Science.gov

Sample records for simulated electronic structures

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary electron images for real sample structures in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Wang, H Y; Li, Y G; Mao, S F; Ding, Z J

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for the study of electron beam interaction with solids have been mostly concerned with specimens of simple geometry. In this article, we propose a simulation algorithm for treating arbitrary complex structures in a real sample. The method is based on a finite element triangular mesh modeling of sample geometry and a space subdivision for accelerating simulation. Simulation of secondary electron image in scanning electron microscopy has been performed for gold particles on a carbon substrate. Comparison of the simulation result with an experiment image confirms that this method is effective to model complex morphology of a real sample.

  2. The CECAM Electronic Structure Library: community-driven development of software libraries for electronic structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Micael

    The CECAM Electronic Structure Library (ESL) is a community-driven effort to segregate shared pieces of software as libraries that could be contributed and used by the community. Besides allowing to share the burden of developing and maintaining complex pieces of software, these can also become a target for re-coding by software engineers as hardware evolves, ensuring that electronic structure codes remain at the forefront of HPC trends. In a series of workshops hosted at the CECAM HQ in Lausanne, the tools and infrastructure for the project were prepared, and the first contributions were included and made available online (http://esl.cecam.org). In this talk I will present the different aspects and aims of the ESL and how these can be useful for the electronic structure community.

  3. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano electronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently-coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I-V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical convergence

  4. Modeling and simulation of electronic structure, material interface and random doping in nano electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-06-20

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic devices, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. Modeling and simulation of this class of problems have emerged as an important topic in applied and computational mathematics. This work presents mathematical models and computational algorithms for the simulation of nano-scale MOSFETs. We introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential of the nano-electronic device. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions in an equal footing at nano scale. By optimization of the energy functional, we derive consistently-coupled Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations. Additionally, layered structures are crucial to the electrostatic and transport properties of nano transistors. A material interface model is proposed for more accurate description of the electrostatics governed by the Poisson equation. Finally, a new individual dopant model that utilizes the Dirac delta function is proposed to understand the random doping effect in nano electronic devices. Two mathematical algorithms, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method and the Dirichlet-to-Neumann mapping (DNM) technique, are introduced to improve the computational efficiency of nano-device simulations. Electronic structures are computed via subband decomposition and the transport properties, such as the I-V curves and electron density, are evaluated via the non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) formalism. Two distinct device configurations, a double-gate MOSFET and a four-gate MOSFET, are considered in our three-dimensional numerical simulations. For these devices, the current fluctuation and voltage threshold lowering effect induced by the discrete dopant model are explored. Numerical convergence

  5. Refractory metals in molten salts: Theory and simulation of geometry, electronic structure, and electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koslowski, Thorsten

    2000-12-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical and numerical study of the microscopic and electronic structure of solutions of refractory metal halides in alkali halide melts, [NbCl5]x[KCl]1-x and [TaCl5]x[KCl]1-x with 0⩽x⩽0.5. The geometry of the melts is described by ensembles of charged hard spheres, the electronic structure is modeled by a tight-binding Hamiltonian, which is extended by a reaction field to describe the diabatic energy profile of the electronic self-exchange in many-orbital mixed-valence systems. Despite its simplicity, the model leads to the formation of distorted octahedral [NbCl6]- and [TaCl6]- clusters, as evident both from the inspection of the simulation geometries and from the analysis of the partial pair distribution functions. Even in the presence of the strong potential energy fluctuations characteristic of ionic liquids, the octahedral structure is manifest in the density of states in a t2g-eg splitting of the conduction band. The Hamiltonian that describes mixed-valence systems is solved self-consistently. Using an attractive Hubbard parameter of 1.5 eV, we show that the numerical results can be interpreted by Marcus' theory of outer-sphere electron transfer reactions with a reorganization energy of 2.2 eV, an electronic coupling parameter of 0.12 eV, and an activation energy of 0.42 eV. Both anion-d metal cation and intervalence charge transfer excitations contribute to the optical absorption spectrum, the latter leads to a pronounced polaron absorption peak. These findings are compared to recent experimental results.

  6. Structure, dynamics, and electronic structure of liquid Ag-Se alloys investigated by ab initio simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchhoff, F.; Holender, J. M.; Gillan, M. J.

    1996-07-01

    Ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the structure, dynamics, and electronic properties of the liquid alloy Ag1-xSex at 1350 K and at the three compositions x=0.33, 0.42, and 0.65. To provide a point of reference, calculations are also presented for the equilibrium structure and the electronic structure of the α-Ag2Se crystal. The calculations are based on density-functional theory in the local-density approximation and on the pseudopotential plane-wave method. For the solid, we find excellent agreement with experiment for the equilibrium lattice parameters and the atomic coordinates of the 12-atom orthorhombic unit cell, and we present an analysis of the electronic density of states and density distribution. The reliability of the liquid simulations is confirmed by detailed comparisons with very recent neutron-diffraction results for the partial structure factors and radial distribution functions (RDF) of the stoichiometric liquid Ag2Se. Comparison with the predictions of an empirical interaction model due to Rino et al. is also given for l-Ag2Se. The ab initio simulations show a dramatic change of the Se-Se RDF with increasing Se content. This change is due to the formation of Se clusters bound by covalent bonds, the Se-Se bond length being almost the same as in pure c-Se and l-Se. The clusters are predominantly chainlike, but for higher x there is a significant fraction of threefold coordinated Se atoms. It is shown that the equilibrium fractions of Se present as isolated atoms and in clusters can be understood on a simple charge-balance model based on an ionic interpretation. The Ag diffusion coefficient in the simulated stoichiometric liquid is consistent with experimental values measured in the high-temperature superionic solid. The Ag and Se diffusion coefficients both increase with Se content, in spite of the Se clustering. An analysis of the Se-Se bond dynamics reveals surprisingly short bond lifetimes of less than 1 ps

  7. Atomistic Simulation and Electronic Structure of Lithium Doped Ionic Liquids: Structure, Transport, and Electrochemical Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskins, Justin B.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Lawson, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Zero-temperature density functional theory (DFT), density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD), and classical molecular dynamics using polarizable force fields (PFF-MD) are employed to evaluate the influence of Lithium ion on the structure, transport, and electrochemical stability of three potential ionic liquid electrolytes: N--methyl-N-butylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([pyr14][TFSI]), N--methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide ([pyr13][FSI]), and 1-ethyl-3--methylimidazolium boron tetrafluoride ([EMIM][BF4]). We characterize the Lithium ion solvation shell through zero-temperature DFT simulations of [Li(Anion)sub n](exp n-1) -clusters, DFT-MD simulations of isolated lithium ions in small ionic liquid systems, and PFF-MD simulations with high Li-doping levels in large ionic liquid systems. At low levels of Li-salt doping, highly stable solvation shells having 2-3 anions are seen in both [pyr14][TFSI] and [pyr13][FSI], while solvation shells with 4 anions dominate in [EMIM][BF sub 4]. At higher levels of doping, we find the formation of complex Li-network structures that increase the frequency of 4 anion-coordinated solvation shells. A comparison of computational and experimental Raman spectra for a wide range of [Li(Anion) sub n](exp n -1) - clusters shows that our proposed structures are consistent with experiment. We estimate the ion diffusion coefficients and quantify both size and simulation time effects. We find estimates of lithium ion diffusion are a reasonable order of magnitude and can be corrected for simulation time effects. Simulation size, on the other hand, is also important, with diffusion coefficients from long PFF-MD simulations of small cells having 20-40% error compared to large-cell values. Finally, we compute the electrochemical window using differences in electronic energy levels of both isolated cation/anion pairs and small ionic liquid systems with Li-salt doping. The single pair and liquid

  8. Ad-hoc Solutions for Capturing Electronic Structure Details in Classical Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crill, John Wesley

    Traditional empirical potentials used in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations replace an explicit treatment of the electronic structure with an appropriate interatomic potential energy expression. This enables MD simulations to model atomistic processes, such as dislocation dynamics and plastic deformation, which typically require size and time domains exceeding what is currently feasible with computationally-demanding first principles techniques. However, discarding the electronic degrees of freedom prevents MD simulations from properly resolving certain phenomena which are dominated by electronic interactions. One example is thermal transport in metals, which is often underestimated by orders of magnitude in MD simulations. A recently-developed multi-scale simulation approach, allowing ad-hoc feedback from continuum heat flow solutions to thermostat atoms in an MD simulation, is used to model Joule-heating in nano-scale metallic contacts under electromagnetic stress. The simulations are carried out under conditions representative of contact surfaces in Radio Frequency Electromechanical Switches (RF MEMS) and rail/armature components of Electromagnetic Launchers (EMLs) and are used to speculate on the mechanisms for experimentally-observed material transfer. Another phenomenon that is typically neglected in MD simulations is charge transfer between atoms of dissimilar electronegativity. A common approach to incorporating a dynamic treatment of charge in a classical potential simulation is to solve atomic charges using an equalization of electronegativity in the charge equilibration (QEq) method. The current work studies the effectiveness of the QEq to mimic the charge distribution properties of f-center defects in a sodium chloride crystal. The results indicate that the QEq is able to replicate some of the electrostatic energy features of an f-center, which include an extremely localized potential well in the vicinity of the defect.

  9. Self-consistent finite difference method for simulation and optimization of qunatum well electron transfer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinert, C. M.; Agrawal, N.

    1994-12-01

    A self-consistent finite difference method for the simulation of quantum well electron transfer structures is developed and applied to optimize InGaAsP/InP/InAlAs structures for fast optical switching devices. Simultaneous solution of Poisson's equation, continuity equation, and Schroedinger's equation on a discretized mesh yields a fast and accurate simulation method which may be applied to arbitrary layer structures and needs no artificial assumptions like abrupt space charge layers. Because of the exact treatment of charge distribution and leakage current the simulation gives new insight into the performance of barrier, reservoir, and quantum well electron transfer structrues, which could not be found by previous approximate theories. With this method we calculate the important physical parameters of these devices, namely, the shift of the optical absorption edge, band filling, leakage current, and capacitance. In addition, each layer is investigated separately with respect to its influence on device performance and fabrication tolerances; the results are used for optimization. Moreover, the exact numerical simulation is used to derive simplified relations for the dependence of band filling, capacitance, and high speed behavior on the heterostructure design.

  10. Photoisomerization mechanism of 4-methylpyridine explored by electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Jun; Fang Weihai; Fang Qiu

    2011-01-28

    In the present paper, different electronic structure methods have been used to determine stationary and intersection structures on the ground (S{sub 0}) and {sup 1}{pi}{pi}* (S{sub 2}) states of 4-methylpyridine, which is followed by adiabatic and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations to explore the mechanistic photoisomerization of 4-methylpyridine. Photoisomerization starts from the S{sub 2}({sup 1}{pi}{pi}*) state and overcomes a small barrier, leading to formation of the prefulvene isomer in the S{sub 0} state via a S{sub 2}/S{sub 0} conical intersection. The ultrafast S{sub 2}{yields} S{sub 0} nonradiative decay and low quantum yield for the photoisomerization reaction were well reproduced by the combined electronic structure calculation and dynamics simulation. The prefulvene isomer was assigned as a long-lived intermediate and suggested to isomerize to 4-methylpyridine directly in the previous study, which is not supported by the present calculation. The nonadiabatic dynamics simulation and electronic structure calculation reveal that the prefulvene isomer is a short-lived intermediate and isomerizes to benzvalene form very easily. The benzvalene form was predicted as the stable isomer in the present study and is probably the long-lived intermediate observed experimentally. A consecutive light and thermal isomerization cycle via Dewar isomer was determined and this cycle mechanism is different from that reported in the previous study. It should be pointed out that formation of Dewar isomer from the S{sub 2}({sup 1}{pi}{pi}*) state is not in competition with the isomerization to the prefulvene form. The Dewar structure observed experimentally may originate from other excited states.

  11. Statistical Exploration of Electronic Structure of Molecules from Quantum Monte-Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhat, Mr; Zubarev, Dmitry; Lester, Jr., William A.

    2010-12-22

    In this report, we present results from analysis of Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulation data with the goal of determining internal structure of a 3N-dimensional phase space of an N-electron molecule. We are interested in mining the simulation data for patterns that might be indicative of the bond rearrangement as molecules change electronic states. We examined simulation output that tracks the positions of two coupled electrons in the singlet and triplet states of an H2 molecule. The electrons trace out a trajectory, which was analyzed with a number of statistical techniques. This project was intended to address the following scientific questions: (1) Do high-dimensional phase spaces characterizing electronic structure of molecules tend to cluster in any natural way? Do we see a change in clustering patterns as we explore different electronic states of the same molecule? (2) Since it is hard to understand the high-dimensional space of trajectories, can we project these trajectories to a lower dimensional subspace to gain a better understanding of patterns? (3) Do trajectories inherently lie in a lower-dimensional manifold? Can we recover that manifold? After extensive statistical analysis, we are now in a better position to respond to these questions. (1) We definitely see clustering patterns, and differences between the H2 and H2tri datasets. These are revealed by the pamk method in a fairly reliable manner and can potentially be used to distinguish bonded and non-bonded systems and get insight into the nature of bonding. (2) Projecting to a lower dimensional subspace ({approx}4-5) using PCA or Kernel PCA reveals interesting patterns in the distribution of scalar values, which can be related to the existing descriptors of electronic structure of molecules. Also, these results can be immediately used to develop robust tools for analysis of noisy data obtained during QMC simulations (3) All dimensionality reduction and estimation techniques that we tried seem to

  12. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  13. Surface structure and composition determination by low-energy electron scattering and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiebing

    This thesis reports on surface and surface alloy structural and compositional determination with low-energy electron scattering and Monte Carlo simulations. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) technique and the newly developed low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) IV technique are used to measure the electron scattering intensity spectra and dynamical multiple scattering analysis is performed to optimize the surface structural and non-structural parameters via comparison between the experimental spectra and calculated ones. My work focuses on the following four surface systems. (111), (110) and (001) surface structures of the semimetal bismuth are determined with LEED. The unreconstructed (1x1) structure is revealed for all three surfaces. The interlayer spacings for several outermost layers are resolved. All results agree with those obtained by first-principles calculations. The Debye temperatures for the Bi(111) and Bi(110) surface are found to be lower than that of the Bi bulk. In conjunction with the LEED technique, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observation is performed on the Bi(001) surface. Surface topology images show dominant bilayer steps and no single layer step. The newly developed LEEM-IV technique is used to investigate the PdCu surface alloy on the substrate Cu(001). Studies include quantifying the temporal evolution of Pd concentration on the Cu(001) terrace, mapping the 3D heterogeneous surface chemical composition, and identifying a step-overgrowth thin film growth mechanism. It is found that, at the initial deposition stages, Pd atoms reside in the second layer at the sample temperature of 473 K, and the Pd concentration increases exponentially with time. The heterogeneous structure and composition near the steps are found to be a result of the step-overgrowth. We highlight the LEEM-IV technique which provides a high lateral resolution at surfaces. We demonstrate a 3D profile of Pd concentration in the surface region by using the LEEM

  14. Excited-state dynamics of oxazole: A combined electronic structure calculations and dynamic simulations study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jun; Xie, Zhi-Zhong; Yu, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, the combined electronic structure calculations and surface hopping simulations have been performed to investigate the excited-state decay of the parent oxazole in the gas phase. Our calculations show that the S2 state decay of oxazole is an ultrafast process characterized by the ring-opening and ring-closure of the five-membered oxazole ring, in which the triplet contribution is minor. The ring-opening involves the Osbnd C bond cleavage affording the nitrile ylide and airine intermediates, while the ring-closure gives rise to a bicyclic species through a 2sbnd 5 bond formation. The azirine and bicyclic intermediates in the S0 state are very likely involved in the phototranspositions of oxazoles. This is different from the previous mechanism in which these intermediates in the T1 state have been proposed for these phototranspositions.

  15. Efficient preconditioning of the electronic structure problem in large scale ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffmann, Florian; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-06-01

    We present an improved preconditioning scheme for electronic structure calculations based on the orbital transformation method. First, a preconditioner is developed which includes information from the full Kohn-Sham matrix but avoids computationally demanding diagonalisation steps in its construction. This reduces the computational cost of its construction, eliminating a bottleneck in large scale simulations, while maintaining rapid convergence. In addition, a modified form of Hotelling's iterative inversion is introduced to replace the exact inversion of the preconditioner matrix. This method is highly effective during molecular dynamics (MD), as the solution obtained in earlier MD steps is a suitable initial guess. Filtering small elements during sparse matrix multiplication leads to linear scaling inversion, while retaining robustness, already for relatively small systems. For system sizes ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand atoms, which are typical for many practical applications, the improvements to the algorithm lead to a 2-5 fold speedup per MD step.

  16. Efficient preconditioning of the electronic structure problem in large scale ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffmann, Florian; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-06-28

    We present an improved preconditioning scheme for electronic structure calculations based on the orbital transformation method. First, a preconditioner is developed which includes information from the full Kohn-Sham matrix but avoids computationally demanding diagonalisation steps in its construction. This reduces the computational cost of its construction, eliminating a bottleneck in large scale simulations, while maintaining rapid convergence. In addition, a modified form of Hotelling’s iterative inversion is introduced to replace the exact inversion of the preconditioner matrix. This method is highly effective during molecular dynamics (MD), as the solution obtained in earlier MD steps is a suitable initial guess. Filtering small elements during sparse matrix multiplication leads to linear scaling inversion, while retaining robustness, already for relatively small systems. For system sizes ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand atoms, which are typical for many practical applications, the improvements to the algorithm lead to a 2-5 fold speedup per MD step.

  17. Electronic Falling Body Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, John M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an analog electronic simulator for the motion of an object projected horizontally in a vertical acceleration field. The device features adjustable values for the horizontal speeds and "gravity." Trajectories are displayed on an oscilloscope. (Author/CP)

  18. Propagation of localized structures in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas using particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    López, Rodrigo A.; Muñoz, Víctor; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, Juan A.

    2015-09-15

    We use a particle-in-cell simulation to study the propagation of localized structures in a magnetized electron-positron plasma with relativistic finite temperature. We use as initial condition for the simulation an envelope soliton solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, derived from the relativistic two fluid equations in the strongly magnetized limit. This envelope soliton turns out not to be a stable solution for the simulation and splits in two localized structures propagating in opposite directions. However, these two localized structures exhibit a soliton-like behavior, as they keep their profile after they collide with each other due to the periodic boundary conditions. We also observe the formation of localized structures in the evolution of a spatially uniform circularly polarized Alfvén wave. In both cases, the localized structures propagate with an amplitude independent velocity.

  19. On the effectiveness of charged wire structures for reducing electron backscatter in system-generated EMP simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbaxani, S. H.; Jones, D. E.; Tesche, F. M.

    1981-08-01

    Using symmetry conditions and conformal mapping techniques, the two-dimensional problem of potentials due to a periodic assembly of thin line charges is first solved. The three-dimensional problem obtained by placing one and two cross-wire meshes parallel to a ground plane are then analyzed for evaluating the effectiveness of such structures in trapping Compton electrons in the system-generated EMP simulators. The parametric analysis conducted here indicates that such structures can successfully trap electrons with velocities considerably in excess of the escape velocity. By considering only very thin wire structures, the relatively unimportant parameter of direct collision of the electrons with the mesh is removed. Parametric analysis yields data suitable for maximizing trapping efficiency as a function of the kinetic energy of the Compton electrons.

  20. Modification of Defect Structures in Graphene by Electron Irradiation: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Zhou, Yungang; Bang, Junhyeok; Prange, Micah P.; Zhang, Shengbai; Gao, Fei

    2012-08-02

    Defects play an important role on the unique properties of the sp2-bonded materials, such as graphene. The creation and evolution of mono-vacancy, di-vacancy, Stone-Wales (SW) and grain boundaries (GBs) under irradiation in graphene are investigated using density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations. It is of great interest to note that the patterns of these defects can be controlled through electron irradiation. The SW defects can be created by electron irradiation with energy of above the displacement threshold energy (Td, {approx}19 eV) and can be healed with an energy (14-18 eV) lower than Td. The transformation between four types of divacancies, V2(5-8-5), V2(555-777), V2(5555-6-7777), and V2(55-77) can be realized through bond rotation induced by electron irradiation. The migrations of divancancies, SW defects, and GBs can also be controlled by electron irradiation. Thus, electron irradiation can serve as an important tool to modify morphology in a controllable manner, and to tailor the physical properties of graphene.

  1. Xyce parallel electronic simulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide.

  2. The role of solvent structure in the absorption spectrum of solvated electrons: Mixed quantum/classical simulations in tetrahydrofuran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedard-Hearn, Michael J.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2005-04-01

    In polar fluids such as water and methanol, the peak of the solvated electron's absorption spectrum in the red has been assigned as a sum of transitions between an s-like ground state and three nearly degenerate p-like excited states bound in a quasispherical cavity. In contrast, in weakly polar solvents such as tetrahydrofuran (THF), the solvated electron has an absorption spectrum that peaks in the mid-infrared, but no definitive assignment has been offered about the origins of the spectrum or the underlying structure. In this paper, we present the results of adiabatic mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamic simulations of the solvated electron in THF, and provide a detailed explanation of the THF-solvated electron's absorption spectrum and electronic structure. Using a classical solvent model and a fully quantum mechanical excess electron, our simulations show that although the ground and first excited states are bound in a quasispherical cavity, a multitude of other, nearby solvent cavities support numerous, nearly degenerate, bound excited states that have little Franck-Condon overlap with the ground state. We show that these solvent cavities, which are partially polarized so that they act as electron trapping sites, are an inherent property of the way THF molecules pack in the liquid. The absorption spectrum is thus assigned to a sum of bound-to-bound transitions between a localized ground state and multiple disjoint excited states scattered throughout the fluid. Furthermore, we find that the usual spherical harmonic labels (e.g., s-like, p-like) are not good descriptors of the excited-state wave functions of the solvated electron in THF. Our observation of multiple disjoint excited states is consistent with femtosecond pump-probe experiments in the literature that suggest that photoexcitation of solvated electrons in THF causes them to relocalize into solvent cavities far from where they originated.

  3. Ab initio calculations on twisted graphene/hBN: Electronic structure and STM image simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, J. D.; Cisternas, E.

    2016-09-01

    By performing ab initio calculations we obtained theoretical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images and studied the electronic properties of graphene on a hexagonal boron-nitrite (hBN) layer. Three different stack configurations and four twisted angles were considered. All calculations were performed using density functional theory, including van der Waals interactions as implemented in the SIESTA ab initio package. Our results show that the electronic structure of graphene is preserved, although some small changes are induced by the interaction with the hBN layer, particularly in the total density of states at 1.5 eV under the Fermi level. When layers present a twisted angle, the density of states shows several van Hove singularities under the Fermi level, which are associated to moiré patterns observed in theoretical STM images.

  4. The VENUS/NWChem Software Package. Tight Coupling Between Chemical Dynamics Simulations and Electronic Structure Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lourderaj, Upakarasamy; Sun, Rui; De Jong, Wibe A.; Windus, Theresa L.; Hase, William L.

    2014-03-01

    The interface for VENUS and NWChem, and the resulting software package for direct dynamics simulations are described. The coupling of the two codes is considered to be a tight coupling. The two codes are compiled and linked together and act as one executable with data being passed between the two codes through routine calls. The advantages of this type of coupling are discussed. The interface has been designed to have as little interference as possible with the core codes of both VENUS and NWChem. VENUS is the code that propagates the direct dynamics trajectories and, therefore, is the program that drives the overall execution of VENUS/NWChem. VENUS has remained an essentially sequential code, which uses the highly parallel structure of NWChem. Subroutines of the interface which accomplish the data transmission and communication between the two computer programs are described. Recent examples of the use of VENUS/NWChem for direct dynamics simulations are summarized.

  5. Electronic structure and mesoscopic simulations of nonylphenol ethoxylate surfactants. a combined DFT and DPD study.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Diego; Aburto, Jorge; García-Cruz, Isidoro

    2013-08-07

    The aim of this work was to gain insight into the effect of ethylene oxide (EO) chains on the properties of a series of nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPE) surfactants. We performed a theoretical study of NPE surfactants by means of density functional theory (DFT) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). Both approximations were used separately to obtain different properties. Four NPEs were selected for this purpose (EO = 4, 7, 11 and 15 length chains). DFT methods provided some electronic properties that are related to the EO units. One of them is the solvation Gibbs energy, which exhibited a linear trend with EO chain length. DPD calculations allow us to observe the dynamic behavior in water of the NPE surfactants. We propose a coarse-grained model which properly simulates the mesophases of each surfactant. This model can be used in other NPEs applications.

  6. Electronic structure of alloxan and its dimers: QM/QD simulations and quantum chemical topology analysis.

    PubMed

    Allehyani, Basmah H; Elroby, Shaaban A; Aziz, Saadalluh G; Hilal, Rifaat H

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify the origin of the extra stability of alloxan, a biologically active pyrimidine. To achieve this goal, detailed DFT computations and quantum dynamics simulations have been performed to establish the most stable conformation and the global minimum structure on the alloxan potential energy surface. The effects of the solvent, basis set, and DFT method have been examined to validate the theoretical model adopted throughout the work. Two non-covalent intermolecular dimers of alloxan, the H-bonded and dipolar dimers, have been investigated at the ωB97X-D and M06-2X levels of theory using the triple zeta 6-311++G** to establish their relative stability. Quantum chemical topology features and natural bond orbital analysis (NBO) have been performed to identify and characterize the forces that govern the structures and underlie the extra stability of alloxan.

  7. Modeling and simulation of heterogeneous electronic system based on smart sensors for aerospace structures health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Paula L.; Aragonés, Raúl; Oliver, Joan; Ferrer, Carles

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a top-down design methodology for a behavioral modeling System, based on smart sensors for aerospace structures monitoring, implemented on a MATLAB/Simulink environment. The modeled acquisition platform in this aeronautic health monitoring systems (AHMS) is built using the following specific sensors: humidity, pressure, temperature, stress and acceleration. For this application it has been implemented frequency acquisition techniques ensuring optimum noise immunity, particularly: a signal acquisition technique based on voltage to frequency converter, capacitance to frequency and frequency to code converters (VtoF-cC, CtoF-cC). The Simulink model presents a high accuracy level in signal acquisition and conditioning compared to the electrical system simulation behavior.

  8. Ab initio simulation of the electronic structure of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} crystal modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Perevalov, T. V. Shaposhnikov, A. V.

    2013-06-15

    Ab initio simulation of the electronic structure crystalline {beta} and {delta} phases of tantalum(V) oxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}), representing a promising dielectric material for microelectronics, has been carried out. Both ideal crystals and those with neutral oxygen vacancies in various coordination positions have been studied. The simulation has been performed using the density functional theory with hybrid functionals involving the Hartree-Fock exchange energy. This approach gives a correct description of the bandgap width: 4.1 eV for {beta}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 3.1 eV for {delta}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The energy levels related to oxygen vacancies in various positions have been determined for the spectra of electron states in {beta}- and {delta}-Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} polymorphs. It is established that the presence of oxygen vacancies in Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} crystal modifications leads to the formation of characteristic absorption peaks in their electron energy loss spectra.

  9. Structural and electronic properties of aqueous NaCl solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations with hybrid density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiduk, Alex P.; Zhang, Cui; Gygi, François; Galli, Giulia

    2014-06-01

    We present a study of a dilute solution (1 M) of NaCl in water, carried out using ab initio molecular dynamics with semilocal and hybrid functionals. We showed that the structural and electronic properties of the solute and the solvent are the same as those obtained in the infinite dilution limit, i.e. for aqueous ions in the presence of a uniform compensating background. Compared to semilocal functionals, simulations with hybrid functionals yield a less structured solution with a smaller number of hydrogen bonds and a larger coordination number for the Cl- anion. In addition, hybrid functionals predict qualitatively correct positions of the energy levels of the ions with respect to the valence band of water.

  10. Internal conversion and intersystem crossing in α,β-enones: a combination of electronic structure calculations and dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Xie, Zhi-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    The ab initio electronic structure calculations and CASSCF-based nonadiabatic dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the internal conversion and intersystem crossing process of both trans-acrolein and 2-cyclopentenone in the gas phase. Our calculation results show that relaxation from the Franck-Condon region to an S1 minimum is ultrafast and that the S1 state will dominantly undergo intersystem crossing to triplet states due to the existence of significant barriers to access the S1/S0 intersection points and of energetically close-lying triplet states. The S1/T2/T1 three-state intersection is observed in our dynamics simulations to play an important role in the population of the lowest triplet state, which is consistent with previous suggestions. Although the evolution into triplet states involves a similar path and gives rise to a similar triplet quantum yield for these two molecules, the intersystem crossing rate of 2-cyclopentenone is lower owing to the ring constraint that results in a smaller spin-orbital coupling in the singlet-triplet crossing region. The present theoretical study reproduces the experimental results and gives an explanation about the structural factors that govern the excited-state decay of some types of α,β-enones.

  11. Isomers of small Pbn clusters (n=2-15) : Geometric and electronic structures based on ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, C.; Majumder, C.; Rajan, M. G. R.; Kulshreshtha, S. K.

    2005-12-01

    The geometric and electronic structure of the Pbn clusters (n=2-15) has been calculated to elucidate its structural evolution and compared with other group-IV elemental clusters. The search for several low-lying isomers was carried out using the ab initio molecular dynamics simulations under the framework of the density functional theory formalism. The results suggest that unlike Si, Ge, and Sn clusters, which favor less compact prolate shape in the small size range, Pb clusters favor compact spherical structures consisting of fivefold or sixfold symmetries. The difference in the growth motif can be attributed to their bulk crystal structure, which is diamond-like for Si, Ge, and Sn but fcc for Pb. The relative stability of Pbn clusters is analyzed based on the calculated binding energies and second difference in energy. The results suggest that n=4 , 7, 10, and 13 clusters are more stable than their respective neighbors, reflecting good agreement with experimental observation. Based on the fragmentation pattern it is seen that small clusters up to n=12 favor monomer evaporation, larger ones fragment into two stable daughter products. The experimental observation of large abundance for n=7 and lowest abundance of n=14 have been demonstrated from their fragmentation pattern. Finally a good agreement of our theoretical results with that of the experimental findings reported earlier implies accurate predictions of the ground state geometries of these clusters.

  12. Electron Structure of Francium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufos, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    This talk presents the first calculations of the electronic structure of francium for the bcc, fcc and hcp structures, using the Augmented Plane Wave (APW) method in its muffin-tin and linearized general potential forms. Both the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA), were used to calculate the electronic structure and total energy of francium (Fr). The GGA and LDA both found the total energy of the hcp structure slightly below that of the fcc and bcc structure, respectively. This is in agreement with similar results for the other alkali metals using the same methodology. The equilibrium lattice constant, bulk modulus and superconductivity parameters were calculated. We found that under pressures, in the range of 1-5 GPa, Fr could be a superconductor at a critical temperature of about 4K.

  13. Structural mechanics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffle, Johnny H.

    1992-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratory has a very broad structural capability. Work has been performed in support of reentry vehicles, nuclear reactor safety, weapons systems and components, nuclear waste transport, strategic petroleum reserve, nuclear waste storage, wind and solar energy, drilling technology, and submarine programs. The analysis environment contains both commercial and internally developed software. Included are mesh generation capabilities, structural simulation codes, and visual codes for examining simulation results. To effectively simulate a wide variety of physical phenomena, a large number of constitutive models have been developed.

  14. Structural mechanics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biffle, Johnny H.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratory has a very broad structural capability. Work has been performed in support of reentry vehicles, nuclear reactor safety, weapons systems and components, nuclear waste transport, strategic petroleum reserve, nuclear waste storage, wind and solar energy, drilling technology, and submarine programs. The analysis environment contains both commercial and internally developed software. Included are mesh generation capabilities, structural simulation codes, and visual codes for examining simulation results. To effectively simulate a wide variety of physical phenomena, a large number of constitutive models have been developed.

  15. Cytochrome C on a gold surface: investigating structural relaxations and their role in protein-surface electron transfer by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Siwko, Magdalena E; Corni, Stefano

    2013-04-28

    Proteins immobilized on inorganic surfaces are important in technological fields such as biosensors, enzymatic biofuel cells and biomolecular electronics. In these frameworks, it has been demonstrated that some proteins are able to keep their functionality, although the latter may be somewhat modified by the interaction with the surface. Cytochrome C, an heme-based electron transfer protein, has been found to be able to exchange electrons with the gold surface on which it is immobilized, but some deviations from the expected electron transfer rates were evidenced [C. A. Bortolotti, et al., J. Phys. Chem. C 2007, 111, 12100-12105]. In this work we have used molecular dynamics simulations of (native and mutated) yeast cytochrome C supported on Au(111) to investigate the microscopic picture behind the experimental behavior of the molecule. In particular, we have focused on the structural re-arrangements due to the interactions with the surface. We found that, despite being secondary-structure preserving, they can profoundly affect protein-surface electronic coupling and, in turn, electron transfer rates, explaining experimental findings. The conformational flexibility of the protein in the region of the protein-surface bond is thus pivotal in determining the resulting ET functionality of the immobilized protein.

  16. Xyce parallel electronic simulator design.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Mei, Ting; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Russo, Thomas V.

    2010-09-01

    This document is the Xyce Circuit Simulator developer guide. Xyce has been designed from the 'ground up' to be a SPICE-compatible, distributed memory parallel circuit simulator. While it is in many respects a research code, Xyce is intended to be a production simulator. As such, having software quality engineering (SQE) procedures in place to insure a high level of code quality and robustness are essential. Version control, issue tracking customer support, C++ style guildlines and the Xyce release process are all described. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been under development at Sandia since 1999. Historically, Xyce has mostly been funded by ASC, the original focus of Xyce development has primarily been related to circuits for nuclear weapons. However, this has not been the only focus and it is expected that the project will diversify. Like many ASC projects, Xyce is a group development effort, which involves a number of researchers, engineers, scientists, mathmaticians and computer scientists. In addition to diversity of background, it is to be expected on long term projects for there to be a certain amount of staff turnover, as people move on to different projects. As a result, it is very important that the project maintain high software quality standards. The point of this document is to formally document a number of the software quality practices followed by the Xyce team in one place. Also, it is hoped that this document will be a good source of information for new developers.

  17. Simulation of phase structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, J.

    1995-04-20

    This memo outlines a procedure developed by the author to extract information from phase measurements and produce a simulated phase structure for use in modeling optical systems, including characteristic optics for the Beamlet and NIF laser systems. The report includes an IDL program listing.

  18. Simulations of Gaussian electron guns for RHIC electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A.

    2014-02-28

    Simulations of two versions of the electron gun for RHIC electron lens are presented. The electron guns have to generate an electron beam with Gaussian radial profile of the electron beam density. To achieve the Gaussian electron emission profile on the cathode we used a combination of the gun electrodes and shaping of the cathode surface. Dependence of electron gun performance parameters on the geometry of electrodes and the margins for electrodes positioning are presented.

  19. P3HT:DiPBI bulk heterojunction solar cells: morphology and electronic structure probed by multiscale simulation and UV/vis spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Winands, Thorsten; Böckmann, Marcus; Schemme, Thomas; Ly, Phong-Minh Timmy; de Jong, Djurre H; Wang, Zhaohui; Denz, Cornelia; Heuer, Andreas; Doltsinis, Nikos L

    2016-02-17

    Coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations are performed for a mixture of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and diperylene bisimide (DiPBI). The effect of different annealing and cooling protocols on the morphology is investigated and the resulting domain structures are analyzed. In particular, π-stacked clusters of DiPBI molecules are observed whose size decreases with increasing temperature. Domain structure and diffusivity data suggest that the DiPBI subsystem undergoes an order → disorder phase transition between 700 and 900 K. Electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory are carried out after backmapping the coarse grained model onto an atomistic force field representation built upon first principles. UV/vis absorption spectra of the P3HT:DiPBI mixture are computed using time-dependent density functional linear response theory and recorded experimentally for a spin-coated thin film. It is demonstrated that the absorption spectrum depends sensitively on the details of the amorphous structure, thus providing valuable insight into the morphology. In particular, the results show that the tempering procedure has a significant influence on the material's electronic properties. This knowledge may help to develop effective processing routines to enhance the performance of bulk heterojunction solar cells. PMID:26853376

  20. Simulation of planar channeling-radiation spectra of relativistic electrons and positrons channeled in a diamond-structure or tungsten single crystal (classical approach)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadegan, B.; Wagner, W.

    2015-01-01

    We present a Mathematica package for simulation of spectral-angular distributions and energy spectra of planar channeling radiation of relativistic electrons and positrons channeled along major crystallographic planes of a diamond-structure or tungsten single crystal. The program is based on the classical theory of channeling radiation which has been successfully applied to study planar channeling of light charged particles at energies higher than 100 MeV. Continuous potentials for different planes of diamond, Si, Ge and W single crystals are calculated using the Doyle-Turner approximation to the atomic scattering factor and taking thermal vibrations of the crystal atoms into account. Numerical methods are applied to solve the classical one-dimensional equation of motion. The code is designed to calculate the trajectories, velocities and accelerations of electrons (positrons) channeled by the planar continuous potential. In the framework of classical electrodynamics, these data allow realistic simulations of spectral-angular distributions and energy spectra of planar channeling radiation. Since the generated output is quantitative, the results of calculation may be useful, e.g., for setup configuration and crystal alignment in channeling experiments, for the study of the dependence of channeling radiation on the input parameters of particle beams with respect to the crystal orientation, but also for the simulation of positron production by means of pair creation what is mandatory for the design of efficient positron sources necessary in high-energy and collider physics. Although the classical theory of channeling is well established for long time, there is no adequate library program for simulation of channeling radiation up to now, which is commonly available, sufficiently simple and effective to employ and, therefore, of benefit as for special investigations as for a quick overview of basic features of this type of radiation.

  1. Intermolecular Interactions and Cooperative Effects from Electronic Structure Calculations: An Effective Means for Developing Interaction Potentials for Condensed Phase Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2004-05-01

    The modeling of the macroscopic properties of homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems via atomistic simulations such as molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) techniques is based on the accurate description of the relevant solvent-solute and solvent-solvent intermolecular interactions. The total energy (U) of an n-body molecular system can be formally written as [1,2,3

  2. VORPAL simulations relevant to coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bell,G.; Bruhwiler, D.; Sobol, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Litvinenko, V.; Derbenev, Y.

    2008-06-23

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) [1] combines the best features of electron cooling and stochastic cooling, via free-electron laser technology [2], to offer the possibility of cooling high-energy hadron beams with order-of-magnitude shorter cooling times. Many technical difficulties must be resolved via full-scale 3D simulations, before the CEC concept can be validated experimentally. VORPAL is the ideal code for simulating the modulator and kicker regions, where the electron and hadron beams will co-propagate as in a conventional electron cooling section. Unlike previous VORPAL simulations [3] of electron cooling physics, where dynamical friction on the ions was the key metric, it is the details of the electron density wake driven by each ion in the modulator section that must be understood, followed by strong amplification in the FEL. We present some initial simulation results.

  3. Simulation study of electron response amplification in coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Y.; Litvinenko, V.N.

    2012-05-20

    In Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC), it is essential to study the amplification of electron response to a single ion in the FEL process, in order to proper align the electron beam and the ion beam in the kicker to maximize the cooling effect. In this paper, we use Genesis to simulate the amplified electron beam response of single ion in FEL amplification process, which acts as Green's function of the FEL amplifier.

  4. Electronics for Piezoelectric Smart Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warkentin, D. J.; Tani, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper briefly presents work addressing some of the basic considerations for the electronic components used in smart structures incorporating piezoelectric elements. After general remarks on the application of piezoelectric elements to the problem of structural vibration control, three main topics are described. Work to date on the development of techniques for embedding electronic components within structural parts is presented, followed by a description of the power flow and dissipation requirements of those components. Finally current work on the development of electronic circuits for use in an 'active wall' for acoustic noise is introduced.

  5. Track-Structure Simulations for Charged Particles

    PubMed Central

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Monte-Carlo track-structure simulations provide a detailed and accurate picture of radiation transport of charged particles through condensed matter of biological interest. Liquid water serves as surrogate for soft tissue and is used in most Monte-Carlo track-structure codes. Basic theories of radiation transport and track-structure simulations are discussed and differences to condensed history codes highlighted. Interaction cross sections for electrons, protons, alpha particles, light and heavy ions are required input data for track-structure simulations. Different calculation methods, including the plane-wave Born approximation, the dielectric theory, and semi-empirical approaches are presented using liquid water as a target. Low-energy electron transport and light ion transport are discussed as areas of special interest. PMID:23032889

  6. QUEST: QUantum Electron Simulation Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Roger Che-Rung; Chiesa, Simone; Varney, Christopher N; Khatami, Ehsan; Bai, Zhaojun; D'Azevedo, Ed F; Jarrell, Mark; Maier, Thomas A; Savrasov, Sergey; Scalettar, Richard; Tomko, Karen

    2010-01-01

    QUEST is a part of the SciDAC project on next generation multi-scale quantum simulation software for strongly correlated materials. It is a Fortran 90/95 package that implements the determinant quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) method for simulation of magnetic, superconducting, and metal-insulator transitions in model Hamiltonians. In this paper, we show how QUEST is capable of treating lattices of unprecedentedly large sizes and how this can be fruitful in the study of the physics of trapped fermionic system, in the development of more efficient solvers for Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) and as a tool to test and, in the future, improve diagrammatic approaches such as the Parquet approximation. We will also present a range of synergistic activities on the development of stable and robust numerical algorithms and hybrid granularity parallelization scheme that combines algorithmic and implementation techniques to high-performance DQMC simulation. The work reported here is a key step forward in achieving the goals of our SciDAC project.

  7. Photoinduced reactions of both 2-formyl-2H-azirine and isoxazole: A theoretical study based on electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jun

    2015-06-28

    In the present work, the combined electronic structure calculations and dynamics simulations have been performed to explore photocleavages of 2-formyl-2H-azirine and isoxazole in the gas phase and the subsequent rearrangement reactions. The carbonyl n → π{sup *} transition induces a cleavage of the C—N single bond of 2-formyl-2H-azirine to yield β-formylvinylnitrene in open-shell singlet state. However, the n → π{sup *} excitation of the imine chromophore results in a cleavage of the C—C single bond, producing a nitrile ylide intermediate through an internal conversion to the ground state. β-formylvinylnitrene and nitrile ylide with the carbonyl group are easily transformed into 2-formyl-2H-azirine and oxazole, respectively. The N—O bond cleavages on both S{sub 1}({sup 1}ππ{sup *}) and S{sub 2}({sup 1}n{sub N}π{sup *}) of isoxazole are ultrafast processes, and they give products of 2-formyl-2H-azirine, 3-formylketenimine, HCN + CHCHO, and HCO + CHCHN. Both 2H-azirines and ketenimines were suggested to be formed from the triplet vinylnitrenes by intersystem crossing in the previous studies. However, our calculations show that the singlet β-formylvinylnitrene is responsible for the formation of 2-formyl-2H-azirine and 3-formylketenimine, and the singlet vinylnitrenes can play a key role in the photoinduced reactions of both 2H-azirines and isoxazoles.

  8. Photoinduced reactions of both 2-formyl-2H-azirine and isoxazole: A theoretical study based on electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun

    2015-06-28

    In the present work, the combined electronic structure calculations and dynamics simulations have been performed to explore photocleavages of 2-formyl-2H-azirine and isoxazole in the gas phase and the subsequent rearrangement reactions. The carbonyl n → π(*) transition induces a cleavage of the C-N single bond of 2-formyl-2H-azirine to yield β-formylvinylnitrene in open-shell singlet state. However, the n → π(*) excitation of the imine chromophore results in a cleavage of the C-C single bond, producing a nitrile ylide intermediate through an internal conversion to the ground state. β-formylvinylnitrene and nitrile ylide with the carbonyl group are easily transformed into 2-formyl-2H-azirine and oxazole, respectively. The N-O bond cleavages on both S1((1)ππ(*)) and S2((1)nNπ(*)) of isoxazole are ultrafast processes, and they give products of 2-formyl-2H-azirine, 3-formylketenimine, HCN + CHCHO, and HCO + CHCHN. Both 2H-azirines and ketenimines were suggested to be formed from the triplet vinylnitrenes by intersystem crossing in the previous studies. However, our calculations show that the singlet β-formylvinylnitrene is responsible for the formation of 2-formyl-2H-azirine and 3-formylketenimine, and the singlet vinylnitrenes can play a key role in the photoinduced reactions of both 2H-azirines and isoxazoles.

  9. Simulated electron holography of PSD particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Nagy, Les

    2016-04-01

    Electron holography is an experimental technique that is capable of observing magnetic microstructures on the same scale as can be determined using numerical modeling and thus bridge the gap between experimental measurements and theory. I will present a technique for simulating holographic images from the results of micromagnetic models and demonstrate an easily used tool for generating holograms on the fly in an interactive environment (ie in ParaView). Since holography flattens 3D information onto a 2D image, some useful information can be lost. By looking at some examples of holograms of interesting 3D magnetizations (ie PSD structures), particularly how they change as they're rotated, along with comparisons of different structures, I will examine what information can be retrieved and what might be lost. The existance of an external dipole can be indicative of an in-plane component of a seemingly out-of-plane vortex core. It is also seen, however, that two quite different structures (in this case a [111] vortex core and a [111] uniform magnetization) can sometimes be quite indistinguishable.

  10. ELECTRON COOLING SIMULATION FOR ARBITRARY DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    SIDORIN,A.; SMIRNOV, A.; FEDOTOV, A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KAYRAN, D.

    2007-09-10

    Typically, several approximations are being used in simulation of electron cooling process, for example, density distribution of electrons is calculated using an analytical expression and distribution in the velocity space is assumed to be Maxwellian in all degrees of freedom. However, in many applications, accurate description of the cooling process based on realistic distribution of electrons is very useful. This is especially true for a high-energy electron cooling system which requires bunched electron beam produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (Em). Such systems are proposed, for instance, for RHIC and electron - ion collider. To address unique features of the RHIC-I1 cooler, new algorithms were introduced in BETACOOL code which allow us to take into account local properties of electron distribution as well as calculate friction force for an arbitrary velocity distribution. Here, we describe these new numerical models. Results based on these numerical models are compared with typical approximations using electron distribution produced by simulations of electron bunch through ERL of RHIC-II cooler.

  11. VORPAL Simulations Relevant to Coherent Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Sobol, A.V.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Litvinenko, Vladimir; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2008-07-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC)* combines the best features of electron cooling and stochastic cooling, via free-electron laser technology**, to offer the possibility of cooling high-energy hadron beams with order-of-magnitude shorter cooling times. Many technical difficulties must be resolved via full-scale 3D simulations, before the CEC concept can be validated experimentally. VORPAL is the ideal code for simulating the â modulatorâ and â kickerâ regions, where the electron and hadron beams will co-propagate as in a conventional electron cooling section. Unlike previous VORPAL simulations*** of electron cooling physics, where dynamical friction on the ions was the key metric, it is the details of the electron density wake driven by each ion in the modulator section that must be understood, followed by strong amplification in the FEL. We present some initial simulation results. In particular, we compare the semi-analytic binary collision model with electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC).

