for the prediction of target attainment of ceftobiprole against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus using minimum inhibitory concentration and time-kill curve based approaches.

    PubMed

    Barbour, April M; Schmidt, Stephan; Zhuang, Luning; Rand, Kenneth; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to compare two different methods for dose optimisation of antimicrobials. The probability of target attainment (PTA) was calculated using Monte Carlo simulation to predict the PK/PD target of fT>MIC or modelling and simulation of time-kill curve data. Ceftobiprole, the paradigm compound, activity against two MRSA strains was determined, ATCC 33591 (MIC=2mg/L) and a clinical isolate (MIC=1mg/L). A two-subpopulation model accounting for drug degradation during the experiment adequately fit the time-kill curve data (concentration range 0.25-16× MIC). The PTA was calculated for plasma, skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue based on data from a microdialysis study in healthy volunteers. A two-compartment model with distribution factors to account for differences between free serum and tissue interstitial space fluid concentration appropriately fit the pharmacokinetic data. Pharmacodynamic endpoints of fT>MIC of 30% or 40% and 1- or 2-log kill were used. The PTA was >90% in all tissues based on the PK/PD endpoint of fT>MIC >40%. The PTAs based on a 1- or 2-log kill from the time-kill experiments were lower than those calculated based on fT>MIC. The PTA of a 1-log kill was >90% for both MRSA isolates for plasma and skeletal muscle but was slightly below 90% for subcutaneous adipose tissue (both isolates ca. 88%). The results support a dosing regimen of 500mg three times daily as a 2-h intravenous infusion. This dose should be confirmed as additional pharmacokinetic data from various patient populations become available.

  18. Incidence of accessory canals in Japanese anterior maxillary teeth following root canal filling ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Adorno, C G; Yoshioka, T; Suda, H

    2010-05-01

    To investigate the vertical and horizontal distribution and the incidence of accessory canals in Japanese maxillary anterior teeth following root filling. The study included maxillary teeth; 69 central incisors, 61 lateral incisors and 31 canines. After the canal systems had been dyed and root canal instrumentation had been carried out, all prepared canals were filled with gutta-percha without using sealer. Transparent specimens were then obtained and examined with a digital microscope for horizontal and vertical distributions of accessory canals. The incidence of teeth with accessory canals in the apical 3 mm was 46%, 29% and 38% for the maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors and canines, respectively. The horizontal distribution was mainly buccal for central incisors, palatal for lateral incisors and distal and palatal for canines. There was a significant difference (P < 0.05) between the apical 3 mm and the rest of the root (16%, 20% and 19% for the maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors and canines, respectively) in terms of the presence of accessory canals. A high percentage of accessory canals can be found in apical 3 mm of the root. The horizontal distribution of accessory canals differed amongst the tooth types studied.

  19. Adapting fiber-reinforced composite root canal posts for use in noncircular-shaped canals.

    PubMed

    Grande, Nicola Maria; Butti, Andrea; Plotino, Gianluca; Somma, Francesco

    2006-10-01

    Post placement in oval-shaped root canals implies the sacrifice of sound dental tissue to adapt the canal shape to fit the post, which can result in one of several significant complications. A semidirect, single-visit, chairside procedure is proposed, which permits the use of an almost anatomically shaped post, starting from a preformed fiber-reinforced composite root canal post of the largest size commercially available. The utilization of this post capitalizes on the advantages of both the fiber post and the anatomical post in oval- and ribbon-shaped canals to provide restoration of endodontically treated teeth.

  20. Tornado-Shaped Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Sol Sáez; de la Rosa, Félix Martínez; Rojas, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In Advanced Calculus, our students wonder if it is possible to graphically represent a tornado by means of a three-dimensional curve. In this paper, we show it is possible by providing the parametric equations of such tornado-shaped curves.

  1. Tornado-Shaped Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Sol Sáez; de la Rosa, Félix Martínez; Rojas, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In Advanced Calculus, our students wonder if it is possible to graphically represent a tornado by means of a three-dimensional curve. In this paper, we show it is possible by providing the parametric equations of such tornado-shaped curves.

  2. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  3. Flow-duration curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James Kincheon

    1959-01-01

    The flow-duration curve is a cumulative frequency curve that shows the percent of time specified discharges were equaled or exceeded during a given period. It combines in one curve the flow characteristics of a stream throughout the range of discharge, without regard to the sequence of occurrence. If the period upon which the curve is based represents the long-term flow of a stream, the curve may be used to predict the distribution of future flows for water- power, water-supply, and pollution studies. This report shows that differences in geology affect the low-flow ends of flow-duration curves of streams in adjacent basins. Thus, duration curves are useful in appraising the geologic characteristics of drainage basins. A method for adjusting flow-duration curves of short periods to represent long-term conditions is presented. The adjustment is made by correlating the records of a short-term station with those of a long-term station.

