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Sample records for simulated dissolver off-gas

  1. Fabrication of ATALANTE Dissolver Off-Gas Sorbent-Based Capture System

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Jr., Joseph Franklin; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2015-04-30

    A small sorbent-based capture system was designed that could be placed in the off-gas line from the fuel dissolver in the ATALANTE hot cells with minimal modifications to the ATALANTE dissolver off-gas system. Discussions with personnel from the ATALANTE facility provided guidance that was used for the design. All components for this system have been specified, procured, and received on site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), meeting the April 30, 2015, milestone for completing the fabrication of the ATALANTE dissolver off-gas capture system. This system will be tested at ORNL to verify operation and to ensure that all design requirements for ATALANTE are met. Modifications to the system will be made, as indicated by the testing, before the system is shipped to ATALANTE for installation in the hot cell facility.

  2. Off-gas Adsorption Model and Simulation - OSPREY

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J Rutledge

    2013-10-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and REcoverY (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed.

  3. Off-gas adsorption model and simulation - OSPREY

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, V.J.

    2013-07-01

    A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes is expected to provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. To support this capability, a modeling effort focused on the off-gas treatment system of a used nuclear fuel recycling facility is in progress. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed within Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Off-gas Separation and Recovery (OSPREY) models the adsorption of offgas constituents for dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions. Inputs to the model include gas composition, sorbent and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which breakthrough data can be obtained. The breakthrough data can be used to determine bed capacity, which in turn can be used to size columns. In addition to concentration data, the model predicts temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. A description of the OSPREY model, results from krypton adsorption modeling and plans for modeling the behavior of iodine, xenon, and tritium will be discussed. (author)

  4. Dissolver Off-gas Hot Operations Authorization (AFCI CETE Milestone Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2009-06-01

    The head-end processing of the Coupled-End-to-End (CETE) Demonstration includes fuel receipt, fuel disassembly, exposure of fuel (e.g., by segmenting the fuel pins), voloxidation of the fuel to separate tritium, and fuel dissolution. All of these processing steps with the exception of the dissolution step will be accomplished in the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) (Building 3525). The final headend step will be performed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (Building 7920). The primary purpose of the fuel dissolution step is to prepare the solid fuel for subsequent liquid separations steps. This is accomplished by dissolving the fuel solids using nitric acid. During the dissolution process gases are evolved. Oxides of nitrogen are the primary off-gas components generated by the reactions of nitric acid and the fuel oxides however, during the dissolution and sparging of the resulting solution, iodine, C-14 as carbon dioxide, xenon, and krypton gasses are also released to the off-gas stream. The Dissolver Off-gas treatment rack provides a means of trapping these volatile fission products and other gases via various trapping media. Specifically the rack will recover iodine on a solid sorbent bed, scrub NOx in a water/acid column, scrub CO{sub 2} in a caustic scrubber column, remove moisture with solid sorbent drier beds and recover Xe and Kr using solid absorbent beds. The primary purpose of this experimental rack and the off-gas rack associated with the voloxidation equipment located at IFEL is to close the material balances around the volatile gases and to provide an understanding of the impacts of specific processing conditions on the fractions of the volatile components released from the various head-end processing steps.

  5. Design, Fabrication, and Shakeout Testing of ATALANTE Dissolver Off-Gas Sorbent-Based Capture System

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Jr, Joseph Franklin; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Jordan, Jacob A.; Bruffey, Stephanie H.

    2015-07-31

    A sorbent-based capture system designed for integration into the existing dissolver off-gas (DOG) treatment system at the ATelier Alpha et Laboratoires pour ANalyses, Transuraniens et Etudes de retraitement (ATALANTE) facility has been successfully designed and fabricated and has undergone shakeout testing. Discussions with personnel from the ATALANTE facility provided guidance that was used for the design. All components for this system were specified, procured, and received on site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system was then fabricated and tested at ORNL to verify operation. Shakeout testing resulted in a simplified system. This system should be easily installed into the existing facility and should be straightforward to operate during future experimental testing. All parts were selected to be compatible with ATALANTE power supplies, space requirements, and the existing DOG treatment system. Additionally, the system was demonstrated to meet all of four design requirements. These include (1) a dissolver off-gas flow rate of ≤100 L/h (1.67 L/min), (2) an external temperature of ≤50°C for all system components placed in the hot cell, (3) a sorbent bed temperature of ~150°C, and (4) a gas temperature of ~150°C upon entry into the sorbent bed. The system will be ready for shipment and installation in the existing DOG treatment system at ATALANTE in FY 2016.

  6. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporation of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.H.

    2001-03-28

    The purposes of this work were to: (1) develop preliminary operating data such as expected concentration endpoints for flow sheet development and evaporator design, and (2) examine the regulatory off-gas emission impacts from the evaporation of relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 Envelope C waste simulant containing 14 volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide organic compounds potentially present in actual Hanford RPP waste.

  7. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporation of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B. Jr.

    2003-10-23

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, remaining low activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation prior to being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide compounds, and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River Technology Center. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using EPA SW-846 Methods. Volatile and light semi-volatile organic compounds in the waste simulant were found to largely exit through the condenser vent, while heavier semi-volatiles and pesticides generally remain in the evaporator concentrate. An OLI Environmental Simulation Program evaporator model successfully predicted operating conditions and the experimental distribution of the fed target organics exiting in the concentrate, condensate and off-gas streams with the exception of a few semi-volatile and pesticide compounds. Comparison with Henry's Law predictions suggests the OLI ESP model is constrained by available literature data.

  8. Regulatory Off-Gas Analysis from the Evaporator of Hanford Simulated Waste Spiked with Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Calloway, T.B.

    2002-08-21

    After strontium/transuranics removal by precipitation followed by cesium/technetium removal by ion exchange, remaining low activity waste in the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant is to be concentrated by evaporation prior to being mixed with glass formers and vitrified. To provide a technical basis to permit the waste treatment facility, a relatively organic-rich Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 waste simulant was spiked with 14 target volatile, semi-volatile and pesticide compounds, and evaporated under vacuum in a bench-scale natural circulation evaporator fitted with an industrial stack off-gas sampler at the Savannah River Technology Center. An evaporator material balance for the target organics was calculated by combining liquid stream mass and analytical data with off-gas emissions estimates obtained using EPA SW-846 Methods.

  9. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27

    (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion of tanks and equipment, precipitation of solids, release of ammonia gas vapors, and scale in the tank farm evaporator. Routing this stream to the tank farms does not permanently divert it from recycling into the WTP, only temporarily stores it prior to reprocessing. Testing is normally performed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. The primary parameter of this phase of the test program was measuring the formation of solids during evaporation in order to assess the compatibility of the stream with the evaporator and transfer and storage equipment. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW facility melter offgas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and, thus, the composition will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. This report discusses results of evaporation testing of the simulant. Two conditions were tested, one with the simulant at near neutral pH, and a second at alkaline pH. The neutral pH test is comparable to the conditions in the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator, although that evaporator operates at near atmospheric pressure and tests were done under vacuum. For the alkaline test, the target pH was based on the tank farm corrosion control program requirements, and the test protocol and equipment was comparable to that

  10. Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang

    2008-03-15

    The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-21

    compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. This report discusses results of preliminary radionuclide decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of Monosodium Titanate (MST) to remove {sup 90}Sr and actinides, inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc, and zeolites for {sup 137}Cs. Test results indicate that excellent removal of {sup 99}Tc was achieved using Sn(II)Cl{sub 2} as a reductant, coupled with sorption onto hydroxyapatite, even in the presence of air and at room temperature. This process was very effective at neutral pH, with a Decontamination Factor (DF) >577 in two hours. It was less

  12. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29

    compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in greatest abundance in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are low but are also expected to be in measurable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. These are present due to their partial volatility and some entrainment in the off-gas system. This report discusses results of optimized {sup 99}Tc decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc. Testing focused on minimizing the quantity of sorbents/reactants added, and minimizing mixing time to reach the decontamination targets in this simulant formulation. Stannous chloride and ferrous sulfate were tested as reducing agents to determine the minimum needed to convert soluble pertechnetate

  13. A system of miniaturized stirred bioreactors for parallel continuous cultivation of yeast with online measurement of dissolved oxygen and off-gas.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Schneider, Konstantin; Heinzle, Elmar

    2013-02-01

    Chemostat cultivation is a powerful tool for physiological studies of microorganisms. We report the construction and application of a set of eight parallel small-scale bioreactors with a working volume of 10 mL for continuous cultivation. Hungate tubes were used as culture vessels connected to multichannel-peristaltic pumps for feeding fresh media and removal of culture broth and off-gas. Water saturated air is sucked into the bioreactors by applying negative pressure, and small stirrer bars inside the culture vessels allow sufficient mixing and oxygen transfer. Optical sensors are used for non-invasive online measurement of dissolved oxygen, which proved to be a powerful indicator of the physiological state of the cultures, particularly of steady-state conditions. Analysis of culture exhaust-gas by means of mass spectrometry enables balancing of carbon. The capacity of the developed small-scale bioreactor system was validated using the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, focusing on the metabolic shift from respiratory to respiro-fermentative metabolism, as well as studies on consumption of different substrates such as glucose, fructose, and gluconate. In all cases, an almost completely closed carbon balance was obtained proving the reliability of the experimental setup.

  14. Cement solidification of simulated off-gas condensates from vitrification of low-level nuclear waste solutions.

    PubMed

    Katz, A; Brough, A R; Kirkpatrick, R J; Struble, L J; Sun, G K; Young, J F

    2001-01-01

    Solidification in a cementitious matrix is a viable alternative for low-level nuclear waste management; it is therefore important to understand the behavior and properties of such wasteforms. We have examined the cementitious solidification of simulated off-gas waste streams resulting from the vitrification of low-level nuclear waste. Different possible methods for scrubbing the off-gasses from a vitrifier give rise to three possible types of waste compositions: acidic (from aqueous dissolution of volatile NOx and POx carried over from the vitrifier), basic (from neutralizing the former with sodium hydroxide), and fully carbonated (arising from a direct-combustion vitrifier). Six binder compositions were tested in which ordinary Portland cement was replaced at different proportions by fly ash and/or ground granulated blast furnace slag. A high solution to binder ratio of 1l/1 kg was used to minimize the volume of the wasteform and 10% attapulgite clay was added to all mixes to ensure that the fresh mix did not segregate prior to setting. The 28-day compressive strengths decreased when a high proportion of cement was replaced with fly ash, but were increased significantly when the cement was replaced with slag. The heats of hydration at early age for the various solids compositions decreased when cement was replaced with either fly ash or slag; however, for the fly ash mix the low heat was also associated with a significant decrease in compressive strength. High curing temperature (60 degrees C) or the use of extra-fine slag did not significantly affect the compressive strength. Recommendations for choice of binder formulations and treatment of off-gas condensates are discussed.

  15. Steady-state and dynamic simulation study on boil-off gas minimization and recovery strategies at LNG exporting terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurle, Yogesh

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is becoming one of the prominent clean energy sources with its abundance, high calorific value, low emission, and price. Vapors generated from LNG due to heat leak are called boil-off gas (BOG). As world-wide LNG productions are increasing fast, BOG generation and handling problems are becoming more critical. Also, due to stringent environmental regulations, flaring of BOG is not a viable option. In this study, typical Propane-and-Mixed-Refrigerant (C3-MR) process, storage facilities, and loading facilities are modeled and simulated to study BOG generation at LNG exporting terminals, including LNG processing, storage, and berth loading areas. Factors causing BOG are presented, and quantities of BOG generated due to each factor at each location are calculated under different LNG temperatures. Various strategies to minimize, recover, and reuse BOG are also studied for their feasibility and energy requirements. Rate of BOG generation during LNG loading---Jetty BOG (JBOG)---changes significantly with loading time. In this study, LNG vessel loading is simulated using dynamic process simulation software to obtain JBOG generation profile and to study JBOG recovery strategies. Also, fuel requirements for LNG plant to run steam-turbine driven compressors and gas-turbine driven compressors are calculated. Handling of JBOG generated from multiple loadings is also considered. The study would help proper handling of BOG problems in terms of minimizing flaring at LNG exporting terminals, and thus reducing waste, saving energy, and protecting surrounding environments.

  16. Laboratory optimization tests of technetium decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L.; McCabe, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  17. Adsorption Model for Off-Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2011-03-01

    The absence of industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other countries. Thus, it is essential to model complex series of unit operations to simulate, understand, and predict inherent transient behavior and feedback loops. A capability of accurately simulating the dynamic behavior of advanced fuel cycle separation processes will provide substantial cost savings and many technical benefits. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, an adsorption model has been developed in gPROMS software. Inputs include gas stream constituents, sorbent, and column properties, equilibrium and kinetic data, and inlet conditions. It models dispersed plug flow in a packed bed under non-isothermal and non-isobaric conditions for a multiple component gas stream. The simulation outputs component concentrations along the column length as a function of time from which the breakthrough data is obtained. It also outputs temperature along the column length as a function of time and pressure drop along the column length. Experimental data will be input into the adsorption model to develop a model specific for iodine adsorption on silver mordenite as well as model(s) specific for krypton and xenon adsorption. The model will be validated with experimental breakthrough curves. Another future off-gas modeling goal is to develop a model for the unit operation absorption. The off-gas models will be made available via the server or web for evaluation by customers.

  18. Laboratory Optimization Tests of Technetium Decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Direct Feed Low Activity Waste Melter Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; McCabe, D.

    2015-12-23

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable less integrated operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  19. FINAL REPORT REGULATORY OFF GAS EMISSIONS TESTING ON THE DM1200 MELTER SYSTEM USING HLW AND LAW SIMULANTS VSL-05R5830-1 REV 0 10/31/05

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    system was reconfigured to enable testing of the baseline HLW or LAW off-gas trains to perform off-gas emissions testing with both LAW and HLW simulants in the present work. During 2002 and 2003, many of these off-gas components were tested individually and in an integrated manner with the DM1200 Pilot Melter. Data from these tests are being used to support engineering design confirmation and to provide data to support air permitting activities. In fiscal year 2004, the WTP Project was directed by the Office of River Protection (ORP) to comply with Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements for organics. This requires that the combined melter and off-gas system have destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of >99.99% for principal organic dangerous constituents (PODCs). In order to provide confidence that the melter and off-gas system are able to achieve the required DRE, testing has been directed with both LAW and HLW feeds. The tests included both 'normal' and 'challenge' WTP melter conditions in order to obtain data for the potential range of operating conditions for the WTP melters and off-gas components. The WTP Project, Washington State Department of Ecology, and ORP have agreed that naphthalene will be used for testing to represent semi-volatile organics and allyl alcohol will be used to represent volatile organics. Testing was also performed to determine emissions of halides, metals, products of incomplete combustion (PICs), dioxins, furans, coplanar PCBs, total hydrocarbons, and COX and NOX, as well as the particle size distribution (PSD) of particulate matter discharged at the end of the off-gas train. A description of the melter test requirements and analytical methods used is provided in the Test Plan for this work. Test Exceptions were subsequently issued which changed the TCO catalyst, added total organic emissions (TOE) to exhaust sampling schedule, and allowing modification of the test conditions in

  20. Melter Off-Gas Flammability Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, FG III

    2003-12-12

    The objective of this work was to develop predictive models to assess offgas flammability for a low activity radioactive waste melter. The models had to be comprehensive enough to explicitly describe the effects of key melter operating variables such as total organic carbon in the feed, melter air purge and vapor space temperature. Once validated against pilot melter data, these models were used to simulate a series of safety scenarios involving over-batching of sugar, used as a reducing agent, and off-gas surges. The overall scope of the work was broken down into two parts, each focusing on a physically distinct region in the melter.

  1. Off gas film cooler cleaner

    SciTech Connect

    Dhingra, H.S.; Koch, W.C.; Burns, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    An apparatus is described for cleaning depositions of particulate matter from the inside of tubular piping while the piping is in use. The apparatus is remotely controlled in order to operate in hazardous environments. A housing containing brush and shaft assemblies is mounted on top of the tubular piping. Pneumatic cylinders provide linear motion. A roller nut bearing provides rotary motion. The combined motion causes the brush assembly to rotate as it travels along the tube dislodging particulate matter. The main application for this invention is to clean the off gas cooler of a radioactive waste vitrification unit.

  2. Glass melter off-gas system

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method for melting glass in a glass melter in such a way as to reduce deposition of particulates in the off-gas duct. Deposit accumulation is reduced by achieving an off-gas velocity above approximately 15 meters/second and an off-gas temperature as close as possible to, but not higher than, the glass softening point. Because the deposits are largely water-soluble, those that do form on the interior surface of the duct can be readily removed by injecting water or steam directly into the off-gas duct from its entrance or exit.

  3. Method for treating a nuclear process off-gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Pence, Dallas T.; Chou, Chun-Chao

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for selectively removing and recovering the noble gas and other gaseous components typically emitted during nuclear process operations. The method is adaptable and useful for treating dissolver off-gas effluents released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels whereby to permit radioactive contaminant recovery prior to releasing the remaining off-gases to the atmosphere. Briefly, the method sequentially comprises treating the off-gas stream to preliminarily remove NO.sub.x, hydrogen and carbon-containing organic compounds, and semivolatile fission product metal oxide components therefrom; adsorbing iodine components on silver-exchanged mordenite; removing water vapor carried by said stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing the carbon dioxide components of said off-gas stream by means of a molecular sieve; selectively removing xenon in gas phase by passing said stream through a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from oxygen by means of a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite; selectively separating krypton from the bulk nitrogen stream using a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchanged mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; concentrating the desorbed krypton upon a molecular sieve comprising silver-exchange mordenite cooled to about -140.degree. to -160.degree. C.; and further cryogenically concentrating, and the recovering for storage, the desorbed krypton.

  4. Dynamic Absorption Model for Off-Gas Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica J. Rutledge

    2011-07-01

    Modeling and simulations will aid in the future design of U.S. advanced reprocessing plants for the recovery and recycle of actinides in used nuclear fuel. The specific fuel cycle separation process discussed in this report is the off-gas treatment system. The off-gas separation consists of a series of scrubbers and adsorption beds to capture constituents of interest. Dynamic models are being developed to simulate each unit operation involved so each unit operation can be used as a stand-alone model and in series with multiple others. Currently, a rate based, dynamic absorption model is being developed in gPROMS software. Inputs include liquid and gas stream constituents, column properties, liquid and gas phase reactions, number of stages, and inlet conditions. It simulates multiple component absorption with countercurrent flow and accounts for absorption by mass transfer and chemical reaction. The assumption of each stage being a discrete well-mixed entity was made. Therefore, the model is solved stagewise. The simulation outputs component concentrations in both phases as a function of time from which the rate of absorption is determined. Temperature of both phases is output as a function of time also. The model will be used able to be used as a standalone model in addition to in series with other off-gas separation unit operations. The current model is being generated based on NOx absorption; however, a future goal is to develop a CO2 specific model. The model will have the capability to be modified for additional absorption systems. The off-gas models, both adsorption and absorption, will be made available via the server or web for evaluation by customers.

  5. Heat exchangers and thermal energy storage concepts for the off-gas heat of steelmaking devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinparzer, T.; Haider, M.; Fleischanderl, A.; Hampel, A.; Enickl, G.; Zauner, F.

    2012-11-01

    The fluctuating thermal emissions of electric arc furnaces require energy storage systems to provide downstream consumers with a continuous amount of thermal energy or electricity. Heat recovery systems based on thermal energy storage are presented. A comparison of different thermal energy storage systems has been performed. For the purpose, suitable heat exchangers for the off-gas heat have been developed. Dynamic process simulations of the heat recovery plants were necessary to check the feasibility of the systems and consider the non-steady-state off-gas emissions of the steelmaking devices. The implementation of a pilot plant into an existing off-gas duct of an electric arc furnace was required to check the real behavior of the heat exchanger and determine suitable materials in view of corrosion issues. The pilot plant is presented in this paper.

  6. Adsorption modeling for off-gas treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ladshaw, A.; Sharma, K.; Yiacoumi, S.; Tsouris, C.; De Paoli, D.W.

    2013-07-01

    Off-gas generated from the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel contains a mixture of several radioactive gases including {sup 129}I{sub 2}, {sup 85}Kr, HTO, and {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Over the past few decades, various separation and recovery processes have been studied for capturing these gases. Adsorption data for gaseous mixtures of species can be difficult to determine experimentally. Therefore, procedures capable of predicting the adsorption behavior of mixtures need to be developed from the individual isotherms of each of the pure species. A particular isotherm model of interest for the pure species is the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption isotherm. This model contains an adjustable number of parameters and will therefore describe a wide range of adsorption isotherms for a variety of components. A code has been developed in C++ to perform the non-linear regression analysis necessary for the determination of the isotherm parameters, as well as the least number of parameters needed to describe an entire set of data. (authors)

  7. Simulation of hydrodynamics, temperature, and dissolved oxygen in Bull Shoals Lake, Arkansas, 1994-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.; Green, W. Reed

    2003-01-01

    and dissolved-oxygen concentration through time. However, results from both scenarios for water temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentration were within the boundaries of the error between measured and simulated water column profile values.

  8. Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants – A Literature Survey and Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

    2013-09-01

    Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

  9. Development of silver impregnated alumina for iodine separation from off-gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Funabashi, Kiyomi; Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1995-02-01

    An inorganic iodine adsorbent, silver impregnated alumina (AgA), has been developed to separate iodine effectively from off-gas streams of nuclear facilities and to decrease the volume of waste (spent adsorbent). Iodine removal efficiency was improved at relatively high humidity by using alumina carrier with two different pore diameters. Waste volume reduction was achieved by impregnating relatively large amounts of silver into the alumina pores. The developed adsorbent was tested first with simulated off-gas streams under various experimental conditions and finally with actual off-gas streams of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant. The decontamination factor (DF) was about 100 with the AgA bed depth of 2cm at 70% relative humidity, which was a DF one order higher than that when AgA with one pore size was used. Iodine adsorption capacity was checked by passing excess iodine into the AgA bed. Values were about 0.12 and 0.35 g-I/cm`-AgA bed for 10 and 24wt% silver impregnated AgA, respectively. The results obtained in this study demonstrated the applicability of the developed AgA to the off-gas treatment system of nuclear facilities.

  10. Sorption Modeling and Verification for Off-Gas Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Tavlarides, Lawrence L.; Lin, Ronghong; Nan, Yue; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; Ladshaw, Austin; Sharma, Ketki; Gabitto, Jorge; DePaoli, David

    2015-04-29

    The project has made progress toward developing a comprehensive modeling capability for the capture of target species in off gas evolved during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The effort has integrated experimentation, model development, and computer code development for adsorption and absorption processes. For adsorption, a modeling library has been initiated to include (a) equilibrium models for uptake of off-gas components by adsorbents, (b) mass transfer models to describe mass transfer to a particle, diffusion through the pores of the particle and adsorption on the active sites of the particle, and (c) interconnection of these models to fixed bed adsorption modeling which includes advection through the bed. For single-component equilibria, a Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) code was developed to represent experimental data from a broad range of isotherm types; this is equivalent to a Langmuir isotherm in the two-parameter case, and was demonstrated for Kr on INL-engineered sorbent HZ PAN, water sorption on molecular sieve A sorbent material (MS3A), and Kr and Xe capture on metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. The GSTA isotherm was extended to multicomponent systems through application of a modified spreading pressure surface activity model and generalized predictive adsorbed solution theory; the result is the capability to estimate multicomponent adsorption equilibria from single-component isotherms. This advance, which enhances the capability to simulate systems related to off-gas treatment, has been demonstrated for a range of real-gas systems in the literature and is ready for testing with data currently being collected for multicomponent systems of interest, including iodine and water on MS3A. A diffusion kinetic model for sorbent pellets involving pore and surface diffusion as well as external mass transfer has been established, and a methodology was developed for determining unknown diffusivity parameters from transient

  11. COUPLED FREE AND DISSOLVED PHASE TRANSPORT: NEW SIMULATION CAPABILITIES AND PARAMETER INVERSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vadose zone free-phase simulation capabilities of the US EPA Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM)have been linked with the 3-D multi-species dissolved-phase contaminant transport simulator MT3DMS.

  12. HC-21C off-gas test procedure. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, L.T.

    1995-02-02

    Stabilization of plutonium bearing scrap material occurs in furnaces, FUR-21C-1 and FUR-21C-2, located in glovebox HC-21C. During previous testing and processing operations, water has been observed forming in the off-gas rotameters, FI-21C-1 and FI-21C-2. The off-gas is filtered through a 2 micron ceramic filter, F-21C-1 or F-21C-2, before discharge into the 26 inch vacuum system. The goal of this test plan is to determine the cause and location of water formation in the sludge stabilization off-gas system. The results should help determine what design improvements or processing steps will be implemented to prevent this phenomena from occurring in the future.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, J.

    2011-11-14

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently received a deposit sample from the Melter Primary Off Gas System (POG) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This sample was composed of material that had been collected while the quencher was in operation January 27, 2011 through March 31, 2011. DWPF requested, through a technical assistance request, characterization of the melter off-gas deposits by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The purpose of the Melter Off-Gas System is to reduce the amount of radioactive particles and mercury in the gases vented to the atmosphere. Gases emitted from the melter pass through the primary film cooler, quencher, Off-Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT), Steam Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), a condenser, a high efficiency mist eliminator, and a high efficiency particulate air filter, before being vented to the Process Vessel Vent System. The film coolers cool the gases leaving the melter vapor space from {approx}750 C to {approx}375 C, by introducing air and steam to the flow. In the next step, the quencher cools the gas to about 60 C by bringing the condensate from the OGCT in contact with the effluent (Figure 1). Most of the steam in the effluent is then condensed and the melter vapor space pressure is reduced. The purpose of the OGCT is to collect and store the condensate formed during the melter operation. Condensate from the OGCT is circulated to the SAS and atomized with steam. This atomized condensate is mixed with the off-gas to wet and join the particulate which is then removed in the cyclone. The next stage incorporates a chilled water condenser which separates the vapors and elemental mercury from the off-gas steam. Primary off-gas deposit samples from the DWPF melter have previously been analyzed. In 2003, samples from just past the film cooler, from the inlet of the quencher and inside the quencher were analyzed at SRNL. It was determined that the samples were a

  14. Simulation Analysis for HB-Line Dissolver Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S

    2006-03-22

    In support of the HB-Line Engineering agitator mixing project, flow pattern calculations have been made for a 90{sup o} apart and helical pitch agitator submerged in a flat tank containing dissolver baskets. The work is intended to determine maximum agitator speed to keep the dissolver baskets from contacting the agitator for the nominal tank liquid level. The analysis model was based on one dissolver basket located on the bottom surface of the flat tank for a conservative estimate. The modeling results will help determine acceptable agitator speeds and tank liquid levels to ensure that the dissolver basket is kept from contacting the agitator blade during HB-Line dissolver tank operations. The numerical modeling and calculations have been performed using a computational fluid dynamics approach. Three-dimensional steady-state momentum and continuity equations were used as the basic equations to estimate fluid motion driven by an agitator with four 90{sup o} pitched blades or three flat blades. Hydraulic conditions were fully turbulent (Reynolds number about 1 x 10{sup 5}). A standard two-equation turbulence model ({kappa},{var_epsilon}), was used to capture turbulent eddy motion. The commercial finite volume code, Fluent [5], was used to create a prototypic geometry file with a non-orthogonal mesh. Hybrid meshing was used to fill the computational region between the round-edged tank bottom and agitator regions. The nominal calculations and a series of sensitivity runs were made to investigate the impact of flow patterns on the lifting behavior of the dissolver basket. At high rotational speeds and low tank levels, local turbulent flow reaches the critical condition for the dissolver basket to be picked up from the tank floor and to touch the agitator blades during the tank mixing operations. This is not desirable in terms of mixing performance. The modeling results demonstrate that the flow patterns driven by the agitators considered here are not strong enough to

  15. Efficiency analysis of a hydrogen-fueled solid oxide fuel cell system with anode off-gas recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Roland; Deja, Robert; Engelbracht, Maximilian; Frank, Matthias; Nguyen, Van Nhu; Blum, Ludger; Stolten, Detlef

    2016-10-01

    This study analyzes different hydrogen-fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system layouts. It begins with a simple system layout without any anode off-gas recirculation, continues with a configuration equipped with off-gas recirculation, including steam condensation and then considers a layout with a dead-end anode off-gas loop. Operational parameters such as stack fuel utilization, as well as the recirculation rate, are modified, with the aim of achieving the highest efficiency values. Drawing on experiments and the accumulated experience of the SOFC group at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, a set of operational parameters were defined and applied to the simulations. It was found that anode off-gas recirculation, including steam condensation, improves electrical efficiency by up to 11.9 percentage-points compared to a layout without recirculation of the same stack fuel utilization. A system layout with a dead-end anode off-gas loop was also found to be capable of reaching electrical efficiencies of more than 61%.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Salinity and Dissolved Oxygen at Perdido Bay and Adjacent Coastal Ocean

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC), a numerical estuarine and coastal ocean circulation hydrodynamic model, was used to simulate the distribution of the salinity, temperature, nutrients and dissolved oxygen (DO) in Perdido Bay and adjacent Gulf of Mexico. External forcing fa...

  17. Simple hobby computer-based off-gas analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Forrest, E.H.; Jansen, N.B.; Flickinger, M.C.; Tsao, G.T.

    1981-02-01

    An Apple II computer has been adapted to monitor fermentation offgas in laboratory and pilot scale fermentors. It can calculate oxygen uptake rates, carbon dioxide evolution rates, respiratory quotient as well as initiating recalibration procedures. In this report the computer-based off-gas analysis system is described.

  18. ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

    2009-01-01

    This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

  19. Hanford Low-Activity Waste Processing: Demonstration of the Off-Gas Recycle Flowsheet - 13443

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, William G.; Esparza, Brian P.

    2013-07-01

    Vitrification of Hanford Low-Activity Waste (LAW) is nominally the thermal conversion and incorporation of sodium salts and radionuclides into borosilicate glass. One key radionuclide present in LAW is technetium-99. Technetium-99 is a low energy, long-lived beta emitting radionuclide present in the waste feed in concentrations on the order of 1-10 ppm. The long half-life combined with a high solubility in groundwater results in technetium-99 having considerable impact on performance modeling (as potential release to the environment) of both the waste glass and associated secondary waste products. The current Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flowsheet calls for the recycle of vitrification process off-gas condensates to maximize the portion of technetium ultimately immobilized in the waste glass. This is required as technetium acts as a semi-volatile specie, i.e. considerable loss of the radionuclide to the process off-gas stream can occur during the vitrification process. To test the process flowsheet assumptions, a prototypic off-gas system with recycle capability was added to a laboratory melter (on the order of 1/200 scale) and testing performed. Key test goals included determination of the process mass balance for technetium, a non-radioactive surrogate (rhenium), and other soluble species (sulfate, halides, etc.) which are concentrated by recycling off-gas condensates. The studies performed are the initial demonstrations of process recycle for this type of liquid-fed melter system. This paper describes the process recycle system, the waste feeds processed, and experimental results. Comparisons between data gathered using process recycle and previous single pass melter testing as well as mathematical modeling simulations are also provided. (authors)

  20. Dissolved carbon in extreme conditions characterized by first principles simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ding; Galli, Giulia

    One key component to understanding carbon transport in the Earth interior is the determination of the molecular species formed when carbon bearing materials are dissolved in water at extreme conditions. We used first principles molecular dynamics to investigate oxidized carbon in water at high pressure (P) and high temperature (T), up to the conditions of the Earth's upper mantle. Contrary to popular geochemistry models assuming that CO2 is the major carbon species present in water, we found that most of the dissolved carbon at 10 GPa and 1000 K is in the form of solvated CO32- and HCO3-anions. We also found that ion pairing between alkali metal cations and CO32- or HCO3-anions is greatly affected by P-T conditions, decreasing with pressure along an isotherm. Our study shows that it is crucial to take into account the specific molecular structure of water under extreme conditions and the changes in hydrogen bonding occurring at high P and T, in order to predict chemical reactions in dissolved carbon. Our findings also shed light on possible reduction mechanisms of CO2 when it is geologically stored, depending on the availability of water. The work is supported by the Sloan Foundation through the Deep Carbon Observatory.

  1. Simulation of hydrodynamics, temperature, and dissolved oxygen in Beaver Lake, Arkansas, 1994-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggard, Brian; Green, W. Reed

    2002-01-01

    The tailwaters of Beaver Lake and other White River reservoirs support a cold-water trout fishery of significant economic yield in northwestern Arkansas. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has requested an increase in existing minimum flows through the Beaver Lake dam to increase the amount of fishable waters downstream. Information is needed to assess the impact of additional minimum flows on temperature and dissolved-oxygen qualities of reservoir water above the dam and the release water. A two-dimensional, laterally averaged hydrodynamic, thermal and dissolved-oxygen model was developed and calibrated for Beaver Lake, Arkansas. The model simulates surface-water elevation, currents, heat transport and dissolved-oxygen dynamics. The model was developed to assess the impacts of proposed increases in minimum flows from 1.76 cubic meters per second (the existing minimum flow) to 3.85 cubic meters per second (the additional minimum flow). Simulations included assessing (1) the impact of additional minimum flows on tailwater temperature and dissolved-oxygen quality and (2) increasing initial water-surface elevation 0.5 meter and assessing the impact of additional minimum flow on tailwater temperatures and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. The additional minimum flow simulation (without increasing initial pool elevation) appeared to increase the water temperature (<0.9 degrees Celsius) and decrease dissolved oxygen concentration (<2.2 milligrams per liter) in the outflow discharge. Conversely, the additional minimum flow plus initial increase in pool elevation (0.5 meter) simulation appeared to decrease outflow water temperature (0.5 degrees Celsius) and increase dissolved oxygen concentration (<1.2 milligrams per liter) through time. However, results from both minimum flow scenarios for both water temperature and dissolved oxygen concentration were within the boundaries or similar to the error between measured and simulated water column profile values.

  2. FY-2001 Accomplishments in Off-gas Treatment Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Douglas William

    2001-09-01

    This report summarizes the efforts funded by the Tank Focus Area to investigate nitrogen oxide (NOx) destruction (a.k.a. deNOx) technologies and off-gas scrubber system designs. The primary deNOx technologies that were considered are staged combustion (a.k.a. NOx reburning), selective catalytic reduction, selective non-catalytic reduction, and steam reformation. After engineering studies and a team evaluation were completed, selective catalytic reduction and staged combustion were considered the most likely candidate technologies to be deployed in a sodium-bearing waste vitrification facility. The outcome of the team evaluation factored heavily in the establishing a baseline configuration for off-gas and secondary waste treatment systems.

  3. Microwave off-gas treatment apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Rebecca L.; Clark, David E.; Wicks, George G.

    2003-01-01

    The invention discloses a microwave off-gas system in which microwave energy is used to treat gaseous waste. A treatment chamber is used to remediate off-gases from an emission source by passing the off-gases through a susceptor matrix, the matrix being exposed to microwave radiation. The microwave radiation and elevated temperatures within the combustion chamber provide for significant reductions in the qualitative and quantitative emissions of the gas waste stream.

  4. Validation of DWPF Melter Off-Gas Combustion Model

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.S.

    2000-08-23

    The empirical melter off-gas combustion model currently used in the DWPF safety basis calculations is valid at melter vapor space temperatures above 570 degrees C, as measured in the thermowell. This lower temperature bound coincides with that of the off-gas data used as the basis of the model. In this study, the applicability of the empirical model in a wider temperature range was assessed using the off-gas data collected during two small-scale research melter runs. The first data set came from the Small Cylindrical Melter-2 run in 1985 with the sludge feed coupled with the precipitate hydrolysis product. The second data set came from the 774-A melter run in 1996 with the sludge-only feed prepared with the modified acid addition strategy during the feed pretreatment step. The results of the assessment showed that the data from these two melter runs agreed well with the existing model, and further provided the basis for extending the lower temperature bound of the model to the measured melter vapor space temperature of 445 degrees C.

  5. COUPLED FREE AND DISSOLVED PHASE TRANSPORT: NEW SIMULATION CAPABILITIES AND PARAMETER INVERSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The vadose zone free-phase simulation capabilities of the US EPA Hydrocarbon Spill Screening Model (HSSM) (Weaver et al., 1994) have been linked with the 3-D multi-species dissolved-phase contaminant transport simulator MT3DMS (Zheng and Wang, 1999; Zheng, 2005). The linkage pro...

  6. Simulation of hydrodynamics, temperature, and dissolved oxygen in Norfork Lake, Arkansas, 1994-1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.; Green, W. Reed

    2002-01-01

    Outflow from Norfork Lake and other White River reservoirs support a cold-water trout fishery of significant economic yield in north-central Arkansas and south-central Missouri. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission has requested an increase in existing minimum flows through the Norfork Lake dam to increase the amount of fishable waters downstream. Information is needed to assess the impact of increased minimum flows on temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentrations of reservoir water and the outflow. A two-dimensional, laterally averaged, hydrodynamic, temperature, and dissolved-oxygen model was developed and calibrated for Norfork Lake, located on the Arkansas-Missouri State line. The model simulates water-surface elevation, heat transport, and dissolved-oxygen dynamics. The model was developed to assess the impacts of proposed increases in minimum flow from 1.6 cubic meter per second (the existing minimum flow) to 8.5 cubic meters per second (the increased minimum flow). Simulations included assessing the impact of (1) increased minimum flows and (2) increased minimum flows with increased water-surface elevation of 1.1 meter in Norfork Lake on outflow temperatures and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. The increased minimum flow simulation (without increasing initial water-surface elevation) appeared to increase the water temperature and decrease dissolved-oxygen concentration in the outflow. Conversely, the increased minimum flow and initial increase in water-surface elevation (1.1 meter) simulation appeared to decrease outflow water temperature and increase dissolved-oxygen concentration through time. However, results from both scenarios for water temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentration were within the boundaries or similar to the error between measured and simulated water column profile values.

  7. Simulated changes in dissolved Iron deposition to the global ocean driven by human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Daskalakis, Nikos; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Baker, Alex R.; Nenes, Athanassios; Kanakidou, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The global 3-d chemistry transport atmospheric model TM4-ECPL is used to simulate the atmospheric cycle of iron (Fe) and evaluate its atmospheric deposition to the ocean by accounting for both Fe natural and anthropogenic sources as well as of the proton and ligand promoted iron mobilisation from dust aerosol. Model evaluation is performed by comparison to available observations. Present day dissolved Fe deposition presents strong spatial and temporal variability with an annual deposition flux about 0.489 Tg(Fe)/yr from which about 25% are deposited over the ocean. The model simulates past, present and future iron deposition accounting for changes in anthropogenic emissions. We show that dissolved iron deposition has significantly increased since 1850 while it is expected to decrease in the future due to air pollution regulations. These changes affect the atmospheric dissolved Fe supply to High-Nutrient-Low-Chlorophyll oceanic areas characterized by Fe scarcity.

  8. SIMULATED CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON DISSOLVED OXYGEN CHARACTERISTICS IN ICE-COVERED LAKES. (R824801)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic, one-dimensional model is presented which simulates daily dissolved oxygen (DO) profiles and associated water temperatures, ice covers and snow covers for dimictic and polymictic lakes of the temperate zone. The lake parameters required as model input are surface ...

  9. Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor

    DOEpatents

    Carl, D.E.

    1997-10-21

    In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector`s centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gas flow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel`s wall in the form of a ``wavy film,`` while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator. 4 figs.

  10. Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor

    DOEpatents

    Carl, Daniel E.

    1997-01-01

    In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector's centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gasflow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel's wall in the form of a "wavy film," while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator.

  11. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOEpatents

    Wright, G.T.

    1991-04-08

    This report describes an off-gas stack for a melter, furnace or reaction vessel comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes prevents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  12. Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack

    DOEpatents

    Wright, George T.

    1992-01-01

    An off-gas stack for a melter comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes pervents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

  13. Simulation of hydrodynamics, temperature, and dissolved oxygen in Table Rock Lake, Missouri, 1996-1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, W. Reed; Galloway, Joel M.; Richards, Joseph M.; Wesolowski, Edwin A.

    2003-01-01

    Outflow from Table Rock Lake and other White River reservoirs support a cold-water trout fishery of substantial economic yield in south-central Missouri and north-central Arkansas. The Missouri Department of Conservation has requested an increase in existing minimum flows through the Table Rock Lake Dam from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to increase the quality of fishable waters downstream in Lake Taneycomo. Information is needed to assess the effect of increased minimum flows on temperature and dissolved- oxygen concentrations of reservoir water and the outflow. A two-dimensional, laterally averaged, hydrodynamic, temperature, and dissolved-oxygen model, CE-QUAL-W2, was developed and calibrated for Table Rock Lake, located in Missouri, north of the Arkansas-Missouri State line. The model simulates water-surface elevation, heat transport, and dissolved-oxygen dynamics. The model was developed to assess the effects of proposed increases in minimum flow from about 4.4 cubic meters per second (the existing minimum flow) to 11.3 cubic meters per second (the increased minimum flow). Simulations included assessing the effect of (1) increased minimum flows and (2) increased minimum flows with increased water-surface elevations in Table Rock Lake, on outflow temperatures and dissolved-oxygen concentrations. In both minimum flow scenarios, water temperature appeared to stay the same or increase slightly (less than 0.37 ?C) and dissolved oxygen appeared to decrease slightly (less than 0.78 mg/L) in the outflow during the thermal stratification season. However, differences between the minimum flow scenarios for water temperature and dissolved- oxygen concentration and the calibrated model were similar to the differences between measured and simulated water-column profile values.

  14. ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg

    2009-04-01

    AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site with a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The AFS ART CCIM project includes several collaborators from AREVA subsidiaries, French companies, and DOE national laboratories. The Savannah River National Laboratory and the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique (CEA) have performed laboratory-scale studies and testing to determine a suitable, high-waste-loading glass matrix. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CEA are performing CCIM demonstrations at two different pilot scales to assess CCIM design and operation for treating SRS sludge wastes that are currently being treated in the DWPF. SGN is performing engineering studies to validate the feasibility of retrofitting CCIM technology into the DWPF Melter Cell. The long-term project plan includes more lab-testing, pilot- and large-scale demonstrations, and engineering activities to be performed during subsequent project phases. A simulant of the DWPF SB4 feed was successfully fed and melted in a small pilot-scale CCIM system during two test series. The OGSE tests provide initial results that (a) provide melter operating conditions while feeding a DWPF SB4 simulant feed, (b) determine the fate of feed organic and metal feed constituents and metals partitioning, and (c) characterize the melter off-gas source term to a downstream off-gas system. The INL CCIM test system was operated continuously for about 30 hours during the parametric test series, and for about 58 hours during the OGSE test. As the DWPF simulant feed was continuously fed to the melter, the glass level gradually increased until a portion of the molten glass was drained from the melter

  15. Removal of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen during simulated soil aquifer treatment.

    PubMed

    Essandoh, H M K; Tizaoui, C; Mohamed, M H A

    2013-07-01

    Soil aquifer treatment was simulated in 1 m laboratory soil columns containing silica sand under saturated and unsaturated soil conditions to examine the effect of travel length through the unsaturated zone on the removal of wastewater organic matter, the effect of soil type on dissolved organic carbon removal and also the type of microorganisms involved in the removal process. Dissolved organic carbon removal and nitrification did enhance when the wastewater travelled a longer length through the unsaturated zone. A similar consortium of microorganisms was found to exist in both saturated and unsaturated columns. Microbial concentrations however were lowest in the soil column containing silt and clay in addition to silica sand. The presence of silt and clay was detrimental to DOC removal efficiency under saturated soil conditions due to their negative effect on the hydraulic performance of the soil column and microbial growth.

  16. Literature search for offsite data to improve the DWPF melter off-gas model

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, W.E.

    2000-05-04

    This report documents the literature search performed and any relevant data that may help relax some of the constraints on the DWPF melter off-gas model. The objective of this task was to look for outside sources of technical data to help reduce some of the conservatism built in the DWPF melter off-gas model.

  17. Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, W. E.

    2013-02-13

    An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

  18. One-dimensional simulation of stratification and dissolved oxygen in McCook Reservoir, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the Chicagoland Underflow Plan/Tunnel and Reservoir Plan, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District, plans to build McCook Reservoir.a flood-control reservoir to store combined stormwater and raw sewage (combined sewage). To prevent the combined sewage in the reservoir from becoming anoxic and producing hydrogen sulfide gas, a coarse-bubble aeration system will be designed and installed on the basis of results from CUP 0-D, a zero-dimensional model, and MAC3D, a three-dimensional model. Two inherent assumptions in the application of MAC3D are that density stratification in the simulated water body is minimal or not present and that surface heat transfers are unimportant and, therefore, may be neglected. To test these assumptions, the previously tested, one-dimensional Dynamic Lake Model (DLM) was used to simulate changes in temperature and dissolved oxygen in the reservoir after a 1-in-100-year event. Results from model simulations indicate that the assumptions made in MAC3D application are valid as long as the aeration system, with an air-flow rate of 1.2 cubic meters per second or more, is operated while the combined sewage is stored in the reservoir. Results also indicate that the high biochemical oxygen demand of the combined sewage will quickly consume the dissolved oxygen stored in the reservoir and the dissolved oxygen transferred through the surface of the reservoir; therefore, oxygen must be supplied by either the rising bubbles of the aeration system (a process not incorporated in DLM) or some other technique to prevent anoxia.

  19. Simulating the effects of fluctuating dissolved oxygen on growth, reproduction, and survival of fish and shrimp.

    PubMed

    Miller Neilan, Rachael; Rose, Kenneth

    2014-02-21

    Individuals are commonly exposed to fluctuating levels of stressors, while most laboratory experiments focus on constant exposures. We develop and test a mathematical model for predicting the effects of low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) on growth, reproduction, and survival using laboratory experiments on fish and shrimp. The exposure-effects model simulates the hourly reductions in growth and survival, and the reduction in reproduction (fecundity) at times of spawning, of an individual as it is exposed to constant or hourly fluctuating dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. The model was applied to seven experiments involving fish and shrimp that included constant and fluctuating DO exposures, with constant exposures used for parameter estimation and the model then used to simulate the growth, reproduction, and survival in the fluctuating treatments. Cumulative effects on growth, reproduction, and survival were predicted well by the model, but the model did not replay the observed episodic low survival days. Further investigation should involve the role of acclimation, possible inclusion of repair effects in reproduction and survival, and the sensitivity of model predictions to the shape of the immediate effects function. Additional testing of the model with other taxa, different patterns of fluctuating exposures, and different stressors is needed to determine the model's generality and robustness.

  20. Dissolved Organic Phosphorus Production during Simulated Phytoplankton Blooms in a Coastal Upwelling System

    PubMed Central

    Ruttenberg, K. C.; Dyhrman, S. T.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) is increasingly recognized as an important phosphorus source to marine primary producers. Despite its importance, the production rate and fate of DOP is poorly understood. In this study, patterns of DOP production were evaluated by tracking the evolution of DOP during simulated phytoplankton blooms initiated with nutrient amended surface waters, relative to controls, from the Oregon (USA) coastal upwelling system. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) additions were used to decouple DOP production and hydrolysis by inducing or repressing, respectively, community alkaline phosphatase activity. In order to examine the progression of nutrient uptake and DOP production under upwelling versus relaxation conditions, two experiments were initiated with waters collected during upwelling events, and two with waters collected during relaxation events. Maximum [under (+P) conditions] and minimum [under (+N) conditions] DOP production rates were calculated and applied to in situ DOP levels to evaluate which end-member rate most closely approximates the in situ DOP production rate at the four study sites in this coastal system. Increases in DOP concentration occurred by day-5 in control treatments in all experiments. N treatments displayed increased chlorophyll a, increased alkaline phosphatase activity, and yielded lower net DOP production rates relative to controls, suggesting that DOP levels were depressed as a consequence of increased hydrolysis of bioavailable DOP substrates. Phosphorus additions resulted in a significant net production of DOP at all stations, but no increase in chlorophyll a relative to control treatments. The contrasting patterns in DOP production between treatments suggests that changes in the ambient dissolved inorganic nitrogen:dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIN:DIP) ratio could exert profound control over DOP production rates in this system. Patterns of DOP production across the different experiments also suggest that

  1. Anode shroud for off-gas capture and removal from electrolytic oxide reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, James L.; Barnes, Laurel A.; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G.; Williamson, Mark A.; Willit, James L.

    2014-07-08

    An electrolytic oxide reduction system according to a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention may include a plurality of anode assemblies and an anode shroud for each of the anode assemblies. The anode shroud may be used to dilute, cool, and/or remove off-gas from the electrolytic oxide reduction system. The anode shroud may include a body portion having a tapered upper section that includes an apex. The body portion may have an inner wall that defines an off-gas collection cavity. A chimney structure may extend from the apex of the upper section and be connected to the off-gas collection cavity of the body portion. The chimney structure may include an inner tube within an outer tube. Accordingly, a sweep gas/cooling gas may be supplied down the annular space between the inner and outer tubes, while the off-gas may be removed through an exit path defined by the inner tube.

  2. Watershed modeling of dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand using a hydrological simulation Fortran program.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijun; Kieffer, Janna M; Kingery, William L; Huddleston, David H; Hossain, Faisal

    2007-11-01

    Several inland water bodies in the St. Louis Bay watershed have been identified as being potentially impaired due to low level of dissolved oxygen (DO). In order to calculate the total maximum daily loads (TMDL), a standard watershed model supported by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Hydrological Simulation Program Fortran (HSPF), was used to simulate water temperature, DO, and bio-chemical oxygen demand (BOD). Both point and non-point sources of BOD were included in watershed modeling. The developed model was calibrated at two time periods: 1978 to 1986 and 2000 to 2001 with simulated DO closely matched the observed data and captured the seasonal variations. The model represented the general trend and average condition of observed BOD. Water temperature and BOD decay are the major factors that affect DO simulation, whereas nutrient processes, including nitrification, denitrification, and phytoplankton cycle, have slight impacts. The calibrated water quality model provides a representative linkage between the sources of BOD and in-stream DO\\BOD concentrations. The developed input parameters in this research could be extended to similar coastal watersheds for TMDL determination and Best Management Practice (BMP) evaluation.

  3. Cesium determination for the DWPF off-gas system performance test

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M.K.; Elder, H.H.; Boyce, W.T.

    1996-04-11

    In an effort to determine the cesium decontamination factors (DF`s) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter off-gas system at the Savannah River Site, the system was verified during an off-gas performance test. The off-gas performance test occurred during the DWPF waste Qualification Campaigns, WP-16 and WP-17. The verification of the off-gas system, which eliminated the need for a startup test involving a radioactive cesium addition, was based on the analysis of nonradioactive cesium across the first and second stage High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters. The amount of cesium on the first and second stage HEPA filters was determined by leaching samples from each HEPA filter with nitric acid and analyzing the leachate using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ICP-MS method has been demonstrated to be sufficiently sensitive to measure small quantities of cesium on filters. Based on the cesium results of the HEPA filter, cesium DF`s were calculated. The DF`s indicated that the DWPF HEPA filters performed better than the design basis. In addition to the HEPA filters, a determination of the cesium concentration in the melter feed, the canister glass and the off-gas condensate was made. These analyses provided information on cesium flow through the DWPF. This paper will focus on the methods used in the determination of nonradioactive cesium and the calculation of the DF`s for the DWPF melter off-gas system.

  4. Simulations of Mixing and Transport of Dissolved Waste Discharged From a Submerged Aquaculture pen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venayagamoorthy, S. K.; Fringer, O. B.; Koseff, J. R.; Naylor, R. L.

    2007-05-01

    The present study focuses on understanding the transport and fate of dissolved wastes from an aquaculture pen in near-coastal environments using the hydrodynamic code SUNTANS, which uses unstructured grids to compute flows at very high resolution. Simulations of the pollutant concentration field (in time and space) as a function of the local environment (stratification, bathymetry, wind), flow conditions (tides, currents), and the location of the pen were performed. The fish-pen causes partial blockage of the water flow, causing deceleration of the approaching flow and the formation of a downstream wake. Results of both the near-field (area within 10 to 20 pen diameters of fish-pen site) as well as the far-field behavior of the pollutant field will be presented. The results provide an understanding of the impact of aquaculture fish-pens on coastal water quality.

  5. Numerical simulations of aquaculture dissolved waste transport in a coastal embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venayagamoorthy, Subhas; Fringer, Oliver; Koseff, Jeffrey; Naylor, Rosamond

    2008-11-01

    The present study focuses on understanding the transport and fate of dissolved wastes from aquaculture pens in near-coastal environments using the hydrodynamics code SUNTANS (Stanford Unstructured Nonhydrostatic Terrain-following Adaptive Navier- Stokes Simulator), which employs unstructured grids to compute flows in the coastal ocean at very high resolution. Simulations of a pollutant concentration field (in time and space) as a function of the local environment (bathymetry, rotation), flow conditions (tides, wind-induced currents and wind stress), and the location of the pens were performed to study their effects on the evolution of the waste plume. The presence of the fish farm pens causes partial blockage of the flow, leading to the deceleration of the approaching flow and formation of downstream wakes. Results of both the near-field area (area within 10 to 20 pen diameters of the fish-pen site) as well as far-field behavior of the pollutant field are presented. These results highlight for the first time the importance of the wake vortex dynamics on the evolution of the near-field plume as well as the rotation of the earth on the far-field plume. The results provide an understanding of the impact of aquaculture fish-pens on coastal water quality.

  6. Granular and Dissolved Polyacrylamide Effects on Erosion and Runoff under Simulated Rainfall.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jihoon; Amoozegar, Aziz; Heitman, Joshua L; McLaughlin, Richard A

    2014-11-01

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) has been demonstrated to reduce erosion under many conditions, but less is known about the effects of its application method on erosion and concentrations in the runoff water. A rainfall simulation study was conducted to evaluate the performance of an excelsior erosion control blanket (cover) and two PAM application methods. The treatments were (i) no cover + no PAM (control), (ii) cover + no PAM, (iii) cover + granular PAM (GPAM), and (iv) cover + dissolved PAM (DPAM) applied to soil packed in wooden runoff boxes. The GPAM or DPAM (500 mg L) was surface-applied at a rate of 30 kg ha 1 d before rainfall simulation. Rainfall was applied at 83 mm h for 50 min and then repeated for another 20 min after a 30-min rest period. Runoff samples were analyzed for volume, turbidity in nephelometric turbidity units (NTU), total suspended solids (TSS), sediment particle size distribution, and PAM concentration. The cover alone reduced turbidity and TSS in runoff by >60% compared with the control (2315 NTU, 2777 mg TSS L). The PAM further reduced turbidity and TSS by >30% regardless of the application method. The median particle diameter of eroded sediments for PAM treatments was seven to nine times that of the control (12.4 μm). Loss of applied PAM in the runoff water (not sediment) was 19% for the GPAM treatment but only 2% for the DPAM treatment. Both GPAM and DPAM were effective at improving groundcover performance, but DPAM resulted in much less PAM loss.

  7. Detailed Design Data Package item 3.9a: Cadmium buildup in off-gas lines

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.M.; Buchmiller, W.C.; Anderson, L.D.; Whittington, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    Waste currently stored at the Hanford Reservation in underground double-shell and single-shell tanks is being considered for vitrification and disposal. To achieve this, Hanford is conducting a Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Technology Development Project melter campaign. In this campaign, a requirement was identified to quantify the amount of cadmium depositing in the off-gas line between the liquid-fed ceramic melter and the submerged bed scrubber. This issue of cadmium volatility was raised due to the limited data on cadmium volatility in HLW vitrification. Prior to the start of slurry processing, the off-gas line sections were removed and inspects. Any pre-existing deposits were removed. Following the melter campaign, the lines were again removed and solids deposits were sampled and the quantity of deposits were estimated. The data presented in this package include chemical analysis of feed, glass, line deposits, in-ling off-gas stream, and SBS condensate samples. Process data includes melter feeding and glass production rates, off- gas flow rate, and plenum and off-gas stream temperatures.

  8. Removal efficiency of silver impregnated filter materials and performance of iodie filters in the off-gas of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, F.J.; Herrmann, B.; Hoeflich, V.

    1997-08-01

    An almost quantitative retention of iodine is required in reprocessing plants. For the iodine removal in the off-gas streams of a reprocessing plant various sorption materials had been tested under realistic conditions in the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK in cooperation with the Karlsruhe research center FZK. The laboratory results achieved with different iodine sorption materials justified long time performance tests in the WAK Plant. Technical iodine filters and sorption materials for measurements of iodine had been tested from 1972 through 1992. This paper gives an overview over the most important results, Extended laboratory, pilot plant, hot cell and plant experiences have been performed concerning the behavior and the distribution of iodine-129 in chemical processing plants. In a conventional reprocessing plant for power reactor fuel, the bulk of iodine-129 and iodine-127 is evolved into the dissolver off-gas. The remainder is dispersed over many aqueous, organic and gaseous process and waste streams of the plant. Iodine filters with silver nitrate impregnated silica were installed in the dissolver off-gas of the Karlsruhe reprocessing plant WAK in 1975 and in two vessel vent systems in 1988. The aim of the Karlsruhe iodine research program was an almost quantitative evolution of the iodine during the dissolution process to remove as much iodine with the solid bed filters as possible. After shut down of the WAK plant in December 1990 the removal efficiency of the iodine filters at low iodine concentrations had been investigated during the following years. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Simulation of Temperature, Nutrients, Biochemical Oxygen Demand, and Dissolved Oxygen in the Catawba River, South Carolina, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Conrads, Paul A.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Sanders, Curtis L.; Bales, Jerad D.

    2003-01-01

    Time-series plots of dissolved-oxygen concentrations were determined for various simulated hydrologic and point-source loading conditions along a free-flowing section of the Catawba River from Lake Wylie Dam to the headwaters of Fishing Creek Reservoir in South Carolina. The U.S. Geological Survey one-dimensional dynamic-flow model, BRANCH, was used to simulate hydrodynamic data for the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model. Waterquality data were used to calibrate the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model and included concentrations of nutrients, chlorophyll a, and biochemical oxygen demand in water samples collected during two synoptic sampling surveys at 10 sites along the main stem of the Catawba River and at 3 tributaries; and continuous water temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentrations measured at 5 locations along the main stem of the Catawba River. A sensitivity analysis of the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentrations to model coefficients and data inputs indicated that the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentrations were most sensitive to watertemperature boundary data due to the effect of temperature on reaction kinetics and the solubility of dissolved oxygen. Of the model coefficients, the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentration was most sensitive to the biological oxidation rate of nitrite to nitrate. To demonstrate the utility of the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model for the Catawba River, the model was used to simulate several water-quality scenarios to evaluate the effect on the 24-hour mean dissolved-oxygen concentrations at selected sites for August 24, 1996, as simulated during the model calibration period of August 23 27, 1996. The first scenario included three loading conditions of the major effluent discharges along the main stem of the Catawba River (1) current load (as sampled in August 1996); (2) no load (all point-source loads were removed from the main stem of the Catawba River; loads from the main tributaries were not removed); and (3

  10. Impact Of Melter Internal Design On Off-Gas Flammability

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A. S.; Lee, S. Y.

    2012-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) identify the more dominant design parameters that can serve as the quantitative measure of how prototypic a given melter is, (2) run the existing DWPF models to simulate the data collected using both DWPF and non-DWPF melter configurations, (3) confirm the validity of the selected design parameters by determining if the agreement between the model predictions and data is reasonably good in light of the design and operating conditions employed in each data set, and (4) run Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to gain new insights into how fluid mixing is affected by the configuration of melter internals and to further apply the new insights to explaining, for example, why the agreement is not good.

  11. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  12. Molecular Simulation of Copper Complexation by a Model of Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, A. G.; Sposito, G.

    2008-12-01

    The coadsorption of cations and organic matter to mineral surfaces has been proposed as a mechanism to stabilize soil organic carbon and explain enhanced cation adsorption in soils. Spectroscopic investigations of coadsorption in copper (Cu)-organic ligand-mineral systems have provided conclusive evidence that ternary surface complexes do occur in instances where the simple organic ligand possesses a minimal number of homogeneous binding sites. Although the results of many experimental and spectroscopic investigations of ternary systems with dissolved organic matter (DOM) suggest that ternary surface complexes may be present, unambiguous conclusions cannot be drawn due to the nature of DOM and the heterogeneity of DOM binding sites. Molecular simulations of ternary surface complexes are powerful tools that can be used in the interpretation of spectroscopic data from these experimental systems. Molecular simulations of Cu-DOM coadsorption at mineral surfaces require a model of Cu-DOM that adequately reproduces the physical-chemical behavior of natural Cu-DOM. The Cu-saturated Schulten DOM molecule, whose charge from deprotonated carboxyl groups was balanced by Cu2+ ions, was modeled using the COMPASS forcefield and energy minimization and molecular dynamics algorithms. Compared to previous simulations of Na- and Ca-saturated Schulten DOM, the Cu-DOM was more compact and spherical, as demonstrated by the decreases in the surface area, surface area: volume ratio, porosity, and radius of gyration and by an increase in the volume. The Cu-DOM complex is more polar than Ca-DOM and less polar than Na-DOM, as indicated by the dipole moment and extent of hydrogen bonding. The Cu2+ ion coordination environment contains an average of four oxygen atoms at 2.04 Å from the metal center. These first shell atoms are primarily water and carboxylate oxygen, although oxygen atoms from carbonyl, phenolic, and esters functionalities as well as nitrogen groups are also present. The DOM

  13. Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

    2014-01-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion

  14. Cationic complexation with dissolved organic matter: Insights from molecular dynamics computer simulations and NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinichev, A. G.; Xu, X.; Kirkpatrick, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in soil and surface water and plays many important geochemical and environmental roles acting as a proton donor/acceptor and pH buffer and interacting with metal ions, minerals and organic species to form water-soluble and water-insoluble complexes of widely differing chemical and biological stabilities. There are strong correlations among the concentration of DOM and the speciation, solubility and toxicity of many trace metals in soil and water due to metal-DOM interaction. DOM can also significantly negatively affect the performance of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes used industrially for water purification and desalination, being one of the major causes of a so-called `membrane bio- fouling'. The molecular scale mechanisms and dynamics of the DOM interactions with metals and membranes are, however, quite poorly understood. Methods of computational molecular modeling, combined with element- specific nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, can serve as highly effective tools to probe and quantify on a fundamental molecular level the DOM interactions with metal cations in aqueous solutions, and to develop predictive models of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the metal-DOM complexation in the environment. This paper presents the results of molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations of the interaction of DOM with dissolved Na+, Cs+, Mg2+, and Ca2+. Na+ forms only very weak outer-sphere complexes with DOM. These results and the results of other recent molecular modeling efforts (e.g., Sutton et al., Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 24, 1902-1911, 2005), clearly indicate that both the structural and dynamic aspects of the cation-DOM complexation follow a simple trend in terms of the charge/size ratio for the ions. Due to the competition between ion hydration in bulk aqueous solution and adsorption of these cations by the negatively charged DOM functional groups (primarily carboxylate

  15. Simulating Streamflow and Dissolved Organic Matter Export from small Forested Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, N.; Wilson, H.; Saiers, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Coupling the rainfall-runoff process and solute transport in catchment models is important for understanding the dynamics of water-quality-relevant constituents in a watershed. To simulate the hydrologic and biogeochemical processes in a parametrically parsimonious way remains challenging. The purpose of this study is to quantify the export of water and dissolved organic matter (DOM) from a forested catchment by developing and testing a coupled model for rainfall-runoff and soil-water flushing of DOM. Natural DOM plays an important role in terrestrial and aquatic systems by affecting nutrient cycling, contaminant mobility and toxicity, and drinking water quality. Stream-water discharge and DOM concentrations were measured in a first-order stream in Harvard Forest, Massachusetts. These measurements show that stream water DOM concentrations are greatest during hydrologic events induced by rainfall or snowmelt and decline to low, steady levels during periods of baseflow. Comparison of the stream-discharge data to calculations of a simple rainfall-runoff model reveals a hysteretic relationship between stream-flow rates and the storage of water within the catchment. A modified version of the rainfall-runoff model that accounts for hysteresis in the storage-discharge relationship in a parametrically simple way is capable of describing much, but not all, of the variation in the time-series data on stream discharge. Our ongoing research is aimed at linking the new rainfall-runoff formulation with coupled equations that predict soil-flushing and stream-water concentrations of DOM as functions of the temporal change in catchment water storage. This model will provide a predictive tool for examining how changes in climatic variables would affect the runoff generation and DOM fluxes from terrestrial landscape.

  16. Simulation of oil bioremediation in a tidally influenced beach: Spatiotemporal evolution of nutrient and dissolved oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Pan, Zhong; Boufadel, Michel C.; Ozgokmen, Tamay; Lee, Kenneth; Zhao, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Numerical experiments of oil bioremediation of tidally influenced beach were simulated using the model BIOMARUN. Nutrient and dissolved oxygen were assumed present in a solution applied on the exposed beach face, and the concentration of these amendments was tracked throughout the beach for up to 6 months. It was found that, in comparison to natural attenuation, bioremediation increased the removal efficiency by 76% and 65% for alkanes and aromatics, respectively. Increasing the nutrient concentration in the applied solution did not always enhance biodegradation as oxygen became limiting even when the beach was originally oxygen-rich. Therefore, replenishment of oxygen to oil-contaminated zone was also essential. Stimulation of oil biodegradation was more evident in the upper and midintertidal zone of the beach, and less in the lower intertidal zone. This was due to reduced nutrient and oxygen replenishment, as very little of the amendment solution reached that zone. It was found that under continual application, most of the oil biodegraded within 2 months, while it persisted for 6 months under natural conditions. While the difference in duration suggests minimal long-term effects, there are situations where the beach would need to be cleaned for major ecological functions, such as temporary nesting or feeding for migratory birds. Biochemical retention time map (BRTM) showed that the duration of solution application was dependent upon the stimulated oil biodegradation rate. By contrast, the application rate of the amendment solution was dependent upon the subsurface extent of the oil-contaminated zone. Delivery of nutrient and oxygen into coastal beach involved complex interaction among amendment solution, groundwater, and seawater. Therefore, approaches that ignore the hydrodynamics due to tide are unlikely to provide the optimal solutions for shoreline bioremediation.