  12. Electronic notebook for physical system simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    A scientist who sets up and runs experiments typically keeps notes of this process in a lab notebook. A scientist who runs computer simulations should be no different. Experiments and simulations both require a set-up process which should be documented along with the results of the experiment or simulation. The documentation is important for knowing and understanding what was attempted, what took place, and how to reproduce it in the future. Modern simulations of physical systems have become more complex due in part to larger computational resources and increased understanding of physical systems. These simulations may be performed by combining the results from multiple computer codes. The machines that these simulations are executed on are often massively parallelldistributed systems. The output result of one of these simulations can be a terabyte of data and can require months of computing. All of these things contribute to the difficulty of keeping a useful record of the process of setting up and executing a simulation for a physical system. An electronic notebook for physical system simulations has been designed to help document the set up and execution process. Much of the documenting is done automatically by the simulation rather than the scientist running the simulation. Tho simulation knows what codes, data, software libraries, and versions thereof it is drawing together. All of these pieces of information become documented in the electronic notebook. The electronic notebook is designed with and uses the extensible Markup Language (XML). XML facilitates the representation, storage, interchange, and further use of the documented information.

  13. An electronic notebook for physical system simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, Robert L.

    2003-09-01

    A scientist who sets up and runs experiments typically keeps notes of this process in a lab notebook. A scientist who runs computer simulations should be no different. Experiments and simulations both require a set-up process which should be documented along with the results of the experiment or simulation. The documentation is important for knowing and understanding what was attempted, what took place, and how to reproduce it in the future. Modern simulations of physical systems have become more complex due in part to larger computational resources and increased understanding of physical systems. These simulations may be performed by combining the results from multiple computer codes. The machines that these simulations are executed on are often massively parallel/distributed systems. The output result of one of these simulations can be a terabyte of data and can require months of computing. All of these things contribute to the difficulty of keeping a useful record of the process of setting up and executing a simulation for a physical system. An electronic notebook for physical system simulations has been designed to help document the set up and execution process. Much of the documenting is done automatically by the simulation rather than the scientist running the simulation. The simulation knows what codes, data, software libraries, and versions thereof it is drawing together. All of these pieces of information become documented in the electronic notebook. The electronic notebook is designed with and uses the eXtensible Markup Language (XML). XML facilitates the representation, storage, interchange, and further use of the documented information.

  14. Electronic Structure Principles and Aromaticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chattaraj, P. K.; Sarkar, U.; Roy, D. R.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between aromaticity and stability in molecules on the basis of quantities such as hardness and electrophilicity is explored. The findings reveal that aromatic molecules are less energetic, harder, less polarizable, and less electrophilic as compared to antiaromatic molecules, as expected from the electronic structure principles.

  15. Electronic structure of disordered conjugated polymers: Polythiophenes

    SciTech Connect

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-11-26

    Electronic structure of disordered semiconducting conjugated polymers was studied. Atomic structure was found from a classical molecular dynamics simulation and the charge patching method was used to calculate the electronic structure with the accuracy similar to the one of density functional theory in local density approximation. The total density of states, the local density of states at different points in the system and the wavefunctions of several states around the gap were calculated in the case of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and polythiophene (PT) systems to gain insight into the origin of disorder in the system, the degree of carrier localization and the role of chain interactions. The results indicated that disorder in the electronic structure of alkyl substituted polythiophenes comes from disorder in the conformation of individualchains, while in the case of polythiophene there is an additional contribution due to disorder in the electronic coupling between the chains. Each of the first several wavefunctions in the conduction and valence band of P3HT is localized over several rings of a single chain. It was shown that the localization can be caused in principle both by ring torsions and chain bending, however the effect of ring torsions is much stronger. PT wavefunctions are more complicated due to larger interchain electronic coupling and are not necessarily localized on a single chain.

  16. MEIC Electron Cooling Simulation Using Betacool

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, He; Zhang, Yuhong

    2013-12-01

    Electron cooling of ion beams is the most critical R&D issue in Jefferson Lab's MEIC design. In the ion collider ring, a bunched electron beam driven by an energy-recovery SRF linac assisted by a circulate ring will be employed to cool protons or ions with energies up to 100 GeV/u, a parameter regime that electron cooling has never been applied. It is essential to understand how efficient the electron cooling is, particularly in the high energy range, to confirm the feasibility of the design. Electron cooling is also important in LEIC design although the ion energy is 25 GeV/u, lower than MEIC. In this paper, we will present first results of the simulation studies of electron cooling processes in the collider ring of both MEIC and LEIC using BETACOOL code.

  17. Dispersed Polaron Simulations of Electron Transfer in Photosynthetic Reaction Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warshel, A.; Chu, Z. T.; Parson, W. W.

    1989-10-01

    A microscopic method for simulating quantum mechanical, nuclear tunneling effects in biological electron transfer reactions is presented and applied to several electron transfer steps in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers. In this ``dispersed polaron'' method the fluctuations of the protein and the electron carriers are projected as effective normal modes onto an appropriate reaction coordinate and used to evaluate the quantum mechanical rate constant. The simulations, based on the crystallographic structure of the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, focus on electron transfer from a bacteriopheophytin to a quinone and the subsequent back-reaction. The rates of both of these reactions are almost independent of temperature or even increase with decreasing temperature. The simulations reproduce this unusual temperature dependence in a qualitative way, without the use of adjustable parameters for the protein's Franck-Condon factors. The observed dependence of the back-reaction on the free energy of the reaction also is reproduced, including the special behavior in the ``inverted region.''

  18. Single Pass Electron Cooling Simulations for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G. I.; Pogorelov, I. V.; Schwartz, B. T.; Zhang, Yuhong; Zhang, He

    2013-12-01

    Cooling of medium energy protons is critical for the proposed Jefferson Lab Medium Energy Ion Collider (MEIC). We present simulations of electron cooling of protons up to 60 GeV. In the beam frame in which the proton and electrons are co-propagating, their motion is non-relativistic. We use a binary collision model which treats the cooling process as the sum of a large number of two-body collisions which are calculated exactly. This model can treat even very close collisions between an electron and ion with high accuracy. We also calculate dynamical friction using a delta-f PIC model. The code VSim (formerly Vorpal) is used to perform the simulations. We compare the friction rates with that obtained by a 3D integral over electron velocities which is used by BETACOOL.

  19. Electric fields in Scanning Electron Microscopy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arat, K. T.; Bolten, J.; Klimpel, T.; Unal, N.

    2016-03-01

    The electric field distribution and charging effects in Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were studied by extending a Monte-Carlo based SEM simulator by a fast and accurate multigrid (MG) based 3D electric field solver. The main focus is on enabling short simulation times with maintaining sufficient accuracy, so that SEM simulation can be used in practical applications. The implementation demonstrates a gain in computation speed, when compared to a Gauss-Seidel based reference solver is roughly factor of 40, with negligible differences in the result (~10-6 𝑉). In addition, the simulations were compared with experimental SEM measurements using also complex 3D sample, showing that i) the modelling of e-fields improves the simulation accuracy, and ii) multigrid method provide a significant benefit in terms of simulation time.

  20. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Mniszewski, Susan M; Negre, Christian F A; Cawkwell, Marc J; Swart, Pieter J; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C; Wall, Michael E; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-21

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27334148

  1. Dynamical simulations of strongly correlated electron materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Joel; Barros, Kipton; Batista, Cristian; Chern, Gia-Wei; Kotliar, Gabriel

    We present a formulation of quantum molecular dynamics that includes electron correlation effects via the Gutzwiller method. Our new scheme enables the study of the dynamical behavior of atoms and molecules with strong electron interactions. The Gutzwiller approach goes beyond the conventional mean-field treatment of the intra-atomic electron repulsion and captures crucial correlation effects such as band narrowing and electron localization. We use Gutzwiller quantum molecular dynamics to investigate the Mott transition in the liquid phase of a single-band metal and uncover intriguing structural and transport properties of the atoms.

  2. Electronic structure of Calcium hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byounghak; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2005-06-15

    We present a theoretical study of crystal and electronic structures of CaB6 within a screened-exchange local density approximation (sX-LDA). Our ab initio total energy calculations show that CaB6 is a semiconductor with a gap of >1.2 eV, in agreement with recent experimental observations. We show a very sensitive band gap dependence on the crystal internal parameter, which might partially explain the scatter of previous theoretical results. Our calculation demonstrates that it is essential to study this system simultaneously for both crystal structures and electronic properties, and that the sX-LDA provides an ideal method for this problem.

  3. Understanding Cellulose Through Molecular Simulation and Electron Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution cellulose crystal structures have been determined from diffraction experiments using large diameter microfibrils as the sample material. However, cellulose microfibrils in plants are much smaller in diameter, and are more difficult to directly examine experimentally. Molecular dynamics simulation combined with quantum chemical calculations can help to elucidate the structure and dynamics of small diameter cellulose microfibrils. These simulation techniques also aid in the interpretation of electron tomography volumetric structural data from maize cell walls, where pretreatment with dilute acid or ammonia reveals microfibril geometry.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of electrons in dense gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattersall, Wade; Boyle, Greg; Cocks, Daniel; Buckman, Stephen; White, Ron

    2014-10-01

    We implement a Monte-Carlo simulation modelling the transport of electrons and positrons in dense gases and liquids, by using a dynamic structure factor that allows us to construct structure-modified effective cross sections. These account for the coherent effects caused by interactions with the relatively dense medium. The dynamic structure factor also allows us to model thermal gases in the same manner, without needing to directly sample the velocities of the neutral particles. We present the results of a series of Monte Carlo simulations that verify and apply this new technique, and make comparisons with macroscopic predictions and Boltzmann equation solutions. Financial support of the Australian Research Council.

  5. Electron Coherence in Mesoscopic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenev, Alex; Glazman, Leonid

    2011-03-20

    The recent rapid progress in nanofabrication and experimental techniques made it possible to investigate a variety of meso-- and nano--scale systems, which were unavailable only a few years ago. Examples include fabrication of high-quality quantum wires in semiconductor heterostructures, of nanoscale hybrid superconductor--normal metal structures, and of a variety of novel (and much smaller) quantum dot and q-bit designs. These technological advances have led to formulation of a number of condensed matter theory problems which are equally important for applications and for the fundamental science. The present proposal aims at filling the exposed gaps in knowledge and at facilitating further development of experimental and theoretical physics of nanoscale structures. Specifically, the two PIs address the following issues: (i) The theory of interacting electrons in a quantum wire which accounts adequately for the non-linear dispersion relation of the electrons. The existing approaches rely on models with {\\em linearized} electron spectrum, which fall short of addressing a growing list of experimentally relevant phenomena. (ii) Dynamics of hybrid normal--superconducting systems. A reliable treatment of dissipative phenomena in such structures is not developed as of yet, while rapid progress in fabrication makes finding the proper theoretical treatment methods highly desirable. (iii)~The fundamental limits on relaxation times of a superconducting charge q-bit. The latter is one of the most advanced scalable realizations of a quantum computing device. (iv)~The dynamics and relaxation times of a spin of an electron in a small semiconductor quantum dot. Besides the fundamental importance, these structures are also valuable candidates for quantum computing applications.

  6. Exposure simulation of electron beam microcolumn lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Kon; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2004-05-01

    We propose an improved method to describe the electron-resist interaction based on Dill"s model for exposure simulation. For this purpose, Monte Carlo simulation was performed to obtain the energy intensity distribution in the chemically amplified resist. Tabulated Mott data for elastic scattering, Moller and Vriens cross sections for inelastic scattering, and Modified Bethe equation plus discrete energy loss for energy loss are used for the calculation of the energy intensity distribution. Through the electron-resist interaction, the energy intensity distribution changes resist components into the exposure production such as the photoacid concentration or the photoacid generator inside resists with various pattern shapes by using the modified Dill"s model. Our simulation profiles show a good agreement with experimental profiles.

  7. Electronic Structure of Few-Electron Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popsueva, V.; Hansen, J. P.; Caillat, J.

    2007-12-01

    We present a study of strongly correlated few-electron quantum dots, exploring the spectra of various few-electron quantum dot molecules: a double (diatomic) structure a quadruple two-electron quantum dot, and a three-electron double dot. Electron energy spectra are computed for different values of dot separation. All spectra show clear band structures and can be understood from asymptotical properties of the system.

  8. Structural Dynamics of Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhir, E.

    2013-03-01

    The published work on analytical ("mathematical") and computer-aided, primarily finite-element-analysis (FEA) based, predictive modeling of the dynamic response of electronic systems to shocks and vibrations is reviewed. While understanding the physics of and the ability to predict the response of an electronic structure to dynamic loading has been always of significant importance in military, avionic, aeronautic, automotive and maritime electronics, during the last decade this problem has become especially important also in commercial, and, particularly, in portable electronics in connection with accelerated testing of various surface mount technology (SMT) systems on the board level. The emphasis of the review is on the nonlinear shock-excited vibrations of flexible printed circuit boards (PCBs) experiencing shock loading applied to their support contours during drop tests. At the end of the review we provide, as a suitable and useful illustration, the exact solution to a highly nonlinear problem of the dynamic response of a "flexible-and-heavy" PCB to an impact load applied to its support contour during drop testing.

  9. Xyce(™) Parallel Electronic Simulator

    2013-10-03

    The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator simulates electronic circuit behavior in DC, AC, HB, MPDE and transient mode using standard analog (DAE) and/or device (PDE) device models including several age and radiation aware devices. It supports a variety of computing platforms (both serial and parallel) computers. Lastly, it uses a variety of modern solution algorithms dynamic parallel load-balancing and iterative solvers.! ! Xyce is primarily used to simulate the voltage and current behavior of a circuitmore » network (a network of electronic devices connected via a conductive network). As a tool, it is mainly used for the design and analysis of electronic circuits.! ! Kirchoff's conservation laws are enforced over a network using modified nodal analysis. This results in a set of differential algebraic equations (DAEs). The resulting nonlinear problem is solved iteratively using a fully coupled Newton method, which in turn results in a linear system that is solved by either a standard sparse-direct solver or iteratively using Trilinos linear solver packages, also developed at Sandia National Laboratories.« less

  10. Xyce(™) Parallel Electronic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-03

    The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator simulates electronic circuit behavior in DC, AC, HB, MPDE and transient mode using standard analog (DAE) and/or device (PDE) device models including several age and radiation aware devices. It supports a variety of computing platforms (both serial and parallel) computers. Lastly, it uses a variety of modern solution algorithms dynamic parallel load-balancing and iterative solvers.! ! Xyce is primarily used to simulate the voltage and current behavior of a circuit network (a network of electronic devices connected via a conductive network). As a tool, it is mainly used for the design and analysis of electronic circuits.! ! Kirchoff's conservation laws are enforced over a network using modified nodal analysis. This results in a set of differential algebraic equations (DAEs). The resulting nonlinear problem is solved iteratively using a fully coupled Newton method, which in turn results in a linear system that is solved by either a standard sparse-direct solver or iteratively using Trilinos linear solver packages, also developed at Sandia National Laboratories.

  11. Simulating Nuclear and Electronic Quantum Effects in Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Isborn, C M; Markland, T E

    2016-01-01

    An accurate treatment of the structures and dynamics that lead to enhanced chemical reactivity in enzymes requires explicit treatment of both electronic and nuclear quantum effects. The former can be captured in ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations, while the latter can be included by performing ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (AI-PIMD) simulations. Both AIMD and AI-PIMD simulations have traditionally been computationally prohibitive for large enzymatic systems. Recent developments in streaming computer architectures and new algorithms to accelerate path integral simulations now make these simulations practical for biological systems, allowing elucidation of enzymatic reactions in unprecedented detail. In this chapter, we summarize these recent developments and discuss practical considerations for applying AIMD and AI-PIMD simulations to enzymes. PMID:27498646

  12. Electronic instrumentation for smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanar, George J.

    1995-04-01

    The requirements of electronic instrumentation for smart structures are similar to those of data acquisition systems at our national particle physics laboratories. Modern high energy and heavy ion physics experiments may have tens of thousands of channels of data sources producing data that must be converted to digital form, compacted, stored and interpreted. In parallel, multiple sensors distributed in and around smart structures generate either binary or analog signals that are voltage, charge, or time like in their information content. In all cases, they must be transmitted, converted and preserved into a unified digital format for real-time processing. This paper will review the current status of practical large scale electronic measurement systems with special attention to architectures and physical organization. Brief surveys of the current state of the art will include preamplifiers and amplifiers, comparators and discriminators, voltage or charge analog-to-digital converters, time internal meters or time-to-digital converters, and finally, counting or scalar systems. The paper will conclude by integrating all of these ideas in a concept for an all-digital readout of a smart structure using the latest techniques used in physics research today.

  13. Simulation of electron transport during electron-beam-induced deposition of nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2013-01-01

    Summary We present a numerical investigation of energy and charge distributions during electron-beam-induced growth of tungsten nanostructures on SiO2 substrates by using a Monte Carlo simulation of the electron transport. This study gives a quantitative insight into the deposition of energy and charge in the substrate and in the already existing metallic nanostructures in the presence of the electron beam. We analyze electron trajectories, inelastic mean free paths, and the distribution of backscattered electrons in different compositions and at different depths of the deposit. We find that, while in the early stages of the nanostructure growth a significant fraction of electron trajectories still interacts with the substrate, when the nanostructure becomes thicker the transport takes place almost exclusively in the nanostructure. In particular, a larger deposit density leads to enhanced electron backscattering. This work shows how mesoscopic radiation-transport techniques can contribute to a model that addresses the multi-scale nature of the electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) process. Furthermore, similar simulations can help to understand the role that is played by backscattered electrons and emitted secondary electrons in the change of structural properties of nanostructured materials during post-growth electron-beam treatments. PMID:24367747

  14. Xyce parallel electronic simulator release notes.

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Eric R; Hoekstra, Robert John; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01

    The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support, in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. Specific requirements include, among others, the ability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms, improved numerical performance and object-oriented code design and implementation. The Xyce release notes describe: Hardware and software requirements New features and enhancements Any defects fixed since the last release Current known defects and defect workarounds For up-to-date information not available at the time these notes were produced, please visit the Xyce web page at http://www.cs.sandia.gov/xyce.

  15. Testing gyrokinetic simulations of electron turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, C.; DeBoo, J. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Wang, G.; White, A. E.; Austin, M. E.; Doyle, E. J.; Peebles, W. A.; Petty, C. C.; Zeng, L.; Candy, J.

    2012-06-01

    An extensive set of tests comparing gyrokinetic predictions of temperature-gradient driven electron turbulence to power balance transport analyses and fluctuation measurements are presented. These tests use data from an L-mode validation study on the DIII-D tokamak (Luxon 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 614) in which the local value of a/L_{T_e } =-(a/T_e )(dT_e /dr) is varied by modulated electron cyclotron heating; the GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) is used to make the gyrokinetic predictions. Using a variety of novel measures, both local and global nonlinear simulations are shown to predict key characteristics of the electron energy flux Qe and long-wavelength (low-k) Te fluctuations, but systematically underpredict (by roughly a factor of two) the ion energy flux Qi. A new synthetic diagnostic for comparison to intermediate wavelength Doppler backscattering measurements is presented, and used to compare simulation predictions against experiment. In contrast to the agreement observed in the low-k Te fluctuation comparisons, little agreement is found between the predicted and measured intermediate-k density fluctuation responses. The results presented in this paper significantly expand upon those previously reported in DeBoo et al (2010 Phys. Plasmas 17 056105), comparing transport and multiple turbulence predictions from numerically converged local and global simulations for all four experimental heating configurations (instead of only fluxes and low-k Te fluctuations for one condition) to measurements and power balance analyses.

  16. Xyce parallel electronic simulator : reference guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2011-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support, in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. It is targeted specifically to run on large-scale parallel computing platforms but also runs well on a variety of architectures including single processor workstations. It also aims to support a variety of devices and models specific to Sandia needs. This document is intended to complement the Xyce Users Guide. It contains comprehensive, detailed information about a number of topics pertinent to the usage of Xyce. Included in this document is a netlist reference for the input-file commands and elements supported within Xyce; a command line reference, which describes the available command line arguments for Xyce; and quick-references for users of other circuit codes, such as Orcad's PSpice and Sandia's ChileSPICE.

  17. Xyce parallel electronic simulator : users' guide.

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Warrender, Christina E.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2011-05-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: (1) Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers; (2) Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinear and linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques. (3) Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation-aware devices (for Sandia users only); and (4) Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices that ensure that the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passing parallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. The development of Xyce provides a platform for computational research and development aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. With Xyce, Sandia has an 'in-house' capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model development) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms) research and development can be performed. As a result, Xyce is a unique

  18. Electron Microburst Energy Dispersion Derived by Test Particle Simulation Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Parks, G. K.; Park, Y.; Tsurutani, B.

    2011-12-01

    Electron microbursts, energetic electron precipitation having duration less than 1 sec, have been thought to be generated by chorus wave and electron interactions. While the coincidence of chorus and microburst occurrence supports the wave-particle interaction theory, more crucial evidences have not been observed to explain the origin of microbursts. We think one of the observational evidences could be energy dispersion of microbursts. During chorus waves propagate along magnetic field, the resonance condition should be satisfied at different magnetic latitude for different energy electrons because chorus waves are coherent waves having narrow frequency band and electron microbursts have wide energy range, at least several hundreds KeV. If we observed electron microbursts at low altitude, the arrival time of different energy electrons should make unique energy dispersion structures. In order to observe the energy dispersion, we need a detector having fast time resolution and wide energy range. Our study is focused on defining the time resolution and energy range required to measure microburst energy dispersion. We performed test particles simulation interacting with simple coherent waves like chorus waves. By the wave-particle interaction, energetic electrons (test particles) changed pitch angles and some electrons were detected with energy dispersion at 600 km. We assumed a detector measuring microbursts at the altitude of 600 km. These results provide useful information in designing electron detectors for the future mission.

  19. Lowest electronic states of the CP47 antenna protein complex of photosystem II: simulation of optical spectra and revised structural assignments.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Mike; Acharya, Khem; Neupane, Bhanu; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2010-09-16

    In this work, we present simulated steady-state absorption, emission, and nonresonant hole burning (HB) spectra for the CP47 antenna complex of photosystem II (PS II) based on fits to recently refined experimental data (Neupane et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 4214). Excitonic simulations are based on the 2.9 Å resolution structure of the PS II core from cyanobacteria (Guskov et al. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 2009, 16, 334), and allow for preliminary assignment of the chlorophylls (Chls) contributing to the lowest excitonic states. The search for realistic site energies was guided by experimental constraints and aided by simple fitting algorithms. The following experimental constraints were used: (i) the oscillator strength of the lowest-energy state should be approximately ≤0.5 Chl equivalents; (ii) the excitonic structure must explain the experimentally observed red-shifted (∼695 nm) emission maximum; and (iii) the excitonic interactions of all states must properly describe the broad (non-line-narrowed, NLN) HB spectrum (including its antihole) whose shape is extremely sensitive to the excitonic structure of the complex, especially the lowest excitonic states. Importantly, our assignments differ significantly from those previously reported by Raszewski and Renger (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 4431), due primarily to differences in the experimental data simulated. In particular, we find that the lowest state localized on Chl 526 possesses too high of an oscillator strength to fit low-temperature experimental data. Instead, we suggest that Chl 523 most strongly contributes to the lowest excitonic state, with Chl 526 contributing to the second excitonic state. Since the fits of nonresonant holes are more restrictive (in terms of possible site energies) than those of absorption and emission spectra, we suggest that fits of linear optical spectra along with HB spectra provide more realistic site energies.

  20. Measurements and simulations of seeded electron microbunches with collective effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, K.; Molo, R.; Khan, S.; Lazzarino, L. L.; Lechner, C.; Maltezopoulos, Th.; Plath, T.; Rossbach, J.; Ackermann, S.; Bödewadt, J.; Dohlus, M.; Ekanayake, N.; Laarmann, T.; Schlarb, H.

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of the longitudinal phase-space distributions of electron bunches seeded with an external laser were done in order to study the impact of collective effects on seeded microbunches in free-electron lasers. When the collective effects of Coulomb forces in a drift space and coherent synchrotron radiation in a chicane are considered, velocity bunching of a seeded microbunch appears to be a viable alternative to compression with a magnetic chicane under high-gain harmonic generation seeding conditions. Measurements of these effects on seeded electron microbunches were performed with a rf deflecting structure and a dipole magnet which streak out the electron bunch for single-shot images of the longitudinal phase-space distribution. Particle tracking simulations in 3D predicted the compression dynamics of the seeded microbunches with collective effects.

  1. Aircraft Electronics Maintenance Training Simulator. Curriculum Outlines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackhawk Technical Coll., Janesville, WI.

    Instructional materials are provided for nine courses in an aircraft electronics maintenance training program. Courses are as follows: aviation basic electricity, direct current and alternating current electronics, basic avionic installations, analog electronics, digital electronics, microcomputer electronics, radio communications, aircraft…

  2. Nonlinearity in structural and electronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.R.; Beardmore, K.M.; Ben-Naim, E.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project strengthens a nonlinear technology base relevant to a variety of problems arising in condensed matter and materials science, and applies this technology to those problems. In this way the controlled synthesis of, and experiments on, novel electronic and structural materials provide an important focus for nonlinear science, while nonlinear techniques help advance the understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of microstructure and dynamics in complex materials. This research is primarily focused on four topics: (1) materials microstructure: growth and evolution, and porous media; (2) textures in elastic/martensitic materials; (3) electro- and photo-active polymers; and (4) ultrafast photophysics in complex electronic materials. Accomplishments included the following: organization of a ``Nonlinear Materials`` seminar series and international conferences including ``Fracture, Friction and Deformation,`` ``Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions,`` and ``Landscape Paradigms in Physics and Biology``; invited talks at international conference on ``Synthetic Metals,`` ``Quantum Phase Transitions,`` ``1996 CECAM Euroconference,`` and the 1995 Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society; large-scale simulations and microscopic modeling of nonlinear coherent energy storage at crack tips and sliding interfaces; large-scale simulation and microscopic elasticity theory for precursor microstructure and dynamics at solid-solid diffusionless phase transformations; large-scale simulation of self-assembling organic thin films on inorganic substrates; analysis and simulation of smoothing of rough atomic surfaces; and modeling and analysis of flux pattern formation in equilibrium and nonequilibrium Josephson junction arrays and layered superconductors.

  3. Final Scientific/Technical Report for "Role of Electron Kinetic Effects on the Macroscopic Structure and Evolution of Collisionless Reconnection in Simulations with Open Boundary Conditions"

    SciTech Connect

    Scudder, Jack

    2011-02-04

    The final years of this grant have been dedicated to diagnosing the observable properties of Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection (CMR) as disclosed by the open boundary condition PIC simulations developed under this grant. Particular attention has focussed on identifying the Electron Diffusion Region (EDR), the short scale domain where the process is thought to be enabled. The critical issue has been the need for experimental closure for CMR that is widely invoked in astrophysics, but has actually rather little direct, incontrovertible evidence for its involvement. This difficulty arises because CMR is about topology change of the magnetic field - a concept that is not conducive to single, or even few point correlations as are beginning to be possible with spacecraft armada, like Cluster or the planned Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) mission to be launched in 2014. Alternate formulations about the time rate of magnetic flux inventoried by a moving observer, reformulate the needed evidence in terms of the curl of various weak vector fields, such as E+UexB, that is zero in ideal MHD. To sense E+UexB from space measurements is already a heroic task. The curl of such a small vector field is outside the domain of the possible.

  4. Towards scalable electronic structure calculations for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stocks, G.M.; Nicholson, D.M.C.; Wang, Y.; Shelton, W.A.; Szotek, Z.; Temmermann, W.M.

    1994-06-01

    A new approach to calculating the properties of large systems within the local density approximation (LDA) that offers the promise of scalability on massively parallel supercomputers is outlined. The electronic structure problem is formulated in real space using multiple scattering theory. The standard LDA algorithm is divided into two parts. Firstly, finding the self-consistent field (SCF) electron density, Secondly, calculating the energy corresponding to the SCF density. We show, at least for metals and alloys, that the former problem is easily solved using real space methods. For the second we take advantage of the variational properties of a generalized Harris-Foulkes free energy functional, a new conduction band Fermi function, and a fictitious finite electron temperature that again allow us to use real-space methods. Using a compute-node {R_arrow} atom equivalence the new method is naturally highly parallel and leads to O(N) scaling where N is the number of atoms making up the system. We show scaling data gathered on the Intel XP/S 35 Paragon for systems up to 512-atoms/simulation cell. To demonstrate that we can achieve metallurgical-precision, we apply the new method to the calculation the energies of disordered CuO{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5} alloys using a large random sample.

  5. Electronic structure of herbicides: Atrazine and bromoxynil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Kovač, Branka

    2011-06-01

    The electronic structures of herbicides atrazine and bromoxynil have been investigated by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), quantum chemical calculations and comparison with X-ray diffraction, molecular docking and molecular dynamics studies. Their electronic and molecular structures are discussed in the context of their biological activity. This is the first report which correlates the molecular mechanism of biological activity of these herbicides with their experimentally determined electronic and molecular structures.

  6. Electron heat transport from stochastic fields in gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Nevins, W. M.; Candy, J.; Hatch, D.; Terry, P.; Guttenfelder, W.

    2011-05-15

    GYRO is used to examine the perturbed magnetic field structure generated by electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations of the CYCLONE base case as {beta}{sub e} is varied from 0.1% to 0.7%, as investigated by J. Candy [Phys. Plasmas 12, 072307 (2005)]. Poincare surface of section plots obtained from integrating the self-consistent magnetic field demonstrates widespread stochasticity for all nonzero values of {beta}{sub e}. Despite widespread stochasticity of the perturbed magnetic fields, no significant increase in electron transport is observed. The magnetic diffusion, d{sub m}[A. B. Rechester and M. N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett 40, 38 (1978)], is used to quantify the degree of stochasticity and related to the electron heat transport for hundreds of time slices in each simulation.

  7. Fractal electronic devices: simulation and implementation.

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, M S; McCarthy, D N; Scott, S A; Brown, S A; Taylor, R P

    2011-09-01

    Many natural structures have fractal geometries that exhibit useful functional properties. These properties, which exploit the recurrence of patterns at increasingly small scales, are often desirable in applications and, consequently, fractal geometry is increasingly employed in diverse technologies ranging from radio antennae to storm barriers. In this paper, we explore the application of fractal geometry to electrical devices. First, we lay the foundations for the implementation of fractal devices by considering diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) of atomic clusters. Under appropriate growth conditions, atomic clusters of various elements form fractal patterns driven by DLA. We perform a fractal analysis of both simulated and physical devices to determine their spatial scaling properties and demonstrate their potential as fractal circuit elements. Finally, we simulate conduction through idealized and DLA fractal devices and show that their fractal scaling properties generate novel, nonlinear conduction properties in response to depletion by electrostatic gates. PMID:21841218

  8. Fractal electronic devices: simulation and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbanks, M. S.; McCarthy, D. N.; Scott, S. A.; Brown, S. A.; Taylor, R. P.

    2011-09-01

    Many natural structures have fractal geometries that exhibit useful functional properties. These properties, which exploit the recurrence of patterns at increasingly small scales, are often desirable in applications and, consequently, fractal geometry is increasingly employed in diverse technologies ranging from radio antennae to storm barriers. In this paper, we explore the application of fractal geometry to electrical devices. First, we lay the foundations for the implementation of fractal devices by considering diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) of atomic clusters. Under appropriate growth conditions, atomic clusters of various elements form fractal patterns driven by DLA. We perform a fractal analysis of both simulated and physical devices to determine their spatial scaling properties and demonstrate their potential as fractal circuit elements. Finally, we simulate conduction through idealized and DLA fractal devices and show that their fractal scaling properties generate novel, nonlinear conduction properties in response to depletion by electrostatic gates.

  9. Stochastic simulation of electron avalanches on supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Rogasinsky, S. V.; Marchenko, M. A.

    2014-12-09

    In the paper, we present a three-dimensional parallel Monte Carlo algorithm named ELSHOW which is developed for simulation of electron avalanches in gases. Parallel implementation of the ELSHOW was made on supercomputers with different architectures (massive parallel and hybrid ones). Using the ELSHOW, calculations of such integral characteristics as the number of particles in an avalanche, the coefficient of impact ionization, the drift velocity, and the others were made. Also, special precise computations were made to select an appropriate size of the time step using the technique of dependent statistical tests. Particularly, the algorithm consists of special methods of distribution modeling, a lexicographic implementation scheme for “branching” of trajectories, justified estimation of functionals. A comparison of the obtained results for nitrogen with previously published theoretical and experimental data was made.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of large electron fields.

    PubMed

    Faddegon, Bruce A; Perl, Joseph; Asai, Makoto

    2008-03-01

    Two Monte Carlo systems, EGSnrc and Geant4, the latter with two different 'physics lists,' were used to calculate dose distributions in large electron fields used in radiotherapy. Source and geometry parameters were adjusted to match calculated results to measurement. Both codes were capable of accurately reproducing the measured dose distributions of the six electron beams available on the accelerator. Depth penetration matched the average measured with a diode and parallel-plate chamber to 0.04 cm or better. Calculated depth dose curves agreed to 2% with diode measurements in the build-up region, although for the lower beam energies there was a discrepancy of up to 5% in this region when calculated results are compared to parallel-plate measurements. Dose profiles at the depth of maximum dose matched to 2-3% in the central 25 cm of the field, corresponding to the field size of the largest applicator. A 4% match was obtained outside the central region. The discrepancy observed in the bremsstrahlung tail in published results that used EGS4 is no longer evident. Simulations with the different codes and physics lists used different source energies, incident beam angles, thicknesses of the primary foils, and distance between the primary and secondary foil. The true source and geometry parameters were not known with sufficient accuracy to determine which parameter set, including the energy of the source, was closest to the truth. These results underscore the requirement for experimental benchmarks of depth penetration and electron scatter for beam energies and foils relevant to radiotherapy.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of large electron fields

    PubMed Central

    Faddegon, Bruce A; Perl, Joseph; Asai, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Two Monte Carlo systems, EGSnrc and Geant4, the latter with two different “physics lists,” were used to calculate dose distributions in large electron fields used in radiotherapy. Source and geometry parameters were adjusted to match calculated results to measurement. Both codes were capable of accurately reproducing the measured dose distributions of the 6 electron beams available on the accelerator. Depth penetration matched the average measured with a diode and parallel-plate chamber to 0.04 cm or better. Calculated depth dose curves agreed to 2% with diode measurements in the buildup region, although for the lower beam energies there was a discrepancy of up to 5% in this region when calculated results are compared to parallel-plate measurements. Dose profiles at the depth of maximum dose matched to 2-3% in the central 25 cm of the field, corresponding to the field size of the largest applicator. A 4% match was obtained outside the central region. The discrepancy observed in the bremsstrahlung tail in published results that used EGS4 is no longer evident. Simulations with the different codes and physics lists used different source energies, incident beam angles, thicknesses of the primary foils, and distance between the primary and secondary foil. The true source and geometry parameters were not known with sufficient accuracy to determine which parameter set, including the energy of the source, was closest to the truth. These results underscore the requirement for experimental benchmarks of depth penetration and electron scatter for beam energies and foils relevant to radiotherapy. PMID:18296775

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of large electron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faddegon, Bruce A.; Perl, Joseph; Asai, Makoto

    2008-03-01

    Two Monte Carlo systems, EGSnrc and Geant4, the latter with two different 'physics lists,' were used to calculate dose distributions in large electron fields used in radiotherapy. Source and geometry parameters were adjusted to match calculated results to measurement. Both codes were capable of accurately reproducing the measured dose distributions of the six electron beams available on the accelerator. Depth penetration matched the average measured with a diode and parallel-plate chamber to 0.04 cm or better. Calculated depth dose curves agreed to 2% with diode measurements in the build-up region, although for the lower beam energies there was a discrepancy of up to 5% in this region when calculated results are compared to parallel-plate measurements. Dose profiles at the depth of maximum dose matched to 2-3% in the central 25 cm of the field, corresponding to the field size of the largest applicator. A 4% match was obtained outside the central region. The discrepancy observed in the bremsstrahlung tail in published results that used EGS4 is no longer evident. Simulations with the different codes and physics lists used different source energies, incident beam angles, thicknesses of the primary foils, and distance between the primary and secondary foil. The true source and geometry parameters were not known with sufficient accuracy to determine which parameter set, including the energy of the source, was closest to the truth. These results underscore the requirement for experimental benchmarks of depth penetration and electron scatter for beam energies and foils relevant to radiotherapy.

  13. Electronic correlation contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    2015-03-01

    The recursion method is used to calculate electronic excitation spectra including electron-electron interactions within the Hubbard model. The effects of correlation on structural energies are then obtained from these spectra and applied to stacking faults. http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288 Supported by the Richmond F. Snyder Fund and Gifts.

  14. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Christopher T. Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  15. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, David; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  16. Teaching Behavioral Modeling and Simulation Techniques for Power Electronics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramovitz, A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of behavioral modeling of switch-mode power electronics systems through simulation by general-purpose electronic circuit simulators. The methodology is oriented toward electrical engineering (EE) students at the undergraduate level, enrolled in courses such as "Power Electronics,"…

  17. Electron tomography of dislocation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.S.; House, S.D.; Kacher, J.; Tanaka, M.; Higashida, K.; Robertson, I.M.

    2014-01-15

    Recent developments in the application of electron tomography for characterizing microstructures in crystalline solids are described. The underlying principles for electron tomography are presented in the context of typical challenges in adapting the technique to crystalline systems and in using diffraction contrast imaging conditions. Methods for overcoming the limitations associated with the angular range, the number of acquired images, and uniformity of image contrast are introduced. In addition, a method for incorporating the real space coordinate system into the tomogram is presented. As the approach emphasizes development of experimental solutions to the challenges, the solutions developed and implemented are presented in the form of examples.

  18. Electronic structures of endohedral fullerenes

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Changming; Hettich, R.L.; Puretzky, A.A.; Ying, Z.C.; Haufler, R.E.; Compton, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    Fullerenes with different elements trapped inside the cage have been the subject of active research both experimentally and theoretically ever since the initial discovery of C{sub 60}. La@C{sub n}, were the first endohedral fullerenes produced both in gas phase and in macroscopic quantities. Early electron spin resonance investigation of La@C{sub 82} by R.D. Johnson, et.al indicated that La transfer nearly all of the three valence electrons to the fullerene cage, forming a La{sup 3+}@C{sub 82}{sup 3-} complex. Theoretical calculations also have shown that La transfers its valence electrons to the fullerene cage in molecules of La@C{sub n}. Investigations with ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy by L. Wang, et.al. indicated that attaching a potassium atom outside the C{sub 60} cage lowers the electron affinity (EA) while trapping Ca atom inside the C{sub 60} sphere increases the EA compared with parent C{sub 60} molecule. These results indicate that metallofullerenes appear to have substantially lower ionization potentials (IP) and higher EA than empty fullerenes.

  19. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  20. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Brian J.; Dennis, Robert V.; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-03-01

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  1. An electronic structure perspective of graphene interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Brian J; Dennis, Robert V; Lee, Vincent; Banerjee, Sarbajit

    2014-04-01

    The unusual electronic structure of graphene characterized by linear energy dispersion of bands adjacent to the Fermi level underpins its remarkable transport properties. However, for practical device integration, graphene will need to be interfaced with other materials: 2D layered structures, metals (as ad-atoms, nanoparticles, extended surfaces, and patterned metamaterial geometries), dielectrics, organics, or hybrid structures that in turn are constituted from various inorganic or organic components. The structural complexity at these nanoscale interfaces holds much promise for manifestation of novel emergent phenomena and provides a means to modulate the electronic structure of graphene. In this feature article, we review the modifications to the electronic structure of graphene induced upon interfacing with disparate types of materials with an emphasis on iterative learnings from theoretical calculations and electronic spectroscopy (X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD)). We discuss approaches for engineering and modulating a bandgap in graphene through interfacial hybridization, outline experimental methods for examining electronic structure at interfaces, and overview device implications of engineered interfaces. A unified view of how geometric and electronic structure are correlated at interfaces will provide a rational means for designing heterostructures exhibiting emergent physical phenomena with implications for plasmonics, photonics, spintronics, and engineered polymer and metal matrix composites.

  2. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pedraza, D.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  3. Structural change of graphite during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, J.; Pedraza, D.F.

    1992-12-31

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300-keV electrons. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structure of electron-irradiated graphite. Results consistently indicated absence of long-range order periodicity in the basal plane, and loose retention of the c-axis periodicity. Structure was modeled based on a mixture of sixfold and non-sixfold atom rings. Formation of non-sixfold atom rings was related to the observed buckling and discontinuity of the original graphite basal plane.

  4. Electronic Structure of Small Lanthanide Containing Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Topolski, Josey E.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide-based materials have unusual electronic properties because of the high number of electronic degrees of freedom arising from partial occupation of 4f orbitals, which make these materials optimal for their utilization in many applications including electronics and catalysis. Electronic spectroscopy of small lanthanide molecules helps us understand the role of these 4f electrons, which are generally considered core-like because of orbital contraction, but are energetically similar to valence electrons. The spectroscopy of small lanthanide-containing molecules is relatively unexplored and to broaden this understanding we have completed the characterization of small cerium, praseodymium, and europium molecules using photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations. The characterization of PrO, EuH, EuO/EuOH, and CexOy molecules have allowed for the determination of their electron affinity, the assignment of numerous anion to neutral state transitions, modeling of anion/neutral structures and electron orbital occupation.

  5. Structural physiology based on electron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    There are many questions in brain science, which are extremely interesting but very difficult to answer. For example, how do education and other experiences during human development influence the ability and personality of the adult? The molecular mechanisms underlying such phenomena are still totally unclear. However, technological and instrumental advancements of electron microscopy have facilitated comprehension of the structures of biological components, cells, and organelles. Electron crystallography is especially good for studying the structure and function of membrane proteins, which are key molecules of signal transduction in neural and other cells. Electron crystallography is now an established technique to analyze the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which are close to their natural biological environment. By utilizing cryo-electron microscopes with helium cooled specimen stages, which were developed through a personal motivation to understand functions of neural systems from a structural point of view, structures of membrane proteins were analyzed at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review has four objectives. First, it is intended to introduce the new research field of structural physiology. Second, it introduces some of the personal struggles, which were involved in developing the cryo-electron microscope. Third, it discusses some of the technology for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy. Finally, it reviews structural and functional analyses of membrane proteins. PMID:21416541

  6. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (..delta..H) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides.

  7. Electronic and Thermal Properties of Graphene and Carbon Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Gilmore; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    We will present the general properties of carbon structures. The research involves the study of carbon structures: Graphene, Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), and Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs). A review of electrical and thermal conduction phenomena of the structures will be discussed. Particularly carbon nanoribbons and CNTs have many interesting physical properties, and have the potential for device applications. Our research interests include the study of electronic structures, electrical and thermal transport properties of the carbon structures. Results are produced analytically as well as by simulation. The numerical simulations are conducted using various tools such as Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD), Large Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS), NanoHub at Purdue University and the Beowulf Cluster at Ball State University.

  8. Efficient numerical simulation of electron states in quantum wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerkhoven, Thomas; Galick, Albert T.; Ravaioli, Umberto; Arends, John H.; Saad, Youcef

    1990-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for the numerical simulation of electrons in a quantum wire as described by a two-dimensional eigenvalue problem for Schroedinger's equation coupled with Poisson's equation. Initially, the algorithm employs an underrelaxed fixed point iteration to generate an approximation which is reasonably close to the solution. Subsequently, this approximate solution is employed as an initial guess for a Jacobian-free implementation of an approximate Newton method. In this manner the nonlinearity in the model is dealt with effectively. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated in a set of numerical experiments which study the electron states on the cross section of a quantum wire structure based on III-V semiconductors at 4.2 and 77 K.

  9. Including the Effects of Electronic Excitations and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cascade Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, Dorothy |

    2008-07-01

    Radiation damage has traditionally been modeled using cascade simulations however such simulations generally neglect the effects of electron-ion interactions, which may be significant in high energy cascades. A model has been developed which includes the effects of electronic stopping and electron-phonon coupling in Molecular Dynamics simulations by means of an inhomogeneous Langevin thermostat. The energy lost by the atoms to electronic excitations is gained by the electronic system and the energy evolution of the electronic system is modeled by the heat diffusion equation. Energy is exchanged between the electronic system and the atoms in the Molecular Dynamics simulation by means of a Langevin thermostat, the temperature of which is the local electronic temperature. The model is applied to a 10 keV cascade simulation for Fe. (authors)

  10. Computational Chemistry Using Modern Electronic Structure Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen; Dines, Trevor J.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Withnall, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Various modern electronic structure methods are now days used to teach computational chemistry to undergraduate students. Such quantum calculations can now be easily used even for large size molecules.

  11. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  12. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  13. Electronic structure calculations in arbitrary electrostatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Mark A.; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Lee, Elizabeth M. Y.; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of electronic structure of molecules in electrostatic environments is of considerable relevance for surface-enhanced spectroscopy and molecular electronics. We have developed and implemented a novel approach to the molecular electronic structure in arbitrary electrostatic environments that is compatible with standard quantum chemical methods and can be applied to medium-sized and large molecules. The scheme denoted CheESE (chemistry in electrostatic environments) is based on the description of molecular electronic structure subject to a boundary condition on the system/environment interface. Thus, it is particularly suited to study molecules on metallic surfaces. The proposed model is capable of describing both electrostatic effects near nanostructured metallic surfaces and image-charge effects. We present an implementation of the CheESE model as a library module and show example applications to neutral and negatively charged molecules.

  14. The Electron Transport Chain: An Interactive Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Chris; Choun, James

    2014-01-01

    This activity provides students an interactive demonstration of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis during aerobic respiration. Students use simple, everyday objects as hydrogen ions and electrons and play the roles of the various proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane to show how this specific process in cellular…

  15. Theoretical bioinorganic chemistry: the electronic structure makes a difference.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Barbara; Wennmohs, Frank; Ye, Shengfa; Neese, Frank

    2007-04-01

    Theoretical bioinorganic and biomimetic chemistry involves the careful description of the electronic structure: for example, 'valence bond reading' of broken-symmetry density functional theory computations gives insight into the structure and bonding of metal-radical systems with complex electronic structures. Exploring the reactivities of such systems leads to the design of novel compounds with better reactivities. Combined quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics (QM/MM), where the QM part is a sophisticated ab initio method, aids in understanding nature's most complicated reaction mechanisms in atomic detail. First principles molecular dynamics simulations (Car-Parrinello simulations) open up exciting new avenues for studying transition metal centers and enable several questions to be addressed that cannot be resolved with either standard quantum chemical or traditional force-field methods. PMID:17349817

  16. Structured building model reduction toward parallel simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Justin R.; Hencey, Brondon M.