  4. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  5. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  6. 8. VIEW SHOWING THE DEMOSSING OF GRAND CANAL LOCATION UNKNOWN. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW SHOWING THE DEMOSSING OF GRAND CANAL LOCATION UNKNOWN. AT TEAM OF HORSES ON OPPOSITE BANKS OF THE CANAL DRAG A CHAIN BETWEEN THEM ALONG THE BOTTOM OF THE CANAL, WHICH PULLS THE MOSS AND WEEDS LOOSE. THE PLANS THEN FLOAT DOWN THE CANAL AND ARE CAUGHT IN A SCREEN AND REMOVED. Photographer unknown, 1923 - Grand Canal, North side of Salt River, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  7. Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, F.; Randle, R.

    1984-01-01

    The application of flight simulation in regional airline training programs is discussed. Specifically, the use of simulation in cockpit resources management training (CRMT) is investigated. The availability of simulation resources is explored and the simulator disadvantages and advantages are cited. Problems with simulator specification, procurement, validation and use that have plagued the major air carriers over several decades are addressed.

  8. CURVES: curve evolution for vessel segmentation.

    PubMed

    Lorigo, L M; Faugeras, O D; Grimson, W E; Keriven, R; Kikinis, R; Nabavi, A; Westin, C F

    2001-09-01

    The vasculature is of utmost importance in neurosurgery. Direct visualization of images acquired with current imaging modalities, however, cannot provide a spatial representation of small vessels. These vessels, and their branches which show considerable variations, are most important in planning and performing neurosurgical procedures. In planning they provide information on where the lesion draws its blood supply and where it drains. During surgery the vessels serve as landmarks and guidelines to the lesion. The more minute the information is, the more precise the navigation and localization of computer guided procedures. Beyond neurosurgery and neurological study, vascular information is also crucial in cardiovascular surgery, diagnosis, and research. This paper addresses the problem of automatic segmentation of complicated curvilinear structures in three-dimensional imagery, with the primary application of segmenting vasculature in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images. The method presented is based on recent curve and surface evolution work in the computer vision community which models the object boundary as a manifold that evolves iteratively to minimize an energy criterion. This energy criterion is based both on intensity values in the image and on local smoothness properties of the object boundary, which is the vessel wall in this application. In particular, the method handles curves evolving in 3D, in contrast with previous work that has dealt with curves in 2D and surfaces in 3D. Results are presented on cerebral and aortic MRA data as well as lung computed tomography (CT) data.

  9. CT appearances of external ear canal cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, P N; Francis, I S; Wareing, M J; Cox, T C

    1997-09-01

    External ear canal cholesteatoma (EECC) is rare in ear, nose and throat (ENT) practice. Two cases, one bilateral, are described. Computed tomography demonstrates the extent of bony involvement. Erosion of the external canal should not be overlooked when reviewing CT of the petrous bone in cases of discharge from the ear. EECC may necessitate surgery and delay in the diagnosis of EECC can result in progressive bony destruction.

  10. Mechanics of the Panama Canal slides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, George F.

    1917-01-01

    Dr. Becker visited the Canal Zone in 1913 as a geologist of the United States Geological Survey and since that time has given the problem the benefit of his study. His appointment as a member of the committee of the National Academy of Sciences has made it appropriate for his conclusions, based upon his personal observations and already reported in part to the Canal Commission, to be stated for the benefit of his associates and other American scientists and engineers.

  11. Infinite swapping in curved spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curotto, E.; Mella, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    We develop an extension of the infinite swapping and partial infinite swapping techniques [N. Plattner, J. D. Doll, P. Dupuis, H. Wang, Y. Liu, and J. E. Gubernatis, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134111 (2011)] to curved spaces. Furthermore, we test the performance of infinite swapping and partial infinite swapping in a series of flat spaces characterized by the same potential energy surface model. We develop a second order variational algorithm for general curved spaces without the extended Lagrangian formalism to include holonomic constraints. We test the new methods by carrying out NVT classical ensemble simulations on a set of multidimensional toroids mapped by stereographic projections and characterized by a potential energy surface built from a linear combination of decoupled double wells shaped purposely to create rare events over a range of temperatures.