  17. Removal of I, Rn, Xe and Kr from off gas streams using PTFE membranes

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, Darryl D.; Lewis, Leroy C.

    1990-01-01

    A process for removing I, R, Xe and Kr which involves the passage of the off gas stream through a tube-in-shell assembly, whereby the tubing is a PTFE membrane which permits the selective passages of the gases for removing and isolating the gases.

  18. Removal of I, Rn, Xe and Kr from off gas streams using PTFE membranes

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, Darryl D.; Lewis, Leroy C.

    1990-08-07

    A process for removing I, R, Xe and Kr which involves the passage of the off gas stream through a tube-in-shell assembly, whereby the tubing is a PTFE membrane which permits the selective passages of the gases for removing and isolating the gases.

  19. Particulate Scrubbing Performance of the High Level Caves Off-Gas System

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, G.T.

    2001-08-16

    Performance tests were conducted at the ETF using off-gas from the Small Cylindrical Melter (SCM) -2. The purpose of these tests was to develop data for comparing small and full scale equipment performance. This reports discusses those test results.

  20. Preliminary Results from Electric Arc Furnace Off-Gas Enthalpy Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U; Thekdi, Arvind; Keiser, James R; Storey, John Morse

    2015-01-01

    This article describes electric arc furnace (EAF) off-gas enthalpy models developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate overall heat availability (sensible and chemical enthalpy) and recoverable heat values (steam or power generation potential) for existing EAF operations and to test ORNL s new EAF waste heat recovery (WHR) concepts. ORNL s new EAF WHR concepts are: Regenerative Drop-out Box System and Fluidized Bed System. The two EAF off-gas enthalpy models described in this paper are: 1.Overall Waste Heat Recovery Model that calculates total heat availability in off-gases of existing EAF operations 2.Regenerative Drop-out Box System Model in which hot EAF off-gases alternately pass through one of two refractory heat sinks that store heat and then transfer it to another gaseous medium These models calculate the sensible and chemical enthalpy of EAF off-gases based on the off-gas chemical composition, temperature, and mass flow rate during tap to tap time, and variations in those parameters in terms of actual values over time. The models provide heat transfer analysis for the aforementioned concepts to confirm the overall system and major component sizing (preliminary) to assess the practicality of the systems. Real-time EAF off-gas composition (e.g., CO, CO2, H2, and H2O), volume flow, and temperature data from one EAF operation was used to test the validity and accuracy of the modeling work. The EAF off-gas data was used to calculate the sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases to generate steam and power. The article provides detailed results from the modeling work that are important to the success of ORNL s EAF WHR project. The EAF WHR project aims to develop and test new concepts and materials that allow cost-effective recovery of sensible and chemical heat from high-temperature gases discharged from EAFs.

  1. Detailed off-gas measurements for improved modelling of the aeration performance at the WWTP of Eindhoven.

    PubMed

    Amerlinck, Y; Bellandi, G; Amaral, A; Weijers, S; Nopens, I

    2016-01-01

    At wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), the aerobic conversion processes in the bioreactor are driven by the presence of dissolved oxygen (DO). Within these conversion processes, the oxygen transfer is a rate limiting step as well as being the largest energy consumer. Despite this high importance, WWTP models often lack detail on the aeration part. An extensive measurement campaign with off-gas tests was performed at the WWTP of Eindhoven to provide more information on the performance and behaviour of the aeration system. A high spatial and temporal variability in the oxygen transfer efficiency was observed. Applying this gathered system knowledge in the aeration model resulted in an improved prediction of the DO concentrations. Moreover, an important consequence of this was that ammonium predictions could be improved by resetting the ammonium half-saturation index for autotrophs to its default value. This again proves the importance of balancing sub-models with respect to the need for model calibration as well as model predictive power.

  2. Development of density plumes of dissolved CO2: Comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Karen; Vosper, Hayley; Rochelle, Chris; Noy, Dave; Chadwick, Andy

    2014-05-01

    The long-term trapping of CO2 within deep geological storage reservoirs will be dependent upon CO2-water-rock geochemical reactions. The first, and most important, steps in this process will be dissolution of CO2 into the reservoir porewater and the transport of this dissolved CO2 through the reservoir. As part of the CO2CARE project we have investigated these via laboratory tests using a water-filled porous medium. Key experimental parameters were measured to determine system permeability, so that a high-resolution numerical model could be built in an attempt to reproduce the observed system behaviour. The Hele-Shaw cell comprised two glass sheets 65 cm wide and 36 cm high, separated by a spacing of 1.1 mm, and filled with closely-packed glass beads 0.4-0.6 mm in diameter. The surface of the glass was treated to prevent the formation of a higher permeability zone along this interface. A pH-sensitive dye was added to the pore-filling water to show where it had been acidified due to the presence of CO2. CO2 gas was introduced to a space at the top of the cell, which created a thin, diffusion-controlled boundary layer of CO2-rich water below the CO2-water interface. CO2 dissolution increased water density, resulting in gravitational instabilities and the formation of many small, downward-migrating plumes. Time-lapse photography was used to track the formation and progress of these plumes. As the plumes grew they increased in length relative to their width, and decreased in number over time. They also became more complex with time, splitting and forming several lobes, whose outer edges became more diffuse as they mixed with the CO2-poor water. The onset time of plume development and the horizontal wavelength (spacing) of the descending plumes are diagnostic measures of the system properties, notably permeability. They were analysed from the time-lapse images and expressed as probability density functions based on histograms of the observations. The derived

  3. On The Impact of Borescope Camera Air Purge on DWPF Melter Off-Gas Flammability

    SciTech Connect

    CHOI, ALEXANDER

    2004-07-22

    DWPF Engineering personnel requested that a new minimum backup film cooler air flow rate, which will meet the off-gas safety basis limits for both normal and seismic sludge-only operations, be calculated when the air purge to the borescope cameras is isolated from the melter. Specifically, it was requested that the latest calculations which were used to set the off-gas flammability safety bases for the sludge batch 2 and 3 feeds be revised, while maintaining all other process variables affecting off-gas flammability such as total organic carbon (TOC), feed rate, melter air purges, and vapor space temperature at their current respective maximum or minimum limits. Before attempting to calculate the new minimum backup film cooler air flow, some of the key elements of the combustion model were reviewed, and it was determined that the current minimum backup film cooler air flow of 233 lb/hr is adequate to satisfy the off-gas flammability safety bases for both normal and seismic operations i n the absence of any borescope camera air purge. It is, therefore, concluded that there is no need to revise the reference E-7 calculations. This conclusion is in essence based on the fact that the current minimum backup film cooler air flow was set to satisfy the minimum combustion air requirement under the worst-case operating scenario involving a design basis earthquake during which all the air purges not only to the borescope cameras but to the seal pot are presumed to be lost due to pipe ruptures. The minimum combustion air purge is currently set at 150 per cent of the stoichiometric air flow required to combust 3 times the normal flow of flammable gases. The DWPF control strategy has been that 100 per cent of the required minimum combustion air is to be provided by the controlled air purge through the backup film cooler alone.

  4. The integrated melter off-gas treatment systems at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, R.F.

    1991-12-01

    The West Valley Demonstration project was established by an act of Congress in 1980 to solidify the high level radioactive liquid wastes produced from operation of the Western New York Nuclear Services Center from 1966 to 1972. The waste will be solidified as borosilicate glass. This report describes the functions, the controlling design criteria, and the resulting design of the melter off-gas treatment systems.

  5. Advanced Off-Gas Control System Design For Radioactive And Mixed Waste Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg

    2005-09-01

    Treatment of radioactive and mixed wastes is often required to destroy or immobilize hazardous constituents, reduce waste volume, and convert the waste to a form suitable for final disposal. These kinds of treatments usually evolve off-gas. Air emission regulations have become increasingly stringent in recent years. Mixed waste thermal treatment in the United States is now generally regulated under the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. These standards impose unprecedented requirements for operation, monitoring and control, and emissions control. Off-gas control technologies and system designs that were satisfactorily proven in mixed waste operation prior to the implementation of new regulatory standards are in some cases no longer suitable in new mixed waste treatment system designs. Some mixed waste treatment facilities have been shut down rather than have excessively restrictive feed rate limits or facility upgrades to comply with the new standards. New mixed waste treatment facilities in the U. S. are being designed to operate in compliance with the HWC MACT standards. Activities have been underway for the past 10 years at the INL and elsewhere to identify, develop, demonstrate, and design technologies for enabling HWC MACT compliance for mixed waste treatment facilities. Some specific off-gas control technologies and system designs have been identified and tested to show that even the stringent HWC MACT standards can be met, while minimizing treatment facility size and cost.

  6. OFF-GAS MERCURY CONTROL USING SULFUR-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON – TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg

    2007-05-01

    Several laboratory and pilot-scale tests since the year 2000 have included demonstrations of off-gas mercury control using fixed bed, sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. These demonstrations have included operation of carbon beds with gas streams containing a wide range of mercury and other gas species concentrations representing off-gas from several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed waste treatment processes including electrical resistance heated (joule-heated) glass melters, fluidized bed calciners, and fluidized bed steam reformers. Surrogates of various DOE mixed waste streams (or surrogates of offgas from DOE mixed waste streams) including INL “sodium bearing waste” (SBW), liquid “low activity waste” (LAW) from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and liquid waste from Savannah River National Laboratory (“Tank 48H waste”) have been tested. Test results demonstrate mercury control efficiencies up to 99.999%, high enough to comply with the Hazardous Waste (HWC) Combustor Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards even when the uncontrolled off-gas mercury concentrations exceed 400,000 ug/dscm (at 7% O2), and confirm carbon bed design parameters for such high efficiencies. Results of several different pilot-scale and engineering-scale test programs performed over several years are presented and compared.

  7. Selective Trapping of Volatile Fission Products with an Off-Gas Treatment System

    SciTech Connect

    B.R. Westphal; J.J. Park; J.M. Shin; G.I. Park; K.J. Bateman; D.L. Wahlquist

    2008-07-01

    A head-end processing step, termed DEOX for its emphasis on decladding via oxidation, is being developed for the treatment of spent oxide fuel by pyroprocessing techniques. The head-end step employs high temperatures to oxidize UO2 to U3O8 resulting in the separation of fuel from cladding and the removal of volatile fission products. Development of the head-end step is being performed in collaboration with the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) through an International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Following the initial experimentation for the removal of volatile fission products, an off-gas treatment system was designed in conjunction with KAERI to collect specific fission gases. The primary volatile species targeted for trapping were iodine, technetium, and cesium. Each species is intended to be collected in distinct zones of the off-gas system and within those zones, on individual filters. Separation of the volatile off-gases is achieved thermally as well as chemically given the composition of the filter media. A description of the filter media and a basis for its selection will be given along with the collection mechanisms and design considerations. In addition, results from testing with the off-gas treatment system will be presented.

  8. Theory to boil-off gas cooled shields for cryogenic storage vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, A.

    2004-03-01

    An intermediate refrigeration with boil-off gas cooled shields using the boil-off gas stream is an alternative method to the conventional intermediate refrigeration with a cryogenic liquid. By using an analytical calculation method relations are derived, which enable complete predictions about the effectiveness of an intermediate refrigeration with boil-off gas cooled shields as a function of the number of shields for the different stored cryogenic liquids. For this theoretical derivation however, the restrictive assumption must be made that the thermal conductivity of the used insulation material has a constant value between the considered temperature boundaries. For purposes of a more exact calculation a numerical method is therefore suggested, which takes into consideration that the thermal conductivity is temperature-dependent. For a liquid hydrogen storage vessel with a perlite-vacuum insulation e.g., the effectiveness of one shield and its equilibrium temperature are given as a function of the position of the shield in the insulation space.

  9. Ambient conditions and fate and transport simulations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate in Beaver Lake, Arkansas, 2006--10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, W. Reed

    2013-01-01

    Beaver Lake is a large, deep-storage reservoir located in the upper White River Basin in northwestern Arkansas, and was completed in 1963 for the purposes of flood control, hydroelectric power, and water supply. Beaver Lake is affected by point and nonpoint sources of minerals, nutrients, and sediments. The City of Fayetteville discharges about half of its sewage effluent into the White River immediately upstream from the backwater of the reservoir. The City of West Fork discharges its sewage effluent into the West Fork of the White River, and the City of Huntsville discharges its sewage effluent into a tributary of War Eagle Creek. A study was conducted to describe the ambient conditions and fate and transport of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate concentrations in Beaver Lake. Dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate are components of wastewater discharged into Beaver Lake and a major concern of the drinking water utilities that use Beaver Lake as their source. A two-dimensional model of hydrodynamics and water quality was calibrated to include simulations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate for the period January 2006 through December 2010. Estimated daily dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate loads were increased in the White River and War Eagle Creek tributaries, individually and the two tributaries together, by 1.2, 1.5, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0 times the baseline conditions to examine fate and transport of these constituents through time at seven locations (segments) in the reservoir, from upstream to downstream in Beaver Lake. Fifteen dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate fate and transport scenarios were compared to the baseline simulation at each of the seven downstream locations in the reservoir, both 2 meters (m) below the surface and 2 m above the bottom. Concentrations were greater in the reservoir at model segments closer to where the tributaries entered the reservoir. Concentrations resulting from the increase in loading became more diluted

  10. Characterization of water quality and simulation of temperature, nutrients, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen in the Wateree River, South Carolina, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    In May 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey entered into a cooperative agreement with the Kershaw County Water and Sewer Authority to characterize and simulate the water quality in the Wateree River, South Carolina. Longitudinal profiling of dissolved-oxygen concentrations during the spring and summer of 1996 revealed dissolved-oxygen minimums occurring upstream from the point-source discharges. The mean dissolved-oxygen decrease upstream from the effluent discharges was 2.0 milligrams per liter, and the decrease downstream from the effluent discharges was 0.2 milligram per liter. Several theories were investigated to obtain an improved understanding of the dissolved-oxygen dynamics in the upper Wateree River. Data suggest that the dissolved-oxygen concentration decrease is associated with elevated levels of oxygen-consuming nutrients and metals that are flowing into the Wateree River from Lake Wateree. Analysis of long-term streamflow and water-quality data collected at two U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations suggests that no strong correlation exists between streamflow and dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Wateree River. However, a strong negative correlation does exist between dissolved-oxygen concentrations and water temperature. Analysis of data from six South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control monitoring stations for 1980.95 revealed decreasing trends in ammonia nitrogen at all stations where data were available and decreasing trends in 5-day biochemical oxygen demand at three river stations. The influence of various hydrologic and point-source loading conditions on dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Wateree River were determined by using results from water-quality simulations by the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model. The effects of five tributaries and four point-source discharges were included in the model. Data collected during two synoptic water-quality samplings on June 23.25 and August 11.13, 1997, were used to calibrate

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS QUENCHER AND STEAM ATOMIZED SCRUBBER DEPOSIT SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, K; Ned Bibler, N

    2007-06-06

    This report summarizes the results from the characterization of deposits from the inlets of the primary off-gas Quencher and Steam Atomized Scrubber (SAS) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), as requested by a technical assistance request. DWPF requested elemental analysis and compound identification to help determine the potential causes for the substance formation. This information will be fed into Savannah River National Laboratory modeling programs to determine if there is a way to decrease the formation of the deposits. The general approach to the characterization of these samples included x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis. The following conclusions are drawn from the analytical results found in this report: (1) The deposits are not high level waste glass from the DWPF melt pool based on comparison of the compositions of deposits to the composition of a sample of glass taken from the pour stream of the melter during processing of Sludge Batch 3. (2) Chemical composition results suggest that the deposits are probably a combination of sludge and frit particles entrained in the off-gas. (3) Gamma emitters, such as Co-60, Cs-137, Eu-154, Am-241, and Am-243 were detected in both the Quencher and SAS samples with Cs-137 having the highest concentration of the gamma emitters. (4) No evidence existed for accumulation of fissile material (U-233, U-235, and Pu-239) relative to Fe in either deposit. (5) XRD results indicated both samples were primarily amorphorous and contained some crystals of the iron oxides, hematite and magnetite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe(Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4})), along with sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}). The other main crystalline compound in the SAS deposit was mercurous chloride. The main crystalline compound in the Quencher deposit was a uranium oxide compound. These are all sludge components. (6) SEM analysis of the Quencher deposit revealed crystalline uranium compounds within the sample

  12. Critique of Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant off-gas sampling requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Goles, R.W.

    1996-03-01

    Off-gas sampling and monitoring activities needed to support operations safety, process control, waste form qualification, and environmental protection requirements of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) have been evaluated. The locations of necessary sampling sites have been identified on the basis of plant requirements, and the applicability of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) reference sampling equipment to these HWVP requirements has been assessed for all sampling sites. Equipment deficiencies, if present, have been described and the bases for modifications and/or alternative approaches have been developed.

  13. FY-12 INL KR CAPTURE ACTIVITIES SUPPORTING THE OFF-GAS SIGMA TEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D Law

    2012-08-01

    Tasks performed this year by INL Kr capture off-gas team members can be segregated into three separate task sub-sections which include: 1) The development and testing of a new engineered form sorbent, 2) An initial NDA gamma scan effort performed on the drum containing the Legacy Kr-85 sample materials, and 3) Collaborative research efforts with PNNL involving the testing of the Ni-DOBDC MOF and an initial attempt to make powdered chalcogel material into an engineered form using our binding process. This document describes the routes to success for the three task sub-sections.

  14. [Comparative evaluation of Russian and foreign methods of off-gas testing of polymer materials].

    PubMed

    Pashin, S S; Ushakov, V F; Solomin, G I; Marchenko, L V

    1998-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of Russian and foreign (NASA/USA) off-gas tests for polymers proposed for use onboard the NASA space vehicles was fulfilled with a polymer hardware model. Qualitative and quantitative composition of gases emitted in the model was determined with the gas-chromatographic technique. Data of the evaluation allow the suggestion that informational capacity of the NASA technique is insufficient for making conclusions on suitability of a polymer or a device for long-operating manned vehicles. Discussed are the options for development of a short-cut test method that might combine desirable characteristics of the methods practiced in two countries.

  15. Remediation of MTBE from drinking water: air stripping followed by off-gas adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Balaji; Sorial, George A; Speth, Thomas F; Clark, Patrick; Zaffiro, Alan; Patterson, Craig; Hand, David W

    2004-05-01

    The widespread use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as an oxygenate in gasoline has resulted in the contamination of a large number of ground and surface water sources. Even though air stripping has been proven to be an effective treatment technology for MTBE removal, off-gas treatment often is required in conjunction with it. This study evaluated the combined treatment technologies of air stripping followed by off-gas adsorption on a pilot scale for the treatment of MTBE-contaminated water. The effect of air/water ratios on the treatment efficiency was studied, and the mass transfer coefficient was determined. Air/water ratios of 105:1, 151:1, 177:1, 190:1, 202:1, and 206:1 were used, and a treatment efficiency of >99% was achieved for all the runs conducted. The depth of packing required to achieve maximum treatment efficiency decreased with increasing air/water ratio. Relative humidity (RH) impacts on the MTBE adsorption capacity of a granular activated carbon (GAC) and carbonaceous resin were determined from pilot plant studies. Breakthrough profiles obtained from the pilot plant studies conducted at 20, 30, and 50% RH indicated that GAC has a higher adsorptive capacity than resin. The adsorptive capacity of GAC decreased with increasing RH, whereas RH did not impact the resin adsorptive capacity.

  16. Selection among aqueous and off-gas treatment technologies for synthetic organic chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, B.I.; Herbeck, C.J.; Meurer, C.P.; Lawler, D.F.; Speitel, G.E. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    A methodology for selecting the least-cost treatment technology for waters contaminated by organic wastes was developed using performance and cost models. This methodology simplifies the selection of the least expensive treatment process(es) for a given set of conditions. Two aqueous-phase treatment options were considered: air stripping and liquid-phase adsorption (granular activated carbon). When the off-gases from air stripping must be treated, four off-gas treatment options were considered: gas-phase adsorption (with both on- and off-site regeneration of the granular activated carbon), thermal incineration, and catalytic oxidation. Methodologies were developed for rapidly selecting the least-cost off-gas treatment option [for volatile organic compound (VOC) sources such as an air stripping tower], for selecting the least-cost overall (liquid and gas phase treatment) system, and for selecting the least-cost overall system for a multicomponent mixture. The comparison methodology is based on physical parameters of the target chemical: Henry`s constant and the solute distribution parameter. The results are a set of diagrams and heuristics for rapid identification of cases for which one treatment option is significantly less expensive than the other.

  17. Literature review: Assessment of DWPF melter and melter off-gas system lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.

    2015-07-30

    A glass melter for use in processing radioactive waste is a challenging environment for the materials of construction (MOC) resulting from a combination of high temperatures, chemical attack, and erosion/corrosion; therefore, highly engineered materials must be selected for this application. The focus of this report is to review the testing and evaluations used in the selection of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), glass contact MOC specifically the Monofrax® K-3 refractory and Inconel® 690 alloy. The degradation or corrosion mechanisms of these materials during pilot scale testing and in-service operation were analyzed over a range of oxidizing and reducing flowsheets; however, DWPF has primarily processed a reducing flowsheet (i.e., Fe2+/ΣFe of 0.09 to 0.33) since the start of radioactive operations. This report also discusses the materials selection for the DWPF off-gas system and the corrosion evaluation of these materials during pilot scale testing and non-radioactive operations of DWPF Melter #1. Inspection of the off-gas components has not been performed during radioactive operations with the exception of maintenance because of plugging.

  18. Literature review: Assessment of DWPF melter and melter off-gas system lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M.

    2015-07-30

    A glass melter for use in processing radioactive waste is a challenging environment for the materials of construction (MOC) resulting from a combination of high temperatures, chemical attack, and erosion/corrosion; therefore, highly engineered materials must be selected for this application. The focus of this report is to review the testing and evaluations used in the selection of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), glass contact MOC specifically the Monofrax® K-3 refractory and Inconel® 690 alloy. The degradation or corrosion mechanisms of these materials during pilot scale testing and in-service operation were analyzed over a range of oxidizing and reducing flowsheets; however, DWPF has primarily processed a reducing flowsheet (i.e., Fe2+/ΣFe of 0.09 to 0.33) since the start of radioactive operations. This report also discusses the materials selection for the DWPF off-gas system and the corrosion evaluation of these materials during pilot scale testing and non-radioactive operations of DWPF Melter #1. Inspection of the off-gas components has not been performed during radioactive operations with the exception of maintenance because of plugging.

  19. Method of measurement of VOCs in the off-gas and wastewater of wastewater treatment plants

    SciTech Connect

    Min Wang; Keener, T.C.; Orton, T.L.; Zhu, H.; Bishop, P.; Pekonen, S.; Siddiqui, K.

    1997-12-31

    VOCs need to be controlled according to Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), so an accurate estimation of the total VOC emissions must be attained. This paper reports on a study where EPA method 624 was revised so that this method could be used for VOC analysis both in the water and off-gas of wastewater treatment plants. The revised method uses the same approach and equipment as water and soil analyses, thereby providing a great time and cost advantage for anyone needing to perform this type of analysis. Without using a cryogenic preconcentration step, gas samples from Tedlar bags are easily analyzed to concentrations of approximately 20 ppb using scan mode in a GC-MS unit. For the wastewater, scan mode was still used for the identification, but Selected Ion Monitoring (SIM) mode was used for quantitative analysis because of lower VOC concentration in the water. The results show that this method`s detection limit (MDL) was lowered 2--3 orders of magnitude when compared with scan mode. The modified method has been successfully applied to the identification and quantitative analysis of wastewater and off-gas VOCs from a publicly owned treatment works (POTW) aeration basin (120 MGD).

  20. Respiratory response to formaldehyde and off-gas of urea formaldehyde foam insulation.

    PubMed Central

    Day, J H; Lees, R E; Clark, R H; Pattee, P L

    1984-01-01

    In 18 subjects, 9 of whom had previously complained of various nonrespiratory adverse effects from the urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) in their homes, pulmonary function was assessed before and after exposure in a laboratory. On separate occasions formaldehyde, 1 part per million (ppm), and UFFI off-gas yielding a formaldehyde concentration of 1.2 ppm, were delivered to each subject in an environmental chamber for 90 minutes and a fume hood for 30 minutes respectively. None of the measures of pulmonary function used (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second or maximal midexpiratory flow rate) showed any clinically or statistically significant response to the exposure either immediately after or 8 hours after its beginning. There were no statistically significant differences between the responses of the group that had previously complained of adverse effects and of the group that had not. There was no evidence that either formaldehyde or UFFI off-gas operates as a lower airway allergen or important bronchospastic irritant in this heterogeneous population. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6388780

  1. Assessment of the impact of TOA partitioning on DWPF off-gas flammability

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, W. E.

    2013-06-01

    An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of increasing the amount of TOA in the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon of the current solvent limit (150 ppm) in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would be about 7% higher and the nonvolatile hydrogen would be 2% higher than the actual current solvent (126 ppm) with an addition of up to 3 ppm of TOA when the concentration of Isopar L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm and the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle. Therefore, the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 3 ppm of TOA in the effluent based on these assumptions. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

  2. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM - PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2009-03-25

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently evaluating an alternative Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet to increase throughput. It includes removal of the steam-stripping step, which would significantly reduce the CPC processing time and lessen the sampling needs. However, its downside would be to send 100% of the mercury that come in with the sludge straight to the melter. For example, the new mercury content in the Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) melter feed is projected to be 25 times higher than that in the SB4 with nominal steam stripping of mercury. This task was initiated to study the impact of the worst-case scenario of zero-mercury-removal in the CPC on the DWPF melter off-gas system. It is stressed that this study is intended to be scoping in nature, so the results presented in this report are preliminary. In order to study the impact of elevated mercury levels in the feed, it is necessary to be able to predict how mercury would speciate in the melter exhaust under varying melter operating conditions. A homogeneous gas-phase oxidation model of mercury by chloride was developed to do just that. The model contains two critical parameters pertaining to the partitioning of chloride among HCl, Cl, Cl{sub 2}, and chloride salts in the melter vapor space. The values for these parameters were determined at two different melter vapor space temperatures by matching the calculated molar ratio of HgCl (or Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) to HgCl{sub 2} with those measured during the Experimental-Scale Ceramic Melter (ESCM) tests run at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The calibrated model was then applied to the SB5 simulant used in the earlier flowsheet study with an assumed mercury stripping efficiency of zero; the molar ratio of Cl-to-Hg in the resulting melter feed was only 0.4, compared to 12 for the ESCM feeds. The results of the model run at the indicated melter vapor space temperature of 650 C (TI4085D) showed that due to excessive shortage of

  3. Analysis and numerical simulation of natural and human-caused low dissolved oxygen in the Minjiang River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Pang, Yong; Shi, Chengchun; Wang, Yishu; Xu, Lei; Pan, Hongche; Xie, Rongrong

    2016-01-01

    The Minjiang River, a typical tidal channel in Southeast China, plays an important role in the supply of drinking water, flood control and drought relief, farming and navigation, as well as shipping and other functions. Dissolved oxygen (DO), as a basic living condition for aquatic biota, has been deteriorating in the Minjiang River in recent years. In order to understand how the spatial distribution of DO responds to river discharge, nutrient loading and water temperature, a three-dimensional Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code model was used to simulate water age and the distribution of DO in the Minjiang River. The model presented in this paper was used for water resource and water quality simulations under various physical, chemical, and biological scenarios. Sensitivity simulation results indicated that the three factors had a significant impact on the spatial distribution variation of DO in the Minjiang River. Increased river discharge or split ratio of the North Channel resulted in decreased water age and increased DO. Increased nutrient loading and water temperature caused lower DO. In order to protect coastal environments in the Minjiang River, river discharge should be increased and pollutants of local cities should be reduced during the high temperature and drought period.

  4. Analysis and numerical simulation of natural and human-caused low dissolved oxygen in the Minjiang River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Pang, Yong; Shi, Chengchun; Wang, Yishu; Xu, Lei; Pan, Hongche; Xie, Rongrong

    2016-01-01

    The Minjiang River, a typical tidal channel in Southeast China, plays an important role in the supply of drinking water, flood control and drought relief, farming and navigation, as well as shipping and other functions. Dissolved oxygen (DO), as a basic living condition for aquatic biota, has been deteriorating in the Minjiang River in recent years. In order to understand how the spatial distribution of DO responds to river discharge, nutrient loading and water temperature, a three-dimensional Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code model was used to simulate water age and the distribution of DO in the Minjiang River. The model presented in this paper was used for water resource and water quality simulations under various physical, chemical, and biological scenarios. Sensitivity simulation results indicated that the three factors had a significant impact on the spatial distribution variation of DO in the Minjiang River. Increased river discharge or split ratio of the North Channel resulted in decreased water age and increased DO. Increased nutrient loading and water temperature caused lower DO. In order to protect coastal environments in the Minjiang River, river discharge should be increased and pollutants of local cities should be reduced during the high temperature and drought period. PMID:27191570

  5. Study on Indirect Measuring Technology of EAF Steelmaking Decarburization Rate by Off-gas Analysis Technique in Hot State Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kai; Liu, Wenjuan; Zhu, Rong

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, measurement method of EAF Steelmaking decarburization rate is studied. Because of the fuel gas blown and air mixed, the composition of hot temperature off-gas is measurand unreally, and the flow rate is unknown too, the direct measurement of EAF decarburization rate by furnace gas analysis is unrealized. Firstly, the off-gas generation process is discussed. After that, dynamic concentration of CO2, CO, and O2 in off-gas and EAF oxygen supply rate are monitored in real time. Finally, the concentration and volume flow rate of off-gas are obtained to measure the EAF decarburization rate indirectly. The results of the hot state experiments show that the decarburization rate in oxidization step can reach up to about 0.53 mol/s, and the forecasting carbon concentration is 1.14% corresponding to the average carbon concentration (1.43%) in finial metal samples. The measurement of decarburization rate by off-gas analysis technique can be reasonable in EAF production process.

  6. Recovery Act: Molecular Simulation of Dissolved Inorganic Carbons for Underground Brine CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, William

    2012-11-30

    To further our understanding and develop the method for measuring the DICs under geological sequestration conditions, we studied the infrared spectra of DICs under high pressure and temperature conditions. First principles simulations of DICs in brine conditions were performed using a highly optimized ReaxFF-DIC forcefield. The thermodynamics stability of each species were determined using the 2PT method, and shown to be consistent with the Reax simulations. More importantly, we have presented the IR spectra of DIC in real brine conditions as a function of temperature and pressure. At near earth conditions, we find a breaking of the O-C-O bending modes into asymmetric and symmetric modes, separated by 100cm{sup -1} at 400K and 5 GPa. These results can now be used to calibrate FTIR laser measurements.

  7. Dissolved gas - the hidden saboteur

    SciTech Connect

    Magorien, V.G.

    1993-12-31

    Almost all hydraulic power components, to properly perform their tasks, rely on one basic, physical property, i.e., the incompressibility of the working fluid. Unfortunately, a frequently overlooked fluid property which frustrates this requirement is its ability to absorb, i.e., dissolve, store and give off gas. The gas is, most often but not always, air. This property is a complex one because it is a function not only of the fluid`s chemical make-up but temperature, pressure, exposed area, depth and time. In its relationshiop to aircraft landing-gear, where energy is absorbed hydraulically, this multi-faceted fluid property can be detrimental in two ways: dynamically, i.e., loss of energy absorption ability and statically, i.e., improper aircraft attitude on the ground. The pupose of this paper is to bring an awareness to this property by presenting: (1) examples of these manifestations with some empirical and practical solutions to them, (2) illustrations of this normally `hidden saboteur` at work, (3) Henry`s Dissolved Gas Law, (4) room-temperature, saturated values of dissolved gas for a number of different working fluids, (5) a description of the instrument used to obtain them, (6) some `missing elements` of the Dissolved Gas Law pertaining to absoption, (7) how static and dynamic conditions effect gas absorption and (8) some recommended solutions to prevent becoming a victim of this `hidden saboteur`

  8. Ground water flow in a desert basin: challenges of simulating transport of dissolved chromium.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Charles B; Neville, Christopher J

    2003-01-01

    A large chromium plume that evolved from chromium releases in a valley near the Mojave River was studied to understand the processes controlling fate and migration of chromium in ground water and used as a tracer to study the dynamics of a basin and range ground water system. The valley that was studied is naturally arid with high evapotranspiration such that essentially no precipitation infiltrates to the water table. The dominant natural hydrogeologic processes are recharge to the ground water system from the Mojave River during the infrequent episodes when there is flow in the river, and ground water flow toward a playa lake where the ground water evaporates. Agricultural pumping in the valley from the mid-1930s to the 1970s significantly altered ground water flow conditions by decreasing water levels in the valley by more than 20 m. This pumping declined significantly as a result of dewatering of the aquifer, and water levels have since recovered modestly. The ground water system was modeled using MODFLOW, and chromium transport was simulated using MT3D. Several innovative modifications were made to these modeling programs to simulate important processes in this ground water system. Modifications to MODFLOW include developing a new well package that estimates pumping rates from irrigation wells at each time step based on available drawdown. MT3D was modified to account for mass trapped above the water table when the water table declines beneath nonirrigated areas and to redistribute mass to the system when water levels rise.

  9. MELTER OFF-GAS FLAMMABILITY ASSESSMENT FOR DWPF ALTERNATE REDUCTANT FLOWSHEET OPTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A.

    2011-07-08

    Glycolic acid and sugar are being considered as potential candidates to substitute for much of the formic acid currently being added to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter feed as a reductant. A series of small-scale melter tests were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) in January 2011 to collect necessary data for the assessment of the impact of these alternate reductants on the melter off-gas flammability. The DM10 melter with a 0.021 m{sup 2} melt surface area was run with three different feeds which were prepared at SRNL based on; (1) the baseline formic/nitric acid flowsheet, (2) glycolic/formic/nitric acid flowsheet, and (3) sugar/formic/nitric acid flowsheet - these feeds will be called the baseline, glycolic, and sugar flowsheet feeds, respectively, hereafter. The actual addition of sugar to the sugar flowsheet feed was made at VSL before it was fed to the melter. For each feed, the DM10 was run under both bubbled (with argon) and non-bubbled conditions at varying melter vapor space temperatures. The goal was to lower its vapor space temperature from nominal 500 C to less than 300 C at 50 C increments and maintain steady state at each temperature at least for one hour, preferentially for two hours, while collecting off-gas data including CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} concentrations. Just a few hours into the first test with the baseline feed, it was discovered that the DM10 vapor space temperature would not readily fall below 350 C simply by ramping up the feed rate as the test plan called for. To overcome this, ambient air was introduced directly into the vapor space through a dilution air damper in addition to the natural air inleakage occurring at the operating melter pressure of -1 inch H{sub 2}O. A detailed description of the DM10 run along with all the data taken is given in the report issued by VSL. The SRNL personnel have analyzed the DM10 data and identified 25 steady state periods lasting from 32 to 92 minutes for all

  10. MODELING THE IMPACT OF ELEVATED MERCURY IN DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY MELTER FEED ON THE MELTER OFF-GAS SYSTEM-PRELIMINARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zamecnik, J.; Choi, A.

    2010-08-18

    chloride, only 6% of the mercury fed is expected to get oxidized, mostly as HgCl, while the remaining mercury would exist either as elemental mercury vapor (90%) or HgO (4%). Noting that the measured chloride level in the SB5 qualification sample was an order of magnitude lower than that used in the SB5 simulant, the degree of chloride shortage will be even greater. As a result, the projected level of HgCl in the actual SB5 melter exhaust will be even lower than 6% of the total mercury fed, while that of elemental mercury is likely to be greater than 90%. The homogeneous oxidation of mercury in the off-gas was deemed to be of primary importance based on the postulation that mercury and other volatile salts form submicron sized aerosols upon condensation and thus remain largely in the gas stream downstream of the quencher where they can deposit in the off-gas lines, Steam-Atomized Scrubbers (SAS), and High-Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME). Formation of these submicron semi-volatile salts in the condensate liquid is considered to be unlikely, so the liquid phase reactions were considered to be less important. However, subsequent oxidation of mercury in the liquid phase in the off-gas system was examined in a simplified model of the off-gas condensate. It was found that the condensate chemistry was consistent with further oxidation of elemental mercury to Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and conversion of HgO to chlorides. The results were consistent with the available experimental data. It should also be noted that the model predictions presented in this report do not include any physically entrained solids, which typically account for much of the off-gas carryover on a mass basis. The high elemental mercury vapor content predicted at the DWPF Quencher inlet means that physically entrained solids could provide the necessary surface onto which elemental mercury vapor could condense, thereby coating the solids as well as the internal surfaces of the off-gas system with mercury. Clearly

  11. Innovative method for increased methane recovery from two-phase anaerobic digestion of food waste through reutilization of acidogenic off-gas in methanogenic reactor.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing Hua; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the performance of a two-phase anaerobic digestion reactor treating food waste with the reutilization of acidogenic off-gas was investigated with the objective to improve the hydrogen availability for the methanogenic reactor. As a comparison a treatment without off-gas reutilization was also set up. Results showed that acidogenic off-gas utilization in the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor increased the methane recovery up to 38.6%. In addition, a 27% increase in the production of cumulative chemical oxygen demand (COD) together with an improved soluble microbial products recovery dominated by butyrate was observed in the acidogenic leach bed reactor (LBR) with off-gas reutilization. Of the increased methane recovery, ∼8% was contributed by the utilization of acidogenic off-gas in UASB. Results indicated that utilization of acidogenic off-gas in methanogenic reactor is a viable technique for improving overall methane recovery.

  12. Simulated climate change impact on summer dissolved organic carbon release from peat and surface vegetation: implications for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Ritson, Jonathan P; Bell, Michael; Graham, Nigel J D; Templeton, Michael R; Brazier, Richard E; Verhoef, Anne; Freeman, Chris; Clark, Joanna M

    2014-12-15

    Uncertainty regarding changes in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) quantity and quality has created interest in managing peatlands for their ecosystem services such as drinking water provision. The evidence base for such interventions is, however, sometimes contradictory. We performed a laboratory climate manipulation using a factorial design on two dominant peatland vegetation types (Calluna vulgaris and Sphagnum Spp.) and a peat soil collected from a drinking water catchment in Exmoor National Park, UK. Temperature and rainfall were set to represent baseline and future conditions under the UKCP09 2080s high emissions scenario for July and August. DOC leachate then underwent standard water treatment of coagulation/flocculation before chlorination. C. vulgaris leached more DOC than Sphagnum Spp. (7.17 versus 3.00 mg g(-1)) with higher specific ultraviolet (SUVA) values and a greater sensitivity to climate, leaching more DOC under simulated future conditions. The peat soil leached less DOC (0.37 mg g(-1)) than the vegetation and was less sensitive to climate. Differences in coagulation removal efficiency between the DOC sources appears to be driven by relative solubilisation of protein-like DOC, observed through the fluorescence peak C/T. Post-coagulation only differences between vegetation types were detected for the regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs), suggesting climate change influence at this scale can be removed via coagulation. Our results suggest current biodiversity restoration programmes to encourage Sphagnum Spp. will result in lower DOC concentrations and SUVA values, particularly with warmer and drier summers.

  13. Comparison of a fuel-driven and steam-driven ejector in solid oxide fuel cell systems with anode off-gas recirculation: Part-load behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelbracht, Maximilian; Peters, Roland; Blum, Ludger; Stolten, Detlef

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates the use of ejectors for recirculating anode off-gas in an SOFC system, focusing on the part-load capability of two different systems. In the first system, recirculation was enabled by a fuel-driven ejector. The part-load threshold of this system was determined by carbon formation and was 77.8% assuming a fuel utilization of 70% and suitable ejector geometry. The second system was based on a steam-driven ejector. The simulation results for this system showed an improved part-load capability of 37.8% as well as a slightly improved electrical efficiency. Here, the minimal part load was determined by the condensation temperature of the condenser used in the system.

  14. Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

  15. Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator (FINS): A particle-based model of juvenile salmonid movement and dissolved gas exposure history in the Columbia River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2002-01-30

    This paper describes a numerical model of juvenile salmonid migration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The model, called the Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator or FINS, employs a discrete, particle-based approach to simulate the migration and history of exposure to dissolved gases of individual fish. FINS is linked to a two-dimensional (vertically-averaged) hydrodynamic simulator that quantifies local water velocity, temperature, and dissolved gas levels as a function of river flow rates and dam operations. Simulated gas exposure histories can be input to biological mortality models to predict the effects of various river configurations on fish injury and mortality due to dissolved gas supersaturation. Therefore, FINS serves as a critical linkage between hydrodynamic models of the river system and models of biological impacts. FINS was parameterized and validated based on observations of individual fish movements collected using radiotelemetry methods during 1997 and 1998. A quasi-inverse approach was used to decouple fish swimming movements from advection with the local water velocity, allowing inference of time series of non-advective displacements of individual fish from the radiotelemetry data. Statistical analyses of these displacements are presented, and confirm that strong temporal correlation of fish swimming behavior persists in some cases over several hours. A correlated random-walk model was employed to simulate the observed migration behavior, and parameters of the model were estimated that lead to close correspondence between predictions and observations.

  16. Simulation of the dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus loads in different land uses in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region--based on the improved export coefficient model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinliang; Shao, Jing'an; Wang, Dan; Ni, Jiupai; Xie, Deti

    2015-11-01

    Nonpoint source pollution is one of the primary causes of eutrophication of water bodies. The concentrations and loads of dissolved pollutants have a direct bearing on the environmental quality of receiving water bodies. Based on the Johnes export coefficient model, a pollutant production coefficient was established by introducing the topographical index and measurements of annual rainfall. A pollutant interception coefficient was constructed by considering the width and slope of present vegetation. These two coefficients were then used as the weighting factors to modify the existing export coefficients of various land uses. A modified export coefficient model was created to estimate the dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus loads in different land uses in the Three Gorges Reservoir Region (TGRR) in 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010. The results show that the new land use export coefficient was established by the modification of the production pollution coefficient and interception pollution coefficient. This modification changed the single numerical structure of the original land use export coefficient and takes into consideration temporal and spatial differentiation features. The modified export coefficient retained the change structure of the original single land use export coefficient, and also demonstrated that the land use export coefficient was not only impacted by the change of land use itself, but was also influenced by other objective conditions, such as the characteristics of the underlying surface, amount of rainfall, and the overall presence of vegetation. In the five analyzed years, the simulation values of the dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus loads in paddy fields increased after applying the modification in calculation. The dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus loads in dry land comprised the largest proportions of the TGRR's totals. After modification, the dry land values showed an initial increase and then a decrease over time, but the increments were

  17. Electrolytic dissolver

    DOEpatents

    Wheelwright, E.J.; Fox, R.D.

    1975-08-26

    This patent related to an electrolytic dissolver wherein dissolution occurs by solution contact including a vessel of electrically insulative material, a fixed first electrode, a movable second electrode, means for insulating the electrodes from the material to be dissolved while permitting a free flow of electrolyte therebetween, means for passing a direct current between the electrodes and means for circulating electrolyte through the dissolver. (auth)

  18. Silica-based waste form for immobilization of iodine from reprocessing plant off-gas streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyáš, Josef; Canfield, Nathan; Sulaiman, Sannoh; Zumhoff, Mac

    2016-08-01

    A high selectivity and sorption capacity for iodine and a feasible consolidation to a durable SiO2-based waste form makes silver-functionalized silica aerogel (Ag0-aerogel) an attractive choice for the removal and sequestration of iodine compounds from the off-gas of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Hot uniaxial pressing of iodine-loaded Ag0-aerogel (20.2 mass% iodine) at 1200 °C for 30 min under 29 MPa pressure provided a partially sintered product with residual open porosity of 16.9% that retained ∼93% of sorbed iodine. Highly iodine-loaded Ag0-aerogel was successfully consolidated by hot isostatic pressing at 1200 °C with a 30-min hold and under 207 MPa. The fully densified waste form had a bulk density of 3.3 × 103 kg/m3 and contained ∼39 mass% iodine. The iodine was retained in the form of nano- and micro-particles of AgI that were uniformly distributed inside and along boundaries of fused silica grains.

  19. Release model for in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Pafford, D.J.; Tung, V.X.

    1992-03-01

    A conceptual model for the vapor and aerosol transport and deposition in the in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas system (OGS) has been developed. This model can be used to predict the emissions from the OGS under normal and off-normal conditions. Results generated by the model can be used to evaluate design and/or procedural modifications, define tests, and predict results. The OGS vapor and aerosol transport and deposition is modeled using the PULSE/MOD-ISV/VER 1.0.0 developmental computer code. Input data requirements for this code include the specific geometries of the OGS components; the composition, rate, and temperature of the vapors and aerosols entering the OGS; and the OGS component surface temperatures or heat fluxes. Currently, not all of these model inputs are available. Therefore, conceptual input parameters are developed. Using this input data, preliminary calculations with the code have been performed. These calculations include a demonstration that the code predicts convergent results, a comparison of predicted results with performance data for one of the OGS components, and a preliminary sensitivity study of the complete model.

  20. Design and cost estimate for the SRL integrated hot off gas facility using selective adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Pence, D T; Kirstein, B E

    1981-07-01

    Based on the results of an engineering-scale demonstration program, a design and cost estimate were performed for a 25-m/sup 3//h (15-ft/sup 3//min) capacity pilot plant demonstration system using selective adsorption technology for installation at the Integrated Hot Off Gas Facility at the Savannah River Plant. The design includes provisions for the destruction of NO/sub x/ and the concentration and removal of radioisotopes of ruthenium, iodine-129, tritiated water vapor, carbon-14 contaminated carbon dioxide, and krypton-85. The nobel gases are separated by the use of selective adsorption on mordenite-type zeolites. The theory of noble gas adsorption on zeolites is essentially the same as that for the adsorption of noble gases on activated charcoals. Considerable detail is provided regarding the application of the theory to adsorbent bed designs and operation. The design is based on a comprehensive material balance and appropriate heat transfer calculations. Details are provided on techniques and procedures used for heating, cooling, and desorbing the adsorbent columns. Analyses are also given regarding component and arrangement selection and includes discussions on alternative arrangements. The estimated equipment costs for the described treatment system is about $1,400,000. The cost estimate includes a detailed equipment list of all the major component items in the design. Related technical issues and estimated system performance are also discussed.

  1. Modelling of dissolved oxygen in the Danube River using artificial neural networks and Monte Carlo Simulation uncertainty analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antanasijević, Davor; Pocajt, Viktor; Perić-Grujić, Aleksandra; Ristić, Mirjana

    2014-11-01

    This paper describes the training, validation, testing and uncertainty analysis of general regression neural network (GRNN) models for the forecasting of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the Danube River. The main objectives of this work were to determine the optimum data normalization and input selection techniques, the determination of the relative importance of uncertainty in different input variables, as well as the uncertainty analysis of model results using the Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) technique. Min-max, median, z-score, sigmoid and tanh were validated as normalization techniques, whilst the variance inflation factor, correlation analysis and genetic algorithm were tested as input selection techniques. As inputs, the GRNN models used 19 water quality variables, measured in the river water each month at 17 different sites over a period of 9 years. The best results were obtained using min-max normalized data and the input selection based on the correlation between DO and dependent variables, which provided the most accurate GRNN model, and in combination the smallest number of inputs: Temperature, pH, HCO3-, SO42-, NO3-N, Hardness, Na, Cl-, Conductivity and Alkalinity. The results show that the correlation coefficient between measured and predicted DO values is 0.85. The inputs with the greatest effect on the GRNN model (arranged in descending order) were T, pH, HCO3-, SO42- and NO3-N. Of all inputs, variability of temperature had the greatest influence on the variability of DO content in river body, with the DO decreasing at a rate similar to the theoretical DO decreasing rate relating to temperature. The uncertainty analysis of the model results demonstrate that the GRNN can effectively forecast the DO content, since the distribution of model results are very similar to the corresponding distribution of real data.

  2. The simulation research of dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus non-point source pollution in Xiao-Jiang watershed of Three Gorges Reservoir area.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Long, Tian-Yu; Li, Chong-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Xiao-jiang, with a basin area of almost 5,276 km(2) and a length of 182.4 km, is located in the center of the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, and is the largest tributary of the central section in Three Gorges Reservoir Area, farmland accounts for a large proportion of Xiao-jiang watershed, and the hilly cropland of purple soil is much of the farmland of the watershed. After the second phase of water storage in the Three Gorges Reservoir, the majority of sub-rivers in the reservoir area experienced eutrophication phenomenon frequently, and non-point source (NPS) pollution has become an important source of pollution in Xiao-jiang Watershed. Because dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus non-point source pollution are related to surface runoff and interflow, using climatic, topographic and land cover data from the internet and research institutes, the Semi-Distributed Land-use Runoff Process (SLURP) hydrological model was introduced to simulate the complete hydrological cycle of the Xiao-jiang Watershed. Based on the SLURP distributed hydrological model, non-point source pollution annual output load models of land use and rural residents were respectively established. Therefore, using GIS technology, considering the losses of dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus in the course of transport, a dissolved non-point source pollution load dynamic model was established by the organic coupling of the SLURP hydrological model and land-use output model. Through the above dynamic model, the annual dissolved non-point source nitrogen and phosphorus pollution output as well as the load in different types were simulated and quantitatively estimated from 2001 to 2008, furthermore, the loads of Xiao-jiang Watershed were calculated and expressed by temporal and spatial distribution in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. The simulation results show that: the temporal changes of dissolved nitrogen and phosphorus load in the watershed are close to the inter-annual changes of rainfall runoff, and the

  3. Distribution and Dynamic Properties of Xenon Dissolved in the Ionic Smectic Phase of [C16mim][NO3]: MD Simulation and Theoretical Model.

    PubMed

    Frezzato, Diego; Saielli, Giacomo

    2016-03-10

    We have investigated the structural and dynamic properties of Xe dissolved in the ionic liquid crystal (ILC) phase of 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Xe is found to be preferentially dissolved within the hydrophobic environment of the alkyl chains rather than in the ionic layers of the smectic phase. The structural parameters and the estimated local diffusion coefficients concerning the short-time motion of Xe are used to parametrize a theoretical model based on the Smoluchowski equation for the macroscopic dynamics across the smectic layers, a feature which cannot be directly obtained from the relatively short MD simulations. This protocol represents an efficient combination of computational and theoretical tools to obtain information on slow processes concerning the permeability and diffusivity of the xenon in smectic ILCs.

  4. Effects of simulated natural and massive resuspension on benthic oxygen, nutrient and dissolved inorganic carbon fluxes in Loch Creran, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almroth-Rosell, Elin; Tengberg, Anders; Andersson, Sara; Apler, Anna; Hall, Per O. J.

    2012-08-01

    The effect of repeated natural resuspension on benthic oxygen consumption and the effect of natural and massive resuspension on oxygen consumption and fluxes of phosphate, silicate, ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were studied at two stations (S1 and S2) in a Scottish sea loch. Station S11 had organically enriched sediment and station S1 had lower organic content in the sediment. The fluxes were measured in situ using the Göteborg benthic lander. Natural resuspension, simulating resuspension events due to strong wind, waves or currents, and massive resuspension, simulating resuspension due to e.g. trawling or dredging, were created inside the incubation chambers by regulating the stirring of the incubated overlying water or by retracting and shaking the incubated sediment. Natural resuspension showed clear effects on the oxygen consumption at station S11, where it increased with an average of 12.8 (standard error (s.e.) 0.17) and 7.7 (s.e. 0.12) mmol m- 2 d- 1 during the first and second incubations, respectively. At station S1 there was no clear effect of natural resuspension on the oxygen consumption. Massive resuspension increased the oxygen consumption on S1 with an average of 608 (standard deviation (sd) 366) mmol m- 2 d- 1 and on S11 with an average of 2396 (sd 2265) mmol m- 2 d- 1. The fluxes of ammonium, phosphate and silicate were affected by the massive resuspension in 50, 14 and 33% of the chambers, respectively, on station S11. However, in the majority of the cases there were no effects on the nutrient and DIC fluxes of massive resuspension. The absolute concentrations of DIC, ammonium and silicate did however instantly increase with an average of 419 (sd 297), 48 (sd 27) and 6.9 (sd 3.7) μM, respectively, at S11 upon massive resuspension. The concentrations of phosphate decreased instantly with an average of 0.2 (sd 0.1) μM. On station S1 there were effects only on the ammonium and silicate concentrations, which increased with 0.8 (sd

  5. Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

    2011-05-01

    Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absoption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

  6. Systematic selection of off-gas treatment at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    McKillip, S.T.; Rehder, T.E.

    1992-05-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), from 1958--1985, effluent waste from the reactor fuel and target rod fabrication area (M-Area) was discharged to a settling basin. In 1981, monitoring wells detected groundwater contamination, specifically trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, in the immediate vicinity of the basin. Under the auspices of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) the M-Area contamination must be addressed by a corrective action program until the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations reach Drinking Water Standards. This was initiated in 1985 with startup of a full-scale pump-and-treat air stripper system. Recently, remediation efforts have focused on vacuum extraction to treat vadose zone contamination not addressed by the original recovery wells, and additional pump-and-treat systems to achieve hydraulic control of the plume. Regulatory requirements allowed for discharge of VOCs to the atmosphere when the original remediation system was installed; however, 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act will eventually require treatment of VOC contaminated air prior to discharge. This has ramifications to systems currently being design, as well as the existing systems. In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments, SRS initiated a study to assess commercially available off-gas treatment technologies. These included carbon adsorption, thermal incineration, catalytic oxidation, absorption, condensation, and UV/peroxide destruction, and xenon flashlamp. Criteria used to evaluate the technologies were the thirty (30) year life cycle cost, permitting considerations, and manpower requirements. The study concluded that catalytic oxidation provided the most desirable combination of these elements.

  7. Systematic selection of off-gas treatment at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    McKillip, S.T.; Rehder, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), from 1958--1985, effluent waste from the reactor fuel and target rod fabrication area (M-Area) was discharged to a settling basin. In 1981, monitoring wells detected groundwater contamination, specifically trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, in the immediate vicinity of the basin. Under the auspices of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) the M-Area contamination must be addressed by a corrective action program until the volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations reach Drinking Water Standards. This was initiated in 1985 with startup of a full-scale pump-and-treat air stripper system. Recently, remediation efforts have focused on vacuum extraction to treat vadose zone contamination not addressed by the original recovery wells, and additional pump-and-treat systems to achieve hydraulic control of the plume. Regulatory requirements allowed for discharge of VOCs to the atmosphere when the original remediation system was installed; however, 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act will eventually require treatment of VOC contaminated air prior to discharge. This has ramifications to systems currently being design, as well as the existing systems. In response to the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments, SRS initiated a study to assess commercially available off-gas treatment technologies. These included carbon adsorption, thermal incineration, catalytic oxidation, absorption, condensation, and UV/peroxide destruction, and xenon flashlamp. Criteria used to evaluate the technologies were the thirty (30) year life cycle cost, permitting considerations, and manpower requirements. The study concluded that catalytic oxidation provided the most desirable combination of these elements.

  8. Modeling of off-gas emissions from wood pellets during marine transportation.

    PubMed

    Pa, Ann; Bi, Xiaotao T

    2010-10-01

    After a fatal accident during the discharge of wood pellets at Helsingborg, emissions from pellets during marine transportation became a concern for the safe handling and storage of wood pellets. In this paper, a two-compartment model has been developed for the first time to predict the concentrations of CO, CO₂, CH₄, and O₂ inside the cargo ship and the time and rate of forced ventilation required before the safe entry into the stairway adjacent to the storage hatch. The hatch and stairway are treated as two perfectly mixed tanks. The gas exchange rate between these two rooms and the gas exchange rate with the atmosphere are fitted to satisfy a measured tracer final concentration of 33 p.p.m.v. in the stairway and an average final hatch to stairway CO, CO₂, and CH₄ concentration ratio of 1.62 based on measurement from five other hatch and stairway systems. The reaction kinetics obtained from a laboratory unit using a different batch of pellets, however, need to be scaled in order to bring the prediction to close agreement with onboard measured emission data at the end of voyage. Using the adjusted kinetic data, the model was able to predict the general trend of data recorded in the first 12.5 days of the voyage. Further validation, however, requires the data recorded over the whole journey. The model was applied to predict the effect of ocean temperature on the off-gas emissions and the buildup of concentrations in the hatch and stairway. For safe entry to the cargo ship, the current model predicted that a minimal ventilation rate of 4.4 hr⁻¹ is required for the stairway's CO concentration to lower to a safe concentration of 25 p.p.m.v. At 4.4 hr⁻¹, 10 min of ventilation time is required for the safe entry into the stairway studied.

  9. Modeling of off-gas emissions from wood pellets during marine transportation.

    PubMed

    Pa, Ann; Bi, Xiaotao T

    2010-10-01

    After a fatal accident during the discharge of wood pellets at Helsingborg, emissions from pellets during marine transportation became a concern for the safe handling and storage of wood pellets. In this paper, a two-compartment model has been developed for the first time to predict the concentrations of CO, CO₂, CH₄, and O₂ inside the cargo ship and the time and rate of forced ventilation required before the safe entry into the stairway adjacent to the storage hatch. The hatch and stairway are treated as two perfectly mixed tanks. The gas exchange rate between these two rooms and the gas exchange rate with the atmosphere are fitted to satisfy a measured tracer final concentration of 33 p.p.m.v. in the stairway and an average final hatch to stairway CO, CO₂, and CH₄ concentration ratio of 1.62 based on measurement from five other hatch and stairway systems. The reaction kinetics obtained from a laboratory unit using a different batch of pellets, however, need to be scaled in order to bring the prediction to close agreement with onboard measured emission data at the end of voyage. Using the adjusted kinetic data, the model was able to predict the general trend of data recorded in the first 12.5 days of the voyage. Further validation, however, requires the data recorded over the whole journey. The model was applied to predict the effect of ocean temperature on the off-gas emissions and the buildup of concentrations in the hatch and stairway. For safe entry to the cargo ship, the current model predicted that a minimal ventilation rate of 4.4 hr⁻¹ is required for the stairway's CO concentration to lower to a safe concentration of 25 p.p.m.v. At 4.4 hr⁻¹, 10 min of ventilation time is required for the safe entry into the stairway studied. PMID:20603277

  10. Analysis on storage off-gas emissions from woody, herbaceous, and torrefied biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Lim, C. Jim; Bi, Xiaotao T.; Kuang, Xingya; Melin, Staffan; Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2015-03-02

    Wood chips, torrefied wood chips, ground switchgrass, and wood pellets were tested for off-gas emissions during storage. Storage canisters with gas-collection ports were used to conduct experiments at room temperature of 20 °C and in a laboratory oven set at 40 °C. Commercially-produced wood pellets yielded the highest carbon monoxide (CO) emissions at both 20 and 40 °C (1600 and 13,000 ppmv), whereas torrefied wood chips emitted the lowest of about <200 and <2000 ppmv. Carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions from wood pellets were 3000 ppmv and 42,000 ppmv, whereas torrefied wood chips registered at about 2000 and 25,000 ppmv, at 20 and 40 °C at the end of 11 days of storage. CO emission factors (milligrams per kilogram of biomass) calculated were lowest for ground switchgrass and torrefied wood chips (2.68 and 4.86 mg/kg) whereas wood pellets had the highest CO of about 10.60 mg/kg, respectively, at 40 °C after 11 days of storage. In the case of CO₂, wood pellets recorded the lowest value of 55.46 mg/kg, whereas switchgrass recorded the highest value of 318.72 mg/kg. This study concludes that CO emission factor is highest for wood pellets, CO₂ is highest for switchgrass and CH₄ is negligible for all feedstocks except for wood pellets, which is about 0.374 mg/kg at the end of 11-day storage at 40 °C.

  11. Analysis on storage off-gas emissions from woody, herbaceous, and torrefied biomass

    DOE PAGES

    Tumuluru, Jaya Shankar; Lim, C. Jim; Bi, Xiaotao T.; Kuang, Xingya; Melin, Staffan; Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2015-03-02

    Wood chips, torrefied wood chips, ground switchgrass, and wood pellets were tested for off-gas emissions during storage. Storage canisters with gas-collection ports were used to conduct experiments at room temperature of 20 °C and in a laboratory oven set at 40 °C. Commercially-produced wood pellets yielded the highest carbon monoxide (CO) emissions at both 20 and 40 °C (1600 and 13,000 ppmv), whereas torrefied wood chips emitted the lowest of about <200 and <2000 ppmv. Carbon dioxide (CO₂) emissions from wood pellets were 3000 ppmv and 42,000 ppmv, whereas torrefied wood chips registered at about 2000 and 25,000 ppmv, atmore » 20 and 40 °C at the end of 11 days of storage. CO emission factors (milligrams per kilogram of biomass) calculated were lowest for ground switchgrass and torrefied wood chips (2.68 and 4.86 mg/kg) whereas wood pellets had the highest CO of about 10.60 mg/kg, respectively, at 40 °C after 11 days of storage. In the case of CO₂, wood pellets recorded the lowest value of 55.46 mg/kg, whereas switchgrass recorded the highest value of 318.72 mg/kg. This study concludes that CO emission factor is highest for wood pellets, CO₂ is highest for switchgrass and CH₄ is negligible for all feedstocks except for wood pellets, which is about 0.374 mg/kg at the end of 11-day storage at 40 °C.« less

  12. Simulation of carbon cycling, including dissolved organic carbon transport, in forest soil locally enriched with 14C

    SciTech Connect

    Tipping, Ed; Chamberlain, Paul M.; Froberg, Mats J.; Hanson, Paul J; Jardine, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    The DyDOC model was used to simulate organic matter decomposition and dissolved organic matter (DOM) transport in deciduous forest soils at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Tennessee, USA. The model application relied on extensive data from the Enriched Background Isotope study (EBIS), which made use of a local atmospheric enrichment of radiocarbon to establish a large-scale manipulation experiment with different inputs of 14C from both above-ground and below-ground litter. The aim of the modelling was to test if the processes that constitute DyDOC can explain the available observations for C dynamics in the ORR. More specifically we used the model to investigate the origins of DOM, its dynamics within the soil profile, and how it contributes to the formation of stable carbon in the mineral soil. The model was first configured to account for water transport through the soil, then observed pools and fluxes of carbon and 14C data were used to fit the model parameters that describe the rates of the metabolic transformations. The soils were described by a thin O-horizon, a 15 cm thick A-horizon and a 45-cm thick B-horizon. Within the thin O-horizon, litter is either converted to CO2 or to a second organic matter pool, which is converted to CO2 at a different rate, both pools being able to produce DOM. The best model performance was obtained by assuming that adsorption of downwardly transported DOM in horizons A and B, followed by further conversion to stable forms, produces mineral-associated carbon pools, while root litter is the source of non-mineral associated carbon, with relatively short residence times. In the simulated steady-state, most carbon entering the O-horizon leaves quickly as CO2, but 17% (46 gC m-2 a-1) is lost as DOC in percolating water. The DOM comprises mainly hydrophobic material, 40% being derived from litter and 60% from older organic matter pools (residence time ~ 10 years). Most of the DOM is converted to CO2 in the mineral soil, over

  13. Simulated effects of the proposed Garrison Diversion Unit on streamflow and dissolved solids in the Sheyenne River and the Red River of the North, North Dakota and Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guenthner, R. Scott

    1993-01-01

    Future development of the Garrison Diversion Unit in North Dakota could deliver 100 cubic feet per second of water for the cities of Fargo, Grand Forks, and surrounding communities. Missouri River water from the Garrison Diversion Unit Sheyenne River water supply would be delivered to the upper reaches of the Sheyenne River, which would convey the water to the Red River of the North. Potential effects of releasing Missouri River water to the Sheyenne River on the quantity and quality of streamflow in the Sheyenne River and in the Red River of the North are evaluated for two proposed operating plans--year-round operation (12 months each year) and nonwinter operation (April through October each year). The Project Canals, Reservoirs, and River Systems (PROCRRS) and Canals, Rivers, and Reservoirs Salinity Accounting Procedures (CRRSAP) monthly accounting models are used to predict streamflow and dissolved-solids changes that could result from the proposed release of treated Missouri River water into the Sheyenne River and the Red River of the North. For year-round operation of the Garrison Diversion Unit Sheyenne River water supply for the period 1931-84, the maximum quantity of water that must be delivered to the upper reaches of the Sheyenne River so that 100 cubic feet per second of Missouri River water can be delivered to Fargo, N.Dak., and Grand Forks, N.Dak., was estimated to be about 151 cubic feet per second for August 1976. For nonwinter operation the maximum quantity of water was estimated to be about 210 cubic feet per second. Model simulations were used to assess the effects that operation of the Garrison Diversion Unit Sheyenne River water supply could have on streamflow and water quality of the Sheyenne River and the Red River of the North. Effects were assessed by comparing simulated streamflows that include Missouri River water to baseline conditions, which represent hydrologic conditions before addition of Missouri River water. Simulated mean monthly

  14. Microbial community evolution during simulated managed aquifer recharge in response to different biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) concentrations.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Alidina, Mazahirali; Ouf, Mohamed; Sharp, Jonathan O; Saikaly, Pascal; Drewes, Jörg E

    2013-05-01

    This study investigates the evolution of the microbial community in laboratory-scale soil columns simulating the infiltration zone of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems and analogous natural aquifer sediment ecosystems. Parallel systems were supplemented with either moderate (1.1 mg/L) or low (0.5 mg/L) biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) for a period of six months during which time, spatial (1 cm, 30 cm, 60 cm, 90 cm, and 120 cm) and temporal (monthly) analyses of sediment-associated microbial community structure were analyzed. Total microbial biomass associated with sediments was positively correlated with BDOC concentration where a significant decline in BDOC was observed along the column length. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated dominance by Bacteria with Archaea comprising less than 1 percent of the total community. Proteobacteria was found to be the major phylum in samples from all column depths with contributions from Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. Microbial community structure at all the phylum, class and genus levels differed significantly at 1 cm between columns receiving moderate and low BDOC concentrations; in contrast strong similarities were observed both between parallel column systems and across samples from 30 to 120 cm depths. Samples from 1 cm depth of the low BDOC columns exhibited higher microbial diversity (expressed as Shannon Index) than those at 1 cm of moderate BDOC columns, and both increased from 5.4 to 5.9 at 1 cm depth to 6.7-8.3 at 30-120 cm depths. The microbial community structure reached steady state after 3-4 months since the initiation of the experiment, which also resulted in an improved DOC removal during the same time period. This study suggested that BDOC could significantly influence microbial community structure regarding both composition and diversity of artificial MAR systems and analogous natural aquifer sediment ecosystems.