    2013-08-26

    Building energy model reduction exchanges accuracy for improved simulation speed by reducing the number of dynamical equations. Parallel computing aims to improve simulation times without loss of accuracy but is poorly utilized by contemporary simulators and is inherently limited by inter-processor communication. This paper bridges these disparate techniques to implement efficient parallel building thermal simulation. We begin with a survey of three structured reduction approaches that compares their performance to a leading unstructured method. We then use structured model reduction to find thermal clusters in the building energy model and allocate processing resources. Experimental results demonstrate faster simulation and low error without any interprocessor communication.

  17. Effective in silico prediction of new oxazolidinone antibiotics: force field simulations of the antibiotic–ribosome complex supervised by experiment and electronic structure methods

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary We propose several new and promising antibacterial agents for the treatment of serious Gram-positive infections. Our predictions rely on force field simulations, supervised by first principle calculations and available experimental data. Different force fields were tested in order to reproduce linezolid's conformational space in terms of a) the isolated and b) the ribosomal bound state. In a first step, an all-atom model of the bacterial ribosome consisting of nearly 1600 atoms was constructed and evaluated. The conformational space of 30 different ribosomal/oxazolidinone complexes was scanned by stochastic methods, followed by an evaluation of their enthalpic penalties or rewards and the mechanical strengths of the relevant hydrogen bonds (relaxed force constants; compliance constants). The protocol was able to reproduce the experimentally known enantioselectivity favoring the S-enantiomer. In a second step, the experimentally known MIC values of eight linezolid analogues were used in order to crosscheck the robustness of our model. In a final step, this benchmarking led to the prediction of several new and promising lead compounds. Synthesis and biological evaluation of the new compounds are on the way. PMID:27340438

  18. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations. Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.

  19. Image simulation for electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oxley, Mark P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2007-10-22

    In this paper, aberration correction of the probe forming optics of the scanning transmission electron microscope has allowed the probe-forming aperture to be increased in size, resulting in probes of the order of 1 Å in diameter. The next generation of correctors promise even smaller probes. Improved spectrometer optics also offers the possibility of larger electron energy loss spectrometry detectors. The localization of images based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is examined as function of both probe-forming aperture and detector size. The effective ionization is nonlocal in nature, and two common local approximations are compared to full nonlocal calculations.more » Finally, the affect of the channelling of the electron probe within the sample is also discussed.« less

  20. Electronic device simulates respiration rate and depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. A.

    1964-01-01

    An oscillator circuit and a thermistor, in close proximity to a light bulb, periodically alter the heat output of the bulb by varying the voltage across its filament. Use of this simulator permits checkout tests on pneumographs.

  1. MAPS FOR FAST ELECTRON CLOUD SIMULATIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    IRISO,Y.PEGGS,S.

    2004-07-05

    Luminosity in several colliders, including RHIC, is limited by the electron cloud effect. A careful re-distribution of the bunch pattern around the azimuth of a ring can decrease the average electron density for a fixed total bunch current, allowing the luminosity to be increased. In the search for a bunch pattern that maximizes the luminosity, a fast computer simulation is a key requirement. We discuss the use of fast polynomial maps to simulate the bunch to bunch evolution of the electron density at RHIC. Such maps are empirically derived from existing conventional slow simulation codes.

  2. Structural and electronic properties for atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan

    We have studied the structural and electronic properties for different groups of atomic clusters by doing a global search on the potential energy surface using the Taboo Search in Descriptors Space (TSDS) method and calculating the energies with Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory (KS-DFT). Our goal was to find the structural and electronic principles for predicting the structure and stability of clusters. For Ben (n = 3--20), we have found that the evolution of geometric and electronic properties with size reflects a change in the nature of the bonding from van der Waals to metallic and then bulk-like. The cluster sizes with extra stability agree well with the predictions of the jellium model. In the 4d series of transition metal (TM) clusters, as the d-type bonding becomes more important, the preferred geometric structure changes from icosahedral (Y, Zr), to distorted compact structures (Nb, Mo), and FCC or simple cubic crystal fragments (Tc, Ru, Rh) due to the localized nature of the d-type orbital. Analysis of relative isomer energies and their electronic density of states suggest that these clusters tend to follow a maximum hardness principle (MHP). For A4B12 clusters (A is divalent, B is monovalent), we found unusually large (on average 1.95 eV) HOMO-LUMO gap values. This shows the extra stability at an electronic closed shell (20 electrons) predicted by the jellium model. The importance of symmetry, closed electronic and ionic shells in stability is shown by the relative stability of homotops of Mg4Ag12 which also provides support for the hypothesis that clusters that satisfy more than one stability criterion ("double magic") should be particularly stable.

  3. Hydrated Electron Transfer to Nucleobases in Aqueous Solutions Revealed by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Mei; Fu, Aiyun; Yang, Hongfang; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-08-01

    We present an ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation study into the transfer dynamics of an excess electron from its cavity-shaped hydrated electron state to a hydrated nucleobase (NB)-bound state. In contrast to the traditional view that electron localization at NBs (G/A/C/T), which is the first step for electron-induced DNA damage, is related only to dry or prehydrated electrons, and a fully hydrated electron no longer transfers to NBs, our AIMD simulations indicate that a fully hydrated electron can still transfer to NBs. We monitored the transfer dynamics of fully hydrated electrons towards hydrated NBs in aqueous solutions by using AIMD simulations and found that due to solution-structure fluctuation and attraction of NBs, a fully hydrated electron can transfer to a NB gradually over time. Concurrently, the hydrated electron cavity gradually reorganizes, distorts, and even breaks. The transfer could be completed in about 120-200 fs in four aqueous NB solutions, depending on the electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs and the structural fluctuation of the solution. The transferring electron resides in the π*-type lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the NB, which leads to a hydrated NB anion. Clearly, the observed transfer of hydrated electrons can be attributed to the strong electron-binding ability of hydrated NBs over the hydrated electron cavity, which is the driving force, and the transfer dynamics is structure-fluctuation controlled. This work provides new insights into the evolution dynamics of hydrated electrons and provides some helpful information for understanding the DNA-damage mechanism in solution.

  4. Defect Induced Electronic Structure of Uranofullerene

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xing; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Wei; Xin, Minsi; Huai, Ping; Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between the inner atoms/cluster and the outer fullerene cage is the source of various novel properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. Herein, we introduce an adatom-type spin polarization defect on the surface of a typical endohedral stable U2@C60 to predict the associated structure and electronic properties of U2@C61 based on the density functional theory method. We found that defect induces obvious changes in the electronic structure of this metallofullerene. More interestingly, the ground state of U2@C61 is nonet spin in contrast to the septet of U2@C60. Electronic structure analysis shows that the inner U atoms and the C ad-atom on the surface of the cage contribute together to this spin state, which is brought about by a ferromagnetic coupling between the spin of the unpaired electrons of the U atoms and the C ad-atom. This discovery may provide a possible approach to adapt the electronic structure properties of endohedral metallofullerenes. PMID:23439318

  5. High Resolution Simulation of Beam Dynamics in Electron Linacs for Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.A.; Qiang, J.

    2009-01-05

    In this paper we report on large scale multi-physics simulation of beam dynamics in electron linacs for next generation free electron lasers (FELs). We describe key features of a parallel macroparticle simulation code including three-dimensional (3D) space-charge effects, short-range structure wake fields, longitudinal coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) wake fields, and treatment of radiofrequency (RF) accelerating cavities using maps obtained from axial field profiles. A macroparticle up-sampling scheme is described that reduces the shot noise from an initial distribution with a smaller number of macroparticles while maintaining the global properties of the original distribution. We present a study of the microbunching instability which is a critical issue for future FELs due to its impact on beam quality at the end of the linac. Using parameters of a planned FEL linac at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we show that a large number of macroparticles (beyond 100 million) is needed to control numerical shot noise that drives the microbunching instability. We also explore the effect of the longitudinal grid on simulation results. We show that acceptable results are obtained with around 2048 longitudinal grid points, and we discuss this in view of the spectral growth rate predicted from linear theory. As an application, we present results from simulations using one billion macroparticles of the FEL linac under design at LBNL. We show that the final uncorrelated energy spread of the beam depends not only on the initial uncorrelated energy spread but also depends strongly on the shape of the initial current profile. By using a parabolic initial current profile, 5 keV initial uncorrelated energy spread at 40 MeV injection energy, and improved linac design, those simulations demonstrate that a reasonable beam quality can be achieved at the end of the linac, with the final distribution having about 100 keV energy spread, 2.4 GeV energy, and 1.2 kA peak

  6. The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bursten, Bruce E.

    2000-07-25

    The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.

  7. Electronic flaw simulator for eddy current probe calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almasy, L. J.; Cowfer, C. D.

    1970-01-01

    Electronic flaw simulator cycled into the eddy current system eliminates errors in probe calibration. A discrimination level reference established in the probe permits recognition of those flaws in materials with an equivalent volume equal to or greater than the reference.

  8. Electronic structure of Si/disilicide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Hideaki; Asano, Setsuro

    1990-01-01

    Using supercells, the electronic structures of Si(111)/CoSi2 and Si(111)/NiSi2 interfaces are studied by the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method (LMTO-ASA). Schottky barrier heights (SBH's) are strongly correlated with the interface atomic structures and are determined mainly by interface bonding states and the screening effect of the semiconductor. Metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are metal wave function tails caused by the Schottky barriers.

  9. Electronic structure of Si/disilicide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, Hideaki; Asano, Setsuro

    1989-11-01

    Using supercells, the electronic structures of Si(111)/CoSi 2 and Si(111)/NiSi 2 interfaces are studied by the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method (LMTO-ASA). Schottky barrier heights (SBH's) are strongly correlated with the interface atomic structures and are determined mainly by interface bonding states and the screening effect of the semiconductor. Metal-induced gap states (MIGS) are metal wave function tails caused by the Schottky barriers.

  10. Atomic and electronic structure of exfoliated black phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ryan J.; Topsakal, Mehmet; Jeong, Jong Seok; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Low, Tony; Robbins, Matthew C.; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J.

    2015-11-15

    Black phosphorus, a layered two-dimensional crystal with tunable electronic properties and high hole mobility, is quickly emerging as a promising candidate for future electronic and photonic devices. Although theoretical studies using ab initio calculations have tried to predict its atomic and electronic structure, uncertainty in its fundamental properties due to a lack of clear experimental evidence continues to stymie our full understanding and application of this novel material. In this work, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are used to study the crystal structure of few-layer black phosphorus. Directly interpretable annular dark-field images provide a three-dimensional atomic-resolution view of this layered material in which its stacking order and all three lattice parameters can be unambiguously identified. In addition, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to measure the conduction band density of states of black phosphorus, which agrees well with the results of density functional theory calculations performed for the experimentally determined crystal. Furthermore, experimental EELS measurements of interband transitions and surface plasmon excitations are also consistent with simulated results. Finally, the effects of oxidation on both the atomic and electronic structure of black phosphorus are analyzed to explain observed device degradation. The transformation of black phosphorus into amorphous PO{sub 3} or H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} during oxidation may ultimately be responsible for the degradation of devices exposed to atmosphere over time.

  11. Crystal structure refinement from electron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Dudka, A. P. Avilov, A. S.; Lepeshov, G. G.

    2008-05-15

    A procedure of crystal structure refinement from electron diffraction data is described. The electron diffraction data on polycrystalline films are processed taking into account possible overlap of reflections and two-beam interaction. The diffraction from individual single crystals in an electron microscope equipped with a precession attachment is described using the Bloch-wave method, which takes into account multibeam scattering, and a special approach taking into consideration the specific features of the diffraction geometry in the precession technique. Investigations were performed on LiF, NaF, CaF{sub 2}, and Si crystals. A method for reducing experimental data, which allows joint electron and X-ray diffraction study, is proposed.

  12. Simulating Electron Clouds in Heavy-Ion Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik,A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2005-04-07

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a concern for most accelerators of positive-charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly-, weakly-, and un-magnetized. They describe their approach to such self-consistency, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyro period in the magnets. They present tests and applications: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam and an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrates the ability of the large-timestep mover to accurately calculate the instability.

  13. NASCAP simulation of laboratory charging tests using multiple electron guns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, M. J.; Katz, I.; Parks, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    NASCAP calculations have been performed simulating exposure of a spacecraft-like model to multiple electron guns. The results agree well with experiment. It is found that magnetic field effects are fairly small, but substantial differential charging can result from electron gun placement. Conditions for surface flashover are readily achieved.

  14. Electronic and crystallographic structure of apatites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderín, L.; Stott, M. J.; Rubio, A.

    2003-04-01

    An ab initio study of four different stoichiometric apatites (oxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite, and chlorapatite) is presented. The calculations were performed using density-functional theory with the local-density approximation for exchange and correlation, and a full relaxation of the electronic structure, the atomic arrangement, and the unit cell. Hexagonal unit cells were obtained for all four apatites, and the calculated atomic arrangements are in close agreement with observation in those cases for which the structure is firmly established. A zero-temperature structure is predicted for oxyapatite, and two possible configurations were found for the Cl- ions in chlorapatite. The possibility of the monoclinic structure in hydroxyapatite and chlorapatite was also studied but no indication of greater stability with respect to the hexagonal structure was found. A relationship between the structure of the apatites and that of pure calcium is discussed.

  15. Structural Reliability and Monte Carlo Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laumakis, P. J.; Harlow, G.

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes a simple boom structure and assesses its reliability using elementary engineering mechanics. Demonstrates the power and utility of Monte-Carlo simulation by showing that such a simulation can be implemented more readily with results that compare favorably to the theoretical calculations. (Author/MM)

  16. Analysing Deep Structure in Games and Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gredler, Margaret Bell

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of the design of games and simulations focuses on the fundamental defining features called deep structure. The two main levels of interaction in games and simulations are described; generalized reinforcers are discussed; types of defective contingencies are explained, including escape or avoidance behaviors; and the concept of negative…

  17. Elements of Regolith Simulant's Cost Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    The cost of lunar regolith simulants is much higher than many users anticipate. After all, it is nothing more than broken rock. This class will discuss the elements which make up the cost structure for simulants. It will also consider which elements can be avoided under certain circumstances and which elements might be altered by the application of additional research and development.

  18. Multiscale quantum mechanics/electromagnetics simulation for electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Yam, ChiYung; Meng, Lingyi; Chen, GuanHua; Chen, Quan; Wong, Ngai

    2011-08-28

    The continuous downsizing of modern electronic devices implies the increasing importance of quantum phenomena. As the feature sizes of transistors inch towards 10 nanometer, simulations including quantum effects and atomistic details are inevitable. Here we report a novel hybrid quantum mechanics and electromagnetics (QM/EM) method to model individual electronic components at the nanoscale. QM and EM models are solved in different regions of the system in a self-consistent manner. As a demonstration, we study a carbon nanotube based electronic device embedded in a silicon block. Good agreement is obtained between simulation by QM/EM method and full QM treatment of the entire system.

  19. Multi-million atom electronic structure calculations for quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, Muhammad

    Quantum dots grown by self-assembly process are typically constructed by 50,000 to 5,000,000 structural atoms which confine a small, countable number of extra electrons or holes in a space that is comparable in size to the electron wavelength. Under such conditions quantum dots can be interpreted as artificial atoms with the potential to be custom tailored to new functionality. In the past decade or so, these nanostructures have attracted significant experimental and theoretical attention in the field of nanoscience. The new and tunable optical and electrical properties of these artificial atoms have been proposed in a variety of different fields, for example in communication and computing systems, medical and quantum computing applications. Predictive and quantitative modeling and simulation of these structures can help to narrow down the vast design space to a range that is experimentally affordable and move this part of nanoscience to nano-Technology. Modeling of such quantum dots pose a formidable challenge to theoretical physicists because: (1) Strain originating from the lattice mismatch of the materials penetrates deep inside the buffer surrounding the quantum dots and require large scale (multi-million atom) simulations to correctly capture its effect on the electronic structure, (2) The interface roughness, the alloy randomness, and the atomistic granularity require the calculation of electronic structure at the atomistic scale. Most of the current or past theoretical calculations are based on continuum approach such as effective mass approximation or k.p modeling capturing either no or one of the above mentioned effects, thus missing some of the essential physics. The Objectives of this thesis are: (1) to model and simulate the experimental quantum dot topologies at the atomistic scale; (2) to theoretically explore the essential physics i.e. long range strain, linear and quadratic piezoelectricity, interband optical transition strengths, quantum confined

  20. Electronic structure engineering of various structural phases of phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sumandeep; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2016-07-21

    We report the tailoring of the electronic structures of various structural phases of phosphorene (α-P, β-P, γ-P and δ-P) based homo- and hetero-bilayers through in-plane mechanical strains, vertical pressure and transverse electric field by employing density functional theory. In-plane biaxial strains have considerably modified the electronic bandgap of both homo- and hetero-bilayers while vertical pressure induces metallization in the considered structures. The γ-P homo-bilayer structure showed the highest ultimate tensile strength (UTS ∼ 6.21 GPa) upon in-plane stretching. Upon application of a transverse electric field, the variation in the bandgap of hetero-bilayers was found to be strongly dependent on the polarity of the applied field which is attributed to the counterbalance between the external electric field and the internal field induced by different structural phases and heterogeneity in the arrangements of atoms of each surface of the hetero-bilayer system. Our results demonstrate that the electronic structures of the considered hetero- and homo-bilayers of phosphorene could be modified by biaxial strain, pressure and electric field to achieve the desired properties for future nano-electronic devices.

  1. Simulation of Electron Cloud Multipacting in Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A

    2004-01-27

    A simulation algorithm is based on a numerical solution of the Vlasov equation for the distribution function of an electron cloud density in a cylindrical vacuum chamber with solenoidal magnetic field. The algorithm takes into consideration space charge effects. This approach improves the simulation of multipacting effects as it is free of statistical fluctuations. Simulation studies were carried for the SLAC B-factory vacuum chamber for different bunch patterns and solenoidal field strength. Space charge and the magnetic field limit the maximum density of the electron cloud. Magnetic resonant damping of multipacting was found in special cases of positron beam parameters and magnetic field amplitude.

  2. Efficient simulations with electronic open boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, Andrew P.; Boleininger, Max; D'Agosta, Roberto; Iyer, Vyas; Thong, Aaron; Todorov, Tchavdar N.; White, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    We present a reformulation of the hairy-probe method for introducing electronic open boundaries that is appropriate for steady-state calculations involving nonorthogonal atomic basis sets. As a check on the correctness of the method we investigate a perfect atomic wire of Cu atoms and a perfect nonorthogonal chain of H atoms. For both atom chains we find that the conductance has a value of exactly one quantum unit and that this is rather insensitive to the strength of coupling of the probes to the system, provided values of the coupling are of the same order as the mean interlevel spacing of the system without probes. For the Cu atom chain we find in addition that away from the regions with probes attached, the potential in the wire is uniform, while within them it follows a predicted exponential variation with position. We then apply the method to an initial investigation of the suitability of graphene as a contact material for molecular electronics. We perform calculations on a carbon nanoribbon to determine the correct coupling strength of the probes to the graphene and obtain a conductance of about two quantum units corresponding to two bands crossing the Fermi surface. We then compute the current through a benzene molecule attached to two graphene contacts and find only a very weak current because of the disruption of the π conjugation by the covalent bond between the benzene and the graphene. In all cases we find that very strong or weak probe couplings suppress the current.

  3. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-15

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer (S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  4. Simulation of an electronic countermeasure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. W.

    1984-06-01

    An apparatus for use in evaluating the effectiveness of an ECM technique, such as the Cross Eye technique, which transmits RF signals from spatially separated antennas against a hostile radar system, such as a monopulse radar. The invention splits the radar transmit RF signal into separate paths, applies the ECM signal, and calibrates the combined radar-ECM signal for phase and amplitude balance after every pulse repitition interval. The signal is down converted to an intermediate frequency where a radar receive antenna is simulated. Following the antenna, an injection network up converts the frequency of the signal and adds computer controlled inputs (including echoes) prior to sending it to the radar receiver for final processing.

  5. Probing Structural and Electronic Dynamics with Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Plemmons, DA; Suri, PK; Flannigan, DJ

    2015-05-12

    In this Perspective, we provide an overview,of the field of ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM). We begin by briefly discussing the emergence of methods for probing ultrafast structural dynamics and the information that can be obtained. Distinctions are drawn between the two main types a probes for femtosecond (fs) dynamics fast electrons and X-ray photons and emphasis is placed on hour the nature of charged particles is exploited in ultrafast electron-based' experiments:. Following this, we describe the versatility enabled by the ease with which electron trajectories and velocities can be manipulated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM): hardware configurations, and we emphasize how this is translated to the ability to measure scattering intensities in real, reciprocal, and energy space from presurveyed and selected rianoscale volumes. Owing to decades of ongoing research and development into TEM instrumentation combined with advances in specimen holder technology, comprehensive experiments can be conducted on a wide range of materials in various phases via in situ methods. Next, we describe the basic operating concepts, of UEM, and we emphasize that its development has led to extension of several of the formidable capabilities of TEM into the fs domain, dins increasing the accessible temporal parameter spade by several orders of magnitude. We then divide UEM studies into those conducted in real (imaging), reciprocal (diffraction), and energy (spectroscopy) spate. We begin each of these sections by providing a brief description of the basic operating principles and the types of information that can be gathered followed by descriptions of how these approaches are applied in UM, the type of specimen parameter space that can be probed, and an example of the types of dynamics that can be resolved. We conclude with an Outlook section, wherein we share our perspective on some future directions of the field pertaining to continued instrument development and

  6. Electronic structure calculations on helical conducting polymers.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Juan D; Serna, Andrei; Guerra, Doris; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2010-10-21

    We present a study of the electronic structure and derived properties of polyfurane (PFu), polypyrrol (PPy), and polythiophene (PTh). Two spatial arrangements are considered: trans chain (tc-PFu, tc-PPy, tc-PTh) and cis α-helical (α-PFu, α-PPy, α-PTh). Even at the small sizes considered here, helical conformations appear to be stable. Band gaps of pure, undoped oligomers fall into the semiconductor range. Density of states (DOS) analysis suggest dense valence and conduction bands. Bond length alternation analysis predicts almost complete delocalization of the π clouds in all spatial arrangements. Doping with electron donors or electron-withdrawing impurities reduces all band gaps close to the metallic regime in addition to increasing the DOS for the valence and conduction bands.

  7. Electronic structure of self-assembled amorphous polyfluorenes.

    PubMed

    Kilina, Svetlana; Batista, Enrique R; Yang, Ping; Tretiak, Sergei; Saxena, Avadh; Martin, Richard L; Smith, Darryl L

    2008-07-01

    We investigate the role of conformational disorder and intermolecular interactions on the electronic structure of amorphous clusters of polyfluorenes. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine probable molecular geometries and chain packing, and first-principles density functional theory calculations are employed to determine electronic structure and orbital localization properties. Intramolecular and intermolecular effects are disentangled by contrasting results for densely packed oligomer clusters and for ensembles of isolated oligomers with the same intramolecular geometries. Our simulations show that intermolecular disorder allows for nearly planar configurations of interacting fluorenes compared to the isolated molecules. This rationalizes the experimentally detected formation of the planar crystalline morphologies that frequently accompany twisted glassy configurations in fluorene films. The energy gap (HOMO-LUMO gap) significantly decreases for planar configurations. The electron and hole orbital energies are strongly dependent on both torsional angles and intermolecular interactions. This leads to strong localization of electronic states in amorphous polymer aggregates, which is analyzed by examining the respective orbital participation ratios. Notably, the energies of unoccupied levels show stronger dependence on the conformational disorder, compared to that of occupied levels. This results in the more probable formation of trap states near the edge of the conduction band than near the valence band. PMID:19206305

  8. Characterizing Electron Temperature Gradient Turbulence Via Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W M; Candy, J; Cowley, S; Dannert, T; Dimits, A; Dorland, W; Estrada-Mila, C; Hammett, G W; Jenko, F; Pueschel, M J; Shumaker, D E

    2006-05-22

    Numerical simulations of electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence are presented which characterize the ETG fluctuation spectrum, establish limits to the validity of the adiabatic ion model often employed in studying ETG turbulence, and support the tentative conclusion that plasmaoperating regimes exist in which ETG turbulence produces sufficient electron heat transport to be experimentally relevant. We resolve prior controversies regarding simulation techniques and convergence by benchmarking simulations of ETG turbulence from four microturbulence codes, demonstrating agreement on the electron heat flux, correlation functions, fluctuation intensity, and rms flow shear at fixed simulation cross section and resolution in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. Excellent convergence of both continuum and particle-in-cell codes with time step and velocity-space resolution is demonstrated, while numerical issues relating to perpendicular (to the magnetic field) simulation dimensions and resolution are discussed. A parameter scan in the magnetic shear, s, demonstrates that the adiabatic ion model is valid at small values of s (s < 0.4 for the parameters used in this scan) but breaks down at higher magnetic shear. A proper treatment employing gyrokinetic ions reveals a steady increase in the electron heat transport with increasing magnetic shear, reaching electron heat transport rates consistent with analyses of experimental tokamak discharges.

  9. Electronic Structure of Iridium Clusters on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Bradford A.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Coh, Sinisa; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was predicted to exhibit non-trivial Z2 topology, but its exceedingly weak spin-orbit coupling prevented this from being observed. Previous theoretical work has proposed enhancing the spin-orbit coupling strength by depositing individual adatoms adsorbed onto the surface of graphene. We show experimental evidence that the iridium adatoms cluster, with a cluster size of at least two atoms. We investigate through theoretical calculations the orientation of the iridium dimers on graphene, contrast the electronic structure of iridium dimers with iridium monomers, and compare the theoretical iridium dimer electronic structure calculations with the experimental results determined via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at LBNL's NERSC facility.

  10. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  11. Boltzmann electron PIC simulation of the E-sail effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janhunen, P.

    2015-12-01

    The solar wind electric sail (E-sail) is a planned in-space propulsion device that uses the natural solar wind momentum flux for spacecraft propulsion with the help of long, charged, centrifugally stretched tethers. The problem of accurately predicting the E-sail thrust is still somewhat open, however, due to a possible electron population trapped by the tether. Here we develop a new type of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation for predicting E-sail thrust. In the new simulation, electrons are modelled as a fluid, hence resembling hybrid simulation, but in contrast to normal hybrid simulation, the Poisson equation is used as in normal PIC to calculate the self-consistent electrostatic field. For electron-repulsive parts of the potential, the Boltzmann relation is used. For electron-attractive parts of the potential we employ a power law which contains a parameter that can be used to control the number of trapped electrons. We perform a set of runs varying the parameter and select the one with the smallest number of trapped electrons which still behaves in a physically meaningful way in the sense of producing not more than one solar wind ion deflection shock upstream of the tether. By this prescription we obtain thrust per tether length values that are in line with earlier estimates, although somewhat smaller. We conclude that the Boltzmann PIC simulation is a new tool for simulating the E-sail thrust. This tool enables us to calculate solutions rapidly and allows to easily study different scenarios for trapped electrons.

  12. Electronic structure studies of topological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuyun

    Three-dimensional (3D) Dirac fermions are a new class of topological quantum materials. In 3D Dirac semimetals, the conduction and valence bands touch each other at discrete points in the momentum space and show linear dispersions along all momentum directions, forming 3D Dirac cones which are protected by the crystal symmetry. Here I will present our recent studies of the electronic structures of novel materials which host 3D Dirac fermions by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  13. Structure and Electronic Properties of Polycrystalline Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mckenna, Keith P.; Shluger, AL

    2013-07-07

    We present an overview of the theoretical approaches that can be employed to model polycrystalline oxides along with a discussion of their limitations and associated challenges. We then present results for two metal oxide materials, MgO and HfO2, where theory and experiment have come together to provide insight into the structure and electronic properties of grain boundaries. Finally, we conclude with a discussion and outlook.

  14. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-05-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a0), bulk modulus (B0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  15. Puffin: A three dimensional, unaveraged free electron laser simulation code

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L. T.; McNeil, B. W. J.

    2012-09-15

    An unaveraged 3D model of the free electron laser (FEL) is presented which is capable of modelling electron interactions with broad bandwidth radiation that includes electron beam shot-noise and coherent spontaneous emission effects. Non-localised electron transport throughout the beam is modelled self-consistently allowing better modelling of systems where a larger electron energy range is required. The FEL interaction can be modelled with undulator fields of variable polarisation. A modular undulator system allows insertion of other magnetic structures, such as chicanes. A set of working equations that describe the model are derived, the parallel numerical method that solves them described, and some example FEL interactions presented.

  16. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Taisuke; Bostwick, Aaron; McChesney, Jessica; Seyller, Thomas; Horn, Karsten; Rotenberg, Eli

    2007-03-01

    Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes, graphite intercalation compounds, fullerenes, and ultrathin graphite films exhibit many exotic phenomena such as superconductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect. These findings have caused renewed interest in the electronic structure of ultrathin layers of graphene: a single honeycomb carbon layer that is the building block for these materials. There is a strong motivation to incorporate graphene multilayers into atomic-scale devices, spurred on by rapid progress in their fabrication and manipulation. We have synthesized bilayer graphene thin films deposited on insulating silicon carbide and characterized their electronic band structure using angle-resolved photoemission. By selectively adjusting the carrier concentration in each layer, changes in the Coulomb potential led to control of the gap between valence and conduction bands [1]. This control over the band structure suggests the potential application of bilayer graphene to switching functions in atomic scale electronic devices. [1] T. Ohta, A. Bostwick, T. Seyller, K. Horn, E. Rotenberg, Science, 313, 951 (2006).

  17. Smart electronics and MEMS for aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper, smart electronics and MEMS are employed to sense and control the drag in aircraft structures. The sensors are fabricated with interdigital transducers printed on a piezoelectric polymer. They in turn are mounted onto an ultra thin Penn State's novel RF antenna (Patent field). The sensor are designed to measure both pressure and shear of the fluid flow on aerospace structures. The wave form measurements may be monitored at a remote location either at the cockpit or elsewhere via the antennas in the sensors and an outside antenna. The integrated MEMS actuators which comprise of cantilever-, diaphram- and microbridge-based MEMS with suitable smart electronics etched onto the structure are controlled by the built-in antennas through feedback and feedforward control architecture. The integration of such materials and smart electronics into the skin of airfoil is ideal for sensing and controlling drag. The basic idea of this concept involves detection of the point of transition from laminar to turbulent flow and transmitting acoustical energy into the boundary layer so that the low energy fluid particles accelerate in the transverse direction and mix with the high energy flow outside of the boundary layer. 3D microriblets can be fabricated using stereo lithography and UV curable conducting polymers. The control of drag using these active microriblets are outlined.

  18. Structural model uncertainty in stochastic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, M.D.; Morrison, J.D.

    1997-09-01

    Prediction uncertainty in stochastic simulation models can be described by a hierarchy of components: stochastic variability at the lowest level, input and parameter uncertainty at a higher level, and structural model uncertainty at the top. It is argued that a usual paradigm for analysis of input uncertainty is not suitable for application to structural model uncertainty. An approach more likely to produce an acceptable methodology for analyzing structural model uncertainty is one that uses characteristics specific to the particular family of models.

  19. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    PubMed

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements.

  20. Simulation of the nonlinear evolution of electron plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Cairns, I. H.

    1991-01-01

    Electrostatic waves driven by an electron beam in an ambient magnetized plasma were studied using a quasi-1D PIC simulation of electron plasma waves (i.e., Langmuir waves). The results disclose the presence of a process for moving wave energy from frequencies and wavenumbers predicted by linear theory to the Langmuir-like frequencies during saturation of the instability. A decay process for producing backward propagating Langmuir-like waves, along with low-frequency waves, is observed. The simulation results, however, indicate that the backscattering process is not the conventional Langmuir wave decay. Electrostatic waves near multiples of the electron plasma frequency are generated by wave-wave coupling during the nonlinear stage of the simulations, confirming the suggestion of Klimas (1983).

  1. A spectral unaveraged algorithm for free electron laser simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Andriyash, I.A.; Lehe, R.; Malka, V.

    2015-02-01

    We propose and discuss a numerical method to model electromagnetic emission from the oscillating relativistic charged particles and its coherent amplification. The developed technique is well suited for free electron laser simulations, but it may also be useful for a wider range of physical problems involving resonant field–particles interactions. The algorithm integrates the unaveraged coupled equations for the particles and the electromagnetic fields in a discrete spectral domain. Using this algorithm, it is possible to perform full three-dimensional or axisymmetric simulations of short-wavelength amplification. In this paper we describe the method, its implementation, and we present examples of free electron laser simulations comparing the results with the ones provided by commonly known free electron laser codes.

  2. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of doped Al1- x Ti x N ( x = 0.03, 0.25) compositions based on cubic aluminum nitride from ab initio simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannikov, V. V.; Beketov, A. R.; Baranov, M. V.; Elagin, A. A.; Kudyakova, V. S.; Shishkin, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    The phase stability, electronic structure, and magnetic properties of Al1- x Ti x N compositions based on the metastable aluminum nitride modification with the rock-salt structure at low ( x = 0.03) and high ( x = 0.25) concentrations of titanium in the system have been investigated using the results of ab initio band calculations. It has been shown that, at low values of x, the partial substitution is characterized by a positive enthalpy, which, however, changes sign with an increase in the titanium concentration. According to the results of the band structure calculations, the doped compositions have electronic conductivity. For x = 0.03, titanium impurity atoms have local magnetic moments (˜0.6 μB), and the electronic spectrum is characterized by a 100% spin polarization of near-Fermi states. Some of the specific features of the chemical bonding in Al1- x Ti x N cubic phases have been considered.

  3. Simulation Of Electron Cloud Effects On Electron Beam At ERL With Pipelined QuickPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, B.; Muggli, P.; Huang, C.; Decyk, V.; Mori, W. B.; Hoffstaetter, G. H.; Katsouleas, T.

    2009-01-22

    With the successful implementation of pipelining algorithm to the QuickPIC code, the number of processors used is increased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude, and the speed of the simulation is improved by a similar factor. The pipelined QuickPIC is used to simulate the electron cloud effect on electron beam in the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) due to extremely small emittance and high peak currents anticipated in the machine. A tune shift is found due to electron cloud on electron beams, which is of equal magnitude to that on positron beams but in an opposite direction; however, emittance growth of the electron beam in an electron cloud is not observed for ERL parameters.

  4. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliav, Ephraim; Fritzsche, Stephan; Kaldor, Uzi

    2015-12-01

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac-Coulomb-Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental-computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  5. Resolving Presynaptic Structure by Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Guy A.; Jackson, Dakota R.; Spirou, George A.

    2016-01-01

    A key goal in neurobiology is to generate a theoretical framework that merges structural, physiological and molecular explanations of brain function. These categories of explanation do not advance in synchrony; advances in one category define new experiments in other categories. For example, the synapse was defined physiologically and biochemically before it was visualized using electron microscopy. Indeed, the original descriptions of synapses in the 1950s were lent credence by the presence of spherical vesicles in presynaptic terminals that were considered to be the substrate for quantal neurotransmission. In the last few decades, our understanding of synaptic function has again been driven by physiological and molecular techniques. The key molecular players for synaptic vesicle structure, mobility and fusion were identified and applications of the patch clamp technique permitted physiological estimation of neurotransmitter release and receptor properties. These advances demand higher resolution structural images of synapses. During the 1990s a second renaissance in cell biology driven by EM was fueled by improved techniques for electron tomography (ET) with the ability to compute virtual images with nm resolution between image planes. Over the last fifteen years, ET has been applied to the presynaptic terminal with special attention to the active zone and organelles of the nerve terminal. In this review, we first summarize the technical improvements that have led to a resurgence in utilization of ET and then we summarize new insights gained by the application of ET to reveal the high-resolution structure of the nerve terminal. PMID:25683026

  6. SIMPLEX: simulator and postprocessor for free-electron laser experiments

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    SIMPLEX is a computer program developed for simulating the amplification process of free-electron lasers (FELs). It numerically solves the so-called FEL equations describing the evolution of the radiation field and growth of microbunching while the electron beam travels along the undulator. In order to reduce the numerical cost, the FEL equations have been reduced to more convenient forms for numerical implementation by applying reasonable approximations. SIMPLEX is equipped with a postprocessor to facilitate the retrieval of desired information from the simulation results, which is crucial for practical applications such as designing the beamline and analyzing the experimental results. PMID:26289287

  7. Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Simulation of Electron-Driven Turbulence in HSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Benjamin; Pueschel, M. J.; Weir, Gavin; Likin, Konstatin; Talmadge, Joseph; Anderson, Simon; Anderson, David

    2014-10-01

    The first nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of plasmas in the Helically Symmetric eXperiment (HSX) are presented. Due to large electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and little ion heating, microtubulence in HSX is driven by electron dynamics and thus the simulations performed require two kinetic species. Linear growth rate calculations of plasmas at experimental parameters indicate HSX is unstable at low kyρs to the Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) and the Electron Temperature Gradient (ETG) mode at high kyρs , especially in the core region where the normalized temperature gradient is significantly larger than the normalized density gradient. Nonlinear flux tube simulations show heat fluxes shift to smaller scales than for ion-driven turbulence, with the flux spectrum peaking at kyρs ~ 0 . 9 for TEM turbulence. Nonlinear simulations also show the evolution of zonal flows, which are a possible candidate for the nonlinear saturation mechanism. Calculation of the dependence of the saturated heat flux on the normalized electron temperature gradient provides a computational comparison with the stiffness measurements obtained in heat pulse propagation experiments. Work supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-FG02-93ER54222.

  8. Thermal transfer structures coupling electronics card(s) to coolant-cooled structure(s)

    DOEpatents

    David, Milnes P; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Parida, Pritish R; Schmidt, Roger R

    2014-12-16

    Cooling apparatuses and coolant-cooled electronic systems are provided which include thermal transfer structures configured to engage with a spring force one or more electronics cards with docking of the electronics card(s) within a respective socket(s) of the electronic system. A thermal transfer structure of the cooling apparatus includes a thermal spreader having a first thermal conduction surface, and a thermally conductive spring assembly coupled to the conduction surface of the thermal spreader and positioned and configured to reside between and physically couple a first surface of an electronics card to the first surface of the thermal spreader with docking of the electronics card within a socket of the electronic system. The thermal transfer structure is, in one embodiment, metallurgically bonded to a coolant-cooled structure and facilitates transfer of heat from the electronics card to coolant flowing through the coolant-cooled structure.

  9. Free-electron laser simulations on the MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonlaven, Scott A.; Liebrock, Lorie M.

    1987-01-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) are of interest because they provide high power, high efficiency, and broad tunability. FEL simulations can make efficient use of computers of the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) class because most of the processing consists of applying a simple equation to a set of identical particles. A test version of the KMS Fusion FEL simulation, which resides mainly in the MPPs host computer and only partially in the MPP, has run successfully.

  10. Xyce parallel electronic simulator reference guide, version 6.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd S; Pawlowski, Roger P; Warrender, Christina E.; Baur, David Gregory.

    2013-08-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide [1] .

  11. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator : reference guide, version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, Robert John; Waters, Lon J.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Fixel, Deborah A.; Russo, Thomas V.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Hutchinson, Scott Alan; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Wix, Steven D.

    2004-06-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide.

  12. Xyce parallel electronic simulator reference guide, version 6.1

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Eric R; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Baur, David Gregory

    2014-03-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide [1] .

  13. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator : reference guide, version 4.1.

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2009-02-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users Guide.

  14. Xyce™ Parallel Electronic Simulator: Reference Guide, Version 5.1

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Eric R.; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Schiek, Richard Louis; Santarelli, Keith R.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd S.; Pawlowski, Roger P.

    2009-11-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users’ Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users’ Guide.

  15. Electronic structure interpolation via atomic orbitals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mohan; Guo, G-C; He, Lixin

    2011-08-17

    We present an efficient scheme for accurate electronic structure interpolation based on systematically improvable optimized atomic orbitals. The atomic orbitals are generated by minimizing the spillage value between the atomic basis calculations and the converged plane wave basis calculations on some coarse k-point grid. They are then used to calculate the band structure of the full Brillouin zone using the linear combination of atomic orbitals algorithms. We find that usually 16-25 orbitals per atom can give an accuracy of about 10 meV compared to the full ab initio calculations, and the accuracy can be systematically improved by using more atomic orbitals. The scheme is easy to implement and robust, and works equally well for metallic systems and systems with complicated band structures. Furthermore, the atomic orbitals have much better transferability than Shirley's basis and Wannier functions, which is very useful for perturbation calculations.

  16. Electronic structure and bonding in crystalline peroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Königstein, Markus; Sokol, Alexei A.; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    1999-08-01

    Hartree-Fock and density-functional PW91 theories as realized in the CRYSTAL95 code have been applied to investigate the structural and electronic properties of Ba, Sr, and Ca peroxide materials with the calcium carbide crystal structure, results for which are compared with those for the corresponding oxides. Special attention is paid to the stabilization of the peroxide molecular ion O2-2 in the ionic environment provided by the lattice, and to chemical bonding effects. In order to describe the covalent bonding within the O2-2 ion and the polarization of the O- ion in the crystal electrostatic field, it is essential to include an account of the effects of electron correlation. The PW91 density functional has allowed us to reproduce the crystallographic parameters within a 3% error. The chemical bonding within the peroxide molecular ion has a complex nature with a balance between the weak covalent bond of σz type and the strong electrostatic repulsion of the closed-shell electron groups occupying O 2s and O 2px and 2py states. Compression of the peroxide ion in the ionic crystals gives rise to an excessive overlap of the O 2s closed shells of the two O- ions of a peroxide molecular ion O2-2, which in turn determines the antibonding character of the interaction and chemical bonding in the O2-2 molecular ion.

  17. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes under electron irradiation simulated with a tight-binding model

    SciTech Connect

    Loponen, T.; Nieminen, R. M.; Krasheninnikov, A. V.; Kaukonen, M.

    2006-08-15

    Experiments show that nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes subjected to the electron beam in a transmission electron microscope can easily lose dopant atoms and that overall they are less stable under electron irradiation than the pristine tubes. To understand the lower stability of nitrogen-doped nanotubes we use a density-functional-theory-based tight-binding model and simulate impacts of energetic electrons onto the nanotubes. We show that the dopant atom displacement energy and thus the electron threshold energy is lower for nanotubes with smaller diameter and that, independent of the nanotube diameter, the dopant nitrogen atoms can be displaced more easily than the host carbon atoms. Our results set a limit on the threshold electron energy for damage production in N-doped tubes and indicate that spatially localized electron irradiation of doped nanotubes can be used for local atomic and band structure engineering.

  18. Electron Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction: Simulations and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, M.; Matsukiyo, S.; Mazelle, C. X.; Hada, T.

    2015-12-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles (cosmic rays) in space. While most of the past studies about particle acceleration assume the presence of a single shock, in space two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. Hietala et al. [2011] observed the collision of an interplanetary shock and the earth's bow shock and the associated acceleration of energetic ions. The kinetic natures of a shock-shock collision has not been well understood. Only the work done by using hybrid simulation was reported by Cargill et al. [1986], in which they focus on a collision of two supercritical shocks and the resultant ion acceleration. We expect similarly that electron acceleration can also occur in shock-shock collision. To investigate the electron acceleration process in a shock-shock collision, we perform one-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In the simulation energetic electrons are observed between the two approaching shocks before colliding. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). The reflected electrons create a temperature anisotropy and excite large amplitude waves upstream via the electron fire hose instability. The large amplitude waves can scatter the energetic electrons in pitch angle so that some of them gain large pitch angles and are easily reflected when they encounter the shocks subsequently. The reflected electrons can sustain, or probably even strengthen, them. We further discuss observational results of an interaction of interplanetary shocks and the earth's bow shock by examining mainly Cluster data. We focus on whether or not electrons are accelerated in the shock-shock interaction.

  19. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  20. Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S; Bauer, Eric D; Moore, David P; Mitchell, Jeremy N; Kennison, John A; Martin, Richard L; Roy, Lindsay E; Scuseria, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

  1. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-28

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K{sub 1}RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K{sub 1}RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D{sub 2}-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C{sub 2h}-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D{sub 2}-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C{sub 2h}-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D{sub 2}- and C{sub 2h}-like K{sub 1}RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments

  2. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-01

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K1RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D2- and C2h-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K1RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D2-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C2h-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D2-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C2h-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments than the other two on the opposite side, which leads to the largely enhanced

  3. Geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsung-Lung; Lu, Wen-Cai

    2015-06-28

    The geometric and electronic structures of potassium-adsorbed rubrene complexes are studied in this article. It is found that the potassium-rubrene (K1RUB) complexes inherit the main symmetry characteristics from their pristine counterparts and are thus classified into D2- and C2h-like complexes according to the relative orientations of the four phenyl side groups. The geometric structures of K1RUB are governed by two general effects on the total energy: Deformation of the carbon frame of the pristine rubrene increases the total energy, while proximity of the potassium ion to the phenyl ligands decreases the energy. Under these general rules, the structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB, however, exhibit their respective peculiarities. These peculiarities can be illustrated by their energy profiles of equilibrium structures. For the potassium adsorption-sites, the D2-like complexes show minimum-energy basins, whereas the C2h-like ones have single-point minimum-energies. If the potassium atom ever has the energy to diffuse from the minimum-energy site, the potassium diffusion path on the D2-like complexes is most likely along the backbone in contrast to the C2h-like ones. Although the electronic structures of the minimum-energy structures of D2- and C2h-like K1RUB are very alike, decompositions of their total spectra reveal insights into the electronic structures. First, the spectral shapes are mainly determined by the facts that, in comparison with the backbone carbons, the phenyl carbons have more uniform chemical environments and far less contributions to the electronic structures around the valence-band edge. Second, the electron dissociated from the potassium atom mainly remains on the backbone and has little effects on the electronic structures of the phenyl groups. Third, the two phenyls on the same side of the backbone as the potassium atom have more similar chemical environments than the other two on the opposite side, which leads to the largely enhanced

  4. Electronic Structure of B12 coenzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, W. Y.; Randaccio, Lucio

    2001-06-01

    We have carried out an ab-initio local density functional calculations of the two most important B12 coenzymes, adoensyl-cobalamin (Ado-Cbl) and methyl-cobalamin (Me-Cbl). The crystal structures were determined by accurate X-ray synchrotron radiation measurements. Both crystals have space group P2121 with four molecules, or about 800 atoms, per unit cell. Our electronic structure calculation is based on one full molecule including the side chains. Results are analyzed in terms of atom and orbital resolved partial density of states (PDOS), Mulliken effective charges and bond orders. The PDOS analysis shows that the Co complexes of both B12 coenzymes had a HOMO/LUMO gap of about 1.5 eV. The Co-C bond order in Me-Cbl is smaller than that in Ado-Cbl. This appears to be in contradiction with the measured bond dissociated energies. However, this could also indicate the importance of the effects of solvents, which were not included in the calculation. We are investigating whether the effect of the solvents could dramatically modify the electronic structures of Ado-Cbl and Me-Cbl.

  5. Kinetic electrons in global electromagnetic gyrokinetic particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Wang, W.