  12. Infinite swapping in curved spaces.

    PubMed

    Curotto, E; Mella, Massimo

    2014-01-07

    We develop an extension of the infinite swapping and partial infinite swapping techniques [N. Plattner, J. D. Doll, P. Dupuis, H. Wang, Y. Liu, and J. E. Gubernatis, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134111 (2011)] to curved spaces. Furthermore, we test the performance of infinite swapping and partial infinite swapping in a series of flat spaces characterized by the same potential energy surface model. We develop a second order variational algorithm for general curved spaces without the extended Lagrangian formalism to include holonomic constraints. We test the new methods by carrying out NVT classical ensemble simulations on a set of multidimensional toroids mapped by stereographic projections and characterized by a potential energy surface built from a linear combination of decoupled double wells shaped purposely to create rare events over a range of temperatures.

  13. Disinfection of Contaminated Canals by Different Laser Wavelengths, while Performing Root Canal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Safavi, Nassimeh

    2013-01-01

    Removal of smear layer and disinfection of canals are important objectives of teeth root canal cleaning. In order to achieve this purpose, rinsing substances, intra canal drugs as well as ultrasound are used. Today, use of laser to remove smear layer and to disinfect root canals has increasingly attracted the attentions. Till now different lasers such as CO2, Nd:YAG, Er:YAG, Er,Cr:YSGG have been used for debris and smear removal from the canals. Numerous studies have shown that Er:YAG is the most appropriate laser for intra canal debris and smear removal. In addition different laser wavelengths have been used directly or as an adjunctive to disinfect canals. Laser light can penetrate areas of canals where irrigating and disinfecting solutions cannot reach, like secondary canals and deep dentinal tubules and also can eliminate microorganisms. Different studies have confirmed the penetration of Nd:YAG laser in deep dentin and reduction of microorganisms penetration. But studies on comparison of antibacterial effects of Nd:YAG laser with sodium hypochlorite showed effectiveness of both, with a better effect for sodium hypochlorite. Studies performed in relation with anti-microbial effects of Diode laser with various parameters show that this laser can be effective in reducing intra canal bacterial count and penetration in the depth of 500 microns in dentin. In studies performed on Diode laser in combination with canal irrigating solutions such as sodium hypochlorite and oxygenated water better results were obtained. Although studies on disinfection by the Erbium laser family show that use of this laser alone can be effective in disinfecting canals, studies evaluating the disinfecting effects of this laser and different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite show that the latter alone is more effective in disinfecting canals. And better results were obtained when Erbium laser was used in combination with sodium hypochlorite irrigating solution in canals. Results of the

  14. Disinfection of Contaminated Canals by Different Laser Wavelengths, while Performing Root Canal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Safavi, Nassimeh

    2013-01-01

    Removal of smear layer and disinfection of canals are important objectives of teeth root canal cleaning. In order to achieve this purpose, rinsing substances, intra canal drugs as well as ultrasound are used. Today, use of laser to remove smear layer and to disinfect root canals has increasingly attracted the attentions. Till now different lasers such as CO2, Nd:YAG, Er:YAG, Er,Cr:YSGG have been used for debris and smear removal from the canals. Numerous studies have shown that Er:YAG is the most appropriate laser for intra canal debris and smear removal. In addition different laser wavelengths have been used directly or as an adjunctive to disinfect canals. Laser light can penetrate areas of canals where irrigating and disinfecting solutions cannot reach, like secondary canals and deep dentinal tubules and also can eliminate microorganisms. Different studies have confirmed the penetration of Nd:YAG laser in deep dentin and reduction of microorganisms penetration. But studies on comparison of antibacterial effects of Nd:YAG laser with sodium hypochlorite showed effectiveness of both, with a better effect for sodium hypochlorite. Studies performed in relation with anti-microbial effects of Diode laser with various parameters show that this laser can be effective in reducing intra canal bacterial count and penetration in the depth of 500 microns in dentin. In studies performed on Diode laser in combination with canal irrigating solutions such as sodium hypochlorite and oxygenated water better results were obtained. Although studies on disinfection by the Erbium laser family show that use of this laser alone can be effective in disinfecting canals, studies evaluating the disinfecting effects of this laser and different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite show that the latter alone is more effective in disinfecting canals. And better results were obtained when Erbium laser was used in combination with sodium hypochlorite irrigating solution in canals. Results of the

  15. Learning curve for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of pancreatic lesions in a novel ex-vivo simulation model