  15. Formation of the ZnFe2O4 phase in an electric arc furnace off-gas treatment system.

    PubMed

    Suetens, T; Guo, M; Van Acker, K; Blanpain, B

    2015-04-28

    To better understand the phenomena of ZnFe2O4 spinel formation in electric arc furnace dust, the dust was characterized with particle size analysis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). Different ZnFe2O4 formation reaction extents were observed for iron oxide particles with different particle sizes. ZnO particles were present as both individual particles and aggregated on the surface of larger particles. Also, the slag particles found in the off-gas were shown not to react with the zinc vapor. After confirming the presence of a ZnFe2O4 formation reaction, the thermodynamic feasibility of in-process separation - a new electric arc furnace dust treatment technology - was reevaluated. The large air intake and the presence of iron oxide particles in the off-gas were included into the thermodynamic calculations. The formation of the stable ZnFe2O4 spinel phase was shown to be thermodynamically favorable in current electric arc furnace off-gas ducts conditions even before reaching the post combustion chamber.

  16. Airborne waste management technology applicable for use in reprocessing plants for control of iodine and other off-gas constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    Extensive work in the area of iodine removal from reprocessing plant off-gas streams using various types of solid sorbent materials has been conducted worldwide over the past two decades. This work has focused on the use of carbon filters, primarily for power plant applications. More recently, the use of silver-containing sorbents has been the subject of considerable research. The most recent work in the United States has addressed the use of silver-exchanged faujasites and mordenites. The chemical reactions of iodine with silver on the sorbent are not well defined, but it is generally believed that chemisorbed iodides and iodates are formed. The process for iodine recovery generally involves passage of the iodine-laden gas stream through a packed bed of the adsorbent material preheated to a temperature of about 150/degree/C. Most iodine removal system designs utilizing silver-containing solid sorbents assume only a 30 to 50% silver utilization. Based on laboratory tests, potentially 60 to 70% of the silver contained in the sorbents can be reacted with iodine. To overcome the high cost of silver associated with these materials, various approaches have been explored. Among these are the regeneration of the silver-containing sorbent by stripping the iodine and trapping the iodine on a sorbent that has undergone only partial silver exchange and is capable of attaining a much higher silver utilization. This summary report describes the US work in regeneration of iodine-loaded solid sorbent material. In addition, the report discusses the broader subject of plant off-gas treatment including system design. The off-gas technologies to recovery No/sub x/ and to recover and dispose of Kr, /sup 14/C, and I are described as to their impacts on the design of an integrated off-gas system. The effect of ventilation philosophy for the reprocessing plant is discussed as an integral part of the overall treatment philosophy of the plant off-gas. 103 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Calibration and use of an interactive-accounting model to simulate dissolved solids, streamflow, and water-supply operations in the Arkansas River basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    An interactive-accounting model was used to simulate dissolved solids, streamflow, and water supply operations in the Arkansas River basin, Colorado. Model calibration of specific conductance to streamflow relations at three sites enabled computation of dissolved-solids loads throughout the basin. To simulate streamflow only, all water supply operations were incorporated in the regression relations for streamflow. Calibration for 1940-85 resulted in coefficients of determination that ranged from 0.89 to 0.58, and values in excess of 0.80 were determined for 16 of 20 nodes. The model then incorporated 74 water users and 11 reservoirs to simulate the water supply operations for two periods, 1943-74 and 1975-85. For the 1943-74 calibration, coefficients of determination for streamflow ranged from 0.87 to 0.02. Calibration of the water supply operations resulted in coefficients of determination that ranged from 0.87 to negative for simulated irrigation diversions of 37 selected water users. Calibration for 1975-85 was not evaluated statistically, but average values and plots of reservoir contents indicated reasonableness of the simulation. To demonstrate the utility of the model, six specific alternatives were simulated to consider effects of potential enlargement of Pueblo Reservoir. Three general major alternatives were simulated: the 1975-85 calibrated model data, the calibrated model data with an addition of 30 cu ft/sec in Fountain Creek flows, and the calibrated model data plus additional municipal water in storage. These three major alternatives considered the options of reservoir enlargement or no enlargement. A 40,000-acre-foot reservoir enlargement resulted in average increases of 2,500 acre-ft in transmountain diversions, of 800 acre-ft in storage diversions, and of 100 acre-ft in winter-water storage. (USGS)

  18. Optimization of UA of heat exchangers and BOG compressor exit pressure of LNG boil-off gas reliquefaction system using exergy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochunni, Sarun Kumar; Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Chowdhury, Kanchan

    2015-12-01

    Boil-off gas (BOG) generation and its handling are important issues in Liquefied natural gas (LNG) value chain because of economic, environment and safety reasons. Several variants of reliquefaction systems of BOG have been proposed by researchers. Thermodynamic analyses help to configure them and size their components for improving performance. In this paper, exergy analysis of reliquefaction system based on nitrogen-driven reverse Brayton cycle is carried out through simulation using Aspen Hysys 8.6®, a process simulator and the effects of heat exchanger size with and without related pressure drop and BOG compressor exit pressure are evaluated. Nondimensionalization of parameters with respect to the BOG load allows one to scale up or down the design. The process heat exchanger (PHX) requires much higher surface area than that of BOG condenser and it helps to reduce the quantity of methane vented out to atmosphere. As pressure drop destroys exergy, optimum UA of PHX decreases for highest system performance if pressure drop is taken into account. Again, for fixed sizes of heat exchangers, as there is a range of discharge pressures of BOG compressor at which the loss of methane in vent minimizes, the designer should consider choosing the pressure at lower value.

  19. Process system evaluation-consolidated letters. Volume 1. Alternatives for the off-gas treatment system for the low-level waste vitrification process

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, L.M.; Deforest, T.J; Richards, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    This report provides an evaluation of alternatives for treating off-gas from the low-level waste (LLW) melter. The study used expertise obtained from the commercial nonradioactive off-gas treatment industry. It was assumed that contact maintenance is possible, although the subsequent risk to maintenance personnel was qualitatively considered in selecting equipment. Some adaptations to the alternatives described may be required, depending on the extent of contact maintenance that can be achieved. This evaluation identified key issues for the off-gas system design. To provide background information, technology reviews were assembled for various classifications of off-gas treatment equipment, including off-gas cooling, particulate control, acid gas control, mist elimination, NO{sub x} reduction, and SO{sub 2} removal. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate for one of the off-gas systems considered is provided using both the off-gas characteristics associated with the Joule-heated and combustion-fired melters. The key issues identified and a description of the preferred off-gas system options are provided below. Five candidate treatment systems were evaluated. All of the systems are appropriate for the different melting/feed preparations currently being considered. The lowest technical risk is achieved using option 1, which is similar to designs for high-level waste (HLW) vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP) and the West Valley. Demonstration Project. Option 1 uses a film cooler, submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME) prior to NO{sub x} reduction and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration. However, several advantages were identified for option 2, which uses high-temperature filtration. Based on the evaluation, option 2 was identified as the preferred alternative. The characteristics of this option are described below.

  20. SNL Sigma Off-Gas Team Contribution to the FY15 DOE/NE-MRWFD Campaign Accomplishments Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-08-21

    This program at Sandia is focused on Iodine waste form development for Fuel Cycle R&D needs. Our research has a general theme of “Capture and Storage of Iodine Fission Gas “ in which we are focused on silver loaded zeolite waste forms, evaluation of iodine loaded getter materials (eg., mordenite zeolite), and the development of low temperature glass waste forms that successfully incorporate iodine loaded getter materials from I2, organic iodide, etc. containing off-gas streams.

  1. Mutual and Self-Diffusivities in Binary Mixtures of [EMIM][B(CN)4] with Dissolved Gases by Using Dynamic Light Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Koller, Thomas M; Heller, Andreas; Rausch, Michael H; Wasserscheid, Peter; Economou, Ioannis G; Fröba, Andreas P

    2015-07-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are possible working fluids for the separation of carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gases. For evaluating their performance in such processes, reliable mutual-diffusivity data are required for mixtures of ILs with relevant flue gas components. In the present study, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used for the investigation of the molecular diffusion in binary mixtures of the IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetracyanoborate ([EMIM][B(CN)4]) with the dissolved gases carbon dioxide, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, methane, oxygen, and hydrogen sulfide at temperatures from 298.15 to 363.15 K and pressures up to 63 bar. At conditions approaching infinite dilution of a gas, the Fick mutual diffusivity of the mixture measured by DLS and the self-diffusivity of the corresponding gas calculated by MD simulations match, which could be generally found within combined uncertainties. The obtained diffusivities are in agreement with literature data for the same or comparable systems as well as with the general trend of increasing diffusivities for decreasing IL viscosities. The DLS and MD results reveal distinctly larger molecular diffusivities for [EMIM][B(CN)4]-hydrogen mixtures compared to mixtures with all other gases. This behavior results in the failure of an empirical correlation with the molar volumes of the gases at their normal boiling points. The DLS experiments also showed that there is no noticeable influence of the dissolved gas and temperature on the thermal diffusivity of the studied systems. PMID:26075680

  2. Deactivation of titanium dioxide photocatalyst by oxidation of polydimethylsiloxane and silicon sealant off-gas in a recirculating batch reactor.

    PubMed

    Chemweno, Maurice K; Cernohlavek, Leemer G; Jacoby, William A

    2008-01-01

    We have studied deactivation of titanium dioxide (TiO2) photocatalyst by oxidation of polydimethylsiloxane and silicone sealant off-gas in a recirculating batch reactor. Polydimethylsiloxane vapor is a model indoor air pollutant. It does not adsorb strongly on TiO2 in the dark, but undergoes oxidation when the ultraviolet (UV) photons are also present. Commercial silicone (room-temperature vulcanizing) sealant off-gas is an actual indoor air pollutant subject to short-term spikes in concentration. It does adsorb on the TiO2 surface in the dark, but UV photons also catalyze its oxidation. The oxidation of the Si-containing vapors was monitored using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscope equipped with a gas cell. Subsequent to each incremental exposure, a hexane oxidation reaction was performed to track the titania catalyst's activity. The exposures were repeated until substantial deactivation was achieved. We have also documented the regenerative effect of washing the catalyst surface with water. Surface science techniques were used to view the topography of the catalyst and to identify the elements causing the deactivation. Procedural observations of interest in the context of our recirculating batch reactor include the following: the rate of oxidation of hexane was used to assess the activity of a photocatalyst sample; hexane is an appropriate choice of a probe molecule because it does not adsorb in the dark and it undergoes photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) completely, forming CO2; and hexane does not deactivate the photocatalyst surface.

  3. FLOWSHEET EVALUATION FOR THE DISSOLVING AND NEUTRALIZATION OF SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, W. E.; Hansen, E. K.; Shehee, T. C.

    2012-10-30

    This report includes the literature review, hydrogen off-gas calculations, and hydrogen generation tests to determine that H-Canyon can safely dissolve the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE; thorium fuel), Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR; aluminum alloy fuel), and Denmark Reactor (DR-3; silicide fuel, aluminum alloy fuel, and aluminum oxide fuel) assemblies in the L-Bundles with respect to the hydrogen levels in the projected peak off-gas rates. This is provided that the number of L-Bundles charged to the dissolver is controlled. Examination of SRE dissolution for potential issues has aided in predicting the optimal batching scenario. The calculations detailed in this report demonstrate that the FNR, SRE, and DR-3 used nuclear fuel (UNF) are bounded by MURR UNF and may be charged using the controls outlined for MURR dissolution in a prior report.

  4. Effects of dissolved oxygen on microbial community of single-stage autotrophic nitrogen removal system treating simulating mature landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Jiale; Qing, Xiaoxia; He, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    The performance of four identical sequencing biofilm batch reactors (SBBR) for autotrophic nitrogen removal was investigated with 2000mg/L ammonia-containing mature landfill leachate at 30°C. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the performance and microbial community of single-stage nitrogen removal using anammox and partial nitritation (SNAP) system. At an applied load of 0.5kgNm(-3)d(-1), average total nitrogen removal efficiency (TNRE) above 90% was long-term achieved with an optimal DO concentration of 2.7mg/L. The microelectrode-measured profiles showed the microenvironments inside the biofilms. 16S ribosomal Ribonucleic Acid (rRNA) amplicon pyrosequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) were used to analyze the microbial variations of different DO concentrations and different positions inside one reactor. PMID:27450126

  5. Effect of temperature and dissolved hydrogen on oxide films formed on Ni and Alloy 182 in simulated PWR water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, R.; Bosch, R.-W.; Van Renterghem, W.; Vankeerberghen, M.; de Araújo Figueiredo, C.

    2016-08-01

    Alloy 182 is a nickel-based weld metal, which is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water. It shows a peak in SCC susceptibility at a certain temperature and hydrogen concentration. This peak is related to the electrochemical condition where the Ni to NiO transition takes place. One hypothesis is that the oxide layer at this condition is not properly developed and so the material is not optimally protected against SCC. Therefore the oxide layer formed on Alloy 182 is investigated as a function of the dissolved hydrogen concentration and temperature around this Ni/NiO transition. Exposure tests were performed with Alloy 182 and Ni coupons in a PWR environment at temperatures between 300 °C and 345 °C and dissolved hydrogen concentration between 5 and 35 cc (STP)H2/kg. Post-test analysis of the formed oxide layers were carried out by SEM, EDS and XPS. The exposure tests with Ni coupons showed that the Ni/NiO transition curve is at a higher temperature than the curve based on thermodynamic calculations. The exposure tests with Alloy 182 showed that oxide layers were present at all temperatures, but that the morphology changed from spinel crystals to needle like oxides when the Ni/NiO transition curve was approached. Oxide layers were present below the Ni/NiO transition curve i.e. when the Ni coupon was still free of oxides. In addition an evolved slip dissolution model was proposed that could explain the observed experimental results and the peak in SCC susceptibility for Ni-based alloys around the Ni/NiO transition.

  6. Distributions of 14 elements on 60 selected absorbers from two simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1993-10-01

    Sixty commercially available or experimental absorber materials were evaluated for partitioning high-level radioactive waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. The distributions of 14 elements onto each absorber were measured from simulated solutions that represent acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate solutions from Hanford high-level waste (HLW) Tank 102-SY. The selected elements, which represent fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y); actinides (U, Pu, and Am); and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr), were traced by radionuclides and assayed by gamma spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for each of the 1680 element/absorber/solution combinations were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to provide sorption kinetics information for the specified elements from these complex media. More than 5000 measured distribution coefficients are tabulated.

  7. A Literature Survey to Identify Potentially Volatile Iodine-Bearing Species Present in Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, S. H.; Spencer, B. B.; Strachan, D. M.; Jubin, R. T.; Soelberg, N. R.; Riley, B. J.

    2015-06-30

    Four radionuclides have been identified as being sufficiently volatile in the reprocessing of nuclear fuel that their gaseous release needs to be controlled to meet regulatory requirements (Jubin et al. 2011, 2012). These radionuclides are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. Of these, 129I has the longest half-life and potentially high biological impact. Accordingly, control of the release of 129I is most critical with respect to the regulations for the release of radioactive material in stack emissions. It is estimated that current EPA regulations (EPA 2010) would require any reprocessing plant in the United States to limit 129I release to less than 0.05 Ci/MTIHM for a typical fuel burnup of 55 gigawatt days per metric tonne (GWd/t) (Jubin 2011). The study of inorganic iodide in off-gas systems has been almost exclusively limited to I2 and the focus of organic iodide studies has been CH3I. In this document, we provide the results of an examination of publically available literature that is relevant to the presence and sources of both inorganic and organic iodine-bearing species in reprocessing plants. We especially focus on those that have the potential to be poorly sequestered with traditional capture methodologies. Based on the results of the literature survey and some limited thermodynamic modeling, the inorganic iodine species hypoiodous acid (HOI) and iodine monochloride (ICl) were identified as potentially low-sorbing iodine species that could present in off-gas systems. Organic species of interest included both short chain alkyl iodides such as methyl iodide (CH3I) and longer alkyl iodides up to iodododecane (C10H21I). It was found that fuel dissolution may provide conditions conducive to HOI formation and has been shown to result in volatile long-chain alkyl iodides, though these may not volatilize until later in the reprocessing sequence. Solvent extraction processes were found to be significant sources of various organic iodine-bearing species; formation of these

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDROGEN MORDENITE SORBENT FOR THE CAPTURE OF KRYPTON FROM USED NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING OFF-GAS STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law

    2014-04-01

    A novel new sorbent for the separation of krypton from off-gas streams resulting from the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel has been developed and evaluated. A hydrogen mordenite powder was successfully incorporated into a macroporous polymer binder and formed into spherical beads. The engineered form sorbent retained the characteristic surface area and microporosity indicative of mordenite powder. The sorbent was evaluated for krypton adsorption capacities utilizing thermal swing operations achieving capacities of 100 mmol of krypton per kilogram of sorbent at a temperature of 191 K. A krypton adsorption isotherm was also obtained at 191 K with varying krypton feed gas concentrations. Adsorption/desorption cycling effects were also evaluated with results indicating that the sorbent experienced no decrease in krypton capacity throughout testing.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of the NMR Relaxation of Xenon-131 Dissolved in 1,3-Dioxane and 1,4-Dioxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmer, M.; Reisse, J.

    The experimental NMR relaxation study of Xe-131 dissolved in 1,3-dioxane and 1,4-dioxane indicates that the intermolecular quadrupole relaxation mechanism is equally as efficient in both solvents even if 1,3-dioxane is a dipolar molecule while 1,4-dioxane is not. In order to interpret this observation, molecular-dynamics simulations were performed for model systems of xenon gas dissolved in 1,3-dioxane and 1,4-dioxane. The simulations were able to satisfactorily reproduce various experimental data for each system and, in perfect agreement with the experiment, yielded the same 131Xe quadrupole relaxation rate in both solvents. This result was obtained assuming an electrostatic origin of the electric-field gradient, and therefore validates this explanation. In 1,4-dioxane, the overwhelming part of the fluctuating electric-field gradient experienced by the xenon nucleus is due to the quadrupole moment of the solvent molecules. In 1,3-dioxane, the dipole moment is responsible for approximately half the value of the amplitude of the electric-field-gradient fluctuations only. Contributions at least up to the octopole moment are important and, consequently, the correlation time characterizing the electric-field-gradient fluctuations in 1,3-dioxane is significantly shorter than the dipolar correlation time and is found to be similar to the correlation time value in 1,4-dioxane. The relaxation rate of 131Xe in dioxanes is compared to the value in other solvents including cyclohexane, and comments are made on the general concept of polarity.

  10. Simulating unsteady transport of nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen in the Chattahoochee River downstream from Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1985-01-01

    As part of an intensive water-quality assessment of the Chattahoochee River, repetitive water-quality measurements were made at 12 sites along a 69-kilometer reach of the river downstream of Atlanta, Georgia. Concentrations of seven constituents (temperature, dissolved oxygen, ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), organic nitrogen, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate) were obtained during two periods of 36 hours, one starting on August 30, 1976, and the other starting on May 31, 1977. The study reach contains one large and several small sewage outfalls and receives the cooling water from two large powerplants. An unsteady water-quality model of the Lagrangian type was calibrated using the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The model provided a good means of interpreting these data even though both the flow and the pollution loading rates were highly unsteady. A kinetic model of the cascade type accurately described the physical and biochemical processes occurring in the river. All rate coefficients, except reaeration coefficients and those describing the resuspension of BOD, were fitted to the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The study showed that, at steady low flow, about 38 percent of the BOD settled without exerting an oxygen demand. At high flow, this settled BOD was resuspended and exerted an immediate oxygen demand. About 70 percent of the ammonia extracted from the water column was converted to nitrite, but the fate of the remaining 30 percent is unknown. Photosynthetic production was not an important factor in the oxygen balance during either run.

  11. Studying dissolved organic carbon export from the Penobscot Watershed in to Gulf of Maine using Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhani, S. F. B. B.; Schaaf, C.; Douglas, E. M.; Choate, J. S.; Yang, Y.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    The movement of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from terrestrial system into aquatic system plays an important role for carbon sequestration in ecosystems and affects the formation of soil organic matters.Carbon cycling, storage, and transport to marine systems have become critical issues in global-change science, especially with regard to northern latitudes (Freeman et al., 2001; Benner et al., 2004). DOC, as an important composition of the carbon cycling, leaches from the terrestrial watersheds is a large source of marine DOC. The Penobscot River basin in north-central Maine is the second largest watershed in New England, which drains in to Gulf of Maine. Approximately 89% of the watershed is forested (Griffith and Alerich, 1996).Studying temporal and spatial changes in DOC export can help us to understand terrestrial carbon cycling and to detect any shifts from carbon sink to carbon source or visa versa in northern latitude forested ecosystems.Despite for the importance of understanding carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemistry, the Doc export, especially the combination of DOC production from bio-system and DOC transportation from the terrestrial in to stream has been lightly discussed in most conceptual or numerical models. The Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys), which has been successfully applied in many study sites, is a physical process based terrestrial model that has the ability to simulate both the source and transportation of DOC by combining both hydrological and ecological processes. The focus of this study is on simulating the DOC concentration and flux from the land to the water using RHESSys in the Penobscot watershed. The simulated results will be compared with field measurement of DOC from the watershed to explore the spatial and temporal DOC export pattern. This study will also enhance our knowledge to select sampling locations properly and also improve our understanding on DOC production and transportation in

  12. Low-Level waste phase 1 melter testing off gas and mass balance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.N.

    1996-06-28

    Commercially available melter technologies were tested during 1994-95 as part of a multiphase program to test candidate technologies for vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream to be derived from retrieval and pretreatment of Hanford Site tank wastes. Seven vendors were selected for Phase 1 testing to demonstrate vitrification of a high sodium content liquid LLW simulant. The tested melter technologies included four Joule-heated melters, a carbon electrode melter, a combustion melter, and a plasma melter. Various dry and slurry melter feed preparation processes were also tested. Various feed material samples, product glass samples, and process offgas streams were characterized to provide data for evaluation of process decontamination factors and material mass balances for each vitrification technology. This report describes the melter mass balance evaluations and results for six of the Phase 1 LLW melter vendor demonstration tests.

  13. Hot Corrosion of Inconel 625 Overlay Weld Cladding in Smelting Off-Gas Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi Zahrani, E.; Alfantazi, A. M.

    2013-10-01

    Degradation mechanisms and hot corrosion behavior of weld overlay alloy 625 were studied. Phase structure, morphology, thermal behavior, and chemical composition of deposited salt mixture on the weld overlay were characterized utilizing XRD, SEM/EDX, DTA, and ICP/OES, respectively. Dilution level of Fe in the weldment, dendritic structure, and degradation mechanisms of the weld were investigated. A molten phase formed on the weld layer at the operating temperature range of the boiler, which led to the hot corrosion attack in the water wall and the ultimate failure. Open circuit potential and weight-loss measurements and potentiodynamic polarization were carried out to study the hot corrosion behavior of the weld in the simulated molten salt medium at 873 K, 973 K, and 1073 K (600 °C, 700 °C, and 800 °C). Internal oxidation and sulfidation plus pitting corrosion were identified as the main hot corrosion mechanisms in the weld and boiler tubes. The presence of a significant amount of Fe made the dendritic structure of the weld susceptible to preferential corrosion. Preferentially corroded (Mo, Nb)-depleted dendrite cores acted as potential sites for crack initiation from the surface layer. The penetration of the molten phase into the cracks accelerated the cracks' propagation mainly through the dendrite cores and further crack branching/widening.

  14. Off-Gas Generation Rate during Chemical Cleaning Operations at the Savannah River Site - 12499

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, Bruce J.; Subramanian, Karthik H.; Ketusky, Edward T.

    2012-07-01

    The enhanced chemical cleaning process (ECC) is being developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to remove the residual radioactive sludge heel that remains in a liquid waste storage tank. Oxalic acid is the chemical agent utilized for this purpose. However, the acid also corrodes the carbon steel tank wall and cooling coils. If the oxalic acid has little interaction with the sludge, hydrogen gas could conceivably evolve at cathodic areas due to the corrosion of the carbon steel. Scenarios where hydrogen evolution could occur during ECC include the initial filling of the tank prior to agitation and near the end of the process when there is little or no sludge present. The purpose of this activity was to provide a bounding estimate for the hydrogen generation rate during the ECC process. Sealed vessel coupon tests were performed to estimate the hydrogen generation rate due to corrosion of carbon steel by oxalic acid. These tests determined the maximum instantaneous hydrogen generation rate, the rate at which the generation rate decays, and the total hydrogen generated. The tests were performed with polished ASTM A285 Grade C carbon steel coupons. This steel is representative of the Type I and II waste tanks at SRS. Bounding conditions were determined for the solution environment. The oxalic acid concentration was 2.5 wt.% and the test temperature was 75 deg. C. The test solution was agitated and contained no sludge simulant. Duplicate tests were performed and showed excellent reproducibility for the hydrogen generation rate and total hydrogen generated. The results showed that the hydrogen generation rate was initially high, but decayed rapidly within a couple of days. A statistical model was developed to predict the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate as a function of exposure time by combining both sets of data. An upper bound on the maximum hydrogen generation rate was determined from the upper 95% confidence limit. The upper bound limit on the maximum

  15. Novel sorbent development and evaluation for the capture of krypton and xenon from nuclear fuel reprocessing off-gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Garn, T.G.; Greenhalgh, M.R.; Law, J.D.

    2013-07-01

    The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, Idaho National Laboratory sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up. (authors)

  16. Novel Sorbent Development and Evaluation for the Capture of Krypton and Xenon from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

    2013-09-01

    The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, INL sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up.

  17. Novel Sorbent Development and Evaluation for the Capture of Krypton and Xenon from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell R. Greenhalgh; Jack D. Law

    2013-10-01

    The release of volatile radionuclides generated during Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing in the US will most certainly need to be controlled to meet US regulatory emission limits. A US DOE sponsored Off-Gas Sigma Team has been tasked with a multi-lab collaborative research and development effort to investigate and evaluate emissions and immobilization control technologies for the volatile radioactive species generated from commercial Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) Reprocessing. Physical Adsorption technology is a simpler and potential economical alternative to cryogenic distillation processes that can be used for the capture of krypton and xenon and has resulted in a novel composite sorbent development procedure using synthesized mordenite as the active material. Utilizing the sorbent development procedure, INL sigma team members have developed two composite sorbents that have been evaluated for krypton and xenon capacities at ambient and 191 K temperature using numerous test gas compositions. Adsorption isotherms have been generated to predict equilibration and maximum capacities enabling modeling to support process equipment scale-up.

  18. TREATMENT TANK OFF-GAS TESTING FOR THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.

    2011-08-29

    The purpose of this activity was to provide a bounding estimate of the volume of hydrogen gas generated during Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) of residual sludge remaining in a Type I or Type II treatment tank as well as to provide results independent of the sludge volume in the waste tank to be cleaned. Previous testing to support Chemical Cleaning was based on a 20:1 oxalic acid to sludge ratio. Hydrogen gas evolution is the primary safety concern. Sealed vessel coupon tests were performed to estimate the hydrogen generation rate due to corrosion of carbon steel by 2.5 wt.% oxalic acid. These tests determined the maximum instantaneous hydrogen generation rate, the rate at which the generation rate decays, and the total hydrogen generated. These values were quantified based on a small scale methodology similar to the one described in WSRC-STI-2007-00209, Rev. 0. The measured rates support identified Safety Class functions. The tests were performed with ASTM A285 Grade C carbon steel coupons. Bounding conditions were determined for the solution environment. The oxalic acid concentration was 2.5 wt.% and the test temperature was 75 C. The test solution was agitated and contained no sludge simulant. Duplicate tests were performed and showed excellent reproducibility for the hydrogen generation rate and total hydrogen generated. The results showed that the hydrogen generation rate was initially high, but decayed rapidly within a couple of days. A statistical model was developed to predict the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate as a function of exposure time by combining both sets of data. An upper bound on the maximum hydrogen generation rate was determined from the upper 95% confidence limit. The upper bound confidence limit for the hydrogen generation rate is represented by the following equation. ln (G{sub v}) = -8.22-0.0584 t + 0.0002 t{sup 2}. This equation should be utilized to estimate the instantaneous hydrogen generation rate per unit surface area, G

  19. The effect of feed water dissolved organic carbon concentration and composition on organic micropollutant removal and microbial diversity in soil columns simulating river bank filtration.

    PubMed

    Bertelkamp, C; van der Hoek, J P; Schoutteten, K; Hulpiau, L; Vanhaecke, L; Vanden Bussche, J; Cabo, A J; Callewaert, C; Boon, N; Löwenberg, J; Singhal, N; Verliefde, A R D

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated organic micropollutant (OMP) biodegradation rates in laboratory-scale soil columns simulating river bank filtration (RBF) processes. The dosed OMP mixture consisted of 11 pharmaceuticals, 6 herbicides, 2 insecticides and 1 solvent. Columns were filled with soil from a RBF site and were fed with four different organic carbon fractions (hydrophilic, hydrophobic, transphilic and river water organic matter (RWOM)). Additionally, the effect of a short-term OMP/dissolved organic carbon (DOC) shock-load (e.g. quadrupling the OMP concentrations and doubling the DOC concentration) on OMP biodegradation rates was investigated to assess the resilience of RBF systems. The results obtained in this study imply that - in contrast to what is observed for managed aquifer recharge systems operating on wastewater effluent - OMP biodegradation rates are not affected by the type of organic carbon fraction fed to the soil column, in case of stable operation. No effect of a short-term DOC shock-load on OMP biodegradation rates between the different organic carbon fractions was observed. This means that the RBF site simulated in this study is resilient towards transient higher DOC concentrations in the river water. However, a temporary OMP shock-load affected OMP biodegradation rates observed for the columns fed with the river water organic matter (RWOM) and the hydrophilic fraction of the river water organic matter. These different biodegradation rates did not correlate with any of the parameters investigated in this study (cellular adenosine triphosphate (cATP), DOC removal, specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), richness/evenness of the soil microbial population or OMP category (hydrophobicity/charge).

  20. The effect of feed water dissolved organic carbon concentration and composition on organic micropollutant removal and microbial diversity in soil columns simulating river bank filtration.

    PubMed

    Bertelkamp, C; van der Hoek, J P; Schoutteten, K; Hulpiau, L; Vanhaecke, L; Vanden Bussche, J; Cabo, A J; Callewaert, C; Boon, N; Löwenberg, J; Singhal, N; Verliefde, A R D

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated organic micropollutant (OMP) biodegradation rates in laboratory-scale soil columns simulating river bank filtration (RBF) processes. The dosed OMP mixture consisted of 11 pharmaceuticals, 6 herbicides, 2 insecticides and 1 solvent. Columns were filled with soil from a RBF site and were fed with four different organic carbon fractions (hydrophilic, hydrophobic, transphilic and river water organic matter (RWOM)). Additionally, the effect of a short-term OMP/dissolved organic carbon (DOC) shock-load (e.g. quadrupling the OMP concentrations and doubling the DOC concentration) on OMP biodegradation rates was investigated to assess the resilience of RBF systems. The results obtained in this study imply that - in contrast to what is observed for managed aquifer recharge systems operating on wastewater effluent - OMP biodegradation rates are not affected by the type of organic carbon fraction fed to the soil column, in case of stable operation. No effect of a short-term DOC shock-load on OMP biodegradation rates between the different organic carbon fractions was observed. This means that the RBF site simulated in this study is resilient towards transient higher DOC concentrations in the river water. However, a temporary OMP shock-load affected OMP biodegradation rates observed for the columns fed with the river water organic matter (RWOM) and the hydrophilic fraction of the river water organic matter. These different biodegradation rates did not correlate with any of the parameters investigated in this study (cellular adenosine triphosphate (cATP), DOC removal, specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), richness/evenness of the soil microbial population or OMP category (hydrophobicity/charge). PMID:26432535

  1. Culture of Escherichia coli under dissolved oxygen gradients simulated in a two-compartment scale-down system: metabolic response and production of recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Basurto, Edgar A; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco; Ramírez, Octavio T

    2005-02-20

    A significant problem of large-scale cultures, but scarcely studied for recombinant E. coli, is the presence of gradients in dissolved oxygen tension (DOT). In this study, the effect of DOT gradients on the metabolic response of E. coli and production of recombinant pre-proinsulin, accumulated as inclusion bodies, was determined. DOT gradients were simulated in a two-compartment scale-down system consisting of two interconnected stirred-tank bioreactors, one maintained at anoxic conditions and the other at a DOT of at least 6%. Cells were continuously circulated between both vessels to simulate circulation times (tc) of 20, 50, 90, and 180 sec. A complete kinetic and stoichiometric characterization was performed in the scale-down system as well as in control cultures maintained at constant DOT in the range of 0-20%. The performance of E. coli cultured under oscillating DOT was significantly affected, even at a tc of 20 sec corresponding to transient exposures of only 13.3 sec to anaerobic conditions. Specific growth rate decreased linearly with tc to a maximum reduction of 30% at the highest tc tested. The negative effect of DOT gradients was even more pronounced for the overall biomass yield on glucose and the maximum concentration and yield of pre-proinsulin. In these cases, the losses were 9%, 27%, and 20%, respectively, at tc of 20 sec and 65%, 94%, and 87%, respectively, at tc of 180 sec. Acetic, lactic, formic, and succinic acids accumulated during oscillatory DOT cultures, indicating that deviation of carbon flow to anaerobic metabolism was responsible for the observed losses. The results of this study indicate that even very short exposures to anaerobic conditions, typical of large-scale operations, can substantially reduce recombinant protein productivity. The information presented here is useful for establishing improved rational scale-up strategies and understanding the behavior of recombinant E. coli exposed to DOT gradients.

  2. Peer review panel summary report for technical determination of mixed waste incineration off-gas systems for Rocky Flats; Appendix A

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    A Peer Review Panel was convened on September 15-17, 1992 in Boulder, Co. The members of this panel included representatives from DOE, EPA, and DOE contractors along with invited experts in the fields of air pollution control and waste incineration. The primary purpose of this review panel was to make a technical determination of a hold, test and release off gas capture system should be implemented in the proposed RF Pland mixed waste incineration system; or if a state of the art continuous air pollution control and monitoring system should be utilized as the sole off-gas control system. All of the evaluations by the panel were based upon the use of the fluidized bed unit proposed by Rocky Flats and cannot be generalized to other systems.

  3. The development of an industrial-scale fed-batch fermentation simulation.

    PubMed

    Goldrick, Stephen; Ştefan, Andrei; Lovett, David; Montague, Gary; Lennox, Barry

    2015-01-10

    This paper describes a simulation of an industrial-scale fed-batch fermentation that can be used as a benchmark in process systems analysis and control studies. The simulation was developed using a mechanistic model and validated using historical data collected from an industrial-scale penicillin fermentation process. Each batch was carried out in a 100,000 L bioreactor that used an industrial strain of Penicillium chrysogenum. The manipulated variables recorded during each batch were used as inputs to the simulator and the predicted outputs were then compared with the on-line and off-line measurements recorded in the real process. The simulator adapted a previously published structured model to describe the penicillin fermentation and extended it to include the main environmental effects of dissolved oxygen, viscosity, temperature, pH and dissolved carbon dioxide. In addition the effects of nitrogen and phenylacetic acid concentrations on the biomass and penicillin production rates were also included. The simulated model predictions of all the on-line and off-line process measurements, including the off-gas analysis, were in good agreement with the batch records. The simulator and industrial process data are available to download at www.industrialpenicillinsimulation.com and can be used to evaluate, study and improve on the current control strategy implemented on this facility. PMID:25449107

  4. The development of an industrial-scale fed-batch fermentation simulation.

    PubMed

    Goldrick, Stephen; Ştefan, Andrei; Lovett, David; Montague, Gary; Lennox, Barry

    2015-01-10

    This paper describes a simulation of an industrial-scale fed-batch fermentation that can be used as a benchmark in process systems analysis and control studies. The simulation was developed using a mechanistic model and validated using historical data collected from an industrial-scale penicillin fermentation process. Each batch was carried out in a 100,000 L bioreactor that used an industrial strain of Penicillium chrysogenum. The manipulated variables recorded during each batch were used as inputs to the simulator and the predicted outputs were then compared with the on-line and off-line measurements recorded in the real process. The simulator adapted a previously published structured model to describe the penicillin fermentation and extended it to include the main environmental effects of dissolved oxygen, viscosity, temperature, pH and dissolved carbon dioxide. In addition the effects of nitrogen and phenylacetic acid concentrations on the biomass and penicillin production rates were also included. The simulated model predictions of all the on-line and off-line process measurements, including the off-gas analysis, were in good agreement with the batch records. The simulator and industrial process data are available to download at www.industrialpenicillinsimulation.com and can be used to evaluate, study and improve on the current control strategy implemented on this facility.

  5. Orientation and dynamics of benzyl alcohol and benzyl alkyl ethers dissolved in nematic lyotropic liquid crystals. 2H NMR and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ahumada, H; Montecinos, R; Tieleman, D P; Weiss-López, B E

    2005-08-01

    Most drugs have to cross cell membranes to reach their final target. A better understanding of the distribution, interactions, and dynamics of biologically active molecules in model bilayers is of fundamental importance in understanding drug functioning and design. 2H NMR quadrupole splittings (delta nu(Q)) and longitudinal relaxation times (T1) from the aromatic ring of benzyl alcohol-d5 (C0), a commonly used anesthetic, and a series of linear alkyl benzyl-d5 ethers with chain lengths from 1 to 12 carbon atoms (C1-C12), were measured. The molecules were dissolved in a nematic discotic lyotropic liquid crystal solution made of tetradecyltrimethylammonium chloride (TTAC)/decanol (DeOH)/NaCl/H2O. Values of delta nu(Q) and T1 from 1,1-dideuteriodecanol (15% enriched) and DHO (H2O with 0.2% D2O) were also measured. Delta nu(Q) of DeOH and DHO remained constant throughout the series. The value of delta nu(Q) of the para position of the ring (delta nu(p)) in C1 is 30% smaller than the delta nu(p) of C0. This is attributed to the existence of an H-bond between the alcohol hydroxyl proton and the solvent, which influences the average orientation of the ring. The relaxation data show that T1o,m is always longer than T1p and both decrease with the increase in alkyl chain length. Molecular dynamics simulations of the experimentally studied systems were performed. The aggregate was represented as a bilayer. The distribution, average orientation, and order parameters of the aromatic ring of the guest molecules in the bilayer were examined. Rotational correlation functions of all the C-D bonds and the OH bond from H2O were evaluated, allowing an estimate of the correlation times and T1. According to these results all spins relax in extreme narrowing conditions, except DeOH. Experimental and calculated T1 values differ at most by a factor of 3. However, the order of magnitude and the observed trends are well reproduced by the calculations. The aromatic ring of C0 possesses a

  6. Efficient carbon dioxide utilization and simultaneous hydrogen enrichment from off-gas of acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation by succinic acid producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    He, Aiyong; Kong, Xiangping; Wang, Chao; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Min; Ma, Jiangfeng; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-08-01

    The off-gas from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was firstly used to be CO2 source (co-substrate) for succinic acid production. The optimum ratio of H2/CO2 indicated higher CO2 partial pressures with presence of H2 could enhance C4 pathway flux and reductive product productivity. Moreover, when an inner recycling bioreactor was used for CO2 recycling at a high total pressure (0.2Mpa), a maximum succinic acid concentration of 65.7g·L(-1) was obtained, and a productivity of 0.76g·L(-1)·h(-1) and a high yield of 0.86g·g(-1) glucose were achieved. Furthermore, the hydrogen content was simultaneously enriched to 92.7%. These results showed one successful attempt to reuse the off-gas of ABE fermentation which can be an attractive CO2 source for succinic acid production. PMID:27142628

  7. Rate and peak concentrations of off-gas emissions in stored wood pellets sensitivities to temperature, relative humidity, and headspace volume

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Xingya; Shankar, T.J.; Bi, X.T.; Lim, C. Jim; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Melin, Staffan

    2009-08-01

    Wood pellets emit CO, CO2, CH4 and other volatiles during storage. Increased concentration of these gases in a sealed storage causes depletion of concentration of oxygen. The storage environment becomes toxic to those who operate in and around these storages. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of temperature, moisture and storage headspace on emissions from wood pellets in an enclosed space. Twelve 10-liter plastic containers were used to study the effects of headspace ratio (25%, 50%, and 75% of container volume) and temperatures (10-50oC). Another eight containers were set in uncontrolled storage relative humidity and temperature. Concentrations of CO2, CO and CH4 were measured by a gas chromatography (GC). The results showed that emissions of CO2, CO and CH4 from stored wood pellets are most sensitive to storage temperature. Higher peak emission factors are associated with higher temperatures. Increased headspace volume ratio increases peak off-gas emissions because of the availability of oxygen for pellet decomposition. Increased relative humidity in the enclosed container increases the rate of off-gas emissions of CO2, CO and CH4 and oxygen depletion.

  8. Dissolver vessel bottom assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kilian, Douglas C.

    1976-01-01

    An improved bottom assembly is provided for a nuclear reactor fuel reprocessing dissolver vessel wherein fuel elements are dissolved as the initial step in recovering fissile material from spent fuel rods. A shock-absorbing crash plate with a convex upper surface is disposed at the bottom of the dissolver vessel so as to provide an annular space between the crash plate and the dissolver vessel wall. A sparging ring is disposed within the annular space to enable a fluid discharged from the sparging ring to agitate the solids which deposit on the bottom of the dissolver vessel and accumulate in the annular space. An inlet tangential to the annular space permits a fluid pumped into the annular space through the inlet to flush these solids from the dissolver vessel through tangential outlets oppositely facing the inlet. The sparging ring is protected against damage from the impact of fuel elements being charged to the dissolver vessel by making the crash plate of such a diameter that the width of the annular space between the crash plate and the vessel wall is less than the diameter of the fuel elements.

  9. Investigation of the effects of beam scattering and beam wandering on laser beams passing thorough the off-gas duct of an Electric Arc Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhanzadeh, Amirhossein

    The project sets to determine the effects of scattering and beam wandering on light that passes through the off-gas of EAF. The effects of light scattering from metallic dust and beam wandering due to temperature gradient and turbulence in the medium are investigated. Using Matlab, a model was developed based on Mie theory to calculate light transmission when the optical properties are known; most importantly refractive index of the dust as well as incident wavelength, particle size and concentration of the particles per cm 3 of the gas. The model was validated and was used to show that as the particle size parameter increases, the scattering losses decreases. Turbulence and temperature gradients in the air cause the laser beam to change shape. Using a big collection lens can minimize the signal fluctuation caused by the beam wandering. A thorough understanding of these phenomena helps in designing optical sensors in the industry.

  10. The interplay between the paracetamol polymorphism and its molecular structures dissolved in supercritical CO2 in contact with the solid phase: In situ vibration spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Oparin, Roman D; Moreau, Myriam; De Walle, Isabelle; Paolantoni, Marco; Idrissi, Abdenacer; Kiselev, Michael G

    2015-09-18

    The aim of this paper is to characterize the distribution of paracetamol conformers which are dissolved in a supercritical CO2 phase being in equilibrium with their corresponding crystalline form. The quantum calculations and molecular dynamics simulations were used in order to characterize the structure and analyze the vibration spectra of the paracetamol conformers in vacuum and in a mixture with CO2 at various thermodynamic state parameters (p,T). The metadynamics approach was applied to efficiently sample the various conformers of paracetamol. Furthermore, using in situ IR spectroscopy, the conformers that are dissolved in supercritical CO2 were identified and the evolution of the probability of their presence as a functions of thermodynamic condition was quantified while the change in the crystalline form of paracetamol have been monitored by DSC, micro IR and Raman techniques. The DSC analysis as well as micro IR and Raman spectroscopic studies of the crystalline paracetamol show that the subsequent heating up above the melting temperature of the polymorph I of paracetamol and the cooling down to room temperature in the presence of supercritical CO2 induces the formation of polymorph II. The in situ IR investigation shows that two conformers (Conf. 1 and Conf. 2) are present in the phase of CO2 while conformer 3 (Conf. 3) has a high probability to be present after re-crystallization.

  11. Simulation of dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand, Plantation Canal, Broward County, Florida with an evaluation of the QUAL-I model for use in south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russo, Thomas N.; McQuivey, Raul S.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model; QUAL-I, developed by the Texas Water Development Board, was evaluated as a management tool in predicting the spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand in Plantation Canal. Predictions based on the QUAL-I model, which was verified only against midday summer-flow conditions, showed that improvement of quality of inflows from sewage treatment plants and use of at least 130 cubic feet per second of dilution water would improve water quality in the canal significantly. The model was not fully amenable to use on Plantation Canal because: (1) it did not consider photosynthetic production, nitrification, and benthic oxygen demand as sources and sinks of oxygen; (2) the model assumptions of complete mixing, transport, and steady state were not met; and (3) the data base was inadequate because it consisted of only one set of data for each case. However, it was felt that meaningful results could be obtained for some sets of conditions. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. FINAL REPORT DM1200 TESTS WITH AZ 101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-03R3800-4 REV 0 2/17/04

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; GONG W; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM 1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of simulated HLW AZ-101 feed. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW AZ-101 feed; determine the effect of bubbling rate and feed solids content on production rate; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and to perform pre- and post-test inspections of system components. The test objectives (including test success criteria), along with how they were met, are outlined in a table.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANTIFOAM TRACKING SYSTEM AS AN OPTION TO SUPPORT THE MELTER OFF-GAS FLAMMABILITY CONTROL STRATEGY AT THE DWPF

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Lambert, D.

    2014-08-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) in the development and implementation of an additional strategy for confidently satisfying the flammability controls for DWPF’s melter operation. An initial strategy for implementing the operational constraints associated with flammability control in DWPF was based upon an analytically determined carbon concentration from antifoam. Due to the conservative error structure associated with the analytical approach, its implementation has significantly reduced the operating window for processing and has led to recurrent Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) and Melter Feed Tank (MFT) remediation. To address the adverse operating impact of the current implementation strategy, SRR issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to SRNL requesting the development and documentation of an alternate strategy for evaluating the carbon contribution from antifoam. The proposed strategy presented in this report was developed under the guidance of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and involves calculating the carbon concentration from antifoam based upon the actual mass of antifoam added to the process assuming 100% retention. The mass of antifoam in the Additive Mix Feed Tank (AMFT), in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), and in the SME is tracked by mass balance as part of this strategy. As these quantities are monitored, the random and bias uncertainties affecting their values are also maintained and accounted for. This report documents: 1) the development of an alternate implementation strategy and associated equations describing the carbon concentration from antifoam in each SME batch derived from the actual amount of antifoam introduced into the AMFT, SRAT, and SME during the processing of the batch. 2) the equations and error structure for incorporating the proposed strategy into melter off-gas flammability assessments

  14. Development and Testing of the Advanced CHP System Utilizing the Off-Gas from the Innovative Green Coke Calcining Process in Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect

    Chudnovsky, Yaroslav; Kozlov, Aleksandr

    2013-08-15

    Green petroleum coke (GPC) is an oil refining byproduct that can be used directly as a solid fuel or as a feedstock for the production of calcined petroleum coke. GPC contains a high amount of volatiles and sulfur. During the calcination process, the GPC is heated to remove the volatiles and sulfur to produce purified calcined coke, which is used in the production of graphite, electrodes, metal carburizers, and other carbon products. Currently, more than 80% of calcined coke is produced in rotary kilns or rotary hearth furnaces. These technologies provide partial heat utilization of the calcined coke to increase efficiency of the calcination process, but they also share some operating disadvantages. However, coke calcination in an electrothermal fluidized bed (EFB) opens up a number of potential benefits for the production enhancement, while reducing the capital and operating costs. The increased usage of heavy crude oil in recent years has resulted in higher sulfur content in green coke produced by oil refinery process, which requires a significant increase in the calcinations temperature and in residence time. The calorific value of the process off-gas is quite substantial and can be effectively utilized as an “opportunity fuel” for combined heat and power (CHP) production to complement the energy demand. Heat recovered from the product cooling can also contribute to the overall economics of the calcination process. Preliminary estimates indicated the decrease in energy consumption by 35-50% as well as a proportional decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. As such, the efficiency improvement of the coke calcinations systems is attracting close attention of the researchers and engineers throughout the world. The developed technology is intended to accomplish the following objectives: - Reduce the energy and carbon intensity of the calcined coke production process. - Increase utilization of opportunity fuels such as industrial waste off-gas from the novel

  15. [Reponses of soil total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon to simulated nitrogen deposition in temperate typical steppe in Inner Mongolia, China].

    PubMed

    Qi, Yu-Chun; Peng, Qin; Dong, Yun-She; Xiao, Sheng-Sheng; Sun, Liang-Jie; Liu, Xin-Chao; He, Ya-Ting; Jia, Jun-Qiang; Cao, Cong-Cong

    2014-08-01

    Based on a field manipulative nitrogen (N) addition experiment, the effects of atmospheric N deposition level change on the contents, inter-annual variation and profile distribution of soil total organic carbon (TOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were investigated from May, 2008 to October, 2011 in a temperate typical steppe in Inner Mongolia of China, and the relationship between TOC and DOC was also discussed. The treatments in the manipulative experiment included N additions at rates of 0, 5, 10, and 20 g x (m2 x a)(-1), representing the control (CK), low N (LN), medium N (MN), and high N (HN) treatment, respectively. The results indicated that the concentrations of soil TOC and DOC decreased progressively with soil depth in all cases except for the DOC at 10-20 cm depth in individual years. The increase of N input in typical steppe did not change the vertical distribution of soil TOC and DOC, but reduced the vertical variation of TOC and increased the vertical variation of DOC in the surface soil horizon. In addition, the contents of soil TOC and DOC at 0- 10 cm and 10- 20 cm soil layers changed insignificantly after the continuous increase in anthropogenic N input for four years. The soil organic C density of 0-20 cm soil layer for different N treatment levels varied between 3.9 kg x m(-2) and 5.6 kg x m(-2), and the soil organic C densities of fertilized treatments in the first two years were similar to or slightly lower than those of CK, while in the following two years, the increase in N deposition gradually played a positive role in increasing soil organic C density, but the differences in soil TOC and DOC contents between CK and fertilized plots were not significant (P > 0.05). The ratio of soil DOC to TOC (DOC/TOC) varied from 0.32% to 1.09%. The increase in N deposition generally lowered the proportion of DOC in soil TOC, which was conducive to the accumulation of soil organic C. The change of soil DOC was positively correlated with that of TOC (P

  16. Dead-ended anode polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack operation investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, off-gas analysis and thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Quentin; Ashton, Sean; Curnick, Oliver; Reisch, Tobias; Adcock, Paul; Ronaszegi, Krisztian; Robinson, James B.; Brett, Daniel J. L.

    2014-05-01

    Dead-ended anode operation, with intermittent purge, is increasingly being used in polymer electrolyte fuel cells as it simplifies the mass flow control of feed and improves fuel efficiency. However, performance is affected through a reduction in voltage during dead-ended operation, particularly at high current density. This study uses electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), off-gas analysis and high resolution thermal imaging to examine the source of performance decay during dead-ended operation. A novel, 'reconstructed impedance' technique is applied to acquire complete EIS spectra with a temporal resolution that allows the dynamics of cell processes to be studied. The results provide evidence that upon entering dead-ended operation, there is an initial increase in performance associated with an increase in anode compartment pressure and improved hydration of the membrane electrolyte. Subsequent reduction in performance is associated with an increase in mass transport losses due to a combination of water management issues and build-up of N2 in the anode. The purge process rapidly recovers performance. Understanding of the processes involved in the dead-end/purge cycle provides a rationale for determining the optimum cycle frequency and duration as a function of current density.

  17. Simulated passage through a modified Kaplan turbine pressure regime: A supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect

    Abernethy, C. S.; Amidan, B. G.; Cada, G. F.

    2002-04-01

    A previous test series (Abernethy et al. 2001) evaluated the effects of passage through a Kaplan turbine under the “worst case” pressure conditions. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a Kaplan turbine under a more “fish-friendly” mode of operation. The results were compared to results from Abernethy et al. (2001). These data indicate that altered operating conditions that raise the nadir (low point) of the turbine passage pressure regime could reduce the injury and mortality rates of fish during turbine passage. Fall Chinook salmon were not injured or killed when subjected to the modified pressure scenario. Bluegills were more sensitive to pressure effects than fall Chinook salmon, but injury and mortality rates were lower under the modified Kaplan pressure regime. This improvement was particularly significant among fish that were acclimated to greater water pressures (traveling at greater depth).

  18. Influence of pH, inorganic anions, and dissolved organic matter on the photolysis of antimicrobial triclocarban in aqueous systems under simulated sunlight irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shi-Ling; Wang, Xi-Kui; Jiang, Wen-Qiang; Zhao, Ru-Song; Shen, Ting-Ting; Wang, Chen; Wang, Xia

    2015-04-01

    The photolysis of the antimicrobial triclocarban (TCC) in aqueous systems under simulated sunlight irradiation was studied. The effects of several abiotic parameters, including solution pH, initial TCC concentration, presence of natural organic matter, and most common inorganic anions in surface waters, were investigated. The results show that the photolysis of TCC followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The TCC photolysis rate constant increased with increasing solution pH and decreasing the initial TCC concentration. Compared with the TCC photolysis in pure water, the presence of aqueous bicarbonate, nitrate, humic acids, and its sodium salt decreased the TCC photolysis rate, but fulvic acid increased the TCC photolysis rate. The electron spin resonance and reactive oxygen species scavenging experiments indicated that TCC may undergo two different types of phototransformation reactions: direct photolysis and energy transfer to generate (1)O2. The main degradation products were tentatively identified by gas chromatography interfaced with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and a possible degradation pathway was also proposed.

  19. Off gas film cooler cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Dhingra, H.S.; Koch, W.C.; Burns, D.C.

    1997-08-26

    An apparatus is described for cleaning depositions of particulate matter from the inside of tubular piping while the piping is in use. The apparatus is remote controlled in order to operate in hazardous environments. A housing containing brush and shaft assemblies is mounted on top of the tubular piping. Pneumatic cylinders provide linear motion. A roller nut bearing provides rotary motion. The combined motion causes the brush assembly to rotate as it travels along the tube dislodging particulate matter. 5 figs.

  20. Off gas film cooler cleaner

    DOEpatents

    Dhingra, Hardip S.; Koch, William C.; Burns, David C.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus for cleaning depositions of particulate matter from the inside of tubular piping while the piping is in use. The apparatus is remote controlled in order to operate in hazardous environments. A housing containing brush and shaft assemblies is mounted on top of the tubular piping. Pneumatic cylinders provide linear motion. A roller nut bearing provides rotary motion. The combined motion causes the brush assembly to rotate as it travels along the tube dislodging particulate matter.

  1. ADDING REALISM TO NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLVING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, B.

    2011-08-15

    Two new criticality modeling approaches have greatly increased the efficiency of dissolver operations in H-Canyon. The first new approach takes credit for the linear, physical distribution of the mass throughout the entire length of the fuel assembly. This distribution of mass is referred to as the linear density. Crediting the linear density of the fuel bundles results in using lower fissile concentrations, which allows higher masses to be charged to the dissolver. Also, this approach takes credit for the fact that only part of the fissile mass is wetted at a time. There are multiple assemblies stacked on top of each other in a bundle. On average, only 50-75% of the mass (the bottom two or three assemblies) is wetted at a time. This means that only 50-75% (depending on operating level) of the mass is moderated and is contributing to the reactivity of the system. The second new approach takes credit for the progression of the dissolving process. Previously, dissolving analysis looked at a snapshot in time where the same fissile material existed both in the wells and in the bulk solution at the same time. The second new approach models multiple consecutive phases that simulate the fissile material moving from a high concentration in the wells to a low concentration in the bulk solution. This approach is more realistic and allows higher fissile masses to be charged to the dissolver.

  2. Effect of Greenhouse Gases Dissolved in Seawater.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shigeki

    2015-12-30

    A molecular dynamics simulation has been performed on the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane dissolved in a sodium chloride aqueous solution, as a simple model of seawater. A carbon dioxide molecule is also treated as a hydrogen carbonate ion. The structure, coordination number, diffusion coefficient, shear viscosity, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of the solutions have been discussed. The anomalous behaviors of these properties, especially the negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, have been observed in the higher-pressure region.

  3. Method for dissolving plutonium dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Tallent, Othar K.

    1978-01-01

    The fluoride-catalyzed, non-oxidative dissolution of plutonium dioxide in HNO.sub.3 is significantly enhanced in rate by oxidizing dissolved plutonium ions. It is believed that the oxidation of dissolved plutonium releases fluoride ions from a soluble plutonium-fluoride complex for further catalytic action.

  4. The decomposition of vegetation and soil in marginal peat-forming landscapes: climate simulations to quantify gaseous and dissolved carbon fluxes and the effects on peat accumulation and drinking water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritson, J.; Bell, M.; Clark, J. M.; Graham, N.; Templeton, M.; Brazier, R.; Verhoef, A.; Freeman, C.

    2013-12-01

    Peatlands in the UK represent a large proportion of the soil carbon store, however there is concern that some systems may be switching from sinks to sources of carbon. The accumulation of organic material in peatlands results from the slow rates of decomposition typically occurring in these regions. Climate change may lead to faster decomposition which, if not matched by an equivalent increase in net primary productivity and litter fall, may tip the balance between source and sink. Recent trends have seen a greater flux of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from peatlands to surface waters and a change in DOM character, presenting challenges to water treatment, for example in terms of increased production of disinfectant by-products (DBPs). Peat systems border a large proportion of reservoirs in the UK so uncertainty regarding DOM quantity and quality is a concern for water utilities. This study considered five peatland vegetation types (Sphagnum spp., Calluna vulgaris, Molinea caerulea, peat soil and mixed litter) collected from the Exmoor National Park, UK where it is hypothesised that peat formation may be strongly affected by future changes to climate. A factorial experiment design to simulate climate was used, considering vegetation type, temperature and rainfall amount using a current baseline and predictions from the UKCP09 model. Gaseous fluxes of carbon were monitored over a two month period to quantify the effect on carbon mineralisation rates while 13C NMR analysis was employed to track which classes of compounds decayed preferentially. The DOM collected was characterised using UV and fluorescence techniques before being subject to standard drinking water treatment processes (coagulation/flocculation followed by chlorination). The effect of the experimental factors on DOM amenability to removal and propensity to form DBPs was then considered, with both trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetonitrile (HAN) DBP classes monitored. Initial results have shown a

  5. Air classification: Potential treatment method for optimized recycling or utilization of fine-grained air pollution control residues obtained from dry off-gas cleaning high-temperature processing systems.

    PubMed

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2015-11-01

    In the dust collected from the off-gas of high-temperature processes, usually components that are volatile at the process temperature are enriched. In the recycling of the dust, the concentration of these volatile components is frequently limited to avoid operation problems. Also, for external utilization the concentration of such volatile components, especially heavy metals, is often restricted. The concentration of the volatile components is usually higher in the fine fractions of the collected dust. Therefore, air classification is a potential treatment method to deplete the coarse material from these volatile components by splitting off a fines fraction with an increased concentration of those volatile components. In this work, the procedure of a sequential classification using a laboratory air classifier and the calculations required for the evaluation of air classification for a certain application were demonstrated by taking the example of a fly ash sample from a biomass combustion plant. In the investigated example, the Pb content in the coarse fraction could be reduced to 60% by separation of 20% fines. For the non-volatile Mg the content was almost constant. It can be concluded that air classification is an appropriate method for the treatment of off-gas cleaning residues.

  6. Knowledge and understanding of dissolved solids in the Rio Grande–San Acacia, New Mexico, to Fort Quitman, Texas, and plan for future studies and monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyer, Douglas; Anderholm, Scott K.; Hogan, James F.; Phillips, Fred M.; Hibbs, Barry J.; Witcher, James C.; Matherne, Anne Marie; Falk, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    -Focused Hydrogeology Studies at Inflow Sources: Map dissolved-solids concentrations in the Rio Grande and underlying alluvial aquifer; perform hydrogeologic characterization of subsurface areas containing unusually high concentrations of dissolved solids. -Modeling of Dissolved Solids: Develop models to simulate the transport and storage of dissolved solids in both surface-water and groundwater systems.

  7. The Measurement of Dissolved Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thistlethwayte, D.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Describes an experiment in environmental chemistry which serves to determine the dissolved oxygen concentration in both fresh and saline water. Applications of the method at the undergraduate and secondary school levels are recommended. (CC)

  8. METHOD OF DISSOLVING URANIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Slotin, L.A.

    1958-02-18

    This patent relates to an economicai means of dissolving metallic uranium. It has been found that the addition of a small amount of perchloric acid to the concentrated nitric acid in which the uranium is being dissolved greatly shortens the time necessary for dissolution of the metal. Thus the use of about 1 or 2 percent of perchioric acid based on the weight of the nitric acid used, reduces the time of dissolution of uranium by a factor of about 100.

  9. Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO{sub x} emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO{sub x} fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO{sub x} emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO{sub 2} which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  10. Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO[sub x] emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO[sub x] fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO[sub x] emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO[sub 2] which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  11. Hydrothermal contribution to the oceanic dissolved iron inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliabue, Alessandro; Bopp, Laurent; Dutay, Jean-Claude; Bowie, Andrew R.; Chever, Fanny; Jean-Baptiste, Philippe; Bucciarelli, Eva; Lannuzel, Delphine; Remenyi, Tomas; Sarthou, Géraldine; Aumont, Olivier; Gehlen, Marion; Jeandel, Catherine

    2010-04-01

    Iron limits phytoplankton growth and hence the biological carbon pump in the Southern Ocean. Models assessing the impacts of iron on the global carbon cycle generally rely on dust input and sediment resuspension as the predominant sources. Although it was previously thought that most iron from deep-ocean hydrothermal activity was inaccessible to phytoplankton because of the formation of particulates, it has been suggested that iron from hydrothermal activity may be an important source of oceanic dissolved iron. Here we use a global ocean model to assess the impacts of an annual dissolved iron flux of approximately 9×108mol, as estimated from regional observations of hydrothermal activity, on the dissolved iron inventory of the world's oceans. We find the response to the input of hydrothermal dissolved iron is greatest in the Southern Hemisphere oceans. In particular, observations of the distribution of dissolved iron in the Southern Ocean (Chever et al., manuscript in preparation; Bowie et al., manuscript in preparation) can be replicated in our simulations only when our estimated iron flux from hydrothermal sources is included. As the hydrothermal flux of iron is relatively constant over millennial timescales, we propose that hydrothermal activity can buffer the oceanic dissolved iron inventory against shorter-term fluctuations in dust deposition.

  12. Reducing Emissions from Uranium Dissolving

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO{sub x} emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. The trays are steam coil heated. The process has operated satisfactorily, with few difficulties, for decades. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO{sub x} fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO{sub x} emissions. Because NO{sub x} is hazardous, fumes should be suppressed whenever the electric blower system is inoperable. Because the tray dissolving process has worked well for decades, as much of the current capital equipment and operating procedures as possible were preserved. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO{sub 2}, which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered.

  13. Dissolving pulp from jute stick.

    PubMed

    Matin, Mhafuza; Rahaman, M Mostafizur; Nayeem, Jannatun; Sarkar, Mamon; Jahan, M Sarwar

    2015-01-22

    Jute stick is woody portion of jute plant, which remain as leftover after extracting bast fibre. Presently, it is being used for fencing in the rural area. In this investigation, biorefinery concept was initiated in producing dissolving pulp from jute stick by pre-hydrolysis kraft process. At 170°C for 1h of pre-hydrolysis, 70% of hemicelluloses was dissolved with negligible loss of α-cellulose. At this condition, 75% of dissolved sugars in the pre-hydrolysis liquor were in the oligomeric form. The pre-hydrolysed jute stick was subsequently pulped by kraft process with the variation of active alkali. The pulp yield was 36.2% with kappa number 18.5 at the conditions of 16% active alkali for 2h of cooking at 170°C. Final pulp was produced with 92% α-cellulose and 89% brightness after D0EpD1EpD1 bleaching. The produced dissolving pulp can be used in rayon production.

  14. Dissolving pulp from jute stick.

    PubMed

    Matin, Mhafuza; Rahaman, M Mostafizur; Nayeem, Jannatun; Sarkar, Mamon; Jahan, M Sarwar

    2015-01-22

    Jute stick is woody portion of jute plant, which remain as leftover after extracting bast fibre. Presently, it is being used for fencing in the rural area. In this investigation, biorefinery concept was initiated in producing dissolving pulp from jute stick by pre-hydrolysis kraft process. At 170°C for 1h of pre-hydrolysis, 70% of hemicelluloses was dissolved with negligible loss of α-cellulose. At this condition, 75% of dissolved sugars in the pre-hydrolysis liquor were in the oligomeric form. The pre-hydrolysed jute stick was subsequently pulped by kraft process with the variation of active alkali. The pulp yield was 36.2% with kappa number 18.5 at the conditions of 16% active alkali for 2h of cooking at 170°C. Final pulp was produced with 92% α-cellulose and 89% brightness after D0EpD1EpD1 bleaching. The produced dissolving pulp can be used in rayon production. PMID:25439866

  15. METHOD OF DISSOLVING METALLIC URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, W.W.

    1959-07-28

    A process is presented for more rapidly dissolving metallic uranium which comprises contacting the uranium with a mixture of nitric and phosphoric acids. The preferred concentration is a mixture which is about 10 M in nitric acid and between 0.1 to 0.15 M in phosphoric acid.