    2005-10-01

    Employing an electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulation model,ootnotetextZ. Lin and L. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 1447 (2001). kinetic electron dynamics in global tokamak geometry is investigated. The massless fluid electron model is developed as a base. We further evolve gyrokinetic equations for non-adiabatic kinetic electrons. To obtain the magnetic perturbation, the fluid-kinetic hybrid electron model^1 employs the inverse of the Faraday's law. Instead, the Ampere's law is used as a closure relation to avoid uncertainties in estimating ue|, the moment of the electron velocities. The physics goal is to investigate the finite beta effects on the turbulent transport, as well as α particle driven turbulence.ootnotetextI. Holod, Z. Lin, et al., this conference. This work is supported by Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02-03ER54695 (UCI), DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03073 (PPPL).

  6. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particularmore » incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Lastly, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.« less

  7. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    SciTech Connect

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particular incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Lastly, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.

  8. Electronic Structure of Buried Interfaces - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Zachary

    2015-08-25

    In the electronics behind computer memory storage, the speed and size are dictated by the performance of permanent magnets inside devices called read heads. Complicated magnets made of stacked layers of thin films can be engineered to have properties that yield more energy storage and faster switching times compared to conventional iron or cobalt magnets. The reason is that magnetism is a result of subtle interactions amongst electrons; just how neurons come together on large scales to make cat brains and dog brains, ensembles of electrons interact and become ferromagnets and paramagnets. These interactions make magnets too difficult to study in their entirety, so I focus on the interfaces between layers, which are responsible for the coupling materials physicists hope to exploit to produce next-generation magnets. This project, I study a transition metal oxide material called LSCO, Lanthanum Cobaltite, which can be a paramagnet or a ferromagnet depending on how you tweak the electronic structure. It exhibits an exciting behavior: its sum is greater than the sum of its parts. When another similar material called a LSMO, Lanthanum Manganite, is grown on top of it, their interface has a different type of magnetism from the LSCO or the LSMO! I hope to explain this by demonstrating differently charged ions in the interface. The typical method for quantifying this is x-ray absorption, but all conventional techniques look at every layer simultaneously, averaging the interfaces and the LSCO layers that we want to characterize separately. Instead, I must use a new reflectivity technique, which tracks the intensity of reflected x-rays at different angles, at energies near the absorption peaks of certain elements, to track changes in the electronic structure of the material. The samples were grown by collaborators at the Takamura group at U.C. Davis and probed with this “resonant reflectivity” technique on Beamline 2-1 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

  9. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-06-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets.

  10. Compressed Sensing Electron Tomography for Determining Biological Structure

    PubMed Central

    Guay, Matthew D.; Czaja, Wojciech; Aronova, Maria A.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    There has been growing interest in applying compressed sensing (CS) theory and practice to reconstruct 3D volumes at the nanoscale from electron tomography datasets of inorganic materials, based on known sparsity in the structure of interest. Here we explore the application of CS for visualizing the 3D structure of biological specimens from tomographic tilt series acquired in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). CS-ET reconstructions match or outperform commonly used alternative methods in full and undersampled tomogram recovery, but with less significant performance gains than observed for the imaging of inorganic materials. We propose that this disparity stems from the increased structural complexity of biological systems, as supported by theoretical CS sampling considerations and numerical results in simulated phantom datasets. A detailed analysis of the efficacy of CS-ET for undersampled recovery is therefore complicated by the structure of the object being imaged. The numerical nonlinear decoding process of CS shares strong connections with popular regularized least-squares methods, and the use of such numerical recovery techniques for mitigating artifacts and denoising in reconstructions of fully sampled datasets remains advantageous. This article provides a link to the software that has been developed for CS-ET reconstruction of electron tomographic data sets. PMID:27291259

  11. Impact of lattice distortion and electron doping on α-MoO3 electronic structure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng-Ru; He, Yao; Cao, Chao; Lu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Band structure of transition metal oxides plays a critical role in many applications such as photo-catalysis, photovoltaics, and electroluminescent devices. In this work we report findings that the band structure of MoO3 can be significantly altered by a distortion in the octahedral coordination structure. We discovered that, in addition to epitaxial type of structural strain, chemical force such as hydrogen inclusion can also cause extended lattice distortion. The lattice distortion in hydrogenated MoO3 led to a significant reduction of the energy gap, overshadowing the Moss-Burstein effect of band filling. Charge doping simulations revealed that filling of conduction band drives the lattice distortion. This suggests that any charge transfer or n-type electron doping could lead to lattice distortion and consequentially a reduction in energy gap. PMID:25410814

  12. Electronic structure and optical properties of resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhi-Fan; Zhou, Rong-Feng

    2013-03-01

    We used the density of functional theory (DFT) to study the electronic structure and density of states of resin by ab initio calculation. The results show the band gap of resin is 1.7 eV. The covalent bond is combined C/O atoms with H atoms. The O 2p orbital is the biggest effect near the Fermi level. The results of optical properties show the reflectivity is low, and the refractive index is 1.7 in visible light range. The highest absorption coefficient peak is in 490 nm and the value is 75,000.

  13. Electron heating during magnetic reconnection: A simulation scaling study

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, M. A. Haggerty, C. C.; Phan, T. D.; Oieroset, M.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Cassak, P. A.; Wu, P.; Malakit, K.

    2014-12-15

    Electron bulk heating during magnetic reconnection with symmetric inflow conditions is examined using kinetic particle-in-cell simulations. Inflowing plasma parameters are varied over a wide range of conditions, and the increase in electron temperature is measured in the exhaust well downstream of the x-line. The degree of electron heating is well correlated with the inflowing Alfvén speed c{sub Ar} based on the reconnecting magnetic field through the relation ΔT{sub e}=0.033 m{sub i} c{sub Ar}{sup 2}, where ΔT{sub e} is the increase in electron temperature. For the range of simulations performed, the heating shows almost no correlation with inflow total temperature T{sub tot}=T{sub i}+T{sub e} or plasma β. An out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field of similar magnitude to the reconnecting field does not affect the total heating, but it does quench perpendicular heating, with almost all heating being in the parallel direction. These results are qualitatively consistent with a recent statistical survey of electron heating in the dayside magnetopause (Phan et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 4475, 2013), which also found that ΔT{sub e} was proportional to the inflowing Alfvén speed. The net electron heating varies very little with distance downstream of the x-line. The simulations show at most a very weak dependence of electron heating on the ion to electron mass ratio. In the antiparallel reconnection case, the largely parallel heating is eventually isotropized downstream due a scattering mechanism, such as stochastic particle motion or instabilities. The simulation size is large enough to be directly relevant to reconnection in the Earth's magnetosphere, and the present findings may prove to be universal in nature with applications to the solar wind, the solar corona, and other astrophysical plasmas. The study highlights key properties that must be satisfied by an electron heating mechanism: (1) preferential heating in the parallel direction; (2) heating

  14. Quantum simulations of small electron-hole complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.A.; Kalia, R.K.; Vashishta, P.D.

    1984-09-01

    The Green's Function Monte Carlo method is applied to the calculation of the binding energies of electron-hole complexes in semiconductors. The quantum simulation method allows the unambiguous determination of the ground state energy and the effects of band anisotropy on the binding energy. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Developments in the electron gun simulation program, EGUN

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1994-11-01

    This paper discusses the developments in the electron gun simulation programs that are based on EGUN with its derivatives and supporting programs. Much of the code development has been inspired by technology changes in computer hardware; the implications of this evolution on EGN2 are discussed. Some examples and a review of the capabilities of the EGUN family are described.

  16. Simulation of tail distributions in electron-positron circular colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, J.

    1992-02-01

    In addition to the Gaussian shaped core region, particle bunches in electron-positron circular colliders have a rarefied halo region of importance in determining beam lifetimes and backgrounds in particle detectors. A method is described which allows simulation of halo particle distributions.

  17. Simulation Tools for Power Electronics Courses Based on Java Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canesin, Carlos A.; Goncalves, Flavio A. S.; Sampaio, Leonardo P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents interactive power electronics educational tools. These interactive tools make use of the benefits of Java language to provide a dynamic and interactive approach to simulating steady-state ideal rectifiers (uncontrolled and controlled; single-phase and three-phase). Additionally, this paper discusses the development and use of…

  18. Simulating electron spin entanglement in a double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Moreno, M. A.; Hernandez de La Luz, A. D.; Meza-Montes, Lilia

    2011-03-01

    One of the biggest advantages of having a working quantum-computing device when compared with a classical one, is the exponential speedup of calculations. This exponential increase is based on the ability of a quantum system to create and operate on entangled states. In order to study theoretically the entanglement between two electron spins, we simulate the dynamics of two electron spins in an electrostatically-defined double quantum dot with a finite barrier height between the dots. Electrons are initially confined to separated quantum dots. Barrier height is varied and the spin entanglement as a function of this variation is investigated. The evolution of the system is simulated by using a numerical approach for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for two particles. Partially supported by VIEP-BUAP.

  19. Hierarchical Simulation of Hot Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Singhal, S. N.

    1993-01-01

    Computational procedures are described to simulate the thermal and mechanical behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) in the following three broad areas: (1) Behavior of HT-MMC's from micromechanics to laminate via Metal Matrix Composite Analyzer (METCAN), (2) tailoring of HT-MMC behavior for optimum specific performance via Metal Matrix Laminate Tailoring (MMLT), and (3) HT-MMC structural response for hot structural components via High Temperature Composite Analyzer (HITCAN). Representative results from each area are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of computational simulation procedures. The sample case results show that METCAN can be used to simulate material behavior such as strength, stress-strain response, and cyclic life in HTMMC's; MMLT can be used to tailor the fabrication process for optimum performance such as that for in-service load carrying capacity of HT-MMC's; and HITCAN can be used to evaluate static fracture and fatigue life of hot pressurized metal matrix composite rings.

  20. Simulating the formation of cosmic structure.

    PubMed

    Frenk, C S

    2002-06-15

    A timely combination of new theoretical ideas and observational discoveries has brought about significant advances in our understanding of cosmic evolution. Computer simulations have played a key role in these developments by providing the means to interpret astronomical data in the context of physical and cosmological theory. In the current paradigm, our Universe has a flat geometry, is undergoing accelerated expansion and is gravitationally dominated by elementary particles that make up cold dark matter. Within this framework, it is possible to simulate in a computer the emergence of galaxies and other structures from small quantum fluctuations imprinted during an epoch of inflationary expansion shortly after the Big Bang. The simulations must take into account the evolution of the dark matter as well as the gaseous processes involved in the formation of stars and other visible components. Although many unresolved questions remain, a coherent picture for the formation of cosmic structure is now beginning to emerge.

  1. Proline puckering parameters for collagen structure simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Di

    2015-03-15

    Collagen is made of triple helices rich in proline residues, and hence is influenced by the conformational motions of prolines. Because the backbone motions of prolines are restricted by the helical structures, the only side chain motion—proline puckering—becomes an influential factor that may affect the stability of collagen structures. In molecular simulations, a proper proline puckering population is desired so to yield valid results of the collagen properties. Here we design the proline puckering parameters in order to yield suitable proline puckering populations as demonstrated in the experimental results. We test these parameters in collagen and the proline dipeptide simulations. Compared with the results of the PDB and the quantum calculations, we propose the proline puckering parameters for the selected collagen model simulations.

  2. Simulating the formation of cosmic structure.

    PubMed

    Frenk, C S

    2002-06-15

    A timely combination of new theoretical ideas and observational discoveries has brought about significant advances in our understanding of cosmic evolution. Computer simulations have played a key role in these developments by providing the means to interpret astronomical data in the context of physical and cosmological theory. In the current paradigm, our Universe has a flat geometry, is undergoing accelerated expansion and is gravitationally dominated by elementary particles that make up cold dark matter. Within this framework, it is possible to simulate in a computer the emergence of galaxies and other structures from small quantum fluctuations imprinted during an epoch of inflationary expansion shortly after the Big Bang. The simulations must take into account the evolution of the dark matter as well as the gaseous processes involved in the formation of stars and other visible components. Although many unresolved questions remain, a coherent picture for the formation of cosmic structure is now beginning to emerge. PMID:12804279

  3. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  4. Computational Simulation of Composite Structural Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    2004-01-01

    Progressive damage and fracture of composite structures subjected to monotonically increasing static, tension-tension cyclic, pressurization, and flexural cyclic loading are evaluated via computational simulation. Constituent material properties, stress and strain limits are scaled up to the structure level to evaluate the overall damage and fracture propagation for composites. Damage initiation, growth, accumulation, and propagation to fracture due to monotonically increasing static and cyclic loads are included in the simulations. Results show the number of cycles to failure at different temperatures and the damage progression sequence during different degradation stages. A procedure is outlined for use of computational simulation data in the assessment of damage tolerance, determination of sensitive parameters affecting fracture, and interpretation of results with insight for design decisions.

  5. Validation experiments for LBM simulations of electron beam melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammer, Regina; Rüde, Ulrich; Markl, Matthias; Jüchter, Vera; Körner, Carolin

    2014-05-01

    This paper validates three-dimensional (3D) simulation results of electron beam melting (EBM) processes by comparing experimental and numerical data. The physical setup is presented which is discretized by a 3D thermal lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). An experimental process window is used for the validation depending on the line energy injected into the metal powder bed and the scan velocity of the electron beam. In the process window, the EBM products are classified into the categories, porous, good and swelling, depending on the quality of the surface. The same parameter sets are used to generate a numerical process window. A comparison of numerical and experimental process windows shows a good agreement. This validates the EBM model and justifies simulations for future improvements of the EBM processes. In particular, numerical simulations can be used to explain future process window scenarios and find the best parameter set for a good surface quality and dense products.

  6. Simulation of free-electron lasers seeded with broadband radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bajlekov, Svetoslav; Fawley, William; Schroeder, Carl; Bartolini, Riccardo; Hooker, Simon

    2011-03-10

    The longitudinal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL) radiation can be enhanced by seeding the FEL with high harmonics of an optical laser pulse. The radiation produced by high-harmonic generation (HHG), however, has a fast-varying temporal profile that can violate the slowly varying envelope approximation and limited frequency window that is employed in conventional free-electron laser simulation codes. Here we investigate the implications of violating this approximation on the accuracy of simulations. On the basis of both analytical considerations and 1D numerical studies, it is concluded that, for most realistic scenarios, conventional FEL codes are capable of accurately simulating the FEL process even when the seed radiation violates the slowly varying envelope approximation. We additionally discuss the significance of filtering the harmonic content of broadband HHG seeds.

  7. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  8. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G; Moore, K T; Chung, B W; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J; Ebbinghaus, B B; Butterfield, M T; Teslich, Jr., N E; Bliss, R A; Morton, S A; Yu, S W; Komesu, T; Waddill, G D; der Laan, G v; Kutepov, A L

    2005-10-13

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy [1], x-ray absorption spectroscopy [1,2,3,4], electron energy loss spectroscopy [2,3,4], Fano Effect measurements [5], and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy [6], including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples. [2,3,6

  9. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.G.; Moore, K.T.; Chung, B.W.; Wall, M.A.; Schwartz, A.J.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Butterfield, M.T.; Teslich, Jr., N.E.; Bliss, R.A.; Morton, S.A.; Yu, S.W.; Komesu, T.; Waddill, G.D.; van der Laan, G.; Kutepov, A.L.

    2008-10-30

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Fano Effect measurements, and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples.

  10. Electron beam coupling to a metamaterial structure

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Shiffler, Don; Cartwright, Keith

    2013-08-15

    Microwave metamaterials have shown promise in numerous applications, ranging from strip lines and antennas to metamaterial-based electron beam driven devices. In general, metamaterials allow microwave designers to obtain electromagnetic characteristics not typically available in nature. High Power Microwave (HPM) sources have in the past drawn inspiration from work done in the conventional microwave source community. In this article, the use of metamaterials in an HPM application is considered by using an effective medium model to determine the coupling of an electron beam to a metamaterial structure in a geometry similar to that of a dielectric Cerenkov maser. Use of the effective medium model allows for the analysis of a wide range of parameter space, including the “mu-negative,”“epsilon-negative,” and “double negative” regimes of the metamaterial. The physics of such a system are modeled analytically and by utilizing the particle-in-cell code ICEPIC. For this geometry and effective medium representation, optimum coupling of the electron beam to the metamaterial, and thus the optimum microwave or RF production, occurs in the epsilon negative regime of the metamaterial. Given that HPM tubes have been proposed that utilize a metamaterial, this model provides a rapid method of characterizing a source geometry that can be used to quickly understand the basic physics of such an HPM device.

  11. Structured Debriefing in Simulation-Based Education.

    PubMed

    Palaganas, Janice C; Fey, Mary; Simon, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Debriefing following a simulation event is a conversational period for reflection and feedback aimed at sustaining or improving future performance. It is considered by many simulation educators to be a critical activity for learning in simulation-based education. Deep learning can be achieved during debriefing and often depends on the facilitation skills of the debriefer as well as the learner's perceptions of a safe and supportive learning environment as created by the debriefer. On the other hand, poorly facilitated debriefings may create adverse learning, generate bad feelings, and may lead to a degradation of clinical performance, self-reflection, or harm to the educator-learner relationship. The use of a structure that recognizes logical and sequential phases during debriefing can assist simulation educators to achieve a deep level of learning. PMID:26909457

  12. The structure of the hydrated electron in bulk and at interfaces: Does the hydrated electron occupy a cavity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Jennifer Ryan

    Since its discovery over fifty years ago, the hydrated electron has been the subject of much interest. Hydrated electrons, which are free electrons in water, are found in fields ranging from biochemistry to radiation chemistry, so it is important that we understand the structure and dynamics of this species. Because of its high reactivity, the hydrated electron's structure has proven difficult to pin down, especially its molecular details. One-electron mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations have proven useful in helping elucidate the structure of the hydrated electron. The picture most commonly presented from these studies is one of the electron residing in a cavity, disrupting the local water structure much like an anion the size of bromide. Our group has recently proposed a completely different structure for the hydrated electron, which arose from rigorous calculations of a new electron-water potential. The picture that emerged was of an electron that does not occupy a cavity but instead draws water within itself; this non-cavity electron resides in a region of enhanced water density. The one-electron cavity and non-cavity models all predict similar experimental observables that probe the electronic structure of the hydrated electron, such as the optical absorption spectrum, which makes it difficult to determine which model most accurately describes the true structure of the hydrated electron. In this thesis, we work to calculate experimental observables for various simulated cavity and non-cavity models that are particularly sensitive to the local water structure near the electron, in an effort to distinguish the various models from each other. Two particular observables we are interested in are the resonance Raman spectrum and the temperature dependent optical absorption spectrum of the hydrated electron. We find that for both of these experiments, only the non-cavity model has qualitative agreement with experiment; the cavity models miss the

  13. Estimation of minimum electron dose necessary to resolve molecular structure of deoxyribonucleic acid by phase transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nomaguchi, Tsunenori; Kimura, Yoshihide; Takai, Yoshizo

    2006-12-04

    The minimum electron dose that is necessary to resolve the molecular structure of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was estimated based on experimental measurements of information limits and simulated DNA images, considering conditions of a low electron dose. From these results, a dose of {approx}400 e/A{sup 2} was found to be necessary to achieve observation of DNA on a molecular scale under the present experimental setup. A DNA molecule was observed by a phase reconstruction method using through-focus images under the limited electron dose. In the reconstructed images, the helical structure and the intervals of the base pairs of DNA were partially resolved.

  14. Structure and navigation for electronic publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillinghast, John; Beretta, Giordano B.

    1998-01-01

    The sudden explosion of the World Wide Web as a new publication medium has given a dramatic boost to the electronic publishing industry, which previously was a limited market centered around CD-ROMs and on-line databases. While the phenomenon has parallels to the advent of the tabloid press in the middle of last century, the electronic nature of the medium brings with it the typical characteristic of 4th wave media, namely the acceleration in its propagation speed and the volume of information. Consequently, e-publications are even flatter than print media; Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet share the same computer screen with a home-made plagiarized copy of Deep Throat. The most touted tool for locating useful information on the World Wide Web is the search engine. However, due to the medium's flatness, sought information is drowned in a sea of useless information. A better solution is to build tools that allow authors to structure information so that it can easily be navigated. We experimented with the use of ontologies as a tool to formulate structures for information about a specific topic, so that related concepts are placed in adjacent locations and can easily be navigated using simple and ergonomic user models. We describe our effort in building a World Wide Web based photo album that is shared among a small network of people.

  15. Pentacene Derivatives: Electronic Structure and Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netusil, Ross; Ilie, Carolina; Kane, Thorin; Damkaci, Fehmi

    2013-03-01

    The variation in composition and structure of the substituent groups of pentacene compounds promises a broad range of electronic structures and behaviors and provides a vast and alluring field of inquiry with avenues of exploration. These include the development of synthetic schema, the process of design for novel derivatives and, in order to identify those hypothesized compounds which demonstrate the desired behavior, the identification and refinement of computational tools that make accurate predictions about the electronic behavior of theoretical compounds. Two computational techniques and six pentacene derivatives are here examined. One technique was used to predict the vibrational spectra of the compounds, in order to both acquire data about the optical conductivity of the compounds and to establish a pool of theoretical data against which experimental data will be compared. The molecular orbital energy level diagram of the same six compounds was derived using a second approach, with the same goals of discerning between valid and invalid predictive schema by comparison with pending experimental data and between hypothesized compounds which show promise and those which present little potential for use in organic semiconductor technology.

  16. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann`s criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site ``local`` chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  17. Electronic and structural properties of metallic microclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.

    1992-04-01

    The first part of this thesis presents a first-order pseudopotential calculation at T=O of the total energy of small sodium clusters of size N<800. The calculation is based on a local-pseudopotential scheme and local-density correlation and exchange. A temperature-size (T-N) phase-diagram is then derived using the T=O results and Lindemann's criterion for melting. The phase-diagram contains three regions of stability: (1) a liquid (jellium) phase at temperatures above the melting line T{sub M}(N) where cluster-stability occurs at electronic magic numbers: (2) a phase related to complete geometrical shells of body-centered-cubic structure at temperatures below the melting line; and (3) a close-packed structure at very low temperatures and sufficiently large N. The melting line drops to T{sub M}(N)=O for N<65, where electronic magic numbers are stable even at T=O. The phase diagram reduces asymptotically to the known phases of sodium as N{yields}{infinity}, including the known martensitic transformation at T{approximately}5 K. The second and the last part of this thesis consists of a study of small-cluster many-body systems by means of an on-site local'' chemical potential which allows the continuous variation of local electron-density. This method yields a criterion to distinguish particular features of a small cluster that are likely to survive in the large-N thermodynamic limit from those discontinuities that arise only from finite-size effects.

  18. Multigrid Methods in Electronic Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Emil

    1996-03-01

    Multigrid techniques have become the method of choice for a broad range of computational problems. Their use in electronic structure calculations introduces a new set of issues when compared to traditional plane wave approaches. We have developed a set of techniques that address these issues and permit multigrid algorithms to be applied to the electronic structure problem in an efficient manner. In our approach the Kohn-Sham equations are discretized on a real-space mesh using a compact representation of the Hamiltonian. The resulting equations are solved directly on the mesh using multigrid iterations. This produces rapid convergence rates even for ill-conditioned systems with large length and/or energy scales. The method has been applied to both periodic and non-periodic systems containing over 400 atoms and the results are in very good agreement with both theory and experiment. Example applications include a vacancy in diamond, an isolated C60 molecule, and a 64-atom cell of GaN with the Ga d-electrons in valence which required a 250 Ry cutoff. A particular strength of a real-space multigrid approach is its ready adaptability to massively parallel computer architectures. The compact representation of the Hamiltonian is especially well suited to such machines. Tests on the Cray-T3D have shown nearly linear scaling of the execution time up to the maximum number of processors (512). The MPP implementation has been used for studies of a large Amyloid Beta Peptide (C_146O_45N_42H_210) found in the brains of Alzheimers disease patients. Further applications of the multigrid method will also be described. (in collaboration D. J. Sullivan and J. Bernholc)

  19. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Complex Biomolecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Lizhi

    2005-03-01

    For over a century vitamin B12 and its enzyme cofactor derivates have persistently attracted research efforts for their vital biological role, unique Co-C bonding, rich red-ox chemistry, and recently their candidacies as drug delivery vehicles etc. However, our understanding of this complex metalorganic molecule's efficient enzyme activated catalytic power is still controversial. We have for the first time calculated the electronic structure, Mulliken effective charge and bonding of a whole Vitamin B12 molecule without any structural simplification by first- principles approaches based on density functional theory using structures determined by high resolution X-ray diffraction. A partial density of states analysis shows excellent agreement with X-ray absorption data and has been used successfully to interpret measured optical absorption spectra. Mulliken bonding analysis of B12 and its derivatives reveal noticeable correlations between the two axial ligands which could be exploited by the enzyme to control the catalytic process. Our calculated X-ray near edge structure of B12 and its derivates using Slater's transition state theory are also in good agreement with experiments. The same approach has been applied to other B12 derivatives, ferrocene peptides, and recently DNA molecules.

  20. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  1. Numerical simulation of transient moisture transfer into an electronic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasirabadi, P. Shojaee; Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    Electronic systems are sometimes exposed to harsh environmental conditions of temperature and humidity. Moisture transfer into electronic enclosures and condensation can cause several problems such as corrosion and alteration in thermal stresses. It is therefore essential to study the local climate inside the enclosures to be able to protect the electronic systems. In this work, moisture transfer into a typical electronic enclosure is numerically studied using CFD. In order to reduce the CPU-time and make a way for subsequent factorial design analysis, a simplifying modification is applied in which the real 3D geometry is approximated by a 2D axial symmetry one. The results for 2D and 3D models were compared in order to calibrate the 2D representation. Furthermore, simulation results were compared with experimental data and good agreement was found.

  2. Multidimensional simulations of the ELFA superradiant free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, P.; Fawley, W. M.; Sharp, W. M.

    1991-07-01

    ELFA (electron laser facility for acceleration) is a high-gain, microwave ( ν = 100 GHz) free electron laser (FEL) facility driven by an rf linac. ELFA will test the existence of the theoretically predicted regimes of strong and weak superradiance. Both regimes can be studied with the same FEL by changing the height of the interaction waveguide, which controls the radiation group velocity, and thus the relative slippage between electrons and photons. The operation of ELFA has been modeled using a modified version of the two-dimensional, time-dependent sideband code GINGER. The simulations take into account the time and space variations of the radiation field, as well as the space charge and transverse emittance of the electron beam. The sensitivity of the superradiant signal to variations of the beam emittance, energy and energy spread is examined.

  3. Stochastic Simulation Tool for Aerospace Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.; Moore, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic simulation refers to incorporating the effects of design tolerances and uncertainties into the design analysis model and then determining their influence on the design. A high-level evaluation of one such stochastic simulation tool, the MSC.Robust Design tool by MSC.Software Corporation, has been conducted. This stochastic simulation tool provides structural analysts with a tool to interrogate their structural design based on their mathematical description of the design problem using finite element analysis methods. This tool leverages the analyst's prior investment in finite element model development of a particular design. The original finite element model is treated as the baseline structural analysis model for the stochastic simulations that are to be performed. A Monte Carlo approach is used by MSC.Robust Design to determine the effects of scatter in design input variables on response output parameters. The tool was not designed to provide a probabilistic assessment, but to assist engineers in understanding cause and effect. It is driven by a graphical-user interface and retains the engineer-in-the-loop strategy for design evaluation and improvement. The application problem for the evaluation is chosen to be a two-dimensional shell finite element model of a Space Shuttle wing leading-edge panel under re-entry aerodynamic loading. MSC.Robust Design adds value to the analysis effort by rapidly being able to identify design input variables whose variability causes the most influence in response output parameters.

  4. Simulations of Large Scale Structures in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Shihong

    Large-scale structures are powerful probes for cosmology. Due to the long range and non-linear nature of gravity, the formation of cosmological structures is a very complicated problem. The only known viable solution is cosmological N-body simulations. In this thesis, we use cosmological N-body simulations to study structure formation, particularly dark matter haloes' angular momenta and dark matter velocity field. The origin and evolution of angular momenta is an important ingredient for the formation and evolution of haloes and galaxies. We study the time evolution of the empirical angular momentum - mass relation for haloes to offer a more complete picture about its origin, dependences on cosmological models and nonlinear evolutions. We also show that haloes follow a simple universal specific angular momentum profile, which is useful in modelling haloes' angular momenta. The dark matter velocity field will become a powerful cosmological probe in the coming decades. However, theoretical predictions of the velocity field rely on N-body simulations and thus may be affected by numerical artefacts (e.g. finite box size, softening length and initial conditions). We study how such numerical effects affect the predicted pairwise velocities, and we propose a theoretical framework to understand and correct them. Our results will be useful for accurately comparing N-body simulations to observational data of pairwise velocities.

  5. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, K.S.

    2000-05-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  6. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  7. Field structure and electron life times in the MEFISTO electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodendorfer, M.; Altwegg, K.; Shea, H.; Wurz, P.

    2008-03-01

    The complex magnetic field of the permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source MEFISTO located at the University of Berne has been numerically simulated. For the first time the magnetized volume qualified for electron cyclotron resonance at 2.45 GHz and 87.5 mT has been analyzed in highly detailed 3D simulations with unprecedented resolution. New results were obtained from the numerical simulation of 25,211 electron trajectories. The evident characteristic ion sputtering trident of hexapole confined ECR ion sources has been identified with the field and electron trajectory distribution. Furthermore, unexpected long electron trajectory lifetimes were found.

  8. Electronic structure of Sc3N@C68

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Shojun; Ogasawara, Naoko; Ohta, Tomona; Yagi, Hajime; Miyazaki, Takafumi; Nishi, Tatsuhiko; Shinohara, Hisanori

    2013-06-01

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectra (UPS) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of non-IPR endohedral fullerene Sc3N@C68 are measured. A simulated spectrum generated from a geometry optimized structure calculated by the density functional theory reproduces the UPS very well. XPS chemical shift of Sc2p3/2 level and electron population analysis of Sc3N@C68 suggest the electronic configuration of (Sc3N)6+@C686-. The Sc2p3/2 and N1s levels of Sc3N@C68, Sc3N@C78 and Sc3N@C80 move toward lower binding energy in accordance with cage size contraction.

  9. Progress in Simulating Turbulent Electron Thermal Transport in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Guttenfelder, Walter; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.; Bell, R. E.; Hammett, G. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Peterson, J. L.; Nevins, W. M.; Candy, J.; Yuh, H.

    2013-07-17

    Nonlinear simulations based on multiple NSTX discharge scenarios have progressed to help differentiate unique instability mechanisms and to validate with experimental turbulence and transport data. First nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing (MT) turbulence in a high-beta NSTX H-mode discharge predict experimental levels of electron thermal transport that are dominated by magnetic flutter and increase with collisionality, roughly consistent with energy confinement times in dimensionless collisionality scaling experiments. Electron temperature gradient (ETG) simulations predict significant electron thermal transport in some low and high beta discharges when ion scales are suppressed by E x B shear. Although the predicted transport in H-modes is insensitive to variation in collisionality (inconsistent with confinement scaling), it is sensitive to variations in other parameters, particularly density gradient stabilization. In reversed shear (RS) Lmode discharges that exhibit electron internal transport barriers, ETG transport has also been shown to be suppressed nonlinearly by strong negative magnetic shear, s<<0. In many high beta plasmas, instabilities which exhibit a stiff beta dependence characteristic of kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) are sometimes found in the core region. However, they do not have a distinct finite beta threshold, instead transitioning gradually to a trapped electron mode (TEM) as beta is reduced to zero. Nonlinear simulations of this "hybrid" TEM/KBM predict significant transport in all channels, with substantial contributions from compressional magnetic perturbations. As multiple instabilities are often unstable simultaneously in the same plasma discharge, even on the same flux surface, unique parametric dependencies are discussed which may be useful for distinguishing the different mechanisms experimentally.

  10. Study of electronic structures of solids with strongly interacting electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yen-Sheng

    This work contains studies of two classes of perovskite transition metal oxides. The first class is the layered perovskite cuprates and the related nickelate. The second class is the three dimensional perovskite manganites. Both model and ab initio calculations are carried out for the two classes of systems. The dissertation is therefore divided into the following four parts. The first part is about the 3-band Hubbard model. The model is commonly used for describing the electronic properties of the important CuO2 layers in the crystals of high-Tc superconducting cuprates, such as doped La2CuO4 and YBa2Cu3O 7. The straightforward perturbation expansion on the model taking tpd/ɛpd (~0.36 for the cuprates) as the small parameter does not converge. In this work, I show that there exist canonical transformations on the model Hamiltonian such that the perturbation expansion based on the transformed Hamiltonians converges. In the second part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for La2NiO4 and La2CuO4. The results predict correctly that these two materials are antiferromagnetic insulators, in contrast to the wrong predictions made by the density functional calculations using the local spin density approximation (LSDA). The spin form factors of the materials are also calculated. The results agree with previous theoretical works using an embedded cluster model. The calculated spin form factor of La2CuO4 is consistent with the few experimental data currently available, while the results for La2NiO4 show a large discrepancy between theory and experiment. We question the accuracy of the experimental results of La2NiO4 and call for more experiments to settle the issue. In the third part, crystal Hartree-Fock calculations are carried out for LaMnO3. Our main focus is on the magnetic and orbital orderings, the effect of the crystal distortion from the cubic perovskite structure, and the analysis of the projected density of states. In addition, we also find

  11. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-02-01

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these. PMID:26656466

  12. Mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization: Implications for simulating anaerobic biodegradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreiber, M.E.; Carey, G.R.; Feinstein, D.T.; Bahr, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Simulation of biodegradation reactions within a reactive transport framework requires information on mechanisms of terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs). In initial modeling efforts, TEAPs were approximated as occurring sequentially, with the highest energy-yielding electron acceptors (e.g. oxygen) consumed before those that yield less energy (e.g., sulfate). Within this framework in a steady state plume, sequential electron acceptor utilization would theoretically produce methane at an organic-rich source and Fe(II) further downgradient, resulting in a limited zone of Fe(II) and methane overlap. However, contaminant plumes often display much more extensive zones of overlapping Fe(II) and methane. The extensive overlap could be caused by several abiotic and biotic processes including vertical mixing of byproducts in long-screened monitoring wells, adsorption of Fe(II) onto aquifer solids, or microscale heterogeneity in Fe(III) concentrations. Alternatively, the overlap could be due to simultaneous utilization of terminal electron acceptors. Because biodegradation rates are controlled by TEAPs, evaluating the mechanisms of electron acceptor utilization is critical for improving prediction of contaminant mass losses due to biodegradation. Using BioRedox-MT3DMS, a three-dimensional, multi-species reactive transport code, we simulated the current configurations of a BTEX plume and TEAP zones at a petroleum- contaminated field site in Wisconsin. Simulation results suggest that BTEX mass loss due to biodegradation is greatest under oxygen-reducing conditions, with smaller but similar contributions to mass loss from biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Results of sensitivity calculations document that BTEX losses due to biodegradation are most sensitive to the age of the plume, while the shape of the BTEX plume is most sensitive to effective porosity and rate constants for biodegradation under Fe(III)-reducing and

  13. Simulated Performance of the Wisconsin Superconducting Electron Gun

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Bosch, K.J. Kleman, R.A. Legg

    2012-07-01

    The Wisconsin superconducting electron gun is modeled with multiparticle tracking simulations using the ASTRA and GPT codes. To specify the construction of the emittance-compensation solenoid, we studied the dependence of the output bunch's emittance upon the solenoid's strength and field errors. We also evaluated the dependence of the output bunch's emittance upon the bunch's initial emittance and the size of the laser spot on the photocathode. The results suggest that a 200-pC bunch with an emittance of about one mm-mrad can be produced for a free-electron laser.

  14. Electron Beam Lifetime in SPEAR3: Measurement and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, J.; Huang, X.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; /Pavilon Tech., Austin

    2007-12-19

    In this paper we report on electron beam lifetime measurements as a function of scraper position, RF voltage and bunch fill pattern in SPEAR3. We then outline development of an empirical, macroscopic model using the beam-loss rate equation. By identifying the dependence of loss coefficients on accelerator and beam parameters, a numerically-integrating simulator can be constructed to compute beam decay with time. In a companion paper, the simulator is used to train a parametric, non-linear dynamics model for the system [1].

  15. Contribution of electronic excitation to the structural evolution of ultrafast laser-irradiated tungsten nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Samuel T.; Giret, Yvelin; Daraszewicz, Szymon L.; Lim, Anthony C.; Shluger, Alexander L.; Tanimura, Katsumi; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2016-03-01

    The redistribution of the electron density in a material during laser irradiation can have a significant impact on its structural dynamics. This electronic excitation can be incorporated into two temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) simulations through the use of electronic temperature dependent potentials. Here, we study the structural dynamics of laser irradiated tungsten nanofilms using 2T-MD simulations with an electronic temperature dependent potential and compare the results to equivalent simulations that employ a ground-state interatomic potential. Electronic excitation leads to an expansion of the crystal and a decrease in the melting point of tungsten. During laser irradiation these factors ensure that the threshold fluences to the different melting regimes are reduced. Furthermore, both heterogenous and homogeneous melting are predicted to occur more rapidly due to excitation and oscillations in the film thickness will be accentuated.

  16. Electronic Structure Calculations of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Steve; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    Exotic systems like Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) are attracting more attention based on their properties and possible interactions. Abundance of HCIs in the solar wind and their interaction with the upper atmosphere puts them in the attention of astro- and atmospheric physicists. Also, their unique properties originating in the high charge make them an excellent candidate for precision measurements and the next generation of atomic clocks. For a better understanding of the dynamics of processes involving HCIs a combined theoretical and experimental effort is needed to study their basic properties and interactions. Both theory and experiment need to be combined due to the extreme nature of these systems. We present preliminary insight into electronic structure of light HCIs, their interactions with neutral atoms and dynamics of charge transfer processes.

  17. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yi E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn; Wang, Yanli E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn

    2014-02-24

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  18. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Yanli

    2014-02-01

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  19. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrault, M. . E-mail: maxime.barrault@edf.fr; Cances, E. . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Hager, W.W. . E-mail: hager@math.ufl.edu; Le Bris, C. . E-mail: lebris@cermics.enpc.fr

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure.

  20. Electronic Structure of Ethynyl Substituted Cyclobutadienes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, Frank Lee Emmert, III; Thompson, Stephanie J.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the effects of ethynyl substitution on the electronic structure of cyclobutadiene. These species are involved in Bergman Cyclization reactionsand are possible intermediates in the formation of fullerenes and graphite sheets. Prediction of the electronic energy of cyclobutadiene is challenging for single-reference ab initio methods such as HF, MP2 or DFT because of Jahn-Teller distortions and the diradical character of the singlet state. We determined the vertical and adiabatic singlet-triplet energy splittings, the natural charges and spin densities in substituted cyclobutadienes, using the equations of motion spin flip coupled cluster with single and double excitations (EOM-SF-CCSD) method that accurately describes diradical states. The adiabatic singlet-triplet gaps decrease upon substituent addition, but the singlet state is always lower in energy. However, we found that the results are affected by spin-contamination of the reference state and deteriorate when an unrestricted HF reference is employed. O. L. Chapman, C. L. McIntosh, J. Pacansky, "Cyclobutadiene" J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1973, 95, (2), 614-617. N. S. Goroff, "Mechanism of Fullerene Formation." Acc. Chem. Res. 1996, 29, (2), 77-83. L.V. Slipchenko and A.I. Krylov, "Singlet-triplet gaps in diradicals by the Spin-Flip approach: A benchmark study", J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 117, 4694-4708.

  1. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Aron Pinczuk

    2009-05-25

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  2. Silicene oxides: formation, structures and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Pi, Xiaodong; Ni, Zhenyi; Liu, Yong; Lin, Shisheng; Xu, Mingsheng; Yang, Deren

    2013-12-16

    Understanding the oxidation of silicon has been critical to the success of all types of silicon materials, which are the cornerstones of modern silicon technologies. For the recent experimentally obtained two-dimensional silicene, oxidation should also be addressed to enable the development of silicene-based devices. Here we focus on silicene oxides (SOs) that result from the partial or full oxidation of silicene in the framework of density functional theory. It is found that the formation of SOs greatly depends on oxidation conditions, which concern the oxidizing agents of oxygen and hydroxyl. The honeycomb lattice of silicene may be preserved, distorted or destroyed after oxidation. The charge state of Si in partially oxidized silicene ranges from +1 to +3, while that in fully oxidized silicene is +4. Metals, semimetals, semiconductors and insulators can all be found among the SOs, which show a wide spectrum of electronic structures. Our work indicates that the oxidation of silicene should be exquisitely controlled to obtain specific SOs with desired electronic properties.

  3. Note: Simulation and test of a strip source electron gun.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Munawar; Islam, G U; Misbah, I; Iqbal, O; Zhou, Z

    2014-06-01

    We present simulation and test of an indirectly heated strip source electron beam gun assembly using Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) electron beam trajectory program. The beam is now sharply focused with 3.04 mm diameter in the post anode region at 15.9 mm. The measured emission current and emission density were 1.12 A and 1.15 A/cm(2), respectively, that corresponds to power density of 11.5 kW/cm(2), at 10 kV acceleration potential. The simulated results were compared with then and now experiments and found in agreement. The gun is without any biasing, electrostatic and magnetic fields; hence simple and inexpensive. Moreover, it is now more powerful and is useful for accelerators technology due to high emission and low emittance parameters. PMID:24985870

  4. Note: Simulation and test of a strip source electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Munawar; Islam, G. U.; Misbah, I.; Iqbal, O.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-06-15

    We present simulation and test of an indirectly heated strip source electron beam gun assembly using Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) electron beam trajectory program. The beam is now sharply focused with 3.04 mm diameter in the post anode region at 15.9 mm. The measured emission current and emission density were 1.12 A and 1.15 A/cm{sup 2}, respectively, that corresponds to power density of 11.5 kW/cm{sup 2}, at 10 kV acceleration potential. The simulated results were compared with then and now experiments and found in agreement. The gun is without any biasing, electrostatic and magnetic fields; hence simple and inexpensive. Moreover, it is now more powerful and is useful for accelerators technology due to high emission and low emittance parameters.

  5. Note: Simulation and test of a strip source electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Munawar; Islam, G. U.; Misbah, I.; Iqbal, O.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-06-01

    We present simulation and test of an indirectly heated strip source electron beam gun assembly using Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) electron beam trajectory program. The beam is now sharply focused with 3.04 mm diameter in the post anode region at 15.9 mm. The measured emission current and emission density were 1.12 A and 1.15 A/cm2, respectively, that corresponds to power density of 11.5 kW/cm2, at 10 kV acceleration potential. The simulated results were compared with then and now experiments and found in agreement. The gun is without any biasing, electrostatic and magnetic fields; hence simple and inexpensive. Moreover, it is now more powerful and is useful for accelerators technology due to high emission and low emittance parameters.

  6. Note: Simulation and test of a strip source electron gun.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Munawar; Islam, G U; Misbah, I; Iqbal, O; Zhou, Z

    2014-06-01

    We present simulation and test of an indirectly heated strip source electron beam gun assembly using Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) electron beam trajectory program. The beam is now sharply focused with 3.04 mm diameter in the post anode region at 15.9 mm. The measured emission current and emission density were 1.12 A and 1.15 A/cm(2), respectively, that corresponds to power density of 11.5 kW/cm(2), at 10 kV acceleration potential. The simulated results were compared with then and now experiments and found in agreement. The gun is without any biasing, electrostatic and magnetic fields; hence simple and inexpensive. Moreover, it is now more powerful and is useful for accelerators technology due to high emission and low emittance parameters.

  7. Simulating electron energy loss spectroscopy with the MNPBEM toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenester, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Within the MNPBEM toolbox, we show how to simulate electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) of plasmonic nanoparticles using a boundary element method approach. The methodology underlying our approach closely follows the concepts developed by García de Abajo and coworkers (Garcia de Abajo, 2010). We introduce two classes eelsret and eelsstat that allow in combination with our recently developed MNPBEM toolbox for a simple, robust, and efficient computation of EEL spectra and maps. The classes are accompanied by a number of demo programs for EELS simulation of metallic nanospheres, nanodisks, and nanotriangles, and for electron trajectories passing by or penetrating through the metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss how to compute electric fields induced by the electron beam and cathodoluminescence. Catalogue identifier: AEKJ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKJ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 38886 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1222650 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Computer: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). Operating system: Any which supports Matlab 7.11.0 (R2010b). RAM:≥1 GB Classification: 18. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEKJ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 370 External routines: MESH2D available at www.mathworks.com Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Simulation of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) for plasmonic nanoparticles. Solution method: Boundary element method using electromagnetic potentials. Reasons for new version: The new version of the toolbox includes two additional classes for the simulation of electron energy

  8. Electron transport in magnetrons by a posteriori Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, C.; Minea, T. M.; Popa, G.

    2014-02-01

    Electron transport across magnetic barriers is crucial in all magnetized plasmas. It governs not only the plasma parameters in the volume, but also the fluxes of charged particles towards the electrodes and walls. It is particularly important in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) reactors, influencing the quality of the deposited thin films, since this type of discharge is characterized by an increased ionization fraction of the sputtered material. Transport coefficients of electron clouds released both from the cathode and from several locations in the discharge volume are calculated for a HiPIMS discharge with pre-ionization operated in argon at 0.67 Pa and for very short pulses (few µs) using the a posteriori Monte Carlo simulation technique. For this type of discharge electron transport is characterized by strong temporal and spatial dependence. Both drift velocity and diffusion coefficient depend on the releasing position of the electron cloud. They exhibit minimum values at the centre of the race-track for the secondary electrons released from the cathode. The diffusion coefficient of the same electrons increases from 2 to 4 times when the cathode voltage is doubled, in the first 1.5 µs of the pulse. These parameters are discussed with respect to empirical Bohm diffusion.

  9. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator - User's Guide, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    HUTCHINSON, SCOTT A; KEITER, ERIC R.; HOEKSTRA, ROBERT J.; WATERS, LON J.; RUSSO, THOMAS V.; RANKIN, ERIC LAMONT; WIX, STEVEN D.

    2002-11-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator code for simulating electrical circuits at a variety of abstraction levels. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been written to support,in a rigorous manner, the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. As such, the development has focused on improving the capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: (1) Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. (2) Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinear and linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques. (3) A client-server or multi-tiered operating model wherein the numerical kernel can operate independently of the graphical user interface (GUI). (4) Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding-practices that ensure that the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. The code is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase--a message passing parallel implementation--which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Furthermore, careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved even as the number of processors grows. Another feature required by designers is the ability to add device models, many specific to the needs of Sandia, to the code. To this end, the device package in the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator is designed to support a variety of device model inputs. These input formats include standard analytical models, behavioral models

  10. Interfacial Ga-As suboxide: Structural and electronic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Colleoni, Davide Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2015-07-20

    The structural and electronic properties of Ga-As suboxide representative of the transition region at the GaAs/oxide interface are studied through density functional calculations. Two amorphous models generated by quenches from the melt are taken under consideration. The absence of As–O bonds indicates that the structure is a mixture of GaAs and Ga-oxide, in accordance with photoemission experiments. The band edges of the models are found to be closely aligned to those of GaAs. The simulation of charging and discharging processes leads to the identification of an As-related defect with an energy level at ∼0.7 eV above the GaAs valence band maximum, in good agreement with the experimental density of interface states.