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. M.; Cohen, J.; Gromski, M. A.; Saito, K.; Loundou, A.; Matthes, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is essential in the management of digestive cancers. However, teaching and learning this technique remain challenging due to the lack of cost-effective models. Material and methods: This was a prospective experimental study using a complete porcine upper gastrointestinal ex-vivo organ package, placed in an Erlangen Active Simulator for Interventional Endoscopy (EASIE-R), and prepared with one cyst and two solid masses (2 cm). Five fellows inexperienced in EUS-FNA were enrolled, performing 10 procedures on each lesion, alternatively. The total time, number of attempts for success, of needle view losses, and of scope handling were recorded, associated with an independent skills rating by procedure. We compared the first 15 procedures with the last 15 for each fellow. Results: The fellows successfully performed all procedures in 2 to 40 minutes, requiring 1 to 6 attempts. All (5/5) improved their total time taken (P < 0.001), number of times when the EUS view of the needle was lost (P < 0.05), scope handling (P < 0.005), and skills rating (P < 0.001), whereas 4/5 (80 %) improved their number of attempts. The overall evaluation showed a significant decrease (P < 0.001) in the total time taken (11.2 ± 7.8 vs 4.3 ± 2.2 minutes), number of attempts (2.6 ± 1.2 vs 1.2 ± 0.7), number of times when the EUS view of the needle was lost (2.3 ± 2 vs 0.5 ± 0.7), and need for scope handling (1.1 ± 1.7 vs 0.1 ± 0.2). We also observed an improvement in skills rating (5 ± 1.9 vs. 7.7 ± 1.1). Conclusion: This newly designed ex-vivo model seems to be an effective way to improve the initial learning of EUS-FNA, by performing 30 procedures. PMID:27995190

  16. Predicting streamflows in snowmelt-driven watersheds using the flow duration curve method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Kaluarachchi, J.

    2014-05-01

    Predicting streamflows in snow-fed watersheds in the Western United States is important for water allocation. Since many of these watersheds are heavily regulated through canal networks and reservoirs, predicting expected natural flows and therefore water availability under limited data is always a challenge. This study investigates the applicability of the flow duration curve (FDC) method for predicting natural flows in gauged and regulated snow-fed watersheds. Point snow observations, air temperature, precipitation, and snow water equivalent were used to simulate the snowmelt process with the SNOW-17 model, and extended to streamflow simulation using the FDC method with a modified current precipitation index. For regulated watersheds, a parametric regional FDC method was applied to reconstruct natural flow. For comparison, a simplified tank model was used considering both lumped and semi-distributed approaches. The proximity regionalization method was used to simulate streamflows in the regulated watersheds with the tank model. The results showed that the FDC method is capable of producing satisfactory natural flow estimates in gauged watersheds when high correlation exists between current precipitation index and streamflow. For regulated watersheds, the regional FDC method produced acceptable river diversion estimates, but it seemed to have more uncertainty due to less robustness of the FDC method. In spite of its simplicity, the FDC method is a practical approach with less computational burden for studies with minimal data availability.

  17. The diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging measurements for assessing cervical spinal canal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Rüegg, Tabea B; Wicki, Anina G; Aebli, Nikolaus; Wisianowsky, Christian; Krebs, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    The authors investigated the relevance of 2D MRI measurements for the diagnosis of critical cervical spinal canal stenosis. Among patients who had sustained a minor cervical spine trauma, they compared MRI measurements of the cervical spine between those with acute cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) and those without. They also investigated the correlation between the MRI measurements and the severity of CSCI as well as classification accuracy concerning the diagnosis of critical spinal canal stenosis for acute CSCI after a minor trauma. The authors conducted a single-center retrospective radiological case-control study of patients who had sustained CSCI after a minor trauma to the cervical spine from January 2000 to August 2010. The controls were patients who had sustained a cervical trauma without clinical or radiological signs of cervical spinal cord pathology. On axial T2-weighted MR images, the following were measured: the transverse spinal canal and cord area, the transverse and sagittal cord diameter, and the sagittal canal diameter of the cervical spine (C3-7). Using these measurements, the authors calculated the cord-canal-area ratio by dividing the transverse cord area by the transverse canal area, the space available for the cord by subtracting the sagittal canal diameter from the sagittal cord diameter, and the compression ratio by dividing the transverse cord diameter by its sagittal diameter. The severity of CSCI was assessed by using the motor index scores of 10 key muscles at different time points (initially, 1, 3, and 12 months after injury) obtained from the clinical records. The intra- and interobserver reliability of the MRI measurements, intra- and intergroup differences, and correlations between variables were also investigated. Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated for evaluating the classification accuracy of the imaging variables for CSCI. Data for 52 CSCI patients and 77 control patients were analyzed. The intra- and

  18. Optimizing Canal Structure Operation Using Meta-heuristic Algorithms in the Treasure Valley, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, J.; Ha, W.; Campbell, A.