  16. Erosion patterns on dissolving blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Patterns in nature are shaped under water flows and wind action, and the understanding of their morphodynamics goes through the identification of the physical mechanisms at play. When a dissoluble body is exposed to a water flow, typical patterns with scallop-like shapes may appear [1,2]. These shapes are observed on the walls of underground rivers or icebergs. We experimentally study the erosion of dissolving bodies made of salt, caramel or ice into water solutions without external flow. The dissolving mixture, which is created at the solid/liquid interface, undergoes a buoyancy-driven instability comparable to a Rayleigh-Bénard instability so that the dissolving front destabilizes into filaments. This mechanism yields to spatial variations of solute concentration and to differential dissolution of the dissolving block. We first observe longitudinal stripes with a well defined wavelength, which evolve towards chevrons and scallops that interact and move again the dissolving current. Thanks to a careful analysis of the competing physical mechanisms, we propose scaling laws, which account for the characteristic lengths and times of the early regime in experiments. The long-term evolution of patterns is understood qualitatively. A close related mechanism has been proposed to explain structures observed on the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes [3] and we suggest that our experiments are analogous and explain the scallop-like patterns on iceberg walls. [1] P. Meakin and B. Jamtveit, Geological pattern formation by growth and dissolution in aqueous systems, Proc. R. Soc. A 466, 659-694 (2010). [2] P.N. Blumberg and R.L. Curl, Experimental and theoretical studies of dissolution roughness, J. Fluid Mech. 65, 735-751 (1974). [3] L. Solari and G. Parker, Morphodynamic modelling of the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes, J.G.R. 118, 1432-1442 (2013).

  17. Novel method for online monitoring of dissolved N2O concentrations through a gas stripping device.

    PubMed

    Mampaey, Kris E; van Dongen, Udo G J M; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2015-01-01

    Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment plants are currently measured by online gas phase analysis or grab sampling from the liquid phase. In this study, a novel method is presented to monitor the liquid phase N2O concentration for aerated as well as non-aerated conditions/reactors, following variations both in time and in space. The monitoring method consists of a gas stripping device, of which the measurement principle is based on a continuous flow of reactor liquid through a stripping flask and subsequent analysis of the N2O concentration in the stripped gas phase. The method was theoretically and experimentally evaluated for its fit for use in the wastewater treatment context. Besides, the influence of design and operating variables on the performance of the gas stripping device was addressed. This method can easily be integrated with online off-gas measurements and allows to better investigate the origin of the gas emissions from the treatment plant. Liquid phase measurements of N2O are of use in mitigation of these emissions. The method can also be applied to measure other dissolved gasses, such as methane, being another important greenhouse gas.

  18. Novel method for online monitoring of dissolved N2O concentrations through a gas stripping device.

    PubMed

    Mampaey, Kris E; van Dongen, Udo G J M; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2015-01-01

    Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment plants are currently measured by online gas phase analysis or grab sampling from the liquid phase. In this study, a novel method is presented to monitor the liquid phase N2O concentration for aerated as well as non-aerated conditions/reactors, following variations both in time and in space. The monitoring method consists of a gas stripping device, of which the measurement principle is based on a continuous flow of reactor liquid through a stripping flask and subsequent analysis of the N2O concentration in the stripped gas phase. The method was theoretically and experimentally evaluated for its fit for use in the wastewater treatment context. Besides, the influence of design and operating variables on the performance of the gas stripping device was addressed. This method can easily be integrated with online off-gas measurements and allows to better investigate the origin of the gas emissions from the treatment plant. Liquid phase measurements of N2O are of use in mitigation of these emissions. The method can also be applied to measure other dissolved gasses, such as methane, being another important greenhouse gas. PMID:25573615

  19. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Shor, R.S.; Vogler, S.

    1958-01-21

    A process is described for dissolving binary zirconium-uranium alloys where the uranium content is about 2%. In prior dissolution procedures for these alloys, an oxidizing agent was added to prevent the precipitation of uranium tetrafluoride. In the present method complete dissolution is accomplished without the use of the oxidizing agent by using only the stoichiometric amount or slight excess of HF required by the zirconium. The concentration of the acid may range from 2M to 10M and the dissolution is advatageously carried out at a temperature of 80 deg C.

  20. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment of Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in responsible to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lines concrete vault, replacing and existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. New scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  1. Erosion Patterns on Dissolving Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Caroline; Polizzi, Stefano; Berhanu, Michael; Derr, Julien; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    The shaping of landscapes results from water or wind erosional processes. Here we focus on dissolution processes. We perform laboratory experiments on hard caramel bodies, which dissolve on a short timescale, compared to geological material such as limestone. We highlight the spontaneous appearance of a dissolution pattern with no external flow. When a tilted hard caramel block dissolves, the syrup (denser than water) sinks in the bath and induces a flow, which results in a pattern on the bottom of the block. First parallel stripes appear, which evolve to transversal scallops in about one hour. The whole pattern moves upstream at a slow velocity. The stripes appearance is due to a buoyancy-driven instability. By varying the density and the viscosity of the bath, we show that the initial wavelengths of the pattern are in agreement with those given by the solutal Rayleigh-Benard number. Later pattern evolution to scallops results from complex interactions between the flow and the topography. Finally we emphasize that similar mechanism of patterns formation can occur in the dissolution of minerals like salt, but also in the shaping of the bottom face of melting icebergs in the cold seas.

  2. Use of combined air sparging and soil vacuum extraction (AS/SVE) and groundwater recovery and treatment as remedial alternatives for dissolved DNAPL recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sturdivant, R. Jr.; Fulton, G.A. Jr.; Bains, F.E.

    1995-10-01

    Corrective action has been implemented to address a dissolved dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) plume in the vicinity of a former waste impoundment at the Paxon Polymer Company facility, located north of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Assessment activities focused on the characterization of the geologic and hydrologic properties of the sediments underlying the area of investigation and the impact of the dissolved DNAPL plume to the soils and groundwater. Geologic characterization revealed that the facility is underlain by Quaternary age sediments consisting of mixtures of fine-grained sands, silt, and clay. Two hydrologic units were identified within the shallow sediments which are referred to as the Upper Permeable Zone and Second Permeable Zone. The investigation focused on the impacted soils and groundwater of the Upper and Second Permeable Zones. The Upper and Second Permeable Zones were characterized hydrologically to determine the most applicable remedial alternative for addressing the dissolved DNAPL plume. Pilot tests consisting of soil vacuum extraction (SVE), combined air sparging with SVE (AS/SVE), and groundwater recovery were performed. Evaluation of these remedial technology alternatives resulted in the selection of the combined AS/SVE system alternative for the Upper Permeable Zone and the groundwater recovery alternative for the Second Permeable Zone. Recovered off-gas from the combined AS/SVE treatment system from the Upper Permeable Zone is treated through use of a granular activated carbon unit, while recovered groundwater form the Second Permeable Zone is treated by use of a low-profile air stripper.

  3. Dissolved air-flotation processes. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Krofta, M.; Wang, L.K.

    1986-11-05

    The theories and applications of various dissolved-air-flotation clarifiers (Supracell, Sandfloat, Floatpress, and Sedifloat) are presented. Supracell is a high-rate dissolved-air-flotation clarifier with only 3 to 5 minutes of detention time. Major application of Supracell is industrial-effluent treatment. Sandfloat is a package plant consisting of flocculation, dissolved-air floatation and automatic backwash filtration, and designed for either potable water treatment or tertiary wastewater-treatment. Sedifloat is a wastewater-treatment package plant consisting of both sedimentation and dissolved-air flotation. Floatpress consists of both dissolved air flotation and filter press and is specifically designed for sludge thickening. A Krofta Bargefloat is a floating lake-water clarification plant designed for acid-rain neutralization, phosphorus removal, algae removal and lake-water purification. Bargefloat has built-in chemical feeders, flocculator, dissolved-air-flotation clarifier and sand filter on a barge.

  4. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on sludge settleability.

    PubMed

    Martins, A M P; Heijnen, J J; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2003-10-01

    This laboratory study presents a detailed evaluation of the effects of dissolved oxygen concentration and accumulation of storage polymers on sludge settleability in activated sludge systems with an aerobic selector. The oxygen and substrate availability regime were simulated in laboratory sequencing batch reactor systems. The experiments showed that low dissolved oxygen concentration (< or =1.1 mg O2 l(-1)) had a strong negative effect on sludge settleability, leading to the proliferation of filamentous bacteria (Thiothrix spp., Type 021N and Type 1851). This negative effect was stronger at high chemical oxygen demand loading rate. This indicates that a compartmentalised (plug flow) aerobic contact tank, designed at short hydraulic residence time to guarantee a strong substrate gradient, with low dissolved oxygen concentration, might be worse for sludge settleability than an "overdesigned" completely mixed contact tank. Contrary to the general hypothesis, the maximum specific acetate uptake rate, poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate production rate, and resistance to short starvation periods are similar in both poor- and well-settling sludge. The results of this study support our previous hypothesis on the importance of substrate gradients for the development of filamentous structures in biological flocs, from soluble organic substrate gradients to dissolved oxygen gradients in sludge flocs.

  5. METHOD OF DISSOLVING REFRACTORY ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Helton, D.M.; Savolainen, J.K.

    1963-04-23

    This patent relates to the dissolution of alloys of uranium with zirconium, thorium, molybdenum, or niobium. The alloy is contacted with an anhydrous solution of mercuric chloride in a low-molecular-weight monohydric alcohol to produce a mercury-containing alcohol slurry. The slurry is then converted to an aqueous system by adding water and driving off the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry is electrolyzed in the presence of a mercury cathode to remove the mercury and produce a uranium-bearing aqueous solution. This process is useful for dissolving irradiated nuclear reactor fuels for radiochemical reprocessing by solvent extraction. In addition, zirconium-alloy cladding is selectively removed from uranium dioxide fuel compacts by this means. (AEC)

  6. [Concentrations and Speciation of Dissolved Heavy Metal in Rainwater in Guiyang, China].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhao-zhou; Li, Jun; Wang, Zhi-ru

    2015-06-01

    In order to understand the pollution situation, as well as seasonal changes in characteristics and speciation of dissolved heavy metals in acid rain control zone, the concentrations of dissolved heavy metals in rainwater collected at Guiyang were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). And the speciation of dissolved heavy metals was further simulated by PHREEQC model. The results showed that the dissolved Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd concentrations were low and not higher than the national standards for drinking water quality in China. The dissolved Pd concentrations were high in fall and winter and higher than the national standards for drinking water quality in China. The Co and Ni in rainwater mainly came from the crust and there was almost no human impact. The Cu, Zn, Cd and Pd pollutions in rainwater were affected by human activity with different levels. The degrees of contamination in autumn and winter were more serious than those in spring and summer. The free metal ion species was the dominant form of dissolved heavy metal, accounting for 47.27%-95.28% of the dissolved metal in rainwater from Guiyang city. The free metal ion species was followed in abundance by Metal-Oxalate and Metal-sulfate complexes that accounted for 0.72% -51.87% and 0.50%-7.66%, respectively. The acidity of rainwater, acid type as well as content of ligand more likely controlled the distribution of dissolved heavy metal in precipitation. PMID:26387294

  7. [Concentrations and Speciation of Dissolved Heavy Metal in Rainwater in Guiyang, China].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhao-zhou; Li, Jun; Wang, Zhi-ru

    2015-06-01

    In order to understand the pollution situation, as well as seasonal changes in characteristics and speciation of dissolved heavy metals in acid rain control zone, the concentrations of dissolved heavy metals in rainwater collected at Guiyang were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). And the speciation of dissolved heavy metals was further simulated by PHREEQC model. The results showed that the dissolved Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd concentrations were low and not higher than the national standards for drinking water quality in China. The dissolved Pd concentrations were high in fall and winter and higher than the national standards for drinking water quality in China. The Co and Ni in rainwater mainly came from the crust and there was almost no human impact. The Cu, Zn, Cd and Pd pollutions in rainwater were affected by human activity with different levels. The degrees of contamination in autumn and winter were more serious than those in spring and summer. The free metal ion species was the dominant form of dissolved heavy metal, accounting for 47.27%-95.28% of the dissolved metal in rainwater from Guiyang city. The free metal ion species was followed in abundance by Metal-Oxalate and Metal-sulfate complexes that accounted for 0.72% -51.87% and 0.50%-7.66%, respectively. The acidity of rainwater, acid type as well as content of ligand more likely controlled the distribution of dissolved heavy metal in precipitation.

  8. Influence of dissolved organic materials on turbid water optical properties and remote-sensing reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Harriss, R. C.; Usry, J. W.; Poole, L. R.; Houghton, W. M.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of dissolved organic materials on turbid-water optical properties are assessed, by means of field measurements and laboratory simulations in which upwelled reflectance, attenuation, absorption, and backscatter spectral properties at wavelengths from 450 to 800 nm are examined in relation to water chemistry. The data show that dissolved organic materials decrease upwelled reflectance from turbid waters, and that the decrease in reflectance is a nonlinear function of concentration with the largest gradients at low carbon concentrations, depending on wavelength. Upwelled reflectance is found to be highly correlated with two backscatter-absorption parameters used in some optical models, which are nonlinear with dissolved organic material concentration change.

  9. Temporal evolution of hyporheic dissolved organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielsen, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a complex suite of organic compounds present in natural ecosystems, and is particularly studied in river systems. The hyporheic zone (HZ), a region of surface water-shallow groundwater exchange, has been identified as a hotspot of DOC processing and is generally regarded as a net sink of organic matter. More recent studies into riverine DOC have shifted to examining DOC quality rather than bulk quantity. DOC quality variability has been linked to hydrologic and climatic variability, both focuses of current climate change research. This presentation examines the effect of organic and inorganic HZ DOC processes, i.e. microbial uptake and sorption, respectively, on DOC quality as measured through molecular weight distributions (MWDs). Sediment and water samples from East Fork Jemez River in northern New Mexico are used to experimentally simulate DOC processes and observe the subsequent effect on MWD evolution. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) of excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) is also used to examine fluorescent properties throughout DOC process experimentation, providing a second characterizing metric. Results from this study will be applied to a field sampling campaign in the summer of 2011 along the East Fork Jemez River to study temporal and spatial variability in organic and inorganic DOC processes.

  10. Investigating Students' Understanding of the Dissolving Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naah, Basil M.; Sanger, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, the authors identified several student misconceptions regarding the process of dissolving ionic compounds in water. The present study used multiple-choice questions whose distractors were derived from these misconceptions to assess students' understanding of the dissolving process at the symbolic and particulate levels. The…

  11. Dissolved Oxygen Data for Coos Estuary (Oregon)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this product is the transmittal of dissolved oxygen data collected in the Coos Estuary, Oregon to Ms. Molly O'Neill (University of Oregon), for use in her studies on the factors influencing spatial and temporal patterns in dissolved oxygen in this estuary. These d...

  12. Dissolved air flotation and me.

    PubMed

    Edzwald, James K

    2010-04-01

    This paper is mainly a critical review of the literature and an assessment of what we know about dissolved air flotation (DAF). A few remarks are made at the outset about the author's personal journey in DAF research, his start and its progression. DAF has been used for several decades in drinking water treatment as an alternative clarification method to sedimentation. DAF is particularly effective in treating reservoir water supplies; those supplies containing algae, natural color or natural organic matter; and those with low mineral turbidity. It is more efficient than sedimentation in removing turbidity and particles for these type supplies. Furthermore, it is more efficient in removing Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts. In the last 20 years, fundamental models were developed that provide a basis for understanding the process, optimizing it, and integrating it into water treatment plants. The theories were tested through laboratory and pilot-plant studies. Consequently, there have been trends in which DAF pretreatment has been optimized resulting in better coagulation and a decrease in the size of flocculation tanks. In addition, the hydraulic loading rates have increased reducing the size of DAF processes. While DAF has been used mainly in conventional type water plants, there is now interest in the technology as a pretreatment step in ultrafiltration membrane plants and in desalination reverse osmosis plants.

  13. Open cluster evolutions in binary system: How they dissolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyatikanto, R.; Arifyanto, M. I.; Wulandari, H. R. T.

    2014-03-01

    Binarity among stellar clusters in galaxy is such a reality which has been realized for a long time, but still hides several questions and problems to be solved. Some of binary star clusters are formed by close encounter, but the others are formed together from similar womb. Some of them undergo separation process, while the others are in the middle of merger toward common future. The products of merger binary star cluster have typical characteristics which differ from solo clusters, especially in their spatial distribution and their stellar members kinematics. On the other hand, these merger products still have to face dissolving processes triggered by both internal and external factors. In this study, we performed N-body simulations of merger binary clusters with different initial conditions. After merging, these clusters dissolve with greater mass-loss rate because of their angular momentum. These rotating clusters also experience more deceleration caused by external tidal field.

  14. Fish passage through a simulated horizontal bulb turbine pressure regime: A supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect

    Abernethy, C. S.; Amidan, B. G.; Cada, G. F.

    2003-07-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the “worst case” pressure conditions (Abernethy et al. 2001) and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized (Abernethy et al. 2002). For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low-head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

  15. Modeled impacts of surface coal mining on dissolved solids in the Tongue River, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woods, Paul F.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model has been developed for spatial and temporal simulation of streamflow and dissolved solids in the Tongue River from the Tongue River Dam to Miles City, Montana. User-defined plans of surface coal mining and agricultural development permit evaluation of potential changes in dissolved solids resulting from leaching of overburden material used to backfill mine pits and from withdrawal and return flow of irrigation water. Provision is made for simulation runs using increased streamflow from a proposed larger reservoir intended to replace the present Tongue River Reservoir. Simulations at mean streamflow indicated that mining 119,600 acres of federally leased coal tracts may increase by 4.8 percent the present annual dissolved-solids concentration in the Tongue River at Miles City. Simulations using the proposed Tongue River reservoir show substantial reductions in dissolved-solids concentration when paired with similar simulations using the present Tongue River Reservoir. When compared on a per-acre basis for the study area, the dewatering caused by irrigation increases dissolved-solids concentration more than the input of leachates from surface coal-mining operations. (USGS)

  16. Documentation of a dissolved-solids model of the Tongue River, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woods, Paul F.

    1981-01-01

    A model has been developed for assessing potential increases in dissolved solids of the Tongue River as a result of leaching of overburden materials used to backfill pits in surface coal-mining operations. The model allows spatial and temporal simulation of streamflow and dissolved-solids loads and concentrations under user-defined scenarios of surface coal mining and agricultural development. The model routes an input quantity of streamflow and dissolved solids from the upstream end to the downstream end of a stream reach while algebraically accounting for gains and losses of streamflow and dissolved solids within the stream reach. Input data needed to operate the model include the following: simulation number, designation of hydrologic conditions for each simulated month, either user-defined or regression-defined concentrations of dissolved solids input by the Tongue River Reservoir, number of irrigated acres, number of mined acres, dissolved-solids concentration of mine leachates and quantity of other water losses. A listing of the Fortran computer program, definitions of all variables in the model, and an example output permit use of the model by interested persons. (USGS)

  17. Transient Dissolved Organic Carbon Through Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Y.; Hornberger, G. M.; Kaplan, L. A.; Newbold, J. D.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Tsang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important constituent of soil solution that plays a role in many chemical and biological processes in soils; it is also an important energy source for bacteria in the soil ecosystem. Hydrology has a significant control on the transport and fate of dissolved organic carbon in the soil but mechanisms that affect said transport are not well understood. In particular, dynamic information on DOC transport through forest soils on short time scales (one or two precipitation event) is lacking at present. DOC is a very complex mix of organic compounds. A key to quantifying DOC dynamics is to establish useful approximations for behavior of this complex mixture. Biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) is an important part of DOC. It is reported that between 12 and 44% of DOC released from the forest floor can be decomposed in solutions by indigenous microbes. In our study, we considered how DOC, BDOC, and flow interact in soil columns. In-situ soil cores with two different lengths were installed under a mixed deciduous canopy. The effects of artificial rain on DOC and BDOC transport were examined by dripping nano pure water amended with bromide on the top of soil cores and sampling the water collected at the bottom of the cores for DOC and BDOC. We used plug-flow biofilm reactors to measure the BDOC concentration. It is likely that reduced rates of decomposition in dry soils will cause microbial products of DOC to accumulate; hence DOC concentration should be high at the first flush of rain and decline as the event proceeds. The experimental results show the expected pattern, that is, the first samples we collected always had the highest DOC and BDOC concentrations. The concentrations tend to decline through the simulated precipitation event. Application of a second “storm” forty minutes after the cessation of the first application of water resulted in effluent DOC concentration increasing a small amount initially and then

  18. The Influence of Physical Forcing on Bottom-water Dissolved Oxygen within the Caloosahatchee River Estuary, FL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC), a numerical estuarine and coastal ocean circulation hydrodynamic model, was used to simulate the distribution of dissolved oxygen (DO), salinity, temperature, nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), and chlorophyll a in the Caloosahatchee Riv...

  19. Photochemistry of Dissolved Black Carbon Released from Biochar: Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Phototransformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Liu, Huiting; Mao, Jingdong; Chu, Wenying; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Qu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved black carbon (BC) released from biochar can be one of the more photoactive components in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool. Dissolved BC was mainly composed of aliphatics and aromatics substituted by aromatic C-O and carboxyl/ester/quinone moieties as determined by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. It underwent 56% loss of absorbance at 254 nm, almost complete loss of fluorescence, and 30% mineralization during a 169 h simulated sunlight exposure. Photoreactions preferentially targeted aromatic and methyl moieties, generating CH2/CH/C and carboxyl/ester/quinone functional groups. During irradiation, dissolved BC generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) including singlet oxygen and superoxide. The apparent quantum yield of singlet oxygen was 4.07 ± 0.19%, 2-3 fold higher than many well-studied DOM. Carbonyl-containing structures other than aromatic ketones were involved in the singlet oxygen sensitization. The generation of superoxide apparently depended on electron transfer reactions mediated by silica minerals in dissolved BC, in which phenolic structures served as electron donors. Self-generated ROS played an important role in the phototransformation. Photobleaching of dissolved BC decreased its ability to further generate ROS due to lower light absorption. These findings have significant implications on the environmental fate of dissolved BC and that of priority pollutants. PMID:26717492

  20. Dialysate With High Dissolved Hydrogen Facilitates Dissociation of Indoxyl Sulfate From Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Tange, Yoshihiro; Takesawa, Shingo; Yoshitake, Shigenori

    2015-01-01

    Background: Protein-bound toxins such as indoxyl sulfate (IS) are not efficiently removed by conventional hemodialysis (HD). Objectives: To improve the removal of IS, we performed an in vitro study to evaluate the effects of high dissolved hydrogen on the dissociation of IS from albumin using simulated HD. Materials and Methods: Wasted dialysate from peritoneal dialysis was concentrated a hundred times using extracorporeal ultrafiltration method. Dialysate with high dissolved hydrogen was made by mixing concentrated dialysis solution and electrolyzed-reduced water. The amounts of free fractions of IS were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Results: IS was significantly dissociated from albumin using dialysate with high dissolved hydrogen compared with conventional dialysate (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Effective removal of IS is expected using a dialysate with high dissolved hydrogen. PMID:25883914

  1. Dissolved Fe(II) in a river-estuary system rich in dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopwood, Mark J.; Statham, Peter J.; Milani, Ambra

    2014-12-01

    Reduced iron, Fe(II), accounts for a significant fraction of dissolved Fe across many natural surface waters despite its rapid oxidation under oxic conditions. Here we investigate the temporal and spatial variation in dissolved Fe redox state in a high dissolved organic matter (DOM) estuarine system, the River Beaulieu. We couple manual sample collection with the deployment of an autonomous in situ analyser, designed to simultaneously measure dissolved Fe(II) and total dissolved Fe, in order to investigate processes operating on the diurnal timescale and to evaluate the performance of the analyser in a high DOM environment. Concentrations of dissolved Fe available to the ligand ferrozine are elevated throughout the estuary (up to 21 μM in freshwater) and notably higher than those previously reported likely due to seasonal variation. Fe(II) is observed to account for a large, varying fraction of the dissolved Fe available to ferrozine (25.5 ± 12.5%) and this fraction decreases with increasing salinity. We demonstrate that the very high DOM concentration in this environment and association of this DOM with dissolved Fe, prevents the accurate measurement of dissolved Fe concentrations in situ using a sensor reliant on rapid competitive ligand exchange.

  2. Dissolved-Solids Load in Henrys Fork Upstream from the Confluence with Antelope Wash, Wyoming, Water Years 1970-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Katharine; Kenney, Terry A.

    2010-01-01

    Annual dissolved-solids load at the mouth of Henrys Fork was estimated by using data from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station 09229500, Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah. The annual dissolved-solids load for water years 1970-2009 ranged from 18,300 tons in 1977 to 123,300 tons in 1983. Annual streamflows for this period ranged from 14,100 acre-feet in 1977 to 197,500 acre-feet in 1983. The 25-percent trimmed mean dissolved-solids load for water years 1970-2009 was 44,300 tons per year at Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah. Previous simulations using a SPAtially Referenced Regression On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) model for dissolved solids specific to water year 1991 conditions in the Upper Colorado River Basin predicted an annual dissolved-solids load of 25,000 tons for the Henrys Fork Basin upstream from Antelope Wash. On the basis of computed dissolved-solids load data from Henrys Fork near Manila, Utah, together with estimated annual dissolved-solids load from Antelope Wash and Peoples Canal, this prediction was adjusted to 37,200 tons. As determined by simulations with the Upper Colorado River Basin SPARROW model, approximately 56 percent (14,000 tons per year) of the dissolved-solids load at Henrys Fork upstream from Antelope Wash is associated with the 21,500 acres of irrigated agricultural lands in the upper Henrys Fork Basin.

  3. Key results from SB8 simulant flowsheet studies

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, D. C.

    2013-04-26

    Key technically reviewed results are presented here in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) acceptance of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). This report summarizes results from simulant flowsheet studies of the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Results include: Hydrogen generation rate for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles of the CPC on a 6,000 gallon basis; Volume percent of nitrous oxide, N2O, produced during the SRAT cycle; Ammonium ion concentrations recovered from the SRAT and SME off-gas; and, Dried weight percent solids (insoluble, soluble, and total) measurements and density.

  4. Treatment of SRS Tank 48H Simulants Using Fenton's Reagent

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, PA

    2003-11-18

    High-level-waste Tank 48H at the Savannah River Site (SRS) contains about 50,000 lb of tetraphenylborate (TPB), which must be destroyed to return the tank to active service. Laboratory-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the use of Fenton's Reagent (hydrogen peroxide and a metal catalyst) to treat simulants of the Tank 48H waste. Samples of the treated slurry and the off-gas were analyzed to determine the reaction products. Process parameters developed earlier by AEA Technology were used for these tests; namely (for 500 mL of waste simulant), reduce pH to 7.5 with nitric acid, heat to boiling, add hydrogen peroxide at 1 mL/min for 1 h, reduce pH to 3.5, and add the remaining peroxide at 2 mL/min. These parameters were developed to minimize the formation of tarry materials during the early part of the reaction and to minimize the concentration of total organic carbon in the final treated slurry. The treated samples contained low concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC) and no detectable TPB. Tests using a mixture of iron and copper salts as the Fenton's catalyst had a lower TOC concentration in the final treated slurry than did tests that used a copper-only catalyst. TPB is known to hydrolyze to benzene, particularly at high temperature and low pH, and copper is known to increase the rate of hydrolysis. Significant amounts of benzene were present in the off-gas from the tests, especially during the early portion of the treatment, indicating that the hydrolysis reaction was occurring in parallel with the oxidation of the TPB by Fenton's reagent. For the reaction conditions used in these tests, approximately equal fractions of the TPB were converted to benzene and carbon dioxide. Minimizing the formation of benzene is important to SRS personnel; however, this consideration was not addressed in the AEA-recommended parameters, since they did not analyze for benzene in the off-gas. Smaller amounts of carbon monoxide and other organics were also produced. One test

  5. Uncertainty analysis in dissolved oxygen modeling in streams.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Maged M; El-Beshry, Manar Z

    2004-08-01

    Uncertainty analysis in surface water quality modeling is an important issue. This paper presents a method based on the first-order reliability method (FORM) to assess the exceedance probability of a target dissolved oxygen concentration in a stream, using a Streeter-Phelps prototype model. Basic uncertainty in the input parameters is considered by representing them as random variables with prescribed probability distributions. Results obtained from FORM analysis compared well with those of the Monte Carlo simulation method. The analysis also presents the stochastic sensitivity of the probabilistic outcome in the form of uncertainty importance factors, and shows how they change with changing simulation time. Furthermore, a parametric sensitivity analysis was conducted to show the effect of selection of different probability distribution functions for the three most important parameters on the design point, exceedance probability, and importance factors.

  6. FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING USING AZ 102 AND C 106/AY-102 HLW SIMULANTS: HLW SIMULANT VERIFICATION VSL-05R5800-1 REV 0 6/27/05

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter tests were to determine the effects of feed rheology, feed solid content, and bubbler configuration on glass production rate and off-gas system performance while processing the HLW AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 feed compositions; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components, as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and perform pre- and post test inspections of system components. The specific objectives (including test success criteria) of this testing, along with how each objective was met, are outlined in a table. The data provided in this Final Report address the impacts of HLW melter feed rheology on melter throughput and validation of the simulated HLW melter feeds. The primary purpose of this testing is to further validate/verify the HLW melter simulants that have been used for previous melter testing and to support their continued use in developing melter and off-gas related processing information for the Project. The primary simulant property in question is rheology. Simulants and melter feeds used in all previous melter tests were produced by direct addition of chemicals; these feed tend to be less viscous than rheological the upper-bound feeds made from actual wastes. Data provided here compare melter processing for the melter feed used in all previous DM100 and DM1200 tests (nominal melter feed) with feed adjusted by the feed vendor (NOAH Technologies) to be more viscous, thereby simulating more closely the upperbounding feed produced from actual waste. This report provides results of tests that are described in the Test Plan for this work. The Test Plan is responsive to one of several test objectives covered in the WTP Test Specification for this work; consequently, only part of the scope described in the Test Specification was addressed in this particular Test Plan. For the purpose of

  7. Process for coal liquefaction in staged dissolvers

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, George W.; Givens, Edwin N.; Skinner, Ronald W.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a pasting oil, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. In accordance with the improved process, the first dissolver is operated at a higher temperature than the second dissolver. This temperature sequence produces improved product selectivity and permits the incorporation of sufficient hydrogen in the solvent for adequate recycle operations.

  8. Dissolved Oxygen Levels in Lake Chabot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, D.; Pica, R.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen levels are crucial in every aquatic ecosystem; it allows for the fish to breathe and it is the best indicator of water quality. Lake Chabot is the main backup water source for Castro Valley, making it crucial that the lake stays in good health. Last year, research determined that the water in Lake Chabot was of good quality and not eutrophic. This year, an experiment was conducted using Lake Chabot's dissolved oxygen levels to ensure the quality of the water and to support the findings of the previous team. After testing three specifically chosen sites at the lake using a dissolved oxygen meter, results showed that the oxygen levels in the lake were within the healthy range. It was then determined that Lake Chabot is a suitable backup water source and it continues to remain a healthy habitat.

  9. A Quantitative Evaluation of Dissolved Oxygen Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pijanowski, Barbara S.

    1971-01-01

    The implications of the presence of dissolved oxygen in water are discussed in terms of its deleterious or beneficial effects, depending on the functional consequences to those affected, e.g., the industrialist, the oceanographer, and the ecologist. The paper is devoted primarily to an examination of the performance of five commercially available dissolved oxygen meters. The design of each is briefly reviewed and ease or difficulty of use in the field described. Specifically, the evaluation program treated a number of parameters and user considerations including an initial check and trial calibration for each instrument and a discussion of the measurement methodology employed. Detailed test results are given relating to the effects of primary power variation, water-flow sensitivity, response time, relative accuracy of dissolved-oxygen readout, temperature accuracy (for those instruments which included this feature), error and repeatability, stability, pressure and other environmental effects, and test results obtained in the field. Overall instrument performance is summarized comparatively by chart.

  10. Dissolving process of a cellulose bunch in ionic liquids: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Suojiang; Yao, Yingying; Yao, Xiaoqian; Xu, Junli; Lu, Xingmei

    2015-07-21

    In recent years, a variety of ionic liquids (ILs) were found to be capable of dissolving cellulose and mechanistic studies were also reported. However, there is still a lack of detailed information at the molecular level. Here, long time molecular dynamics simulations of cellulose bunch in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EmimAc), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EmimCl), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BmimCl) and water were performed to analyze the inherent interaction and dissolving mechanism. Complete dissolution of the cellulose bunch was observed in EmimAc, while little change took place in EmimCl and BmimCl, and nothing significant happened in water. The deconstruction of the hydrogen bond (H-bond) network in cellulose was found and analyzed quantitatively. The synergistic effect of cations and anions was revealed by analyzing the whole dissolving process. Initially, cations bind to the side face of the cellulose bunch and anions insert into the cellulose strands to form H-bonds with hydroxyl groups. Then cations start to intercalate into cellulose chains due to their strong electrostatic interaction with the entered anions. The H-bonds formed by Cl(-) cannot effectively separate the cellulose chain and that is the reason why EmimCl and BmimCl dissolve cellulose more slowly. These findings deepen people's understanding on how ILs dissolve cellulose and would be helpful for designing new efficient ILs to dissolve cellulose. PMID:26095890

  11. Modeled impacts of surface coal mining on dissolved solids in the Tongue River, Southeastern Montana. Water-resources investigations (final)

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, P.F.

    1981-10-01

    A computer model has been developed for assessing potential increases in dissolved solids of streams as a result of leaching of overburden materials used to backfill pits in surface coal-mining operations in southeastern Montana. The model allows spatial and temporal simulation of streamflow and dissolved-solids loads and concentrations for user-defined plans of surface coal mining and agricultural development. The model specifically addresses the Tongue River from the Tongue River Dam to Miles City, Montana and its three major tributaries. Provision is made to simulate releases from the present Tongue River Reservoir or the increased releases expected from a larger dam and reservoir proposed as a replacement for the present Tongue River Reservoir. The model routes an input quantity of streamflow and dissolved solids from the upstream end to the downstream end of a stream reach while algebraically accounting for gains and losses of streamflow and dissolved solids within the stream reach.

  12. Modeling Fish Growth in Low Dissolved Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Rachael Miller

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a computational project designed for undergraduate students as an introduction to mathematical modeling. Students use an ordinary differential equation to describe fish weight and assume the instantaneous growth rate depends on the concentration of dissolved oxygen. Published laboratory experiments suggest that continuous…

  13. Dissolving Microneedles for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Park, Jung-Hwan; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    Microfabrication technology has been adapted to produce micron-scale needles as a safer and painless alternative to hypodermic needle injection, especially for protein biotherapeutics and vaccines. This study presents a design that encapsulates molecules within microneedles that dissolve within the skin for bolus or sustained delivery and leave behind no biohazardous sharp medical waste. A fabrication process was developed based on casting a viscous aqueous solution during centrifugation to fill a micro-fabricated mold with biocompatible carboxymethylcellulose or amylopectin formulations. This process encapsulated sulforhodamine B, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme; lysozyme was shown to retain full enzymatic activity after encapsulation and to remain 96% active after storage for two months at room temperature. Microneedles were also shown to be strong enough to insert into cadaver skin and then to dissolve within minutes. Bolus delivery was achieved by encapsulating molecules just within microneedle shafts. For the first time, sustained delivery over hours to days was achieved by encapsulating molecules within the microneedle backing, which served as a controlled release reservoir that delivered molecules by a combination of swelling the backing with interstitial fluid drawn out of the skin and molecule diffusion into the skin via channels formed by dissolved microneedles. We conclude that dissolving microneedles can be designed to gently encapsulate molecules, insert into skin, and enable bolus or sustained release delivery. PMID:18261792

  14. Predicting dissolved organic nitrogen export from a drained loblolly pine plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Shiying; Youssef, Mohamed A.; Skaggs, R. Wayne; Chescheir, G. M.; Amatya, Devendra M.

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) export from terrestrial ecosystems influences the ecology of receiving surface waters. The soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) model, DRAINMOD-N II, was modified to simulate key processes associated with DON transformations and transport in the soil profile. DON production is modeled by tracking dynamic C:N ratios of dissolved organic matter originating from various organic matter pools. The Langmuir isotherm was used to quantify the assumed instantaneous equilibrium between potentially soluble organic N in solid and aqueous phases. DON transport with soil water was simulated using a numerical solution to the advection-dispersion reaction equation. The modified model was used for simulating temporal variations of DON export from three loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations located in eastern North Carolina. Results showed that the model can accurately predict DON export dynamics during storm events with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (E) of 0.5, seasonal DON losses with E above 0.6, and annual DON losses with E above 0.7. In addition to the well-recognized role of hydrological processes, reasonable quantifications of the seasonal changes in the potentially soluble soil organic matter, the DON sorption to soil particles, and the dynamic C:N ratios of dissolved organic matter were found to be essential for mechanistic representation of DON export dynamics. Specifically, adapting the dynamic C:N ratios enabled the model to reasonably describe the temporal variations of correlations between DON and dissolved organic carbon in drainage water.

  15. Photo-lability of deep ocean dissolved black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbins, A.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-05-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC), defined here as condensed aromatics isolated from seawater via PPL solid phase extraction and quantified as benzenepolycarboxylic acid (BPCA) oxidation products, is a significant component of the oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. These condensed aromatics are widely distributed in the open ocean and appear to be tens of thousands of years old. As such DBC is regarded as highly refractory. In the current study, the photo-lability of DBC, DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM; ultraviolet-visible absorbance) were determined over the course of a 28 day irradiation of North Atlantic Deep Water under a solar simulator. During the irradiation DBC fell from 1044 ± 164 nM-C to 55 ± 15 nM-C, a 20-fold decrease in concentration. Dissolved black carbon photo-degradation was more rapid and more extensive than for bulk CDOM and DOC. The concentration of DBC correlated with CDOM absorbance and the quality of DBC indicated by the ratios of different BPCAs correlated with CDOM absorbance spectral slope, suggesting the optical properties of CDOM may provide a proxy for both DBC concentrations and quality in natural waters. Further, the photo-lability of components of the DBC pool increased with their degree of aromatic condensation. These trends indicate that a continuum of compounds of varying photo-lability exists within the marine DOC pool. In this continuum, photo-lability scales with aromatic character, specifically the degree of condensation. Scaling the rapid photo-degradation of DBC to rates of DOC photo-mineralisation for the global ocean leads to an estimated photo-chemical half-life for oceanic DBC of less than 800 years. This is more than an order of magnitude shorter than the apparent age of DBC in the ocean. Consequently, photo-degradation is posited as the primary sink for oceanic DBC and the apparent survival of DBC molecules in the oceans for millennia appears to be facilitated not by their inherent inertness but

  16. Method of dissolving organic filter cake

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbeck, K.H.; Norman, L.R.

    1989-03-07

    A method of dissolving a polysaccharide-containing filter cake present in a subterranean formation is described, comprising: injecting an effective amount of a treatment fluid comprising a water soluble source of fluoride ions present in an amount sufficient to provide a molar concentration of from about 0.01 to about 0.5 and a source of hydrogen ions present in an amount sufficient to produce a pH in the treatment fluid in the range of from about 2 to about 4 into a subterranean formation wherein a filter cake is present; and maintaining the treatment fluid within the subterranean formation and in contact with the filter cake for a sufficient time to dissolve at least a portion of the filter cake.

  17. Preservation of samples for dissolved mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamlin, S.N.

    1989-01-01

    Water samples for dissolved mercury requires special treatment because of the high chemical mobility and volatility of this element. Widespread use of mercury and its compounds has provided many avenues for contamination of water. Two laboratory tests were done to determine the relative permeabilities of glass and plastic sample bottles to mercury vapor. Plastic containers were confirmed to be quite permeable to airborne mercury, glass containers were virtually impermeable. Methods of preservation include the use of various combinations of acids, oxidants, and complexing agents. The combination of nitric acid and potassium dichromate successfully preserved mercury in a large variety of concentrations and dissolved forms. Because this acid-oxidant preservative acts as a sink for airborne mercury and plastic containers are permeable to mercury vapor, glass bottles are preferred for sample collection. To maintain a healthy work environment and minimize the potential for contamination of water samples, mercury and its compounds are isolated from the atmosphere while in storage. Concurrently, a program to monitor environmental levels of mercury vapor in areas of potential contamination is needed to define the extent of mercury contamination and to assess the effectiveness of mercury clean-up procedures.Water samples for dissolved mercury require special treatment because of the high chemical mobility and volatility of this element. Widespread use of mercury and its compounds has provided many avenues for contamination of water. Two laboratory tests were done to determine the relative permeabilities of glass and plastic sample bottles to mercury vapor. Plastic containers were confirmed to be quite permeable to airborne mercury, glass containers were virtually impermeable. Methods of preservation include the use of various combinations of acids, oxidants, and complexing agents. The combination of nitric acid and potassium dichromate successfully preserved mercury in a

  18. Distribution of dissolved silver in marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriada, J. L.; Achterberg, E. P.; Tappin, A.; Truscott, J.

    2003-04-01

    Silver is one of the most toxic heavy metals, surpassed only by mercury [1-3]. Monitoring of dissolved silver concentrations in natural waters is therefore of great importance. The determination of dissolved silver in waters is not without challenges, because of its low (picomolar) concentrations. Consequently, there are only a few reported studies in marine waters, which have been performed in USA [4-6] and Japan [7]. The analytical techniques used in the reported studies for the determination of silver in seawater were Graphite Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (GFAAS) after solvent extraction [2,4,5], and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) after solvent extraction or solid phase extraction [7,8]. In this contribution, we will present an optimised Magnetic Sector (MS) ICP-MS technique for the determination of dissolved silver in marine waters. The MS-ICP-MS method used anion exchange column to preconcentrate silver from saline waters, and to remove the saline matrix. The ICP-MS method has been used successfully to determine total dissolved silver in estuarine and oceanic samples. Bibliography 1. H. T. Ratte, Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 1999, 18: p. 89-108. 2. R. T. Herrin, A. W. Andren and D. E. Armstrong, Environ. Sci. Technol. 2001, 35: 1953-1958. 3. D. E. Schildkraut, P. T. Dao, J. P. Twist, A. T. Davis and K. A. Robillard, Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 1998, 17: 642-649. 4. E. Breuer, S. A. Sanudo-Wilhelmy and R. C. Aller, Estuaries. 1999, 22:603-615. 5. A. R. Flegal, S. A. Sanudowilhelmy and G. M. Scelfo, Mar. Chem. 1995, 49: 315-320. 6. S. N. Luoma, Y. B. Ho and G. W. Bryan, Mar. Pollut. Bull. 1995, 31: 44-54. 7. Y. Zhang, H. Amakawa and Y. Nozaki, Mar. Chem. 2001, 75: 151-163. 8. L. Yang and R. E. Sturgeon, J. Anal. At. Spectrom. 2002, 17: 88-93.

  19. 7 CFR 760.908 - Deceased individuals or dissolved entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... dissolved entity must be provided. (c) If a participant is now a dissolved general partnership or joint venture, all members of the general partnership or joint venture at the time of dissolution or their...

  20. Dissolvable microneedle fabrication using piezoelectric dispensing technology.

    PubMed

    Allen, Evin A; O'Mahony, Conor; Cronin, Michael; O'Mahony, Thomas; Moore, Anne C; Crean, Abina M

    2016-03-16

    Dissolvable microneedle (DMN) patches are novel dosage forms for the percutaneous delivery of vaccines. DMN are routinely fabricated by dispensing liquid formulations into microneedle-shaped moulds. The liquid formulation within the mould is then dried to create dissolvable vaccine-loaded microneedles. The precision of the dispensing process is critical to the control of formulation volume loaded into each dissolvable microneedle structure. The dispensing process employed must maintain vaccine integrity. Wetting of mould surfaces by the dispensed formulation is also an important consideration for the fabrication of sharp-tipped DMN. Sharp-tipped DMN are essential for ease of percutaneous administration. In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of a piezoelectric dispensing system to dispense picolitre formulation volumes into PDMS moulds enabling the fabrication of bilayer DMN. The influence of formulation components (trehalose and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) content) and piezoelectric actuation parameters (voltage, frequency and back pressure) on drop formation is described. The biological integrity of a seasonal influenza vaccine following dispensing was investigated and maintained voltage settings of 30 V but undermined at higher settings, 50 and 80 V. The results demonstrate the capability of piezoelectric dispensing technology to precisely fabricate bilayer DMN. They also highlight the importance of identifying formulation and actuation parameters to ensure controlled droplet formulation and vaccine stabilisation.

  1. Assessing the Effects of Water Rights Purchases on Dissolved Oxygen, Stream Temperatures, and Fish Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzon, N. R.; Null, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Human impacts from land and water development have degraded water quality and altered the physical, chemical, and biological integrity of Nevada's Walker River. Reduced instream flows and increased nutrient concentrations affect native fish populations through warm daily stream temperatures and low nightly dissolved oxygen concentrations. Water rights purchases are being considered to maintain instream flows, improve water quality, and enhance habitat for native fish species, such as Lahontan cutthroat trout. This study uses the River Modeling System (RMSv4), an hourly, physically-based hydrodynamic and water quality model, to estimate streamflows, temperatures, and dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Walker River. We simulate thermal and dissolved oxygen changes from increased streamflow to prioritize the time periods and locations that water purchases most enhance native trout habitat. Stream temperatures and dissolved oxygen concentrations are proxies for trout habitat. Monitoring results indicate stream temperature and dissolved oxygen limitations generally exist in the 115 kilometers upstream of Walker Lake (about 37% of the study area) from approximately May through September, and this reach currently acts as a water quality barrier for fish passage.

  2. 7 CFR 760.115 - Deceased individuals or dissolved entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Deceased individuals or dissolved entities. 760.115... Agricultural Disaster Assistance Programs § 760.115 Deceased individuals or dissolved entities. (a) Payments... or is a dissolved entity if a representative, who currently has authority to enter into a...

  3. 7 CFR 760.908 - Deceased individuals or dissolved entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Deceased individuals or dissolved entities. 760.908... § 760.908 Deceased individuals or dissolved entities. (a) Payments may be made for eligible losses suffered by an eligible participant who is now a deceased individual or is a dissolved entity if...

  4. 7 CFR 1413.113 - Deceased individuals or dissolved entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Deceased individuals or dissolved entities. 1413.113... PROGRAMS Durum Wheat Quality Program § 1413.113 Deceased individuals or dissolved entities. (a) Payment may... individual or is a dissolved entity if a representative who currently has authority to enter into a...

  5. 27 CFR 19.455 - Dissolving of denaturants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... denatured spirits manufactured does not fall below the proof prescribed for the applicable formula in 27 CFR... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dissolving of denaturants... Denaturation § 19.455 Dissolving of denaturants. Denaturants which are difficult to dissolve in spirits...

  6. The marine geochemistry of dissolved gallium: A comparison with dissolved aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Orians, K.J.; Bruland, K.W. )

    1988-12-01

    Dissolved Ga concentrations in the pacific Ocean range from 2 to 30 picomolar: they are low in surface waters (2-12 pM), with a subsurface maximum at 150-300 m (6-17 pM), a mid-depth minimum from 500 to 1,000 m (4-10 pM) and increasing values with depth to a maximum in the bottom waters (12-30 pM). The highest concentrations are in the central gyre, with lower values toward the north and east where productivity and particle scavenging increase. Dissolved Ga concentrations in the surface waters of the northwest Atlantic are nearly an order of magnitude higher than in the central North pacific, with higher values in the Gulf Stream than in the continental slope boundary region. The vertical distributions and horizontal transects indicate three sources of dissolved Ga to the oceans. The surface distribution reflects an eolian source with no net fluvial input to the open ocean; the subsurface maximum (a feature not seen for North Pacific dissolved Al) is attributed to vertical exchange processes; the source for the deep waters of the North Pacific is from a sediment surface remineralization process or a pore water flux. Scavenging removal throughout the water column is evident in the vertical profiles for both dissolved Ga and Al, with intensified removal in the boundary regions where productivity and particle scavenging are at a maximum. Residence times of dissolved Ga in surface waters are nearly an order of magnitude longer than the corresponding values for Al.

  7. Total dissolvable and dissolved iron isotopes in the water column of the Peru upwelling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chever, Fanny; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Croot, Peter L.; Ponzevera, Emmanuel; Wuttig, Kathrin; Auro, Maureen

    2015-08-01

    Vertical distributions of iron (Fe) concentrations and isotopes were determined in the total dissolvable and dissolved pools in the water column at three coastal stations located along the Peruvian margin, in the core of the Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). The shallowest station 121 (161 m total water depth) was characterized by lithogenic input from the continental plateau, yielding concentrations as high as 456 nM in the total dissolvable pool. At the 2 other stations (stations 122 and 123), Fe concentrations of dissolved and total dissolvable pools exhibited maxima in both surface and deep layers. Fe isotopic composition (δ56Fe) showed a fractionation toward lighter values for both physical pools throughout the water column for all stations with minimum values observed for the surface layer (between -0.64 and -0.97‰ at 10-20 m depth) and deep layer (between -0.03 and -1.25‰ at 160-300 m depth). An Fe isotope budget was established to determine the isotopic composition of the particulate pool. We observed a range of δ56Fe values for particulate Fe from +0.02 to -0.87‰, with lightest values obtained at water depth above 50 m. Such light values in the both particulate and dissolved pools suggest sources other than atmospheric dust deposition in the surface ocean, including lateral transport of isotopically light Fe. Samples collected at station 122 closest to the sediment show the lightest isotope composition in the dissolved and the particulate pools (-1.25 and -0.53‰ respectively) and high Fe(II) concentrations (14.2 ± 2.1 nM) consistent with a major reductive benthic Fe sources that is transferred to the ocean water column. A simple isotopic model is proposed to link the extent of Fe(II) oxidation and the Fe isotope composition of both particulate and dissolved Fe pools. This study demonstrates that Fe isotopic composition in OMZ regions is not only affected by the relative contribution of reductive and non-reductive shelf sediment input but also by

  8. Atomic Layer Deposition from Dissolved Precursors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanlin; Döhler, Dirk; Barr, Maïssa; Oks, Elina; Wolf, Marc; Santinacci, Lionel; Bachmann, Julien

    2015-10-14

    We establish a novel thin film deposition technique by transferring the principles of atomic layer deposition (ALD) known with gaseous precursors toward precursors dissolved in a liquid. An established ALD reaction behaves similarly when performed from solutions. "Solution ALD" (sALD) can coat deep pores in a conformal manner. sALD offers novel opportunities by overcoming the need for volatile and thermally robust precursors. We establish a MgO sALD procedure based on the hydrolysis of a Grignard reagent.

  9. Tracer monitored titrations: measurement of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Martz, Todd; Takeshita, Yuichiro; Rolph, Rebecca; Bresnahan, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The tracer monitored titration (TMT) technique is evaluated for measurement of dissolved oxygen. The TMT developed in this work uses a simple apparatus consisting of a low-precision pump for titrant delivery and an optical detector based on a white LED and two photodiodes with interference filters. It is shown that the classic Winkler method can be made free of routine volumetric and gravimetric measurements by application of TMT theory, which allows tracking the amounts of titrant and sample using a chemical tracer. The measurement precision of the prototype setup was 0.3% RSD.

  10. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Resing, Joseph A; Sedwick, Peter N; German, Christopher R; Jenkins, William J; Moffett, James W; Sohst, Bettina M; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production.

  11. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resing, Joseph A.; Sedwick, Peter N.; German, Christopher R.; Jenkins, William J.; Moffett, James W.; Sohst, Bettina M.; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production.

  12. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2004-11-22

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

  13. Seafloor Weathering Dependence on Temperature and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.; Farahat, N. X.; Archer, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Most thinking on Earth's carbon cycle implicates silicate weathering as the dominant control of atmospheric CO2 concentration over long timescales. Recent analyses of alteration of basalt at the seafloor, however, suggest that seafloor weathering (low-temperature (<60C) chemical alteration of the upper oceanic crust due to hydrothermal seawater circulation) increases dramatically in warm, high CO2 periods of Earth's history. This raises the possibility that seafloor weathering could complement silicate weathering in maintaining Earth's long term climate stability. Moreover, seafloor weathering would be the only type of weathering available on an exoplanet entirely covered by water, so understanding how it might work is essential for understanding the habitable zones of such waterworlds. We have built a 2D numerical model of the flow of seawater through porous basalt coupled to chemical alteration reactions that can calculate alkalinity fluxes and carbonate deposition (seafloor weathering). I will present simulations in which we vary the seawater temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration, which are boundary conditions to our model, over large ranges. These results will provide a constraint on the ability of seafloor weathering to act as an effective climate buffer on Earth and other planets. I can't give you a preview of the results yet because at the time of writing this abstract we haven't completed the simulations!

  14. Method for dissolving delta-phase plutonium

    DOEpatents

    Karraker, David G.

    1992-01-01

    A process for dissolving plutonium, and in particular, delta-phase plutonium. The process includes heating a mixture of nitric acid, hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) and potassium fluoride to a temperature between 40.degree. and 70.degree. C., then immersing the metal in the mixture. Preferably, the nitric acid has a concentration of not more than 2M, the HAN approximately 0.66M, and the potassium fluoride 0.1M. Additionally, a small amount of sulfamic acid, such as 0.1M can be added to assure stability of the HAN in the presence of nitric acid. The oxide layer that forms on plutonium metal may be removed with a non-oxidizing acid as a pre-treatment step.

  15. DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Bernot

    2005-07-13

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) relevant to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are provided in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log fCO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. Even though selection of an appropriate set of radionuclides documented in Radionuclide Screening (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160059]) includes actinium, transport of Ac is not modeled in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) model because of its extremely short half-life. Actinium dose is calculated in the TSPA-LA by assuming secular equilibrium with {sup 231}Pa (Section 6.10); therefore, Ac is not analyzed in this report. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for TSPA-LA used to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for the actinides discussed in this report. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or

  16. Dissolved Concentration Limits of Radioactive Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; E.R. Thomas; F.J. Pearson; P.L. Cloke; T.L. Steinborn; P.V. Brady

    2003-06-20

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of radioactive elements under possible repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, and measurements made in laboratory experiments and field work. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 radioactive elements (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium), which are important to calculated dose. Model outputs are mainly in the form of look-up tables plus one or more uncertainty terms. The rest are either in the form of distributions or single values. The results of this analysis are fundamental inputs for total system performance assessment to constrain the release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Solubilities of plutonium, neptunium, uranium, americium, actinium, thorium, protactinium, lead, and radium have been re-evaluated using the newly updated thermodynamic database (Data0.ymp.R2). For all of the actinides, identical modeling approaches and consistent environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models in this revision. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, activity coefficients, and selection of solubility controlling phase have been quantified or otherwise addressed. Moreover, a new blended plutonium solubility model has been developed in this revision, which gives a mean solubility that is three orders of magnitude lower than the plutonium solubility model used for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation. Two alternative neptunium solubility models have also been

  17. Method for dissolving plutonium oxide with HI and separating plutonium

    DOEpatents

    Vondra, Benedict L.; Tallent, Othar K.; Mailen, James C.

    1979-01-01

    PuO.sub.2 -containing solids, particularly residues from incomplete HNO.sub.3 dissolution of irradiated nuclear fuels, are dissolved in aqueous HI. The resulting solution is evaporated to dryness and the solids are dissolved in HNO.sub.3 for further chemical reprocessing. Alternatively, the HI solution containing dissolved Pu values, can be contacted with a cation exchange resin causing the Pu values to load the resin. The Pu values are selectively eluted from the resin with more concentrated HI.

  18. Method to Estimate the Dissolved Air Content in Hydraulic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to verify the air content in hydraulic fluid, an instrument was needed to measure the dissolved air content before the fluid was loaded into the system. The instrument also needed to measure the dissolved air content in situ and in real time during the de-aeration process. The current methods used to measure the dissolved air content require the fluid to be drawn from the hydraulic system, and additional offline laboratory processing time is involved. During laboratory processing, there is a potential for contamination to occur, especially when subsaturated fluid is to be analyzed. A new method measures the amount of dissolved air in hydraulic fluid through the use of a dissolved oxygen meter. The device measures the dissolved air content through an in situ, real-time process that requires no additional offline laboratory processing time. The method utilizes an instrument that measures the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. By using a standardized calculation procedure that relates the oxygen partial pressure to the volume of dissolved air in solution, the dissolved air content is estimated. The technique employs luminescent quenching technology to determine the partial pressure of oxygen in the hydraulic fluid. An estimated Henry s law coefficient for oxygen and nitrogen in hydraulic fluid is calculated using a standard method to estimate the solubility of gases in lubricants. The amount of dissolved oxygen in the hydraulic fluid is estimated using the Henry s solubility coefficient and the measured partial pressure of oxygen in solution. The amount of dissolved nitrogen that is in solution is estimated by assuming that the ratio of dissolved nitrogen to dissolved oxygen is equal to the ratio of the gas solubility of nitrogen to oxygen at atmospheric pressure and temperature. The technique was performed at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The technique could be theoretically carried out at higher pressures and elevated

  19. METHOD FOR DISSOLVING LANTHANUM FLUORIDE CARRIER FOR PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Koshland, D.E. Jr.; Willard, J.E.

    1961-08-01

    A method is described for dissolving lanthanum fluoride precipitates which is applicable to lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation processes for recovery of plutonium values from aqueous solutions. The lanthanum fluoride precipitate is contacted with an aqueous acidic solution containing dissolved zirconium in the tetravalent oxidation state. The presence of the zirconium increases the lanthanum fluoride dissolved and makes any tetravalent plutonium present more readily oxidizable to the hexavalent state. (AEC)

  20. EFFECTS OF SUNLIGHT ON CARBOXYL CONTENT OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN THE SATILLA RIVER OF GEORGIA, UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study examined the effect of sunlight-initiated photo-degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on its carboxyl content, and the role of oxygen and iron in this process. Solar-simulated irradiations were performed on 0.2-mm filtered water samples collected from the highly c...

  1. [Sources, Migration and Conversion of Dissolved Alkanes, Dissolved Fatty Acids in a Karst Underground River Water, in Chongqing Area].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zuo-bing; Sun, Yu-chuan; Wang, Zun-bo; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Ze-li; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Zheng-Lan; Liao, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids were collected from Qingmuguan underground river in July, October 2013. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), alkanes and fatty acids were quantitatively analyzed. The results showed that average contents of alkanes and fatty acids were 1 354 ng.L-1, 24203 ng.L-1 in July, and 667 ng.L-1, 2526 ng.L-1 in October respectively. With the increasing migration distance of dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids in underground river, their contents decreased. Based on the molecular characteristic indices of alkanes, like CPI, OEP, Paq and R, dissolved alkanes were mainly originated from microorganisms in July, and aquatic plants in October. Saturated straight-chain fatty acid had the highest contents in all samples with the dominant peak in C16:0, combined with the characteristics of carbon peak, algae or bacteria might be the dominant source of dissolved fatty acids. PMID:26717680

  2. Temperature Dependence of Photodegradation of Dissolved Organic Matter to Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Particulate Organic Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Porcal, Petr; Dillon, Peter J.; Molot, Lewis A.

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been studied for more than two decades. Usually, laboratory or “in-situ” experiments are used to determine photodegradation variables. A common problem with these experiments is that the photodegradation experiments are done at higher than ambient temperature. Five laboratory experiments were done to determine the effect of temperature on photochemical degradation of DOM. Experimental results showed strong dependence of photodegradation on temperature. Mathematical modeling of processes revealed that two different pathways engaged in photochemical transformation of DOM to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) strongly depend on temperature. Direct oxidation of DOM to DIC dominated at low temperatures while conversion of DOM to intermediate particulate organic carbon (POC) prior to oxidation to DIC dominated at high temperatures. It is necessary to consider this strong dependence when the results of laboratory experiments are interpreted in regard to natural processes. Photodegradation experiments done at higher than ambient temperature will necessitate correction of rate constants. PMID:26106898

  3. Selected methods for dissolved iron (II, III) and dissolved sulfide (-II) determinations in geothermal waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vivit, D.V.; Jenne, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    Dissolved sulfide (-II) and dissolved iron (II, III) were determined in geothermal well water samples collected at Cerro Prieto, Mexico. Most samples consisted of liquid and gas (two phases) at the instant of collection; and a subset of samples, referred to as ' flashed ' samples, consisted of pressurized steam samples which were allowed to condense. Sulfide was determined by sulfide specific ion electrode; Fe(II) and Fe(III) plus Fe(II) were determined spectrophotometrically. The precision and accuracy of the methods were evaluated for these high-silica waters with replicate analyses, spike recoveries, and an alternate method. Direct current (d.c.) argon plasma emission spectrometry was the alternate method used for Fe(III)-plus-Fe(II) analyses. Mean dissolved iron concentrations ranged from 20.2 to 834 micrograms/L (ug/L) as Fe(II) and 26.8 to 904 ug/L as Fe(III) plus Fe(II). Mean sulfide concentrations ranged from about 0.01 to 5.3 mg/L (S-II) Generally, higher S(-II) values and larger Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios were found in the two-phase samples. These findings suggest that the ' flashed ' samples are at a less reduced state than the two-phase samples. (Author 's abstract)

  4. Artificial neural network modeling of dissolved oxygen in reservoir.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    The water quality of reservoirs is one of the key factors in the operation and water quality management of reservoirs. Dissolved oxygen (DO) in water column is essential for microorganisms and a significant indicator of the state of aquatic ecosystems. In this study, two artificial neural network (ANN) models including back propagation neural network (BPNN) and adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approaches and multilinear regression (MLR) model were developed to estimate the DO concentration in the Feitsui Reservoir of northern Taiwan. The input variables of the neural network are determined as water temperature, pH, conductivity, turbidity, suspended solids, total hardness, total alkalinity, and ammonium nitrogen. The performance of the ANN models and MLR model was assessed through the mean absolute error, root mean square error, and correlation coefficient computed from the measured and model-simulated DO values. The results reveal that ANN estimation performances were superior to those of MLR. Comparing to the BPNN and ANFIS models through the performance criteria, the ANFIS model is better than the BPNN model for predicting the DO values. Study results show that the neural network particularly using ANFIS model is able to predict the DO concentrations with reasonable accuracy, suggesting that the neural network is a valuable tool for reservoir management in Taiwan. PMID:24078053

  5. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean reveals that black carbon (BC) is a significant component of previously uncharacterized DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon to the ocean.

  6. The release of dissolved nutrients and metals from coastal sediments due to resuspension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalnejais, Linda H.; Martin, W. R.; Bothner, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Coastal sediments in many regions are impacted by high levels of contaminants. Due to a combination of shallow water depths, waves, and currents, these sediments are subject to regular episodes of sediment resuspension. However, the influence of such disturbances on sediment chemistry and the release of solutes is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to quantify the release of dissolved metals (iron, manganese, silver, copper, and lead) and nutrients due to resuspension in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, USA. Using a laboratory-based erosion chamber, a range of typical shear stresses was applied to fine-grained Harbor sediments and the solute concentration at each shear stress was measured. At low shear stress, below the erosion threshold, limited solutes were released. Beyond the erosion threshold, a release of all solutes, except lead, was observed and the concentrations increased with shear stress. The release was greater than could be accounted for by conservative mixing of porewaters into the overlying water, suggesting that sediment resuspension enhances the release of nutrients and metals to the dissolved phase. To address the long-term fate of resuspended particles, samples from the erosion chamber were maintained in suspension for 90. h. Over this time, 5-7% of the particulate copper and silver was released to the dissolved phase, while manganese was removed from solution. Thus resuspension releases solutes both during erosion events and over a longer timescale due to reactions of suspended particles in the water column. The magnitude of the annual solute release during erosion events was estimated by coupling the erosion chamber results with a record of bottom shear stresses simulated by a hydrodynamic model. The release of dissolved copper, lead, and phosphate due to resuspension is between 2% and 10% of the total (dissolved plus particulate phase) known inputs to Boston Harbor. Sediment resuspension is responsible for transferring a significant

  7. Composition of dissolved organic matter in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longnecker, Krista; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B.

    2011-05-01

    Groundwater constitutes a globally important source of freshwater for drinking water and other agricultural and industrial purposes, and is a prominent source of freshwater flowing into the coastal ocean. Therefore, understanding the chemical components of groundwater is relevant to both coastal and inland communities. We used electrospray ionization coupled with Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) to examine dissolved organic compounds in groundwater prior to and after passage through a sediment-filled column containing microorganisms. The data revealed that an unexpectedly high proportion of organic compounds contained nitrogen and sulfur, possibly due to transport of surface waters from septic systems and rain events. We matched 292 chemical features, based on measured mass:charge ( m/z) values, to compounds stored in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). A subset of these compounds (88) had only one structural isomer in KEGG, thus supporting tentative identification. Most identified elemental formulas were linked with metabolic pathways that produce polyketides or with secondary metabolites produced by plants. The presence of polyketides in groundwater is notable because of their anti-bacterial and anti-cancer properties. However, their relative abundance must be quantified with appropriate analyses to assess any implications for public health.