  11. Exchange coupling in transition metal monoxides: Electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Guntram; Daene, Markus W; Ernst, Arthur; Bruno, Patrick; Lueders, Martin; Szotek, Zdzislawa; Temmerman, Walter M; Wolfam, Hergert

    2009-01-01

    An ab initio study of magnetic-exchange interactions in antiferromagnetic and strongly correlated 3d transition metal monoxides is presented. Their electronic structure is calculated using the local self-interaction correction approach, implemented within the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker band-structure method, which is based on multiple scattering theory. The Heisenberg exchange constants are evaluated with the magnetic force theorem. Based on these the corresponding Neel temperatures TN and spin-wave dispersions are calculated. The Neel temperatures are obtained using mean-field approximation, random-phase approximation and Monte Carlo simulations. The pressure dependence of TN is investigated using exchange constants calculated for different lattice constants. All the calculated results are compared to experimental data.

  12. Interfacial Ga-As suboxide: Structural and electronic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colleoni, Davide; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    The structural and electronic properties of Ga-As suboxide representative of the transition region at the GaAs/oxide interface are studied through density functional calculations. Two amorphous models generated by quenches from the melt are taken under consideration. The absence of As-O bonds indicates that the structure is a mixture of GaAs and Ga-oxide, in accordance with photoemission experiments. The band edges of the models are found to be closely aligned to those of GaAs. The simulation of charging and discharging processes leads to the identification of an As-related defect with an energy level at ˜0.7 eV above the GaAs valence band maximum, in good agreement with the experimental density of interface states.

  13. Structure and design of the electron lens for RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, A.; Fischer, W.; Alessi, J.; Anerella, M.; Beebe, E. Gassner, D.; Gu, X.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Lambiase, R.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.; Okamura, M.; Tan, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.; Thieberger, P.; Zhang, W.

    2011-03-28

    Two electron lenses for a head-on beam-beam compensation are being planned for RHIC; one for each circulating proton beam. The transverse profile of the electron beam will be Gaussian up to a maximum radius of r{sub e} = 3{sigma}. Simulations and design of the electron gun with Gaussian radial emission current density profile and of the electron collector are presented. Ions of the residual gas generated in the interaction region by electron and proton beams will be removed by an axial gradient of the electric field towards the electron collector. A method for the optical observation of the transverse profile of the electron beam is described.

  14. Numerical simulation and design of a thermionic electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseinzade, M.; Nijatie, M.; Sadighzadeh, A.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports the simulation of an electron gun. The effects on the beam quality of some parameters on the beam quality were studied and optimal choices were identified. It gives numerical beam qualities for a common electrostatic triode gun, and the dependencies on design parameters such as electrode geometries and bias voltages to these electrodes are shown. An electron beam of diameter 5 mm with energy of 5 keV was assumed for the simulation process. Some design parameters were identified as variable parameters in the presence of space charge. These parameters are the inclination angle of emission electrode, the applied voltage to the focusing electrode, the gap width between the emission electrode and the focusing electrode and the diameter of the focusing electrode. The triode extraction system is designed and optimized by using CST software (for Particle Beam Simulations). The physical design of the extraction system is given in this paper. From the simulation results, it is concluded that the inclination angle of the emission electrode is optimized at 22.5°, the applied voltage to the focusing electrode was optimized and found to be V foc = ‑600 V, the optimal separation distance (gap between emission electrode and focusing electrode) is 4 mm, and the optimal diameter of the emission electrode is 14 mm. Initial results for these efforts aimed at emittance improvement are also given.

  15. Vlasov Simulation of Electrostatic Solitary Structures in Multi-Component Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Pickett, Jolene S.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic solitary structures have been observed in the Earth's magnetosheath by the Cluster spacecraft. Recent theoretical work has suggested that these solitary structures are modeled by electron acoustic solitary waves existing in a four-component plasma system consisting of core electrons, two counter-streaming electron beams, and one species of background ions. In this paper, the excitation of electron acoustic waves and the formation of solitary structures are studied by means of a one-dimensional electrostatic Vlasov simulation. The present result first shows that either electron acoustic solitary waves with negative potential or electron phase-space holes with positive potential are excited in four-component plasma systems. However, these electrostatic solitary structures have longer duration times and higher wave amplitudes than the solitary structures observed in the magnetosheath. The result indicates that a high-speed and small free energy source may be needed as a fifth component. An additional simulation of a five-component plasma consisting of a stable four-component plasma and a weak electron beam shows the generation of small and fast electron phase-space holes by the bump-on-tail instability. The physical properties of the small and fast electron phase-space holes are very similar to those obtained by the previous theoretical analysis. The amplitude and duration time of solitary structures in the simulation are also in agreement with the Cluster observation.

  16. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator : users' guide, version 4.1.

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2009-02-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: (1) Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. (2) Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinear and linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques. (3) Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation-aware devices (for Sandia users only). (4) Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices that ensure that the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passing parallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. The development of Xyce provides a platform for computational research and development aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. With Xyce, Sandia has an 'in-house' capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model development) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms) research and development can be performed. As a result, Xyce is a unique electrical

  17. Xyce parallel electronic simulator : users' guide. Version 5.1.

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Ting; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Santarelli, Keith R.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2009-11-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: (1) Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. (2) Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinear and linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques. (3) Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation-aware devices (for Sandia users only). (4) Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices that ensure that the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passing parallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. The development of Xyce provides a platform for computational research and development aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. With Xyce, Sandia has an 'in-house' capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model development) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms) research and development can be performed. As a result, Xyce is a unique electrical

  18. Computational simulation and interpretation of the low-lying excited electronic states and electronic spectrum of thioanisole.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaohong L; Xu, Xuefei; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-08-21

    Three singlet states, namely a closed-shell ground state and two excited states with (1)ππ* and (1)nσ* character, have been suggested to be responsible for the radiationless decay or photochemical reaction of photoexcited thioanisole. The correct interpretation of the electronic spectrum is critical for understanding the character of these low-lying excited states, but the experimental spectrum is yet to be fully interpreted. In the work reported here, we investigated the nature of those three states and a fourth singlet state of thioanisole using electronic structure calculations by multireference perturbation theory, by completely-renormalized equation-of-motion coupled cluster theory with single and double excitations and noniterative inclusion of connected triples (CR-EOM-CCSD(T)), and by linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). We clarified the assignment of the electronic spectrum by simulating it using a normal-mode sampling approach combined with TDDFT in the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The understanding of the electronic states and of the accuracy of the electronic structure methods lays the foundation of our future work of constructing potential energy surfaces. PMID:26088195

  19. RESCU: A real space electronic structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud-Rioux, Vincent; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Hong

    2016-02-01

    In this work we present RESCU, a powerful MATLAB-based Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS-DFT) solver. We demonstrate that RESCU can compute the electronic structure properties of systems comprising many thousands of atoms using modest computer resources, e.g. 16 to 256 cores. Its computational efficiency is achieved from exploiting four routes. First, we use numerical atomic orbital (NAO) techniques to efficiently generate a good quality initial subspace which is crucially required by Chebyshev filtering methods. Second, we exploit the fact that only a subspace spanning the occupied Kohn-Sham states is required, and solving accurately the KS equation using eigensolvers can generally be avoided. Third, by judiciously analyzing and optimizing various parts of the procedure in RESCU, we delay the O (N3) scaling to large N, and our tests show that RESCU scales consistently as O (N2.3) from a few hundred atoms to more than 5000 atoms when using a real space grid discretization. The scaling is better or comparable in a NAO basis up to the 14,000 atoms level. Fourth, we exploit various numerical algorithms and, in particular, we introduce a partial Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm to achieve efficiency gains for systems comprising more than 10,000 electrons. We demonstrate the power of RESCU in solving KS-DFT problems using many examples running on 16, 64 and/or 256 cores: a 5832 Si atoms supercell; a 8788 Al atoms supercell; a 5324 Cu atoms supercell and a small DNA molecule submerged in 1713 water molecules for a total 5399 atoms. The KS-DFT is entirely converged in a few hours in all cases. Our results suggest that the RESCU method has reached a milestone of solving thousands of atoms by KS-DFT on a modest computer cluster.

  20. Hybrid simulations of magnetic reconnection with kinetic ions and fluid electron pressure anisotropy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Le, A.; Daughton, W.; Karimabadi, H.; Egedal, J.

    2016-03-16

    We present the first hybrid simulations with kinetic ions and recently developed equations of state for the electron fluid appropriate for reconnection with a guide field. The equations of state account for the main anisotropy of the electron pressure tensor.Magnetic reconnection is studied in two systems, an initially force-free current sheet and a Harris sheet. The hybrid model with the equations of state is compared to two other models, hybrid simulations with isothermal electrons and fully kinetic simulations. Including the anisotropicequations of state in the hybrid model provides a better match to the fully kinetic model. In agreement with fullymore » kinetic results, the main feature captured is the formation of an electron current sheet that extends several ion inertial lengths. This electron current sheet modifies the Hall magnetic field structure near the X-line, and it is not observed in the standard hybrid model with isotropic electrons. The saturated reconnection rate in this regime nevertheless remains similar in all three models. Here, implications for global modeling are discussed.« less

  1. Online Simulation of Radiation Track Structure Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik

    2015-01-01

    Space radiation comprises protons, helium and high charged and energy (HZE) particles. High-energy particles are a concern for human space flight, because they are no known options for shielding astronauts from them. When these ions interact with matter, they damage molecules and create radiolytic species. The pattern of energy deposition and positions of the radiolytic species, called radiation track structure, is highly dependent on the charge and energy of the ion. The radiolytic species damage biological molecules, which may lead to several long-term health effects such as cancer. Because of the importance of heavy ions, the radiation community is very interested in the interaction of HZE particles with DNA, notably with regards to the track structure. A desktop program named RITRACKS was developed to simulate radiation track structure. The goal of this project is to create a web interface to allow registered internal users to use RITRACKS remotely.

  2. Electronic Structure and Properties of Deformed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Liu; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical framework based on Huckel tight-binding model has been formulated to analyze the electronic structure of carbon nanotubes under uniform deformation. The model successfully quantifies the dispersion relation, density of states and bandgap change of nanotubes under uniform stretching, compression, torsion and bending. Our analysis shows that the shifting of the Fermi point away from the Brillouin zone vertices is the key reason for these changes. As a result of this shifting, the electronic structure of deformed carbon nanotubes varies dramatically depending on their chirality and deformation mode. Treating the Fermi point as a function of strain and tube chirality, the analytical solution preserves the concise form of undeformed carbon nanotubes. It predicts the shifting, merging and splitting of the Van Hove singularities in the density of states and the zigzag pattern of bandgap change under strains. Four orbital tight-binding simulations of carbon nanotubes under uniform stretching, compression, torsion and bending have been performed to verify the analytical solution. Extension to more complex systems are being performed to relate this analytical solution to the spectroscopic characterization, device performance and proposed quantum structures induced by the deformation. The limitations of this model will also be discussed.

  3. Geometry, mechanics, and electronics of singular structures and wrinkles in graphene.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vitor M; Castro Neto, A H; Liang, H Y; Mahadevan, L

    2010-10-01

    As the thinnest atomic membrane, graphene presents an opportunity to combine geometry, elasticity, and electronics at the limits of their validity. We describe the transport and electronic structure in the neighborhood of conical singularities, the elementary excitations of the ubiquitous wrinkled and crumpled graphene. We use a combination of atomistic mechanical simulations, analytical geometry, and transport calculations in curved graphene, and exact diagonalization of the electronic spectrum to calculate the effects of geometry on electronic structure, transport, and mobility in suspended samples, and how the geometry-generated pseudomagnetic and pseudoelectric fields might disrupt Landau quantization.

  4. The electronic structure of hard materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarski, Robert Paul

    This research dissertation involves an experimental as well as a theoretical examination of the electronic structure of hard materials. The materials that are presented in this dissertation cover a wide class of materials, consisting of transition metal borides, irradiated polymer films, theoretically predicted superhard semiconductors, doped intermetallic alloys, and transition metal carbides. The borides are traditionally used in high temperature, hard coating applications, such as rocket nozzle linings, extreme wear surfaces, and corrosion coatings. Measurements of the borides appear to show that the bonding in these hard materials is primarily between the boron atoms in these systems. Also of note are the remarkably short interatomic distances between the boron atoms and between the boron and metal atoms in these materials. Irradiated polymer films are being developed for electronic applications, in the hopes that circuits can be developed that can benefit from the high thermal stability, dielectric properties, and mechanical properties provided by these materials. C3N4 is a theoretically predicted superhard material, and some of the first soft x-ray emission measurements of well-characterized samples of this compound are discussed in this work. Intermetallic alloys, in particular Ni3Al, are rather hard, but brittle metallic alloys. It has been found that the addition of boron atoms, in rather low concentrations, can increase the ductility of these alloys, allowing them to be utilized in a wider variety of applications. Measurements of this system have examined a question regarding the positioning of the boron atoms in the structures of this alloy. Finally, the transition metal carbides are used extensively as coatings in industrial applications such as cutting and grinding tools, and polishing compounds. Measurements of these materials suggest that the high degree of covalency between the metal and carbon atoms is primarily responsible for the hardness of

  5. Digital system for structural dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, A.I.; Lagace, L.J.; Wojnar, M.K.; Glor, C.

    1982-11-01

    State-of-the-art digital hardware and software for the simulation of complex structural dynamic interactions, such as those which occur in rotating structures (engine systems). System were incorporated in a designed to use an array of processors in which the computation for each physical subelement or functional subsystem would be assigned to a single specific processor in the simulator. These node processors are microprogrammed bit-slice microcomputers which function autonomously and can communicate with each other and a central control minicomputer over parallel digital lines. Inter-processor nearest neighbor communications busses pass the constants which represent physical constraints and boundary conditions. The node processors are connected to the six nearest neighbor node processors to simulate the actual physical interface of real substructures. Computer generated finite element mesh and force models can be developed with the aid of the central control minicomputer. The control computer also oversees the animation of a graphics display system, disk-based mass storage along with the individual processing elements.

  6. Digital system for structural dynamics simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauter, A. I.; Lagace, L. J.; Wojnar, M. K.; Glor, C.

    1982-01-01

    State-of-the-art digital hardware and software for the simulation of complex structural dynamic interactions, such as those which occur in rotating structures (engine systems). System were incorporated in a designed to use an array of processors in which the computation for each physical subelement or functional subsystem would be assigned to a single specific processor in the simulator. These node processors are microprogrammed bit-slice microcomputers which function autonomously and can communicate with each other and a central control minicomputer over parallel digital lines. Inter-processor nearest neighbor communications busses pass the constants which represent physical constraints and boundary conditions. The node processors are connected to the six nearest neighbor node processors to simulate the actual physical interface of real substructures. Computer generated finite element mesh and force models can be developed with the aid of the central control minicomputer. The control computer also oversees the animation of a graphics display system, disk-based mass storage along with the individual processing elements.

  7. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator : users' guide, version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, Robert John; Waters, Lon J.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Fixel, Deborah A.; Russo, Thomas V.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Hutchinson, Scott Alan; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Wix, Steven D.

    2004-06-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator capable of simulating electrical circuits at a variety of abstraction levels. Primarily, Xyce has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: {sm_bullet} Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. {sm_bullet} Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinear and linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques. {sm_bullet} Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including many radiation-aware devices. {sm_bullet} A client-server or multi-tiered operating model wherein the numerical kernel can operate independently of the graphical user interface (GUI). {sm_bullet} Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices that ensure that the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable and extensible far into the future. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passing of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible number parallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. One feature required by designers is the ability to add device models, many specific to the needs of Sandia, to the code. To this end, the device package in the Xyce

  8. Electronic properties of graphene: A multiphysics simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sule, Nishant

    Graphene is a single atomic layer of hexagonally arranged carbon atoms. Since the experimental discovery of graphene in 2004, a wealth of research has been conducted on studying its electronic and optical properties, as well as on developing novel applications. To explaining the typically observed electronic properties of graphene and to evaluate its potential in novel applications it is vital to quantitatively examine the intrinsic limits and the influence of the dominant extrinsic factors on the electromagnetic response of this material. The two-dimensional nature of graphene makes it vulnerable to the influence of a host of extrinsic factors, such as the interface phonons from the supporting substrate and trapped charged impurities near the interface between graphene and the substrate. In this dissertation, the electronic transport properties of graphene are examined in detail using multiphysics numerical simulations. Specifically, the following three aspects are studied: electron-phonon scattering rates and the intrinsic mobility, effect of clustered impurities on carrier transport, and substrate-dependent THz-frequency carrier transport. To calculate the electron-phonon scattering rates and predict the intrinsic mobility of graphene, the overlap between the electronic tight-binding Bloch wave functions (TB BWF), up to the third nearest neighbors, are used. Room-temperature carrier dynamics in suspended and supported graphene in the presence of different impurity distributions and densities is simulated using a numerical method that combines semiclassical carrier transport, using ensemble Monte-Carlo (EMC), with electrodynamics, using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique and molecular dynamics (MD). The electron-phonon scattering rates calculated using TB BWFs provide a better estimate of the ``bare'' acoustic and optical deformation potential constants (Dac = 12eV, Dop = 5 x 109 eV cm-1), while the intrinsic mobility calculated exceeds

  9. Toward the Accurate Simulation of Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giussani, Angelo; Nenov, Artur; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Jaiswal, Vishal K.; Rivalta, Ivan; Dumont, Elise; Mukamel, Shaul; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Two-dimensional pump-probe electronic spectroscopy is a powerful technique able to provide both high spectral and temporal resolution, allowing the analysis of ultrafast complex reactions occurring via complementary pathways by the identification of decay-specific fingerprints. [1-2] The understanding of the origin of the experimentally recorded signals in a two-dimensional electronic spectrum requires the characterization of the electronic states involved in the electronic transitions photoinduced by the pump/probe pulses in the experiment. Such a goal constitutes a considerable computational challenge, since up to 100 states need to be described, for which state-of-the-art methods as RASSCF and RASPT2 have to be wisely employed. [3] With the present contribution, the main features and potentialities of two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy are presented, together with the machinery in continuous development in our groups in order to compute two-dimensional electronic spectra. The results obtained using different level of theory and simulations are shown, bringing as examples the computed two-dimensional electronic spectra for some specific cases studied. [2-4] [1] Rivalta I, Nenov A, Cerullo G, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Int. J. Quantum Chem., 2014, 114, 85 [2] Nenov A, Segarra-Martí J, Giussani A, Conti I, Rivalta I, Dumont E, Jaiswal V K, Altavilla S, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Faraday Discuss. 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C4FD00175C [3] Nenov A, Giussani A, Segarra-Martí J, Jaiswal V K, Rivalta I, Cerullo G, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, J. Chem. Phys. submitted [4] Nenov A, Giussani A, Fingerhut B P, Rivalta I, Dumont E, Mukamel S, Garavelli M, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. Submitted [5] Krebs N, Pugliesi I, Hauer J, Riedle E, New J. Phys., 2013,15, 08501

  10. Simulation analysis for ion assisted fast ignition using structured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, H.; Johzaki, T.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.

    2016-05-01

    As the heating efficiency by fast electrons in the fast ignition scheme is estimated to be very low due to their large divergence angle and high energy. To mitigate this problem, low-density plastic foam, which can generate not only proton (H+) but also carbon (C6+) beams, can be introduced to currently used cone-guided targets and additional core heating by ions is expected. According to 2D PIC simulations, it is found that the ion beams also diverge by the static electric field and concave surface deformation. Thus structured targets are suggested to optimize ion beam characteristics, and their improvement and core heating enhancement by ion beams are confirmed.

  11. Auroral Electrons Trapped and Lost: A Vlasov Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunell, H.; Andersson, L.; De Keyser, J. M.; Mann, I.

    2014-12-01

    In the upward current region of the aurora, about two thirds of the total voltage between the auroral ionosphere and the equatorial magnetosphere can be concentrated in a stationary double layer at an altitude of about one earth radius, as Vlasov simulations of the plasma on a magnetic field line have shown (Gunell, et al., Ann. Geophys., 31, 1227-1240, 2013). We perform numerical experiments, changing the total voltage between the ionosphere and the equatorial magnetosphere during the course of the simulation. In the initial state, the total acceleration voltage is 3 kV and there is a double layer approximately 5000 km above the ionospheric end of the system. When the voltage is increased, electrons are trapped between the double layer and the magnetic mirror in a region of velocity space that initially was empty. When the voltage is decreased to its initial value these trapped electrons are released upwards. If the voltage is lowered first and then raised back to where it started, the newly trapped electrons remain trapped. As a consequence of the difference between the two cases, the electron pitch angle distribution, below the double layer, carries information about the recent history of the acceleration voltage. In both cases, most of the change in voltage, ΔV, is assumed by the double layer, in agreement with a study of Cluster data that could confine most of ΔV to altitudes below the spacecraft (Forsyth et al., JGR, 117, A12203, 2012). Hysteresis effects in the double layer position are seen in connection with the electron trapping. This work was supported by the Belgian Science Policy Office through the Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence and by PRODEX/Cluster contract 13127/98/NL/VJ(IC)-PEA 90316.

  12. Shape analysis of simulated breast anatomical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contijoch, Francisco; Lynch, Jennifer M.; Pokrajac, David D.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-03-01

    Recent advances in high-resolution 3D breast imaging, namely, digital breast tomosynthesis and dedicated breast CT, have enabled detailed analysis of the shape and distribution of anatomical structures in the breast. Such analysis is critically important, since the projections of breast anatomical structures make up the parenchymal pattern in clinical images which can mask the existing abnormalities or introduce false alarms; the parenchymal pattern is also correlated with the risk of cancer. As a first step towards the shape analysis of anatomical structures in the breast, we have analyzed an anthropomorphic software breast phantom. The phantom generation is based upon the recursive splitting of the phantom volume using octrees, which produces irregularly shaped tissue compartments, qualitatively mimicking the breast anatomy. The shape analysis was performed by fitting ellipsoids to the simulated tissue compartments. The ellipsoidal semi-axes were calculated by matching the moments of inertia of each individual compartment and of an ellipsoid. The distribution of Dice coefficients, measuring volumetric overlap between the compartment and the corresponding ellipsoid, as well as the distribution of aspect ratios, measuring relative orientations of the ellipsoids, were used to characterize various classes of phantoms with qualitatively distinctive appearance. A comparison between input parameters for phantom generation and the properties of fitted ellipsoids indicated the high level of user control in the design of software breast phantoms. The proposed shape analysis could be extended to clinical breast images, and used to inform the selection of simulation parameters for improved realism.

  13. Code System to Perform Monte Carlo Simulation of Electron Gamma-Ray Showers in Arbitrary Marerials.

    2002-10-15

    Version 00 PENELOPE performs Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers in arbitrary materials. Initially, it was devised to simulate the PENetration and Energy LOss of Positrons and Electrons in matter; photons were introduced later. The adopted scattering model gives a reliable description of radiation transport in the energy range from a few hundred eV to about 1GeV. PENELOPE generates random electron-photon showers in complex material structures consisting of any number of distinct homogeneous regions (bodies)more » with different compositions. The Penelope Forum list archives and other information can be accessed at http://www.nea.fr/lists/penelope.html. PENELOPE-MPI extends capabilities of PENELOPE-2001 (RSICC C00682MNYCP02; NEA-1525/05) by providing for usage of MPI type parallel drivers and extends the original version's ability to read different types of input data sets such as voxel. The motivation is to increase efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations for medical applications. The physics of the calculations have not been changed, and the original description of PENELOPE-2001 (which follows) is still valid. PENELOPE-2001 contains substantial changes and improvements to the previous versions 1996 and 2000. As for the physics, the model for electron/positron elastic scattering has been revised. Bremsstrahlung emission is now simulated using partial-wave data instead of analytical approximate formulae. Photoelectric absorption in K and L-shells is described from the corresponding partial cross sections. Fluorescence radiation from vacancies in K and L-shells is followed. Refinements were also introduced in electron/positron transport mechanics, mostly to account for energy dependence of the mean free paths for hard events. Simulation routines were re-programmed in a more structured way, and new example MAIN programs were written with a more flexible input and expanded output.« less

  14. Electronic Structure and Dynamics of Nitrosyl Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Scheidt, W. Robert; Barabanschikov, Alexander; Pavlik, Jeffrey W.; Silvernail, Nathan J.; Sage, J. Timothy

    2010-01-01

    fully successful at capturing the interaction between the axial NO and imidazole ligands. This supports previous conclusions that hemeNO complexes exhibit an unusual degree of variability with respect to computational method, and we speculate that this variability hints at a genuine electronic instability that a protein can exploit to tune reactivity. We anticipate that ongoing characterization of heme-NO complexes will deepen our understanding of their structure, dynamics, and reactivity. PMID:20666384

  15. Simulations of nanocrystals under pressure: Combining electronic enthalpy and linear-scaling density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Corsini, Niccolò R. C. Greco, Andrea; Haynes, Peter D.; Hine, Nicholas D. M.; Molteni, Carla

    2013-08-28

    We present an implementation in a linear-scaling density-functional theory code of an electronic enthalpy method, which has been found to be natural and efficient for the ab initio calculation of finite systems under hydrostatic pressure. Based on a definition of the system volume as that enclosed within an electronic density isosurface [M. Cococcioni, F. Mauri, G. Ceder, and N. Marzari, Phys. Rev. Lett.94, 145501 (2005)], it supports both geometry optimizations and molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce an approach for calibrating the parameters defining the volume in the context of geometry optimizations and discuss their significance. Results in good agreement with simulations using explicit solvents are obtained, validating our approach. Size-dependent pressure-induced structural transformations and variations in the energy gap of hydrogenated silicon nanocrystals are investigated, including one comparable in size to recent experiments. A detailed analysis of the polyamorphic transformations reveals three types of amorphous structures and their persistence on depressurization is assessed.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of electron beams collimated with a dual electron multileaf collimator: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Inyang, S O; Chamberlain, A C

    2009-07-01

    Electron applicators and cut-outs have been used for some time in the delivery of electron beam therapy. A dual electron multileaf collimator (eMLC) consisting of upper and lower eMLCs was designed, and dose distributions of electron beams delivered by it were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations by use of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. The percentage depth dose (PDD), dose profiles, dose gradient falloff (G), depth of maximum dose (R(100)), surface dose, bremsstrahlung background, beam flatness, and penumbra of the dual eMLC were evaluated and compared with those simulated and measured with the standard applicators inserted into the treatment head of the medical linear accelerator (linac). The results showed good agreement in most cases. Specifically, the flatness and penumbra obtained with the dual eMLC were better than those obtained with standard applicators. It is therefore possible to use the proposed dual eMLC in the delivery of electron beam therapy without the need for applicators and cut-outs. This will minimize the inconvenience of placing cut-outs on the patients; also, changes in the required field can be effected without the therapist going into the accelerator room when the dual eMLC is finally automated. The absence of a helium bag between the upper and lower eMLCs did not offer significant changes in the dosimetry parameters compared to the eMLC fitted with the helium bag. PMID:20821122

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary electron and backscattered electron images for a nanoparticle matrix system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Y. T.; Li, H. M.; Ding, Z. J.

    2005-06-01

    Contrast simulation of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images for particle-matrix systems is important for understanding the contrast formation mechanism in such systems. Most of the previous works have been limited to backscattered electron (BSE) signals because of the difficulties involved in the simulation of the secondary electron (SE) signals. This limitation prevents some important information from being extracted from experimental SEM images. A comprehensive and accurate Monte Carlo model has been developed for simulation of electron-solid interactions, which enables the simulation of production and emission of cascade SEs and is then quite suitable for investigating both SE and BSE signals. In this paper, we have modified the simulation model for a particle-matrix system and performed a simulation of SE and BSE images for nano-size Pt particles in a carbon matrix. Since the size of the particles is comparable with the electron scattering mean free path, modification of the conventional Monte Carlo procedure for a solid is necessary in order to include the boundary correction due to different scattering mean free paths. SE and BSE line scans and two-dimensional images under various conditions (particle size, depth and beam incident angle) are obtained and discussed in detail. The results have shown that: (1) In the formation of Pt-C contrast, the material factor plays a dominant role. (2) Only those particles located on, or quite close to, the matrix surface can be clearly revealed in a SE image. The maximum visible depth in SE observation for a Pt particle embedded in carbon matrix is about three times the particle size, while it is twice deeper than that with BSE signals. (3) The maximum SE emission from Pt particles appears at the centre of, instead of the sides of, the particle when the size falls down to the nanometre region; (4) Both the SE and BSE contrast have maximum values at a certain primary energy for particles of a specific size. (5) For

  18. Electronic structure of Mg: From monolayers to bulk

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, F.; Laubschat, C.; Heber, M.; Servedio, V.D.P.

    2004-09-15

    The structure of thin Mg films epitaxially grown onto a W(110) crystal was analyzed by low energy electron and Auger electron diffraction verifying a growth of bulk Mg. Normal-emission angle-resolved photoemission spectra of the growing films reveal quantum well states on both sides of a surface state. These states result from electron confinement in the Mg layer and are used to derive the electronic structure perpendicular to the surface. Off-normal, the electronic structure is dominated by the parabolic dispersion of surface states forming circles around the {gamma}-points and ellipses around the M-points in the Fermi surface cuts.

  19. PIC simulations on the termination shock: Microstructure and electron acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukiyo, S.; Scholer, M.

    2013-05-01

    The ability of the termination shock as a particle accelerator is totally unknown. Voyager data and recent kinetic numerical simulations revealed that the compression ratio of the termination shock is rather low due to the presence of pickup ions, i.e., the termination shock appears to be a weak shock. Nevertheless, two Voyager spacecraft observed not only high energy ions called termination shock particles, which are non-thermal but less energetic compared to the so-called anomalous cosmic rays, but also high energy electrons. In this study we focus especially on microstructure of the termination shock and the associated electron acceleration process by performing one-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for a variety of parameters. For typical solar wind parameters at the termination shock, a shock potential has no sharp ramp with the spatial scale of the order of electron inertial length which is suitable for the injection of anomalous cosmic ray acceleration. Solar wind ions are not so much heated, which is consistent with Voyager spacecraft data. If a shock angle is close to 90 deg., a shock is almost time stationary or weakly breathing when a relative pickup ion density is 30%, while it becomes non-stationary if the relative pickup ion density is 20%. When the shock angle becomes oblique, a self-reformation occurs due to the interaction of solar wind ions and whistler precursors. Here, the shock angle is defined as the angle between upstream magnetic field and shock normal. For the case with relatively low beta solar wind plasma (electron beta is 0.1 and solar wind ion temperature equals to electron temperature), modified two-stream instability (MTSI) gets excited in the extended foot sustained by reflected pickup ions, and both solar wind electrons and ions are heated. If the solar wind plasma temperature gets five times higher, on the other hand, the MTSI is weakened and the pre-heating of the solar wind plasma in the extended foot is

  20. Probing Actinide Electronic Structure through Pu Cluster Calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryzhkov, Mickhail V.; Mirmelstein, Alexei; Yu, Sung-Woo; Chung, Brandon W.; Tobin, James G.

    2013-02-26

    The calculations for the electronic structure of clusters of plutonium have been performed, within the framework of the relativistic discrete-variational method. Moreover, these theoretical results and those calculated earlier for related systems have been compared to spectroscopic data produced in the experimental investigations of bulk systems, including photoelectron spectroscopy. Observation of the changes in the Pu electronic structure as a function of size provides powerful insight for aspects of bulk Pu electronic structure.

  1. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Reference Guide Version 6.4

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Eric R.; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason; Baur, David Gregory

    2015-12-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce . This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide [1] . Trademarks The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2015 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Portions of the Xyce TM code are: Copyright c 2002, The Regents of the University of California. Produced at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Written by Alan Hindmarsh, Allan Taylor, Radu Serban. UCRL-CODE-2002-59 All rights reserved. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence Design Systems, Inc. Microsoft, Windows and Windows 7 are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation. Amtec and TecPlot are trademarks of Amtec Engineering, Inc. Xyce 's expression library is based on that inside Spice 3F5 developed by the EECS Department at the University of California. The EKV3 MOSFET model was developed by the EKV Team of the Electronics Laboratory-TUC of the Technical University of Crete. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners. Contacts Bug Reports (Sandia only) http://joseki.sandia.gov/bugzilla http://charleston.sandia.gov/bugzilla World Wide Web http://xyce.sandia.gov http://charleston.sandia.gov/xyce (Sandia only) Email xyce@sandia.gov (outside Sandia) xyce-sandia@sandia.gov (Sandia only)

  2. Stacked-Bloch-wave electron diffraction simulations using GPU acceleration.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Robert S; Wang, Feng; Koch, Christoph T

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the advantages for Bloch-wave simulations performed using graphics processing units (GPUs), based on approximating the matrix exponential directly instead of performing a matrix diagonalization. Our direct matrix-exponential algorithm yields a functionally identical electron scattering matrix to that generated with matrix diagonalization. Using the matrix-exponential scaling-and-squaring method with a Padé approximation, direct GPU-based matrix-exponential double-precision calculations are up to 20× faster than CPU-based calculations and up to approximately 70× faster than matrix diagonalization. We compare precision and runtime of scaling and squaring methods with either the Padé approximation or a Taylor expansion. We also discuss the stacked-Bloch-wave method, and show that our stacked-Bloch-wave implementation yields the same electron scattering matrix as traditional Bloch-wave matrix diagonalization.

  3. Simulation and Characterization of a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica A.; Jerman, Gregory A.; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Abbott, Terry O.; Sampson, Allen R.

    2011-01-01

    A miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope (mSEM) for in-situ lunar investigations is being developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center with colleagues from the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), Advanced Research Systems (ARS), the University of Tennessee in Knoxville (UTK) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). This effort focuses on the characterization of individual components of the mSEM and simulation of the complete system. SEMs can provide information on the size, shape, morphology and chemical composition of lunar regolith. Understanding these basic properties will allow us to better estimate the challenges associated with In-Situ Resource Utilization and to improve our basic science knowledge of the lunar surface (either precluding the need for sample return or allowing differentiation of unique samples to be returned to Earth.) The main components of the mSEM prototype includes: a cold field emission electron gun (CFEG), focusing lens, deflection/scanning system and backscatter electron detector. Of these, the electron gun development is of particular importance as it dictates much of the design of the remaining components. A CFEG was chosen for use with the lunar mSEM as its emission does not depend on heating of the tungsten emitter (lower power), it offers a long operation lifetime, is orders of magnitude brighter than tungsten hairpin guns, has a small source size and exhibits low beam energy spread.

  4. Electronic simulation of a multiterminal quantum Hall effect device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosso, A.; Capra, P. P.

    1999-04-01

    A circuit with only resistors and unity gain amplifiers can be proven to be equivalent to the Ricketts and Kemeny electrical model of multiterminal quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices. By means of the new equivalent circuit, commercial software for electronic circuit analysis can be used to study a QHE measurement system. Moreover, it can be easily implemented, and we were able to build a circuit that simulates the electrical behavior of a QHE device. Particular care was taken in the design to reduce the effect of parasitic capacitances, which act as loads connected to the device terminals. Bootstrap buffers have been adopted to significantly reduce the capacitance of input stage. The small residual loading effect can be calculated and eliminated, allowing simulation of a QHE device with good accuracy.

  5. Nonlinear electromagnetic gyrokinetic particle simulations with the electron hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lin, Z.; Chen, L.; Hahm, T.; Wang, W.; Lee, W.

    2006-10-01

    The electromagnetic model with fluid electrons is successfully implemented into the global gyrokinetic code GTC. In the ideal MHD limit, shear Alfven wave oscillation and continuum damping is demonstrated. Nonlinear electromagnetic simulation is further pursued in the presence of finite ηi. Turbulence transport in the AITG unstable β regime is studied. This work is supported by Department of Energy (DOE) Grant DE-FG02-03ER54724, Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02-04ER54796 (UCI), DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-76CH03073 (PPPL), and in part by SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas. Z. Lin, et al., Science 281, 1835 (1998). F. Zonca and L. Chen, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 2240 (1998); G. Zhao and L. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 9, 861 (2002).

  6. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Electron Beams Focused by Periodic Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1999-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional (3D) model of an electron beam focused by a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stack has been developed. First, the simulation code MAFIA was used to model a PPM stack using the magnetostatic solver. The exact geometry of the magnetic focusing structure was modeled; thus, no approximations were made regarding the off-axis fields. The fields from the static solver were loaded into the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) solver of MAFIA where fully 3D behavior of the beam was simulated in the magnetic focusing field. The PIC solver computes the time-integration of electromagnetic fields simultaneously with the time integration of the equations of motion of charged particles that move under the influence of those fields. Fields caused by those moving charges are also taken into account; thus, effects like space charge and magnetic forces between particles are fully simulated. The electron beam is simulated by a number of macro-particles. These macro-particles represent a given charge Q amounting to that of several million electrons in order to conserve computational time and memory. Particle motion is unrestricted, so particle trajectories can cross paths and move in three dimensions under the influence of 3D electric and magnetic fields. Correspondingly, there is no limit on the initial current density distribution of the electron beam, nor its density distribution at any time during the simulation. Simulation results including beam current density, percent ripple and percent transmission will be presented, and the effects current, magnetic focusing strength and thermal velocities have on beam behavior will be demonstrated using 3D movies showing the evolution of beam characteristics in time and space. Unlike typical beam optics models, this 3D model allows simulation of asymmetric designs such as non- circularly symmetric electrostatic or magnetic focusing as well as the inclusion of input/output couplers.

  7. Simulations And Experiments of Electron Beams Pre-Modulated at the Photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, J.G.; Fiorito, R.B.; O'Shea, P.G.; Carr, G.L.; Shaftan, T.V.; Sheehy, B.; Shen, Y.; Wu, Z.; Graves, W.; Loos, H.; /SLAC

    2006-02-15

    The University of Maryland and the Source Development Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory have been collaborating on a project that explores the use of electron beam pre-modulation at the cathode to control the longitudinal structure of the electron beam. This technique could be applied to creating deliberate modulations which can lead to the generation of terahertz radiation, or creating a smooth profile in order to suppress radiation. This paper focuses on simulations that explore some of the pre-modulated cases achieved experimentally.

  8. Simulation of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Veitzer, Seth A.; Stoltz, Peter; Spentzouris, Panagiotis G.; Cary, John R.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2011-05-01

    We present results from a precision simulation of the electron cloud (EC) problem in the Fermilab Main Injector using the code VORPAL. This is a fully 3d and self consistent treatment of the EC. Both distributions of electrons in 6D phase-space and EM field maps have been generated. Various configurations of the magnetic fields found around the machine have been studied. Plasma waves associated to the fluctuation density of the cloud have been analyzed. Our results have been successfully benchmarked against the POSINST code for the 2D electrostatic case. The response of a Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) to the EC has been simulated as well as the more challenging microwave absorption experiment. While numerically accurate predictions can be made for a given secondary emission yield (SEY) and initial conditions, the large uncertainties in this SEY and in the spatial distribution of the EC prior to the exponential growth of the EC do make ab-initio prediction difficult. Note also that the RFA response is also uncertain due to the collection efficiency in unknown stray magnetic fields. Nonetheless, our simulations do provide guidance to the experimental program. Moreover, for a reasonable set of initial condition, this calculation shows that no dramatic, non-linear, increase of the EC density will occur when the bunch charges increases by a factor of three. Finally, electric field maps or parametric functions are being provided to the Synergia tracking code such that instabilities due to the EC can be simulated over much longer periods of time.

  9. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Users Guide Version 6.2.

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Eric R.; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason C.; Baur, David Gregory

    2014-09-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been de- signed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel com- puting platforms (up to thousands of processors). This includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. A differential-algebraic-equation (DAE) formulation, which better isolates the device model package from solver algorithms. This allows one to develop new types of analysis without requiring the implementation of analysis-specific device models. Device models that are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation- aware devices (for Sandia users only). Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase -- a message passing parallel implementation -- which allows it to run efficiently a wide range of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel platforms. Attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. Trademarks The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2014 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Portions of the Xyce TM code are: Copyright c 2002, The Regents of the University of California. Produced at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Written by Alan Hindmarsh, Allan Taylor, Radu Serban. UCRL-CODE-2002-59 All rights reserved. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are

  10. Simulations of kinetically irreversible protein aggregate structure.

    PubMed Central

    Patro, S Y; Przybycien, T M

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated the structure of kinetically irreversible protein aggregates in two-dimensional space using a lattice-based Monte-Carlo routine. Our model specifically accounts for the intermolecular interactions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic protein surfaces and a polar solvent. The simulations provide information about the aggregate density, the types of inter-monomer contacts and solvent content within the aggregates, the type and extent of solvent exposed perimeter, and the short- and long-range order all as a function of (i) the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area and its distribution on the model protein surface and (ii) the magnitude of the hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energy. An increase in the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area resulted in increased aggregate densities with concomitant decreased system free energies. These effects are accompanied by increases in the number of hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts and decreases in the solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface area of the aggregates. Grouping monomer hydrophobic surfaces in a single contiguous stretch resulted in lower aggregate densities and lower short range order. More favorable hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energies produced structures with higher densities but the number of unfavorable protein-protein contacts was also observed to increase; greater configurational entropy produced the opposite effect. Properties predicted by our model are in good qualitative agreement with available experimental observations. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 13 PMID:8061184

  11. Simulation of electron transport in quantum well devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.; Gullapalli, K. K.; Reddy, V. R.; Neikirk, D. P.

    1992-01-01

    Double barrier resonant tunneling diodes (DBRTD) have received much attention as possible terahertz devices. Despite impressive experimental results, the specifics of the device physics (i.e., how the electrons propagate through the structure) are only qualitatively understood. Therefore, better transport models are warranted if this technology is to mature. In this paper, the Lattice Wigner function is used to explain the important transport issues associated with DBRTD device behavior.

  12. Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 100 Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA)Database for Simulation of Electron Spectra for Surface Analysis (SESSA) (PC database for purchase)   This database has been designed to facilitate quantitative interpretation of Auger-electron and X-ray photoelectron spectra and to improve the accuracy of quantitation in routine analysis. The database contains all physical data needed to perform quantitative interpretation of an electron spectrum for a thin-film specimen of given composition. A simulation module provides an estimate of peak intensities as well as the energy and angular distributions of the emitted electron flux.

  13. A nanoscale three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation of electron-beam-induced deposition with gas dynamics.

    PubMed

    Smith, D A; Fowlkes, J D; Rack, P D

    2007-07-01

    A computer simulation was developed to simulate electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID). Simulated growth produced high-aspect-ratio, nanoscale pillar structures by simulating a stationary Gaussian electron beam. The simulator stores in memory the spatial and temporal coordinates of deposited atoms in addition to the type of electron, either primary (PE), back-scattered (BSE), or secondary (SE), that induced its deposition. The results provided in this paper apply to tungsten pillar growth by EBID on a tungsten substrate from WF(6) precursor, although the simulation may be applied to any substrate-precursor set. The details of the simulation are described including the Monte Carlo electron-solid interaction simulation used to generate scattered electron trajectories and SE generation, the probability of molecular dissociation of the precursor gas when an electron traverses the surface, and the gas dynamics which control the surface coverage of the WF(6) precursor on the substrate and pillar surface. In this paper, three specific studies are compared: the effects of beam energy, mass transport versus reaction-rate-limited growth, and the effects of surface diffusion on the EBID process.

  14. Multiscale Simulation of Microbe Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Harshad; Singharoy, Abhishek; Sereda, Yuriy V.; Cheluvaraja, Srinath C.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A multiscale mathematical and computational approach is developed that captures the hierarchical organization of a microbe. It is found that a natural perspective for understanding a microbe is in terms of a hierarchy of variables at various levels of resolution. This hierarchy starts with the N -atom description and terminates with order parameters characterizing a whole microbe. This conceptual framework is used to guide the analysis of the Liouville equation for the probability density of the positions and momenta of the N atoms constituting the microbe and its environment. Using multiscale mathematical techniques, we derive equations for the co-evolution of the order parameters and the probability density of the N-atom state. This approach yields a rigorous way to transfer information between variables on different space-time scales. It elucidates the interplay between equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium processes underlying microbial behavior. It also provides framework for using coarse-grained nanocharacterization data to guide microbial simulation. It enables a methodical search for free-energy minimizing structures, many of which are typically supported by the set of macromolecules and membranes constituting a given microbe. This suite of capabilities provides a natural framework for arriving at a fundamental understanding of microbial behavior, the analysis of nanocharacterization data, and the computer-aided design of nanostructures for biotechnical and medical purposes. Selected features of the methodology are demonstrated using our multiscale bionanosystem simulator DeductiveMultiscaleSimulator. Systems used to demonstrate the approach are structural transitions in the cowpea chlorotic mosaic virus, RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus, virus-like particles related to human papillomavirus, and iron-binding protein lactoferrin. PMID:21802438

  15. Development of inorganic resists for electron beam lithography: Novel materials and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumar, Augustin

    Electron beam lithography is gaining widespread utilization as the semiconductor industry progresses towards both advanced optical and non-optical lithographic technologies for high resolution patterning. The current resist technologies are based on organic systems that are imaged most commonly through chain scission, networking, or a chemically amplified polarity change in the material. Alternative resists based on inorganic systems were developed and characterized in this research for high resolution electron beam lithography and their interactions with incident electrons were investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. A novel inorganic resist imaging scheme was developed using metal-organic precursors which decompose to form metal oxides upon electron beam irradiation that can serve as inorganic hard masks for hybrid bilayer inorganic-organic imaging systems and also as directly patternable high resolution metal oxide structures. The electron beam imaging properties of these metal-organic materials were correlated to the precursor structure by studying effects such as interactions between high atomic number species and the incident electrons. Optimal single and multicomponent precursors were designed for utilization as viable inorganic resist materials for sub-50nm patterning in electron beam lithography. The electron beam imaging characteristics of the most widely used inorganic resist material, hydrogen silsesquioxane (HSQ), was also enhanced using a dual processing imaging approach with thermal curing as well as a sensitizer catalyzed imaging approach. The interaction between incident electrons and the high atomic number species contained in these inorganic resists was also studied using Monte Carlo simulations. The resolution attainable using inorganic systems as compared to organic systems can be greater for accelerating voltages greater than 50 keV due to minimized lateral scattering in the high density inorganic systems. The effects of loading

  16. Gyrokinetic-ion drift-kinetic-electron simulation of the (m = 2, n = 1) cylindrical tearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Chowdhury, J.; Maksimovic, N.; Parker, S. E.; Wan, W.