    2012-12-01

    The computer program that was proven to produce optimal operational solutions for open-channel irrigation conveyance and distribution networks for synthetic data in previous research was tested for real world data. Data gathered from databases and the field by the Boise Project, Idaho, provided input to the hydraulic model for the physical characteristics of the conveyance system. We selected three reaches of the Deer Flat Low Line in the Treasure Valley for optimizing actual gate operations. The total of 59.1 km canal with a maximum capacity of 34 m3/s irrigates mainly corn, wheat, sugar-beet and potato crops. The computer model uses an accuracy-based learning classifier system (XCS) with an embedded genetic algorithm to produce optimal rules for gate structure operation in irrigation canals. Rules are generated through the exploration and exploitation of genetic algorithm population, with the support of RootCanal, an unsteady-state hydraulic simulation model. The objective function was set for satisfying variable demand along three reaches while minimizing water level deviations from target. All canal gate structures operate simultaneously while maintaining water depth near target values during variable-demand periods, with a hydraulically stabilized system. It is noteworthy to mention that this very simple 3-reach problem, requires the computer performing several thousand simulations during continuous days for finding plausible solutions. The model is currently simulating the Deer Flat Low Line Canal in Caldwell, Idaho with promising results. The population evolution is measured by a fitness parameter, which shows that canal structure operations generated by the model are improving towards plausible solutions. This research is one step forward for optimizing the way we use and manage water resources. Relying on management practices of the past will no longer work in a world that is impacted by global climate variability.

  19. The fluid mechanics of root canal irrigation.

    PubMed

    Gulabivala, K; Ng, Y-L; Gilbertson, M; Eames, I

    2010-12-01

    Root canal treatment is a common dental operation aimed at removing the contents of the geometrically complex canal chambers within teeth; its purpose is to remove diseased or infected tissue. The complex chamber is first enlarged and shaped by instruments to a size sufficient to deliver antibacterial fluids. These irrigants help to dissolve dying tissue, disinfect the canal walls and space and flush out debris. The effectiveness of the procedure is limited by access to the canal terminus. Endodontic research is focused on finding the instruments and clinical procedures that might improve success rates by more effectively reaching the apical anatomy. The individual factors affecting treatment outcome have not been unequivocally deciphered, partly because of the difficulty in isolating them and in making the link between simplified, general experimental models and the complex biological objects that are teeth. Explicitly considering the physical processes within the root canal can contribute to the resolution of these problems. The central problem is one of fluid motion in a confined geometry, which makes the dispersion and mixing of irrigant more difficult because of the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume. The effects of treatments can be understood through the use of scale models, mathematical modelling and numerical computations. A particular concern in treatment is that caustic irrigant may penetrate beyond the root canal, causing chemical damage to the jawbone. In fact, a stagnation plane exists beyond the needle tip, which the irrigant cannot penetrate. The goal is therefore to shift the stagnation plane apically to be coincident with the canal terminus without extending beyond it. Needle design may solve some of the problems but the best design for irrigant penetration conflicts with that for optimal removal of the bacterial biofilm from the canal wall. Both irrigant penetration and biofilm removal may be improved through canal fluid

  20. Calculating the equation of state parameters and predicting the spinodal curve of isotactic polypropylene/poly(ethylene-co-octene) blend by molecular dynamics simulations combined with Sanchez-Lacombe lattice fluid theory.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Wei; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Sun, Zhao-Yan; Li, Ze-Sheng; An, Li-Jia

    2007-05-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations are adopted to calculate the equation of state characteristic parameters P*, rho*, and T* of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) and poly(ethylene-co-octene) (PEOC), which can be further used in the Sanchez-Lacombe lattice fluid theory (SLLFT) to describe the respective physical properties. The calculated T* is a function of the temperature, which was also found in the literature. To solve this problem, we propose a Boltzmann fitting of the data and obtain T* at the high-temperature limit. With these characteristic parameters, the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) data of iPP and PEOC are predicted by the SLLFT equation of state. To justify the correctness of our results, we also obtain the PVT data for iPP and PEOC by experiments. Good agreement is found between the two sets of data. By integrating the Euler-Lagrange equation and the Cahn-Hilliard relation, we predict the density profiles and the surface tensions for iPP and PEOC, respectively. Furthermore, a recursive method is proposed to obtain the characteristic interaction energy parameter between iPP and PEOC. This method, which does not require fitting to the experimental phase equilibrium data, suggests an alternative way to predict the phase diagrams that are not easily obtained in experiments. As an example, in the framework of SLLFT, the spinodal curve for the iPP/PEOC blend is predicted at the low molecular weights that are used in the simulations.