  8. Systemic delivery of artemether by dissolving microneedles.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuqin; Li, Chun; Zhang, Suohui; Yang, Guozhong; He, Meilin; Gao, Yunhua

    2016-07-11

    Dissolving microneedles (DMNs) based transdermal delivery is an attractive drug delivery approach with minimal invasion. However, it is still challenging to load poorly water-soluble drugs in DMNs for systemic delivery. The aim of the study was to develop DMNs loaded with artemether (ARM) as a model drug, to enable efficient drug penetration through skin for systemic absorption and distribution. The micro-conduits created by microneedles were imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and the insertion depth was suggested to be about 270μm. The maximum amount of ARM delivered into skin was 72.67±2.69% of the initial dose loaded on DMNs preparation. Pharmacokinetics study in rats indicated a dose-dependent profile of plasma ARM concentrations, after ARM-loaded DMNs treatment. In contrast to intramuscular injection, DMNs application resulted in lower peak plasma levels, but higher plasma ARM concentration at 8h after administration. There were no significant difference in area under the curve and bioavailability between DMNs group and intramuscular group (P>0.05). Pharmacodynamics studies performed in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats showed that ARM-loaded DMNs could reverse paw edema, similar to ARM intramuscular injection. In conclusion, developed DMNs provided a potential minimally invasive route for systemic delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:27150946

  9. Determination of dissolved aluminum in water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afifi, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A technique has been modified for determination of a wide range of concentrations of dissolved aluminum (Al) in water and has been tested. In this technique, aluminum is complexed with 8-hydroxyquinoline at pH 8.3 to minimize interferences, then extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The extract is analyzed colorimetrically at 395 nm. This technique is used to analyze two forms of monomeric Al, nonlabile (organic complexes) and labile (free, Al, Al sulfate, fluoride and hydroxide complexes). A detection limit 2 ug/L is possible with 25-ml samples and 10-ml extracts. The detection limit can be decreased by increasing the volume of the sample and (or) decreasing the volume of the methyl isobutyl ketone extract. The analytical uncertainty of this method is approximately + or - 5 percent. The standard addition technique provides a recovery test for this technique and ensures precision in samples of low Al concentrations. The average percentage recovery of the added Al plus the amount originally present was 99 percent. Data obtained from analyses of filtered standard solutions indicated that Al is adsorbed on various types of filters. However, the relationship between Al concentrations and adsorption remains linear. A test on standard solutions also indicated that Al is not adsorbed on nitric acid-washed polyethylene and polypropylene bottle wells. (USGS)

  10. Dissolved methane in Indian freshwater reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Narvenkar, G; Naqvi, S W A; Kurian, S; Shenoy, D M; Pratihary, A K; Naik, H; Patil, S; Sarkar, A; Gauns, M

    2013-08-01

    Emission of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas, from tropical reservoirs is of interest because such reservoirs experience conducive conditions for CH4 production through anaerobic microbial activities. It has been suggested that Indian reservoirs have the potential to emit as much as 33.5 MT of CH4 per annum to the atmosphere. However, this estimate is based on assumptions rather than actual measurements. We present here the first data on dissolved CH4 concentrations from eight freshwater reservoirs in India, most of which experience seasonal anaerobic conditions and CH4 buildup in the hypolimnia. However, strong stratification prevents the CH4-rich subsurface layers to ventilate CH4 directly to the atmosphere, and surface water CH4 concentrations in these reservoirs are generally quite low (0.0028-0.305 μM). Moreover, only in two small reservoirs substantial CH4 accumulation occurred at depths shallower than the level where water is used for power generation and irrigation, and in the only case where measurements were made in the outflowing water, CH4 concentrations were quite low. In conjunction with short periods of CH4 accumulation and generally lower concentrations than previously assumed, our study implies that CH4 emission from Indian reservoirs has been greatly overestimated. PMID:23397538

  11. Methanex, Hoechst Celanese dissolve methanol partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1993-03-31

    One of the many joint venture alliances recently announced in the petrochemical sector is ending in divorce. Hoechst Celanese Chemical (Dallas) and Methanex Corp. (Vancouver) are in the process of dissolving the partnership they had formed to restart Hoechst Celanese's methanol plant at Clear Lake, TX. Hoechst Celanese says it is actively seeking replacement partners and has several likely prospects, while Methanex is concentrating on its other ventures. Those include its just-completed acquisition of Fletcher Challenge's (Auckland, NZ) methanol business and a joint venture with American Cyanamid to convert an ammonia plant at Fortier, LA to methanol. Methanex will still be the world's largest producer of methanol. Officially, the negotiations between Methanex and Hoechst Celanese just broke down over the last month or so,' says Steve Yurich, operations manager for the Clear Lake plant. Market sources, however, say that Methanex found itself with too many irons in the fire' and pulled out before it ran into financial or perhaps even antitrust difficulties.

  12. Evaluation of filter media for clarification of partially dissolved residues containing plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, E.S.

    1989-10-09

    A common process in the chemical industry employs the leaching of a desirable component from an insoluble substrate, followed by filtration to produce a clarified solution of the desirable component and a discardable residue. The work described here involved evaluating sintered metal filter media for separating dissolved plutonium from undissolved residues generated at various locations owned by the Department of Energy throughout the United States. The work was performed during a six-week assignment at the Savannah River Laboratory as part of a high school science enrichment program conducted in the summer of 1989. The leach step used included dissolving the plutonium-containing solids in a solution of nitric-hydrofluoric acid. To simulate the partial solubility of the actual plutonium-containing residues, a non-radioactive power plant flyash was used. 6 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Resolving Coffee Roasting-Degree Phases Based on the Analysis of Volatile Compounds in the Roasting Off-Gas by Photoionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PI-TOFMS) and Statistical Data Analysis: Toward a PI-TOFMS Roasting Model.

    PubMed

    Czech, Hendryk; Schepler, Claudia; Klingbeil, Sophie; Ehlert, Sven; Howell, Jessalin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-06-29

    Coffee beans of two cultivars, Arabica (Mexico) and Robusta (Vietnam), were roasted in a small-scale drum roaster at different temperature profiles. Evolving volatile compounds out of the roasting off-gas were analyzed by photoionization mass spectrometry at four different wavelengths, either with single-photon ionization (SPI) or resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The different analyte selectivities at the four wavelengths and their relevance for the examination of the roasting process were discussed. Furthermore, intensities of observed m/z were grouped by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) to reveal the temporal evolutions of four roasting phases ("evaporation", "early roast", "late roast", and "overroast") from NMF scores and the corresponding molecular composition from the NMF factor loadings, giving chemically sound results concerning the roasting phases. Finally, linear classifiers were constructed from real mass spectra at maximum NMF scores by linear discriminant analysis to obtain quantities which are simple to measure for real-time analysis of the roasting process. PMID:27309797

  14. Resolving Coffee Roasting-Degree Phases Based on the Analysis of Volatile Compounds in the Roasting Off-Gas by Photoionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PI-TOFMS) and Statistical Data Analysis: Toward a PI-TOFMS Roasting Model.

    PubMed

    Czech, Hendryk; Schepler, Claudia; Klingbeil, Sophie; Ehlert, Sven; Howell, Jessalin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-06-29

    Coffee beans of two cultivars, Arabica (Mexico) and Robusta (Vietnam), were roasted in a small-scale drum roaster at different temperature profiles. Evolving volatile compounds out of the roasting off-gas were analyzed by photoionization mass spectrometry at four different wavelengths, either with single-photon ionization (SPI) or resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The different analyte selectivities at the four wavelengths and their relevance for the examination of the roasting process were discussed. Furthermore, intensities of observed m/z were grouped by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) to reveal the temporal evolutions of four roasting phases ("evaporation", "early roast", "late roast", and "overroast") from NMF scores and the corresponding molecular composition from the NMF factor loadings, giving chemically sound results concerning the roasting phases. Finally, linear classifiers were constructed from real mass spectra at maximum NMF scores by linear discriminant analysis to obtain quantities which are simple to measure for real-time analysis of the roasting process.

  15. Dissolved organic carbon and chromophoric dissolved organic matter properties of rivers in the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Aiken, George R.

    2012-09-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) parameters were measured over a range of discharge in 30 U.S. rivers, covering a diverse assortment of fluvial ecosystems in terms of watershed size and landscape drained. Relationships between CDOM absorption at a range of wavelengths (a254, a350, a440) and DOC in the 30 watersheds were found to correlate strongly and positively for the majority of U.S. rivers. However, four rivers (Colorado, Colombia, Rio Grande and St. Lawrence) exhibited statistically weak relationships between CDOM absorption and DOC. These four rivers are atypical, as they either drain from the Great Lakes or experience significant impoundment of water within their watersheds, and they exhibited values for dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters indicative of autochthonous or anthropogenic sources or photochemically degraded allochthonous DOM and thus a decoupling between CDOM and DOC. CDOM quality parameters in the 30 rivers were found to be strongly correlated to DOM compositional metrics derived via XAD fractionation, highlighting the potential for examining DOM biochemical quality from CDOM measurements. This study establishes the ability to derive DOC concentration from CDOM absorption for the majority of U.S. rivers, describes characteristics of riverine systems where such an approach is not valid, and emphasizes the possibility of examining DOM composition and thus biogeochemical function via CDOM parameters. Therefore, the usefulness of CDOM measurements, both laboratory-based analyses and in situ instrumentation, for improving spatial and temporal resolution of DOC fluxes and DOM dynamics in future studies is considerable in a range of biogeochemical studies.

  16. Dissolved organic carbon and chromophoric dissolved organic matter properties of rivers in the USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, Robert G.M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Aiken, George R.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) parameters were measured over a range of discharge in 30 U.S. rivers, covering a diverse assortment of fluvial ecosystems in terms of watershed size and landscape drained. Relationships between CDOM absorption at a range of wavelengths (a254, a350, a440) and DOC in the 30 watersheds were found to correlate strongly and positively for the majority of U.S. rivers. However, four rivers (Colorado, Colombia, Rio Grande and St. Lawrence) exhibited statistically weak relationships between CDOM absorption and DOC. These four rivers are atypical, as they either drain from the Great Lakes or experience significant impoundment of water within their watersheds, and they exhibited values for dissolved organic matter (DOM) parameters indicative of autochthonous or anthropogenic sources or photochemically degraded allochthonous DOM and thus a decoupling between CDOM and DOC. CDOM quality parameters in the 30 rivers were found to be strongly correlated to DOM compositional metrics derived via XAD fractionation, highlighting the potential for examining DOM biochemical quality from CDOM measurements. This study establishes the ability to derive DOC concentration from CDOM absorption for the majority of U.S. rivers, describes characteristics of riverine systems where such an approach is not valid, and emphasizes the possibility of examining DOM composition and thus biogeochemical function via CDOM parameters. Therefore, the usefulness of CDOM measurements, both laboratory-based analyses and in situ instrumentation, for improving spatial and temporal resolution of DOC fluxes and DOM dynamics in future studies is considerable in a range of biogeochemical studies.

  17. Spectrophotometric discrimination of river dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Andy

    2002-11-01

    There is a need to be able to differentiate the dissolved organic matter (DOM) fraction in river waters. Research in the 1970s and 1980s has attempted to utilize both absorbance and fluorescence to distinguish between DOM fractions in river waters, but both were limited by the available technology. Total organic carbon content has, therefore, been widely used as a standard method of measuring DOM concentration, although it has little power to differentiate DOM fractions. Recent advances in fluorescence spectrophotometry enable rapid and optically precise analysis of DOM. Here, we show how a combination of both fluorescence and absorbance can be used to discriminate statistically between spatial variations of DOM in tributaries in a small catchment of the Ouseburn, NE England. The results of the discriminant analysis suggest that about 70% of the samples can be correctly classified to its tributary. Discriminant function 1 explains 60·8% of the variance in the data and the fulvic-like fluorescence intensity has the largest absolute correlation within this function; discriminant function 2 explains a further 21·5% of the variance and the fulvic-like fluorescence emission wavelength has the largest absolute correlation within this function. The discriminant analysis does not correctly classify all tributaries every time, and successfully discriminates between the different tributaries 70% of the time. Occasions when the tributary waters are less well discriminated are due to either episodic pollution events (at two sites) or due to tributaries that have strong seasonal trends in spectrophotometric parameters, which allows the sites to be misclassified. Results suggest that spectrophotometric techniques have considerable potential in the discrimination of DOM in rivers.

  18. Chemical characterization of dissolvable tobacco products promoted to reduce harm.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Christina L; Conder, Paige A; Goodpaster, John V

    2011-03-23

    In 2009, the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. released a line of dissolvable tobacco products that are marketed as an alternative to smoking in places where smoking is prohibited. These products are currently available in Indianapolis, IN, Columbus, OH, and Portland, OR. This paper describes the chemical characterization of four such products by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The dissolvable tobacco products were extracted and prepared by ultrasonic extraction using acetone, trimethylsilyl derivatization, and headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME). The following compounds were identified in the dissolvables using either ultrasonic extractions or trimethylsilyl derivatization: nicotine, ethyl citrate, palmitic acid, stearic acid, sorbitol, glycerol, and xylitol. The following compounds were identified in the dissolvables using headspace SPME: nicotine, ethyl citrate, cinnamaldehyde, coumarin, vanillin, and carvone. With the exception of nicotine, the compounds identified thus far in the dissolvables are either flavoring compounds or binders. The concentration of free nicotine in the dissolvables was determined from the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and by measuring the pH and nicotine concentration by GC-MS. The results presented here are the first to reveal the complexity of dissolvable tobacco products and may be used to assess potential oral health effects.

  19. Isolation and chemical characterization of dissolved and colloidal organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.; Leenheer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Commonly used techniques for the concentration and isolation of organic matter from water, such as preparative chromatography, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis, and the methods used to analyze the organic matter obtained by these methods are reviewed. The development of methods to obtain organic matter that is associated with fractions of the dissolved organic carbon other than humic substances, such as organic bases, hydrophilic organic acids and colloidal organic matter are discussed. Methods specifically used to study dissolved organic nitrogen and dissolved organic phosphorous are also discussed. -from Authors

  20. Chapter A6. Section 6.2. Dissolved Oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Revised by Lewis, Michael Edward

    2006-01-01

    Accurate data for the concentration of dissolved oxygen in surface and ground waters are essential for documenting changes in environmental water resources that result from natural phenomena and human activities. Dissolved oxygen is necessary in aquatic systems for the survival and growth of many aquatic organisms and is used as an indicator of the health of surface-water bodies. This section of the National Field Manual (NFM) includes U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) guidance and protocols for four methods to determine dissolved-oxygen concentrations: the amperometric, luminescent-sensor, spectrophotometric, and iodometric (Winkler) methods.

  1. Dissolved oxygen as an indicator of bioavailable dissolved organic carbon in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Bradley, Paul M.; McMahon, Peter B.; Kaiser, Karl; Benner, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) plotted vs. dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in groundwater samples taken from a coastal plain aquifer of South Carolina (SC) showed a statistically significant hyperbolic relationship. In contrast, DO-DOC plots of groundwater samples taken from the eastern San Joaquin Valley of California (CA) showed a random scatter. It was hypothesized that differences in the bioavailability of naturally occurring DOC might contribute to these observations. This hypothesis was examined by comparing nine different biochemical indicators of DOC bioavailability in groundwater sampled from these two systems. Concentrations of DOC, total hydrolysable neutral sugars (THNS), total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA), mole% glycine of THAA, initial bacterial cell counts, bacterial growth rates, and carbon dioxide production/consumption were greater in SC samples relative to CA samples. In contrast, the mole% glucose of THNS and the aromaticity (SUVA254) of DOC was greater in CA samples. Each of these indicator parameters were observed to change with depth in the SC system in a manner consistent with active biodegradation. These results are uniformly consistent with the hypothesis that the bioavailability of DOC is greater in SC relative to CA groundwater samples. This, in turn, suggests that the presence/absence of a hyperbolic DO-DOC relationship may be a qualitative indicator of relative DOC bioavailability in groundwater systems.

  2. Graphite fuels combustion off-gas treatment options

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkham, R.J.; Lords, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    Scenarios for burning bulk graphite and for burning crushed fuel particles from graphite spent nuclear fuels have been considered. Particulates can be removed with sintered metal filters. Subsequent cooling would then condense semi-volatile fission products into or onto a particulate. These particulates would be trapped by a second sintered metal filter or downstream packed bed. A packed bed scrub column can be used to eliminate most of the iodine-129 and tritium. A molecular sieve bed is proposed to collect the residual {sup 129}I and other tramp radionuclides downstream (Ruthenium, etc.). Krypton-85 can be recovered, if need be, either by cryogenics or by the KALC process (Krypton Adsorption in Liquid Carbon dioxide). Likewise carbon-14 in the form of carbon dioxide could be collected with a caustic or lime scrub solution and incorporated into a grout. Sulfur dioxide present will be well below regulatory concern level of 4.0 tons per year and most of it would be removed by the scrubber. Carbon monoxide emissions will depend on the choice of burner and start-up conditions. Should the system exceed the regulatory concern level, a catalytic converter in the final packed bed will be provided. Radon and its daughters have sufficiently short half-lives (less than two minutes). If necessary, an additional holdup bed can be added before the final HEPA filters or additional volume can be added to the molecular sieve bed to limit radon emissions. The calculated total effective dose equivalent at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory boundary from a single release of all the {sup 3}, {sup 14}C, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I in the total fuel mass if 0.43 mrem/year.

  3. Methods to optimize myxobacterial fermentations using off-gas analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The influence of carbon dioxide and oxygen on microbial secondary metabolite producers and the maintenance of these two parameters at optimal levels have been studied extensively. Nevertheless, most studies have focussed on their influence on specific product formation and condition optimization of established processes. Considerably less attention has been paid to the influence of reduced or elevated carbon dioxide and oxygen levels on the overall metabolite profiles of the investigated organisms. The synergistic action of both gases has garnered even less attention. Results We show that the composition of the gas phase is highly important for the production of different metabolites and present a simple approach that enables the maintenance of defined concentrations of both O2 and CO2 during bioprocesses over broad concentration ranges with a minimal instrumental setup by using endogenously produced CO2. The metabolite profiles of a myxobacterium belonging to the genus Chondromyces grown under various concentrations of CO2 and O2 showed considerable differences. Production of two unknown, highly cytotoxic compounds and one antimicrobial substance was found to increase depending on the gas composition. In addition, the observation of CO2 and O2 in the exhaust gas allowed optimization and control of production processes. Conclusions Myxobacteria are becoming increasingly important due to their potential for bioactive secondary metabolite production. Our studies show that the influence of different gas partial pressures should not be underestimated during screening processes for novel compounds and that our described method provides a simple tool to investigate this question. PMID:22571441

  4. Evaporation of iodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, J.A.; Bosuego, G.P.

    1980-07-14

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  5. Dissolved gas and isotopic tracers of denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; McNab, W W; Carle, S F; Cey, B D

    2008-02-28

    We present results from field studies in California (USA) where tritium-helium age dating is used in conjunction with major gases (N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}), noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), and stable isotopes ({sup 15}N/{sup 14}N, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) in order to document nitrate loading and denitrification associated with confined animal agricultural operations and septic systems. Preliminary results show that in-field extraction of the full suite of dissolved gases will be possible using a new Gas Extraction System under development to augment the current Noble Gas Mass Spectrometry and Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry techniques. Ascribing observed groundwater nitrate levels to specific current and past land use practices is often complicated by uncertainty in groundwater age and the degree and locus of dentrification. Groundwater age dating at dairy field sites using the {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He method indicates that the highest nitrate concentrations (150-260 mg/L-NO3) occur in waters with apparent ages of <5 yrs, whereas older waters contain excess N{sub 2} from saturated zone denitrification [1]. At a residential septic system site in Livermore, CA, waters with young apparent ages (<1 yr) proximal to leach line drainage have lower nitrate concentrations and elevated nitrate {delta}{sup 15}N and {delta}{sup 18}O values consistent with denitrification, but little evidence for excess N{sub 2}, indicating that denitrification is occurring in the unsaturated zone. Degassing of groundwater can complicate efforts to calculate travel times [2] and to quantify denitrification. Degassed groundwater underlying dairy operations is formed by two distinct mechanisms: (1) recharge of manure lagoon water affected by biogenic gas ebullition [3] and (2) saturated zone denitrification producing N{sub 2} gas above solubility in groundwater. Gas loss due to both mechanisms is evident in the concentrations of noble gases and major gases in dairy groundwater samples.

  6. High-pressure injection of dissolved oxygen for hydrocarbon remediation in a fractured dolostone aquifer.

    PubMed

    Greer, K D; Molson, J W; Barker, J F; Thomson, N R; Donaldson, C R

    2010-10-21

    A field experiment was completed at a fractured dolomite aquifer in southwestern Ontario, Canada, to assess the delivery of supersaturated dissolved oxygen (supersaturated with respect to ambient conditions) for enhanced bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater. The injection lasted for 1.5h using iTi's gPro® oxygen injection technology at pressures of up to 450 kPa and at concentrations of up to 34 mg O₂/L. A three-dimensional numerical model for advective-dispersive transport of dissolved oxygen within a discretely-fractured porous medium was calibrated to the observed field conditions under a conservative (no-consumption) scenario. The simulation demonstrated that oxygen rapidly filled the local intersecting fractures as well as the porous matrix surrounding the injection well. Following injection, the local fractures were rapidly flushed by the natural groundwater flow system but slow back-diffusion ensured a relatively longer residence time in the matrix. A sensitivity analysis showed significant changes in behaviour with varying fracture apertures and hydraulic gradients. Applying the calibrated model to a 7-day continuous injection scenario showed oxygen residence times (at the 3mg/L limit), within a radius of 2-4m from the injection well, of up to 100 days. This study has demonstrated that supersaturated dissolved oxygen can be effectively delivered to this type of a fractured and porous bedrock system at concentrations and residence times potentially sufficient for enhanced aerobic biodegradation. PMID:20727615

  7. Formulation of rizatriptan benzoate fast dissolving buccal films by emulsion evaporation technique

    PubMed Central

    Vidyadhara, Suryadevara; Sasidhar, Reddyvallam Lankapalli; Balakrishna, Thalamanchi; Vardhan, Malapolu Santha

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study deals with the formulation of fast dissolving films of Rizatriptan benzoate that is used for the treatment of Migraine. The concept of fast-dissolving drug delivery emerged from the desire to provide patient with more conventional means of taking their medication. Materials and Methods: In the present research work, various trials were carried out using film forming agents such as maltodextrin, gum karaya and xanthan gum to prepare an ideal film. Emulsion evaporation method was used for the preparation of films. The prepared films were evaluated for weight uniformity, drug content, film thickness, folding endurance, dispersion test and curling. The in vitro dissolution studies were carried out using simulated salivary fluid (pH 6.8 phosphate buffer). Results: About 97% of the drug was found to be released from the film within 10 min that is a desirable character for fast absorption. The drug excipient interaction studies carried out by differential scanning calorimetry analysis and Fourier transform infrared studies revealed that there were no major interactions between the drugs and excipients used for the preparation of films. Conclusion: Fast dissolving films of Rizatriptan benzoate prepared by emulsion evaporation technique were found to be suitable for eliciting better therapeutic effect in the treatment of migraine. PMID:25838995

  8. High-pressure injection of dissolved oxygen for hydrocarbon remediation in a fractured dolostone aquifer.

    PubMed

    Greer, K D; Molson, J W; Barker, J F; Thomson, N R; Donaldson, C R

    2010-10-21

    A field experiment was completed at a fractured dolomite aquifer in southwestern Ontario, Canada, to assess the delivery of supersaturated dissolved oxygen (supersaturated with respect to ambient conditions) for enhanced bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater. The injection lasted for 1.5h using iTi's gPro® oxygen injection technology at pressures of up to 450 kPa and at concentrations of up to 34 mg O₂/L. A three-dimensional numerical model for advective-dispersive transport of dissolved oxygen within a discretely-fractured porous medium was calibrated to the observed field conditions under a conservative (no-consumption) scenario. The simulation demonstrated that oxygen rapidly filled the local intersecting fractures as well as the porous matrix surrounding the injection well. Following injection, the local fractures were rapidly flushed by the natural groundwater flow system but slow back-diffusion ensured a relatively longer residence time in the matrix. A sensitivity analysis showed significant changes in behaviour with varying fracture apertures and hydraulic gradients. Applying the calibrated model to a 7-day continuous injection scenario showed oxygen residence times (at the 3mg/L limit), within a radius of 2-4m from the injection well, of up to 100 days. This study has demonstrated that supersaturated dissolved oxygen can be effectively delivered to this type of a fractured and porous bedrock system at concentrations and residence times potentially sufficient for enhanced aerobic biodegradation.

  9. Cellulase activity and dissolved organic carbon release from lignocellulose macrophyte-derived in four trophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Bottino, Flávia; Cunha-Santino, Marcela Bianchessi; Bianchini, Irineu

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of lignocellulose macrophyte-derived for the energy flux in aquatic ecosystems and the nutrient concentrations as a function of force which influences the decomposition process, this study aims to relate the enzymatic activity and lignocellulose hydrolysis in different trophic statuses. Water samples and two macrophyte species were collected from the littoral zone of a subtropical Brazilian Reservoir. A lignocellulosic matrix was obtained using aqueous extraction of dried plant material (≈40°C). Incubations for decomposition of the lignocellulosic matrix were prepared using lignocelluloses, inoculums and filtered water simulating different trophic statuses with the same N:P ratio. The particulate organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC, respectively) were quantified, the cellulase enzymatic activity was measured by releasing reducing sugars and immobilized carbon was analyzed by filtration. During the cellulose degradation indicated by the cellulase activity, the dissolved organic carbon daily rate and enzyme activity increased. It was related to a fast hydrolysable fraction of cellulose that contributed to short-term carbon immobilization (ca. 10 days). After approximately 20 days, the dissolved organic carbon and enzyme activity were inversely correlated suggesting that the respiration of microorganisms was responsible for carbon mineralization. Cellulose was an important resource in low nutrient conditions (oligotrophic). However, the detritus quality played a major role in the lignocelluloses degradation (i.e., enzyme activity) and carbon release. PMID:26991278

  10. High-pressure injection of dissolved oxygen for hydrocarbon remediation in a fractured dolostone aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, K. D.; Molson, J. W.; Barker, J. F.; Thomson, N. R.; Donaldson, C. R.

    2010-10-01

    A field experiment was completed at a fractured dolomite aquifer in southwestern Ontario, Canada, to assess the delivery of supersaturated dissolved oxygen (supersaturated with respect to ambient conditions) for enhanced bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in groundwater. The injection lasted for 1.5 h using iTi's gPro® oxygen injection technology at pressures of up to 450 kPa and at concentrations of up to 34 mg O 2/L. A three-dimensional numerical model for advective-dispersive transport of dissolved oxygen within a discretely-fractured porous medium was calibrated to the observed field conditions under a conservative (no-consumption) scenario. The simulation demonstrated that oxygen rapidly filled the local intersecting fractures as well as the porous matrix surrounding the injection well. Following injection, the local fractures were rapidly flushed by the natural groundwater flow system but slow back-diffusion ensured a relatively longer residence time in the matrix. A sensitivity analysis showed significant changes in behaviour with varying fracture apertures and hydraulic gradients. Applying the calibrated model to a 7-day continuous injection scenario showed oxygen residence times (at the 3 mg/L limit), within a radius of 2-4 m from the injection well, of up to 100 days. This study has demonstrated that supersaturated dissolved oxygen can be effectively delivered to this type of a fractured and porous bedrock system at concentrations and residence times potentially sufficient for enhanced aerobic biodegradation.

  11. Characterization of a novel dissolved CO2 sensor for utilization in environmental monitoring and aquaculture industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, K.; Jesus, João. M.; Gouveia, C.; Domingues, Jorge O.; Markovics, A.; Baptista, J. M.; Kovacs, B.; Pereira, Carlos M.; Borges, Maria-Teresa; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2013-11-01

    A novel optical fiber sensor is presented for measuring dissolved CO2 for water quality monitoring applications, where the optical signal is based either on refractive index changes or on color change. The sensing chemistry is based on the acid-basic equilibrium of 4-nitrophenol, that is converted into the anionic form by addition quaternary ammonium hydroxide. The CO2 sensitive layer was characterized and tested by using simple absorbance/reflectance measurement setups where the sensor was connected to a fiber optic CCD spectrometer. A prototype simulating a real shallow raceway aquaculture system was developed and its hydraulic behavior characterized. A commercially available partial-pressure- NDIR sensor was used as a reference for dissolved CO2 tests with the new optical fiber sensor under development. Preliminary tests allowed verifying the suitability of the new optical sensor for accurately tracking the dissolved carbon dioxide concentration in a suitable operation range. Direct comparison of the new sensor and the reference sensor system allowed to demonstrate the suitability of the new technology but also to identify some fragilities there are presently being addressed.

  12. Assessment of water quality and factors affecting dissolved oxygen in the Sangamon River, Decatur to Riverton, Illinois, summer 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidt, A.R.; Stamer, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Water quality and processes that affect the dissolved-oxygen concentration in a 45.9 mile reach of the Sangamon River from Decatur to Riverton, Illinois, were determined from data collected during low-flow periods in the summer of 1982. Relations among dissolved oxygen, water discharge, biochemical oxygen demand, ammonia and nitrite plus nitrate concentrations, and photosynthetic-oxygen production were simulated using a one-dimensional, steady-state computer model. Average dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from 8.0 milligrams per liter at the upstream end of the study reach at Decatur to 5.2 milligrams per liter 12.2 miles downstream. Ammonia concentrations ranged from 45 milligrams per liter at the mouth of Stevens Creek (2.6 miles downstream from Decatur) to 0.03 milligram per liter at the downstream end of the study reach. Un-ionized ammonia concentrations exceeded the maximum concentration specified in the State water quality standard (0.04 milligram per liter) throughout most of the study reach. Model simulations indicated that oxidation of ammonia to form nitrite plus nitrate was the most significant process leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations in the river. (USGS)

  13. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN: A COMPARISON OF TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement and interpretation of geochemical redox parameters are key components of ground water remedial investigations. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is perhaps the most robust geochemical parameter in redox characterization; however, recent work has indicated a need for proper da...

  14. The effect of membrane filtration on dissolved trace element concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Lum, K.R.; Garbarino, J.R.; Hall, G.E.M.; Lemieux, C.; Demas, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    The almost universally accepted operational definition for dissolved constituents is based on processing whole-water samples through a 0.45-??m membrane filter. Results from field and laboratory experiments indicate that a number of factors associated with filtration, other than just pore size (e.g., diameter, manufacturer, volume of sample processed, amount of suspended sediment in the sample), can produce substantial variations in the 'dissolved' concentrations of such elements as Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, Pb, Co, and Ni. These variations result from the inclusion/exclusion of colloidally- associated trace elements. Thus, 'dissolved' concentrations quantitated by analyzing filtrates generated by processing whole-water through similar pore- sized membrane filters may not be equal/comparable. As such, simple filtration through a 0.45-??m membrane filter may no longer represent an acceptable operational definition for dissolved chemical constituents. This conclusion may have important implications for environmental studies and regulatory agencies.

  15. Neptunium estimation in dissolver and high-level-waste solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, P.N.; Prabhu, D.R.; Kanekar, A.S.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2008-07-01

    This papers deals with the optimization of the experimental conditions for the estimation of {sup 237}Np in spent-fuel dissolver/high-level waste solutions using thenoyltrifluoroacetone as the extractant. (authors)

  16. 7 CFR 760.115 - Deceased individuals or dissolved entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... now a dissolved general partnership or joint venture, all members of the general partnership or joint venture at the time of dissolution or their duly authorized representatives must sign the application...

  17. High export of dissolved silica from the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meire, L.; Meire, P.; Struyf, E.; Krawczyk, D. W.; Arendt, K. E.; Yde, J. C.; Juul Pedersen, T.; Hopwood, M. J.; Rysgaard, S.; Meysman, F. J. R.

    2016-09-01

    Silica is an essential element for marine life and plays a key role in the biogeochemistry of the ocean. Glacial activity stimulates rock weathering, generating dissolved silica that is exported to coastal areas along with meltwater. The magnitude of the dissolved silica export from large glacial areas such as the Greenland Ice Sheet is presently poorly quantified and not accounted for in global budgets. Here we present data from two fjord systems adjacent to the Greenland Ice Sheet which reveal a large export of dissolved silica by glacial meltwater relative to other macronutrients. Upscaled to the entire Greenland Ice Sheet, the export of dissolved silica equals 22 ± 10 Gmol Si yr-1. When the silicate-rich meltwater mixes with upwelled deep water, either inside or outside Greenland's fjords, primary production takes place at increased silicate to nitrate ratios. This likely stimulates the growth of diatoms relative to other phytoplankton groups.

  18. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate-Scale Hydrodynamic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Labiosa, Rochelle G.; Kim, Taeyun

    2010-11-30

    The Washington State Department of Ecology contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic and water quality model to study dissolved oxygen and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound and to help define potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies and decisions. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or dominate human impacts to dissolved oxygen levels in the sensitive areas. In this study, an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic model of Puget Sound was developed to simulate the hydrodynamics of Puget Sound and the Northwest Straits for the year 2006. The model was constructed using the unstructured Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model. The overall model grid resolution within Puget Sound in its present configuration is about 880 m. The model was driven by tides, river inflows, and meteorological forcing (wind and net heat flux) and simulated tidal circulations, temperature, and salinity distributions in Puget Sound. The model was validated against observed data of water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity at various stations within the study domain. Model validation indicated that the model simulates tidal elevations and currents in Puget Sound well and reproduces the general patterns of the temperature and salinity distributions.

  19. Utilizing Colored Dissolved Organic Matter to Derive Dissolved Black Carbon Export by Arctic Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbins, Aron; Spencer, Robert; Mann, Paul; Holmes, R.; McClelland, James; Niggemann, Jutta; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    Wildfires have produced black carbon (BC) since land plants emerged. Condensed aromatic compounds, a form of BC, have accumulated to become a major component of the soil carbon pool. Condensed aromatics leach from soils into rivers, where they are termed dissolved black carbon (DBC). The transport of DBC by rivers to the sea is a major term in the global carbon and BC cycles. To estimate Arctic river DBC export, 25 samples collected from the six largest Arctic rivers (Kolyma, Lena, Mackenzie, Ob’, Yenisey and Yukon) were analyzed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and DBC. A simple, linear regression between DOC and DBC indicated that DBC accounted for 8.9 ± 0.3% DOC exported by Arctic rivers. To improve upon this estimate, an optical proxy for DBC was developed based upon the linear correlation between DBC concentrations and CDOM light absorption coefficients at 254 nm (a254). Relatively easy to measure a254 values were determined for 410 Arctic river samples between 2004 and 2010. Each of these a254 values was converted to a DBC concentration based upon the linear correlation, providing an extended record of DBC concentration. The extended DBC record was coupled with daily discharge data from the six rivers to estimate riverine DBC loads using the LOADEST modeling program. The six rivers studied cover 53% of the pan-Arctic watershed and exported 1.5 ± 0.1 million tons of DBC per year. Scaling up to the full area of the pan-Arctic watershed, we estimate that Arctic rivers carry 2.8 ± 0.3 million tons of DBC from land to the Arctic Ocean each year. This equates to ~8% of Arctic river DOC export, slightly less than indicated by the simpler DBC vs DOC correlation-based estimate. Riverine discharge is predicted to increase in a warmer Arctic. DBC export was positively correlated with river runoff, suggesting that the export of soil BC to the Arctic Ocean is likely to increase as the Arctic warms.

  20. Cellular partitioning of nanoparticulate versus dissolved metals in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K; Jarvis, Tayler A; Lenihan, Hunter S; Miller, Robert J

    2014-11-18

    Discharges of metal oxide nanoparticles into aquatic environments are increasing with their use in society, thereby increasing exposure risk for aquatic organisms. Separating the impacts of nanoparticle from dissolved metal pollution is critical for assessing the environmental risks of the rapidly growing nanomaterial industry, especially in terms of ecosystem effects. Metal oxides negatively affect several species of marine phytoplankton, which are responsible for most marine primary production. Whether such toxicity is generally due to nanoparticles or exposure to dissolved metals liberated from particles is uncertain. The type and severity of toxicity depends in part on whether phytoplankton cells take up and accumulate primarily nanoparticles or dissolved metal ions. We compared the responses of the marine diatom, Thalassiosira weissflogii, exposed to ZnO, AgO, and CuO nanoparticles with the responses of T. weissflogii cells exposed to the dissolved metals ZnCl2, AgNO3, and CuCl2 for 7 d. Cellular metal accumulation, metal distribution, and algal population growth were measured to elucidate differences in exposure to the different forms of metal. Concentration-dependent metal accumulation and reduced population growth were observed in T. weissflogii exposed to nanometal oxides, as well as dissolved metals. Significant effects on population growth were observed at the lowest concentrations tested for all metals, with similar toxicity for both dissolved and nanoparticulate metals. Cellular metal distribution, however, markedly differed between T. weissflogii exposed to nanometal oxides versus those exposed to dissolved metals. Metal concentrations were highest in the algal cell wall when cells were exposed to metal oxide nanoparticles, whereas algae exposed to dissolved metals had higher proportions of metal in the organelle and endoplasmic reticulum fractions. These results have implications for marine plankton communities as well as higher trophic levels, since

  1. Modeling dissolved and free phase gas dynamics under decompression.

    PubMed

    Wienke, B R

    1990-04-01

    Dissolved and free gases do not behave the same way in tissue under pressure, and their interaction is complex. Differences are highlighted, particularly with respect to time scales, gradients and transport. Impacts of free phases on diving are described, contrasting increased off-gassing pressures, slower ascent rates, safety stops and reduced repetitive exposures as consistent practical measures within Haldane models (limited supersaturation) which can be played off against buildup of dissolved gas. Simple computations illustrate the points.

  2. Cellular partitioning of nanoparticulate versus dissolved metals in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K; Jarvis, Tayler A; Lenihan, Hunter S; Miller, Robert J

    2014-11-18

    Discharges of metal oxide nanoparticles into aquatic environments are increasing with their use in society, thereby increasing exposure risk for aquatic organisms. Separating the impacts of nanoparticle from dissolved metal pollution is critical for assessing the environmental risks of the rapidly growing nanomaterial industry, especially in terms of ecosystem effects. Metal oxides negatively affect several species of marine phytoplankton, which are responsible for most marine primary production. Whether such toxicity is generally due to nanoparticles or exposure to dissolved metals liberated from particles is uncertain. The type and severity of toxicity depends in part on whether phytoplankton cells take up and accumulate primarily nanoparticles or dissolved metal ions. We compared the responses of the marine diatom, Thalassiosira weissflogii, exposed to ZnO, AgO, and CuO nanoparticles with the responses of T. weissflogii cells exposed to the dissolved metals ZnCl2, AgNO3, and CuCl2 for 7 d. Cellular metal accumulation, metal distribution, and algal population growth were measured to elucidate differences in exposure to the different forms of metal. Concentration-dependent metal accumulation and reduced population growth were observed in T. weissflogii exposed to nanometal oxides, as well as dissolved metals. Significant effects on population growth were observed at the lowest concentrations tested for all metals, with similar toxicity for both dissolved and nanoparticulate metals. Cellular metal distribution, however, markedly differed between T. weissflogii exposed to nanometal oxides versus those exposed to dissolved metals. Metal concentrations were highest in the algal cell wall when cells were exposed to metal oxide nanoparticles, whereas algae exposed to dissolved metals had higher proportions of metal in the organelle and endoplasmic reticulum fractions. These results have implications for marine plankton communities as well as higher trophic levels, since

  3. Spatial distribution of dissolved constituents in Icelandic river waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskarsdottir, Sigrídur Magnea; Gislason, Sigurdur Reynir; Snorrason, Arni; Halldorsdottir, Stefanía Gudrún; Gisladottir, Gudrún

    2011-02-01

    SummaryIn this study we map the spatial distribution of selected dissolved constituents in Icelandic river waters using GIS methods to study and interpret the connection between river chemistry, bedrock, hydrology, vegetation and aquatic ecology. Five parameters were selected: alkalinity, SiO 2, Mo, F and the dissolved inorganic nitrogen and dissolved inorganic phosphorus mole ratio (DIN/DIP). The highest concentrations were found in rivers draining young rocks within the volcanic rift zone and especially those draining active central volcanoes. However, several catchments on the margins of the rift zone also had high values for these parameters, due to geothermal influence or wetlands within their catchment area. The DIN/DIP mole ratio was higher than 16 in rivers draining old rocks, but lowest in rivers within the volcanic rift zone. Thus primary production in the rivers is limited by fixed dissolved nitrogen within the rift zone, but dissolved phosphorus in the old Tertiary catchments. Nitrogen fixation within the rift zone can be enhanced by high dissolved molybdenum concentrations in the vicinity of volcanoes. The river catchments in this study were subdivided into several hydrological categories. Importantly, the variation in the hydrology of the catchments cannot alone explain the variation in dissolved constituents. The presence or absence of central volcanoes, young reactive rocks, geothermal systems and wetlands is important for the chemistry of the river waters. We used too many categories within several of the river catchments to be able to determine a statistically significant connection between the chemistry of the river waters and the hydrological categories. More data are needed from rivers draining one single hydrological category. The spatial dissolved constituent distribution clearly revealed the difference between the two extremes, the young rocks of the volcanic rift zone and the old Tertiary terrain.

  4. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzel, Duane A.

    2009-09-14

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including changes in pressure as they pass through turbines and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). To examine pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists conducted specific tests using a hyperbaric chamber. Tests were designed to simulate Kaplan turbine passage conditions and to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes, with and without the complication of fish being acclimated to gas-supersaturated water.

  5. Characterization of Urban Runoff Pollution between Dissolved and Particulate Phases

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhang; Simin, Li; Fengbing, Tang

    2013-01-01

    To develop urban stormwater management effectively, characterization of urban runoff pollution between dissolved and particulate phases was studied by 12 rainfall events monitored for five typical urban catchments. The average event mean concentration (AEMC) of runoff pollutants in different phases was evaluated. The AEMC values of runoff pollutants in different phases from urban roads were higher than the ones from urban roofs. The proportions of total dissolved solids, total dissolved nitrogen, and total dissolved phosphorus in total ones for all the catchments were 26.19%–30.91%, 83.29%–90.51%, and 61.54–68.09%, respectively. During rainfall events, the pollutant concentration at the initial stage of rainfall was high and then sharply decreased to a low value. Affected by catchments characterization and rainfall distribution, the highest concentration of road pollutants might appear in the later period of rainfall. Strong correlations were also found among runoffs pollutants in different phases. Total suspended solid could be considered as a surrogate for particulate matters in both road and roof runoff, while dissolved chemical oxygen demand could be regarded as a surrogate for dissolved matters in roof runoff. PMID:23935444

  6. Dissolved Organic Matter in the Hudson River Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. F.; Gardner, G. B.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the LATTE (Lagrangian Transport and Transformation Experiment) program, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were measured in the Hudson River Estuary and Plume. As revealed by high resolution measurements from the Integrated Coastal Observation System (ICOS), dissolved organic matter has several sources within the estuary including the Hudson and Raritan Rivers, and a yet unidentified anthropogenic source off Manhattan. The quantity of dissolved organic matter that is exported from the Hudson River Estuary is significantly greater than that which the Hudson River can supply by simply conservative mixing with coastal seawater. In May, 2004, rhodamine dye was injected at the surface as the plume flowed out onto the New York/New Jersey shelf, once as the plume turned north towards Long Island, and once as the plume flowed south along the New Jersey coast. The ECOShuttle (a towed-undulating vehicle) carrying a rhodamine fluorometer was able to track these dye patches. An examination of dissolved organic matter transformations that occurred over these two to two and one-half day Lagrangian experiments will be discussed. In addition seasonal distributions of dissolved organic matter distributions will be presented from cruises in June 2003, June 2004 and September 2004 under different river flow and wind conditions.

  7. On the losses of dissolved CO(2) during champagne serving.

    PubMed

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Villaume, Sandra; Jeandet, Philippe; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume

    2010-08-11

    Pouring champagne into a glass is far from being consequenceless with regard to its dissolved CO(2) concentration. Measurements of losses of dissolved CO(2) during champagne serving were done from a bottled Champagne wine initially holding 11.4 +/- 0.1 g L(-1) of dissolved CO(2). Measurements were done at three champagne temperatures (i.e., 4, 12, and 18 degrees C) and for two different ways of serving (i.e., a champagne-like and a beer-like way of serving). The beer-like way of serving champagne was found to impact its concentration of dissolved CO(2) significantly less. Moreover, the higher the champagne temperature is, the higher its loss of dissolved CO(2) during the pouring process, which finally constitutes the first analytical proof that low temperatures prolong the drink's chill and helps it to retain its effervescence during the pouring process. The diffusion coefficient of CO(2) molecules in champagne and champagne viscosity (both strongly temperature-dependent) are suspected to be the two main parameters responsible for such differences. Besides, a recently developed dynamic-tracking technique using IR thermography was also used in order to visualize the cloud of gaseous CO(2) which flows down from champagne during the pouring process, thus visually confirming the strong influence of champagne temperature on its loss of dissolved CO(2).

  8. Photochemical Degradation of Persistent Organic Pollutants: A Study of Ice Photochemistry Mediated by Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobby, R.; Pagano, L.; Grannas, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established that ice is a reactive medium in the environment and that active photochemistry occurs in frozen systems. Snow and ice contain a number of absorbing species including nitrate, peroxide and organic matter. Upon irradiation, they can generate a variety of reactive intermediates such as hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen. It has been shown that dissolved organic matter is a ubiquitous component of snow and ice and plays an important role in overall light absorption properties of the sample. Additionally, the reactive intermediates produced can further react with contaminants present and alter their fate in the environment. Unfortunately, the role of dissolved organic matter in ice photochemistry has received little attention. Here we present results from laboratory-based studies aimed at elucidating the role of dissolved organic matter photochemistry on contaminant degradation in ice. Aqueous samples of our target pollutant, aldrin (20 μg/L), in liquid and frozen phases, were irradiated under Q-Panel 340 lamps to simulate the UV radiation profile of natural sunlight. Results indicated that frozen samples degraded more quickly than liquid samples and that the addition of dissolved organic matter increases the aldrin degradation rate significantly. Both terrestrial (Suwannee River, U.S.) and microbial sources (Pony Lake, Antarctica) of DOM were able to sensitize aldrin loss in ice. Scavengers of singlet oxygen, such as furfuryl alcohol and β-carotene, were also added to DOM solutions. Based on the type of organic matter present, the scavengers had different effects on the photochemical degradation of aldrin. Our results indicate that natural organic matter present in ice is an important component of ice photochemical processes.

  9. Exchanges and photo-biogeochemical transformation of dissolved organic compounds in Eastern US tidal marsh ecosystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzortziou, Maria; Neale, Patrick; Megonigal, Patrick; Butterworth, Megan; Jaffe, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    The role of tidal marshes as sources, sinks and/or transformers of biologically important nutrients, carbon and pollutants has been studied in various marsh-estuarine environments and geomorphological settings. Although there is no consensus on the magnitude and direction of marsh-estuary net (particulate and dissolved) organic fluxes, most previous studies suggest that salt marshes export dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the surrounding estuarine waters. There has been less attention, however, to the influence of transformations on marsh-exported organic carbon composition or "quality". Yet, carbon composition affects a wide variety of estuarine processes, including microbial respiration and photochemistry. Our objectives in this study were to quantify the photo-reactivity and bio-availability of dissolved organic carbon compounds exported from tidal wetlands of the Chesapeake Bay and determine their effects on the optical properties of colored organic matter (CDOM). We quantified DOC bioavailability with two assays of microbial mineralization: the traditional batch incubation approach in which a suspension of DOM and microbial cells (1 µm filtrate) was incubated in bottles for 7 d, and a continuous-flow bioreactor approach in which DOC (0.2 µm filtrate) was passed through a microbial community that had been pre-established on glass beads from the same source water. Photochemical degradation was measured after a 10h exposure to filtered xenon irradiance simulating midday surface exposure. We measured decreases in CDOM absorption and fluorescence spectra, DOC concentrations, changes in molecular weight distribution, and increases in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and CO2. Results provide important insights on the transformation, fate and cycling of marsh-exported organic compounds, and the role of tidal marsh systems as major regulators of short-scale biological, optical and biogeochemical variability in highly dynamic coastal margins and catchment areas.

  10. Attractive surface force in the presence of dissolved gas: a molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Bratko, Dusan; Luzar, Alenka

    2008-02-19

    Despite widespread evidence of the influence of dissolved air on hydrophobic interaction, the mechanisms of observed effects are still unknown. Although some experiments indicate that adsorbed gases can modify the structure of water next to hydrophobic surfaces, gas effects on measured forces have been observed only at large surface separations. Gas-specific depletion of water at a hydrophobic surface has been detected but was not reproduced in subsequent measurements. We use computer simulations to study short-ranged hydrophobic attraction in the absence and presence of dissolved gas and monitor gas adsorption at molecular resolution inaccessible in experiments. Although we observe a significant accumulation of dissolved gases at hydrophobic surfaces, even in supersaturated gas solutions surface concentrations remain too low to induce any significant change in the local structure of water and short-range surface forces. We present direct calculations of the hydrophobic force between model hydrocarbon plates at separations between 1.5 and 4 nm. Although stronger, the calculated solvation force has a similar decay rate as deduced from recent surface force apparatus measurements at a somewhat lower contact angle. Within the statistical uncertainty, short-range attraction is not affected by the presence of dissolved nitrogen, even in supersaturated solution with a gas fugacity as high as 30 atm. Comparisons of the adsorption behavior of N2, O2, CO2, and Ar reveal similar features in contrast to the peculiar suppression of water depletion reported for an Ar solution in a neutron reflectivity experiment. Our calculations reveal a notable difference between pathways to the capillary evaporation of pure water and gas-phase nucleation in confined supersaturated gas solutions. PMID:17979305

  11. Seasonal Changes in Arctic Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boot, C. M.; Wallenstein, M. D.; Schimel, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic is a landscape in flux. Temperatures are shifting upward and plant communities are transitioning from tussock to shrub tundra in some regions. Decomposition processes sensitive to temperature, moisture, and plant inputs are controls on the source/sink dynamics of the Arctic C pool. The response of decomposition to warming will, in part, determine if the Arctic C pool feeds back positively or negatively to climate change. The portion of the C pool immediately available to decomposers is dissolved organic matter (DOM). The aim of this is study is to examine the molecular composition of DOM to determine which components vary seasonally in soil pore water among three vegetation types at Toolik Field Station in Alaska. Vegetation types include wet sedge (Carex aquatilis and Eriophorum angustifolium), moist acidic tussock (E. vaginatum) and shrub tundra (Betula nana and Salix sp.). These sites were sampled during winter/summer transitions in 2010 in order to capture both growing season and winter dynamics. We expected the chemical composition of DOM in pore water to be distinct among plant communities due to differences in root exudates, litter chemistry and microbial community; and vary seasonally due to shifting temperature and water availability and their impacts on decomposition of DOM. Soil pore water was isolated through centrifugation and is being characterized with ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) in line with a quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometer (QTOF-MS) as well as with specific UV absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA), and excitation emission matrices (EEMs) generated by fluorescence spectroscopy. The DOM concentrations across vegetation types show consistent seasonal patterns, spiking at thaw, and declining through late summer. As soils freeze these patterns diverge-in tussock soils DOM concentration decreases slightly, while in shrub and wet sedge sites it increases. SUVA values (indicator of aromaticity) were consistent among

  12. Surface segregation of dissolved salt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hofft, Oliver; Borodin, Andriy; Kahnert, Uwe; Kempter, Volker; Dang, Liem X.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2006-06-22

    Surface segregation of iodide, but not of fluoride or cesium ions, is observed by a combination of metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS(HeI)) of amorphous solid water exposed to CsI or CsF vapor. The same surface ionic behavior is also derived from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the corresponding aqueous salt solutions. The MIES results provide first direct evidence for the suggested presence of heavier halides (iodide, bromide, and to a lesser extent chloride) at aqueous surfaces, and confirm the structural similarity between the amorphous solid and the corresponding liquid. In contrast, no appreciable surface segregation of ions is observed in methanol, neither in the experiment nor in the simulation, which points to the remarkable surface properties of water among polar solvents. The propensity of heavier halides for the air/solution interface has important implications for heterogeneous chemical processes, particularly on aqueous aerosols in the atmosphere. This work was supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy, in part by the Chemical Sciences program and in part by the Engineering and Geosciences Division. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-76RL01830.

  13. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Partitioning of PCBs in Dissolver Solution After Neutralization/Precipitation (Caustic Adjustment)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Hoppe, E.W.; Mong, G.M.; Silvers, K.L.; Slate, S.O.

    1999-01-04

    The purpose of the work described in this report was to gain a better understanding of how PCB congeners present in a simulated K Basin sludge dissolver solution will partition upon neutralization and precipitation (i.e., caustic adjustment). In a previous study (Mong et al. 1998),the entire series of sludge conditioning steps (acid dissolution, filtration, and caustic adjustment) were examined during integrated testing. In the work described here, the caustic adjustment step was isolated to examine the fate of PCBs in more detail within this processing step. For this testing, solutions of dissolver simulant (containing no solids) with a known initial concentration of PCB congeners were neutralized with caustic to generate a clarified supernatant and a settled sludge phase. PCBs were quantified in each phase (including the PCBs associated with the test vessel rinsates), and material balance information was collected.

  14. Relative effect of temperature and pH on diel cycling of dissolved trace elements in prickly pear creek, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, C.A.; Nimick, D.A.; McCleskey, R.B.

    2004-01-01

    Diel (24 hr) cycles in dissolved metal and As concentrations have been documented in many northern Rocky Mountain streams in the U.S.A. The cause(s) of the cycles are unknown, although temperature- and pH-dependent sorption reactions have been cited as likely causes. A light/dark experiment was conducted to isolate temperature and pH as variables affecting diel metal cycles in Prickly Pear Creek, Montana. Light and dark chambers containing sediment and a strand of macrophyte were placed in the stream to simulate instream temperature oscillations. Photosynthesis-induced pH changes were allowed to proceed in the light chambers while photosynthesis was prevented in the dark chambers. Water samples were collected periodically for 22 hr in late July 2001 from all chambers and the stream. In the stream, dissolved Zn concentrations increased by 300% from late afternoon to early morning, while dissolved As concentrations exhibited the opposite pattern, increasing 33% between early morning and late afternoon. Zn and As concentrations in the light chambers showed similar, though less pronounced, diel variations. Conversely, Zn and As concentrations in the dark chambers had no obvious diel variation, indicating that light, or light-induced reactions, caused the variation. Temperature oscillations were nearly identical between light and dark chambers, strongly suggesting that temperature was not controlling the diel variations. As expected, pH was negatively correlated (P < 0.01) with dissolved Zn concentrations and positively correlated with dissolved As concentrations in both the light and dark chambers. From these experiments, photosynthesis-induced pH changes were determined to be the major cause of the diel dissolved Zn and As cycles in Prickly Pear Creek. Further research is necessary in other streams to verify that this finding is consistent among streams having large differences in trace-element concentrations and mineralogy of channel substrate. ?? 2004 Kluwer

  15. Variable C : N : P stoichiometry of dissolved organic matter cycling in the Community Earth System Model

    DOE PAGES

    Letscher, R. T.; Moore, J. K.; Teng, Y. -C.; Primeau, F.

    2015-01-12

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in the ocean's biological carbon pump by providing an advective/mixing pathway for ~ 20% of export production. DOM is known to have a stoichiometry depleted in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) compared to the particulate organic matter pool, a fact that is often omitted from biogeochemical ocean general circulation models. However the variable C : N : P stoichiometry of DOM becomes important when quantifying carbon export from the upper ocean and linking the nutrient cycles of N and P with that of carbon. Here we utilize recent advances in DOM observationalmore » data coverage and offline tracer-modeling techniques to objectively constrain the variable production and remineralization rates of the DOM C : N : P pools in a simple biogeochemical-ocean model of DOM cycling. The optimized DOM cycling parameters are then incorporated within the Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling (BEC) component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and validated against the compilation of marine DOM observations. The optimized BEC simulation including variable DOM C : N : P cycling was found to better reproduce the observed DOM spatial gradients than simulations that used the canonical Redfield ratio. Global annual average export of dissolved organic C, N, and P below 100 m was found to be 2.28 Pg C yr-1 (143 Tmol C yr-1, 16.4 Tmol N yr-1, and 1 Tmol P yr-1, respectively, with an average export C : N : P stoichiometry of 225 : 19 : 1 for the semilabile (degradable) DOM pool. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export contributed ~ 25% of the combined organic C export to depths greater than 100 m.« less

  16. Ocean metabolism and dissolved organic matter: How do small dissolved molecules persist in the ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, Ronald

    2010-05-01

    The ocean reservoir of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is among the largest global reservoirs (~700 Pg C) of reactive organic carbon. Marine primary production (~50 Pg C/yr) by photosynthetic microalgae and cyanobacteria is the major source of organic matter to the ocean and the principal substrate supporting marine food webs. The direct release of DOM from phytoplankton and other organisms as well as a variety of other processes, such as predation and viral lysis, contribute to the ocean DOM reservoir. Continental runoff and atmospheric deposition are relatively minor sources of DOM to the ocean, but some components of this material appear to be resistant to decomposition and to have a long residence time in the ocean. Concentrations of DOM are highest in surface waters and decrease with depth, a pattern that reflects the sources and diagenesis of DOM in the upper ocean. Most (70-80%) marine DOM exists as small molecules of low molecular weight (<1 kDalton). Surprisingly, high-molecular-weight (>1 kDalton) DOM is relatively enriched in major biochemicals, such as combined neutral sugars and amino acids, and is more bioavailable than low-molecular-weight DOM. The observed relationships among the size, composition, and reactivity of DOM have led to the size-reactivity continuum model, which postulates that diagenetic processes lead to the production of smaller molecules that are structurally altered and resistant to microbial degradation. The radiocarbon content of these small dissolved molecules also indicates these are the most highly aged components of DOM. Chemical signatures of bacteria are abundant in DOM and increase during diagenesis, indicating bacteria are an important source of slowly cycling biochemicals. Recent analyses of DOM isolates by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry have revealed an incredibly diverse mixture of molecules. Carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules are abundant in DOM, and they appear to be derived from diagenetically

  17. Effect of membrane filtration artifacts on dissolved trace element concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, Arthur J.; Elrick, Kent A.; Colberg, Mark R.

    1992-01-01

    Among environment scientists, the current and almost universally accepted definition of dissolved constituents is an operational one; only those materials which pass through a 0.45-??m membrane filter are considered to be dissolved. Detailed laboratory and field studies on Fe and Al indicate that a number of factors associated with filtration, other than just pore size, can substantially alter 'dissolved' trace element concentrations; these include: filter type, filter diameter, filtration method, volume of sample processed, suspended sediment concentration, suspended sediment grain-size distribution, concentration of colloids and colloidally associated trace elements and concentration of organic matter. As such, reported filtered-water concentrations employing the same pore size filter may not be equal. Filtration artifacts may lead to the production of chemical data that indicate seasonal or annual 'dissolved' chemical trends which do not reflect actual environmental conditions. Further, the development of worldwide averages for various dissolved chemical constituents, the quantification of geochemical cycles, and the determination of short- or long-term environmental chemical trends may be subject to substantial errors, due to filtration artifacts, when data from the same or multiple sources are combined. Finally, filtration effects could have a substantial impact on various regulatory requirements.

  18. X-ray fluorescence measurements of dissolved gas and cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Swantek, Andrew B.; Matusik, Katarzyna E.; Powell, Christopher F.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of dissolved gas and cavitation are strongly coupled, yet these phenomena are difficult to measure in-situ. Both create voids in the fluid that can be difficult to distinguish. We present an application of X-ray fluorescence in which liquid density and total noncondensible gas concentration (both dissolved and nucleated) are simultaneously measured. The liquid phase is doped with 400 ppm of a bromine tracer, and dissolved air is removed and substituted with krypton. Fluorescent emission at X-ray wavelengths is simultaneously excited from the Br and Kr with a focused monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source. We measure the flow in a cavitating nozzle 0.5 mm in diameter. From Br fluorescence, total displacement of the liquid is measured. From Kr fluorescence, the mass fraction of both dissolved and nucleated gas is measured. Volumetric displacement of liquid due to both cavitation and gas precipitation can be separated through estimation of the local equilibrium dissolved mass fraction. The uncertainty in the line of sight projected densities of the liquid and gas phases is 4-6 %. The high fluorescence yields and energies of Br and Kr allow small mass fractions of gas to be measured, down to 10-5, with an uncertainty of 8 %. These quantitative measurements complement existing optical diagnostic techniques and provide new insight into the diffusion of gas into cavitation bubbles, which can increase their internal density, pressure and lifetimes by orders of magnitude.

  19. Quantification of dissolved iron sources to the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.

    2014-07-01

    Dissolved iron is an essential micronutrient for marine phytoplankton, and its availability controls patterns of primary productivity and carbon cycling throughout the oceans. The relative importance of different sources of iron to the oceans is not well known, however, and flux estimates from atmospheric dust, hydrothermal vents and oceanic sediments vary by orders of magnitude. Here we present a high-resolution transect of dissolved stable iron isotope ratios (δ56Fe) and iron concentrations ([Fe]) along a section of the North Atlantic Ocean. The different iron sources can be identified by their unique δ56Fe signatures, which persist throughout the water column. This allows us to calculate the relative contribution from dust, hydrothermal venting and reductive and non-reductive sedimentary release to the dissolved phase. We find that Saharan dust aerosol is the dominant source of dissolved iron along the section, contributing 71-87 per cent of dissolved iron. Additional sources of iron are non-reductive release from oxygenated sediments on the North American margin (10-19 per cent), reductive sedimentary dissolution on the African margin (1-4 per cent) and hydrothermal venting at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (2-6 per cent). Our data also indicate that hydrothermal vents in the North Atlantic are a source of isotopically light iron, which travels thousands of kilometres from vent sites, potentially influencing surface productivity. Changes in the relative importance of the different iron sources through time may affect interactions between the carbon cycle and climate.

  20. Leaching of dissolved phosphorus from tile-drained agricultural areas.

    PubMed

    Andersen, H E; Windolf, J; Kronvang, B

    2016-01-01

    We investigated leaching of dissolved phosphorus (P) from 45 tile-drains representing animal husbandry farms in all regions of Denmark. Leaching of P via tile-drains exhibits a high degree of spatial heterogeneity with a low concentration in the majority of tile-drains and few tile-drains (15% in our investigation) having high to very high concentration of dissolved P. The share of dissolved organic P (DOP) was high (up to 96%). Leaching of DOP has hitherto been a somewhat overlooked P loss pathway in Danish soils and the mechanisms of mobilization and transport of DOP needs more investigation. We found a high correlation between Olsen-P and water extractable P. Water extractable P is regarded as an indicator of risk of loss of dissolved P. Our findings indicate that Olsen-P, which is measured routinely in Danish agricultural soils, may be a useful proxy for the P leaching potential of soils. However, we found no straight-forward correlation between leaching potential of the top soil layer (expressed as either degree of P saturation, Olsen-P or water extractable P) and the measured concentration of dissolved P in the tile-drain. This underlines that not only the source of P but also the P loss pathway must be taken into account when evaluating the risk of P loss. PMID:27332841

  1. Dissolving Microneedle Patch for Transdermal Delivery of Human Growth Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Seong-O; Felner, Eric I.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical impact of biotechnology has been constrained by the limitations of traditional hypodermic injection of biopharmaceuticals. Microneedle patches have been proposed as a minimally invasive alternative. In this study, we assess the translation of a dissolving microneedle patch designed for simple, painless self-administration of biopharmacetucials that generates no sharp biohazardous waste. To study pharmacokinetics and safety of this approach, human growth hormone (hGH) was encapsulated in 600 μm long dissolving microneedles composed of carboxymethylcellulose and trehalose using an aqueous, moderate-temperature process that maintained complete hGH activity after encapsulation and retained most activity after storage for up to 15 months at room temperature and humidity. After manual insertion into the skin of hairless rats, hGH pharmacokinetics were similar to conventional subcutaneous injection. After patch removal, the microneedles had almost completely dissolved, leaving behind only blunt stubs. The dissolving microneedle patch was well tolerated, causing only slight, transient erythema. This study suggests that a dissolving microneedle patch can deliver hGH and other biopharmaceuticals in a manner suitable for self-administration without sharp biohazardous waste. PMID:21360810

  2. Modelling Dissolved Pollutants in Krishna River Using Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matli, C. S.; Umamahesh, N. V.

    2014-01-01

    Water quality models are used to describe the discharge concentration relationships in the river. Number of models exists to simulate the pollutant loads in a river, of which some of them are based on simple cause effect relationships and others on highly sophisticated physical and mathematical approaches that require extensive data inputs. Fuzzy rule based modeling extensively used in other disciplines, is attempted in the present study for modeling water quality with respect of dissolved pollutants in Krishna river flowing in Southern part of India. Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference Systems (ANFIS), a recent development in the area of neuro-computing, based on the concept of fuzzy sets is used to model highly non-linear relationships and are capable of adaptive learning. This paper presents the results of the application of ANFIS for modeling dissolved pollutants in the Krishna River. The application and validation of the models is carried out using water quality and flow data obtained from the monitoring stations on the river. The results indicate that the models are quite successful in simulating the physical processes of the relationships between discharge and concentrations.

  3. Time Series Stream Temperature And Dissolved Oxygen Modeling In The Lower Flint River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Jackson, C. R.

    2004-12-01

    The tributaries of the Lower Flint River Basin (LFRB) are incised into the upper Floridan semi-confined limestone aquifer, and thus seepage of relatively old groundwater sustains baseflows and provides some control over temperature and dissolved oxygen fluctuations. This hydrologic and geologic setting creates aquatic habitat that is unique in the state of Georgia. Groundwater withdrawals and possible water supply reservoirs threaten to exacerbate low flow conditions during summer droughts, which may force negative impacts to stream temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO). To evaluate the possible effects of human modifications to stream habitat, summer time series (in 15 min interval) of stream temperature and DO were monitored over the last three years along these streams, and a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) model was developed and calibrated with these data. The driving forces of the diel trends and the overall levels of stream temperature and DO were identified by this model. Simulations were conducted with assumed managed flow conditions to illustrate potential effects of various stream flow regimes on stream temperature and DO time series. The goal of this research is to provide an accurate simulation tool to guide management decisions.