    2016-05-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of (m =2 ,n =1 ) tearing mode in cylindrical plasmas are carried out with kinetic electrons using the split-weight control-variate algorithm [Y. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 220, 839 (2007)]. Radially, global simulation shows global mode structure in agreement with reduced-magnetohydrodynamic eigenmode calculation. Simulations of the tearing layer are verified with analytic results for the collisionless, semi-collisional, and drift-tearing mode.

  17. Dramatic changes in electronic structure revealed by fractionally charged nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Aron J.; Mori-Sánchez, Paula

    2014-01-28

    Discontinuous changes in the electronic structure upon infinitesimal changes to the Hamiltonian are demonstrated. These are revealed in one and two electron molecular systems by full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations when the realm of the nuclear charge is extended to be fractional. FCI electron densities in these systems show dramatic changes in real space and illustrate the transfer, hopping, and removal of electrons. This is due to the particle nature of electrons seen in stretched systems and is a manifestation of an energy derivative discontinuity at constant number of electrons. Dramatic errors of density functional theory densities are seen in real space as this physics is missing from currently used approximations. The movements of electrons in these simple systems encapsulate those in real physical processes, from chemical reactions to electron transport and pose a great challenge for the development of new electronic structure methods.

  18. Electronic structure calculations of hexaborides and boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Ripplinger, H.; Schwarz, K.; Blaha, P.

    1997-10-01

    The electronic structures of several CaB{sub 6}-type hexaborides and boron carbide, B{sub 4}C, are studied by the full potential linearized-augmented plane-wave (LAPW) method within density functional theory. The hexaborides contain inter- and intra-octahedral boron-boron bonds, which under pressure decrease approximately linearly; however, the former shrinks more than the latter, consistent with Raman spectra and a simple spring constant model. The boron-boron dumbbell is stronger than the intraoctahedral bonds. For boron carbide several substitutions of the three-atom chain are simulated (BBC, BCB, CBC, CCB, and CCC). Trends in the charge distribution are analyzed and electric field gradient calculations compared to nuclear quadrupole coupling constant measurements show that B must be in the center position.

  19. Monte Carlo computer simulations and electron microscopy of colloidal cluster formation via emulsion droplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Ingmar; Fortini, Andrea; Wagner, Claudia Simone; Wittemann, Alexander; Schmidt, Matthias

    2011-12-01

    We consider a theoretical model for a binary mixture of colloidal particles and spherical emulsion droplets. The hard sphere colloids interact via additional short-ranged attraction and long-ranged repulsion. The droplet-colloid interaction is an attractive well at the droplet surface, which induces the Pickering effect. The droplet-droplet interaction is a hard-core interaction. The droplets shrink in time, which models the evaporation of the dispersed (oil) phase, and we use Monte Carlo simulations for the dynamics. In the experiments, polystyrene particles were assembled using toluene droplets as templates. The arrangement of the particles on the surface of the droplets was analyzed with cryogenic field emission scanning electron microscopy. Before evaporation of the oil, the particle distribution on the droplet surface was found to be disordered in experiments, and the simulations reproduce this effect. After complete evaporation, ordered colloidal clusters are formed that are stable against thermal fluctuations. Both in the simulations and with field emission scanning electron microscopy, we find stable packings that range from doublets, triplets, and tetrahedra to complex polyhedra of colloids. The simulated cluster structures and size distribution agree well with the experimental results. We also simulate hierarchical assembly in a mixture of tetrahedral clusters and droplets, and find supercluster structures with morphologies that are more complex than those of clusters of single particles.

  20. Structure and Electronic Properties of Ionized PAH Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joblin, Christine; Kokkin, Damian L.; Sabbah, Hassan; Bonnamy, Anthony; Dontot, Leo; Rapacioli, Mathias; Simon, Aude; Spiegelman, Fernand; Parneix, Pascal; Pino, Thomas; Pirali, Olivier; Falvo, Cyril; Gamboa, Antonio; Brechignac, Philippe; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been proposed as candidates for evaporating very small grains that are revealed by their mid-IR emission at the surface of UV-irradiated clouds in interstellar space. This suggestion is a motivation for further characterization of the properties of these clusters in particular when they are ionized. We have used a molecular beam coupled to the photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectrometer DELICIOUS II/ III at the VUV beamline DESIRS of the synchrotron SOLEIL to characterize the electronic properties of cationic coronene (C24H12) and pyrene (C16H10) clusters up to the pentamer and heptamer, respectively. These experimental results are analysed in the light of electronic structure calculations. Simulations of the properties of ionized PAH clusters are faced with the difficulty of describing charge delocalization in these large systems. We will show that recent developments combining a Density Functional Tight Binding method with Configuration Interaction scheme is successful in simulating the ionization potential, which gives strong confidence into the predicted structures for these PAH clusters. We will also present current effort to study charge transfer states by performing complementary measurements with the PIRENEA ion trap set-up. Joint ANR project GASPARIM, ANR-10-BLAN-501 M. Rapacioli, C. Joblin and P. Boissel Astron. & Astrophys., 429 (2005), 193-204. G. Garcia, H. Soldi-Lose and L. Nahon Rev. Sci. Instrum., 80 (2009), 023102; G. Garcia, B. Cunha de Miranda, M. Tia, S. Daly, L. Nahon, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 84 (2013), 053112 M. Rapacioli, A. Simon, L. Dontot and F. Spiegelman Phys. Status Solidi B, 249 (2) (2012), 245-258; L. Dontot, M. Rapacioli and F. Spiegelman (2014) submitted

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo for electronic structure: Recent developments and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriquez, M. M.S.

    1995-04-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods have been found to give excellent results when applied to chemical systems. The main goal of the present work is to use QMC to perform electronic structure calculations. In QMC, a Monte Carlo simulation is used to solve the Schroedinger equation, taking advantage of its analogy to a classical diffusion process with branching. In the present work the author focuses on how to extend the usefulness of QMC to more meaningful molecular systems. This study is aimed at questions concerning polyatomic and large atomic number systems. The accuracy of the solution obtained is determined by the accuracy of the trial wave function`s nodal structure. Efforts in the group have given great emphasis to finding optimized wave functions for the QMC calculations. Little work had been done by systematically looking at a family of systems to see how the best wave functions evolve with system size. In this work the author presents a study of trial wave functions for C, CH, C{sub 2}H and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The goal is to study how to build wave functions for larger systems by accumulating knowledge from the wave functions of its fragments as well as gaining some knowledge on the usefulness of multi-reference wave functions. In a MC calculation of a heavy atom, for reasonable time steps most moves for core electrons are rejected. For this reason true equilibration is rarely achieved. A method proposed by Batrouni and Reynolds modifies the way the simulation is performed without altering the final steady-state solution. It introduces an acceleration matrix chosen so that all coordinates (i.e., of core and valence electrons) propagate at comparable speeds. A study of the results obtained using their proposed matrix suggests that it may not be the optimum choice. In this work the author has found that the desired mixing of coordinates between core and valence electrons is not achieved when using this matrix. A bibliography of 175 references is included.

  2. Simulations of Electron Transport in Laser Hot Spots

    SciTech Connect

    S. Brunner; E. Valeo

    2001-08-30

    Simulations of electron transport are carried out by solving the Fokker-Planck equation in the diffusive approximation. The system of a single laser hot spot, with open boundary conditions, is systematically studied by performing a scan over a wide range of the two relevant parameters: (1) Ratio of the stopping length over the width of the hot spot. (2) Relative importance of the heating through inverse Bremsstrahlung compared to the thermalization through self-collisions. As for uniform illumination [J.P. Matte et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30 (1988) 1665], the bulk of the velocity distribution functions (VDFs) present a super-Gaussian dependence. However, as a result of spatial transport, the tails are observed to be well represented by a Maxwellian. A similar dependence of the distributions is also found for multiple hot spot systems. For its relevance with respect to stimulated Raman scattering, the linear Landau damping of the electron plasma wave is estimated for such VD Fs. Finally, the nonlinear Fokker-Planck simulations of the single laser hot spot system are also compared to the results obtained with the linear non-local hydrodynamic approach [A.V. Brantov et al., Phys. Plasmas 5 (1998) 2742], thus providing a quantitative limit to the latter method: The hydrodynamic approach presents more than 10% inaccuracy in the presence of temperature variations of the order delta T/T greater than or equal to 1%, and similar levels of deformation of the Gaussian shape of the Maxwellian background.

  3. First principles study of structural, electronic and mechanical properties of alkali nitride-KN

    SciTech Connect

    Murugan, A.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R. Santhosh, M.; Iyakutti, K.

    2015-06-24

    The structural, electronic and elastic properties of alkali- metal nitride (KN) is investigated by the first principles calculations based on density functional theory as implemented in Vienna ab-initio simulation package. At ambient pressure KN is stable in the ferromagnetic state with NaCl structure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The electronic structure reveals that the KN is half metallic ferromagnet at normal pressure. A pressure-induced structural phase transition from NaCl to ZB phase is observed in KN. Half metallicity and ferromagnetism is maintained at all pressures.

  4. Monte Carlo simulations of Kα source generated by hot electrons-nanobrush target interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jincui; Zheng, Jianhua; Cao, Lihua; Zhao, Zongqing; Li, Shu; Gu, Yuqiu; Liu, Jie

    2016-09-01

    We focus on the transport processes from hot electrons to Kα x-ray emission in a copper nanobrush target. The physics on the enhancement of Kα photon yield and conversion efficiency from laser to Kα x-ray ηL→Kα is studied by combining Monte Carlo simulations and previous particle-in-cell simulation results. Simulation results show that Kα photon yield and electron- Kα photon conversion efficiency ηe-→Kα from nanobrush targets rise gradually and then stay nearly constant. Kα photon yield from the structured nanobrush target increases with peak number density n0, but the yield is a little less than that from the same-size planar target when the electron temperature T =400 keV and n0=1021 cm-3 . It is because the number density of atoms and ions in the nanobrush target is almost one half of the foil target. Compared to the planar target, Kα photons after the nanobrush target are more than those before the target. Because it is easier for the electrons to enter the structured target surface, and Kα x-ray source is produced in the deeper position of the structured nanobrush target. Considering the realistic number of hot electrons produced by laser-nanobrush and -planar targets interaction, Kα photon yield in nanobrush targets has a significant enhancement of over 2-6 folds relative to laser-foil irradiation. The yield and ηL→K α from the nanobrush target are, respectively, 5.42 ×109 sr-1 and 7.32 ×10-5 when laser strength I λ2≈2 ×1018 W cm-2 μm2 . The yield and ηL→Kα decrease gradually with the laser strength, but the values are always higher than that from the planar target. Therefore, the laser-nanobrush target interaction can produce brighter and smaller-size Kα photon source, compared to a planar target.

  5. Numerical simulation of condensation on structured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaowu; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2014-11-25

    Condensation of liquid droplets on solid surfaces happens widely in nature and industrial processes. This phase-change phenomenon has great effect on the performance of some microfluidic devices. On the basis of micro- and nanotechnology, superhydrophobic structured surfaces can be well-fabricated. In this work, the nucleating and growth of droplets on different structured surfaces are investigated numerically. The dynamic behavior of droplets during the condensation is simulated by the multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which has the ability to incorporate the microscopic interactions, including fluid-fluid interaction and fluid-surface interaction. The results by the LBM show that, besides the chemical properties of surfaces, the topography of structures on solid surfaces influences the condensation process. For superhydrophobic surfaces, the spacing and height of microridges have significant influence on the nucleation sites. This mechanism provides an effective way for prevention of wetting on surfaces in engineering applications. Moreover, it suggests a way to prevent ice formation on surfaces caused by the condensation of subcooled water. For hydrophilic surfaces, however, microstructures may be submerged by the liquid films adhering to the surfaces. In this case, microstructures will fail to control the condensation process. Our research provides an optimized way for designing surfaces for condensation in engineering systems.

  6. Numerical simulation of condensation on structured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaowu; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2014-11-25

    Condensation of liquid droplets on solid surfaces happens widely in nature and industrial processes. This phase-change phenomenon has great effect on the performance of some microfluidic devices. On the basis of micro- and nanotechnology, superhydrophobic structured surfaces can be well-fabricated. In this work, the nucleating and growth of droplets on different structured surfaces are investigated numerically. The dynamic behavior of droplets during the condensation is simulated by the multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which has the ability to incorporate the microscopic interactions, including fluid-fluid interaction and fluid-surface interaction. The results by the LBM show that, besides the chemical properties of surfaces, the topography of structures on solid surfaces influences the condensation process. For superhydrophobic surfaces, the spacing and height of microridges have significant influence on the nucleation sites. This mechanism provides an effective way for prevention of wetting on surfaces in engineering applications. Moreover, it suggests a way to prevent ice formation on surfaces caused by the condensation of subcooled water. For hydrophilic surfaces, however, microstructures may be submerged by the liquid films adhering to the surfaces. In this case, microstructures will fail to control the condensation process. Our research provides an optimized way for designing surfaces for condensation in engineering systems. PMID:25347594

  7. Electronic band structure and photoemission: A review and projection

    SciTech Connect

    Falicov, L.M.

    1987-09-01

    A brief review of electronic-structure calculations in solids, as a means of interpreting photoemission spectra, is presented. The calculations are, in general, of three types: ordinary one-electron-like band structures, which apply to bulk solids and are the basis of all other calculations; surface modified calculations, which take into account, self-consistently if at all possible, the presence of a vacuum-solid interface and of the electronic modifications caused thereby; and many-body calculations, which go beyond average-field approximations and consider dynamic rearrangement effects caused by electron-electron correlations during the photoemission process. 44 refs.

  8. Spatial and electron structure of substituted gold clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarzhemsky, V. G.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Dyakov, Y. A.; Kosheleva, O. K.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    The structure of intermetallic clusters Au12M (M=Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os) and features of their interaction with electron donors and acceptor atoms, i.e. H and F, were investigated making use computer calculation based of density functional theory. In was found that metal clusters with effective electron number equal to 18 have more symmetrical shape then that with a number of electrons differing from 18. The interaction of gold nanoparticles with silica was modeled by attachment of SiO4H groups and the connection of the electronic structure with electronic transitions in spaser is discussed.

  9. Simulations of charge transfer in Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, N.; Stefanov, K.; Hall, D.; Jordan, D.; Holland, A.

    2014-12-01

    Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Devices (EMCCDs) are a variant of traditional CCD technology well suited to applications that demand high speed operation in low light conditions. On-chip signal amplification allows the sensor to effectively suppress the noise introduced by readout electronics, permitting sub-electron read noise at MHz pixel rates. The devices have been the subject of many detailed studies concerning their operation, however there has not been a study into the transfer and multiplication process within the EMCCD gain register. Such an investigation has the potential to explain certain observed performance characteristics, as well as inform further optimisations to their operation. In this study, the results from simulation of charge transfer within an EMCCD gain register element are discussed with a specific focus on the implications for serial charge transfer efficiency (CTE). The effects of operating voltage and readout speed are explored in context with typical operating conditions. It is shown that during transfer, a small portion of signal charge may become trapped at the semiconductor-insulator interface that could act to degrade the serial CTE in certain operating conditions.

  10. Electronic structure of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Ruffieux, Pascal; Cai, Jinming; Plumb, Nicholas C; Patthey, Luc; Prezzi, Deborah; Ferretti, Andrea; Molinari, Elisa; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Pignedoli, Carlo A; Fasel, Roman

    2012-08-28

    Some of the most intriguing properties of graphene are predicted for specifically designed nanostructures such as nanoribbons. Functionalities far beyond those known from extended graphene systems include electronic band gap variations related to quantum confinement and edge effects, as well as localized spin-polarized edge states for specific edge geometries. The inability to produce graphene nanostructures with the needed precision, however, has so far hampered the verification of the predicted electronic properties. Here, we report on the electronic band gap and dispersion of the occupied electronic bands of atomically precise graphene nanoribbons fabricated via on-surface synthesis. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy data from armchair graphene nanoribbons of width N = 7 supported on Au(111) reveal a band gap of 2.3 eV, an effective mass of 0.21 m(0) at the top of the valence band, and an energy-dependent charge carrier velocity reaching 8.2 × 10(5) m/s in the linear part of the valence band. These results are in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions that include image charge corrections accounting for screening by the metal substrate and confirm the importance of electron-electron interactions in graphene nanoribbons.

  11. Atomistic simulation and the mechanism of graphene amorphization under electron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zilin; Xu, Ziwei; Yan, Tianying; Ding, Feng

    2014-02-21

    Real-time reconstruction of a divacancy in graphene under electron irradiation (EI) is investigated by nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulation (NEMD). The formation of the amorphous structure is found to be driven by the generalized Stone-Wales transformations (GSWTs), i.e. C-C bond rotations, around the defective area. The simulation reveals that each step of the reconstruction can be viewed as a quasi-thermal process and thus the reconstruction from a point defect to an amorphous structure favors the minimum energy path. On the other hand, the formation of a high energy large defective area is kinetically dominated by the balance between its expansion and shrinkage, and a kinetic model was proposed to understand the size of the defective area. The current study demonstrates that the route of the reconstruction from the point defective graphene toward an amorphous structure is predictive, though under stochastic EI.

  12. QWalk: A quantum Monte Carlo program for electronic structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Lucas K. Bajdich, Michal Mitas, Lubos

    2009-05-20

    We describe QWalk, a new computational package capable of performing quantum Monte Carlo electronic structure calculations for molecules and solids with many electrons. We describe the structure of the program and its implementation of quantum Monte Carlo methods. It is open-source, licensed under the GPL, and available at the web site (http://www.qwalk.org)

  13. Crashworthiness simulation of composite automotive structures

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, M E; Johnson, N L; Simunovic, S; Zywicz, E

    1998-06-01

    In 1990 the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) began the investigation of crash worthiness simulation methods for composite materials. A contract was given to Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC) to implement a new damage model in LS-DYNA3DTM specifically for composite structures. This model is in LS-DYNA3DTM and is in use by the ACC partners. In 1994 USCAR, a partnership of American auto companies, entered into a partnership called SCAAP (Super Computing Automotive Applications Partnership) for the express purpose of working with the National Labs on computational oriented research. A CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) was signed with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory to work in three distinctly different technical areas, one of which was composites material modeling for crash worthiness. Each Laboratory was assigned a specific modeling task. The ACC was responsible for the technical direction of the composites project and provided all test data for code verification. All new models were to be implemented in DYNA3D and periodically distributed to all partners for testing. Several new models have been developed and implemented. Excellent agreement has been shown between tube crush simulation and experiments.

  14. Magnetic field structure influence on primary electron cusp losses for micro-scale discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Dankongkakul, Ben; Araki, Samuel J.; Wirz, Richard E.

    2014-04-15

    An experimental effort was used to examine the primary electron loss behavior for micro-scale (≲3 cm diameter) discharges. The experiment uses an electron flood gun source and an axially aligned arrangement of ring-cusps to guide the electrons to a downstream point cusp. Measurements of the electron current collected at the point cusp show an unexpectedly complex loss pattern with azimuthally periodic structures. Additionally, in contrast to conventional theory for cusp losses, the overall radii of the measured collection areas are over an order of magnitude larger than the electron gyroradius. Comparing these results to Monte Carlo particle tracking simulations and a simplified analytical analysis shows that azimuthal asymmetries of the magnetic field far upstream of the collection surface can substantially affect the electron loss structure and overall loss area.

  15. A framework for stochastic simulations and visualization of biological electron-transfer dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, C. Masato; Byun, Hye Suk; Ma, Heng; Wei, Tao; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2015-08-01

    Electron transfer (ET) dictates a wide variety of energy-conversion processes in biological systems. Visualizing ET dynamics could provide key insight into understanding and possibly controlling these processes. We present a computational framework named VizBET to visualize biological ET dynamics, using an outer-membrane Mtr-Omc cytochrome complex in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as an example. Starting from X-ray crystal structures of the constituent cytochromes, molecular dynamics simulations are combined with homology modeling, protein docking, and binding free energy computations to sample the configuration of the complex as well as the change of the free energy associated with ET. This information, along with quantum-mechanical calculations of the electronic coupling, provides inputs to kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of ET dynamics in a network of heme groups within the complex. Visualization of the KMC simulation results has been implemented as a plugin to the Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD) software. VizBET has been used to reveal the nature of ET dynamics associated with novel nonequilibrium phase transitions in a candidate configuration of the Mtr-Omc complex due to electron-electron interactions.

  16. Development of a model electronic Hamiltonian for understanding electronic relaxation dynamics of [Fe(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} through molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Satoru; Koga, Nobuaki

    2015-12-31

    A model electronic Hamiltonian of [Fe(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}, which was recently refined for use in molecular dynamics simulations, is reviewed with some additional results. In particular, the quality of the refined model Hamiltonian is examined in terms of the vibrational frequencies and solvation structures of the lowest singlet and quintet states.

  17. DNA strand breaks induced by electrons simulated with Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code: NASIC.

    PubMed

    Li, Junli; Li, Chunyan; Qiu, Rui; Yan, Congchong; Xie, Wenzhang; Wu, Zhen; Zeng, Zhi; Tung, Chuanjong

    2015-09-01

    The method of Monte Carlo simulation is a powerful tool to investigate the details of radiation biological damage at the molecular level. In this paper, a Monte Carlo code called NASIC (Nanodosimetry Monte Carlo Simulation Code) was developed. It includes physical module, pre-chemical module, chemical module, geometric module and DNA damage module. The physical module can simulate physical tracks of low-energy electrons in the liquid water event-by-event. More than one set of inelastic cross sections were calculated by applying the dielectric function method of Emfietzoglou's optical-data treatments, with different optical data sets and dispersion models. In the pre-chemical module, the ionised and excited water molecules undergo dissociation processes. In the chemical module, the produced radiolytic chemical species diffuse and react. In the geometric module, an atomic model of 46 chromatin fibres in a spherical nucleus of human lymphocyte was established. In the DNA damage module, the direct damages induced by the energy depositions of the electrons and the indirect damages induced by the radiolytic chemical species were calculated. The parameters should be adjusted to make the simulation results be agreed with the experimental results. In this paper, the influence study of the inelastic cross sections and vibrational excitation reaction on the parameters and the DNA strand break yields were studied. Further work of NASIC is underway.

  18. PIC simulations of the trapped electron filamentation instability in finite-width electron plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winjum, B. J.; Banks, J. W.; Berger, R. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Chapman, T.; Hittinger, J. A. F.; Rozmus, W.; Strozzi, D. J.; Brunner, S.

    2012-10-01

    We present results on the kinetic filamentation of finite-width nonlinear electron plasma waves (EPW). Using 2D simulations with the PIC code BEPS, we excite a traveling EPW with a Gaussian transverse profile and a wavenumber k0λDe= 1/3. The transverse wavenumber spectrum broadens during transverse EPW localization for small width (but sufficiently large amplitude) waves, while the spectrum narrows to a dominant k as the initial EPW width increases to the plane-wave limit. For large EPW widths, filaments can grow and destroy the wave coherence before transverse localization destroys the wave; the filaments in turn evolve individually as self-focusing EPWs. Additionally, a transverse electric field develops that affects trapped electrons, and a beam-like distribution of untrapped electrons develops between filaments and on the sides of a localizing EPW. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-061. Supported also under Grants DE-FG52-09NA29552 and NSF-Phy-0904039. Simulations were performed on UCLA's Hoffman2 and NERSC's Hopper.

  19. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological structures.

    PubMed

    Colliex, C; Mory, C

    1994-01-01

    The design of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been conceived to optimize its detection efficiency of the different elastic and inelastic signals resulting from the interaction of the high energy primary electrons with the specimen. Its potential use to visualize and measure biological objects was recognized from the first studies by Crewe and coworkers in the seventies. Later the real applications have not followed the initial hopes. The purpose of the present paper is to describe how the instrument has practically evolved and recently begun to demonstrate all its potentialities for quantitative electron microscopy of a wide range of biological specimens, from freeze-dried isolated macromolecules to unstained cryosections. Emphasis will be put on the mass-mapping, multi-signal and elemental mapping modes which are unique features of the STEM instruments.

  20. Non-equilibrium Green function method: theory and application in simulation of nanometer electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Van-Nam

    2014-09-01

    We review fundamental aspects of the non-equilibrium Green function method in the simulation of nanometer electronic devices. The method is implemented into our recently developed computer package OPEDEVS to investigate transport properties of electrons in nano-scale devices and low-dimensional materials. Concretely, we present the definition of the four real-time Green functions, the retarded, advanced, lesser and greater functions. Basic relations among these functions and their equations of motion are also presented in detail as the basis for the performance of analytical and numerical calculations. In particular, we review in detail two recursive algorithms, which are implemented in OPEDEVS to solve the Green functions defined in finite-size opened systems and in the surface layer of semi-infinite homogeneous ones. Operation of the package is then illustrated through the simulation of the transport characteristics of a typical semiconductor device structure, the resonant tunneling diodes.

  1. Beam Dynamics Simulations of Optically-Enhanced Field Emission from Structured Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, A.; Grote, D.; Mihalcea, D.; Piot, P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2014-01-01

    Structured cathodes - cathodes with a segmented emission surface - are finding an increasing number of applications and can be combined with a variety of emission mechanisms, including photoemission and field emission. These cathodes have been used to enhance the quantum efficiency of metallic cathodes when operated as plasmonic cathodes, have produced high-current electron bunches though field emission from multiple tips, and can be used to form beams with transverse segmentations necessary for improving the performance of accelerator-based light sources. In this report we present recent progress towards the development of finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell simulations using the emission process in structured cathodes based on the WARP framework. The simulations give further insight on the localized source of the emitted electrons which could be used for additional high-fidelity start-to-end simulations of electron accelerators that employ this type of electron source.

  2. Simulation study of interactions of Space Shuttle-generated electron beams with ambient plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin S.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-1936. The objective of this report is to conduct large scale simulations of electron beams injected into space. The topics covered include the following: (1) simulation of radial expansion of an injected electron beam; (2) simulations of the active injections of electron beams; (3) parameter study of electron beam injection into an ionospheric plasma; and (4) magnetosheath-ionospheric plasma interactions in the cusp.

  3. Precession electron diffraction and its utility for structural fingerprinting in the transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeck, Peter; Rouvimov, Sergei; Nicolopoulos, Stavros

    2009-09-01

    Precession electron diffraction (PED) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is discussed in order to illustrate its utility for structural fingerprinting of nanocrystals. While individual nanocrystals may be fingerprinted structurally from PED spot patterns, ensembles of nanocrystals may be fingerprinted from powder PED ring patterns.

  4. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator - Users' Guide Version 2.1.

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, Scott A; Hoekstra, Robert J.; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric; Pawlowski, Roger P.; Fixel, Deborah A; Schiek, Richard; Bogdan, Carolyn W.; Shirley, David N.; Campbell, Phillip M.; Keiter, Eric R.

    2005-06-01

    This manual describes the use of theXyceParallel Electronic Simulator.Xycehasbeen designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, andhas been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratorieselectrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over thecurrent state-of-the-art in the following areas:%04Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale par-allel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includessupport for most popular parallel and serial computers.%04Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinearand linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques.%04Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, includingmany radiation-aware devices.3 XyceTMUsers' Guide%04Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practicesthat ensure that theXyceParallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable andextensible far into the future.Xyceis a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passingparallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible numberof computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memoryparallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to thespecific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiencyis achieved as the number of processors grows.The development ofXyceprovides a platform for computational research and de-velopment aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. WithXyce, Sandia hasan %22in-house%22 capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model develop-ment) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms)research and development can be performed. As a result,Xyceis a unique electricalsimulation capability, designed to

  5. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkov, A. A.; Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  6. Electron crystallography for structural and functional studies of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    Membrane proteins are important research targets for basic biological sciences and drug design, but studies of their structure and function are considered difficult to perform. Studies of membrane structures have been greatly facilitated by technological and instrumental advancements in electron microscopy together with methodological advancements in biology. Electron crystallography is especially useful in studying the structure and function of membrane proteins. Electron crystallography is now an established method of analyzing the structures of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, which resembles their natural biological environment. To better understand the neural system function from a structural point of view, we developed the cryo-electron microscope with a helium-cooled specimen stage, which allows for analysis of the structures of membrane proteins at a resolution higher than 3 Å. This review introduces recent instrumental advances in cryo-electron microscopy and presents some examples of structure analyses of membrane proteins, such as bacteriorhodopsin, water channels and gap junction channels. This review has two objectives: first, to provide a personal historical background to describe how we came to develop the cryo-electron microscope and second, to discuss some of the technology required for the structural analysis of membrane proteins based on cryo-electron microscopy.

  7. The change of the electronic structure of alkali halide films on W(110) under electron bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckhoff, S.; Maus-Friedrichs, W.; Kempter, V.

    1992-03-01

    NaCl and Csl films of up to four layers were deposited onto W(110) surfaces and investigated by metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES), UPS and AES. The electronic structure of the films under electron bombardment was then studied by MIES/UPS. The results are compared with the corresponding ones obtained by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). An interpretation of the results is attempted on the basis of existing theories for desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) of alkali halides.

  8. Cellulose Acetate Membranes: Electron Microscopy of Structure.

    PubMed

    Riley, R; Gardner, J O; Merten, U

    1964-02-21

    Electron photomicrographs of cellulose acetate membranes used in the reverse osmosis processof water desalination reveal a dense surface layer with a porous substructure. The high rate oftransmission for water can be correlated with the thickness of the dense layer on the air-driedsurface of the membrane.

  9. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator Users Guide Version 6.4

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Eric R.; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Verley, Jason; Baur, David Gregory

    2015-12-01

    This manual describes the use of the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator. Xyce has been de- signed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, and has been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratories electrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over the current state-of-the-art in the following areas: Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale parallel com- puting platforms (up to thousands of processors). This includes support for most popular parallel and serial computers. A differential-algebraic-equation (DAE) formulation, which better isolates the device model package from solver algorithms. This allows one to develop new types of analysis without requiring the implementation of analysis-specific device models. Device models that are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, including some radiation- aware devices (for Sandia users only). Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practices. Xyce is a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase -- a message passing parallel implementation -- which allows it to run efficiently a wide range of computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memory parallel platforms. Attention has been paid to the specific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiency is achieved as the number of processors grows. Trademarks The information herein is subject to change without notice. Copyright c 2002-2015 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved. Xyce TM Electronic Simulator and Xyce TM are trademarks of Sandia Corporation. Portions of the Xyce TM code are: Copyright c 2002, The Regents of the University of California. Produced at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Written by Alan Hindmarsh, Allan Taylor, Radu Serban. UCRL-CODE-2002-59 All rights reserved. Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are

  10. Ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulation of electron transfer process: Fractional electron approach

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Xiancheng; Hu Hao; Hu Xiangqian; Cohen, Aron J.; Yang Weitao

    2008-03-28

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions are one of the most important processes in chemistry and biology. Because of the quantum nature of the processes and the complicated roles of the solvent, theoretical study of ET processes is challenging. To simulate ET processes at the electronic level, we have developed an efficient density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical (MM) approach that uses the fractional number of electrons as the order parameter to calculate the redox free energy of ET reactions in solution. We applied this method to study the ET reactions of the aqueous metal complexes Fe(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup 2+/3+} and Ru(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup 2+/3+}. The calculated oxidation potentials, 5.82 eV for Fe(II/III) and 5.14 eV for Ru(II/III), agree well with the experimental data, 5.50 and 4.96 eV, for iron and ruthenium, respectively. Furthermore, we have constructed the diabatic free energy surfaces from histogram analysis based on the molecular dynamics trajectories. The resulting reorganization energy and the diabatic activation energy also show good agreement with experimental data. Our calculations show that using the fractional number of electrons (FNE) as the order parameter in the thermodynamic integration process leads to efficient sampling and validate the ab initio QM/MM approach in the calculation of redox free energies.

  11. Airflow Simulations around OA Intake Louver with Electronic Velocity Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hwataik; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2009-04-01

    It is important to control outdoor airflow rates into HVAC systems in terms of energy conservation and healthy indoor environment. Technologies are being developed to measure outdoor air (OA) flow rates through OA intake louvers on a real time basis. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the airflow characteristics through an OA intake louver numerically in order to provide suggestions for sensor installations. Airflow patterns are simulated with and without electronic air velocity sensors within cylindrical probes installed between louver blades or at the downstream face of the louver. Numerical results show quite good agreements with experimental data, and provide insights regarding measurement system design. The simulations indicate that velocity profiles are more spatially uniform at the louver outlet relative to between louver blades, that pressure drops imposed by the sensor bars are smaller with sensor bars at the louver outlet, and that placement of the sensor bars between louver blades substantially increases air velocities inside the louver. These findings suggest there is an advantage to placing the sensor bars at the louver outlet face.

  12. Driving Plasmaspheric Electron Density Simulations During Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pascuale, S.; Kletzing, C.; Jordanova, V.; Goldstein, J.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We test global convection electric field models driving plasmaspheric electron density simulations (RAM-CPL) during geomagnetic storms with in situ measurements provided by the Van Allen Probes (RBSP). RAM-CPL is the cold plasma component of the ring-current atmosphere interactions suite (RAM-SCB) and describes the evolution of plasma density in the magnetic equatorial plane near Earth. Geomagnetic events observed by the RBSP satellites in different magnetic local time (MLT) sectors enable a comparison of local asymmetries in the input electric field and output densities of these simulations. Using a fluid MHD approach, RAM-CPL reproduces core plasmaspheric densities (L<4) to less than 1 order of magnitude difference. Approximately 80% of plasmapause crossings, defined by a low-density threshold, are reproduced to within a mean radial difference of 0.6 L. RAM-CPL, in conjunction with a best-fit driver, can be used in other studies as an asset to predict density conditions in locations distant from RBSP orbits of interest.

  13. Electronic transmission in quasiperiodic serial stub structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Samar; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2004-01-01

    We present exact results on the electronic transmission through quantum stub waveguides arranged in a Fibonacci quasiperiodic pattern. Discretizing the Schrödinger equation, we map the problem into an equivalent tight binding form and study the transmission spectrum using the transfer matrix method. We emphasize the effect of local positional correlations in a Fibonacci quantum stub array that may lead to resonant eigenstates. Using the real space renormalization group ideas we unravel various local clusters of stubs responsible for resonance. Extended eigenstates have been shown to exist and we find that, under some special circumstances, the electronic charge density exhibits a totally periodic character in such a non-periodic sequence. Our method is completely general and can be applied to any arbitrary sequence of stubs: periodic, quasiperiodic or random. This may lead to a possible experimental verification of the role of positional correlations in the transport behaviour of a class of mesoscopic devices.

  14. TGF electron avalanches and gamma-ray emission with LEPTRACK - a new detailed simulation software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Paul

    2014-05-01

    In designing the MXGS coded mask imager of the ASIM mission on the ISS, to detect and locate gamma-rays from Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes, it was necessary to write software to simulate the expansion of gamma-ray photons from 15-20 km altitudes for an initial estimate of TGF spectra and diffuse beam structure likely to be observed at orbital altitudes. From this a new detailed LEPTRACK simulation software package has been developed to track all electron-photon scattering via Bremsstrahlung and ionization, and via any spatial electric-magnetic field geometies which will drive the Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA) process at the heart of TGF origin. LEPTRACK uses the standard physics of keV-MeV photon interactions, Bremsstrahlung scattering, Binary-Electron-Bethe models of electron ionization-scattering, positron Bhabha scattering and annihilation. Unlike simulation packages GEANT4, EGS, etc, the physics of these processes is transferred outside the software and controlled by a standard database of text files of total scattering cross sections, differential energy transfer and deflection angle PDFs - easy to read and plot - but which can also be changed, if the user understands the physics involved and wishes to create their own modified database. It also uses a superparticle spatial mesh system to control particle density and flux fields, electric field evolution, and exponential avalanche growth. Results will be presented of TGF simulations using macro electric field geometries expected in storm clouds and micro field geometries expected around streamer tips - and combinations of both - and will include video displays showing the evolving ionization structure of electron trajectories, the time evolution of photon-electron-positron density and flux fields, local molecular ion densities, the dielectric effect of induced local electric fields - and the important effect of the local earth magnetic field on circular lepton feedback and TGF beam direction

  15. Electron Precipitation Associated with Small-Scale Auroral Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R.; Samara, M.; Grubbs, G. A., II; Hampton, D. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Ogasawara, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present results from the Ground-to-Rocket Electrons Electrodynamics Correlative Experiment (GREECE) sounding rocket mission, where we combined high-resolution ground-based auroral imaging with high time-resolution precipitating electron measurements. The GREECE payload successfully launched from Poker Flat, Alaska on 03 March 2014 and reached an apogee of approximately 335 km. The narrow field-of-view auroral imaging was taken from Venetie, AK, which is directly under apogee. This enabled the small-scale auroral features at the magnetic footpoint of the rocket payload to be imaged in detail. The electron precipitation was measured with the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) onboard the payload. Features in the electron data are matched up with their corresponding auroral structures and boundaries, enabling measurement of the exact electron distributions responsible for the specific small-scale auroral features. These electron distributions will then be used to infer what the potential electron acceleration processes were.

  16. A Structured Debriefing Process for International Business Culture Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGraw, Peter; Palmer, Ian

    1999-01-01

    Outlines a nine-step structure for debriefing an international business culture simulation. Stresses the need to address three stages in the experiential learning cycle: reflection, processing, and transfer. Appendices include the specific simulation used and a debriefing note. (DB)

  17. Energy-filtered Electron Transport Structures for Low-power Low-noise 2-D Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuan; Qiu, Wanzhi; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2016-01-01

    In addition to cryogenic techniques, energy filtering has the potential to achieve high-performance low-noise 2-D electronic systems. Assemblies based on graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been demonstrated to exhibit interesting transport properties, including resonant tunnelling. In this paper, we investigate GQDs based structures with the goal of producing energy filters for next generation lower-power lower-noise 2-D electronic systems. We evaluate the electron transport properties of the proposed GQD device structures to demonstrate electron energy filtering and the ability to control the position and magnitude of the energy passband by appropriate device dimensioning. We also show that the signal-to-thermal noise ratio performance of the proposed nanoscale device can be modified according to device geometry. The tunability of two-dimensional GQD structures indicates a promising route for the design of electron energy filters to produce low-power and low-noise electronics. PMID:27796343

  18. Structural phase transition and electronic properties of NdBi

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Ashvini K.; Patiya, Jagdish; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2015-06-24

    The structural and electronic properties of NdBi from an electronic structure calculation have been presented. The calculation is performed using self-consistent tight binding linear muffin tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA). The calculated equilibrium structural parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results. It is found that this compound shows metallic behavior under ambient condition and undergoes a structural phase transition from the NaCl structure to the CsCl structure at the pressure 20.1 GPa. The electronic structures of NdBi under pressure are investigated. It is found that NdBi have metallization and the hybridizations of atoms in NdBi under pressure become stronger.

  19. Simulation of electron energy loss spectra of nanomaterials with linear-scaling density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, E. W.; Ratcliff, L. E.; Payne, M. C.; Haynes, P. D.; Hine, N. D. M.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental techniques for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combine high energy resolution with high spatial resolution. They are therefore powerful tools for investigating the local electronic structure of complex systems such as nanostructures, interfaces and even individual defects. Interpretation of experimental electron energy loss spectra is often challenging and can require theoretical modelling of candidate structures, which themselves may be large and complex, beyond the capabilities of traditional cubic-scaling density functional theory. In this work, we present functionality to compute electron energy loss spectra within the onetep linear-scaling density functional theory code. We first demonstrate that simulated spectra agree with those computed using conventional plane wave pseudopotential methods to a high degree of precision. The ability of onetep to tackle large problems is then exploited to investigate convergence of spectra with respect to supercell size. Finally, we apply the novel functionality to a study of the electron energy loss spectra of defects on the (1 0 1) surface of an anatase slab and determine concentrations of defects which might be experimentally detectable.

  20. Simulation of electron energy loss spectra of nanomaterials with linear-scaling density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Tait, E W; Ratcliff, L E; Payne, M C; Haynes, P D; Hine, N D M

    2016-05-18

    Experimental techniques for electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) combine high energy resolution with high spatial resolution. They are therefore powerful tools for investigating the local electronic structure of complex systems such as nanostructures, interfaces and even individual defects. Interpretation of experimental electron energy loss spectra is often challenging and can require theoretical modelling of candidate structures, which themselves may be large and complex, beyond the capabilities of traditional cubic-scaling density functional theory. In this work, we present functionality to compute electron energy loss spectra within the onetep linear-scaling density functional theory code. We first demonstrate that simulated spectra agree with those computed using conventional plane wave pseudopotential methods to a high degree of precision. The ability of onetep to tackle large problems is then exploited to investigate convergence of spectra with respect to supercell size. Finally, we apply the novel functionality to a study of the electron energy loss spectra of defects on the (1 0 1) surface of an anatase slab and determine concentrations of defects which might be experimentally detectable. PMID:27094207

  1. Electronic and structural properties of ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes by density functional theory calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Lin, Ken-Huang; Li, Jia-Yun; Ju, Shin-Pon

    2014-10-07

    The simulated annealing basin-hopping method incorporating the penalty function was used to predict the lowest-energy structures for ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes of different sizes. These predicted structures indicate that tungsten one-dimensional structures at this small scale do not possess B.C.C. configuration as in bulk tungsten material. In order to analyze the relationship between multi-shell geometries and electronic transfer, the electronic and structural properties of tungsten wires and tubes including partial density of state and band structures which were determined and analyzed by quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, in order to understand the application feasibility of these nanowires and tubes on nano-devices such as field emitters or chemical catalysts, the electronic stability of these ultrathin tungsten nanowires was also investigated by density functional theory calculations.

  2. Electronic structure and stability of some silicon compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Abu-Izneid, Tareq; Kovač, Branka

    2010-05-01

    The electronic structures of N,1,3-tris(1,1-dimethylethyl)-cyclodisilazan-2-amine ( I) and 2,3,5,5-tetrakis(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadiene ( II) have been investigated by HeI and HeII UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and quantum chemical calculations. We discuss the influence of substituent effects on their electronic structure and thermodynamic stability. Our study shows that trimethylsilyl substituents have strong influence on the electronic structure of cyclopentadiene via inductive effect. Their influence on thermodynamic stability is also pronounced. In substituted cyclodisilazanes hyperconjugative influence of alkylsilyl groups was shown to cause relative thermodynamic stabilization of the cyclodisilazane system.

  3. Geometric simulation of structures containing rigid units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    Much insight into the behaviour of the framework silicates can be obtained from the Rigid Unit model. I review results from geometric analyses [1] of framework structures, quantifying the significance of rigid unit motion in thermal disorder and in defect accomodation, and from a method of simulation [2,3] based on a whole-body `geometric potential' rather than on interatomic potentials. I show the application of the geometric potential to the symmetry-constrained generation of hypothetical zeolite frameworks [4], and to the rapid generation of protein conformations using insights from rigid cluster decomposition [5]. 1. Wells, Dove and Tucker, Journal of Applied Crystallography, 37:536--544 (2004). 2. G.D. Gatta and S.A. Wells, Phys. Chem. Min. 31:1--10 (2004). 3. A. Sartbaeva, S. A. Wells, S. A. T. Redfern, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 16, 8173 (2004) 4. M. M. J. Treacy, I. Rivin, E. Balkovsky, K. H. Randall and M. D. Foster, Micropor. Mesopor. Mater. 74, 121-132 (2004). 5. M.F. Thorpe, Ming Lei, A.J. Rader, Donald J. Jacobs, and Leslie A. Kuhn, Journal of Molecular Graphics and Modelling 19, 1:60 - 69, (2001).

  4. Electron Energization and Structure of the Diffusion Region During Asymmetric Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Li-Jen; Hesse, Michael; Wang, Shan; Bessho, Naoki; Daughton, William

    2016-01-01

    Results from particle-in-cell simulations of reconnection with asymmetric upstream conditions are reported to elucidate electron energization and structure of the electron diffusion region (EDR). Acceleration of unmagnetized electrons results in discrete structures in the distribution functions and supports the intense current and perpendicular heating in the EDR. The accelerated electrons are cyclotron turned by the reconnected magnetic field to produce the outflow jets, and as such, the acceleration by the reconnection electric field is limited, leading to resistivity without particle-particle or particle-wave collisions. A map of electron distributions is constructed, and its spatial evolution is compared with quantities previously proposed to be EDR identifiers to enable effective identifications of the EDR in terrestrial magnetopause reconnection.

  5. Electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: Electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Lee, Ensang; Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Lee, Dong-Hun; Seon, Jongho; Jin, Ho

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we investigated the electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability using two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. We introduced a velocity shear layer with a thickness comparable to the electron Debye length and examined the generation of the KH instability. The KH instability occurs in a similar manner as observed in the KH instabilities in fluid or ion scales producing surface waves and rolled-up vortices. The strength and growth rate of the electron Debye scale KH instability is affected by the structure of the velocity shear layer. The strength depends on the magnitude of the velocity and the growth rate on the velocity gradient of the shear layer. However, the development of the electron Debye scale KH instability is mainly determined by the electric field generated by charge separation. Significant mixing of electrons occurs across the shear layer, and a fraction of electrons can penetrate deeply into the opposite side fairly far from the vortices across the shear layer.

  6. Electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: Electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Lee, Ensang Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Lee, Dong-Hun; Seon, Jongho; Jin, Ho

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, we investigated the electron Debye scale Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability using two-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. We introduced a velocity shear layer with a thickness comparable to the electron Debye length and examined the generation of the KH instability. The KH instability occurs in a similar manner as observed in the KH instabilities in fluid or ion scales producing surface waves and rolled-up vortices. The strength and growth rate of the electron Debye scale KH instability is affected by the structure of the velocity shear layer. The strength depends on the magnitude of the velocity and the growth rate on the velocity gradient of the shear layer. However, the development of the electron Debye scale KH instability is mainly determined by the electric field generated by charge separation. Significant mixing of electrons occurs across the shear layer, and a fraction of electrons can penetrate deeply into the opposite side fairly far from the vortices across the shear layer.

  7. Structural and electronic properties of endohedral metallofullerenes.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Takeshi; Lu, Xing

    2012-04-01

    This account presents an overview of our achievements in structural and chemical understanding of endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs), a new class of metal-carbon hybrid materials formed by encapsulation of metals inside fullerene cavities. Structural determination of EMFs is of fundamental importance for understanding their intrinsic properties and the formation mechanism, and for broadening their applications. We have developed an effective method for determining the structures of paramagnetic EMFs, and also succeeded in observing the motion of cluster in a di-metal EMF for the first time. Recently, we unambiguously established the structures of some carbide EMFs which had been wrongly assumed as conventional EMFs previously. More importantly, we have obtained some insoluble EMF species which had never been explored or even expected before. Meanwhile, the chemical properties of various EMFs with different cage structures or different metallic cores have been systematically investigated by means of both covalent and supramolecular considerations, yielding many fascinating results relating to the dictating effect of internal metals. It is noteworthy that all these achievements are based on unambiguous X-ray results of pristine or functionalized EMFs.