  4. [Dynamic change of dissolved iron in wetland soil solutions responding to freeze-thaw cycles].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-fei; Wang, Guo-ping; Lü, Xian-guo; Zou, Yuan-chun; Jiang, Ming

    2010-05-01

    The effects of five freeze-thaw cycles on the dynamic change of dissolved iron in three typical wetland soils (humus marsh soil in Carex lasiocarpa community, meadow marsh soil in Cares meyeriarna community, and meadow albic soil in Calamagrostis angustifolia community)of Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China, was analyzed through in-situ soil column simulation. One freeze-thaw cycle was conducted as freezing at -10 degrees C for 1 d and then thawing at 5 degrees C for 7 d. The thermostatically incubated soils at 5 degrees C were controls. The results showed that most pH and Eh values increased after the first freeze-thaw cycle, and then decreased after the subsequent cycles. 84.4% of the pH values of freeze-thaw treated soils were smaller than that of control, while 82.2% of the Eh values of freeze-thaw treated soils were greater than that of control. Most of the dissolved iron in all soil solutions were Fe3+ ions and colloids, and the reduction of these Fe3+ species were inhibited. The concentrations of Fe2, Fe3+, and total dissolved iron (TFe) of the freeze-thaw treated soils were all smaller than that of controls, with the means of (0.62 +/- 0.08) mg x L(-1) and (1.25 +/- 0.16) mg x L(-1), respectively. The variation trends of pH, Eh, and dissolved iron in the humus marsh soil were significantly different from that in the meadow albic soil. The trends in the meadow marsh soil, as the transitional soil type, were more similar to the meadow albic soil for pH, while more similar to the humus marsh soil for Eh and dissolved iron. Among the three soils, the difference between freeze-thaw treated columns and controls of the second layer were all smaller than that of the third and fourth layer, which indicated that the effect of freeze-thaw cycles were more significant for the upper annular wetland soil layers than the lower layers.

  5. Removal of dissolved organic matter by anion exchange: Effect of dissolved organic matter properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyer, T.H.; Singer, P.C.; Aiken, G.R.

    2008-01-01

    Ten isolates of aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) were evaluated to determine the effect that chemical properties of the DOM, such as charge density, aromaticity, and molecular weight, have on DOM removal by anion exchange. The DOM isolates were characterized asterrestrial, microbial, or intermediate humic substances or transphilic acids. All anion exchange experiments were conducted using a magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) resin. The charge density of the DOM isolates, determined by direct potentiometric titration, was fundamental to quantifying the stoichiometry of the anion exchange mechanism. The results clearly show that all DOM isolates were removed by anion exchange; however, differences among the DOM isolates did influence their removal by MIEX resin. In particular, MIEX resin had the greatest affinity for DOM with high charge density and the least affinity for DOM with low charge density and low aromaticity. This work illustrates that the chemical characteristics of DOM and solution conditions must be considered when evaluating anion exchange treatment for the removal of DOM. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  6. Influence of dissolved organic matter on dissolved vanadium speciation in the Churchill River estuary (Manitoba, Canada).

    PubMed

    Shi, Yong Xiang; Mangal, Vaughn; Guéguen, Céline

    2016-07-01

    Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) devices were used to investigate the temporal and spatial changes in vanadium (V) speciation in the Churchill estuary system (Manitoba). Thirty-six DGT sets and 95 discrete water samples were collected at 8 river and 3 estuary sites during spring freshet and summer base flow. Dissolved V concentration in the Churchill River at summer base flow was approximately 5 times higher than those during the spring high flow (27.3 ± 18.9 nM vs 4.8 ± 3.5 nM). DGT-labile V showed an opposite trend with greater values found during the spring high flow (2.6 ± 1.8 nM vs 1.4 ± 0.3 nM). Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) conducted on 95 excitation-emission matrix spectra validated four humic-like (C1C4) and one protein-like (C5) fluorescent components. Significant positive relationship was found between protein-like DOM and DGT-labile V (r = 0.53, p < 0.05), indicating that protein-like DOM possibly affected the DGT-labile V concentration in Churchill River. Sediment leachates were enriched in DGT-labile V and protein-like DOM, which can be readily released when river sediment began to thaw during spring freshet.

  7. Extreme conditions in a dissolving air nanobubble.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of the dissolution of an air nanobubble in water have been performed taking into account the effect of bubble dynamics (inertia of the surrounding liquid). The presence of stable bulk nanobubbles is not assumed in the present study because the bubble radius inevitably passes the nanoscale in the complete dissolution of a bubble. The bubble surface is assumed to be clean because attachment of hydrophobic materials on the bubble surface could considerably change the gas diffusion rate. The speed of the bubble collapse (the bubble wall speed) increases to about 90 m/s or less. The shape of a bubble is kept nearly spherical because the amplitude of the nonspherical component of the bubble shape is negligible compared to the instantaneous bubble radius. In other words, a bubble never disintegrates into daughter bubbles during the dissolution. At the final moment of the dissolution, the temperature inside a bubble increases to about 3000 K due to the quasiadiabatic compression. The bubble temperature is higher than 1000 K only for the final 19 ps. However, the Knudsen number is more than 0.2 for this moment, and the error associated with the continuum model should be considerable. In the final 2.3 ns, only nitrogen molecules are present inside a bubble as the solubility of nitrogen is the lowest among the gas species. The radical formation inside a bubble is negligible because the probability of nitrogen dissociation is only on the order of 10^{-15}. The pressure inside a bubble, as well as the liquid pressure at the bubble wall, increases to about 5 GPa at the final moment of dissolution. The pressure is higher than 1 GPa for the final 0.7 ns inside a bubble and for the final 0.6 ns in the liquid at the bubble wall. The liquid temperature at the bubble wall increases to about 360 K from 293 K at the final stage of the complete dissolution. PMID:27575216

  8. Extreme conditions in a dissolving air nanobubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of the dissolution of an air nanobubble in water have been performed taking into account the effect of bubble dynamics (inertia of the surrounding liquid). The presence of stable bulk nanobubbles is not assumed in the present study because the bubble radius inevitably passes the nanoscale in the complete dissolution of a bubble. The bubble surface is assumed to be clean because attachment of hydrophobic materials on the bubble surface could considerably change the gas diffusion rate. The speed of the bubble collapse (the bubble wall speed) increases to about 90 m/s or less. The shape of a bubble is kept nearly spherical because the amplitude of the nonspherical component of the bubble shape is negligible compared to the instantaneous bubble radius. In other words, a bubble never disintegrates into daughter bubbles during the dissolution. At the final moment of the dissolution, the temperature inside a bubble increases to about 3000 K due to the quasiadiabatic compression. The bubble temperature is higher than 1000 K only for the final 19 ps. However, the Knudsen number is more than 0.2 for this moment, and the error associated with the continuum model should be considerable. In the final 2.3 ns, only nitrogen molecules are present inside a bubble as the solubility of nitrogen is the lowest among the gas species. The radical formation inside a bubble is negligible because the probability of nitrogen dissociation is only on the order of 10-15. The pressure inside a bubble, as well as the liquid pressure at the bubble wall, increases to about 5 GPa at the final moment of dissolution. The pressure is higher than 1 GPa for the final 0.7 ns inside a bubble and for the final 0.6 ns in the liquid at the bubble wall. The liquid temperature at the bubble wall increases to about 360 K from 293 K at the final stage of the complete dissolution.

  9. Extreme conditions in a dissolving air nanobubble.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Tuziuti, Toru; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of the dissolution of an air nanobubble in water have been performed taking into account the effect of bubble dynamics (inertia of the surrounding liquid). The presence of stable bulk nanobubbles is not assumed in the present study because the bubble radius inevitably passes the nanoscale in the complete dissolution of a bubble. The bubble surface is assumed to be clean because attachment of hydrophobic materials on the bubble surface could considerably change the gas diffusion rate. The speed of the bubble collapse (the bubble wall speed) increases to about 90 m/s or less. The shape of a bubble is kept nearly spherical because the amplitude of the nonspherical component of the bubble shape is negligible compared to the instantaneous bubble radius. In other words, a bubble never disintegrates into daughter bubbles during the dissolution. At the final moment of the dissolution, the temperature inside a bubble increases to about 3000 K due to the quasiadiabatic compression. The bubble temperature is higher than 1000 K only for the final 19 ps. However, the Knudsen number is more than 0.2 for this moment, and the error associated with the continuum model should be considerable. In the final 2.3 ns, only nitrogen molecules are present inside a bubble as the solubility of nitrogen is the lowest among the gas species. The radical formation inside a bubble is negligible because the probability of nitrogen dissociation is only on the order of 10^{-15}. The pressure inside a bubble, as well as the liquid pressure at the bubble wall, increases to about 5 GPa at the final moment of dissolution. The pressure is higher than 1 GPa for the final 0.7 ns inside a bubble and for the final 0.6 ns in the liquid at the bubble wall. The liquid temperature at the bubble wall increases to about 360 K from 293 K at the final stage of the complete dissolution.

  10. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found.

  11. Dynamics of dissolved gas in a cavitating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastikhin, Igor V.; Newling, Benedict

    2008-12-01

    A strong acoustic field in a liquid separates the liquid and dissolved gases by the formation of bubbles (cavitation). Bubble growth and collapse is the result of active exchange of gas and vapor through the bubble walls with the surrounding liquid. This paper details a new approach to the study of cavitation, not as an evolution of discrete bubbles, but as the dynamics of molecules constituting both the bubbles and the fluid. We show, by direct, independent measurement of the liquid and the dissolved gas, that the motions of dissolved gas (freon-22, CHClF2 ) and liquid (water) can be quite different during acoustic cavitation and are strongly affected by filtration or previous cavitation of the solvent. Our observations suggest that bubbles can completely refresh their content within two acoustic cycles and that long-lived (˜minutes) microbubbles act as nucleation sites for cavitation. This technique is complementary to the traditional optical and acoustical techniques.

  12. Microscopic residues of bone from dissolving human remains in acids.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Erwin; Zoon, Peter; van Wijk, Mayonne; Gerretsen, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Dissolving bodies is a current method of disposing of human remains and has been practiced throughout the years. During the last decade in the Netherlands, two cases have emerged in which human remains were treated with acid. In the first case, the remains of a cremated body were treated with hydrofluoric acid. In the second case, two complete bodies were dissolved in a mixture of hydrochloric and sulfuric acid. In both cases, a great variety of evidence was collected at the scene of crime, part of which was embedded in resin, polished, and investigated using SEM/EDX. Apart from macroscopic findings like residual bone and artificial teeth, in both cases, distinct microscopic residues of bone were found as follows: (partly) digested bone, thin-walled structures, and recrystallized calcium phosphate. Although some may believe it is possible to dissolve a body in acid completely, at least some of these microscopic residues will always be found. PMID:25677640

  13. Relationship between ecosystem respiration and aeration constant in open channel dissolved oxygen analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, S. J.; Butler, A. P.; Heppell, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Using the open channel diel method of Odum (1956) and the night-time regression method (Hornberger and Kelly, 1985), we analysed a time series of dissolved oxygen (DO) in two slow flowing streams for a two month period in summer 2014 and obtained values for ecosystem respiration and the aeration constant for each day in the period. We then used the standard dissolved oxygen lumped model to generate a DO time series behaviour for one of those rivers selecting respiration and aeration parameters by randomly sampling from the values obtained from the data. Two synthetic time series were created, one where respiration and aeration were independent of temperature and a second where respiration and aeration were affected by temperature according to the modified Arrhenius relationship. With these two synthetic time series, we again recovered the respiration and aeration input parameters using the night- time regression method and compared those recovered parameters with the input parameters. Because the simulations were conducted with parameters that were known, the values recovered using the night-time regression method (i.e post-simulation) could be compared with parameters driving the simulation (i.e. pre-simulation input values). For values based on data, we found a strong correlation between the aeration constant and respiration for both rivers. For the synthetic time series, no such correlation was found, either with the temperature independent or temperature dependent time series. The night-time regression method also recovered perfectly the input parameters, so the correlation was not brought about as a result of implementing the method itself. We are currently investigating the cause of the correlation.

  14. Modelling dissolved oxygen and benthic algae dynamics in a coastal ecosystem by exploiting real-time monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovato, T.; Ciavatta, S.; Brigolin, D.; Rubino, A.; Pastres, R.

    2013-03-01

    In this work we propose a methodological approach for the detection and simulation of relevant changes in coastal ecosystems, i.e. oxygen depletion and proliferation of benthic algae. This approach is based on the integration of the data provided by real-time monitoring systems with the output of complex ecosystem models. We tested the method in a case study, where real-time Dissolved Oxygen (DO) data and a 2D Reaction-Transport model were used to simulate the growth of macroalgae and the daily dynamics of DO in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy). The spatiotemporal relationships among the macroalgae distribution and the DO observations were quantified by analysing and comparing the Dissolved Oxygen time series and model outputs. The outcomes were used for the inverse estimation of the initial, i.e. late winter, biomass of macroalgae. The model was then applied to simulate the growth of macroalgae and the daily dynamic of DO during the productive (i.e., spring and summer) seasons. The comparison between the model output and the real-time data indicates that the model had skill in simulating the short term (daily) DO dynamic at several lagoon sites impacted by macroalgae proliferation. The simulated intra-daily variability of Dissolved Oxygen is significantly correlated with the observations in half of the monitoring sites, as well the simulated algal growth, which resulted comparable with the field measurements. The estimated average value of macroalgae biomass was ˜1 kgfw m-2 in 2007, which is consistent with a good to moderate quality status of the Lagoon of Venice. The proposed methodology can be useful in the assessment of the environmental status of coastal ecosystems as required by recent national and international legislation.

  15. Effects of dissolved organic matter from a eutrophic lake on the freely dissolved concentrations of emerging organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yi-Hua; Huang, Qing-Hui; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Li, Fei-Peng; Chen, Ling

    2014-08-01

    The authors studied the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the bioavailability of bisphenol A (BPA) and chloramphenicol by measuring the freely dissolved concentrations of the contaminants in solutions containing DOM that had been isolated from a mesocosm in a eutrophic lake. The abundance and aromaticity of the chromophoric DOM increased over the 25-d mesocosm experiment. The BPA freely dissolved concentration was 72.3% lower and the chloramphenicol freely dissolved concentration was 56.2% lower using DOM collected on day 25 than using DOM collected on day 1 of the mesocosm experiment. The freely dissolved concentrations negatively correlated with the ultraviolent absorption coefficient at 254 nm and positively correlated with the spectral slope of chromophoric DOM, suggesting that the bioavailability of these emerging organic contaminants depends on the characteristics of the DOM present. The DOM-water partition coefficients (log KOC ) for the emerging organic contaminants positively correlated with the aromaticity of the DOM, measured as humic acid-like fluorescent components C1 (excitation/emission=250[313]/412 nm) and C2 (excitation/emission=268[379]/456 nm). The authors conclude that the bioavailability of emerging organic contaminants in eutrophic lakes can be affected by changes in the DOM.

  16. Dissolved Solids in Streams of the Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anning, D. W.; Flynn, M.

    2014-12-01

    Studies have shown that excessive dissolved-solids concentrations in water can have adverse effects on the environment and on agricultural, municipal, and industrial water users. Such effects motivated the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program to develop a SPAtially-Referenced Regression on Watershed Attributes (SPARROW) model to improve the understanding of dissolved solids in streams of the United States. Using the SPARROW model, annual dissolved-solids loads from 2,560 water-quality monitoring stations were statistically related to several spatial datasets serving as surrogates for dissolved-solids sources and transport processes. Sources investigated in the model included geologic materials, road de-icers, urban lands, cultivated lands, and pasture lands. Factors affecting transport from these sources to streams in the model included climate, soil, vegetation, terrain, population, irrigation, and artificial-drainage characteristics. The SPARROW model was used to predict long-term mean annual conditions for dissolved-solids sources, loads, yields, and concentrations in about 66,000 stream reaches and corresponding incremental catchments nationwide. The estimated total amount of dissolved solids delivered to the Nation's streams is 272 million metric tons (Mt) annually, of which 194 million Mt (71%) are from geologic sources, 38 million Mt (14%) are from road de-icers, 18 million Mt (7%) are from pasture lands, 14 million Mt (5 %) are from urban lands, and 8 million Mt (3%) are from cultivated lands. The median incremental-catchment yield delivered to local streams is 26 metric tons per year per square kilometer [(Mt/yr)/km2]. Ten percent of the incremental catchments yield less than 4 (Mt/yr)/km2, and 10 percent yield more than 90 (Mt/yr)/km2. In 13% of the reaches, predicted flow-weighted concentrations exceed 500 mg/L—the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary non-enforceable drinking-water standard.

  17. Dissolved gas concentrations of the geothermal fluids in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ai-Ti; Yang, Tsanyao Frank

    2010-05-01

    Taiwan, a geologically active island, is located on the boundary of the Philippine Sea Plate and the Eurasian Plate. High heat flow and geothermal gradient generated by the complex collision and orogeny, warm up the meteoric water and/or the ground water. The heated water becomes geothermal fluids. In previous studies, researchers tried to categorize hot springs based on the appearance, chemical compositions and lithological areas. Because of the chemical inertness, the concentrations and isotopic composition of dissolved noble gases are good indicators of the mantle degassing, geothermal conditions, and so on. In this study, 55 hot springs were collected from different tectonic units. It is the first time to systematically study the hot springs in Taiwan in terms of dissolved gases. Hot spring water is sampled and stored in pre-evacuated glass bottles for analyzing gas compositions. The abundances of noble gases were determined by a quadrupole mass spectrometer based on the isotope dilution technique. Samples with glass vials are introduced to RAD 7 and GC for dissolved Rn and major dissolved gases analyses. Furthermore, helium isotopic ratios and helium-neon ratios are measured on a conventional noble gas mass spectrometer. For hydrochemistry analysis, water samples are analyzed by IC, ICP-MS and titration. We can classify the hot springs samples into three major groups from main anion concentration data; and then, subdivide them into nine minor groups by cation concentration data. Moreover, according to major dissolved gases compositions, three major gas components: CH4, N2 and CO2, are identified. Dissolved noble gases provided more detailed clues about hot springs sources in Taiwan, such as the degree of mixing between meteoric water and deep-source water, which will be further discussed in this study.

  18. Recycle Waste Collection Tank (RWCT) simulant testing in the PVTD feed preparation system

    SciTech Connect

    Abrigo, G.P.; Daume, J.T.; Halstead, S.D.; Myers, R.L.; Beckette, M.R.; Freeman, C.J.; Hatchell, B.K.

    1996-03-01

    (This is part of the radwaste vitrification program at Hanford.) RWCT was to routinely receive final canister decontamination sand blast frit and rinse water, Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank bottoms, and melter off-gas Submerged Bed Scrubber filter cake. In order to address the design needs of the RWCT system to meet performance levels, the PNL Vitrification Technology (PVTD) program used the Feed Preparation Test System (FPTS) to evaluate its equipment and performance for a simulant of RWCT slurry. (FPTS is an adaptation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility feed preparation system and represents the initially proposed Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feed preparation system designed by Fluor-Daniel, Inc.) The following were determined: mixing performance, pump priming, pump performance, simulant flow characterization, evaporator and condenser performance, and ammonia dispersion. The RWCT test had two runs, one with and one without tank baffles.

  19. Rapid Dissolving-Debonding Strategy for Optically Transparent Paper Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinbo; Han, Xiaogang; Fang, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Fan; Zhao, Bin; Lu, Pengbo; Li, Jun; Dai, Jiaqi; Lacey, Steven; Elspas, Raphael; Jiang, Yuhao; Liu, Detao; Hu, Liangbing

    2015-01-01

    Transparent paper is an alternative substrate for electronic devices due to its unique properties. However, energy-intensive and/or time-consuming procedures currently limit the scalable production of transparent paper. In this report, we demonstrate a rapid process to fabricate optically transparent paper with regenerative cellulose fibers (RCFs) by employing a dissolving-debonding strategy. The RCFs have an average width of 19.3 μm and length of several hundred microns and are prepared into transparent paper by vacuum filtration. This new dissolving-debonding approach enables high production efficiency while creating transparent paper with excellent optical and mechanical properties. PMID:26657809

  20. Dissolved-oxygen quenching of in-situ fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudyk, Wayne; Tonaszuck, David; Pohlig, Kenneth

    1993-04-01

    In-situ fluorescence measurements of aromatic organic ground water contaminants do not always agree with gas chromatographic methods. Dissolved oxygen quenching of fluorescence may be an interferant in field measurements. Two standard fluorescent aromatics, quinine sulfate and naphthalene, were evaluated in this study. Over the range of dissolved oxygen concentrations expected to be encountered in the field, no effects of oxygen quenching on fluorescence of these compounds was observed. Quenching of quinine sulfate fluorescence by sodium chloride was observed using this system. Sodium chloride quenching was shown to follow the Stern-Volmer relation.

  1. Thermodynamic properties of gases dissolved in electrolyte solutions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiepel, E. W.; Gubbins, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method based on perturbation theory for mixtures is applied to the prediction of thermodynamic properties of gases dissolved in electrolyte solutions. The theory is compared with experimental data for the dependence of the solute activity coefficient on concentration, temperature, and pressure; calculations are included for partial molal enthalpy and volume of the dissolved gas. The theory is also compared with previous theories for salt effects and found to be superior. The calculations are best for salting-out systems. The qualitative feature of salting-in is predicted by the theory, but quantitative predictions are not satisfactory for such systems; this is attributed to approximations made in evaluating the perturbation terms.

  2. Nano-Enriched and Autonomous Sensing Framework for Dissolved Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Nader; Azab, Mohammed; Kandas, Ishac; Meehan, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates a nano-enhanced wireless sensing framework for dissolved oxygen (DO). The system integrates a nanosensor that employs cerium oxide (ceria) nanoparticles to monitor the concentration of DO in aqueous media via optical fluorescence quenching. We propose a comprehensive sensing framework with the nanosensor equipped with a digital interface where the sensor output is digitized and dispatched wirelessly to a trustworthy data collection and analysis framework for consolidation and information extraction. The proposed system collects and processes the sensor readings to provide clear indications about the current or the anticipated dissolved oxygen levels in the aqueous media. PMID:26287211

  3. Iron oxides, dissolved silica, and regulation of marine phosphate concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planavsky, N.; Reinhard, C.; Lyons, T.

    2008-12-01

    Phosphorous concentrations in iron oxide-rich sediments reflect orthophosphate levels in the water column from which iron oxides precipitated. Sediment P/Fe ratios are also strongly influenced by the concentrations of dissolved species that inhibit orthophosphate-to-ferrihydrite sorption, most notably silica. It may, therefore, be possible to use P/Fe ratios in iron oxide-rich sediments to estimate past dissolved P concentrations, if one considers the evolution of the silica cycle. A compilation of Fe and P data in iron oxide-rich sediments through time reveals an increase in P/Fe ratios after the Jurassic. We propose that this trend indicates evolution of the iron-oxide phosphate removal mechanism caused by decreasing levels of sorption inhibition by dissolved silica. The large difference in P/Fe ratios in Cenozoic versus older iron-oxide rich sediments can be linked with Si drawdown caused by the proliferation of siliceous plankton in the Cretaceous. There is also a late Mesozoic or Cenozoic increase in V/Fe ratios, which provides additional evidence for lower ferrihydrite anion sorption efficiency prior to diatom radiation. P/Fe ratios in iron oxide-rich sediments from the early and middle Phanerozoic are comparable to the ratios in iron formations previously presented as evidence for an early Precambrian phosphate crisis (Bjerrum and Canfield, 2002, Nature, 417:159-162). Given the compelling evidence for higher Si concentrations in the Precambrian compared to the Phanerozoic and dissolved P concentrations comparable to modern levels throughout the Phanerozoic, the presented trend of P/Fe ratios suggests dissolved P concentrations were higher in Precambrian than Phanerozoic oceans. High dissolved P levels in the Precambrian may have been linked to inhibited carbonate fluorapatite (CFA) formation as a result of persistently high levels of carbonate supersaturation. Carbonate ion substitution into CFA scales with the ambient carbonate ion activity and increases

  4. Dissolved oxygen analysis, TMDL model comparison, and particulate matter shunting—Preliminary results from three model scenarios for the Klamath River upstream of Keno Dam, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Annett B.; Rounds, Stewart A.; Deas, Michael L.; Sogutlugil, I. Ertugrul

    2012-01-01

    Efforts are underway to identify actions that would improve water quality in the Link River to Keno Dam reach of the Upper Klamath River in south-central Oregon. To provide further insight into water-quality improvement options, three scenarios were developed, run, and analyzed using previously calibrated CE-QUAL-W2 hydrodynamic and water-quality models. Additional scenarios are under development as part of this ongoing study. Most of these scenarios evaluate changes relative to a "current conditions" model, but in some cases a "natural conditions" model was used that simulated the reach without the effect of point and nonpoint sources and set Upper Klamath Lake at its Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) targets. These scenarios were simulated using a model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Watercourse Engineering, Inc. for the years 2006–09, referred to here as the "USGS model." Another model of the reach was developed by Tetra Tech, Inc. for years 2000 and 2002 to support the Klamath River TMDL process; that model is referred to here as the "TMDL model." The three scenarios described in this report included (1) an analysis of whether this reach of the Upper Klamath River would be in compliance with dissolved oxygen standards if sources met TMDL allocations, (2) an application of more recent datasets to the TMDL model with comparison to results from the USGS model, and (3) an examination of the effect on dissolved oxygen in the Klamath River if particulate material were stopped from entering Klamath Project diversion canals. Updates and modifications to the USGS model are in progress, so in the future these scenarios will be reanalyzed with the updated model and the interim results presented here will be superseded. Significant findings from this phase of the investigation include: * The TMDL analysis used depth-averaged dissolved oxygen concentrations from model output for comparison with dissolved oxygen standards. The Oregon dissolved oxygen

  5. Dissolved Organic Matter and Emerging Contaminants in Urban Stream Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S. S.; Findlay, S.; Groffman, P.; Belt, K.; Delaney, K.; Sides, A.; Walbridge, M.; Mayer, P.

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the effects of urbanization on the sources, bioavailability and forms of natural and anthropogenic organic matter found in streams located in Maryland, U.S.A. We found that the abundance, biaoavailability, and enzymatic breakdown of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) increased in streams with increasing watershed urbanization suggesting that organic nutrients may represent a growing form of nutrient loading to coastal waters associated with land use change. Organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in urban streams were elevated several-fold compared to forest and agricultural streams. Enzymatic activities of stream microbes in organic matter decomposition were also significantly altered across watershed land use. Chemical characterization suggested that organic matter in urban streams originated from a variety of sources including terrestrial, sewage, and in-stream transformation. In addition, a characterization of emerging organic contaminants (polyaromatic cyclic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardents), showed that organic contaminants and dissolved organic matter increase with watershed urbanization and fluctuate substantially with changing climatic conditions. Elucidating the emerging influence of urbanization on sources, transport, and in-stream transformation of organic nutrients and contaminants will be critical in unraveling the changing role of organic matter in urban degraded and restored stream ecosystems.

  6. TOTAL DISSOLVED AND BIOAVAILABLE METALS AT LAKE TEXOMA MARINAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved metals in water and total metals in sediments have been measured at marina areas in Lake Texoma during June 1999 to October 2001, and October 2001, respectively. The metals most often found in the highest concentrations in marina water were Na and Ca, followed by Mg an...

  7. Effects of elevated total dissolved solids on bivalves

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of experiments were performed to assess the toxicity of different dominant salt recipes of excess total dissolved solids (TDS) to organisms in mesocosms. Multiple endpoints were measured across trophic levels. We report here the effects of four different TDS recipes on b...

  8. Removal properties of dissolved boron by glucomannan gel.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kyoko; Maehata, Yugo

    2013-04-01

    Boron ions have long been known to form complexes with the cis-diol group of a polysaccharide. Konjac glucomannan (KGM) which is one of polysaccharides was used to remove dissolved boron in this study. KGM forms a complex with boron, but does not remove boron from contaminated waters as well as other polysaccharides because of its high water solubility. Therefore, the removal efficiencies of dissolved boron were examined using both an insoluble KGM gel and KGM semi-gel. The former did not remove dissolved boron, but the latter did. The difference in the ability of boron removal was due to the presence of diol group inside. KGM loses free diol group during the process of gelation. On the other hand, the semi-gel gelated only surface layer in water has diol group inside. The boron removal capacity of the semi-gel was highest at pHs⩾11, when the boron species is present as B(OH)4(-). The capacity was slightly increased by the addition of Al, Ca and Mg under high pH conditions. This was due to co-precipitation of boron with Ca dissolved from the semi-gel. The boron adsorbed to the semi-gel easily was desorbed under low pH conditions and the hysteresis was not found.

  9. Chloride Analysis of RFSA Second Campaign Dissolver Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, H.P.

    2001-05-17

    The dissolver solution from the second RFSA campaign was analyzed for chloride using the recently-developed turbidimetric method. Prior to chloride removal in head end, the solution contained 1625 ppm chloride. After chloride removal with Hg(I) and prior to feeding to solvent extraction, the solution contained only 75 ppm chloride. This report discusses those analysis results.

  10. Reduction of Dissolved Oxygen at a Copper Rotating Disc Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kear, Gareth; Albarran, Carlos Ponce-de-Leon; Walsh, Frank C.

    2005-01-01

    Undergraduates from chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and environmental science courses, together with first-year postgraduate research students in electrochemical technology, are provided with an experiment that demonstrates the reduction of dissolved oxygen in aerated seawater at 25°C. Oxygen reduction is examined using linear sweep…

  11. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN: A COMPARISON OF METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to confidently measure the concentration of dissolved oxygen (D.O.) in ground water is a key aspect of remedial selection and assessment. Presented here is a comparison of the commonly practiced methods for determining D.O. concentrations in ground water, including c...

  12. CONDUCTOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF DISSOLVED HUMIC MATERIALS. (R828158)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conductometric replacement titrations of humic and fulvic acids dissolved in a slight excess of hydroxide were carried out with standard acid. The slope of the titration curve corresponding to the protonation of humate/fulvate was related to the electrophoretic mobility of the...

  13. Investigating Factors that Affect Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantzen, Paul G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes activities that demonstrate the effects of factors such as wind velocity, water temperature, convection currents, intensity of light, rate of photosynthesis, atmospheric pressure, humidity, numbers of decomposers, presence of oxidizable ions, and respiration by plants and animals on the dissolved oxygen concentration in water. (MA)

  14. Dissolved oxygen concentration affects hybrid striped bass growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in ponds at night during the growing season is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher nightly DO concentrations. Three studies were conducted to quantify performance traits and metabolic responses of hybrid striped b...

  15. DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER AND METALS: EFFECTS OF PH ON PARTITIONING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eighteen Dutch soils were extracted in aqueous solutions at varying pH. Extracts were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn by ICP-AES. Extract dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was fractionated into three operationally defined fractions: hydrophilic acids (Hyd), fulvic acids (FA), an...

  16. PROCESS OF DISSOLVING FUEL ELEMENTS OF NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wall, E.M.V.; Bauer, D.T.; Hahn, H.T.

    1963-09-01

    A process is described for dissolving stainless-steelor zirconium-clad uranium dioxide fuel elements by immersing the elements in molten lead chloride, adding copper, cuprous chloride, or cupric chloride as a catalyst and passing chlorine through the salt mixture. (AEC)

  17. Removal properties of dissolved boron by glucomannan gel.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Kyoko; Maehata, Yugo

    2013-04-01

    Boron ions have long been known to form complexes with the cis-diol group of a polysaccharide. Konjac glucomannan (KGM) which is one of polysaccharides was used to remove dissolved boron in this study. KGM forms a complex with boron, but does not remove boron from contaminated waters as well as other polysaccharides because of its high water solubility. Therefore, the removal efficiencies of dissolved boron were examined using both an insoluble KGM gel and KGM semi-gel. The former did not remove dissolved boron, but the latter did. The difference in the ability of boron removal was due to the presence of diol group inside. KGM loses free diol group during the process of gelation. On the other hand, the semi-gel gelated only surface layer in water has diol group inside. The boron removal capacity of the semi-gel was highest at pHs⩾11, when the boron species is present as B(OH)4(-). The capacity was slightly increased by the addition of Al, Ca and Mg under high pH conditions. This was due to co-precipitation of boron with Ca dissolved from the semi-gel. The boron adsorbed to the semi-gel easily was desorbed under low pH conditions and the hysteresis was not found. PMID:23260255

  18. Dissolving Carboxylic Acids and Primary Amines on the Overhead Projector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Sally D.; Rutkowsky, Susan A.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid carboxylic acids (or primary amines) with limited solubility in water are dissolved by addition of aqueous sodium hydroxide (or hydrochloric acid) on the stage of an overhead projector using simple glassware and very small quantities of chemicals. This effective and colorful demonstration can be used to accompany discussions of the…

  19. Dependence of riverine nitrous oxide emissions on dissolved oxygen levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosamond, Madeline S.; Thuss, Simon J.; Schiff, Sherry L.

    2012-10-01

    Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas, and it destroys stratospheric ozone. Seventeen per cent of agricultural nitrous oxide emissions come from the production of nitrous oxide in streams, rivers and estuaries, in turn a result of inorganic nitrogen input through leaching, runoff and sewage. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and global nitrous oxide budgets assume that riverine nitrous oxide emissions increase linearly with dissolved inorganic nitrogen loads, but data are sparse and conflicting. Here we report measurements over two years of nitrous oxide emissions in the Grand River, Canada, a seventh-order temperate river that is affected by agricultural runoff and outflow from a waste-water treatment plant. Emissions were disproportionately high in urban areas and during nocturnal summer periods. Moreover, annual emission estimates that are based on dissolved inorganic nitrogen loads overestimated the measured emissions in a wet year and underestimated them in a dry year. We found no correlations of nitrous oxide emissions with nitrate or dissolved inorganic nitrogen, but detected negative correlations with dissolved oxygen, suggesting that nitrate concentrations did not limit emissions. We conclude that future increases in nitrate export to rivers will not necessarily lead to higher nitrous oxide emissions, but more widespread hypoxia most likely will.

  20. The Placebo Effect: Dissolving the Expectancy Versus Conditioning Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart-Williams, Steve; Podd, John

    2004-01-01

    The authors review the literature on the 2 main models of the placebo effect: expectancy theory and classical conditioning. A path is suggested to dissolving the theoretical impasse that has long plagued this issue. The key is to make a clear distinction between 2 questions: What factors shape placebo effects? and What learning mediates the…

  1. Optimization of fast dissolving etoricoxib tablets prepared by sublimation technique.

    PubMed

    Patel, D M; Patel, M M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop fast dissolving tablets of etoricoxib. Granules containing etoricoxib, menthol, crospovidone, aspartame and mannitol were prepared by wet granulation technique. Menthol was sublimed from the granules by exposing the granules to vacuum. The porous granules were then compressed in to tablets. Alternatively, tablets were first prepared and later exposed to vacuum. The tablets were evaluated for percentage friability and disintegration time. A 3(2) full factorial design was applied to investigate the combined effect of 2 formulation variables: amount of menthol and crospovidone. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that for obtaining fast dissolving tablets; optimum amount of menthol and higher percentage of crospovidone should be used. A surface response plots are also presented to graphically represent the effect of the independent variables on the percentage friability and disintegration time. The validity of a generated mathematical model was tested by preparing a checkpoint batch. Sublimation of menthol from tablets resulted in rapid disintegration as compared with the tablets prepared from granules that were exposed to vacuum. The optimized tablet formulation was compared with conventional marketed tablets for percentage drug dissolved in 30 min (Q(30)) and dissolution efficiency after 30 min (DE(30)). From the results, it was concluded that fast dissolving tablets with improved etoricoxib dissolution could be prepared by sublimation of tablets containing suitable subliming agent.

  2. PHOTOCHEMICAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN A BLACKWATER RIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined photochemical alterations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the Satilla River, a high DOC (10-40 mg/liter) blackwater river of southeast Georgia. Water samples were filtered to remove most organisms, placed in quartz tubes, and incubated under natural sunlight a...

  3. Direct and dissolved oxygen involved photodegradation of MeO-PBDEs in water.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weifeng; Chen, Jingwen; Xie, Qing

    2016-04-15

    Photodegradation has been proved to be a crucial way of elimination for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hydroxylated PBDEs (HO-PBDEs). However, it is still unknown whether methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs) can also undergo photodegradation. In this study, 4'-MeO-BDE-17, 5-MeO-BDE-47, 5'-MeO-BDE-99, 6-MeO-BDE-47 and 6-MeO-BDE-85 were selected as targets to investigate their photodegradation in water. Meanwhile, the effects of dissolved oxygen on the photoreactions of MeO-PBDEs were also unveiled. Simulated sunlight experiments indicate that 6-MeO-BDE-47 resisted photodegradation for 20h, while other MeO-PBDEs underwent relatively fast photodegradation, which was greatly susceptible to the substitution patterns of methoxyl and bromine. Photo-excited MeO-PBDEs (except 6-MeO-BDE-47) can sensitize dissolved oxygen to generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and superoxide anion radical (O2(-)). The generated (1)O2 cannot degrade the MeO-PBDEs, whereas O2(-) was reactive with MeO-PBDEs. The contribution of dissolved oxygen to the photodegradation of 4'-MeO-BDE-17 and 6-MeO-BDE-85 was negligible; while the negative contribution was observed for 5-MeO-BDE-47 and 5'-MeO-BDE-99. Hydrodebromination was a crucial photodegradation pathway for MeO-PBDEs (excluding 4'-MeO-BDE-17 and 6-MeO-BDE-47). Eventually, direct photolysis half-lives of MeO-PBDEs except 6-MeO-BDE-47 in the surface waters at 40 N latitude were calculated to be 1.35-3.46d in midsummer and 6.39-17.47d in midwinter. PMID:26802632

  4. Photochemical Flocculation of Terrestrial Dissolved Organic Matter (tDOM) and Iron: Mechanisms and Geochemical Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mopper, K.; Helms, J. R.; Mao, J.; Abdulla, H. A.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2013-12-01

    Photoflocculation of DOM has received relatively little attention. No previous studies have examined the chemical composition of the flocs nor investigated the coagulation mechanisms. We observed that, after 30 days of simulated solar UV irradiation of 0.1-um filtered Great Dismal Swamp (Virginia) water, 7.1% of the DOC was converted to POC while 75% was remineralized. Approximately 87% of the iron was removed from the dissolved phase after 30 days, but iron did not flocculate until a major fraction of DOM was removed by photochemical degradation and flocculation (>10 days); thus, during the initial 10 days, there were sufficient organic ligands present and/or the pH was low enough to keep iron in solution. Although photoflocculation of iron did eventually occur, it is not clear if iron is required for the initial flocculation of DOM. Using NMR and FT-IR techniques, we found that photochemically flocculated POM was enriched in aliphatics and amide functionality relative to the residual non-flocculated DOM, while carbohydrate-like material was neither photochemical degraded nor flocculated. Based on this spectroscopic evidence, we propose several mechanisms for the formation of the flocs during irradiation. We also speculate that abiotic photochemical flocculation may remove a significant fraction of tDOM and iron from the upper water column between headwaters and the ocean, including estuaries. Fig. 1. Concentrations of dissolved (gray), particulate (black), and adsorbed (white) material as a function of irradiation time: (a) organic carbon, (b) absorption at 300 nm, (c) total iron by atomic absorption, and (d) total nitrogen. Error bars represent the combined standard deviations of the 'total,' 'dissolved,' and 'adsorbed' terms from which the 'particulate' term was calculated. Total nitrogen was not determined for the 'adsorbed' material

  5. Quantification of dissolved iron sources to the North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Conway, Tim M; John, Seth G

    2014-07-10

    Dissolved iron is an essential micronutrient for marine phytoplankton, and its availability controls patterns of primary productivity and carbon cycling throughout the oceans. The relative importance of different sources of iron to the oceans is not well known, however, and flux estimates from atmospheric dust, hydrothermal vents and oceanic sediments vary by orders of magnitude. Here we present a high-resolution transect of dissolved stable iron isotope ratios (δ(56)Fe) and iron concentrations ([Fe]) along a section of the North Atlantic Ocean. The different iron sources can be identified by their unique δ(56)Fe signatures, which persist throughout the water column. This allows us to calculate the relative contribution from dust, hydrothermal venting and reductive and non-reductive sedimentary release to the dissolved phase. We find that Saharan dust aerosol is the dominant source of dissolved iron along the section, contributing 71-87 per cent of dissolved iron. Additional sources of iron are non-reductive release from oxygenated sediments on the North American margin (10-19 per cent), reductive sedimentary dissolution on the African margin (1-4 per cent) and hydrothermal venting at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (2-6 per cent). Our data also indicate that hydrothermal vents in the North Atlantic are a source of isotopically light iron, which travels thousands of kilometres from vent sites, potentially influencing surface productivity. Changes in the relative importance of the different iron sources through time may affect interactions between the carbon cycle and climate.

  6. Dissolved amino acids in oceanic basaltic basement fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huei-Ting; Amend, Jan P.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Bingham, Jon-Paul; Cowen, James P.

    2015-09-01

    The oceanic basaltic basement contains the largest aquifer on Earth and potentially plays an important role in the global carbon cycle as a net sink for dissolved organic carbon (DOC). However, few details of the organic matter cycling in the subsurface are known because great water depths and thick sediments typically hinder direct access to this environment. In an effort to examine the role of water-rock-microorganism interaction on organic matter cycling in the oceanic basaltic crust, basement fluid samples collected from three borehole observatories installed on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were analyzed for dissolved amino acids. Our data show that dissolved free amino acids (1-13 nM) and dissolved hydrolyzable amino acids (43-89 nM) are present in the basement. The amino acid concentrations in the ridge-flank basement fluids are at the low end of all submarine hydrothermal fluids reported in the literature and are similar to those in deep seawater. Amino acids in recharging deep seawater, in situ amino acid production, and diffusional input from overlying sediments are potential sources of amino acids in the basement fluids. Thermodynamic modeling shows that amino acid synthesis in the basement can be sustained by energy supplied from inorganic substrates via chemolithotrophic metabolisms. Furthermore, an analysis of amino acid concentrations and compositions in basement fluids support the notion that heterotrophic activity is ongoing. Similarly, the enrichment of acidic amino acids and depletion of hydrophobic ones relative to sedimentary particulate organic matter suggests that surface sorption and desorption also alters amino acids in the basaltic basement. In summary, although the oceanic basement aquifer is a net sink for deep seawater DOC, similar amino acid concentrations in basement aquifer and deep seawater suggest that DOC is preferentially removed in the basement over dissolved amino acids. Our data also suggest that organic carbon

  7. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems.

  8. Heat as a tracer to estimate dissolved organic carbon flux from a restored wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, K.R.; Constantz, J.; Fujii, R.

    2005-01-01

    Heat was used as a natural tracer to characterize shallow ground water flow beneath a complex wetland system. Hydrogeologic data were combined with measured vertical temperature profiles to constrain a series of two-dimensional, transient simulations of ground water flow and heat transport using the model code SUTRA (Voss 1990). The measured seasonal temperature signal reached depths of 2.7 m beneath the pond. Hydraulic conductivity was varied in each of the layers in the model in a systematic manual calibration of the two-dimensional model to obtain the best fit to the measured temperature and hydraulic head. Results of a series of representative best-fit simulations represent a range in hydraulic conductivity values that had the best agreement between simulated and observed temperatures and that resulted in simulated pond seepage values within 1 order of magnitude of pond seepage estimated from the water budget. Resulting estimates of ground water discharge to an adjacent agricultural drainage ditch were used to estimate potential dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads resulting from the restored wetland. Estimated DOC loads ranged from 45 to 1340 g C/(m2 year), which is higher than estimated DOC loads from surface water. In spite of the complexity in characterizing ground water flow in peat soils, using heat as a tracer provided a constrained estimate of subsurface flow from the pond to the agricultural drainage ditch. Copyright ?? 2005 National Ground Water Association.

  9. Solvatochromism and conformational changes in fully dissolved poly(3-alkylthiophene)s.

    PubMed

    Newbloom, Gregory M; Hoffmann, Stephanie M; West, Aaron F; Gile, Melissa C; Sista, Prakash; Cheung, Hoi-Ki C; Luscombe, Christine K; Pfaendtner, Jim; Pozzo, Lilo D

    2015-01-13

    Absorption spectroscopy is commonly utilized to probe optical properties that can be related, among other things, to the conformation of single, isolated conjugated polymer chains in solution. It is frequently suggested that changes in peak positions of optical spectra result from variations in the stiffness of polymer chains in solution because this modifies the conjugation length. In this work we utilize ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, small angle neutron scattering (SANS), and all atom molecular dynamic (AA-MD) simulations to closely probe the relationship between the conformation of single-chains of poly(3-alkylthiophene)s (P3ATs) and their optical properties. SANS results show variations in the radius of gyration and Kuhn length as a function of alkyl chain length, and structure, as well as the solvent environment. Furthermore, both SANS and MD simulations show that dissolved P3HT chains are more rigid in solvents where self-assembly and crystallization are possible. Shifts in P3AT optical properties were also observed for different solvent environments. However, these changes were not correlated to the changes in polymer conformation. Furthermore, changes in optical properties could not be perfectly described by generalized solvent-solute interactions. AA-MD simulations provide new insights into specific polymer-solvent interactions not accounted for in generalized solvatochromic theory. This work highlights the need for experiments and molecular simulations that further inform the specific role of solvent molecules on local polymer conformation and on optical properties.

  10. Rapid behavioral responses of an invertebrate larva to dissolved settlement cue.

    PubMed

    Hadfield, Michael G; Koehl, M A R

    2004-08-01

    Larvae of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae were used to study whether a natural dissolved settlement cue (from their prey, Porites compressa, an abundant coral on Hawaiian reefs) induces behavioral responses that can affect larval transport to suitable settlement sites. As cue and larvae are mixed in the turbulent flow over a reef, cue is distributed in fine-scale filaments that the larva experiences as rapid (seconds) on/off encounters. To examine larval responses in this setting, individual larvae were tethered in a small flume with flow simulating water velocity relative to a freely swimming larva, and their responses to realistic temporal patterns of cue encounter were videotaped. Competent larvae quickly ceased swimming in cue filaments and resumed swimming after exiting filaments. The threshold cue concentration eliciting a response was 3%-17% of concentrations within heads of P. compressa in nature. When moving freely in filtered seawater, competent larvae swam along straight paths in all directions at approximately 0.2 cm s(-1), whereas in water conditioned by P. compressa, most ceased swimming and sank at approximately 0.1 cm s(-1). The ability of larvae to rapidly respond (by sinking) to brief encounters with dissolved settlement cues can enhance their rapid transport to the substratum, even in wave-driven turbulent flow. PMID:15315941

  11. Direct photolysis of carbonyl compounds dissolved in cloud and fog~droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, S. A.; Tapavicza, E.; Furche, F.; Nizkorodov, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Gas-phase photolysis is an important tropospheric sink for many carbonyl compounds; however the significance of direct photolysis of these compounds dissolved in cloud and fog droplets is uncertain. We develop a theoretical approach to assess the importance of aqueous photolysis for a series of carbonyls that possess carboxyl and hydroxyl functional groups by comparison with rates of other atmospheric processes. We use computationally and experimentally derived effective Henry's law constants, hydration equilibrium parameters, aqueous hydroxyl radical (OH) rate constants, and optical extinction coefficients to identify types of compounds that will (or will not) have competitive aqueous photolysis rates. We also present molecular dynamics simulations designed to estimate gas- and aqueous-phase extinction coefficients of unstudied atmospherically relevant compounds found in d-limonene and isoprene secondary organic aerosol. In addition, experiments designed to measure the photolysis rate of glyceraldehyde, an atmospherically relevant water-soluble organic compound, reveal that aqueous quantum yields are highly molecule-specific and cannot be extrapolated from measurements of structurally similar compounds. We find that only two out of the 92 carbonyl compounds investigated, pyruvic acid and acetoacetic acid, may have aqueous photolysis rates that exceed the rate of oxidation by dissolved OH. For almost all carbonyl compounds lacking α,β-conjugation that were investigated, atmospheric removal by direct photolysis in cloud and fog droplets can be neglected under typical atmospheric conditions.

  12. Temporal scale-induced uncertainty in load duration curves for instream-dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Patil, Abhijit; Deng, Zhiqiang; Malone, Ronald F

    2013-02-01

    Load duration curves were developed using the Hydrological Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF) for dissolved oxygen (DO) for the Amite River in Louisiana, USA. The concept of 'dissolved oxygen reserve', defined as the total quantity of DO, is introduced. The effect of temporal resolution on duration curves of DO reserve was examined using duration curves developed based on daily, weekly, biweekly, and monthly average data. Duration curves for DO exhibited high variability in the load estimated using daily data as compared to those based on biweekly and monthly data. A seasonal analysis revealed the trend in the DO reserve. The daily DO reserve for the Amite River at Port Vincent was 44,049.31 kg when daily summer data were used and 74,255.15 kg for daily annual data. A surplus of 10,691 kg of DO reserve was shown in the monthly data during critical summer months. The coefficient of variation (CV), used to define the temporal scale-induced uncertainty, was found to be linearly and inversely correlated with the logarithm of the time scale. Regression equations were developed to extrapolate near real-time flow and water quality data, greatly simplifying flow and water quality monitoring and reducing the cost involved in flow and water quality monitoring. PMID:22623167

  13. Photochemical Oxidation of Dissolved Elemental Mercury by Carbonate Radicals in Water

    DOE PAGES

    He, Feng; Zhao, Weirong; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2014-11-11

    Photochemical oxidation of dissolved elemental mercury [Hg(0)] affects mercury chemical speciation and its transfer at the water-air interface in the aquatic environment. The mechanisms and factors that control Hg(0) photooxidation, however, are not completely understood, especially in natural freshwaters containing dissolved organic matter (DOM) and carbonate. Here, we evaluate Hg(0) photooxidation rates affected by various reactive ionic species [e.g., DOM, CO32-, NO3-] and free radicals in a creek water and a phosphate buffer solution (pH=8) under simulated solar irradiation. We report a high Hg(0) photooxidation rate (k = 1.44 h-1) in the presence of both HCO32- and NO3-, whereas HCO32-,more » NO3-, or DOM alone increased the oxidation rate slightly (k = 0.1 0.17 h-1). Using scavengers and enhancers for singlet oxygen (1O2) and hydroxyl (HO∙ ) radicals, as well as electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identify that carbonate radicals (CO3 ∙-) primarily drive the Hg(0) photooxidation, whereas addition of DOM resulted in a 2-fold decrease in Hg(0) oxidation. This study identifies an unrecognized pathway of Hg(0) photooxidation by CO3 ∙- radicals and the inhibitory effect of DOM, which could be important in assessing Hg transformation and fate in water containing carbonate such as hard water and seawater.« less

  14. Seasonal variability of total dissolved fluxes and origin of major dissolved elements within a large tropical river: The Orinoco, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laraque, Alain; Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Alkattan, Rana; Steiger, Johannes; Mora, Abrahan; Adèle, Georges; Castellanos, Bartolo; Lagane, Christèle; Lopez, José Luis; Perez, Jesus; Rodriguez, Militza; Rosales, Judith

    2013-07-01

    Seasonal variations of total dissolved fluxes of the lower Orinoco River were calculated taking into account four complete hydrological cycles during a five-year period (2005-2010). The modern concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) of the Orinoco surface waters were compared with data collected during the second half of the last century published in the literature. This comparison leads to the conclusion that chemical composition did not evolve significantly at least over the last thirty to forty years. Surface waters of the Orinoco at Ciudad Bolivar are between bicarbonated calcic and bicarbonated mixed. In comparison to mean values of concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) of world river surface waters (89.2 mg l-1), the Orinoco River at Ciudad Bolivar presents mainly low mineralized surface waters (2005-10: TDS 30 mg l-1). The TDS fluxes passing at this station in direction to the Atlantic Ocean between 2005 and 2010 were estimated at 30 × 106 t yr-1, i.e. 36 t km-2 yr-1. It was observed that the seasonal variations (dry season vs wet season) of total dissolved fluxes (TDS and dissolved organic carbon (DOC)) are mainly controlled by discharge variations. Two groups of elements have been defined from dilution curves and molar ratio diagrams. Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3-, Cl- and Na+ mainly come from the same geographic and lithologic area, the Andes. K+ and SiO2 essentially come from the Llanos and the Guayana Shield. These findings are important for understanding fundamental geochemical processes within the Orinoco River basin, but also as a baseline study in the perspective of the development of numerous mining activities related with aluminum and steel industries; and the plans of the Venezuelan government to construct new fluvial ports on the lower Orinoco for the transport of hydrocarbons.

  15. [Exchange Fluxes and Coupling Relationship of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon and Dissolved Organic Carbon Across the Water-Sediment Interface in Lakes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-ying; Lü, Chang-wei; He, Jiang; Zuo, Le; Yan, Dao-hao

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the exchange fluxes and coupling relationship of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were investigated across the water-sediment interface in Lake Wuliangsuhai and Daihai by employing columnar simulation method. The results showed that the sediments in non-Phragmitescommunis area from Lake Wuliangsuhai functioned as the sources of DIC and DOC for overlying water, whereas the sediments from Lake Daihai as the sinks during the period of summer (90 days). In the experimental period, the average exchange rates of DIC and DOC were 71.07 mmol x (m2 x d)(-1) and 185.09 mmol x (m2 x d)(-1) in non-Phragmitescommunis area from Lake Wuliangsuhai, respectively; while in Lake Daihai, they were 155.75 mmol x (m2 x d)(-1) and -1478.08 mmol x (m2 x d)(-1) in shoal water zone, and -486.53 mmol x (m2 x d)(-1) and -1274.02 mmol x (m2 x d)(-1) in deep water zone, respectively. The coupling effects between DIC and DOC were governed by hydrobios, microbial uptake, abiotic and microbiological degradation in Lake Wuliangsuhai and in shoal water zone of Lake Daihai; while they were closely related to the coprecipitation process of CaCO3 and the fraction distribution of inorganic carbon in sediments in deep water zone of Lake Daihai. In summary, the sink or source functions of sediments could be considered as the results of synthetic action of lake types, offshore distance, geohydrochemistry and the fraction distribution of inorganic carbon.

  16. Meridional fluxes of dissolved organic matter in the North Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J.J.; Carder, K.L.; Mueller-Karger, F.E.

    1992-10-15

    Using bio-optical estimates of gelbstoff and a few platinum measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC{sub pt}), a budget of the meridional flux of DOC and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) across 36{degrees}25{prime}N in the North Atlantic is constructed from previous inverse models of water and element transport. Distinct southward subsurface fluxes of dissolved organic matter (DOM) within subducted shelf water, cabelled slope water, and overturned basin water are inferred. Within two cases of a positive gradient of DOC{sub pt} between terrestrial/shelf and offshore stocks, the net equatorward exports of O{sub 2} and DOC{sub pt} from the northern North Atlantic yield molar ratios of 2.1 to 9.1, compared to the expected Redfield O{sub 2}/C ratio of 1.3. In the first case, 63% of the apparent oxygen utilization demands of the water column may be met by DOC, instead of only 14% in the second scenario, preserving a role for falling particles in the sea. With a DOC/DON ratio of 10, the larger net southward export of DON across 36{degrees}25{prime}N balances the postulated net northward input of 1.7 x 10{sup 3} kg NO{sub 3} s{sup {minus}1} of unutilized nitrate within the Gulf Stream. Without an enhanced supply of DOM from the shelves, a zero seaward gradient of DOM in the third case suggests that none of the poleward nitrate flux is returned southward as DON, but instead a net poleward flux of DON prevails as well. The authors present estimates are confounded, however, by the seasonal and multiyear variability of sinking processes in the North Atlantic. Future active and passive remote sensors, field programs, and simulation models must now discriminate between particulate and dissolved components of surface color signals to verify the importance of both continental margins and DOM in global biogeochemical cycles. 98 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Effects of Lithology of Deep Layered Geologic Formations on Trapping of Dissolved CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agartan, E.; Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Zhou, Q.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Secure and long-term trapping of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) in deep geological formations is important for the reduction of leakage risk. Agartan et al. [2014] through controlled laboratory experiments in a test tank using surrogate fluids for scCO2 and brine showed that the dissolved scCO2 can be stored in geological formations containing low permeability layers, thus effectively enhancing dissolution trapping. As this finding was limited to a few test configurations, its validity was evaluated using a numerical modeling study focusing on the influence of different permeabilities and thicknesses of low permeability layers on trapping of dissolved scCO2. A Finite Volume Method (FVM)-based, single-phase, density and viscosity-dependent flow and transport model was employed to determine the effects of porosity and permeability perturbations, and numerical grid resolution on model results and density-dependent finger formations. The experimental data, generated by Agartan et al. [2014], was used to demonstrate the ability of the model to capture the observed transport behaviors. To demonstrate the role of heterogeneity characterized by layering on dissolution trapping at field-scale, a two-dimensional numerical model containing a geological structure similar to the Utsira formation in the Sleipner field was used in a set of test simulations. This formation provided a good test setting as it has the similar features with shale layers interbedded in-between composite sand layers that were used in the experiments. The results highlight that the thicker and lower permeability layers are able to store significant amounts of dissolved scCO2 for a long time. On the other hand, although the thinner and higher permeability layers slow down the vertical spreading, they cannot trap dissolved mass long enough to contribute the storage through immobilization. These findings have practical implications as effective strategies can be developed to enhance trapping by taking the

  18. Greenhouse gases dissolved in soil solution - often ignored, but important?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymann, Daniel; Brueggemann, Nicolas; Puetz, Thomas; Vereecken, Harry

    2014-05-01

    Flux measurements of climate-relevant trace gases from soils are frequently undertaken in contemporary ecosystem studies and substantially contribute to our understanding of greenhouse gas balances of the biosphere. While the great majority of such investigations builds on closed chamber and eddy covariance measurements, where upward gas fluxes to the atmosphere are measured, fewest concurrently consider greenhouse gas dissolution in the seepage and leaching of dissolved gases via the vadose zone to the groundwater. Here we present annual leaching losses of dissolved N2O and CO2 from arable, grassland, and forest lysimeter soils from three sites differing in altitude and climate. We aim to assess their importance in comparison to direct N2O emission, soil respiration, and further leaching parameters of the C- and N cycle. The lysimeters are part of the Germany-wide lysimeter network initiative TERENO-SoilCan, which investigates feedbacks of climate change to the pedosphere on a long-term scale. Soil water samples were collected weekly from different depths of the profiles by means of suction cups. A laboratory pre-experiment proved that no degassing occurred under those sampling conditions. We applied the headspace equilibration technique to determine dissolved gas concentrations by gas chromatography. The seepage water of all lysimeters was consistently supersaturated with N2O and CO2 compared to water equilibrated ambient air. In terms of N2O, leaching losses increased in the ascending order forest, grassland, and arable soils, respectively. In case of the latter soils, we observed a strong variability of N2O, with dissolved concentrations up to 23 μg N L-1. However, since seepage discharge of the arable lysimeters was comparatively small and mostly limited to the hydrological winter season, leached N2O appeared to be less important than direct N2O emissions. In terms of dissolved CO2,our measurements revealed considerable leaching losses from the mountainous

  19. Process performance of the pilot-scale in situ vitrification of a simulated waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J.G.; Koegler, S.S.; Bates, S.O.

    1988-06-01

    Process feasibility studies have been successfully performed on three developmental scales to determine the potential for applying in situ vitrification to intermediate-level (low-level) waste placed in seepage pits and trenches at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In the laboratory, testing was performed in crucibles containing a mixture of 50% ORNL soil and 50% limestone. In an engineering-scale test at Pacific Northwest Laboratory a /1/12/-scale simulation of an ORNL waste trench was constructed and vitrified, resulting in a waste product containing soil and limestone concentrations of 68 wt % and 32 wt %, respectively. In the pilot-scale test a /3/8/-scale simulation of the same trench was constructed and vitrified at ORNL, resulting in soil and limestone concentrations of 80% and 20%, respectively, in the waste product. Results of the three scales of testing indicate that the ORNL intermediate-level (low-level) waste sites can be successfully processed by in situ vitrification; the waste form will retain significant quantities of the cesium and strontium. Because cesium-137 and strontium-90 are the major components of the radionuclide inventory in the ORNL seepage pits and trenches, final field process decontamination factors (i.e., losses to the off-gas system relative to the waste inventory) of 1.0 E + 4 are desired to minimize activity buildup in the off-gas system. 17 refs., 34 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. Removal of dissolved VOCs from water with an air stripper/membrane vapor separation system

    SciTech Connect

    Wijmans, J.G.; Kamaruddin, H.D.; Segelke, S.V.; Wessling, M.; Baker, R.W.

    1997-09-01

    Treatment of water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is a major problem for the United States chemical industry. Currently, VOCs are removed from moderately contaminated wastewater streams by processes such as steam stripping and from dilute wastewaters by air stripping combined with a carbon adsorption off-gas treatment system. This paper describes the development and performance of a hybrid process that combines air stripping with membrane organic-vapor separation to recover VOCs from the stripper off-gas. A number of prototype systems have been constructed and evaluated. The optimum system appears to be a tray stripper fitted with a high-pressure compression-condensation membrane separation unit. Such a system can remove 95 to 99% of the VOCs present in contaminated water; the removed VOCs are recovered as a liquid condensate. The economics of the technology are competitive with alternative processes, particularly for streams containing more than 500 ppm VOC and having flow rates less than 10 to 30 gal/min.

  1. Azomethine H colorimetric method for determining dissolved boron in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, R.R.; Erdmann, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    An automated colorimetric method for determining dissolved boron in water is described. The boron is complexed with azomethine H, which is readily available as the condensation product of H acid (8-amino-1-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid) and salicylaldehyde. The absorbance of the yellow complex formed is then measured colorimetrically at 410 nm. Interference effects from other dissolved species are minimized by the addition of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA); however, iron, zinc, and bicarbonate interfere at concentrations above 400 ??g/L, 2000 ??g/L, and 200 mg/L, respectively. The bicarbonate interference can be eliminated by careful acidification of the sample with concentrated HCl to a pH between 5 and 6. Thirty samples per hour can be routinely analyzed over the range of from 10 to 400 ??g/L, boron.

  2. Unimodal response of fish yield to dissolved organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Finstad, Anders G; Helland, Ingeborg P; Ugedal, Ola; Hesthagen, Trygve; Hessen, Dag O

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate a contrasting effect of terrestrial coloured dissolved organic material on the secondary production of boreal nutrient poor lakes. Using fish yield from standardised brown trout gill-net catches as a proxy, we show a unimodal response of lake secondary productivity to dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This suggests a trade-off between positive and negative effects, where the initial increase may hinge upon several factors such as energy subsidising, screening of UV-radiation or P and N load being associated with organic carbon. The subsequent decline in production with further increase in DOC is likely associated with light limitations of primary production. We also show that shallow lakes switch from positive to negative effects at higher carbon loads than deeper lakes. These results underpin the major role of organic carbon for structuring productivity of boreal lake ecosystems. PMID:24165396

  3. Phototransformation of pesticides in prairie potholes: effect of dissolved organic matter in triplet-induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Karpuzcu, M Ekrem; McCabe, Andrew J; Arnold, William A

    2016-02-01

    Photochemical reactions involving a variety of photosensitizers contribute to the abiotic transformation of pesticides in prairie pothole lakes (PPLs). Despite the fact that triplet excited state dissolved organic matter (DOM) enhances phototransformation of pesticides by acting as a photosensitizer, it may also decrease the overall phototransformation rate through various mechanisms. In this study, the effect of DOM on the phototransformation of four commonly applied pesticides in four different PPL waters was investigated under simulated sunlight using photoexcited benzophenone-4-carboxylate as the oxidant with DOM serving as an anti-oxidant. For atrazine and mesotrione, a decrease in phototransformation rates was observed, while phototransformations of metolachlor and isoproturon were not affected by DOM inhibition. Phototransformation rates and the extent of inhibition/enhancement by DOM varied spatially and temporally across the wetlands studied. Characterization of DOM from the sites and different seasons suggested that the DOM type and variations in the DOM structure are important factors controlling phototransformation rates of pesticides in PPLs.

  4. FINAL REPORT INTEGRATED DM1200 MELTER TESTING OF REDOX EFFECTS USING HLW AZ-101 AND C-106/AY-102 SIMULANTS VSL-04R4800-1 REV 0 5/6/

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; GONG W; BARDAKCI T; D'ANGELO NA; LUTZE W; BIZOT PM; CALLOW RA; BRANDYS M; KOT WK; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29

    This report documents melter and off-gas performance results obtained on the DM1200 HLW Pilot Melter during processing of AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102 HLW simulants. The tests reported herein are a subset of three tests from a larger series of tests described in the Test Plan for the work; results from the remaining tests will be reported separately. Three nine day tests, one with AZ-101 and two with C-106/AY-102 feeds were conducted with variable amounts of added sugar to address the effects of redox. The test with AZ-101 included ruthenium spikes to also address the effects of redox on ruthenium volatility. One of tests addressed the effects of increased flow-sheet nitrate levels using C-106/AY-102 feeds. With high nitrate/nitrite feeds (such as WTP LAW feeds), reductants are required to prevent melt foaming and deleterious effects on glass production rates. Sugar is the baseline WTP reductant for this purpose. WTP HLW feeds typically have relatively low nitrate/nitrite content in comparison to the organic carbon content and, therefore, have typically not required sugar additions. However, HLW feed variability, particularly with respect to nitrate levels, may necessitate the use of sugar in some instances. The tests reported here investigate the effects of variable sugar additions to the melter feed as well as elevated nitrate levels in the waste. Variables held constant to the extent possible included melt temperature, bubbling rate, plenum temperature, cold cap coverage, the waste simulant composition, and the target glass composition. The principal objectives of the DM1200 melter testing were to determine the achievable glass production rates for simulated HLW feeds with variable amounts of added sugar and increased nitrate levels; characterize melter off-gas emissions; characterize the performance of the prototypical off-gas system components as well as their integrated performance; characterize the feed, glass product, and off-gas effluents; and perform pre- and

  5. Determination of total dissolved solids in water analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, C.S.

    1933-01-01

    The figure for total dissolved solids, based on the weight of the residue on evaporation after heating for 1 hour at 180??C., is reasonably close to the sum of the determined constituents for most natural waters. Waters of the carbonate type that are high in magnesium may give residues that weigh less than the sum. Natural waters of the sulfate type usually give residues that are too high on account of incomplete drying.

  6. Characteristics of dissolved carbon change in irrigation water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaike, Y.; Kunishio, A.; Kawamoto, Y.; Murakami, H.; Iwata, T.

    2012-12-01

    It is necessary to estimate carbon emission from soil for understanding carbon cycle processes in cultivated fields. Since irrigation water is introduced into a typical rice paddy field, one part of emitted carbon content from soil were trapped by water and dissolved in it, and dissolved carbon content outflows from the field at the drainage moment. In this study, we continuously and regularly analyzed dissolved carbon content of irrigation water and investigated seasonal variation of efflux of carbon from a paddy field. Experimental site is located reclaimed land in the southern part of Okayama Prefecture, Japan. And rice cropping cultivation has continued in a similar method every year. Intermittent irrigation water managements, or 3 days flooded and 4 days drained condition, were carried out during almost all the period of rice cultivated term. Irrigation water was sampled every flooding and drainage days. Inorganic carbon (IC) concentration was measured with total carbon (TC) analyzer (TOC-V/CSH, SHIMAZU). Amount of dissolved carbon in irrigation water was calculated from product of the carbon concentration and water levels. The experimental paddy field was divided into two areas, and two bottle of water were sampled from each area. In order to investigate what impact is brought on the annual carbon cycle by the difference of disposal management of residual biomass after the harvest, residual biomass was burned and plowed into soil at the one area on 29th Nov., 2011, and residue was not burned and directly plowed into soil at the other area as usual. IC during cultivated term in 2011 and 2012 in both area gradually increased day by day for every flooded periods. And IC showed distinct diurnal variations with lower value in the daytime than at night, it is because of photosynthetic activities by aquatic algae in the irrigation water.

  7. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as <0.025μm filtered, <0.45μm filtered (dissolved) and unfiltered (total) present in solution over the 72-h bioassay. The chronic population growth rate inhibition after aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (p<0.05) increasing with initial cell density from 10(3) to 10(5)cells/mL. No effects on plasma membrane permeability were observed for any of the three diatoms suggesting that mechanisms of aluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated

  8. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as <0.025μm filtered, <0.45μm filtered (dissolved) and unfiltered (total) present in solution over the 72-h bioassay. The chronic population growth rate inhibition after aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (p<0.05) increasing with initial cell density from 10(3) to 10(5)cells/mL. No effects on plasma membrane permeability were observed for any of the three diatoms suggesting that mechanisms of aluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated

  9. Sea Water Ageing of GFRP Composites and the Dissolved salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraverty, A. P.; Mohanty, U. K.; Mishra, S. C.; Satapathy, A.

    2015-02-01

    This paper houses the effect of sea water immersion on glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. The major sources of interest are study of sea water absorption, penetration of the dissolved salts, details of chemical and physical bonds at the interface, variations of mechanical properties and study of failure mechanisms as revealed through SEM fractographs. Eighteen ply GFRP composites are immersed in sea water for a period of one year in steps of two months durations. It is revealed that the moisture absorption transforms from a Fickian to non-Fickian behavior with lapse of time. The dissolved salt 'K' shows highest depth of penetration after one year of immersion while 'Na' shows a least depth of penetration, as revealed from the EDS spectra. It is also revealed that 'Ca' seems to have a sudden burst in the rate of penetration even surpassing that of 'K'. This trend can be attributed to the combined effect of ionic mobility of the various dissolved salts and the probable interaction between 'K' and the -OH group of epoxy resin. This interaction between dissolved 'K' and the -OH group in the polymer could have arrested the further advancement of 'K' salts in the polymer, resulting in comparatively high rates of 'Ca' penetration. The mechanical properties such as inter laminar shear stress (ILSS), stress and strain at rupture, glass transition temperature (Tg) and elastic modulus show a decreasing trend with the increased duration of immersion. As revealed from the SEM fractographs pot- holing, fiber pull-out, matrix crack etc. are seen to be the major reason for failure of the immersed samples under load.

  10. THE ROLE OF NITROGEN IN CHROMOPHORIC AND FLUORESCENT DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial and photochemical processes affect chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) dynamics in the ocean. Some evidence suggests that dissolved nitrogen plays a role in CDOM formation, although this has received little systematic attention in marine ecosystems. Coastal sea...

  11. Use of Passive Samplers to Measure Dissolved Organic Contaminants in a Temperate Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants can be challenging given their low solubilities and high particle association. However, to perform accurate risk assessments of these chemicals, knowing the dissolved concentration is critical since it is considered to b...

  12. Xe-129 NMR of xenon dissolved in biological media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazitov, R. K.; Kuzma, N. N.; Happer, W.; Driehuys, B.; Merrill, G. F.

    2002-03-01

    The high solubility and large chemical shift of ^129Xe in various tissues makes it an ideal, non-invasive probe for pathological conditions such as cancer or atherosclerosis. To this end, we report NMR measurements of lineshapes, chemical shifts, and relaxation times of ^129Xe dissolved in the following biological tissues in vitro: heart, muscle, sinew, stomach(R.K. Mazitov, K. M. Enikeev, et al., Dokl. Akad. Nauk) 365, 396 (1999)., and the white and yolk of egg. NMR measurements of xenon dissolved in olive and sunflower oils are also reported. Tissues weighing 160--250 mg, not exposed to freezing, were studied in a 11.75 T field at the ^129Xe resonance frequency of 138.4 MHz; the pressure of xenon in the sealed-sample ampoules was ~20 bar. The influence of drugs and water content on tissues was studied. No xenon-water clathrates(J.A. Ripmeester and D.W. Davidson, J. Mol. Struct. ) 75, 67 (1981). were observed in the tissues, even at the high pressures used. The aim of this study is to establish possible correlations between the NMR parameters of dissolved xenon and the state of the tissue.

  13. Sequestration of Dissolved CO2 in the Oriskany Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmore, R.M.; Allen, D.E.; McCarthy-Jones, J.R.; Hedges, S.W.; Soong, Yee

    2008-04-15

    Experiments were conducted to determine the solubility of CO2 in a natural brine solution of the Oriskany formation under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. These data were collected at temperatures of 22 and 75 °C and pressures between 100 and 450 bar. Experimentally determined data were compared with CO2 solubility predictions using a model developed by Duan and Sun (Chem. Geol. 2003, 193, 257-271). Model results compare well with Oriskany brine CO2 solubility data collected experimentally, suggesting that the Duan and Sun model is a reliable tool for estimating solution CO2 capacity in high salinity aquifers in the temperature and pressure range evaluated. The capacity for the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 was calculated using results of the solubility models, estimation of the density of CO2 saturated brine, and available geographic information system (GIS) information on the formation depth and thickness. Results indicate that the Oriskany formation can hold approximately 0.36 gigatonnes of dissolved CO2 if the full basin is considered. When only the region where supercritical CO2 can exist (temperatures greater than 31° C and pressures greater than 74 bar) is considered, the capacity of the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 is 0.31 gigatonnes. The capacity estimate considering the potential to sequester free-phase supercritical CO2 if brine were displaced from formation pore space is 8.8 gigatonnes in the Oriskany formation.

  14. Formulation and evaluation of mouth dissolving tablets of the Etoricoxib.

    PubMed

    Chandira, R Margret; Venkataeswarlu, B S; Kumudhavalli, M V; Debjitbhowmik; Jayakar, B

    2010-04-01

    The demand for mouth dissolving tablets has been growing during the last decade especially for elderly and children who have swallowing difficulties. Etoricoxib is a new non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with selective cox-2 inhibitory activity, selective inhibition of cox-2 provides anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity it is commonly used for osteo-arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, primary dysmenorrhoea, post operative dental pain and acute gout. The main criteria for mouth dissolving tablets are to disintegrate or dissolve rapidly in oral cavity with saliva in 15 sec to 60 sec with need of water. The disintegrants used should fulfill the criteria by disintegrating the tablets in specified time limit.in the present investigation variety of super disintegrants like primogel, kollidone, Ac-Di-sol, L-HPMC, L-HPC, were selected and tablets were prepared by direct compression method in different concentration like 4% and 8%. The prepared tablets were evaluated for weight variation, hardness, friability, in vitro disintegration time, wetting time, in vitro dissolution study, etc. formulation f-9 shows the lowest disintegration time (44 sec) and wetting time (52 sec). In vitro dissolution studies revealed that formulation F-9 containing 8% L-HPC showed 97% drug release at the end of 20 min. PMID:20363696

  15. Biogeochemical controls of uranium bioavailability from the dissolved phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, Marie-Noele; Fuller, Christopher C.; Cain, Daniel J.; Campbell, Kate M.; Aiken, George R.

    2016-01-01

    To gain insights into the risks associated with uranium (U) mining and processing, we investigated the biogeochemical controls of U bioavailability in the model freshwater speciesLymnaea stagnalis (Gastropoda). Bioavailability of dissolved U(VI) was characterized in controlled laboratory experiments over a range of water hardness, pH, and in the presence of complexing ligands in the form of dissolved natural organic matter (DOM). Results show that dissolved U is bioavailable under all the geochemical conditions tested. Uranium uptake rates follow first order kinetics over a range encompassing most environmental concentrations. Uranium uptake rates in L. stagnalis ultimately demonstrate saturation uptake kinetics when exposure concentrations exceed 100 nM, suggesting uptake via a finite number of carriers or ion channels. The lack of a relationship between U uptake rate constants and Ca uptake rates suggest that U does not exclusively use Ca membrane transporters. In general, U bioavailability decreases with increasing pH, increasing Ca and Mg concentrations, and when DOM is present. Competing ions did not affect U uptake rates. Speciation modeling that includes formation constants for U ternary complexes reveals that the aqueous concentration of dicarbonato U species (UO2(CO3)2–2) best predicts U bioavailability to L. stagnalis, challenging the free-ion activity model postulate

  16. Iron traps terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter at redox interfaces.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Thomas; Zak, Dominik; Biester, Harald; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2013-06-18

    Reactive iron and organic carbon are intimately associated in soils and sediments. However, to date, the organic compounds involved are uncharacterized on the molecular level. At redox interfaces in peatlands, where the biogeochemical cycles of iron and dissolved organic matter (DOM) are coupled, this issue can readily be studied. We found that precipitation of iron hydroxides at the oxic surface layer of two rewetted fens removed a large fraction of DOM via coagulation. On aeration of anoxic fen pore waters, >90% of dissolved iron and 27 ± 7% (mean ± SD) of dissolved organic carbon were rapidly (within 24 h) removed. Using ultra-high-resolution MS, we show that vascular plant-derived aromatic and pyrogenic compounds were preferentially retained, whereas the majority of carboxyl-rich aliphatic acids remained in solution. We propose that redox interfaces, which are ubiquitous in marine and terrestrial settings, are selective yet intermediate barriers that limit the flux of land-derived DOM to oceanic waters. PMID:23733946

  17. Dissolved oxygen sensing based on fluorescence quenching of ceria nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, Nader; Meehan, Kathleen; Leber, Donald

    2012-10-01

    The development of oxygen sensors has positively impacted the fields of medical science, bioengineering, environmental monitoring, solar cells, industrial process control, and a number of military applications. Fluorescent quenching sensors have an inherent high sensitivity, chemical selectivity, and stability when compared to other types of sensors. While cerium oxide thin films have been used to monitor oxygen in the gas phase, the potential of cerium oxide (ceria) nanoparticles as the active material in sensor for oxygen gas has only recently been investigated. Ceria nanoparticles are one of the most unique nanomaterials that are being studied today due to the diffusion and reactivity of its oxygen vacancies, which contributes to its high oxygen storage capability. The reactivity of the oxygen vacancies, which is also related to conversion of cerium ion from the Ce+4 to Ce+3 state, affects the fluorescence properties of the ceria nanoparticles. Our research demonstrates that the ceria nanoparticles (~7 nm in diameter) have application as a fluorescence quenching sensor to measure dissolved oxygen in water. We have found a strong inverse correlation between the amplitude of the fluorescence emission (λexcitation = 430 nm and λpeak = 520 nm) and the dissolved oxygen concentration between 5 - 13 mg/L. The Stern-Volmer constant, which is an indication of the sensitivity of gas sensing is 184 M-1 for the ceria nanoparticles. The results show that ceria nanoparticles can be used in an improved, robust fluorescence sensor for dissolved oxygen in a liquid medium.

  18. Chemical composition of dissolved organic nitrogen in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Matthew; Pratum, Tom; Hedges, John; Benner, Ronald

    1997-11-01

    Fixed nitrogen is one of the main limiting nutrients for primary production in the ocean, where it is biologically available in the form of dissolved inorganic and organic matter. Inorganic nitrogen concentrations are consequently very low in surface waters of temperate ocean gyres, yet fixed nitrogen persists in the form of dissolved organic matter. The small, rapidly cycling organic compounds fundamental to microbial and planktonic growth (such as free amino acids, amines and urea) account for only a minor fraction of total dissolved organic nitrogen (DON). In contrast, the vast majority of DON, especially in the deep ocean, resides in the form of nitrogenous substances that are resistant to biological degradation. These substances, which represent an enormous reservoir of fixed nitrogen, are not readily identified by conventional biochemical techniques, but have been assumed to consist largely of structurally complex macromolecules resulting from the degradation and spontaneous abiotic condensation of biochemical precursors. Here we present 15N NMR measurements that contradict this view. Our results show that most higher-molecular-weight DON in the ocean exists in amide form, rather than as a collection of nitrogen heterocycles that might be indicative of spontaneous condensation products. Because these amides are unlikely to form abiotically, the bulk of the ocean's DON reservoir appears to derive directly from degradation-resistant biomolecules.

  19. FDA-Approved Natural Polymers for Fast Dissolving Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md Tausif; Parvez, Nayyar; Sharma, Pramod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Oral route is the most preferred route for administration of different drugs because it is regarded as safest, most convenient, and economical route. Fast disintegrating tablets are very popular nowadays as they get dissolved or facilely disintegrated in mouth within few seconds of administration without the need of water. The disadvantages of conventional dosage form, especially dysphagia (arduousness in swallowing), in pediatric and geriatric patients have been overcome by fast dissolving tablets. Natural materials have advantages over synthetic ones since they are chemically inert, non-toxic, less expensive, biodegradable and widely available. Natural polymers like locust bean gum, banana powder, mango peel pectin, Mangifera indica gum, and Hibiscus rosa-sinenses mucilage ameliorate the properties of tablet and utilized as binder, diluent, and superdisintegrants increase the solubility of poorly water soluble drug, decrease the disintegration time, and provide nutritional supplement. Natural polymers are obtained from the natural origin and they are cost efficacious, nontoxic, biodegradable, eco-friendly, devoid of any side effect, renewable, and provide nutritional supplement. It is proved from the studies that natural polymers are more safe and efficacious than the synthetic polymers. The aim of the present article is to study the FDA-approved natural polymers utilized in fast dissolving tablets. PMID:26556207

  20. Dissolved oxygen concentration in culture medium: assumptions and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Newby, D; Marks, L; Lyall, F

    2005-04-01

    Oxygen is a key factor in the regulation of cytotrophoblast differentiation, proliferation and invasion in early pregnancy. Abnormalities in oxygen concentration have also been linked to a number of pregnancy disorders. Cell culture models have been used to study the effect of oxygen on cytotrophoblast behaviour in vitro, however, there is often little or no validation of oxygen levels in these cell culture systems. In this study, dissolved oxygen levels in culture medium maintained in standard culture conditions (18% O(2)) measured 18%. On transfer to a low oxygen environment (2% O(2)), oxygen levels decreased to 6-8% after 4h and reached 2% only after 24h in culture. Culture medium pre-gassed with nitrogen to remove dissolved oxygen quickly absorbed oxygen when exposed to ambient air during dispensing and required further incubation in a 2% oxygen environment before dissolved oxygen levels equilibrated to 2%. Thus, cultured cells placed in a low oxygen environment would be exposed to varying levels of oxygen before the desired level of oxygen exposure is reached. This study highlights the importance of validation of oxygen levels and potential problems associated with in vitro studies on the regulatory effects of oxygen.

  1. Dissolved Nutrient Retention Dynamics in River Networks: A Modeling Investigation of Transient Flow and Scale Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Sheng; Covino, Timothy P.; Sivapalan, Murugesu; Basu, Nandita; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Shaowen

    2012-06-30

    In this paper, we use a dynamic network flow model, coupled with a transient storage zone biogeochemical model, to simulate dissolved nutrient removal processes at the channel network scale. We have explored several scenarios in respect of the combination of rainfall variability, and the biological and geomorphic characteristics of the catchment, to understand the dominant controls on removal and delivery of dissolved nutrients (e.g., nitrate). These model-based theoretical analyses suggested that while nutrient removal efficiency is lower during flood events compared to during baseflow periods, flood events contribute significantly to bulk nutrient removal, whereas bulk removal during baseflow periods is less. This is due to the fact that nutrient supply is larger during flood events; this trend is even stronger in large rivers. However, the efficiency of removal during both periods decreases in larger rivers, however, due to (i) increasing flow velocities and thus decreasing residence time, and (ii) increasing flow depth, and thus decreasing nutrient uptake rates. Besides nutrient removal processes can be divided into two parts: in the main channel and in the hyporheic transient storage zone. When assessing their relative contributions the size of the transient storage zone is a dominant control, followed by uptake rates in the main channel and in the transient storage zone. Increasing size of the transient storage zone with downstream distance affects the relative contributions to nutrient removal of the water column and the transient storage zone, which also impacts the way nutrient removal rates scale with increasing size of rivers. Intra-annual hydrologic variability has a significant impact on removal rates at all scales: the more variable the streamflow is, compared to mean discharge, the less nutrient is removed in the channel network. A scale-independent first order uptake coefficient, ke, estimated from model simulations, is highly dependent on the

  2. Variable C : N : P stoichiometry of dissolved organic matter cycling in the Community Earth System Model

    DOE PAGES

    Letscher, R. T.; Moore, J. K.; Teng, Y. -C.; Primeau, F.

    2014-06-16

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in the ocean's biological carbon pump by providing an advective/mixing pathway for ~ 20% of export production. DOM is known to have a stoichiometry depleted in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) compared to the particulate organic matter pool, a~fact that is often omitted from biogeochemical-ocean general circulation models. However the variable C : N : P stoichiometry of DOM becomes important when quantifying carbon export from the upper ocean and linking the nutrient cycles of N and P with that of carbon. Here we utilize recent advances in DOM observational data coveragemore » and offline tracer-modeling techniques to objectively constrain the variable production and remineralization rates of the DOM C / N / P pools in a simple biogeochemical-ocean model of DOM cycling. The optimized DOM cycling parameters are then incorporated within the Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling (BEC) component of the Community Earth System Model and validated against the compilation of marine DOM observations. The optimized BEC simulation including variable DOM C : N : P cycling was found to better reproduce the observed DOM spatial gradients than simulations that used the canonical Redfield ratio. Global annual average export of dissolved organic C, N, and P below 100 m was found to be 2.28 Pg C yr-1 (143 Tmol C yr-1), 16.4 Tmol N yr-1, and 1 Tmol P yr-1, respectively with an average export C : N : P stoichiometry of 225 : 19 : 1 for the semilabile (degradable) DOM pool. DOC export contributed ~ 25% of the combined organic C export to depths greater than 100 m.« less

  3. Concentrations and fluxes of dissolved uranium in the Yellow River estuary: seasonal variation and anthropogenic (Water-Sediment Regulation Scheme) impact.

    PubMed

    Juanjuan, Sui; Zhigang, Yu; Bochao, Xu; Wenhua, Dong; Dong, Xia; Xueyan, Jiang

    2014-02-01

    The Water-Sediment Regulation Scheme (WSRS) of the Yellow River is a procedure implemented annually from June to July to expel sediments deposited in Xiaolangdi and other large middle-reach reservoirs and to scour the lower reaches of the river, by controlling water and sediment discharges. Dissolved uranium isotopes were measured in river waters collected monthly as well as daily during the 2010 WSRS (June 19-July 16) from Station Lijin (a hydrologic station nearest to the Yellow River estuary). The monthly samples showed dissolved uranium concentrations of 3.85-7.57 μg l(-1) and (234)U/(238)U activity ratios of 1.24-1.53. The concentrations were much higher than those reported for other global major rivers, and showed seasonal variability. Laboratory simulation experiments showed significant uranium release from bottom and suspended sediment. The uranium concentrations and activity ratios differed during the two stages of the WSRS, which may reflect desorption/dissolution of uranium from suspended river sediments of different origins. An annual flux of dissolved uranium of 1.04 × 10(8) g y(-1) was estimated based on the monthly average water discharge and dissolved uranium concentration in the lower reaches of the Yellow River. The amount of dissolved uranium (2.65 × 10(7) g) transported from the Yellow River to the sea during the WSRS constituted about 1/4 of the annual flux.

  4. SLUDGE BATCH 6/TANK 40 SIMULANT CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, David

    2010-04-28

    , and significant mercury was not accounted for in the highest acid run. Coalescence of elemental mercury droplets in the mercury water wash tank (MWWT) appeared to degrade with increasing stoichiometry. Observations were made of mercury scale formation in the SRAT condenser and MWWT. A tacky mercury amalgam with Rh, Pd, and Cu, plus some Ru and Ca formed on the impeller at 159% acid. It contained a significant fraction of the available Pd, Cu, and Rh as well as about 25% of the total mercury charged. Free (elemental) mercury was found in all of the SME products. Ammonia scrubbers were used during the tests to capture off-gas ammonia for material balance purposes. Significant ammonium ion formation was again observed during the SRAT cycle, and ammonia gas entered the off-gas as the pH rose during boiling. Ammonium ion production was lower than in the SB6 Phase II and the qualification simulant testing. Similar ammonium ion formation was seen in the ARP/MCU simulation as in the 120% flowsheet run. A slightly higher pH caused most of the ammonium to vaporize and collect in the ammonia scrubber reflux solution. Two periods of foaminess were noted. Neither required additional antifoam to control the foam growth. A steady foam layer formed during reflux in the 120% acid run. It was about an inch thick, but was 2-3 times more volume of bubbles than is typically seen during reflux. A similar foam layer also was seen during caustic boiling of the simulant during the ARP addition. While frequently seen with the radioactive sludge, foaminess during caustic boiling with simulants has been relatively rare. Two further flowsheet tests were performed and will be documented separately. One test was to evaluate the impact of process conditions that match current DWPF operation (lower rates). The second test was to evaluate the impact of SRAT/SME processing on the rheology of a modified Phase III simulant that had been made five times more viscous using ultrasonication.

  5. Trophic complexity in aqueous systems: bacterial species richness and protistan predation regulate dissolved organic carbon and dissolved total nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Fetzer, Ingo; Harms, Hauke; Chatzinotas, Antonis

    2016-02-24

    Loading of water bodies with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved total nitrogen (DTN) affects their integrity and functioning. Microbial interactions mitigate the negative effects of high nutrient loads in these ecosystems. Despite numerous studies on how biodiversity mediates ecosystem functions, whether and how diversity and complexity of microbial food webs (horizontal, vertical) and the underlying ecological mechanisms influence nutrient removal has barely been investigated. Using microbial microcosms accommodating systematic combinations of prey (bacteria) and predator (protists) species, we showed that increasing bacterial richness improved the extent and reliability of DOC and DTN removal. Bacterial diversity drove nutrient removal either due to species foraging physiology or functional redundancy, whereas protistan diversity affected nutrient removal through bacterial prey resource partitioning and changing nutrient balance in the system. Our results demonstrate that prey-predator diversity and trophic interactions interactively determine nutrient contents, thus implying the vital role of microbial trophic complexity as a biological buffer against DOC and DTN.

  6. Trophic complexity in aqueous systems: bacterial species richness and protistan predation regulate dissolved organic carbon and dissolved total nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Fetzer, Ingo; Harms, Hauke; Chatzinotas, Antonis

    2016-02-24

    Loading of water bodies with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved total nitrogen (DTN) affects their integrity and functioning. Microbial interactions mitigate the negative effects of high nutrient loads in these ecosystems. Despite numerous studies on how biodiversity mediates ecosystem functions, whether and how diversity and complexity of microbial food webs (horizontal, vertical) and the underlying ecological mechanisms influence nutrient removal has barely been investigated. Using microbial microcosms accommodating systematic combinations of prey (bacteria) and predator (protists) species, we showed that increasing bacterial richness improved the extent and reliability of DOC and DTN removal. Bacterial diversity drove nutrient removal either due to species foraging physiology or functional redundancy, whereas protistan diversity affected nutrient removal through bacterial prey resource partitioning and changing nutrient balance in the system. Our results demonstrate that prey-predator diversity and trophic interactions interactively determine nutrient contents, thus implying the vital role of microbial trophic complexity as a biological buffer against DOC and DTN. PMID:26888033

  7. Temporal variations in dissolved selenium in Lake Kinneret (Israel)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishri, A.; Brenner, I.B.; Hall, G.E.M.; Taylor, H.E.

    1999-01-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient for the growth of the dinoflagellate Peridinium gatunense that dominates the spring algal bloom in Lake Kinneret (LK). The relationship between the levels of dissolved selenium species and the occurance of algal blooms in this lake was studied. During algal blooms of P. gatunense in spring and of the blue-green Aphanizomenon ovalisporum in fall (in 1994) the concentration of epilimnetic dissolved organic Se (Se(org)) increased whereas that of selenite (SeIV) decreased, to levels below the limit of detection: 5 ng/l. The disappearance of SeIV during these blooms is attributed to algal uptake and it is suggested that the growth of both algae may have depended on Se(org) regeneration. A budget performed for selenate (SeVI) suggests that this species is also consumed by algae but to a lesser extent than SeIV (in 1994 ~40% of the epilimnetic load). During the stratification period the hypolimnion of Lake Kinneret becomes anoxic, with high levels of dissolved sulfide. The affects of this environment on the distribution of Se oxy-anions, selenite (SeIV) and selenate(SeVI), were also studied. At the onset of thermal stratification (March) about 35% of the lake inventory of both Se oxidized species are entrapped in the hypolimnion. During stages of oxygen depletion and H2S accumulation, SeIV is completely and SeVI partially removed from this layer. The removal is attributed to reduction followed by formation of particulate reduced products, such as elemental selenium Se(o). The ratio between SeVI to total dissolved selenium (SE(T)) in water sources to the lake is ~0.84, about twice the corresponding ratio in the lake (~0.44, during holomixis). In the lake about 75% of annual SeVI inflow from external sources undergoes reduction to selenide (Se-II) and Se(o) through epilimnetic algal assimilation and hypolimnetic anoxic reduction, respectively. It is suggested that the latter oxidation of the dissolved organic selenide released from

  8. Modeling groundwater transport of dissolved gasoline and using the results to evaluate aquifer restoration processes

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, S.C.L.; Chiu, Shen-yann

    1987-01-01

    Solute transport models can be used to simulate aquifer restoration processes for groundwater contaminated by dissolved gasoline. Generic aquifer restoration problems, representing a generalized contamination case for a typical range of aquifer characteristics, were formulated by a selected solute transport model. The results of the simulations were used to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of aquifer restoration by pumping out the contaminted water. The aquifer restoration process consists of a single well located at the center of the contaminated area to pump the groundwater at constant rates of 400, 50, and 5 gpm for three selected aquifer cases, respectively. The pumping rates were selected such that the maximum well drawdown in all three cases is about 10 feet after 20 years of pumping. The modeling results indicate that the time of pumping required to reduce hydrocarbon concentrations down to acceptable levels is quite sensitive to hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer and retardation factors of the hydrocarbons. The aquifer cases considered in the restoration problem had hydraulic conductivities, respectively, of 5000, 500, and 50 gpd/ft/sup 2/. Each aquifer was assumed to be unconfined and to be 20 ft thick. The gasoline-contaminated area in each case was assumed to be 100 ft by 200 ft, with a uniform concentration of hydrocarbons. The removal of two hydrocarbons (benzene and xylene) was simulated by the transport model.

  9. 40 CFR 795.70 - Indirect photolysis screening test: Sunlight photolysis in waters containing dissolved humic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the indirect (or sensitized) photoreaction of dissolved organic chemicals. This reactivity is imparted by dissolved organic material (DOM) in the form of humic substances. These materials absorb sunlight... can be diluted to a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and uv-visible absorbance typical of...

  10. 40 CFR 795.70 - Indirect photolysis screening test: Sunlight photolysis in waters containing dissolved humic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the indirect (or sensitized) photoreaction of dissolved organic chemicals. This reactivity is imparted by dissolved organic material (DOM) in the form of humic substances. These materials absorb sunlight... can be diluted to a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and uv-visible absorbance typical of...

  11. 40 CFR 795.70 - Indirect photolysis screening test: Sunlight photolysis in waters containing dissolved humic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the indirect (or sensitized) photoreaction of dissolved organic chemicals. This reactivity is imparted by dissolved organic material (DOM) in the form of humic substances. These materials absorb sunlight... can be diluted to a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and uv-visible absorbance typical of...

  12. 40 CFR 795.70 - Indirect photolysis screening test: Sunlight photolysis in waters containing dissolved humic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the indirect (or sensitized) photoreaction of dissolved organic chemicals. This reactivity is imparted by dissolved organic material (DOM) in the form of humic substances. These materials absorb sunlight... can be diluted to a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and uv-visible absorbance typical of...

  13. 40 CFR 795.70 - Indirect photolysis screening test: Sunlight photolysis in waters containing dissolved humic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the indirect (or sensitized) photoreaction of dissolved organic chemicals. This reactivity is imparted by dissolved organic material (DOM) in the form of humic substances. These materials absorb sunlight... can be diluted to a dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and uv-visible absorbance typical of...

  14. Biochemical Oxygen Demand and Dissolved Oxygen. Training Module 5.105.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the azide modification of the Winkler dissolved oxygen test and the electronic dissolved oxygen meter test procedures for determining the dissolved oxygen and the biochemical oxygen demand of a wastewater sample. Included are…

  15. Fiber-optic dissolved oxygen and dissolved carbon dioxide sensors using fluorophores encapsulated in sol gel matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeog-Chan

    Fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCS) for oxygen, dissolved oxygen (DO), and dissolved CO2 sensing using thin films of fluorophores encapsulated in sol-gel matrices were made and tested. The DO/O2 sensor used ruthenium(II) tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) perchlorate (Ru(Ph 2Phen)Cl2) as the oxygen sensitive fluorophore and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) sol-gel as the encapsulating matrix material. For the DCO2 sensor, 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) co-doped with sodium bicarbonate was used as the DCO2 sensitive fluorophore-chemical system and diisobutoxy-alumino triethoxysilane (ASE) sol-gel was used as the encapsulating matrix material. It was found that oxygen quenches the excited state Ru(Ph2Phen)Cl 2 by diffusing through the MTMS matrix. Continuous excitation of Ru(Ph 2Phen)Cl2 during MTMS drying resulted in long, single exponential lifetimes of the metal complex and increased sensor sensitivity. When the sensor was field tested, it was found to have an excellent match compared to conventional titration method for determining dissolved oxygen concentrations and had fast response times. It was determined that this sensor measured the vapor pressure of oxygen rather than the absolute concentration of dissolved oxygen. For DCO2 sensing, it was found that the dynamic response of the senor could be tuned by varying the HPTS to NaHCO3 ratios. The sensor had fast response times compared to other fiber optic DCO 2 sensors reported which typically have response times of minutes.

  16. Measurement of Relative Dissolved Gas Concentrations Using Underwater Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R. J.; Toler, S.; van Amerom, F. H.; Wenner, P.; Hall, M.; Edkins, J.; Gassig, S.; Short, R.; Byrne, R.

    2004-12-01

    The deployment of underwater mass spectrometer (UMS) systems in marine and lacustrine environments has provided chemical data of exceptional temporal and spatial resolution. UMS instruments operate moored, tethered, remotely, or autonomously, allowing users to customize deployments to suit a wide variety of situations. The ability to collect and analyze real-time data enables prompt, intelligent sampling decisions based on observed analyte distributions. UMS systems can simultaneously detect a wide variety of analytes generated by biological, chemical, physical, geothermal and anthropogenic activities. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane separates the sample-stream from the spectrometer's vacuum chamber. This membrane is selective against water and charged species, yet highly permeable to volatile organic compounds (VOC) and simple gases. Current detection limits for dissolved gases and VOCs are on the order of ppm and ppb respectively. Semi-quantitative proof-of-concept applications have included horizontal mapping of gas gradients, characterization of geothermal vent water, and observation of dissolved gas profiles. Horizontal gradients in dissolved gas concentrations were determined in Lake Maggiore, St Petersburg, Florida. The UMS was positioned on a remotely-guided surface vehicle, and real-time gas concentration data were transmitted to shore via wireless ethernet. Real-time observations allowed intensive sampling of areas with strong gas gradients. Oxygen and CO2 exhibited patchy distributions and their concentrations varied inversely, presumably in response to biological activity. The UMS signal for methane depended on the instrument's proximity to organic rich sediments. Geothermal vent water was characterized while the UMS was deployed in Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming, on a tethered Eastern Oceanics remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Observations of dissolved vent-gas compositions were obtained to depths of 30m. Distinct differences in dissolved vent

  17. [Sources of dissolved organic carbon and the bioavailability of dissolved carbohydrates in the tributaries of Lake Taihu].

    PubMed

    Ye, Lin-Lin; Wu, Xiao-Dong; Kong, Fan-Xiang; Liu, Bo; Yan, De-Zhi

    2015-03-01

    Surface water samples of Yincungang and Chendonggang Rivers were collected from September 2012 to August 2013 in Lake Taihu. Water temperature, Chlorophyll a and bacterial abundance were analyzed, as well as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, stable carbon isotope of DOC (Δ13C(DOC)), specific UV absorbance (SUVA254 ) and dissolved carbohydrates concentrations. Δ13C(DOC) ranged from -27.03% per thousand ± 0.30% per thousand to -23.38%per thousand ± 0.20% per thousand, indicating a terrestrial source. Both the autochthonous and allochthonous sources contributed to the carbohydrates pool in the tributaries. Significant differences in PCHO (polysaccharides) and MCHO (monosaccharides) concentrations were observed between spring-summer and autumn-winter (P < 0.01, n = 12; P < 0.01, n = 12), which might be caused by the variation in the sources and bioavailability of carbohydrates. PCHO contributed a major fraction to TCHO (total dissolved carbohydrates) in autumn and winter, which could be explained by the accumulation of undegradable PCHO limited by the low water temperature; MCHO contributed a major fraction to TCHO in spring and summer, which might be caused by the transformation from PCHO by microbes at high water temperature.

  18. Assessment of potential climate change impacts on peatland dissolved organic carbon release and drinking water treatment from laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Tang, R; Clark, J M; Bond, T; Graham, N; Hughes, D; Freeman, C

    2013-02-01

    Catchments draining peat soils provide the majority of drinking water in the UK. Over the past decades, concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have increased in surface waters. Residual DOC can cause harmful carcinogenic disinfection by-products to form during water treatment processes. Increased frequency and severity of droughts combined with and increased temperatures expected as the climate changes, have potentials to change water quality. We used a novel approach to investigate links between climate change, DOC release and subsequent effects on drinking water treatment. We designed a climate manipulation experiment to simulate projected climate changes and monitored releases from peat soil and litter, then simulated coagulation used in water treatment. We showed that the 'drought' simulation was the dominant factor altering DOC release and affected the ability to remove DOC. Our results imply that future short-term drought events could have a greater impact than increased temperature on DOC treatability.

  19. Dissolved oxygen imaging in a porous medium to investigate biodegradation in a plume with limited electron acceptor supply.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei E; Oswald, Sascha E; Lerner, David N; Smith, Colin C; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-05-01

    A novel combination of noninvasive imaging with an oxygen sensitive fluorescent indicator was developed to investigate the biodegradation processes occurring at the fringe of a solute plume, where the supply of oxygen was limited. A thin transparent porous matrix (156 x 120 x 3 mm) was made from quartz plates and quartz sand (212-300 microm) and enriched with acetate-degrading bacteria. A degrading plume developed from a continuous acetate source in the uniform flow field containing dissolved oxygen. Ruthenium (II)-dichlorotris(1,10-phenanthroline) (Ru(phen)3Cl2), a water-soluble fluorescent dye, was used as an indicator of dissolved oxygen. The fluorescence intensity was dependent on the concentration of oxygen because the dissolved oxygen acted as collisional quencher. The oxygen distribution was interpreted from images recorded by a CCD camera. These two-dimensional experimental results showed quantitatively how the oxygen concentrations decreased strongly at the narrow plume fringe and that oxygen was depleted at the core of the plume. Separately, dispersivity was measured in a series of nonreactive transport experiments, and biodegradation parameters were evaluated by batch experiments. Two-dimensional numerical simulations with MT3D/RT3D used these parameters, and the predicted oxygen distributions were compared with the experimental results. This measurement method provides a novel approach to investigate details of solute transport and biodegradation in porous media.

  20. Lattice-Boltzmann-based Simulations of Diffusiophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castigliego, Joshua; Kreft Pearce, Jennifer

    We present results from a lattice-Boltzmann-base Brownian Dynamics simulation on diffusiophoresis and the separation of particles within the system. A gradient in viscosity that simulates a concentration gradient in a dissolved polymer allows us to separate various types of particles by their deformability. As seen in previous experiments, simulated particles that have a higher deformability react differently to the polymer matrix than those with a lower deformability. Therefore, the particles can be separated from each other. This simulation, in particular, was intended to model an oceanic system where the particles of interest were zooplankton, phytoplankton and microplastics. The separation of plankton from the microplastics was achieved.

  1. Occurrence and distribution of dissolved tellurium in Changjiang River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaodan; Song, Jinming; Li, Xuegang

    2014-03-01

    With the implementation of the GEOTRACES program, the biogeochemical cycle and distribution of tellurium (Te) in marine environments are becoming increasing environmental concerns. In this study, the concentration of dissolved Te in the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary and nearby waters was determined in May 2009 by hydride-generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry to elucidate the abundance, dominant species, distribution, and relationship with environmental factors. Results show that: (1) dissolved Te was low owing to its low abundance in the Earth's crust, high insolubility in water, and strong affinity to particulate matter; (2) Te(IV) and Te(VI) predominated in surface water. Te(VI) was the dominant species in bottom water, and Te(IV) was the minor species; (3) Horizontally, resulting from low phytoplankton metabolism and the weak reduction from Te(VI) to Te(IV) in the shore, Te(IV) was concentrated in the central zone instead of the coastal region. However, Te(VI) was abundant near the mouth of the Changjiang River where the Changjiang water is diluted and in the area to the south where the Taiwan Warm Current invaded. In the adsorption-desorption process, Te(IV) was negatively related to suspended particulate matter (SPM), indicating that it was adsorbed by particulate matter. While for Te(VI), the positive correlation with SPM suggested that it was desorbed from the solid phase. In the estuary, dissolved Te had a negative correlation to salinity. However, it deviated from the dilution line in high-salinity regions due to the invasion of the Taiwan Warm Current and the mineralization of organic matter. The relationship between Te(IV) and SPM nutrients indicated that it was more bioavailable and more related to phosphorus than to nitrogen. Progress in the field is slow and more research is needed to quantify the input of Te to the estuary and evaluate the biochemical role of organisms.

  2. Formulation and evaluation of aceclofenac mouth-dissolving tablet.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Shailendra Singh; Dahima, Rashmi

    2011-04-01

    Aceclofenac has been shown to have potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities similar to indomethacin and diclofenac, and due to its preferential Cox-2 blockade, it has a better safety than conventional Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs) with respect to adverse effect on gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. Aceclofenac is superior from other NSAIDs as it has selectivity for Cox-2, a beneficial Cox inhibitor is well tolerated, has better Gastrointestinal (GI) tolerability and improved cardiovascular safety when compared with other selective Cox-2 inhibitor. To provide the patient with the most convenient mode of administration, there is need to develop a fast-disintegrating dosage form, particularly one that disintegrates and dissolves/disperses in saliva and can be administered without water, anywhere, any time. Such tablets are also called as "melt in mouth tablet." Direct compression, freeze drying, sublimation, spray drying, tablet molding, disintegrant addition, and use of sugar-based excipients are technologies available for mouth-dissolving tablet. Mouth-dissolving tablets of aceclofenac were prepared with two different techniques, wet granulation and direct compression, in which different formulations were prepared with varying concentration of excipients. These tablets were evaluated for their friability, hardness, wetting time, and disintegration time; the drug release profile was studied in buffer Phosphate buffered Saline (PBS) pH 7.4. Direct compression batch C3 gave far better dissolution than the wet granulation Batch F2, which released only 75.37% drug, and C3, which released 89.69% drug in 90 minutes.

  3. Sources of dissolved salts in the central Murray Basin, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Hanor, J.S.; Evans, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    Large areas of the Australian continent contain scattered saline lakes underlain by shallow saline groundwaters of regional extent and debated origin. The normative salt composition of subsurface pore fluids extracted by squeezing cores collected during deep drilling at Piangil West 2 in the central Murray Basin in southeastern Australia, and of surface and shallow subsurface brines produced by subaerial evaporation in the nearby Lake Tyrrell systems, helps constrain interpretation of the origin of dissolved solutes in the groundwaters of this part of the continent. Although regional sedimentation in the Murray Basin has been dominantly continental except for a marine transgression in Oligocene-Pliocene time, most of the solutes in saline surface and subsurface waters in the central Murray Basin have a distinctly marine character. Some of the Tyrrell waters, to the southwest of Piangil West 2, show the increase in NaCl and decrease in sulfate salts expected with evaporative concentration and gypsum precipitation in an ephemeral saline lake or playa environment. The salt norms for most of the subsurface saline waters at Piangil West 2 are compatible with the dilution of variably fractionated marine bitterns slightly depleted in sodium salts, similar to the more evolved brines at Lake Tyrrell, which have recharged downward after evaporation at the surface and then dissolved a variable amount of gypsum at depth. Apparently over the last 0.5 Ma significant quantities of marine salt have been blown into the Murray Basin as aerosols which have subsequently been leached into shallow regional groundwater systems basin-wide, and have been transported laterally into areas of large evaporative loss in the central part of the basin. This origin for the solutes helps explain why the isotopic compositions of most of the subsurface saline waters at Piangil West 2 have a strong meteoric signature, whereas the dissolved salts in these waters appear similar to a marine assemblage

  4. Process for coal liquefaction by separation of entrained gases from slurry exiting staged dissolvers

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N.; Ying, David H. S.

    1983-01-01

    There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a solvent, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals are separated from the condensed dissolver effluent. In accordance with the improved process, fresh hydrogen is fed to each dissolver and the entrained gas from each dissolver is separated from the slurry phase and removed from the reactor system before the condensed phase is passed to the next dissolver in the series. In accordance with another process, the feeds to the dissolvers are such that the top of each downstream dissolver is used as a gas-liquid separator.

  5. Catchment scale molecular composition of hydrologically mobilized dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeke, Julia; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J.; Oosterwoud, Marieke R.; Bornmann, Katrin; Tittel, Jörg; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Increasing concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in rivers of temperate catchments in Europe and North Amerika impose new technical challenges for drinking water production. The driving factors for this decadal increase in DOM concentration are not conclusive and changes in annual temperatures, precipitation and atmospheric deposition are intensely discussed. It is known that the majority of DOM is released by few but large hydrologic events, mobilizing DOM from riparian wetlands for export by rivers and streams. The mechanisms of this mobilization and the resulting molecular composition of the released DOM may be used to infer long-term changes in the biogeochemistry of the respective catchment. Event-based samples collected over two years from streams in three temperate catchments in the German mid-range mountains were analyzed after solid-phase extraction of DOM for their molecular composition by ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Hydrologic conditions, land use and water chemistry parameters were used to complement the molecular analysis. The molecular composition of the riverine DOM was strongly dependent on the magnitude of the hydrologic events, with unsaturated, oxygen-enriched compounds being preferentially mobilized by large events. This pattern is consistent with an increase in dissolved iron and aluminum concentrations. In contrast, the relative proportions of nitrogen and sulfur bearing compounds increased with an increased agricultural land use but were less affected by the mobilization events. Co-precipitation experiments with colloidal aluminum showed that unsaturated and oxygen-rich compounds are preferentially removed from the dissolved phase. The precipitated compounds thus had similar chemical characteristics as compared to the mobilized DOM from heavy rain events. Radiocarbon analyses also indicated that this precipitated fraction of DOM was of comparably young radiocarbon age. DOM radiocarbon from field samples

  6. Continuous measurement of dissolved sulfide in sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Sutherland-Stacey, L; Corrie, S; Neethling, A; Johnson, I; Gutierrez, O; Dexter, R; Yuan, Z; Keller, J; Hamilton, G

    2008-01-01

    Sulfides are particularly problematic in the sewage industry. Hydrogen sulfide causes corrosion of concrete infrastructure, is dangerous at high concentrations and is foul smelling at low concentrations. Despite the importance of sulfide monitoring there is no commercially available system to quantify sulfide in waste water. In this article we report on our use of an in situ spectrometer to quantify bisulfide in waste water and additional analysis with a pH probe to calculate total dissolved sulfide. Our results show it is possible to use existing commercially available and field proven sensors to measure sulfide to mg/l levels continuously with little operator intervention and no sample preparation. PMID:18309215

  7. Bead and Process for Removing Dissolved Metal Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Bobby L., Jr.; Bennett, Karen L.; Foster, Scott A.

    2005-01-18

    A bead is provided which comprises or consists essentially of activated carbon immobilized by crosslinked poly (carboxylic acid) binder, sodium silicate binder, or polyamine binder. The bead is effective to remove metal and other ionic contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions. A method of making metal-ion sorbing beads is provided, comprising combining activated carbon, and binder solution (preferably in a pin mixer where it is whipped), forming wet beads, and heating and drying the beads. The binder solution is preferably poly(acrylic acid) and glycerol dissolved in water and the wet beads formed from such binder solution are preferably heated and crosslinked in a convection oven.

  8. Simulation test of aerosol generation from vessels in the pre-treatment system of fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Fujine, Sachio; Kitamura, Koichiro; Kihara, Takehiro

    1997-08-01

    Aerosol concentration and droplet size are measured in off-gas of vessel under various conditions by changing off-gas flow rate, stirring air flow rate, salts concentration and temperature of nitrate solution. Aerosols are also measured under evaporation and air-lift operation. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  9. A controlled field experiment on groundwater contamination by a multicomponent DNAPL: dissolved-plume retardation.

    PubMed

    Rivett, Michael O; Allen-King, Richelle M

    2003-10-01

    A natural gradient emplaced-source (ES) controlled field experiment was conducted at the Borden aquifer research site, Ontario, to study the transport of dissolved plumes emanating from residual dense nonaqueous-phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones. The specific objective of the work presented here is to determine the effects of solute and co-solute concentrations on sorption and retardation of dissolved chlorinated solvent-contaminant plumes. The ES field experiment comprised a controlled emplacement of a residual multicomponent DNAPL below the groundwater table and intensive monitoring of dissolved-phase plumes of trichloromethane (TCM), trichloroethylene (TCE), and perchloroethylene (PCE) plumes continuously generated in the aquifer down gradient from gradual source dissolution. Estimates of plume retardation (and dispersion) were obtained from 3-D numerical simulations that incorporated transient source input and flow regimes monitored during the test. PCE, the most retarded solute, surprisingly exhibited a retardation factor approximately 3 times lower than observed in a previous Borden tracer test by Mackay et al. [Water Resour. Res. 22 (1986) 2017] conducted approximately 150 m away. Also, an absence of temporal trend in PCE retardation contrasted with the previous Borden test. Supporting laboratory studies on ES site core indicated that sorption was nonlinear and competitive, i.e. reduced sorption of PCE was observed in the presence of TCE. Consideration of the effects of relatively high co-solute (TCE) concentration (competitive sorption) in addition to PCE concentration effects (nonlinear sorption) was necessary to yield laboratory-based PCE retardation estimates consistent with the field plume values. Concentration- and co-solute-based sorption and retardation analysis was also applied to the previous low-concentration pulse injection test of Mackay et al. [Water Resour. Res. 22 (1986) 2017] and was able to successfully predict the temporal field

  10. Chemical transformations during aging of zerovalent iron nanoparticles in the presence of common groundwater dissolved constituents.

    PubMed

    Reinsch, Brian C; Forsberg, Brady; Penn, R Lee; Kim, Christopher S; Lowry, Gregory V

    2010-05-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) that was aged in simulated groundwater was evaluated for alterations in composition and speciation over 6 months to understand the possible transformations NZVI could undergo in natural waters. NZVI was exposed to 10 mN of various common groundwater anions (Cl(-), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), HPO(4)(2-), and HCO(3)(-)) or to dissolved oxygen (saturated, approximately 9 mg/L). Fresh and exposed NZVI samples, along with Fe-oxide model compounds, were then analyzed using synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to yield both relative oxidation state, using the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and quantitative speciation information regarding the types and proportions of mineral species present, from analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Over 1 month of aging the dissolved anions inhibited the oxidation of the NZVI to varying degrees. Aging for 6 months, however, resulted in average oxidation states that were similar to each other regardless of the anion used, except for nitrate. Nitrate passivated the NZVI surface such that even after 6 months of aging the particles retained nearly the same mineral and Fe(0) content as fresh NZVI. Linear least-squares combination fitting (LCF) of the EXAFS spectra for 1 month-aged samples indicated that the oxidized particles remain predominantly a binary phase system containing Fe(0) and Fe(3)O(4), while the 6 month aged samples contained additional mineral phases such as vivianite (Fe(3)(PO(4))(2).8H(2)O) and iron sulfate species, possibly schwertmannite (Fe(3+)(16)O(16)(OH,SO(4))(12-13).10-12H(2)O). The presence of these additional mineral species was confirmed using synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD). NZVI exposed to water saturated with dissolved oxygen showed a rapid (<24 h) loss of Fe(0) and evolved both magnetite and maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)) within the oxide layer. These findings have implications toward the eventual fate, transport

  11. Dynamics of dissolved organic matter in fjord ecosystems: Contributions of terrestrial dissolved organic matter in the deep layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Youhei; McCallister, S. Leigh; Koch, Boris P.; Gonsior, Michael; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2015-06-01

    Annually, rivers and inland water systems deliver a significant amount of terrestrial organic matter (OM) to the adjacent coastal ocean in both particulate and dissolved forms; however, the metabolic and biogeochemical transformations of OM during its seaward transport remains one of the least understood components of the global carbon cycle. This transfer of terrestrial carbon to marine ecosystems is crucial in maintaining trophic dynamics in coastal areas and critical in global carbon cycling. Although coastal regions have been proposed as important sinks for exported terrestrial materials, most of the global carbon cycling data, have not included fjords in their budgets. Here we present distributional patterns on the quantity and quality of dissolved OM in Fiordland National Park, New Zealand. Specifically, we describe carbon dynamics under diverse environmental settings based on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) depth profiles, oxygen concentrations, optical properties (fluorescence) and stable carbon isotopes. We illustrate a distinct change in the character of DOC in deep waters compared to surface and mid-depth waters. Our results suggest that, both, microbial reworking of terrestrially derived plant detritus and subsequent desorption of DOC from its particulate counterpart (as verified in a desorption experiment) are the main sources of the humic-like enriched DOC in the deep basins of the studied fjords. While it has been suggested that short transit times and protection of OM by mineral sorption may ultimately result in significant terrestrial carbon burial and preservation in fjords, our data suggests the existence of an additional source of terrestrial OM in the form of DOC generated in deep, fjord water.

  12. Modeling the simultaneous transport of silver nanoparticles and dissolved silver ions in water-saturated sand columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavy, A.; Wang, Y.; Mittelman, A.; Becker, M. D.; Pennell, K. D.; Abriola, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    Concerns over the potential adverse impacts of nanosilver particles (nAg) on human health and the environment have arisen based upon their widespread use in various commercial and biomedical products. In addition, in situ dissolution of deposited nAg could enhance its environmental impact through the formation of dissolved silver ion (Ag+) plumes. A hybrid mathematical model is presented that simulates the simultaneous reactive transport of nAg/Ag+ in porous media. The simulator couples a Lagrangian Random Walk-based Particle Tracking (RWPT) method for nAg transport with a conventional Eulerian Finite Differencing (FD) scheme for the reactive transport of dissolved solutes. In the absence of oxidants other than dissolved oxygen (DO), nAg is assumed to dissolve via a cooperative oxidation reaction with DO and proton ions (H+), and dissolution is modeled by a first-order kinetic expression. An existing empirical correlation is implemented for evaluation of the dissolution rate constant from physiochemical characteristics of the system and nanoparticles, including solution pH, particle specific surface area (SSA), and temperature. The hybrid modeling approach enables the consideration of different particle size classes and the associated particle-specific dissolution rates. The utility of simulator is demonstrated by modeling results obtained from nAg/ Ag+ transport studies performed in ca. 10.8-cm long borosilicate glass columns with an inside diameter of 2.5 cm. Three column experiments were performed at a constant flow rate, yielding a particle approach velocity of 7.68±0.04 m/day, at dissolved oxygen concentrations ranging from 1.65 mg/L to 8.99 mg/L. A 3 pore volume pulse of nAg suspension, containing 3.17±0.07 mg/L total Ag and 10mM NaNO3 at pH 7.07, was injected into water-saturated columns packed with washed 40-50 mesh Ottawa sand. Following nAg injection, the columns were flushed with nAg-free background solution for an additional 3 pore volumes, which

  13. Terrestrial C sequestration at elevated CO2 and temperature: the role of dissolved organic N loss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rastetter, Edward B.; Perakis, Steven S.; Shaver, Gaius R.; Agren, Goran I.

    2005-01-01

    We used a simple model of carbona??nitrogen (Ca??N) interactions in terrestrial ecosystems to examine the responses to elevated CO2 and to elevated CO2 plus warming in ecosystems that had the same total nitrogen loss but that differed in the ratio of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) to dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) loss. We postulate that DIN losses can be curtailed by higher N demand in response to elevated CO2, but that DON losses cannot. We also examined simulations in which DON losses were held constant, were proportional to the amount of soil organic matter, were proportional to the soil C:N ratio, or were proportional to the rate of decomposition. We found that the mode of N loss made little difference to the short-term (<60 years) rate of carbon sequestration by the ecosystem, but high DON losses resulted in much lower carbon sequestration in the long term than did low DON losses. In the short term, C sequestration was fueled by an internal redistribution of N from soils to vegetation and by increases in the C:N ratio of soils and vegetation. This sequestration was about three times larger with elevated CO2 and warming than with elevated CO2 alone. After year 60, C sequestration was fueled by a net accumulation of N in the ecosystem, and the rate of sequestration was about the same with elevated CO2 and warming as with elevated CO2 alone. With high DON losses, the ecosystem either sequestered C slowly after year 60 (when DON losses were constant or proportional to soil organic matter) or lost C (when DON losses were proportional to the soil C:N ratio or to decomposition). We conclude that changes in long-term C sequestration depend not only on the magnitude of N losses, but also on the form of those losses.

  14. Sources, bioavailability, and photoreactivity of dissolved organic carbon in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stepanauskas, R.; Moran, M.A.; Bergamaschi, B.A.; Hollibaugh, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed bioavailability, photoreactivity, fluorescence, and isotopic composition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) collected at 13 stations in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta during various seasons to estimate the persistence of DOC from diverse shallow water habitat sources. Prospective large-scale wetland restorations in the Delta may change the amount of DOC available to the food web as well as change the quality of Delta water exported for municipal use. Our study indicates that DOC contributed by Delta sources is relatively refractory and likely mostly the dissolved remnants of vascular plant material from degrading soils and tidal marshes rather than phytoplankton production. Therefore, the prospective conversion of agricultural land into submerged, phytoplankton-dominated habitats may reduce the undesired export of DOC from the Delta to municipal users. A median of 10% of Delta DOC was rapidly utilizable by bacterioplankton. A moderate dose of simulated solar radiation (286 W m-2 for 4 h) decreased the DOC bioavailability by an average of 40%, with a larger relative decrease in samples with higher initial DOC bioavailability. Potentially, a DOC-based microbial food web could support ???0.6 ?? 109 g C of protist production in the Delta annually, compared to ???17 ?? 109 g C phytoplankton primary production. Thus, DOC utilization via the microbial food web is unlikely to play an important role in the nutrition of Delta zooplankton and fish, and the possible decrease in DOC concentration due to wetland restoration is unlikely to have a direct effect on Delta fish productivity. ?? Springer 2005.

  15. Identification of key parameters controlling dissolved oxygen migration and attenuation in fractured crystalline rocks.

    PubMed

    Spiessl, S M; MacQuarrie, K T B; Mayer, K U

    2008-01-28

    In the crystalline rocks of the Canadian Shield, geochemical conditions are currently reducing at depths of 500-1000 m. However, during future glacial periods, altered hydrologic conditions could potentially result in enhanced recharge of glacial melt water containing a relatively high concentration of dissolved oxygen (O2). It is therefore of interest to investigate the physical and geochemical processes, including naturally-occurring redox reactions, that may control O2 ingress. In this study, the reactive transport code MIN3P is used in combination with 2k factorial analyses to identify the most important parameters controlling oxygen migration and attenuation in fractured crystalline rocks. Scenarios considered are based on simplified conceptual models that include a single vertical fracture, or a fracture zone, contained within a rock matrix that extends from the ground surface to a depth of 500 m. Consistent with field observations, Fe(II)-bearing minerals are present in the fractures (i.e. chlorite) and the rock matrix (biotite and small quantities of pyrite). For the parameter ranges investigated, results indicate that for the single fracture case, the most influential factors controlling dissolved O2 ingress are flow velocity in the fracture, fracture aperture, and the biotite reaction rate in the rock matrix. The most important parameters for the fracture zone simulations are flow velocity in the individual fractures, pO2 in the recharge water, biotite reaction rate, and to a lesser degree the abundance and reactivity of chlorite in the fracture zone, and the fracture zone width. These parameters should therefore receive increased consideration during site characterization, and in the formulation of site-specific models intended to predict O2 behavior in crystalline rocks. PMID:17935829

  16. Dissolved organic nitrogen: an overlooked pathway of nitrogen loss from agricultural systems?

    PubMed

    van Kessel, Chris; Clough, Tim; van Groenigen, Jan Willem

    2009-01-01

    Conventional wisdom postulates that leaching losses of N from agriculture systems are dominated by NO(3)(-). Although the export of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) into the groundwater has been recognized for more than 100 yr, it is often ignored when total N budgets are constructed. Leaching of DON into stream and drinking water reservoirs leads to eutrophication and acidification, and can pose a potential risk to human health. The main objective of this review was to determine whether DON losses from agricultural systems are significant, and to what extent they pose a risk to human health and the environment. Dissolved organic N losses across agricultural systems varied widely with minimum losses of 0.3 kg DON ha(-1)yr(-1) in a pasture to a maximum loss of 127 kg DON ha(-1)yr(-1) in a grassland following the application of urine. The mean and median values for DON leaching losses were found to be 12.7 and 4.0 kg N ha(-1)yr(-1), respectively. On average, DON losses accounted for 26% of the total soluble N (NO(3)(-) plus DON) losses, with a median value of 19%. With a few exceptions, DON concentrations exceeded the criteria recommendations for drinking water quality. The extent of DON losses increased with increasing precipitation/irrigation, higher total inputs of N, and increasing sand content. It is concluded that DON leaching can be an important N loss pathway from agricultural systems. Models used to simulate and predict N losses from agricultural systems should include DON losses.

  17. Photochemical Oxidation of Dissolved Elemental Mercury by Carbonate Radicals in Water

    SciTech Connect

    He, Feng; Zhao, Weirong; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2014-11-11

    Photochemical oxidation of dissolved elemental mercury [Hg(0)] affects mercury chemical speciation and its transfer at the water-air interface in the aquatic environment. The mechanisms and factors that control Hg(0) photooxidation, however, are not completely understood, especially in natural freshwaters containing dissolved organic matter (DOM) and carbonate. Here, we evaluate Hg(0) photooxidation rates affected by various reactive ionic species [e.g., DOM, CO32-, NO3-] and free radicals in a creek water and a phosphate buffer solution (pH=8) under simulated solar irradiation. We report a high Hg(0) photooxidation rate (k = 1.44 h-1) in the presence of both HCO32- and NO3-, whereas HCO32-, NO3-, or DOM alone increased the oxidation rate slightly (k = 0.1 0.17 h-1). Using scavengers and enhancers for singlet oxygen (1O2) and hydroxyl (HO ) radicals, as well as electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identify that carbonate radicals (CO3 ∙-) primarily drive the Hg(0) photooxidation, whereas addition of DOM resulted in a 2-fold decrease in Hg(0) oxidation. This study identifies an unrecognized pathway of Hg(0) photooxidation by CO3 ∙- radicals and the inhibitory effect of DOM, which could be important in assessing Hg transformation and fate in water containing carbonate such as hard water and seawater.

  18. Identification of key parameters controlling dissolved oxygen migration and attenuation in fractured crystalline rocks.

    PubMed

    Spiessl, S M; MacQuarrie, K T B; Mayer, K U

    2008-01-28

    In the crystalline rocks of the Canadian Shield, geochemical conditions are currently reducing at depths of 500-1000 m. However, during future glacial periods, altered hydrologic conditions could potentially result in enhanced recharge of glacial melt water containing a relatively high concentration of dissolved oxygen (O2). It is therefore of interest to investigate the physical and geochemical processes, including naturally-occurring redox reactions, that may control O2 ingress. In this study, the reactive transport code MIN3P is used in combination with 2k factorial analyses to identify the most important parameters controlling oxygen migration and attenuation in fractured crystalline rocks. Scenarios considered are based on simplified conceptual models that include a single vertical fracture, or a fracture zone, contained within a rock matrix that extends from the ground surface to a depth of 500 m. Consistent with field observations, Fe(II)-bearing minerals are present in the fractures (i.e. chlorite) and the rock matrix (biotite and small quantities of pyrite). For the parameter ranges investigated, results indicate that for the single fracture case, the most influential factors controlling dissolved O2 ingress are flow velocity in the fracture, fracture aperture, and the biotite reaction rate in the rock matrix. The most important parameters for the fracture zone simulations are flow velocity in the individual fractures, pO2 in the recharge water, biotite reaction rate, and to a lesser degree the abundance and reactivity of chlorite in the fracture zone, and the fracture zone width. These parameters should therefore receive increased consideration during site characterization, and in the formulation of site-specific models intended to predict O2 behavior in crystalline rocks.

  19. Continuous Dissolved Oxygen Measurements and Modelling Metabolism in Peatland Streams.

    PubMed

    Dick, Jonathan J; Soulsby, Chris; Birkel, Christian; Malcolm, Iain; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2016-01-01

    Stream water dissolved oxygen was monitored in a 3.2km2 moorland headwater catchment in the Scottish Highlands. The stream consists of three 1st order headwaters and a 2nd order main stem. The stream network is fringed by peat soils with no riparian trees, though dwarf shrubs provide shading in the lower catchment. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is regulated by the balance between atmospheric re-aeration and the metabolic processes of photosynthesis and respiration. DO was continuously measured for >1 year and the data used to calibrate a mass balance model, to estimate primary production, respiration and re-aeration for a 1st order site and in the 2nd order main stem. Results showed that the stream was always heterotrophic at both sites. Sites were most heterotrophic in the summer reflecting higher levels of stream metabolism. The 1st order stream appeared more heterotrophic which was consistent with the evident greater biomass of macrophytes in the 2nd order stream, with resulting higher primary productivity. Comparison between respiration, primary production, re-aeration and potential physical controls revealed only weak relationships. However, the most basic model parameters (e.g. the parameter linking light and photosynthesis) controlling ecosystem processes resulted in significant differences between the sites which seem related to the stream channel geometry. PMID:27556278

  20. A simple headspace equilibration method for measuring dissolved methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magen, C; Lapham, L.L.; Pohlman, John W.; Marshall, Kristin N.; Bosman, S.; Casso, Michael; Chanton, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved methane concentrations in the ocean are close to equilibrium with the atmosphere. Because methane is only sparingly soluble in seawater, measuring it without contamination is challenging for samples collected and processed in the presence of air. Several methods for analyzing dissolved methane are described in the literature, yet none has conducted a thorough assessment of the method yield, contamination issues during collection, transport and storage, and the effect of temperature changes and preservative. Previous extraction methods transfer methane from water to gas by either a "sparge and trap" or a "headspace equilibration" technique. The gas is then analyzed for methane by gas chromatography. Here, we revisit the headspace equilibration technique and describe a simple, inexpensive, and reliable method to measure methane in fresh and seawater, regardless of concentration. Within the range of concentrations typically found in surface seawaters (2-1000 nmol L-1), the yield of the method nears 100% of what is expected from solubility calculation following the addition of known amount of methane. In addition to being sensitive (detection limit of 0.1 ppmv, or 0.74 nmol L-1), this method requires less than 10 min per sample, and does not use highly toxic chemicals. It can be conducted with minimum materials and does not require the use of a gas chromatograph at the collection site. It can therefore be used in various remote working environments and conditions.

  1. Highly sensitive Raman system for dissolved gas analysis in water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dewang; Guo, Jinjia; Liu, Qingsheng; Luo, Zhao; Yan, Jingwen; Zheng, Ronger

    2016-09-20

    The detection of dissolved gases in seawater plays an important role in ocean observation and exploration. As a potential technique for oceanic applications, Raman spectroscopy has already proved its advantages in the simultaneous detection of multiple species during previous deep-sea explorations. Due to the low sensitivity of conventional Raman measurements, there have been many reports of Raman applications on direct seawater detection in high-concentration areas, but few on undersea dissolved gas detection. In this work, we have presented a highly sensitive Raman spectroscopy (HSRS) system with a special designed gas chamber for small amounts of underwater gas extraction. Systematic experiments have been carried out for system evaluation, and the results have shown that the Raman signals obtained by the innovation of a near-concentric cavity was about 21 times stronger than those of conventional side-scattering Raman measurements. Based on this system, we have achieved a low limit of detection of 2.32 and 0.44  μmol/L for CO2 and CH4, respectively, in the lab. A test-out experiment has also been accomplished with a gas-liquid separator coupled to the Raman system, and signals of O2 and CO2 were detected after 1 h of degasification. This system may show potential for gas detection in water, and further work would be done for the improvement of in situ detection.