  8. Writing silica structures in liquid with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van de Put, Marcel W P; Carcouët, Camille C M C; Bomans, Paul H H; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jonge, Niels; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-02-01

    Silica nanoparticles are imaged in solution with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) membrane windows. The STEM images reveal that silica structures are deposited in well-defined patches on the upper SiN membranes upon electron beam irradiation. The thickness of the deposits is linear with the applied electron dose. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrate that the deposited patches are a result of the merging of the original 20 nm-diameter nanoparticles, and that the related surface roughness depends on the electron dose rate used. Using this approach, sub-micrometer scale structures are written on the SiN in liquid by controlling the electron exposure as function of the lateral position.

  9. Scanning electron microscope studies of bone samples: Influence of simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rahul; Chowdhury, Parimal; Ali, Nawab

    2007-08-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with backscatter and secondary electron emission detectors plus a Si(Li) detector for photon yield measurements was used to study bone samples from skull and leg of mice and rats. These animals were either suspended by their tail to induce simulated microgravity, characterized as hind-limb suspension (HLS) or not suspended (control). Analyses of the SEM images and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) spectra using Si(Li) detector indicate variation in the lattice structures, and in intensities of the characteristics X-rays, produced from the exposed bone surface due to its interaction with the electron beam. Using Flame software, the X-ray spectra were analyzed and normalized ratios of the elements determined. The elemental analysis indicated a variation in the density of calcium, potassium, and oxygen near the knee joints and near the sutures in the skull bones. The comparison of simulated microgravity subjected samples of the rat skull bones with that of the control samples revealed that in the suture region there was a large increase in the ratio of calcium, and to some degree for phosphorus, suggesting simulated microgravity affects distribution of these elements. Elemental composition for control samples with depth (within the cross section of the leg bones) revealed decrease of oxygen and increase of calcium in the first millimeter of the bone depth after which the relative percentage of elements stayed constant.

  10. Electronic structure of xDNA.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Zhao, Xiongce; Kent, P R C; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2007-08-01

    xDNA is an artificial duplex made of natural and benzo-homologated bases. The latter can be seen as a fusion between benzene and a natural base. We have used two different ab initio techniques, one based on B3LYP and a Gaussian expansion of the wave functions, and the other on GGA and plane-waves, to investigate the electronic properties of an xDNA duplex and a natural one with an analogous sequence. The calculations were performed in dry conditions, i.e., H atoms were used to neutralize the charge. It is found that the HOMO-LUMO gap of xDNA is about 0.5 eV smaller than that of B-DNA, independent of the technique used. The pi-pi* gap of xDNA is 1.3 or 1.0 eV smaller than that of B-DNA, depending on whether one uses B3LYP/6-31G or GGA/plane-waves, respectively. An analysis of how saturation changes the electronic properties of the nucleotide pairs that make up these duplexes suggests that different saturation schemes significantly affect the HOMO-LUMO gap value of xDNA and B-DNA. The same is not true for the pi-pi* gap. That xDNA has a smaller pi-pi* gap than B-DNA suggests that xDNA could be a plausible candidate for molecular-wire applications.

  11. Do electron-capture supernovae make neutron stars?. First multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the oxygen deflagration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Röpke, F. K.; Pakmor, R.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Ohlmann, S. T.; Edelmann, P. V. F.

    2016-09-01

    Context. In the classical picture, electron-capture supernovae and the accretion-induced collapse of oxygen-neon white dwarfs undergo an oxygen deflagration phase before gravitational collapse produces a neutron star. These types of core collapse events are postulated to explain several astronomical phenomena. In this work, the oxygen deflagration phase is simulated for the first time using multidimensional hydrodynamics. Aims: By simulating the oxygen deflagration with multidimensional hydrodynamics and a level-set-based flame approach, new insights can be gained into the explosive deaths of 8-10 M⊙ stars and oxygen-neon white dwarfs that accrete material from a binary companion star. The main aim is to determine whether these events are thermonuclear or core-collapse supernova explosions, and hence whether neutron stars are formed by such phenomena. Methods: The oxygen deflagration is simulated in oxygen-neon cores with three different central ignition densities. The intermediate density case is perhaps the most realistic, being based on recent nuclear physics calculations and 1D stellar models. The 3D hydrodynamic simulations presented in this work begin from a centrally confined flame structure using a level-set-based flame approach and are performed in 2563 and 5123 numerical resolutions. Results: In the simulations with intermediate and low ignition density, the cores do not appear to collapse into neutron stars. Instead, almost a solar mass of material becomes unbound from the cores, leaving bound remnants. These simulations represent the case in which semiconvective mixing during the electron-capture phase preceding the deflagration is inefficient. The masses of the bound remnants double when Coulomb corrections are included in the equation of state, however they still do not exceed the effective Chandrasekhar mass and, hence, would not collapse into neutron stars. The simulations with the highest ignition density (log 10ρc = 10.3), representing the case

  12. Electron scale structures and magnetic reconnection signatures in the turbulent magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanova, E.; Vörös, Z.; Varsani, A.; Graham, D. B.; Norgren, C.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Vaivads, A.; Eriksson, E.; Nakamura, R.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Marklund, G.; Ergun, R. E.; Magnes, W.; Baumjohann, W.; Fischer, D.; Plaschke, F.; Narita, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Le Contel, O.; Pollock, C.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. J.; Burch, J. L.; Avanov, L. A.; Dorelli, J. C.; Gershman, D. J.; Paterson, W. R.; Lavraud, B.; Saito, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Collisionless space plasma turbulence can generate reconnecting thin current sheets as suggested by recent results of numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission provides the first serious opportunity to verify whether small ion-electron-scale reconnection, generated by turbulence, resembles the reconnection events frequently observed in the magnetotail or at the magnetopause. Here we investigate field and particle observations obtained by the MMS fleet in the turbulent terrestrial magnetosheath behind quasi-parallel bow shock geometry. We observe multiple small-scale current sheets during the event and present a detailed look of one of the detected structures. The emergence of thin current sheets can lead to electron scale structures. Within these structures, we see signatures of ion demagnetization, electron jets, electron heating, and agyrotropy suggesting that MMS spacecraft observe reconnection at these scales.

  13. Advancing Efficient All-Electron Electronic Structure Methods Based on Numeric Atom-Centered Orbitals for Energy Related Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Volker

    This talk describes recent advances of a general, efficient, accurate all-electron electronic theory approach based on numeric atom-centered orbitals; emphasis is placed on developments related to materials for energy conversion and their discovery. For total energies and electron band structures, we show that the overall accuracy is on par with the best benchmark quality codes for materials, but scalable to large system sizes (1,000s of atoms) and amenable to both periodic and non-periodic simulations. A recent localized resolution-of-identity approach for the Coulomb operator enables O (N) hybrid functional based descriptions of the electronic structure of non-periodic and periodic systems, shown for supercell sizes up to 1,000 atoms; the same approach yields accurate results for many-body perturbation theory as well. For molecular systems, we also show how many-body perturbation theory for charged and neutral quasiparticle excitation energies can be efficiently yet accurately applied using basis sets of computationally manageable size. Finally, the talk highlights applications to the electronic structure of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite materials, as well as to graphene-based substrates for possible future transition metal compound based electrocatalyst materials. All methods described here are part of the FHI-aims code. VB gratefully acknowledges contributions by numerous collaborators at Duke University, Fritz Haber Institute Berlin, TU Munich, USTC Hefei, Aalto University, and many others around the globe.

  14. Electron Diffraction Determination of Nanoscale Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Joel H

    2013-03-01

    Dominant research results on adsorption on gold clusters are reviewed, including adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} on gold cluster cations and anions, kinetics of CO adsorption to middle sized gold cluster cations, adsorption of CO on Au{sub n}{sup +} with induced changes in structure, and H{sub 2}O enhancement of CO adsorption.

  15. Linear Scaling Electronic Structure Methods with Periodic Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavo E. Scuseria

    2008-02-08

    The methodological development and computational implementation of linear scaling quantum chemistry methods for the accurate calculation of electronic structure and properties of periodic systems (solids, surfaces, and polymers) and their application to chemical problems of DOE relevance.

  16. Stacking dependent electronic structures of transition metal dichalcogenides heterobilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yea-Lee; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Ihm, Jisoon

    The systematic study of the electronic structures and optical properties of the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) heterobilayers can significantly improve the designing of new electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we theoretically study the electronic structures and optical properties of TMD heterobilayers using the first-principles methods. The band structures of TMD heterobilayer are shown to be determined by the band alignments of the each layer, the weak interlayer interactions, and angle dependent stacking patterns. The photoluminescence spectra are investigated using the calculated band structures, and the optical absorption spectra are examined by the GW approximations including the electron-hole interaction through the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. It is expected that the weak interlayer interaction gives rise to the substantial interlayer optical transition which will be corresponding to the interlayer exciton.

  17. Electron Transport Simulations of 4-Terminal Crossed Graphene Nanoribbons Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandimarte, Pedro; Papior, Nick R.; Engelund, Mads; Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Frederiksen, Thomas; Sánchez-Portal, Daniel

    Recently, it has been reported theoretically a current switching mechanism by voltage control in a system made by two perpendicular 14-armchair graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). In order to investigate the possibilities of using crossed GNRs as ON/OFF devices, we have studied their electronic and transport properties as function structural parameters determining the crossing. Our calculations were performed with TranSIESTA code, which has been recently generalized to consider N >= 1 arbitrarily distributed electrodes at finite bias. We find that the transmission along each individual GNR and among them strongly depends on the stacking. For a 60° rotation angle, the lattice matching in the crossing region provokes a strong scattering effect that translates into an increased interlayer transmission. FP7 FET-ICT PAMS-project (European Commission, contract 610446), MINECO (Grant MAT2013-46593-C6-2-P) and Basque Dep. de Educación, UPV/EHU (Grant IT-756-13).

  18. The electronic and optical properties of warm dense nitrous oxide using quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yujuan; Wang Cong; Zhang Ping

    2012-11-15

    First-principles molecular-dynamics simulations based on density-functional theory have been used to study the electronic and optical properties of fluid nitrous oxide under extreme conditions. Systematic descriptions of pair-correlation function, atomic structure, and the charge density distribution are used to investigate the dissociation of fluid nitrous oxide. The electrical and optical properties are derived from the Kubo-Greenwood formula. It is found that the nonmetal-metal transition for fluid nitrous oxide can be directly associated to the dissociation and has significant influence on the optical properties of the fluid.

  19. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Langendorf, S. J.; Walker, M. L. R.; Keidar, M.

    2015-04-01

    In particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC MCC) simulations and in an experiment we study sheath formation over an emissive floating Al2O3 plate in a direct current discharge plasma at argon gas pressure 10-4 Torr. The discharge glow is maintained by the beam electrons emitted from a negatively biased hot cathode. We observe three types of sheaths near the floating emissive plate and the transition between them is driven by changing the negative bias. The Debye sheath appears at lower voltages, when secondary electron emission is negligible. With increasing applied voltage, secondary electron emission switches on and a first transition to a new sheath type, beam electron emission (BEE), takes place. For the first time we find this specific regime of sheath operation near the floating emissive surface. In this regime, the potential drop over the plate sheath is about four times larger than the temperature of plasma electrons. The virtual cathode appears near the emissive plate and its modification helps to maintain the BEE regime within some voltage range. Further increase of the applied voltage U initiates the second smooth transition to the plasma electron emission sheath regime and the ratio Δφs/Te tends to unity with increasing U. The oscillatory behavior of the emissive sheath is analyzed in PIC MCC simulations. A plasmoid of slow electrons is formed near the plate and transported to the bulk plasma periodically with a frequency of about 25 kHz.

  20. Electronic structure calculations of ESR parameters of melanin units.

    PubMed

    Batagin-Neto, Augusto; Bronze-Uhle, Erika Soares; Graeff, Carlos Frederico de Oliveira

    2015-03-21

    Melanins represent an important class of natural pigments present in plants and animals that are currently considered to be promising materials for applications in optic and electronic devices. Despite their interesting properties, some of the basic features of melanins are not satisfactorily understood, including the origin of their intrinsic paramagnetism. A number of experiments have been performed to investigate the electron spin resonance (ESR) response of melanin derivatives, but until now, there has been no consensus regarding the real structure of the paramagnetic centers involved. In this work, we have employed electronic structure calculations to evaluate the ESR parameters of distinct melanin monomers and dimers in order to identify the possible structures associated with unpaired spins in this biopolymer. The g-factors and hyperfine constants of the cationic, anionic and radicalar structures were investigated. The results confirm the existence of at least two distinct paramagnetic centers in melanin structure, identifying the chemical species associated with them and their roles in electrical conductivity.

  1. Electronic structure control of single-walled carbon nanotube functionalization.

    PubMed

    Strano, Michael S; Dyke, Christopher A; Usrey, Monica L; Barone, Paul W; Allen, Mathew J; Shan, Hongwei; Kittrell, Carter; Hauge, Robert H; Tour, James M; Smalley, Richard E

    2003-09-12

    Diazonium reagents functionalize single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended in aqueous solution with high selectivity and enable manipulation according to electronic structure. For example, metallic species are shown to react to the near exclusion of semiconducting nanotubes under controlled conditions. Selectivity is dictated by the availability of electrons near the Fermi level to stabilize a charge-transfer transition state preceding bond formation. The chemistry can be reversed by using a thermal treatment that restores the pristine electronic structure of the nanotube. PMID:12970561

  2. Electronic structure of EuFe2As2.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Ganesh; Sahadev, Nishaina; Biswas, Deepnarayan; Bindu, R; Kumar, Neeraj; Thamizhavel, A; Dhar, S K; Maiti, Kalobaran

    2013-06-01

    Employing high resolution photoemission spectroscopy, we studied the temperature evolution of the electronic structure of EuFe2As2, a unique pnictide, where antiferromagnetism of the Eu layer survives within the superconducting phase due to 'FeAs' layers, achieved via substitution and/or pressure. High energy and angle resolution helped to reveal the signature of peak-dip features, having significant p orbital character and spin density wave transition induced band folding in the electronic structure. A significant spectral weight redistribution is observed below 20 K manifesting the influence of antiferromagnetic order on the conduction electrons.

  3. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, J.R.

    1984-10-10

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  4. Electronic structure and magnetism of ThFeAsN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangtao; Shi, Xianbiao

    2016-03-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic properties of ThFeAsN, a newly discovered superconductor, are investigated by means of first-principles calculations. ThFeAsN shares electronic structure and magnetic properties similar to those of LaOFeAs. Its calculated ground state is the stripe antiferromagnetic state. The hole-like Fermi surfaces (FSs) along the Γ\\text-Z line largely overlap with the electron-like FS along the M\\text-A line with the vector q= (π, π, 0) . Such significant FS nesting induces a peak of the bare susceptibility χ0(q ) at the M-point.

  5. Electron beam enhanced surface modification for making highly resolved structures

    DOEpatents

    Pitts, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming high resolution submicron structures on a substrate is provided by direct writing with a submicron electron beam in a partial pressure of a selected gas phase characterized by the ability to dissociate under the beam into a stable gaseous leaving group and a reactant fragment that combines with the substrate material under beam energy to form at least a surface compound. Variations of the method provide semiconductor device regions on doped silicon substrates, interconnect lines between active sites, three dimensional electronic chip structures, electron beam and optical read mass storage devices that may include color differentiated data areas, and resist areas for use with selective etching techniques.

  6. Structural properties of amorphous silicon produced by electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamasaki, J.; Takeda, S.

    1999-07-01

    The structural properties of the amorphous Si (a-Si), which was created from crystalline silicon by 2 MeV electron irradiation at low temperatures about 25 K, are examined in detail by means of transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron diffraction. The peak positions in the radial distribution function (RDF) of the a-Si correspond well to those of a-Si fabricated by other techniques. The electron-irradiation-induced a-Si returns to crystalline Si after annealing at 550 C.

  7. Unveiling the complex electronic structure of amorphous metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Århammar, C.; Pietzsch, Annette; Bock, Nicolas; Holmström, Erik; Araujo, C. Moyses; Gråsjö, Johan; Zhao, Shuxi; Green, Sara; Peery, T.; Hennies, Franz; Amerioun, Shahrad; Föhlisch, Alexander; Schlappa, Justine; Schmitt, Thorsten; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Wallace, Duane C.; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Johansson, Börje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous materials represent a large and important emerging area of material’s science. Amorphous oxides are key technological oxides in applications such as a gate dielectric in Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor devices and in Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon and TANOS (TaN-Al2O3-Si3N4-SiO2-Silicon) flash memories. These technologies are required for the high packing density of today’s integrated circuits. Therefore the investigation of defect states in these structures is crucial. In this work we present X-ray synchrotron measurements, with an energy resolution which is about 5–10 times higher than is attainable with standard spectrometers, of amorphous alumina. We demonstrate that our experimental results are in agreement with calculated spectra of amorphous alumina which we have generated by stochastic quenching. This first principles method, which we have recently developed, is found to be superior to molecular dynamics in simulating the rapid gas to solid transition that takes place as this material is deposited for thin film applications. We detect and analyze in detail states in the band gap that originate from oxygen pairs. Similar states were previously found in amorphous alumina by other spectroscopic methods and were assigned to oxygen vacancies claimed to act mutually as electron and hole traps. The oxygen pairs which we probe in this work act as hole traps only and will influence the information retention in electronic devices. In amorphous silica oxygen pairs have already been found, thus they may be a feature which is characteristic also of other amorphous metal oxides.

  8. Thermal-structural analysis of electron gun with control grid.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lieming; Zhang, Kai; Yu, Hailong; Huang, Tao; Li, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Steady state thermal-structural analysis of electron guns is essential due to the requirement of high reliability in beam performance. Temperatures and displacements for all the components of an electron gun with a control grid are computed. Steady-state thermal analysis has been carried out for various cathode temperatures and various intercepted powers on the control grid to determine the temperature of the control grid. These results are verified experimentally based on measured results from an assembled electron gun. Structural analysis of the electron gun is used to evaluate the deformation of the inner electrodes under the hot condition. The results show that the thermal stress slightly changes the characteristics of the gun. The obtained thermal deformation data can be helpful to modify the design dimensions and assembly of an electron gun.

  9. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  10. Structure and electronic properties of azadirachtin.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Elton A S; de Oliveira, Daniel A B; Farias, Sergio A S; Gargano, Ricardo; Martins, João B L

    2014-02-01

    We performed a combined DFT and Monte Carlo (13)C NMR chemical-shift study of azadirachtin A, a triterpenoid that acts as a natural insect antifeedant. A conformational search using a Monte Carlo technique based on the RM1 semiempirical method was carried out in order to establish its preferred structure. The B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p), M06/6-311++G(d,p), M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p), and CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) levels of theory were used to predict NMR chemical shifts. A Monte Carlo population-weighted average spectrum was produced based on the predicted Boltzmann contributions. In general, good agreement between experimental and theoretical data was obtained using both methods, and the (13)C NMR chemical shifts were predicted highly accurately. The geometry was optimized at the semiempirical level and used to calculate the NMR chemical shifts at the DFT level, and these shifts showed only minor deviations from those obtained following structural optimization at the DFT level, and incurred a much lower computational cost. The theoretical ultraviolet spectrum showed a maximum absorption peak that was mainly contributed by the tiglate group. PMID:24509732

  11. MATERIALS WITH COMPLEX ELECTRONIC/ATOMIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. PARKIN; L. CHEN; ET AL

    2000-09-01

    We explored both experimentally and theoretically the behavior of materials at stresses close to their theoretical strength. This involves the preparation of ultra fine scale structures by a variety of fabrication methods. In the past year work has concentrated on wire drawing of in situ composites such as Cu-Ag and Cu-Nb. Materials were also fabricated by melting alloys in glass and drawing them into filaments at high temperatures by a method known as Taylor wire technique. Cu-Ag microwires have been drawn by this technique to produce wires 10 {micro}m in diameter that consist of nanoscale grains of supersaturated solid solution. Organogels formed from novel organic gelators containing cholesterol tethered to squaraine dyes or trans-stilbene derivatives have been studied from several different perspectives. The two types of molecules are active toward several organic liquids, gelling in some cases at w/w percentages as low as 0.1. While relatively robust, acroscopically dry gels are formed in several cases, studies with a variety of probes indicate that much of the solvent may exist in domains that are essentially liquid-like in terms of their microenvironment. The gels have been imaged by atomic force microscopy and conventional and fluorescence microscopy, monitoring both the gelator fluorescence in the case of the stilbene-cholesterol gels and, the fluorescence of solutes dissolved in the solvent. Remarkably, our findings show that several of the gels are composed of similarly appearing fibrous structures visible at the nano-, micro-, and macroscale.

  12. Monte Carlo Simulation of Secondary Electron Emission from Dielectric Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapor, Maurizio

    2012-12-01

    In modern physics we are interested in systems with many degrees of freedom. The Monte Carlo (MC) method gives us a very accurate way to calculate definite integrals of high dimension: it evaluates the integrand at a random sampling of abscissa. MC is also used for evaluating the many physical quantities necessary to the study of the interactions of particle-beams with solid targets. Letting the particles carry out an artificial random walk and taking into account the effect of the single collisions, it is possible to accurately evaluate the diffusion process. Secondary electron emission is a process where primary incident electrons impinging on a surface induce the emission of secondary electrons. The number of secondary electrons emitted divided by the number of the incident electrons is the so-called secondary electron emission yield. The secondary electron emission yield is conventionally measured as the integral of the secondary electron energy distribution in the emitted electron energy range from 0 to 50eV. The problem of the determination of secondary electron emission from solids irradiated by a particle beam is of crucial importance, especially in connection with the analytical techniques that utilize secondary electrons to investigate chemical and compositional properties of solids in the near surface layers. Secondary electrons are used for imaging in scanning electron microscopes, with applications ranging from secondary electron doping contrast in p-n junctions, line-width measurement in critical-dimension scanning electron microscopy, to the study of biological samples. In this work, the main mechanisms of scattering and energy loss of electrons scattered in dielectric materials are briefly treated. The present MC scheme takes into account all the single energy losses suffered by each electron in the secondary electron cascade, and is rather accurate for the calculation of the secondary electron yield and energy distribution as well.

  13. Modeling a Miniaturized Scanning Electron Microscope Focusing Column - Lessons Learned in Electron Optics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, Jody; Gregory, Don; Gaskin, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    /Fourier series hybrid approach. The presentation will give background remarks about the MSFC mini Lunar SEM concept and electron optics modeling, followed by a description of the alternate field modeling techniques that were tried, along with their incorporation into a ray-trace simulation. Next, the validation of this simulation against commercially available software will be discussed using an example lens as a test case. Then, the efficacy of aberration assessment using direct ray-tracing will be demonstrated, using this same validation case. The discussion will include practical error checks of the field solution. Finally, the ray-trace assessment of the MSFC mini Lunar SEM concept will be shown and discussed. The authors believe this presentation will be of general interest to practitioners of modeling and simulation, as well as those with a general optics background. Because electron optics and photon optics share many basic concepts (e.g., lenses, images, aberrations, etc.), the appeal of this presentation need not be restricted to just those interested in charged particle optics.

  14. Electronic structure of a graphene superlattice with massive Dirac fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2015-02-28

    We study the electronic and transport properties of a graphene-based superlattice theoretically by using an effective Dirac equation. The superlattice consists of a periodic potential applied on a single-layer graphene deposited on a substrate that opens an energy gap of 2Δ in its electronic structure. We find that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic band structure under certain conditions, so it is possible to close the gap between the conduction and valence minibands. We show that the energy gap E{sub g} can be tuned in the range 0 ≤ E{sub g} ≤ 2Δ by changing the periodic potential. We analyze the low energy electronic structure around the contact points and find that the effective Fermi velocity in very anisotropic and depends on the energy gap. We show that the extra Dirac points obtained here behave differently compared to previously studied systems.

  15. Electronic band structure of surface-doped black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jimin; Ryu, Sae Hee; Sohn, Yeongsup; Kim, Keun Su

    2015-03-01

    There are rapidly growing interests in the study of few-layer black phosphorus owing to its promising device characteristics that may impact our future electronics technology. The low-energy band structure of black phosphorus has been widely predicted to be controllable by external perturbations, such as strain and doping. In this work, we attempt to control the electronic band structure of black phosphorous by in-situ surface deposition of alkali-metal atoms. We found that surface doping induces steep band bending towards the bulk, leading to the emergence of new 2D electronic states that are confined within only few phosphorene layers of black phosphorus. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we directly measured the electronic band structure and its evolution as a function of dopant density. Supported by IBS.

  16. Simulation of Nitroxide Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectra from Brownian Trajectories and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    DeSensi, Susan C.; Rangel, David P.; Beth, Albert H.; Lybrand, Terry P.; Hustedt, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    A simulated continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of a nitroxide spin label can be obtained from the Fourier transform of a free induction decay. It has been previously shown that the free induction decay can be calculated by solving the time-dependent stochastic Liouville equation for a set of Brownian trajectories defining the rotational dynamics of the label. In this work, a quaternion-based Monte Carlo algorithm has been developed to generate Brownian trajectories describing the global rotational diffusion of a spin-labeled protein. Also, molecular dynamics simulations of two spin-labeled mutants of T4 lysozyme, T4L F153R1, and T4L K65R1 have been used to generate trajectories describing the internal dynamics of the protein and the local dynamics of the spin-label side chain. Trajectories from the molecular dynamics simulations combined with trajectories describing the global rotational diffusion of the protein are used to account for all of the dynamics of a spin-labeled protein. Spectra calculated from these combined trajectories correspond well to the experimental spectra for the buried site T4L F153R1 and the helix surface site T4L K65R1. This work provides a framework to further explore the modeling of the dynamics of the spin-label side chain in the wide variety of labeling environments encountered in site-directed spin labeling studies. PMID:18234808

  17. Electron beam melting of advanced materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahale, Tushar Ramkrishna

    Layered manufacturing has for long been used for the fabrication of non-functional parts using polymer-based processes. Developments in laser beam and electron beam welding technologies and their adoption to layered manufacturing has made it possible to fabricate high-density functional parts in metal irrespective of the level of complexity. The Electron Beam Melting (EBM) process by Arcam AB is one such layered manufacturing process that utilizes a focused electron beam to process metal powder, layer by layer, in a vacuum environment. Research conducted as part of this body of work looks into the development of both bulk materials in the form of metal alloys and ceramic metal-matrix composites as well as the development of tunable mechanical & thermal metamaterials. Simulation models to approximate electron beam melting were suggested using commercial finite element analysis packages. A framework was developed based on the finite difference method to simulate layered manufacturing using Arcam AB's electron beam melting process. The outputs from the simulation data could be used to better understand the local melting, grain evolution, composition and internal stresses within freeform-fabricated metal parts.

  18. The role of the electron convection term for the parallel electric field and electron acceleration in MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, K.; Terada, N.; Katoh, Y.; Misawa, H.

    2011-08-15

    There has been a great concern about the origin of the parallel electric field in the frame of fluid equations in the auroral acceleration region. This paper proposes a new method to simulate magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations that include the electron convection term and shows its efficiency with simulation results in one dimension. We apply a third-order semi-discrete central scheme to investigate the characteristics of the electron convection term including its nonlinearity. At a steady state discontinuity, the sum of the ion and electron convection terms balances with the ion pressure gradient. We find that the electron convection term works like the gradient of the negative pressure and reduces the ion sound speed or amplifies the sound mode when parallel current flows. The electron convection term enables us to describe a situation in which a parallel electric field and parallel electron acceleration coexist, which is impossible for ideal or resistive MHD.

  19. Electronic correlation in magnetic contributions to structural energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haydock, Roger

    For interacting electrons the density of transitions [see http://arxiv.org/abs/1405.2288] replaces the density of states in calculations of structural energies. Extending previous work on paramagnetic metals, this approach is applied to correlation effects on the structural stability of magnetic transition metals. Supported by the H. V. Snyder Gift to the University of Oregon.

  20. Structural Composites Corrosive Management by Computational Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon

    2006-01-01

    A simulation of corrosive management on polymer composites durability is presented. The corrosive environment is assumed to manage the polymer composite degradation on a ply-by-ply basis. The degradation is correlated with a measured Ph factor and is represented by voids, temperature, and moisture which vary parabolically for voids and linearly for temperature and moisture through the laminate thickness. The simulation is performed by a computational composite mechanics computer code which includes micro, macro, combined stress failure, and laminate theories. This accounts for starting the simulation from constitutive material properties and up to the laminate scale which exposes the laminate to the corrosive environment. Results obtained for one laminate indicate that the ply-by-ply managed degradation degrades the laminate to the last one or the last several plies. Results also demonstrate that the simulation is applicable to other polymer composite systems as well.

  1. Development of an electron-temperature-dependent interatomic potential for molecular dynamics simulation of tungsten under electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakshouri, S.; Alfè, D.; Duffy, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Irradiation of a metal by lasers or swift heavy ions causes the electrons to become excited. In the vicinity of the excitation, an electronic temperature is established within a thermalization time of 10-100 fs, as a result of electron-electron collisions. For short times, corresponding to less than 1 ps after excitation, the resulting electronic temperature may be orders of magnitude higher than the lattice temperature. During this short time, atoms in the metal experience modified interatomic forces as a result of the excited electrons. These forces can lead to ultrafast nonthermal phenomena such as melting, ablation, laser-induced phase transitions, and modified vibrational properties. We develop an electron-temperature-dependent empirical interatomic potential for tungsten that can be used to model such phenomena using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Finite-temperature density functional theory calculations at high electronic temperatures are used to parametrize the model potential.

  2. Simulation-Guided 3D Nanomanufacturing via Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fowlkes, Jason D.; Winkler, Robert; Lewis, Brett B.; Stanford, Michael G.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-06-10

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) is one of the few techniques that enables direct-write synthesis of free-standing 3D nanostructures. While the fabrication of simple architectures such as vertical or curving nanowires has been achieved by simple trial and error, processing complex 3D structures is not tractable with this approach. This is due, inpart, to the dynamic interplay between electron–solid interactions and the transient spatial distribution of absorbed precursor molecules on the solid surface. Here, we demonstrate the ability to controllably deposit 3D lattice structures at the micro/nanoscale, which have received recent interest owing to superior mechanical and optical properties.more » Moreover, a hybrid Monte Carlo–continuum simulation is briefly overviewed, and subsequently FEBID experiments and simulations are directly compared. Finally, a 3D computer-aided design (CAD) program is introduced, which generates the beam parameters necessary for FEBID by both simulation and experiment. In using this approach, we demonstrate the fabrication of various 3D lattice structures using Pt-, Au-, and W-based precursors.« less

  3. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Investigation into Symmetry in Gold Trimer and Tetramer Plasmonic Nanoparticle Structures.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Steven J; Collins, Sean M; Rossouw, David; Funston, Alison M; Botton, Gianluigi A; Midgley, Paul A; Mulvaney, Paul

    2016-09-27

    We present a combined scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) investigation into the mode symmetries of plasmonic nanoparticle trimer and tetramer structures. We obtain nanometer-resolved energy loss spectra for both trimer and tetramer structures and compare these to boundary element method simulations. We show that EELS, in conjunction with eigenmode simulations, offers a complete characterization of the individual superstructures, and we trace the evolution of both optically dark and bright modes and identify multipolar mode contributions. We then apply this technique to tetramer structures that exhibit an expanded range of mode symmetries for two-dimensional and three-dimensional self-assembled geometries. These findings provide a comprehensive experimental account of the available photonic states in self-assembled nanoparticle clusters.

  4. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  5. The roles of electronic exchange and correlation in charge-transfer- to-solvent dynamics: Many-electron nonadiabatic mixed quantum/classical simulations of photoexcited sodium anions in the condensed phase

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, William J.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2008-10-28

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) reactions of solvated atomic anions serve as ideal models for studying the dynamics of electron transfer: The fact that atomic anions have no internal degrees of freedom provides one of the most direct routes to understanding how the motions of solvent molecules influence charge transfer, and the relative simplicity of atomic electronic structure allows for direct contact between theory and experiment. To date, molecular dynamics simulations of the CTTS process have relied on a single-electron description of the atomic anion--only the electron involved in the charge transfer has been treated quantum mechanically, and the electronic structure of the atomic solute has been treated via pseudopotentials. In this paper, we examine the severity of approximating the electronic structure of CTTS anions with a one-electron model and address the role of electronic exchange and correlation in both CTTS electronic structure and dynamics. To do this, we perform many-electron mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the ground- and excited-state properties of the aqueous sodium anion (sodide). We treat both of the sodide valence electrons quantum mechanically and solve the Schroedinger equation using configuration interaction with singles and doubles (CISD), which provides an exact solution for two electrons. We find that our multielectron simulations give excellent general agreement with experimental results on the CTTS spectroscopy and dynamics of sodide in related solvents. We also compare the results of our multielectron simulations to those from one-electron simulations on the same system [C. J. Smallwood et al., J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11263 (2003)] and find substantial differences in the equilibrium CTTS properties and the nonadiabatic relaxation dynamics of one- and two-electron aqueous sodide. For example, the one-electron model substantially underpredicts the size of sodide, which in turn results in a dramatically

  6. Goeppert-Mayer Award Recipient: Electron Scattering and Nucleon Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beise, Elizabeth

    1998-04-01

    Electron scattering from hydrogen and light nuclear targets has long been recognized as one of the best tools for understanding the electromagnetic structure of protons, neutrons and few-nucleon systems. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in the field through advances in polarized beams and polarized targets. Improvements in polarized electron sources has made it feasible to also study the structure of the nucleon through parity-violating electron scattering, where the nucleon's neutral weak structure is probed. In this talk, a summary of the present experimental status of the nucleon's electroweak structure will be presented, with an emphasis on recent results from the MIT-Bates and Jefferson Laboratories.

  7. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  8. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  9. Vertical Electron Transport through PbS-EuS Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrotek, S.; Dybko, K.; Morawski, A.; Makosa, A.; Wosinski, T.; Figielski, T.; Tkaczyk, Z.; Lusakowska, E.; Story, T.; Sipatov, A. Yu

    2003-01-01

    Temperature dependence of current-voltage I-V characteristics and resistivity is studied in ferromagnetic PbS-EuS semiconductor tunnel structures grown on n-PbS (100) substrates. For the structures with a single (2-4 nm thick) ferromagnetic EuS electron barrier we observe strongly non-linear I-V characteristics with an effective tunneling barrier height of 0.3-0.7 eV. The experimentally observed non-monotonic temperature dependence of the (normal to the plane of the structure) electrical resistance of these structures is discussed in terms of the electron tunneling mechanism taking into account the temperature dependent shift of the band offsets at the EuS-PbS heterointerface as well as the exchange splitting of the electronic states at the bottom of the conduction band of EuS.

  10. Properties and features of structure formation CuCr-contact alloys in electron beam cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Durakov, Vasiliy G.; Dampilon, Bair V. E-mail: gnusov@rambler.ru; Gnyusov, Sergey F. E-mail: gnusov@rambler.ru

    2014-11-14

    The microstructure and properties of the contact CuCr alloy produced by electron-beam cladding have been investigated. The effect of the electron beam cladding parameters and preheating temperature of the base metal on the structure and the properties of the coatings has been determined. The bimodal structure of the cladding coating has been established. The short circuit currents tests have been carried out according to the Weil-Dobke synthetic circuit simulating procedure developed for vacuum circuit breakers (VCB) test in real electric circuits. Test results have shown that the electron beam cladding (EBC) contact material has better breaking capacity than that of commercially fabricated sintered contact material. The application of the technology of electron beam cladding for production of contact material would significantly improve specific characteristics and reliability of vacuum switching equipment.

  11. Spectroscopic investigations of the electronic structure of neptunyl ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, M. P.; Berg, J. M.; Dewey, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular electronic structures are innately sensitive to the geometric and chemical environments around the metal center of coordination compounds . However, the interrelationships between the electronic structures and molecular geometries of actinide species, which often contain more than one electron in the Sf valence shell, are quite complex due to the large numbers of possible electronic states and high densities of vibronically enabled transitions .1'2 Investigations of the optical signatures of simple, well-defined molecular systems should provide the most straightforward approach for unharnessing these fundamental relationships, and in particular, systems with a single electron in the valence Sf shell, such as the neptunyl ion (Np0 22+), should provide the most viable means for characte rizing actinide electronic structure. Furthermore, Sf orbital-occupied actinide systems exhibit not only visible and ultraviolet ligand-to-metal charge-transfer spectral bands, but also near-infrared Sf-Sf transitions resulting from promotion of a Sf electron to an orbital of primarily Sf character .

  12. Membrane protein structures without crystals, by single particle electron cryomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting period in membrane protein structural biology with a number of medically important protein structures determined at a rapid pace. However, two major hurdles still remain in the structural biology of membrane proteins. One is the inability to obtain large amounts of protein for crystallization and the other is the failure to get well-diffracting crystals. With single particle electron cryomicroscopy, both these problems can be overcome and high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and other labile protein complexes can be obtained with very little protein and without the need for crystals. In this review, I highlight recent advances in electron microscopy, detectors and software, which have allowed determination of medium to high-resolution structures of membrane proteins and complexes that have been difficult to study by other structural biological techniques. PMID:26435463

  13. Structure of a Bacterial Cell Surface Decaheme Electron Conduit

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Thomas A.; Edwards, Marcus; Gates, Andrew J.; Hall, Andrea; White, Gaye; Bradley, Justin; Reardon, Catherine L.; Shi, Liang; Beliaev, Alex S.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Zheming; Watmough, Nicholas; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.

    2011-05-23

    Some bacterial species are able to utilize extracellular mineral forms of iron and manganese as respiratory electron acceptors. In Shewanella oneidensis this involves deca-heme cytochromes that are located on the bacterial cell surface at the termini of trans-outermembrane (OM) electron transfer conduits. The cell surface cytochromes can potentially play multiple roles in mediating electron transfer directly to insoluble electron sinks, catalyzing electron exchange with flavin electron shuttles or participating in extracellular inter-cytochrome electron exchange along ‘nanowire’ appendages. We present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of one of these deca-heme cytochromes, MtrF, that allows the spatial organization of the ten hemes to be visualized for the first time. The hemes are organized across four domains in a unique crossed conformation, in which a staggered 65 Å octa-heme chain transects the length of the protein and is bisected by a planar 45 Å tetra-heme chain that connects two extended Greek key split β-barrel domains. The structure provides molecular insight into how reduction of insoluble substrate (e.g. minerals), soluble substrates (e.g. flavins) and cytochrome redox partners might be possible in tandem at different termini of a trifurcated electron transport chain on the cell surface.

  14. Parallel adaptive mesh refinement for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Weare, J.; Ong, E.; Baden, S.

    1996-12-01

    We have applied structured adaptive mesh refinement techniques to the solution of the LDA equations for electronic structure calculations. Local spatial refinement concentrates memory resources and numerical effort where it is most needed, near the atomic centers and in regions of rapidly varying charge density. The structured grid representation enables us to employ efficient iterative solver techniques such as conjugate gradients with multigrid preconditioning. We have parallelized our solver using an object-oriented adaptive mesh refinement framework.

  15. Rationalizing the role of structural motif and underlying electronic structure in the finite temperature behavior of atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Susan, Anju; Joshi, Kavita

    2014-04-21

    Melting in finite size systems is an interesting but complex phenomenon. Many factors affect melting and owing to their interdependencies it is a challenging task to rationalize their roles in the phase transition. In this work, we demonstrate how structural motif of the ground state influences melting transition in small clusters. Here, we report a case with clusters of aluminum and gallium having same number of atoms, valence electrons, and similar structural motif of the ground state but drastically different melting temperatures. We have employed Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics to simulate the solid-like to liquid-like transition in these clusters. Our simulations have reproduced the experimental trends fairly well. Further, the detailed analysis of isomers has brought out the role of the ground state structure and underlying electronic structure in the finite temperature behavior of these clusters. For both clusters, isomers accessible before cluster melts have striking similarities and does have strong influence of the structural motif of the ground state. Further, the shape of the heat capacity curve is similar in both the cases but the transition is more spread over for Al{sub 36} which is consistent with the observed isomerization pattern. Our simulations also suggest a way to characterize transition region on the basis of accessibility of the ground state at a specific temperature.

  16. Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Theory and Simulation Applied to Nanoparticle Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Nicholas Walker

    In this dissertation, the capacity of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to probe plasmons is examined in detail. EELS is shown to be able to detect both electric hot spots and Fano resonances in contrast to the prevailing knowledge prior to this work. The most detailed examination of magnetoplasmonic resonances in multi-ring structures to date and the utility of electron tomography to computational plasmonics is explored, and a new tomographic method for the reconstruction of a target is introduced. Since the observation of single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SMSERS) in 1997, questions regarding the nature of the electromagnetic hot spots responsible for such observations still persist. A computational analysis of the electron- and photon-driven surface-plasmon resonances of monomer and dimer metal nanorods is presented to elucidate the differences and similarities between the two excitation mechanisms in a system with well understood optical properties. By correlating the nanostructure's simulated electron energy loss spectrum and loss-probability maps with its induced polarization and scattered electric field we discern how certain plasmon modes are selectively excited and how they funnel energy from the excitation source into the near- and far-field. Using a fully retarded electron-scattering theory capable of describing arbitrary three-dimensional nanoparticle geometries, aggregation schemes, and material compositions, we find that electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is able to indirectly probe the same electromagnetic hot spots that are generated by an optical excitation source. EELS is then employed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to obtain maps of the localized surface plasmon modes of SMSERS-active nanostructures, which are resolved in both space and energy. Single-molecule character is confirmed by the bianalyte approach using two isotopologues of Rhodamine 6G. The origins of this observation are explored

  17. Semiconducting properties of amorphous GaZnSnO thin film based on combinatorial electronic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B. K.; Park, J. S.; Kim, D. H.; Chung, K. B.

    2014-05-05

    Semiconducting properties and electronic structures of amorphous GaZnSnO (GZTO) thin films are investigated with respect to metal cationic composition. An increase of the cationic Sn ratio resulted in an increase of the carrier concentration and a decrease of the mobility of the films. Combinatorial analysis revealed that the electrical characteristics of GZTO films are strongly correlated to changes in electronic structure. The increase in carrier concentration is related to the generation of vacancies by the changes of oxygen coordination around the cationic metal and the shallow band edge state below the conduction band. On the other hand, the decrease of mobility can be explained by the deep band edge state, and the difference between the experimental conduction band and simulated conduction band by the combinatorial electronic structure based on the chemical composition.

  18. Influence of B, Ga and In impurities in the structure and electronic properties of alumina nanoball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabbagh, Hossein A.; Zamani, Mehdi; Farrokhpour, Hossein; Namazian, Mansoor; Habibabadi, Hossein Etedali

    2010-01-01

    The structure and electronic properties of Al 20O 30, B 20O 30, Ga 20O 30 and In 20O 30 fullerene shape nanoballs were calculated at B3LYP and HF levels of theory (6-31++G∗∗/LANL2DZ(d)). The effects of B, Ga and In impurities in the shell of alumina nanoball were investigated. These results show that the substitutional doping of Al 20O 30 with B and In atoms lead to split of HOMO, while Ga impurity did not change the electronic structure. The calculated electronic structure and simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images predicted that B 20O 30 and Al 20O 30 have more propensities to form endohedral complexes; while, Ga 20O 30 and In 20O 30 have more tendencies to construct exohedral complexes.

  19. Semiconducting properties of amorphous GaZnSnO thin film based on combinatorial electronic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. K.; Park, J. S.; Kim, D. H.; Chung, K. B.

    2014-05-01

    Semiconducting properties and electronic structures of amorphous GaZnSnO (GZTO) thin films are investigated with respect to metal cationic composition. An increase of the cationic Sn ratio resulted in an increase of the carrier concentration and a decrease of the mobility of the films. Combinatorial analysis revealed that the electrical characteristics of GZTO films are strongly correlated to changes in electronic structure. The increase in carrier concentration is related to the generation of vacancies by the changes of oxygen coordination around the cationic metal and the shallow band edge state below the conduction band. On the other hand, the decrease of mobility can be explained by the deep band edge state, and the difference between the experimental conduction band and simulated conduction band by the combinatorial electronic structure based on the chemical composition.

  20. The Electronic Structure of Single-Layer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, David Alan

    Single-layer graphene has been widely researched in recent years due to its perceived technological applicability and its scientific importance as a unique model system with relativistic Dirac Fermions. Because of its unique geometric and electronic structure, the properties of graphene can be tuned or manipulated in several ways. This tunability is important for technological applications in its own right, and it also allows us to study the fundamental properties of Dirac Fermions, including unique many-body interactions and the nature of the quasiparticles at half-filling. This thesis is a detailed examination of the electronic and structural properties of graphene, studied with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and other surface science techniques like low-energy electron microscopy and diffraction. This thesis is organized as follows. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to the electronic and structural properties of single-layer graphene. It provides a brief historical overview of major theoretical and experimental milestones and sets the stage for the important theoretical and experimental questions that this thesis addresses. Chapters 2 and 3 describe the experimental setup. Chapter 2 discusses the experimental techniques used in this thesis with particular focus on the mechanics of ARPES. Chapter 3 discusses the different graphene growth techniques that were used to create our sample with particular focus on our characterization of epitaxial graphene on SiC(0001). Chapters 4 and 5 form the meat of this thesis: they provide a thorough discussion of the electronic properties of graphene as studied by ARPES. Chapter 4 describes how various perturbations can result in the manipulation of the bare electronic band structure, including the deposition of atomic or molecular species on top of an epitaxial graphene sheet as well as the interactions between graphene and its substrate. Chapter 5 describes the many-body physics in single-layer graphene. It

  1. Electronic simulation of a barometric pressure sensor for the meteorological monitor assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guiar, C. N.; Duff, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of the electronic simulation of barometric pressure used to self-test the counter electronics of the digital barometer is presented. The barometer is part of the Meteorological Monitor Assembly that supports navigation in deep space communication. The theory of operation of the digital barometer, the design details, and the verification procedure used with the barometric pressure simulator are presented.

  2. Electron cloud buildup and instability: Numerical simulations for the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannozzi, M.; Métral, E.; Métral, G.; Rumolo, G.; Zimmermann, F.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental observations on the electron cloud have been collected at the CERN Proton Synchrotron machine throughout the last two years. At the same time, an intense campaign of simulations has been carried out to understand the observed electron cloud buildup and the related instability. In this paper, the results of the numerical simulations are presented and discussed.

  3. Principles of depth-resolved Kikuchi pattern simulation for electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, A

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a tutorial discussion of the principles underlying the depth-dependent Kikuchi pattern formation of backscattered electrons in the scanning electron microscope. To illustrate the connections between various electron diffraction methods, the formation of Kikuchi bands in electron backscatter diffraction in the scanning electron microscope and in transmission electron microscopy are compared with the help of simulations employing the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. The close relationship between backscattered electron diffraction and convergent beam electron diffraction is illuminated by showing how both effects can be calculated within the same theoretical framework. The influence of the depth-dependence of diffuse electron scattering on the formation of the experimentally observed electron backscatter diffraction contrast and intensity is visualized by calculations of depth-resolved Kikuchi patterns. Comparison of an experimental electron backscatter diffraction pattern with simulations assuming several different depth distributions shows that the depth-distribution of backscattered electrons needs to be taken into account in quantitative descriptions. This should make it possible to obtain more quantitative depth-dependent information from experimental electron backscatter diffraction patterns via correlation with dynamical diffraction simulations and Monte Carlo models of electron scattering.