  2. Molecular-level dynamics of refractory dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggemann, J.; Gerdts, G.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-04-01

    Refractory dissolved organic matter (DOM) accounts for most of the global oceanic organic carbon inventory. Processes leading to its formation and factors determining its stability are still largely unknown. We hypothesize that refractory DOM carries a universal molecular signature. Characterizing spatial and temporal variability in this universal signature is a key to understanding dynamics of refractory DOM. We present results from a long-term study of the DOM geo-metabolome in the open North Sea. Geo-metabolomics considers the entity of DOM as a population of compounds, each characterized by a specific function and reactivity in the cycling of energy and elements. Ten-thousands of molecular formulae were identified in DOM by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry analysis (FT-ICR-MS, Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry). The DOM pool in the North Sea was influenced by a complex interplay of processes that produced, transformed and degraded dissolved molecules. We identified a stable fraction in North Sea DOM with a molecular composition similar to deep ocean DOM. Molecular-level changes in this stable fraction provide novel information on dynamics and interactions of refractory DOM.

  3. Precipitates in landfill leachate mediated by dissolved organic matters.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenze; Xue, Qiang; Liu, Lei; Li, Jiangshan

    2015-04-28

    Clogging of landfill leachate collection system is so ubiquitous that it causes problems to landfills. Although precipitations of calcite and other minerals have been widely observed, the mechanism of precipitation remains obscure. We examined the clog composition, dissolved organic matters, leachate chemical compositions and the correlation of these variables in view of the precipitation process. It is shown that Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) inhibits precipitation of landfill leachate. Using the advanced NICA-Donnan model, the analysis of aqueous chemical reactions between Mg-Ca-DOC-CO2 suggests a good agreement with experimental observations. Calcite and dolomite are both found to be oversaturated in most of the landfill leachate samples. DOC is found to preferentially bind with Mg than Ca, leading to more likely precipitation of Calcite than dolomite from landfill leachate. The NICA-Donnan model gives a reasonable estimation of dolomite saturation index in a wide range of DOC. Modeling confirms the major precipitation mechanism in terms of alkaline earth metal carbonate. Uncertainties in model parameters are discussed with particular focus on DOC composition, functional group types and density concentration and the influential factors. PMID:25661175

  4. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify. PMID:27172378

  5. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter export from U.S. rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Aiken, George R.; Dornblaser, Mark M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Holmes, R. Max; Fiske, Greg; Mann, Paul J.; Stubbins, Aron

    2013-04-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluxes and yields from 15 major U.S. rivers draining an assortment of terrestrial biomes are presented. A robust relationship between CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads is established (e.g., a350 versus DOC; r2 = 0.96, p < 0.001). Calculated CDOM yields are also correlated to watershed percent wetland (e.g. a350; r2 = 0.81, p < 0.001) providing a method for the estimation of CDOM export from ungauged watersheds. A large variation in CDOM yields was found across the rivers. The two rivers in the north-eastern U.S. (Androscoggin and Penobscot), the Edisto draining into the South Atlantic Bight, and some rivers draining into the Gulf of Mexico (Atchafalaya and Mobile) exhibit the highest CDOM yields, linked to extensive wetlands in these watersheds. If the Edisto CDOM yield is representative of other rivers draining into the South Atlantic Bight, this would result in a CDOM load equivalent to that of the Mississippi from a region of approximately 10% of the Mississippi watershed, indicating the importance of certain regions with respect to the role of terrigenous CDOM in ocean color budgets.

  6. Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Export from U.S. Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, R. G.; Aiken, G.; Dornblaser, M.; Butler, K. D.; Holmes, R. M.; Fiske, G.; Mann, P. J.; Stubbins, A.

    2012-12-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluxes and yields from 15 major U.S. rivers draining an assortment of terrestrial biomes are presented. Utilizing CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) flux data we establish a robust universal relationship between CDOM and DOC loads. The application of this relationship allows future studies to derive DOC loads from CDOM utilizing emerging in-situ or remote sensing technologies and thus refine river-to-ocean DOC fluxes, as well as exploit historic imagery to examine how fluxes may have changed. Calculated CDOM yields from the 15 U.S. rivers highlight the importance of certain regions with respect to CDOM flux to the coastal ocean. This approach indicates that future studies might predict CDOM and DOC yields for different watershed types that could then be readily converted to loads providing for the estimation of CDOM and DOC export from ungauged watersheds. Examination of CDOM yields also highlights important geographical regions for future study with respect to the role of terrigenous CDOM in ocean color budgets and CDOM's role in biogeochemical processes.

  7. Precipitates in landfill leachate mediated by dissolved organic matters.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenze; Xue, Qiang; Liu, Lei; Li, Jiangshan

    2015-04-28

    Clogging of landfill leachate collection system is so ubiquitous that it causes problems to landfills. Although precipitations of calcite and other minerals have been widely observed, the mechanism of precipitation remains obscure. We examined the clog composition, dissolved organic matters, leachate chemical compositions and the correlation of these variables in view of the precipitation process. It is shown that Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) inhibits precipitation of landfill leachate. Using the advanced NICA-Donnan model, the analysis of aqueous chemical reactions between Mg-Ca-DOC-CO2 suggests a good agreement with experimental observations. Calcite and dolomite are both found to be oversaturated in most of the landfill leachate samples. DOC is found to preferentially bind with Mg than Ca, leading to more likely precipitation of Calcite than dolomite from landfill leachate. The NICA-Donnan model gives a reasonable estimation of dolomite saturation index in a wide range of DOC. Modeling confirms the major precipitation mechanism in terms of alkaline earth metal carbonate. Uncertainties in model parameters are discussed with particular focus on DOC composition, functional group types and density concentration and the influential factors.

  8. Rapid implantation of dissolving microneedles on an electrospun pillar array.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huisuk; Kim, Soyoung; Huh, Inyoung; Kim, Suyong; Lahiji, Shayan F; Kim, Miroo; Jung, Hyungil

    2015-09-01

    Dissolving microneedles (DMNs), designed to release drugs and dissolve after skin insertion, have been spotlighted as a novel transdermal delivery system due to their advantages such as minimal pain and tissue damage, ability to self-administer, and no associated hazardous residues. The drug delivery efficacy of DMNs, however, is limited by incomplete insertion and the extended period required for DMN dissolution. Here, we introduce a novel DMN delivery system, DMN on an electrospun pillar array (DEPA), which can rapidly implant DMNs into skin. DMNs were fabricated on a pillar array covered by a fibrous sheet produced by electrospinning PLGA solution (14%, w/v). DMNs were implanted into the skin by manual application (press and vibration for 10 s) by tearing of the fibers hung on the 300-μm pillars. Separation of DMNs from the fibrous sheet was dependent on both pillar height and the properties of the fibrous sheet. After evaluation of the implantation and dissolution of DMNs with diffusion of red dye by taking cross-sectional images of porcine skin, the hypoglycemic effect of insulin loaded DEPA was examined using a healthy mouse model. This DMN array overcomes critical issues associated with the low penetration efficiency of flat patch-based DMNs, and will allow realization of patient convenience with the desired drug efficacy. PMID:26117659

  9. Groundwater-transported dissolved organic nitrogen exports from coastal watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kroeger, K.D.; Cole, Marci L.; Valiela, I.

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed groundwater-transported nitrogen (N) exports from 41 watershed segments that comprised 10 Cape Cod, Massachusetts watersheds to test the hypotheses that chemical form of N exports is related to land use and to length of flow paths through watersheds. In the absence of human habitation, these glacial outwash-plain watersheds exported largely dissolved organic N (DON) but at relatively low annual rate. Addition of people to watersheds increased rates of both total dissolved N (TDN) and DON export through groundwater. Percent of TDN as DON in groundwater was negatively related to path length of groundwater through aquifers, but %DON was not significantly related to population density on the watersheds. DON was often the dominant form of N exported from the watersheds, even at high population densities. Our results suggest that natural sources are not entirely responsible for organic N exports from watersheds, but, instead, a substantial portion of anthropogenic N introduced to watersheds is exported as DON. This finding is in disagreement with previous results, which suggest that anthropogenic N is exported from watersheds largely as NO 3- and that DON exported from watersheds is from natural sources. ?? 2006, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  10. Mathematical modeling of wastewater-derived biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Halis

    2016-11-01

    Wastewater-derived dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) typically constitutes the majority of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) discharged to surface waters from advanced wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). When considering the stringent regulations on nitrogen discharge limits in sensitive receiving waters, DON becomes problematic and needs to be reduced. Biodegradable DON (BDON) is a portion of DON that is biologically degradable by bacteria when the optimum environmental conditions are met. BDON in a two-stage trickling filter WWTP was estimated using artificial intelligence techniques, such as adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems, multilayer perceptron, radial basis neural networks (RBNN), and generalized regression neural networks. Nitrite, nitrate, ammonium, TDN, and DON data were used as input neurons. Wastewater samples were collected from four different locations in the plant. Model performances were evaluated using root mean square error, mean absolute error, mean bias error, and coefficient of determination statistics. Modeling results showed that the R(2) values were higher than 0.85 in all four models for all wastewater samples, except only R(2) in the final effluent sample for RBNN modeling was low (0.52). Overall, it was found that all four computing techniques could be employed successfully to predict BDON. PMID:27019968

  11. Continuous Dissolved Oxygen Measurements and Modelling Metabolism in Peatland Streams

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Jonathan J.; Soulsby, Chris; Birkel, Christian; Malcolm, Iain; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2016-01-01

    Stream water dissolved oxygen was monitored in a 3.2km2 moorland headwater catchment in the Scottish Highlands. The stream consists of three 1st order headwaters and a 2nd order main stem. The stream network is fringed by peat soils with no riparian trees, though dwarf shrubs provide shading in the lower catchment. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is regulated by the balance between atmospheric re-aeration and the metabolic processes of photosynthesis and respiration. DO was continuously measured for >1 year and the data used to calibrate a mass balance model, to estimate primary production, respiration and re-aeration for a 1st order site and in the 2nd order main stem. Results showed that the stream was always heterotrophic at both sites. Sites were most heterotrophic in the summer reflecting higher levels of stream metabolism. The 1st order stream appeared more heterotrophic which was consistent with the evident greater biomass of macrophytes in the 2nd order stream, with resulting higher primary productivity. Comparison between respiration, primary production, re-aeration and potential physical controls revealed only weak relationships. However, the most basic model parameters (e.g. the parameter linking light and photosynthesis) controlling ecosystem processes resulted in significant differences between the sites which seem related to the stream channel geometry. PMID:27556278

  12. Dissolved Black Carbon in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Yang, W.; Chen, M.; Ma, H.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC) has been ubiquitously reported in dissolved organic matter (DOM). However, the abundance and provenance of DBC in the ocean are not well understood. Here, DBC in the South China Sea (SCS) was determined at molecular level using the benzenepolycarboxylic acids (BPCAs) method. DBC showed high concentrations in the upper 100 m seawater with the average of 1.13 μmol l-1 (n=55). In the intermediate seawater (200-1500 m), DBC ranged from 0.67 to 0.89 μmol l-1 with the average of 0.78 μmol l-1 (n=9), exhibiting nearly homogeneous distributions. The vertical distribution pattern indicated that DBC significantly degraded in the photic zone, corresponding to an attenuate constant of 12.5±4.9 km-1. The ratios of B6CA/B3CAs increased downward, implying that aromatic condensation degree of DBC increase during transport from surface to deep water. Using the standing crops of DBC in the upper 200 m and the residence time of seawater, atmospheric deposition of DBC was estimated to be 1.94 TgC yr-1, accounting for around 16% of the global BC deposition. Our study highlights that DBC could be an important component of ocean carbon cycling in Pacific Asia Marginal Seas.

  13. Global effects of agriculture on fluvial dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Graeber, Daniel; Boëchat, Iola G; Encina-Montoya, Francisco; Esse, Carlos; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Goyenola, Guillermo; Gücker, Björn; Heinz, Marlen; Kronvang, Brian; Meerhoff, Mariana; Nimptsch, Jorge; Pusch, Martin T; Silva, Ricky C S; von Schiller, Daniel; Zwirnmann, Elke

    2015-11-06

    Agricultural land covers approximately 40% of Earth's land surface and affects hydromorphological, biogeochemical and ecological characteristics of fluvial networks. In the northern temperate region, agriculture also strongly affects the amount and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which constitutes the main vector of carbon transport from soils to fluvial networks and to the sea, and is involved in a large variety of biogeochemical processes. Here, we provide first evidence about the wider occurrence of agricultural impacts on the concentration and composition of fluvial DOM across climate zones of the northern and southern hemispheres. Both extensive and intensive farming altered fluvial DOM towards a more microbial and less plant-derived composition. Moreover, intensive farming significantly increased dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations. The DOM composition change and DON concentration increase differed among climate zones and could be related to the intensity of current and historical nitrogen fertilizer use. As a result of agriculture intensification, increased DON concentrations and a more microbial-like DOM composition likely will enhance the reactivity of catchment DOM emissions, thereby fuelling the biogeochemical processing in fluvial networks, and resulting in higher ecosystem productivity and CO2 outgassing.

  14. Dissolved oxygen imaging to investigate biodegradation at lab scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, D. N.; Rees, H.; Huang, W. E.; Smith, C. C.; Oswald, S. E.

    2003-04-01

    A novel combination of a non-invasive imaging method with an oxygen sensitive fluorescent indicator was developed to investigate the biodegradation processes occurring at the fringe of a solute plume. A thin transparent porous matrix was made from quartz plates and quartz sand and acetate was continuously injected in the uniform flow field containing dissolved oxygen. Ruthenium (II)-dichlorotris(1,10-phenanthroline) (Ru(phen)3Cl2), a water soluble fluorescent dye, was used as an indicator of dissolved oxygen concentration as its fluorescence intensity is dependent on the concentration of oxygen. The oxygen distribution within the matrix was interpreted from images recorded by a CCD camera. These two-dimensional experimental results show quantitatively how the oxygen concentrations decrease strongly at the narrow plume fringe and that oxygen was exhausted at the core of the plume. Separately, dispersivity was measured in a series of non-reactive transport experiments, and biodegradation parameters were evaluated by batch experiments. This measurement method provides a novel approach to investigate details of behavior of solute transport and biodegradation in porous media.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of dissolved organic matter isolated from rainwater.

    PubMed

    Santos, Patrícia S M; Otero, Marta; Duarte, Regina M B O; Duarte, Armando C

    2009-02-01

    Rainwater is a matrix containing extremely low concentrations (in the range of muM C) of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and for its characterization, an efficient extraction procedure is essential. A recently developed procedure based on adsorption onto XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins in series was used in this work for the extraction and isolation of rainwater dissolved organic matter (DOM). Prior to the isolation and fractionation of DOM, and to obtain sufficient mass for the spectroscopic analyses, individual rainwater samples were batched together according to similar meteorological conditions on a total of three composed samples. The results of the isolation procedure indicated that the resin tandem procedure is not applicable for rainwater DOM since the XAD-4 resin caused samples contamination. On the other hand, the XAD-8 resin allowed DOM recoveries of 39.9-50.5% of the DOC of the original combined samples. This recovered organic fraction was characterized by UV-visible, molecular fluorescence, FTIR-ATR and 1H NMR spectroscopies. The chemical characterization of the rainwater DOM showed that the three samples consist mostly of hydroxylated and carboxylic acids with a predominantly aliphatic character, containing a minor component of aromatic structures. The obtained results suggest that the DOM in rainwater, and consequently in the precursor atmospheric particles, may have a secondary origin via the oxidation of volatile organic compounds from different origins.

  16. The effects of dissolved gas supersaturation on white sturgeon larvae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Counihan, T.D.; Miller, A.I.; Mesa, M.G.; Parsley, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Spill at dams has caused supersaturation of atmospheric gas in waters of the Columbia and Snake rivers and raised concerns about the effects of dissolved gas supersaturation (DGS) on white sturgeons Acipenser transmontanus. The timing and location of white sturgeon spawning and the dispersal of white sturgeon larvae from incubation areas makes the larval stage potentially vulnerable to the effects of DGS. To assess the effects of DGS on white sturgeon larvae, we exposed larvae to mean total dissolved gas (TDG) levels of 118% and 131% saturation in laboratory bioassay tests. Gas bubble trauma (GBT) was manifested as a gas bubble in the buccal cavity, nares, or both and it first occurred at developmental stages characterized by the formation of the mouth and gills. Exposure times of 15 min were sufficient to elicit these signs in larvae in various stages of development. No mortality was observed in larvae exposed to 118% TDG for 10 d, but 50% mortality occurred after a 13-d exposure to 131% TDG. The signs of GBT we observed resulted in positive buoyancy and alterations in behavior that may affect the dispersal and predation vulnerability of white sturgeon larvae. The exact depth distribution of dispersing white sturgeon larvae in the Columbia River currently is unknown. Thus, our results may represent a worst-case scenario if white sturgeon larvae are dispersed at depths with insufficient hydrostatic pressure to compensate for high TDG levels.

  17. Measuring and understanding total dissolved gas pressure in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, C.; Roy, J. W.; Randell, J.; Castellon, L.

    2009-05-01

    Since dissolved gases are important to a number of aspects of groundwater (e.g. age dating, active or passive bioremediation, greenhouse gas fluxes, understanding biogeochemical processes involving gases, assessing potential impacts of coal bed methane activities), accurate concentration measurements, and understanding of their subsurface behaviour are important. Researchers have recently begun using total dissolved gas pressure (TGP) sensor measurements, more commonly applied for surface water monitoring, in concert with gas composition analyses to estimate more accurate groundwater gas concentrations in wells. We have used hydraulic packers to isolate the well screens where TDP is being measured, and pump tests to indicate that in-well degassing may reduce TDG below background groundwater levels. Thus, in gas-charged groundwater zones, TGPs can be considerably underestimated in the absence of pumping or screen isolation. We have also observed transient decreased TGPs during pumping that are thought to result from ebullition induced when the water table or water level in the well is lowered below a critical hydrostatic pressure.

  18. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify.

  19. Rabies vaccination in dogs using a dissolving microneedle patch.

    PubMed

    Arya, Jaya M; Dewitt, Kristopher; Scott-Garrard, Maya; Chiang, Yu-Wei; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2016-10-10

    Because humans get rabies primarily through dog bites, stray dog population control and mass or mandatory vaccination of domestic dogs and other animals has virtually eliminated human rabies in industrialized countries. However, thousands of people in developing countries die of rabies each year due to the inability to control dog populations and implement mass vaccination because of financial, logistical and other challenges. The availability of an easier-to-administer and more cost-effective vaccine may help to address some of these issues. Here, we propose the use of dissolving microneedle patches for simple and potentially cost-effective rabies vaccination, and assess the safety and immunogenicity of microneedle patch vaccination using a rabies DNA vaccine in dogs. The vaccine was stable upon formulation and storage for at least 3weeks at 4°C in a microneedle patch. For vaccination, the patches were applied to the inner ear by hand without an applicator. Microneedle patches were well tolerated in the skin, with mild erythema, minimal wheal formation and complete resolution of skin reactions within 7days, and generated no systemic adverse events. Microneedle patches were at least as immunogenic as intramuscular injection at the same dose, as demonstrated by similar serum neutralizing antibody titers. A ten-fold lower vaccine dose administered by microneedle patch generated a weaker immune response compared to full-dose intramuscular vaccination. We conclude that dissolving microneedle patches may provide an innovative approach to mass vaccination of dogs. PMID:27524283

  20. Screening for Dissolved Methane in Groundwater Across Texas Shale Plays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicot, J. P.; Mickler, P. J.; Hildenbrand, Z.; Larson, T.; Darvari, R.; Uhlman, K.; Smyth, R. C.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2014-12-01

    There is considerable interest in methane concentrations in groundwater, particularly as they relate to hydraulic fracturing in shale plays. Recent studies of aquifers in the footprint of several gas plays across the US have shown that (1) dissolved thermogenic methane may or may not be present in the shallow groundwater and (2) shallow thermogenic methane may be naturally occurring and emplaced through mostly vertical migration over geologic time and not necessarily a consequence of recent unconventional gas production. We are currently conducting a large sampling campaign across the state of Texas to characterize shallow methane in fresh-water aquifers overlying shale plays and other tight formations. We collected a total of ~800 water samples, ~500 in the Barnett, ~150 in the Eagle Ford, ~80 in the Haynesville shale plays as well as ~50 in the Delaware Basin of West Texas. Preliminary analytical results suggest that dissolved methane is not widespread in shallow groundwater and that, when present at concentrations exceeding 10 mg/L, it is often of thermogenic origin according to the isotopic signature and to the presence of other light hydrocarbons. The Barnett Shale contains a large methane hotspot (~ 2 miles wide) along the Hood-Parker county line which is likely of natural origin whereas the Eagle Ford and Haynesville shales, neglecting microbial methane, show more distributed methane occurrences. Samples from the Delaware Basin show no methane except close to blowouts.

  1. Highly sensitive Raman system for dissolved gas analysis in water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dewang; Guo, Jinjia; Liu, Qingsheng; Luo, Zhao; Yan, Jingwen; Zheng, Ronger

    2016-09-20

    The detection of dissolved gases in seawater plays an important role in ocean observation and exploration. As a potential technique for oceanic applications, Raman spectroscopy has already proved its advantages in the simultaneous detection of multiple species during previous deep-sea explorations. Due to the low sensitivity of conventional Raman measurements, there have been many reports of Raman applications on direct seawater detection in high-concentration areas, but few on undersea dissolved gas detection. In this work, we have presented a highly sensitive Raman spectroscopy (HSRS) system with a special designed gas chamber for small amounts of underwater gas extraction. Systematic experiments have been carried out for system evaluation, and the results have shown that the Raman signals obtained by the innovation of a near-concentric cavity was about 21 times stronger than those of conventional side-scattering Raman measurements. Based on this system, we have achieved a low limit of detection of 2.32 and 0.44  μmol/L for CO2 and CH4, respectively, in the lab. A test-out experiment has also been accomplished with a gas-liquid separator coupled to the Raman system, and signals of O2 and CO2 were detected after 1 h of degasification. This system may show potential for gas detection in water, and further work would be done for the improvement of in situ detection. PMID:27661606

  2. Dissolved trace element biogeochemistry of a tropical river, Southwestern India.

    PubMed

    Tripti, M; Gurumurthy, G P; Balakrishna, K; Chadaga, M D

    2013-06-01

    River Swarna, a small tropical river originating in Western Ghats (at an altitude of 1,160 m above mean sea level) and flowing in the southwest coast of India discharges an average of 54 m(3)s(-1) of water into the Arabian Sea, of which significant part is being discharged during the monsoon. No studies have been made yet on the water chemistry of the Swarna River basin, even as half a million people of Udupi district use it for domestic and irrigational purposes. As large community in this region depends on the freshwater of Swarna River, there is an urgent need to study the trace element geochemistry of this west flowing river for better water management and sustainable development. The paper presents the results on the biogeochemistry of dissolved trace elements in the Swarna River for a period of 1 year. The results obtained on the trace elements show seasonal effect on the concentrations as well as behavior and thus forming two groups, discharge driven (Li, Be, Al, V, Cr, Ni, Zr, In, Pb, Bi and U) and base flow driven (groundwater input; Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ga, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Ag, Cd, Cs, Ba and Tl) trace elements in Swarna River. The biogeochemical processes explained through Hierarchical Cluster Analysis show complexation of Fe, Ga and Ba with dissolved organic carbon, redox control over Mn and Tl and biological control over V and Ni. Also, the water quality of Swarna River remains within the permissible limits of drinking water standards.

  3. Global effects of agriculture on fluvial dissolved organic matter

    PubMed Central

    Graeber, Daniel; Boëchat, Iola G.; Encina-Montoya, Francisco; Esse, Carlos; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Goyenola, Guillermo; Gücker, Björn; Heinz, Marlen; Kronvang, Brian; Meerhoff, Mariana; Nimptsch, Jorge; Pusch, Martin T.; Silva, Ricky C. S.; von Schiller, Daniel; Zwirnmann, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural land covers approximately 40% of Earth’s land surface and affects hydromorphological, biogeochemical and ecological characteristics of fluvial networks. In the northern temperate region, agriculture also strongly affects the amount and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which constitutes the main vector of carbon transport from soils to fluvial networks and to the sea, and is involved in a large variety of biogeochemical processes. Here, we provide first evidence about the wider occurrence of agricultural impacts on the concentration and composition of fluvial DOM across climate zones of the northern and southern hemispheres. Both extensive and intensive farming altered fluvial DOM towards a more microbial and less plant-derived composition. Moreover, intensive farming significantly increased dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations. The DOM composition change and DON concentration increase differed among climate zones and could be related to the intensity of current and historical nitrogen fertilizer use. As a result of agriculture intensification, increased DON concentrations and a more microbial-like DOM composition likely will enhance the reactivity of catchment DOM emissions, thereby fuelling the biogeochemical processing in fluvial networks, and resulting in higher ecosystem productivity and CO2 outgassing. PMID:26541809

  4. Modeling dissolved organic carbon in temperate forest soils: TRIPLEX-DOC model development and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Peng, C.; Moore, T. R.; Hua, D.; Li, C.; Zhu, Q.; Peichl, M.; Arain, M. A.; Guo, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Even though dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the most active carbon (C) cycling in soil organic carbon (SOC) pools, it receives little attention from the global C budget. DOC fluxes are critical to aquatic ecosystem inputs and contribute to the C balance of terrestrial ecosystems, but few ecosystem models have attempted to integrate DOC dynamics into terrestrial C cycling. This study introduces a new process-based model, TRIPLEX-DOC, that is capable of estimating DOC dynamics in forest soils by incorporating both ecological drivers and biogeochemical processes. TRIPLEX-DOC was developed from Forest-DNDC, a biogeochemical model simulating C and nitrogen (N) dynamics, coupled with a new DOC process module that predicts metabolic transformations, sorption/desorption, and DOC leaching in forest soils. The model was validated against field observations of DOC concentrations and fluxes at white pine forest stands located in southern Ontario, Canada. The model was able to simulate seasonal dynamics of DOC concentrations and the magnitudes observed within different soil layers, as well as DOC leaching in the age sequence of these forests. Additionally, TRIPLEX-DOC estimated the effect of forest harvesting on DOC leaching, with a significant increase following harvesting, illustrating that land use change is of critical importance in regulating DOC leaching in temperate forests as an important source of C input to aquatic ecosystems.

  5. Agent-based modeling of hyporheic dissolved organic carbon transport and transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielsen, P. J.; Wilson, J. L.; Pullin, M.

    2011-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a complex suite of organic compounds present in natural ecosystems, and is particularly studied in river and stream systems. The hyporheic zone (HZ), a region of surface water-shallow groundwater exchange, has been identified as a hotspot of DOC processing and is generally regarded as a net sink of organic matter. More recent studies into stream DOC have shifted to examining DOC quality rather than bulk quantity. DOC quality variability has been linked to hydrologic and climatic variability, both focuses of current climate change research. A new agent-based model in the NetLogo modeling environment couples hydrologic transport with chemical and biological transformation of DOC to simulate changing DOC quality in hyporheic flow. A pore-scale model implements a Lattice Boltzmann fluid dynamic model and surficial interactions to simulate sorption and microbial uptake. Upscaled to a stream meander scale, this model displays spatial variation and evolution of DOC quality. Model output metrics are correlated to field sample analytical results from a hyporheic meander of the East Fork Jemez River, Sandoval Co., NM.

  6. Effects of asynchronous snowmelt on flushing of dissolved organic carbon: A mixing model approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyer, E.W.; Hornberger, G.M.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2000-01-01

    In many snowmelt-dominated catchments, stream dissolved organic carbon (DOC) levels typically increase rapidly as spring melt commences, peak before maximum discharge, and decrease quickly as melting continues. We present data from Deer Creek (Summit County, CO) that shows this distinctive flushing response of DOC during snowmelt runoff, with DOC stored in landscape soils flushed to the stream in response to infiltrating melt waters. Our prior studies show that asynchronous melting of the snowpack across the landscape causes the spring DOC flush to be initiated at different times throughout the catchment. In this study we quantify characteristics of the asynchronous melt and its effect on DOC flushing. We investigated whether a simple mixing model can be used to capture the essentials of the asynchronous melting of a seasonal snowpack and its controls on DOC transport. We divided the catchment into zones of aspect and elevation, which largely determine spatial and temporal variations in the distribution of snow. TOPMODEL was used to simulate the hydrology in each zone, and the simulated flow paths were routed through a simple DOC mixing model to predict contributions of DOC to the stream. The zonal responses were aggregated to give a predicted response of hydrology and DOC fluxes for the entire catchment. Our results indicate that asynchronous melting-which determines the timing of contributions of discharge and DOC to streamflow from different areas of the landscape-can be quantified using a simple modeling approach. Copyright ?? 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Collective and convective effects compete in patterns of dissolving surface droplets.

    PubMed

    Laghezza, Gianluca; Dietrich, Erik; Yeomans, Julia M; Ledesma-Aguilar, Rodrigo; Kooij, E Stefan; Zandvliet, Harold J W; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-06-29

    The effects of neighboring droplets on the dissolution of a sessile droplet, i.e. collective effects, are investigated both experimentally and numerically. On the experimental side small approximately 20 nL mono-disperse surface droplets arranged in an ordered pattern were dissolved and their size evolution is studied optically. The droplet dissolution time was studied for various droplet patterns. On the numerical side, lattice-Boltzmann simulations were performed. Both simulations and experiments show that the dissolution time of a droplet placed in the center of a pattern can increase by as much as 60% as compared to a single, isolated droplet, due to the shielding effect of the neighboring droplets. However, the experiments also show that neighboring droplets enhance the buoyancy driven convective flow of the bulk, increasing the mass exchange and counteracting collective effects. We show that this enhanced convection can reduce the dissolution time of droplets at the edges of the pattern to values below that of a single, isolated droplet. PMID:27270609

  8. Human-driven changes in dissolved phosphorus deposition to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Nenes, Athanasios; Kanakidou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric cycle of phosphorus (P) is parameterized in a global 3-D chemistry-transport model by taking into account the primary emissions of total (TP) and dissolved P (PO4) associated with dust, sea-salt, bioaerosols and combustion particles of anthropogenic and natural sources. Mineral sources are calculated to contribute by roughly 80% to the TP emissions. The calculated annual deposition flux of PO4 presents strong spatial and temporal variability with about 30% occurring over the ocean. Sensitivity simulations using preindustrial (year 1850), present (year 2008) and future (year 2100) anthropogenic and biomass burning emission scenarios, indicate that an increase in dust-P dissolution flux may have occurred in the last 150 years due to increasing atmospheric acidity due to anthropogenic emissions. On the opposite, a decrease of dust-P containing dissolution flux is projected for near future, since air-quality regulations are expected to reduce atmospheric acidity compared to present-day. Present day simulations of atmospheric P aerosol concentrations and deposition fluxes compare satisfactorily with available observations, thus, providing confidence to the model results. This work has been co-financed by the European Union (European Social Fund - ESF) and Greek national funds through the Operational Program "Education and Lifelong Learning" of the National Strategic Reference Framework (NSRF) - Research Funding Program: ARISTEIA - PANOPLY (Pollution Alters Natural Aerosol Composition: implications for Ocean Productivity, cLimate and air qualitY) grant.

  9. Model-Based Feasibility Assessment of Membrane Biofilm Reactor to Achieve Simultaneous Ammonium, Dissolved Methane, and Sulfide Removal from Anaerobic Digestion Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueming; Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) is proposed to achieve simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide from main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors. To avoid dissolved methane stripping, oxygen is introduced through gas-permeable membranes, which also from the substratum for the growth of a biofilm likely comprising ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB), anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) bacteria, denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microorganisms, aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB). A mathematical model is developed and applied to assess the feasibility of such a system and the associated microbial community structure under different operational conditions. The simulation studies demonstrate the feasibility of achieving high-level (>97.0%), simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide in the MBfRs from both main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors through adjusting the influent surface loading (or hydraulic retention time (HRT)) and the oxygen surface loading. The optimal HRT was found to be inversely proportional to the corresponding oxygen surface loading. Under the optimal operational conditions, AOB, DAMO bacteria, MOB, and SOB dominate the biofilm of the main-stream MBfR, while AOB, Anammox bacteria, DAMO bacteria, and SOB coexist in the side-stream MBfR to remove ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide simultaneously.

  10. Nanomaterials in Biosolids Inhibit Nodulation, Shift Microbial Community Composition, and Result in Increased Metal Uptake Relative to Bulk/Dissolved Metals.

    PubMed

    Judy, Jonathan D; McNear, David H; Chen, Chun; Lewis, Ricky W; Tsyusko, Olga V; Bertsch, Paul M; Rao, William; Stegemeier, John; Lowry, Gregory V; McGrath, Steve P; Durenkamp, Mark; Unrine, Jason M

    2015-07-21

    We examined the effects of amending soil with biosolids produced from a pilot-scale wastewater treatment plant containing a mixture of metal-based engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) on the growth of Medicago truncatula, its symbiosis with Sinorhizobium meliloti, and on soil microbial community structure. Treatments consisted of soils amended with biosolids generated with (1) Ag, ZnO, and TiO2 ENMs introduced into the influent wastewater (ENM biosolids), (2) AgNO3, Zn(SO4)2, and micron-sized TiO2 (dissolved/bulk metal biosolids) introduced into the influent wastewater stream, or (3) no metal added to influent wastewater (control). Soils were amended with biosolids to simulate 20 years of metal loading, which resulted in nominal metal concentrations of 1450, 100, and 2400 mg kg(-1) of Zn, Ag, and Ti, respectively, in the dissolved/bulk and ENM treatments. Tissue Zn concentrations were significantly higher in the plants grown in the ENM treatment (182 mg kg(-1)) compared to those from the bulk treatment (103 mg kg(-1)). Large reductions in nodulation frequency, plant growth, and significant shifts in soil microbial community composition were found for the ENM treatment compared to the bulk/dissolved metal treatment. These results suggest differences in metal bioavailability and toxicity between ENMs and bulk/dissolved metals at concentrations relevant to regulatory limits.

  11. Model-Based Feasibility Assessment of Membrane Biofilm Reactor to Achieve Simultaneous Ammonium, Dissolved Methane, and Sulfide Removal from Anaerobic Digestion Liquor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xueming; Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) is proposed to achieve simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide from main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors. To avoid dissolved methane stripping, oxygen is introduced through gas-permeable membranes, which also from the substratum for the growth of a biofilm likely comprising ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB), anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) bacteria, denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microorganisms, aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB). A mathematical model is developed and applied to assess the feasibility of such a system and the associated microbial community structure under different operational conditions. The simulation studies demonstrate the feasibility of achieving high-level (>97.0%), simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide in the MBfRs from both main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors through adjusting the influent surface loading (or hydraulic retention time (HRT)) and the oxygen surface loading. The optimal HRT was found to be inversely proportional to the corresponding oxygen surface loading. Under the optimal operational conditions, AOB, DAMO bacteria, MOB, and SOB dominate the biofilm of the main-stream MBfR, while AOB, Anammox bacteria, DAMO bacteria, and SOB coexist in the side-stream MBfR to remove ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide simultaneously. PMID:27112502

  12. Model-Based Feasibility Assessment of Membrane Biofilm Reactor to Achieve Simultaneous Ammonium, Dissolved Methane, and Sulfide Removal from Anaerobic Digestion Liquor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueming; Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) is proposed to achieve simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide from main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors. To avoid dissolved methane stripping, oxygen is introduced through gas-permeable membranes, which also from the substratum for the growth of a biofilm likely comprising ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB), anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) bacteria, denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microorganisms, aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB). A mathematical model is developed and applied to assess the feasibility of such a system and the associated microbial community structure under different operational conditions. The simulation studies demonstrate the feasibility of achieving high-level (>97.0%), simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide in the MBfRs from both main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors through adjusting the influent surface loading (or hydraulic retention time (HRT)) and the oxygen surface loading. The optimal HRT was found to be inversely proportional to the corresponding oxygen surface loading. Under the optimal operational conditions, AOB, DAMO bacteria, MOB, and SOB dominate the biofilm of the main-stream MBfR, while AOB, Anammox bacteria, DAMO bacteria, and SOB coexist in the side-stream MBfR to remove ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide simultaneously. PMID:27112502

  13. Formulation and Evaluation of Mouth Dissolving Tablets of Cinnarizine

    PubMed Central

    Patel, B. P.; Patel, J. K.; Rajput, G. C.; Thakor, R. S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop mouth dissolve tablets of cinnarizine by effervescent, superdisintegrant addition and sublimation methods. All the three formulations were evaluated for disintegration time, hardness and friability, among these superdisintegrant addition method showed lowest disintegration time; hence it was selected for further studies. Further nine batches (B1-B9) were prepared by using crospovidone, croscarmellose sodium and L-HPC in different concentrations such as 5, 7.5 and 10%. All the formulations were evaluated for weight variation, hardness, friability, drug content, in vitro disintegration time, wetting time, in vitro dissolution. Formulation with 10% L-HPC showed the less disintegration time (25.3 s) and less wetting time (29.1 s). In vitro dissolution studies showed total drug release at the end of 6 min. PMID:21218071

  14. Formulation and evaluation of mouth dissolving tablets of cinnarizine.

    PubMed

    Patel, B P; Patel, J K; Rajput, G C; Thakor, R S

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop mouth dissolve tablets of cinnarizine by effervescent, superdisintegrant addition and sublimation methods. All the three formulations were evaluated for disintegration time, hardness and friability, among these superdisintegrant addition method showed lowest disintegration time; hence it was selected for further studies. Further nine batches (B1-B9) were prepared by using crospovidone, croscarmellose sodium and L-HPC in different concentrations such as 5, 7.5 and 10%. All the formulations were evaluated for weight variation, hardness, friability, drug content, in vitro disintegration time, wetting time, in vitro dissolution. Formulation with 10% L-HPC showed the less disintegration time (25.3 s) and less wetting time (29.1 s). In vitro dissolution studies showed total drug release at the end of 6 min. PMID:21218071

  15. Do dissolving objects converge to a universal shape?

    PubMed

    Nakouzi, Elias; Goldstein, Raymond E; Steinbock, Oliver

    2015-04-14

    Surprisingly, macroscopic objects such as melting ice cubes and growing stalactites approach nonintuitive geometric ideals. Here we investigate the shape of dissolving cylinders in a large volume of water. The cylinders are oriented vertically and consist of amorphous glucose or poly(ethylene glycol). The dissolution causes density differences in the surrounding fluid, which induce gravity-driven convection downward along the object. The resulting concentration gradient shapes the cylinder according to fast dissolution at the tip and slow dissolution at the base. The contour of the object approaches a power law of the form z ∝ R(2), where z is the vertical distance from the tip and R is the corresponding radius. We suggest that this paraboloidal shape is the geometric attractor for the dissolution of noncrystalline objects in the presence of gravity. PMID:25409279

  16. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    SciTech Connect

    Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. There is considerable interest in developing processes that remove or destroy the nitrate wastes. Electrodialysis-Ion Exchange (EDIX) is a possible process that should be more cost effective in treating aqueous waste steams. This report describes the EDIX process.

  17. Dissolved Organic Carbon in the North Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Fontela, Marcos; García-Ibáñez, Maribel I.; Hansell, Dennis A.; Mercier, Herlé; Pérez, Fiz F.

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative role of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export is evaluated by combining DOC measurements with observed water mass transports. In the eastern subpolar North Atlantic, both upper and lower limbs of the AMOC transport high-DOC waters. Deep water formation that connects the two limbs of the AMOC results in a high downward export of non-refractory DOC (197 Tg-C·yr−1). Subsequent remineralization in the lower limb of the AMOC, between subpolar and subtropical latitudes, consumes 72% of the DOC exported by the whole Atlantic Ocean. The contribution of DOC to the carbon sequestration in the North Atlantic Ocean (62 Tg-C·yr−1) is considerable and represents almost a third of the atmospheric CO2 uptake in the region. PMID:27240625

  18. Nature and transformation of dissolved organic matter in treatment wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.; Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.; Stiles, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation into the occurrence, character, and transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in treatment wetlands in the western United States shows that (i) the nature of DOM in the source water has a major influence on transformations that occur during treatment, (ii) the climate factors have a secondary effect on transformations, (iii) the wetlands receiving treated wastewater can produce a net increase in DOM, and (iv) the hierarchical analytical approach used in this study can measure the subtle DOM transformations that occur. As wastewater treatment plant effluent passes through treatment wetlands, the DOM undergoes transformation to become more aromatic and oxygenated. Autochthonous sources are contributed to the DOM, the nature of which is governed by the developmental stage of the wetland system as well as vegetation patterns. Concentrations of specific wastewaterderived organic contaminants such as linear alkylbenzene sulfonate, caffeine, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid were significantly attenuated by wetland treatment and were not contributed by internal loading.

  19. Refractory dissolved organic nitrogen accumulation in high-elevation lakes.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, S J; Ball, G I; Allen, B C; Schladow, S G; Simpson, A J; Masoom, H; Soong, R; Graven, H D; Aluwihare, L I

    2015-01-01

    The role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) as either a sink for inorganic nutrients or an additional nutrient source is an often-neglected component of nutrient budgets in aquatic environments. Here, we examined the role of DOM in reactive nitrogen (N) storage in Sierra Nevada (California, USA) lakes where atmospheric deposition of N has shifted the lakes toward seasonal phosphorus (P)-limitation. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and isotope analyses performed on DOM isolated from Lake Tahoe reveal the accumulation of refractory proteinaceous material with a 100-200-year residence time. In contrast, smaller lakes in the same watershed contain DOM with typical terrestrial characteristics, indicating that proteins in Lake Tahoe are autochthonously produced. These data support the role of DOM as a possible sink for reactive N in these lake ecosystems and identify a potential role for DOM in affecting the inorganic nutrient stoichiometry of these environments. PMID:25704539

  20. Bacterial biomarkers thermally released from dissolved organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, P.F.; Leenheer, J.A.; McIntyre, C.; Berwick, L.; Franzmann, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    Hopane biomarker products were detected using microscale sealed vessel (MSSV) pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of dissolved organic matter from natural aquatic systems colonised by bacterial populations. MSSV pyrolysis can reduce the polyhydroxylated alkyl side chain of bacteriohopanepolyols, yielding saturated hopane products which are more amenable to GC-MS detection than their functionalised precursors. This example demonstrates how the thermal conditions of MSSV pyrolysis can reduce the biologically-inherited structural functionality of naturally occurring organic matter such that additional structural fragments can be detected using GC methods. This approach complements traditional analytical pyrolysis methods by providing additional speciation information useful for establishing the structures and source inputs of recent or extant organic material. ?? 2006.

  1. Monitoring dissolved organic carbon in surface and drinking waters.

    PubMed

    Volk, Christian; Wood, Larry; Johnson, Bruce; Robinson, Jeff; Zhu, Hai Wei; Kaplan, Louis

    2002-02-01

    The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) strongly impacts drinking water treatment, water quality, and water behavior during distribution. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were determined daily over a 22 month period in river water before and after conventional drinking water treatment using an on-line total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer. Quantitative and qualitative variations in organic matter were related to precipitation and runoff, seasons and operating conditions. Following a rainfall event, DOC levels could increase by 3.5 fold over baseflow concentrations, while color, UV absorbance values and turbidity increased by a factor of 8, 12 and 300, respectively. Treated water DOC levels were closely related to the source water quality, with an average organic matter removal of 42% after treatment.

  2. Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts

    SciTech Connect

    Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. This report describes the process of electrodialysis-ion exchange (EDIX) for treating aqueous wastes streams consisting of nitrates, sodium, organics, heavy metals, and radioactive species.

  3. The role of dissolved cations in coffee extraction.

    PubMed

    Hendon, Christopher H; Colonna-Dashwood, Lesley; Colonna-Dashwood, Maxwell

    2014-05-28

    The flavorsome compounds in coffee beans exist in the form of aprotic charge neutral species, as well as a collection of acids and conjugate salts. The dissolution and extraction of these organic molecules is a process dependent on the dissolved mineral content of the water. It is known that different rates and compositions of coffee extraction are achieved through the control of the water "impurities", Na(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+), which coordinate to nucleophilic motifs in coffee. Using density functional theory, we quantify the thermodynamic binding energies of five familiar coffee-contained acids, caffeine, and a representative flavor component, eugenol. From this, we provide insight into the mechanism and ideal mineral composition of water for extraction of flavorsome compounds in coffee. PMID:24802110

  4. [Dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics in karst aquifer systems].

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Zou, Sheng-Zhang; Xia, Ri-Yuan; Xu, Dan-Dan; Yao, Min

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and nutrients have a unique way of producing, decomposing and storing in southwest karst water systems. To understand the biogeochemical cycle of DOM in karst aquifer systems, we investigated the behavioral changes of DOM fluorescence components in Zhaidi karst river system. Two humic-like components (C1 and C2), and one autochthonous tyrosine-like component (C4) were identified using the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model. Compared with the traditional physical and chemical indicators, spatial heterogeneity of DOM was more obvious, which can reflect the subtle changes in groundwater system. Traditional indicators mainly reflect the regional characteristics of karst river system, while DOM fluorescence components reflect the attribute gaps of sampling types.

  5. Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification.

    PubMed

    Allison, Nicola; Cohen, Itay; Finch, Adrian A; Erez, Jonathan; Tudhope, Alexander W

    2014-12-22

    The sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) used to produce scleractinian coral skeletons are not understood. Yet this knowledge is essential for understanding coral biomineralization and assessing the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Here we use skeletal boron geochemistry to reconstruct the DIC chemistry of the fluid used for coral calcification. We show that corals concentrate DIC at the calcification site substantially above seawater values and that bicarbonate contributes a significant amount of the DIC pool used to build the skeleton. Corals actively increase the pH of the calcification fluid, decreasing the proportion of DIC present as CO2 and creating a diffusion gradient favouring the transport of molecular CO2 from the overlying coral tissue into the calcification site. Coupling the increases in calcification fluid pH and [DIC] yields high calcification fluid [CO3(2-)] and induces high aragonite saturation states, favourable to the precipitation of the skeleton.

  6. Release of dissolved nitrogen from water during depressurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were run to study depressurization of water containing various concentrations of dissolved nitrogen gas, the primary case being room temperature water saturated with nitrogen at 4 MPa. In a static depressurization experiment, water with very high nitrogen content was depressurized at rates from 0.09 to 0.50 MPa per second and photographed with high speed movies. The pictures showed that the bubble population at a given pressure increased strongly with decreasing depressurization rate. Flow experiments were performed in an axisymmetric converging-diverging nozzle and in a two-dimensional converging nozzle with glass sidewalls. Depressurization gradients were roughly 500 to 1200 MPa per second. Both nozzles exhibited choked flow behavior even at nitrogen concentration levels as low as 4 percent of saturated. The flow rates were independent of concentration level and could be computed as incompressible water flow based on the difference between stagnation and throat pressures; however, the throat pressures were significantly different between the two nozzles.

  7. Carbon nanotubes: are they dispersed or dissolved in liquids?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geckeler, Kurt Ernst; Premkumar, Thathan

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) constitute a novel class of nanomaterials with remarkable applications in diverse domains. However, the main intrincsic problem of CNTs is their insolubility or very poor solubility in most of the common solvents. The basic key question here is: are carbon nanotubes dissolved or dispersed in liquids, specifically in water? When analyzing the scientific research articles published in various leading journals, we found that many researchers confused between "dispersion" and "solubilization" and use the terms interchangeably, particularly when stating the interaction of CNTs with liquids. In this article, we address this fundamental issue to give basic insight specifically to the researchers who are working with CNTs as well asgenerally to scientists who deal with nano-related research domains.

  8. Removal of dissolved heavy metals and radionuclides by microbial spores

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; Hadden, C.T.; Edenborn, H.

    1997-11-01

    Microbial systems have been shown to remove specific heavy metals from contaminated aqueous waste to levels acceptable to EPA for environmental release. However, systems capable of removing a variety of heavy metals from aqueous waste to environmentally acceptable levels remain to be reported. The present studies were performed to determine the specificity of spores of the bacterium Bacillus megaterium for the adsorption of dissolved metals and radionuclides from aqueous waste. The spores effectively adsorbed eight heavy metals from a prepared metal mix and from a plating rinse waste to EPA acceptable levels for waste water. These results suggest that spores have multiple binding sites for the adsorption of heavy metals. Spores were also effective in adsorbing the radionuclides {sup 85}strontium and {sup 197}cesium. The presence of multiple sites in spores for the adsorption of heavy metals and radionuclides makes this biosorbent a good candidate for the treatment of aqueous wastes associated with the plating and nuclear industries. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Why dissolved organic matter (DOM) enhances photodegradation of methylmercury

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yun; Yin, Xiangping Lisa; Brooks, Scott C; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is known to degrade photochemically, but it remains unclear what roles naturally dissolved organic matter (DOM) and complexing organic ligands play in MeHg photodegradation. Here we investigate the rates and mechanisms of MeHg photodegradation using DOM samples with varying oxidation states and origins as well as organic ligands with known molecular structures. All DOM and organic ligands increased MeHg photodegradation under solar irradiation, but the first-order rate constants varied depending on the oxidation state of DOM and the type and concentration of the ligands. Compounds containing both thiols and aromatics (e.g., thiosalicylate and reduced DOM) increased MeHg degradation rates far greater than those containing only aromatic or thiol functional groups (e.g., salicylate or glutathione). Our results suggest that, among other factors, the synergistic effects of thiolate and aromatic moieties in DOM greatly enhance MeHg photodegradation.

  10. Do dissolving objects converge to a universal shape?

    PubMed

    Nakouzi, Elias; Goldstein, Raymond E; Steinbock, Oliver

    2015-04-14

    Surprisingly, macroscopic objects such as melting ice cubes and growing stalactites approach nonintuitive geometric ideals. Here we investigate the shape of dissolving cylinders in a large volume of water. The cylinders are oriented vertically and consist of amorphous glucose or poly(ethylene glycol). The dissolution causes density differences in the surrounding fluid, which induce gravity-driven convection downward along the object. The resulting concentration gradient shapes the cylinder according to fast dissolution at the tip and slow dissolution at the base. The contour of the object approaches a power law of the form z ∝ R(2), where z is the vertical distance from the tip and R is the corresponding radius. We suggest that this paraboloidal shape is the geometric attractor for the dissolution of noncrystalline objects in the presence of gravity.

  11. The composition and degradability of upland dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Catherine; Worrall, Fred; Clay, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    In order to assess controls on the degradability of DOM in stream water, samples of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) were collected every month for a period of 24 months from an upland, peat-covered catchment in northern England. Each month the degradability of the DOM was assessed by exposing river water to light for up to 24 hours, and the change in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in the water was measured. To provide context for the analysis of DOM and its degradability, samples of peat, vegetation, and litter were also taken from the same catchment and analysed. The organic matter samples were analysed by several methods including: elemental analysis (CHN and O), bomb calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, pyrolysis GC/MS, ICP-OES, stable isotope analysis (13C and 15N) and 13C solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The water samples were analysed for pH, conductivity, absorbance at 400nm, anions, cations, particulate organic carbon (POC) and DOC concentrations. River flow conditions and meteorology were also recorded at the site and included in the analysis of the composition and degradability of DOM. The results of multiple regression models showed that the rates of DOC degradation were affected by the N-alkyl, O-alkyl, aldehyde and aromatic relative intensities, gross heat, OR and C:N. Of these, the N-alkyl relative intensity had the greatest influence, and this in turn was found to be dependent on the rainfall and soil temperature in the week before sampling.

  12. Salt marshes: An important coastal sink for dissolved uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Church, T.M.; Sarin, M.M.; Fleisher, M.Q.; Ferdelman, T.G.

    1996-10-01

    The global budget for marine uranium demands another geochemical sink other than deep-sea systems, and the coastal environment may host some or all of this missing sink. In a previous paper, we have shown that some large subtidal estuaries are seasonal summer sinks at low salinities. In this paper, we show that intertidal salt marshes are even stronger sinks at all salinities, if for somewhat different reasons. Uranium was sampled in dissolved and particulate fractions over several tidal cycles and seasons for a lower Delaware Bay salt marsh (Canary Creek, Lewes, Delaware, USA), and uniquely, during summer months, the dissolved uranium is nonconservative. Moreover, because uranium extraction is greater on higher tides and occurs over the entire salinity gradient, this processing appears associated with surface of vegetated high marsh, We hypothesize that either (1) uranium scavenging occurs during the process of tidal mixing and attendant flocculation of humic acids and iron oxides-favoring this process is the presence of sulfonate complexes in salt marsh humic substances, and iron coprecipitation during its extensive redox cycling in the salt marsh-or (2) uranium extraction occurs at the marsh surface during extensive flooding of the salt marsh surface sediments-favoring this process is the increase in sulfuric acidity at the summer salt marsh surface that could destabilize the tetracarbonate species of U(VI). The latter option is favored by both field observations of maximum removal at the surface during the spring and summer tide conditions, and selective extraction of sediment phases where uranium is found as adsorbed and complexed forms in the ascorbate-citrate and humic acid fractions, respectively. Mass balance calculations show that under steady-state conditions, nearly two-thirds of the uranium extracted from tidal waters is retained in the sediments, while one-third is exported as U-enriched particles during ebbing tides. 41 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): a critical review.

    PubMed

    Nebbioso, Antonio; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Advances in water chemistry in the last decade have improved our knowledge about the genesis, composition, and structure of dissolved organic matter, and its effect on the environment. Improvements in analytical technology, for example Fourier-transform ion cyclotron (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS), homo and hetero-correlated multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and excitation emission matrix fluorimetry (EEMF) with parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis for UV-fluorescence spectroscopy have resulted in these advances. Improved purification methods, for example ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis, have enabled facile desalting and concentration of freshly collected DOM samples, thereby complementing the analytical process. Although its molecular weight (MW) remains undefined, DOM is described as a complex mixture of low-MW substances and larger-MW biomolecules, for example proteins, polysaccharides, and exocellular macromolecules. There is a general consensus that marine DOM originates from terrestrial and marine sources. A combination of diagenetic and microbial processes contributes to its origin, resulting in refractory organic matter which acts as carbon sink in the ocean. Ocean DOM is derived partially from humified products of plants decay dissolved in fresh water and transported to the ocean, and partially from proteinaceous and polysaccharide material from phytoplankton metabolism, which undergoes in-situ microbial processes, becoming refractory. Some of the DOM interacts with radiation and is, therefore, defined as chromophoric DOM (CDOM). CDOM is classified as terrestrial, marine, anthropogenic, or mixed, depending on its origin. Terrestrial CDOM reaches the oceans via estuaries, whereas autochthonous CDOM is formed in sea water by microbial activity; anthropogenic CDOM is a result of human activity. CDOM also affects the quality of water, by shielding it from solar radiation, and constitutes a carbon sink pool. Evidence in support

  14. Drift correction of the dissolved signal in single particle ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Geert; Rauch, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented where drift, the random fluctuation of the signal intensity, is compensated for based on the estimation of the drift function by a moving average. It was shown using single particle ICPMS (spICPMS) measurements of 10 and 60 nm Au NPs that drift reduces accuracy of spICPMS analysis at the calibration stage and during calculations of the particle size distribution (PSD), but that the present method can again correct the average signal intensity as well as the signal distribution of particle-containing samples skewed by drift. Moreover, deconvolution, a method that models signal distributions of dissolved signals, fails in some cases when using standards and samples affected by drift, but the present method was shown to improve accuracy again. Relatively high particle signals have to be removed prior to drift correction in this procedure, which was done using a 3 × sigma method, and the signals are treated separately and added again. The method can also correct for flicker noise that increases when signal intensity is increased because of drift. The accuracy was improved in many cases when flicker correction was used, but when accurate results were obtained despite drift, the correction procedures did not reduce accuracy. The procedure may be useful to extract results from experimental runs that would otherwise have to be run again. Graphical Abstract A method is presented where a spICP-MS signal affected by drift (left) is corrected (right) by adjusting the local (moving) averages (green) and standard deviations (purple) to the respective values at a reference time (red). In combination with removing particle events (blue) in the case of calibration standards, this method is shown to obtain particle size distributions where that would otherwise be impossible, even when the deconvolution method is used to discriminate dissolved and particle signals.

  15. Updated determination of particulate and dissolved thorium-234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleer, Alan P.

    The determination of particulate and dissolved 234Th is similar to the procedure of Anderson and Fleer [1982]. Samples are collected using 30 L Niskin bottles with Teflon- or epoxy-coated internal springs. On deck, the sample is pumped with a delrin impeller pump through a 0.45 μm pore size 147-mm diameter Millipore filter and into a pre-rinsed 6 gallon plastic cubitainer held in a plastic milk crate. An in-line plastic water meter records volumes in gallons. The particulate sample filter is folded twice and stored in a polyethylene sample bag. To the ˜20 L filtered sample is added: 30 mL reagent grade 16 N HNO3; 500 mL 230Th tracer of ˜30 dpm mL-l and 5 mL 50 mg mL-l iron carrier previously cleaned by extraction into isopropyl ether from an 8 M HCl solution and back-extracted into 0.1 M HCl. The acidified sample is allowed to equilibrate for from one day to a maximum of several days. The sample is weighed on a Heathkit digital scale and the pH is adjusted to approximately 8 with about 40 mL 10 M NH4OH to precipitate iron hydroxide, which carries the thorium and uranium from the solution. The precipitate is allowed to settle for 12 to 24 hours. The supernate is drawn off, and the precipitate is spun down in a centrifuge tube to about an 8 mL volume. The precipitate is resuspended in distilled water and spun down again, then dissolved in three times its volume with 12 N HCl to make a 9 N HCl solution. A 1.5 cm×12 cm ion exchange column is filled with AG1×8 100-200 mesh resin and conditioned with 9 N HCl. The sample solution is run slowly through.

  16. Photodegradation of dissolved organic matter in ice under solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shuang; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Zhaohong; Song, Youtao; Liu, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    The photodegradation behavior of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with different origins in ice under solar irradiation was investigated. Exposure to sunlight at 2.7 × 10(5) J m(-2) resulted in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reductions of 22.1-36.5% in ice. The naturally occurring DOM had higher photodegradation potentials than the wastewater-derived DOM in ice. Ultraviolet (UV)-absorbing compounds in DOM, regardless of DOM origin, had much higher photodegradation potentials than gross DOC in ice. The susceptibility of UV-absorbing compounds with natural origin to sunlight exposure in ice was higher than those derived from wastewater. Trihalomethane (THM) precursors were more susceptible to photochemical reactions than gross DOC and haloacetic acid (HAA) precursors in ice. THM precursors in naturally occurring DOM were more photoreactive than those in wastewater-derived DOM in ice, while the photoreactivity of HAA precursors in ice was independent of DOM origin. In ice, the photoreactivity of humic-like fluorescent materials, regardless of DOM origin, was higher than that of gross DOC and protein-like fluorescent materials. DOC reductions caused by sunlight irradiation were found to be negatively correlated to DOC levels, and positively correlated to the aromaticity of DOM. The photodegradation of both wastewater-derived and naturally occurring DOM in ice was significantly facilitated at both acid and alkaline pH, as compared to neutral pH. The photodegradation of DOM in ice, regardless of the origin, was facilitated by nitrate ion [Formula: see text] , nitrite ion [Formula: see text] , ferric ion (Fe(3+)) and ferrous ion (Fe(2+)), and on the other hand, was inhibited by chloridion ion (Cl(-)) and copper ion (Cu(2+)).

  17. Evaluation and validation of criticality codes for fuel dissolver calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Santamarina, A.; Smith, H.J. ); Whitesides, G.E. )

    1991-01-01

    During the past ten years an OECD/NEA Criticality Working Group has examined the validity of criticality safety computational methods. International calculation tools which were shown to be valid in systems for which experimental data existed were demonstrated to be inadequate when extrapolated to fuel dissolver media. The spread of the results in the international calculation amounted to {plus minus} 12,000 pcm in the realistic fuel dissolver exercise n{degrees} 19 proposed by BNFL, and to {plus minus} 25,000 pcm in the benchmark n{degrees} 20 in which fissile material in solid form is surrounded by fissile material in solution. A theoretical study of the main physical parameters involved in fuel dissolution calculations was performed, i.e. range of moderation, variation of pellet size and the fuel double heterogeneity effect. The APOLLO/P{sub IC} method developed to treat latter effect, permits us to supply the actual reactivity variation with pellet dissolution and to propose international reference values. The disagreement among contributors' calculations was analyzed through a neutron balance breakdown, based on three-group microscopic reaction rates solicited from the participants. The results pointed out that fast and resonance nuclear data in criticality codes are not sufficiently reliable. Moreover the neutron balance analysis emphasized the inadequacy of the standard self-shielding formalism (NITAWL in the international SCALE package) to account for {sup 238}U resonance mutual self-shielding in the pellet-fissile liquor interaction. Improvements in the up-dated 1990 contributions, as do recent complementary reference calculations (MCNP, VIM, ultrafine slowing-down CGM calculation), confirm the need to use rigorous self-shielding methods in criticality design-oriented codes. 6 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Climate cycles and dissolved oxygen variability off eastern Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, M.; San Diego-McGlone, M.; Jacinto, G.; Siringan, F.; Villanoy, C.; Gordon, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    We assess the effect of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) on the variability of dissolved oxygen off eastern Luzon, Philippines. In this area, bifurcation of the North Equatorial Current (NEC) into the Kuroshio and Mindanao Currents occurs. Hydrographic parameters and sediment cores obtained during the oceanographic cruises in 2011 and 2012, and data from the World Ocean Atlas 2009 (WOA09) were used in the study. Variability in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration was observed from surface to the thermocline between the neutral (2011) and La Niña (2012) phase. Based on optimum multiparameter analysis, there was a change in the fraction of water masses in the area. Under neutral conditions, waters off eastern Luzon consist mainly of water (NPSW) from the Kuroshio recirculation gyre that contain higher DO. In contrast, during La Niña conditions the North Equatorial Current becomes stronger bringing in water (NPTW) with lower DO. Thus, variability in DO off eastern Luzon is influenced by the change in the source of the water mass arising from the shift in bifurcation latitude that is linked to ENSO. Longer-term variability in DO was examined using a 2.15m sediment core taken in the shelf off eastern Luzon. The sediment record was used to reconstruct the depositional redox environment in the last 1000 years. The elements V, Ni, Cr, Mn and Fe were normalized to Ti and used as chemical proxies to track DO variability. Results show that DO fluctuations have occurred in the past, and these changes are in agreement with DO variability driven by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

  19. Dissolved organic carbon and its potential predictors in eutrophic lakes.

    PubMed

    Toming, Kaire; Kutser, Tiit; Tuvikene, Lea; Viik, Malle; Nõges, Tiina

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of the true role of lakes in the global carbon cycle requires reliable estimates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and there is a strong need to develop remote sensing methods for mapping lake carbon content at larger regional and global scales. Part of DOC is optically inactive. Therefore, lake DOC content cannot be mapped directly. The objectives of the current study were to estimate the relationships of DOC and other water and environmental variables in order to find the best proxy for remote sensing mapping of lake DOC. The Boosted Regression Trees approach was used to clarify in which relative proportions different water and environmental variables determine DOC. In a studied large and shallow eutrophic lake the concentrations of DOC and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were rather high while the seasonal and interannual variability of DOC concentrations was small. The relationships between DOC and other water and environmental variables varied seasonally and interannually and it was challenging to find proxies for describing seasonal cycle of DOC. Chlorophyll a (Chl a), total suspended matter and Secchi depth were correlated with DOC and therefore are possible proxies for remote sensing of seasonal changes of DOC in ice free period, while for long term interannual changes transparency-related variables are relevant as DOC proxies. CDOM did not appear to be a good predictor of the seasonality of DOC concentration in Lake Võrtsjärv since the CDOM-DOC coupling varied seasonally. However, combining the data from Võrtsjärv with the published data from six other eutrophic lakes in the world showed that CDOM was the most powerful predictor of DOC and can be used in remote sensing of DOC concentrations in eutrophic lakes. PMID:27318445

  20. Modeling impact of storage zones on stream dissolved oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapra, S.C.; Runkel, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    The Streeter-Phelps dissolved oxygen model is modified to incorporate storage zones. A dimensionless number reflecting enhanced decomposition caused by the increased residence time of the biochemical oxygen demand in the storage zone parameterizes the impact. This result provides a partial explanation for the high decomposition rates observed in shallow streams. An application suggests that the storage zone increases the critical oxygen deficit and moves it closer to the point source. It also indicates that the storage zone should have lower oxygen concentration than the main channel. An analysis of a dimensionless enhancement factor indicates that the biochemical oxygen demand decomposition in small streams could be up to two to three times more than anticipated based on the standard Streeter-Phelps model without storage zones. For larger rivers, enhancements of up to 1.5 could occur.The Streeter-Phelps dissolved oxygen model is modified to incorporate storage zones. A dimensionless number reflecting enhanced decomposition caused by the increased residence time of the biochemical oxygen demand in the storage zone parameterizes the impact. This result provides a partial explanation for the high decomposition rates observed in shallow streams. An application suggests that the storage zone increases the critical oxygen deficit and moves it closer to the point source. It also indicates that the storage zone should have lower oxygen concentration than the main channel. An analysis of a dimensionless enhancement factor indicates that the biochemical oxygen demand decomposition in small streams could be up to two to three times more than anticipated based on the standard Streeter-Phelps model without storage zones. For larger rivers, enhancements of up to 1.5 could occur.