  4. Simulation of high-speed (orbital) releases of electron attachment materials in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamics of ionospheric plasma irregularities produced by the release of electron attachment materials at orbital velocities across the geomagnetic field is studied. A two-dimensional electrostatic fluid model which includes electron attachment and mutual neutralization chemistry, self-consistent electric fields, and three-species transport is developed. Numerical simulations are performed to study the behavior at early and at late times after the release. At early times, of the order of or less than the attachment material neutral collision time, the negative ion cloud produced by the release may structure owing to the shear in the E x B velocity within the cloud. At high altitudes the cloud may bifurcate and form vortices on the back. At lower altitudes where ion-neutral collisional effects dominate, this structuring is suppressed. At late times, after a plasma depletion has formed due to neutralization chemistry, the cloud structures by the E x B interchange instability. Depending on the release altitude, the depletion structures by the collisional or inertial limit of this instability.

  5. Electronic structure of the silicon vacancy color center in diamond.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Christian; Müller, Tina; Waselowski, Victor; Becker, Jonas N; Pingault, Benjamin; Sternschulte, Hadwig; Steinmüller-Nethl, Doris; Gali, Adam; Maze, Jeronimo R; Atatüre, Mete; Becher, Christoph

    2014-01-24

    The negatively charged silicon vacancy (SiV) color center in diamond has recently proven its suitability for bright and stable single photon emission. However, its electronic structure so far has remained elusive. We here explore the electronic structure by exposing single SiV defects to a magnetic field where the Zeeman effect lifts the degeneracy of magnetic sublevels. The similar responses of single centers and a SiV ensemble in a low strain reference sample prove our ability to fabricate almost perfect single SiVs, revealing the true nature of the defect's electronic properties. We model the electronic states using a group-theoretical approach yielding a good agreement with the experimental observations. Furthermore, the model correctly predicts polarization measurements on single SiV centers and explains recently discovered spin selective excitation of SiV defects. PMID:24484153

  6. Electronic structure and photoelectron spectra of osmium and ruthenium tetraoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Topol', I.A.; Vovna, V.I.; Kazachek, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    The X/sub ..cap alpha../-SW method has been used in the nonrelativistic and quasirelativistic approximations to calculate the electronic structures of OsO/sub 4/, RuO/sub 4/, and FeO/sub 4/. When the 5d element is replaced by a 4d or 3d one, the electron-density redistribution is due mainly to the d electrons. All the d electrons in FeO/sub 4/ are localized on the iron atom, which markedly reduced the ionic and covalent bonding on the transition from RuO/sub 4/ to FeO/sub 4/, which explains the instability of FeO/sub 4/. The calculated spin-orbit splittings agree well with the structure of the PES bands, which enables one to establish the sequence of MO ionization energies unambiguously.

  7. A split-step method to include electron-electron collisions via Monte Carlo in multiple rate equation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthmacher, Klaus; Molberg, Andreas K.; Rethfeld, Bärbel; Gulley, Jeremy R.

    2016-10-01

    A split-step numerical method for calculating ultrafast free-electron dynamics in dielectrics is introduced. The two split steps, independently programmed in C++11 and FORTRAN 2003, are interfaced via the presented open source wrapper. The first step solves a deterministic extended multi-rate equation for the ionization, electron-phonon collisions, and single photon absorption by free-carriers. The second step is stochastic and models electron-electron collisions using Monte-Carlo techniques. This combination of deterministic and stochastic approaches is a unique and efficient method of calculating the nonlinear dynamics of 3D materials exposed to high intensity ultrashort pulses. Results from simulations solving the proposed model demonstrate how electron-electron scattering relaxes the non-equilibrium electron distribution on the femtosecond time scale.

  8. Molecular and electronic structure of the peptide subunit of Geobacter sulfurreducens conductive pili from first principles.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Gustavo T; da Silva, Antonio J R; Reguera, Gemma; Artacho, Emilio

    2012-08-01

    The respiration of metal oxides by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens requires the assembly of a small peptide (the GS pilin) into conductive filaments termed pili. We gained insights into the contribution of the GS pilin to the pilus conductivity by developing a homology model and performing molecular dynamics simulations of the pilin peptide in vacuo and in solution. The results were consistent with a predominantly helical peptide containing the conserved α-helix region required for pilin assembly but carrying a short carboxy-terminal random-coiled segment rather than the large globular head of other bacterial pilins. The electronic structure of the pilin was also explored from first principles and revealed a biphasic charge distribution along the pilin and a low electronic HOMO-LUMO gap, even in a wet environment. The low electronic band gap was the result of strong electrostatic fields generated by the alignment of the peptide bond dipoles in the pilin's α-helix and by charges from ions in solution and amino acids in the protein. The electronic structure also revealed some level of orbital delocalization in regions of the pilin containing aromatic amino acids and in spatial regions of high resonance where the HOMO and LUMO states are, which could provide an optimal environment for the hopping of electrons under thermal fluctuations. Hence, the structural and electronic features of the pilin revealed in these studies support the notion of a pilin peptide environment optimized for electron conduction. PMID:22779741

  9. Studying Atomic Structures by Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Knut W.

    2008-07-01

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations.

  10. Studying atomic structures by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Urban, Knut W

    2008-07-25

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy-loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli-electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations. PMID:18653874

  11. Visualizing Structure and Dynamics of Disaccharide Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effect of several solvent models on the conformational properties and dynamics of disaccharides such as cellobiose and lactose. Significant variation in timescale for large scale conformational transformations are observed. Molecular dynamics simulation provides enough detail to enable insight through visualization of multidimensional data sets. We present a new way to visualize conformational space for disaccharides with Ramachandran plots.

  12. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, S.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references.

  13. Heterogeneous electron transfer at nanoscopic electrodes: importance of electronic structures and electric double layers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengli; Liu, Yuwen; Chen, Junxiang

    2014-08-01

    Heterogeneous electron-transfer (ET) processes at solid electrodes play key roles in molecular electronics and electrochemical energy conversion and sensing. Electrode nanosization and/or nanostructurization are among the major current strategies for performance promotion in these fields. Besides, nano-sized/structured electrodes offer great opportunities to characterize electrochemical structures and processes with high spatial and temporal resolution. This review presents recent insights into the nanoscopic size and structure effects of electrodes and electrode materials on heterogeneous ET kinetics, by emphasizing the importance of the electric double-layer (EDL) at the electrode/electrolyte interface and the electronic structure of electrode materials. It is shown, by general conceptual analysis and recent example demonstrations of representative electrode systems including electrodes of nanometer sizes and gaps and of nanomaterials such as sp(2) hybridized nanocarbons and semiconductor quantum dots, how the heterogeneous ET kinetics, the electronic structures of electrodes, the EDL structures at the electrode/electrolyte interface and the nanoscopic electrode sizes and structures may be related.

  14. Multidomain decomposition approach to large scale electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Kalman

    2010-03-01

    A first-principles electronic structure calculation is presented using a domain decomposition technique. The domain decomposition leads to block tridiagonal Hamiltonian and overlap matrices. With the help of an LDL decomposition the block tridiagonal structure can be exploited and the Kohn-Sham states and/or the electron density can be calculated in an computationally efficient way. The electron density can be calculated from the Green's function or from the eigensolution obtained using subspace iteration. In both cases, the calculation of the density is divided into a series of independent computations that can be done in parallel. This approach allows us to determine tens of thousands of eigenstates with any desired accuracy. If the Kohn-Sham states are not required, the density can be calculated from the Green's function in a linearly scaling fashion. The linear scaling is achieved by using the special structure resulting from the domain decomposition and not by truncation or cutoff.

  15. Cellular structural biology as revealed by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Irobalieva, Rossitza N; Martins, Bruno; Medalia, Ohad

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the function of cellular machines requires a thorough analysis of the structural elements that underline their function. Electron microscopy (EM) has been pivotal in providing information about cellular ultrastructure, as well as macromolecular organization. Biological materials can be physically fixed by vitrification and imaged with cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) in a close-to-native condition. Using this technique, one can acquire three-dimensional (3D) information about the macromolecular architecture of cells, depict unique cellular states and reconstruct molecular networks. Technical advances over the last few years, such as improved sample preparation and electron detection methods, have been instrumental in obtaining data with unprecedented structural details. This presents an exciting opportunity to explore the molecular architecture of both individual cells and multicellular organisms at nanometer to subnanometer resolution. In this Commentary, we focus on the recent developments and in situ applications of cryo-ET to cell and structural biology.

  16. Wiring of metallized microtubules by electron beam-induced structuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Köhler, J. Michael; Böhm, Konrad J.; Unger, Eberhard; Wagner, Thomas; Kirsch, Remo; Mertig, Michael; Pompe, Wolfgang

    1999-09-01

    Molecular electronics emerge as a possibility to continue the miniaturization of electronic circuits down to the lower nanometre scale. One significant challenge is the electrical connection of molecular devices by nanowires. We present here the realization of a new approach for the wiring of nanostructures by linking metallized microtubules (MTs) to prestructured microelectrodes. MTs (tube-like protein structures) were metallized and deposited on microstructured substrates. Electron beam-induced deposition was used for structuring connecting gold lines as nanoelectrodes, which wire a single MT to microelectrodes created by photolithography. Initial electrical measurements confirmed the suitability of the set-up for linking nanometre-scale structures to a measurement device. A metallized MT yielded a resistance below 50 icons/Journals/Common/Omega" ALT="Omega" ALIGN="TOP"/> over the length of 1 µm.

  17. Electron crystallography--the waking beauty of structural biology.

    PubMed

    Pope, Christopher R; Unger, Vinzenz M

    2012-08-01

    Since its debut in the mid 1970s, electron crystallography has been a valuable alternative in the structure determination of biological macromolecules. Its reliance on single-layered or double-layered two-dimensionally ordered arrays and the ability to obtain structural information from small and disordered crystals make this approach particularly useful for the study of membrane proteins in a lipid bilayer environment. Despite its unique advantages, technological hurdles have kept electron crystallography from reaching its full potential. Addressing the issues, recent initiatives developed high-throughput pipelines for crystallization and screening. Adding progress in automating data collection, image analysis and phase extension methods, electron crystallography is poised to raise its profile and may lead the way in exploring the structural biology of macromolecular complexes.

  18. Structural and electronic properties of dense liquid and amorphous nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Boates, B; Bonev, S A

    2011-02-11

    We present first-principles calculations of the structural and electronic properties of liquid nitrogen in the pressure-temperature range of 0-200 GPa and 2000-6000 K. The molecular-polymerization and molecular-atomic liquid phase boundaries have been mapped over this region. We find the polymeric liquid to be metallic, similar to what has been reported for the higher-temperature atomic fluid. An explanation of the electronic properties is given based on the structure and bonding character of the transformed liquids. We discuss the structural and bonding differences between the polymeric liquid and insulating solid cubic-gauche nitrogen to explain the differences in their electronic properties. Furthermore, we discuss the mechanism responsible for charge transport in polymeric nitrogen systems to explain the conductivity of the polymeric fluid and the semi-conducting nature of low-temperature amorphous nitrogen.

  19. Electronic Structure of Dense Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Pollaine, S M; Froula, D H; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Landen, O L

    2003-10-07

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  20. Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of small metal clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the electronic structure of metal clusters, in particular clusters of Group IIA and IIB atoms were conducted. Early in the project it became clear that electron correlation involving d orbitals plays a more important role in the binding of these clusters than had been previously anticipated. This necessitated that computer codes for calculating two electron integrals and for constructing the resulting CI Hamiltonions be replaced with newer, more efficient procedures. Program modification, interfacing and testing were performed. Results of both plans are reported.

  1. Electronic structure and enthalpy of hydrogen and helium mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, M.; Klepeis, J. E.; Schafer, K. J.; Barbee, T. W., III

    1992-11-01

    The first local density approximation (LDA) calculations of the electronic structure, equation of state, and enthalpy of mixing were carried out for a number of different compositions of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices. These are fully quantum mechanical, self-consistent calculations utilizing state-of-the-art methods of electron band theory, which make no assumptions regarding pressure ionization. The major approximation in the LDA method is that the exchange and correlation energy is given by a free electron functional in terms of the local electron density. The majority of previous mixture calculations start with the assumption that both hydrogen and helium are pressure-ionized so that the electronic structure is approximately that of free or weakly screened electrons in the presence of positive ions. Stevenson used a hard-sphere mixture model for the ions with an ion-ion pseudopotential to account for electron screening and predicted that a mixture containing 7% helium by number, the composition believed to be present in Jupiter and Saturn, would phase separate at a temperature of about 7000 K at 8 Mbar. Subsequent calculations carried out for the fully ionized mixture and for a mixture of screened ions (linear response theory) have all arrived at predictions similar to those of Stevenson. MacFarlane and Hubbard performed Thomas-Fermi-Dirac calculations for mixing enthalpies of hydrogen and helium in bcc and fcc lattices and predicted that phase separation would not occur at any temperature.

  2. Effect of electron beam parameters on simulated CBED patterns from edge-on grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Bokel, R M; Tichelaar, F D; Schapink, F W

    2000-01-01

    Convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) at vertical grain boundaries (parallel to the electron beam) can be applied to determine the symmetry of bicrystals. It can also be used to investigate the structure of the boundary region itself when subnanometre probe sizes are employed. In this paper it is shown that (sub)nanometre-probe CBED patterns are largely influenced by the electron-beam geometry. In particular, simulations of coherent CBED patterns based on the multislice algorithm show that the CBED pattern of an edge-on interface depends on the defocus distance between the probe position and the specimen midplane, the probe size and the beam-convergence angle. The pattern symmetry may be lower than the theoretically predicted symmetry in case of large spherical aberration. This effect increases with smaller accelerating voltages. An increase in the beam-convergence angle also increases the possibility of a non-optimum symmetry due to spherical aberration of a coherent probe. Thus, for the determination of an interface structure using subnanometre (coherent) probes, the imaging conditions play an important role. PMID:10620148

  3. Direct Vlasov simulations of electron-attracting cylindrical Langmuir probes in flowing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Pastor-Moreno, D.

    2014-07-15

    Current collection by positively polarized cylindrical Langmuir probes immersed in flowing plasmas is analyzed using a non-stationary direct Vlasov-Poisson code. A detailed description of plasma density spatial structure as a function of the probe-to-plasma relative velocity U is presented. Within the considered parametric domain, the well-known electron density maximum close to the probe is weakly affected by U. However, in the probe wake side, the electron density minimum becomes deeper as U increases and a rarified plasma region appears. Sheath radius is larger at the wake than at the front side. Electron and ion distribution functions show specific features that are the signature of probe motion. In particular, the ion distribution function at the probe front side exhibits a filament with positive radial velocity. It corresponds to a population of rammed ions that were reflected by the electric field close to the positively biased probe. Numerical simulations reveal that two populations of trapped electrons exist: one orbiting around the probe and the other with trajectories confined at the probe front side. The latter helps to neutralize the reflected ions, thus explaining a paradox in past probe theory.

  4. Direct Vlasov simulations of electron-attracting cylindrical Langmuir probes in flowing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Pastor-Moreno, D.

    2014-07-01

    Current collection by positively polarized cylindrical Langmuir probes immersed in flowing plasmas is analyzed using a non-stationary direct Vlasov-Poisson code. A detailed description of plasma density spatial structure as a function of the probe-to-plasma relative velocity U is presented. Within the considered parametric domain, the well-known electron density maximum close to the probe is weakly affected by U. However, in the probe wake side, the electron density minimum becomes deeper as U increases and a rarified plasma region appears. Sheath radius is larger at the wake than at the front side. Electron and ion distribution functions show specific features that are the signature of probe motion. In particular, the ion distribution function at the probe front side exhibits a filament with positive radial velocity. It corresponds to a population of rammed ions that were reflected by the electric field close to the positively biased probe. Numerical simulations reveal that two populations of trapped electrons exist: one orbiting around the probe and the other with trajectories confined at the probe front side. The latter helps to neutralize the reflected ions, thus explaining a paradox in past probe theory.

  5. Ab initio study of electron-ion structure factors in binary liquids with different types of chemical bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Klevets, Ivan; Bryk, Taras

    2014-12-07

    Electron-ion structure factors, calculated in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, are reported for several binary liquids with different kinds of chemical bonding: metallic liquid alloy Bi–Pb, molten salt RbF, and liquid water. We derive analytical expressions for the long-wavelength asymptotes of the partial electron-ion structure factors of binary systems and show that the analytical results are in good agreement with the ab initio simulation data. The long-wavelength behaviour of the total charge structure factors for the three binary liquids is discussed.

  6. A Monte Carlo method using octree structure in photon and electron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, K.; Maeda, S.

    1995-12-01

    Most of the early Monte Carlo calculations in medical physics were used to calculate absorbed dose distributions, and detector responses and efficiencies. Recently, data acquisition in Single Photon Emission CT (SPECT) has been simulated by a Monte Carlo method to evaluate scatter photons generated in a human body and a collimator. Monte Carlo simulations in SPECT data acquisition are generally based on the transport of photons only because the photons being simulated are low energy, and therefore the bremsstrahlung productions by the electrons generated are negligible. Since the transport calculation of photons without electrons is much simpler than that with electrons, it is possible to accomplish the high-speed simulation in a simple object with one medium. Here, object description is important in performing the photon and/or electron transport using a Monte Carlo method efficiently. The authors propose a new description method using an octree representation of an object. Thus even if the boundaries of each medium are represented accurately, high-speed calculation of photon transport can be accomplished because the number of voxels is much fewer than that of the voxel-based approach which represents an object by a union of the voxels of the same size. This Monte Carlo code using the octree representation of an object first establishes the simulation geometry by reading octree string, which is produced by forming an octree structure from a set of serial sections for the object before the simulation; then it transports photons in the geometry. Using the code, if the user just prepares a set of serial sections for the object in which he or she wants to simulate photon trajectories, he or she can perform the simulation automatically using the suboptimal geometry simplified by the octree representation without forming the optimal geometry by handwriting.

  7. One-dimensional Vlasov simulation of parallel electric fields in two-electron population plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Saharia, K.; Goswami, K. S.

    2007-09-15

    One-dimensional Vlasov simulation in electron current carrying multicomponent plasma seeded with a density depression is presented. Considering two electron populations [one is sufficiently hot ({approx}keV) and the other is cold along with cold background ions], the formation of weak double layers is investigated. Simulation results show that in this numerical setting, formation of such double layers needs the majority of the hot electrons.

  8. Moving solvated electrons with light: Nonadiabatic mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the relocalization of photoexcited solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran (THF)

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard-Hearn, Michael J.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2006-11-21

    Motivated by recent ultrafast spectroscopic experiments [Martini et al., Science 293, 462 (2001)], which suggest that photoexcited solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran (THF) can relocalize (that is, return to equilibrium in solvent cavities far from where they started), we performed a series of nonequilibrium, nonadiabatic, mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations that mimic one-photon excitation of the THF-solvated electron. We find that as photoexcited THF-solvated electrons relax to their ground states either by continuous mixing from the excited state or via nonadiabatic transitions, {approx}30% of them relocalize into cavities that can be over 1 nm away from where they originated, in close agreement with the experiments. A detailed investigation shows that the ability of excited THF-solvated electrons to undergo photoinduced relocalization stems from the existence of preexisting cavity traps that are an intrinsic part of the structure of liquid THF. This explains why solvated electrons can undergo photoinduced relocalization in solvents like THF but not in solvents like water, which lack the preexisting traps necessary to stabilize the excited electron in other places in the fluid. We also find that even when they do not ultimately relocalize, photoexcited solvated electrons in THF temporarily visit other sites in the fluid, explaining why the photoexcitation of THF-solvated electrons is so efficient at promoting recombination with nearby scavengers. Overall, our study shows that the defining characteristic of a liquid that permits the photoassisted relocalization of solvated electrons is the existence of nascent cavities that are attractive to an excess electron; we propose that other such liquids can be found from classical computer simulations or neutron diffraction experiments.

  9. Advanced applications of reduced density matrices in electronic structure theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, Adam Eric

    This dissertation describes several applications of reduced density matrices (RDMs) in electronic structure theory. RDM methods are a valuable addition to the library of electronic structure theories because they reduce a many-electron problem to the space of just two electrons without approximation. New theoretical and computational avenues enabled by the two-electron RDM (2-RDM) have already shown substantial progress in calculating atomic and molecular energies and properties with an eye toward predictive chemistry. More than simply accurate calculations, RDM methods entail a paradigm shift in quantum chemistry. While one-electron approaches are conceptually easy to understand, the importance of the 2-RDM quantifies the centrality of a two-body framework. The 2-RDM facilitates a two-electron interpretation of quantum mechanics that will undoubtedly lead to a greater understanding of electron correlation. Two applications presented in the dissertation center around near-exact evaluation of the 2-RDM in chemical systems without the many-electron wave function, but approach the problem from different angles. The first applies variational 2-RDM theory to a model quantum dot; the second attempts non-variational determination of the 2-RDM in open-shell atomic and molecular systems using an extension of the anti-Hermitian contracted Schrodinger equation (ACSE). An example reaction is presented to demonstrate how energies computed with the 2-RDM can facilitate an understanding of chemical reactivity. A third application uses the one-electron RDM (1-RDM) as a tool for understanding molecular conductivity. In this case, the 1-RDM is valuable because it integrates out many extraneous degrees of freedom from metal baths, simplifying the electron transport problem but retaining enough information to predict the dependence of current on applied voltage. The results are competitive with other conductivity theories, including a dominant scattering-based understanding, but

  10. Design and simulation of a novel GaN based resonant tunneling high electron mobility transistor on a silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Subhra; Chattaraj, Swarnabha; Biswas, Dhrubes

    2015-04-01

    For the first time, we have introduced a novel GaN based resonant tunneling high electron mobility transistor (RTHEMT) on a silicon substrate. A monolithically integrated GaN based inverted high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) and a resonant tunneling diode (RTD) are designed and simulated using the ATLAS simulator and MATLAB in this study. The 10% Al composition in the barrier layer of the GaN based RTD structure provides a peak-to-valley current ratio of 2.66 which controls the GaN based HEMT performance. Thus the results indicate an improvement in the current-voltage characteristics of the RTHEMT by controlling the gate voltage in this structure. The introduction of silicon as a substrate is a unique step taken by us for this type of RTHEMT structure.

  11. Chemistry and Electronic Structure of Iron-Based Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Safa-Sefat, Athena; Singh, David J

    2011-01-01

    The solid state provides a richly varied fabric for intertwining chemical bonding, electronic structure, and magnetism. The discovery of superconductivity in iron pnictides and chalcogenides has revealed new aspects of this interplay, especially involving magnetism and superconductivity. Moreover, it has challenged prior thinking about high-temperature superconductivity by providing a set of materials that differ in many crucial aspects from the previously known cuprate superconductors. Here we review some of what is known about the superconductivity and its interplay with magnetism, chemistry, and electronic structure in Fe-based superconductors.

  12. Comparison of electronic structure between monolayer silicenes on Ag (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-Liang, Lin; Ryuichi, Arafune; Maki, Kawai; Noriaki, Takagi

    2015-08-01

    The electronic structures of monolayer silicenes (4 × 4 and ) grown on Ag (111) surface are studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. While both phases have similar electronic structures around the Fermi level, significant differences are observed in the higher energy unoccupied states. The DFT calculations show that the contributions of Si 3pz orbitals to the unoccupied states are different because of their different buckled configurations. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) through Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 24241040 and 25110008) and the World Premier International Research Center Initiative (WPI), MEXT, Japan.

  13. Orientation-dependent C-60 electronic structures revealed byphotoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brouet, V.; Yang, W.L.; Zhou, X.J.; Choi, H.J.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L.; Goldoni, A.; Parmigiani, F.; Hussain, Z.; Shen, Z.X.

    2008-01-17

    We observe, with angle-resolved photoemission, a dramaticchange in the electronic structure of two C60 monolayers, deposited,respectively, on Ag (111) and (100) substrates, and similarly doped withpotassium to half filling of the C60 lowest unoccupied molecular orbital.The Fermi surface symmetry, the bandwidth, and the curvature of thedispersion at gamma point are different. Orient ations of the C60molecules on the two substrates are known to be the main structuraldifference between the two monolayers, and we present new band-structurecalculations for some of these orientations. We conclude thatorientations play a key role in the electronic structure offullerides.

  14. Structural and luminescent properties of electron-irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, N. A.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Aruev, P. N.; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Zabrodskiy, V. V.; Shtel'makh, K. F.; Vdovin, V. I.; Xiang, Luelue; Yang, Deren

    2014-02-21

    Structural defects induced by electron irradiation of p-Cz-Si wafers were identified. The influence of the annealing conditions in a chlorine-containing atmosphere on the structural and luminescent properties of the samples was examined. Light-emitting diodes based on electron-irradiated and high-temperature-annealed wafers were fabricated by a vapour-phase epitaxy technique and their luminescence properties were studied. A high-intensity dislocation-related D1 line was observed at 1.6 μm in the room-temperature electroluminescence spectrum.

  15. The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmaev, E. Z.; Moewes, A.; Ouyang, L.; Randaccio, L.; Rulis, P.; Ching, W. Y.; Bach, M.; Neumann, M.

    2003-05-01

    The electronic structure and chemical bonding of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) and B12-derivative (methylcobalamin) are studied by means of X-ray emission (XES) and photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy. The obtained results are compared with ab initio electronic structure calculations using the orthogonalized linear combination of the atomic orbital method (OLCAO). We show that the chemical bonding in vitamin B12 is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and relatively weak axial Co-N bond. It is further confirmed that the Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is stronger than that of methylcobalamin resulting in their different biological activity.

  16. A simulation framework for the CMS Track Trigger electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amstutz, C.; Magazzù, G.; Weber, M.; Palla, F.

    2015-03-01

    A simulation framework has been developed to test and characterize algorithms, architectures and hardware implementations of the vastly complex CMS Track Trigger for the high luminosity upgrade of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. High-level SystemC models of all system components have been developed to simulate a portion of the track trigger. The simulation of the system components together with input data from physics simulations allows evaluating figures of merit, like delays or bandwidths, under realistic conditions. The use of SystemC for high-level modelling allows co-simulation with models developed in Hardware Description Languages, e.g. VHDL or Verilog. Therefore, the simulation framework can also be used as a test bench for digital modules developed for the final system.

  17. Electronic structure and electron correlation in weakly confining spherical quantum dot potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimani, Peter Borgia Ndungu

    The electronic structure and electron correlations in weakly confining spherical quantum dots potentials are investigated. Following a common practice, the investigation starts with the restricted Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. Then electron correlation is added in steps in a series of approximations based on the single particle Green's function approach: (i) Second-order Green function (GF) (ii) 2ph-Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) and (iii) an extended version thereof (XTDA) which introduces ground-state correlation into the TDA. The study includes as well Hartree-Fock V (N-1) potential approximation in which framework the Hartree-Fock virtual orbitals are calculated in the field of the N-1 electrons as opposed to the regular but unphysical N-electron field Hartree-Fock calculation of virtual orbitals. For contrast and comparison, the same approximation techniques are applied to few-electron closed-shell atoms and few-electron negative ions for which pertinent data is readily available. The results for the weakly confining spherical quantum dot potentials and the standard atomic systems exhibit fundamental similarities as well as significant differences. For the most part the results of these calculations are in favor of application of HF, GF, and TDA techniques in the modeling of three-dimensional weakly confining quantum dot potentials. The observed differences emphasize the significance of confinement and electronic features unique to quantum dots such as the increased binding of electrons with higher angular momentum and the modified shell filling sequences.

  18. Pelegant : a parallel accelerator simulation code for electron generation and tracking.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Borland, M. D.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2006-01-01

    elegant is a general-purpose code for electron accelerator simulation that has a worldwide user base. Recently, many of the time-intensive elements were parallelized using MPI. Development has used modest Linux clusters and the BlueGene/L supercomputer at Argonne National Laboratory. This has provided very good performance for some practical simulations, such as multiparticle tracking with synchrotron radiation and emittance blow-up in the vertical rf kick scheme. The effort began with development of a concept that allowed for gradual parallelization of the code, using the existing beamline-element classification table in elegant. This was crucial as it allowed parallelization without major changes in code structure and without major conflicts with the ongoing evolution of elegant. Because of rounding error and finite machine precision, validating a parallel program against a uniprocessor program with the requirement of bitwise identical results is notoriously difficult. We will report validating simulation results of parallel elegant against those of serial elegant by applying Kahan's algorithm to improve accuracy dramatically for both versions. The quality of random numbers in a parallel implementation is very important for some simulations. Some practical experience with generating parallel random numbers by offsetting the seed of each random sequence according to the processor ID will be reported.

  19. Computer Simulation of High Resolution Transmission Electron Micrographs: Theory and Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaas, Roar

    Computer simulation of electron micrographs is an invaluable aid in their proper interpretation and in defining optimum conditions for obtaining images experimentally. Since modern instruments are capable of atomic resolution, simulation techniques employing high precision are required. This thesis makes contributions to four specific areas of this field. First, the validity of a new method for simulating high resolution electron microscope images has been critically examined. This method, which has been termed the real space method (RSP) since the entire calculation is performed without any Fourier transforms, offers a considerable reduction in computing time over the conventional multislice approach when identical sampling conditions are employed. However, for the same level of accuracy the real space method requires more sampling points and more computing time than the conventional multislice method. These characteristics are illustrated with calculated results using both methods to identify practical limitations. Second, three different methods for computing scattering amplitudes in High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) have been investigated as to their ability to include upper Laue layer (ULL) interaction. The conventional first order multislice method using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and the second order multislice (SOM) method are shown to yield calculated intensities of first order Laue reflections with the use of slice thicknesses smaller than the crystal periodicity along the incident electron beam direction. It is argued that the calculated intensities of ULL reflections approach the correct values in the limiting case of vanishing slice thickness and electron wavelength. The third method, the improved phasegrating method (IPG) does also in principle include ULL effects, but is severely limited as to choice of slice thickness and sampling interval. A practical way to use slice thicknesses less than the crystal periodicity along the

  20. Chapter 2: Simulations of the Structure of Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J. F.; Himmel, M. E.; Brady, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose is the homopolymer of (1 {yields} 4)-{beta}-D-glucose. The chemical composition of this polymer is simple, but understanding the conformation and packing of cellulose molecules is challenging. This chapter describes the structure of cellulose from the perspective of molecular mechanics simulations, including conformational analysis of cellobiose and simulations of hydrated cellulose I{beta} with CSFF and GLYCAM06, two sets of force field parameters developed specifically for carbohydrates. Many important features observed in these simulations are sensitive to differences in force field parameters, giving rise to dramatically different structures. The structures and properties of non-naturally occurring cellulose allomorphs (II, III, and IV) are also discussed.

  1. Structural and Electronic Properties of a Wide-Gap Quaternary Solid Solution: \\(Zn, Mg\\) \\(S, Se\\)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitta, A. M.; de Gironcoli, S.; Baroni, S.

    1998-06-01

    The structural properties of the (Zn, Mg) (S, Se) solid solutions are determined by a combination of the computational alchemy and the cluster expansion methods with Monte Carlo simulations. We determine the phase diagram of the alloy and show that the homogeneous phase is characterized by a large amount of short-range order occurring among first-nearest neighbors. Electronic-structure calculations performed using the special quasirandom structure approach indicate that the energy gap of the alloy is rather sensitive to this short-range order.

  2. Structural surface investigations with low-energy backscattered electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Crescenzi, Maurizio

    The development of electron spectroscopies based on inelastic scattering fine structure is driven mainly by the need for structural methods which allow the investigation of the geometrical environment of different atomic species of the surface region of the sample. The EELFS (Extended Energy Loss Fine Structure) technique, using low-kinetic-energy electrons (1000-2000 eV) in reflection geometry, has been proven a useful tool for local structural investigation of clean surfaces, thin films and chemisorbed species. The main appeal of this technique, besides its experimental accessibility, is that the data analysis follows the procedure used for EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) spectroscopy to obtain the atomic selectivity, the radial distribution function, the coordination number and the thermal and anisotropic effects. The near-edge energy-loss feature has been used to investigate the density of empty states close to EF and it appeeal particularly sensitive for following the structural changes and for discriminating among various phases and compound formations which occur in the surface region. In this work I review some recent developments, applications and theoretical considerations of the EELFS technique to give local structural parameters and to assess the basic mechanisms which dominate the low-energy electron-surface interaction.

  3. Electronic properties of a graphene device with peptide adsorption: insight from simulation.

    PubMed

    Akdim, Brahim; Pachter, Ruth; Kim, Steve S; Naik, Rajesh R; Walsh, Tiffany R; Trohalaki, Steven; Hong, Gongyi; Kuang, Zhifeng; Farmer, Barry L

    2013-08-14

    In this work, to explain doping behavior of single-layer graphene upon HSSYWYAFNNKT (P1) and HSSAAAAFNNKT (P1-3A) adsorption in field-effect transistors (GFETs), we applied a combined computational approach, whereby peptide adsorption was modeled by molecular dynamics simulations, and the lowest energy configuration was confirmed by density functional theory calculations. On the basis of the resulting structures of the hybrid materials, electronic structure and transport calculations were investigated. We demonstrate that π-π stacking of the aromatic residues and proximate peptide backbone to the graphene surface in P1 have a role in the p-doping. These results are consistent with our experimental observation of the GFET's p-doping even after a 24-h annealing procedure. Upon substitution of three of the aromatic residues to Ala in (P1-3A), a considerable decrease from p-doping is observed experimentally, demonstrating n-doping as compared to the nonadsorbed device, yet not explained based on the atomistic MD simulation structures. To gain a qualitative understanding of P1-3A's adsorption over a longer simulation time, which may differ from aromatic amino acid residues' swift anchoring on the surface, we analyzed equilibrated coarse-grain simulations performed for 500 ns. Desorption of the Ala residues from the surface was shown computationally, which could in turn affect charge transfer, yet a full explanation of the mechanism of n-doping will require elucidation of differences between various aromatic residues as dependent on peptide composition, and inclusion of effects of the substrate and environment, to be considered in future work.

  4. Electronic structure of scandium-doped MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Peña, Omar; Agrestini, Stefano

    2005-03-01

    Recently has been reported the synthesis of a new superconducting alloy based on MgB2, where Mg is partially substituted with Sc. In order to analyze the effect of Sc doping on the structural and superconducting properties of Mg1-xScxB2, we have performed a detailed study of the electronic structure for this new diboride. The calculations have been done using the first-principles LAPW method, within the supercell approach for modeling the doping. In this work we report results for the electronic band structure, Fermi surface, and density of states. The effect of the Sc-d orbitals on the structural and electronic properties of Mg1-xScxB2 is analyzed. Increasing the Sc concentration (x) the σ-band is gradually filled, because Sc have one valence electron more than Mg. Interestingly, the analysis of the band structure shows that even for ScB2 the top of the σ-band remain above the Fermi level, nevertheless the σ-band presents high dispersion and has an important contribution of d states. In this way, in addition to the band filling effect, Sc doping gradually reduces the two-dimensional character of the σ- band in Mg1-xScxB2 as a result of increasing the sp(B)-d(Sc) hybridization. This research was partially supported by Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnolog'ia (CONACYT, M'exico) under Grant. No. 43830-F

  5. Free electron laser-driven ultrafast rearrangement of the electronic structure in Ti

    PubMed Central

    Principi, E.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Cucini, R.; Bencivenga, F.; Battistoni, A.; Gessini, A.; Mincigrucci, R.; Saito, M.; Di Fonzo, S.; D'Amico, F.; Di Cicco, A.; Gunnella, R.; Filipponi, A.; Giglia, A.; Nannarone, S.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy density extreme ultraviolet radiation delivered by the FERMI seeded free-electron laser has been used to create an exotic nonequilibrium state of matter in a titanium sample characterized by a highly excited electron subsystem at temperatures in excess of 10 eV and a cold solid-density ion lattice. The obtained transient state has been investigated through ultrafast absorption spectroscopy across the Ti M2,3-edge revealing a drastic rearrangement of the sample electronic structure around the Fermi level occurring on a time scale of about 100 fs. PMID:26798835

  6. Structure, dynamics, and reactivity of hydrated electrons by ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Marsalek, Ondrej; Uhlig, Frank; VandeVondele, Joost; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2012-01-17

    Understanding the properties of hydrated electrons, which were first observed using pulse radiolysis of water in 1962, is crucial because they are key species in many radiation chemistry processes. Although time-resolved spectroscopic studies and molecular simulations have shown that an electron in water (prepared, for example, by water photoionization) relaxes quickly to a localized, cavity-like structure ∼2.5 Å in radius, this picture has recently been questioned. In another experimental approach, negatively charged water clusters of increasing size were studied with photoelectron and IR spectroscopies. Although small water clusters can bind an excess electron, their character is very different from bulk hydrated species. As data on electron binding in liquid water have become directly accessible experimentally, the cluster-to-bulk extrapolations have become a topic of lively debate. Quantum electronic structure calculations addressing experimental measurables have, until recently, been largely limited to small clusters; extended systems were approached mainly with pseudopotential calculations combining a classical description of water with a quantum mechanical treatment of the excess electron. In this Account, we discuss our investigations of electrons solvated in water by means of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. This approach, applied to a model system of a negatively charged cluster of 32 water molecules, allows us to characterize structural, dynamical, and reactive aspects of the hydrated electron using all of the system's valence electrons. We show that under ambient conditions, the electron localizes into a cavity close to the surface of the liquid cluster. This cavity is, however, more flexible and accessible to water molecules than an analogous area around negatively charged ions. The dynamical process of electron attachment to a neutral water cluster is strongly temperature dependent. Under ambient conditions, the electron relaxes in the

  7. Structural, electronic and mechanical properties of rare earth nitride-ErN: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Murugan, A.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R. Santhosh, M.; Priyanga, G. Sudha; Kanagaprabha, S.; Iyakutti, K.

    2015-06-24

    The structural, electronic and mechanical properties of rare earth nitride ErN is investigated by the first principles calculations based on density functional theory using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package. At ambient pressure ErN is stable in the ferromagnetic state with NaCl structure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The electronic structure reveals that ErN is half metallic at normal pressure. A pressure-induced structural phase transition from NaCl (B1) to CsCl (B2) phase is observed in ErN. Ferromagnetic to non magnetic phase transition is predicted in ErN at high pressure.

  8. Chiral phosphorus nanotubes: structure, bonding, and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Escamilla, H N; Quijano-Briones, J J; Tlahuice-Flores, A

    2016-05-14

    The study of black phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs) had been devoted to zigzag and armchair structures, with no consideration of chiral structures to date. In this communication, we studied the structural and electronic (band structure) properties of chiral nanotubes using a periodic plane wave-pseudopotential approach. We found that some chiral nanotubes display similar bandgaps and binding energies per atom (BEA) as armchair PNTs and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations attest their thermal stability. Interestingly, we determined that the bandgap is tuned by varying the PNTs chirality and it is not related to their diameters. This feature can be exploited in optical and electronic applications wherein a direct and sizable bandgap is required. PMID:27094567

  9. Stacking-dependent electronic structure of bilayer silicene

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Huixia; Zhang, Jin; Ding, Zijing; Li, Hui E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn; Meng, Sheng E-mail: smeng@iphy.ac.cn

    2014-03-31

    Bilayer silicene (BLS) is a class of material that possibly holds both topological and superconducting properties; however, its structure is not fully understood. By scanning stacking modes and lattice constants using first principles calculations, several meta-stable configurations are identified, including a slightly faulted-AA packing structure, named slide-2AA. Different from the metallic properties of conventional AA and AB stacking forms, band structure of slide-2AA bilayer presents a sizeable indirect energy gap of ∼1.16 eV. A metal-semiconductor phase transition along the sliding pathway with a small energy barrier is also observed, indicating its electronic properties can be easily tuned by applying small shear force along the BLS surface plane. Such unique quantitative relationship of structure and electronic properties has profound implications in nanoelectronics and electromechanical devices.

  10. Electron-Phonon Renormalization of Electronic Band Structures of C Allotropes and BN Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutchton, Roxanne M.; Marchbanks, Christopher; Wu, Zhigang

    The effect of lattice vibration on electronic band structures has been mostly neglected in first-principles calculations because the electron-phonon (e-ph) renormalization of quasi-particle energies is often small (< 100 meV). However, in certain materials, such as diamond, the electron-phonon coupling reduces the band gap by nearly 0.5 eV, which is comparable to the many-body corrections of the electronic band structures calculated using the density functional theory (DFT). In this work, we compared two implementations of the Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the EPW code and the ABINIT package respectively. Our computations of Si and diamond demonstrate that the ABINIT implementation converges much faster. Using this method, the e-ph renormalizations of electronic structures of three C allotropes (diamond, graphite, graphene) and four BN polymorphs (zincblend, wurtzite, mono-layer, and layered-hexagonal) were calculated. Our results suggest that (1) all of the zero-point renormalizations of band gaps in these materials, except for graphene, are larger than 100 meV, and (2) there are large variations in e-ph renormalization of band gaps due to differences in crystal structure. This work was supported by a U.S. DOE Early Career Award (Grant No. DE-SC0006433). Computations were carried out at the Golden Energy Computing Organization at CSM and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

  11. Spatially resolved dynamic structure factor of finite systems from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Raitza, Thomas; Roepke, Gerd; Reinholz, Heidi; Morozov, Igor

    2011-09-15

    The dynamical response of metallic clusters up to 10{sup 3} atoms is investigated using the restricted molecular dynamics simulations scheme. Exemplarily, a sodium like material is considered. Correlation functions are evaluated to investigate the spatial structure of collective electron excitations and the optical response of laser-excited clusters. In particular, the spectrum of bilocal correlation functions shows resonances representing different modes of collective excitations inside the nano plasma. The spatial structure, the resonance energy, and the width of the eigenmodes have been investigated for various values of electron density, temperature, cluster size, and ionization degree. Comparison with bulk properties is performed and the dispersion relation of collective excitations is discussed.

  12. Two-vortex structure of electron, nonlocality and Dirac equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, S. C.

    2012-02-01

    The dimensionless electromagnetic coupling constant α=e2/planckc may have three interpretations: as the well-known ratio between the electron charge radius e2/mc2 and the Compton wavelength of an electron λc=planck/mc, as the ratio of two angular momenta since the Planck constant has the dimension of angular momentum and as the ratio of two flux quanta e and hc/e . The anomalous part of the electron magnetic moment together with the unified picture of the three interpretations of α is suggested to have deep physical significance. The electric charge is proposed to be a new quantum of flux that leads to a new model of the electron envisaging a two-vortex structure. In analogy with quantum conditions, we postulate sub-quantum conditions applicable in a region of the order of λc replacing planck by a universal constant f=e2/2πc and we apply it to the Dirac equation in internal space that gives rise to the anomalous magnetic moment of an electron. The Dirac spinor and two-spinor representations for the vortex structure of an electron in the single-particle Dirac framework are discussed. The role of sub-quantum rules and internal variables in developing the present ideas is also discussed. A critical discussion of past attempts at giving fundamental importance to magnetism and flux quantum is presented in order to delineate the new ideas in the present work.

  13. Suppression of secondary electron yield by micro-porous array structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, M.; He, Y. N.; Hu, S. G.; Wang, R.; Hu, T. C.; Yang, J.; Cui, W. Z.

    2013-02-01

    We study secondary electron yield (SEY) suppression for metal materials using a roughened surface with a micro-porous array. First, we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the electron trajectory in a single cylindrical well using a phenomenological model of secondary electron emission and the SEY suppression efficiency of a micro-porous array. The simulation results show that the SEY of a roughened surface is affected significantly by the aspect ratio of the micro-pores and the surface porosity of the metal plate. Then, to verify the simulation results, we produce a micro-porous array on metal plates using photolithography and measure their SEYs. We show that the micro-porous array structure can efficiently suppress the SEY of metal materials, and the measurements agree quantitatively with the corresponding simulation results. Finally, we derive an analytical formula to evaluate easily the SEY suppression efficiency of the Ag micro-porous array. In total, the micro-porous array proposed in this paper offers an alternative to SEY suppression in related areas such as multipactor effects in satellite payloads or electron cloud effects in accelerators.

  14. Suppression of secondary electron yield by micro-porous array structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, M.; He, Y. N.; Hu, S. G.; Wang, R.; Hu, T. C.; Yang, J.; Cui, W. Z.

    2013-02-21

    We study secondary electron yield (SEY) suppression for metal materials using a roughened surface with a micro-porous array. First, we perform a Monte Carlo simulation of the electron trajectory in a single cylindrical well using a phenomenological model of secondary electron emission and the SEY suppression efficiency of a micro-porous array. The simulation results show that the SEY of a roughened surface is affected significantly by the aspect ratio of the micro-pores and the surface porosity of the metal plate. Then, to verify the simulation results, we produce a micro-porous array on metal plates using photolithography and measure their SEYs. We show that the micro-porous array structure can efficiently suppress the SEY of metal materials, and the measurements agree quantitatively with the corresponding simulation results. Finally, we derive an analytical formula to evaluate easily the SEY suppression efficiency of the Ag micro-porous array. In total, the micro-porous array proposed in this paper offers an alternative to SEY suppression in related areas such as multipactor effects in satellite payloads or electron cloud effects in accelerators.

  15. Strain fields and electronic structure of CrN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Tomas; Ulloa, Sergio E.

    Chromium nitride (CrN) has a promising future for its resistance to corrosion and hardness, and very interesting magnetic and electronic properties. CrN presents a phase transition in which the crystal structure, magnetic ordering and electronic properties change at a (Néel) temperature ~ 280 K . Thin films from different labs exhibit different conductance behavior at low temperature. We study the unusual electronic and magnetic properties of thin layers. For that purpose we develop a tight binding Hamiltonian based on the Slater-Koster approach, and estimate the interaction between the Cr-3d and N-2p orbitals, by analyzing the band structure and comparing it with ab initio calculations performed using the LSDA+U method. These calculations show the system to behave as a semiconductor below the Néel temperature. Based on our model we calculate the effective masses and analyze the effect of strain fields in the electronic structure in order to understand the electronic behavior near the phase transition. Supported by NSF DMR-1508325.

  16. Electronic structure of hydrogenated diamond: Microscopical insight into surface conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, S.; Alippi, Paola; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Offi, F.; Petaccia, L.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    We have correlated the surface conductivity of hydrogen-terminated diamond to the electronic structure in the Fermi region. Significant density of electronic states (DOS) in proximity of the Fermi edge has been measured by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) on surfaces exposed to air, corresponding to a p -type electric conductive regime, while upon annealing a depletion of the DOS has been achieved, resembling the diamond insulating state. The surface and subsurface electronic structure has been determined, exploiting the different probing depths of PES applied in a photon energy range between 7 and 31 eV. Ab initio density functional calculations including surface charge depletion and band-bending effects favorably compare with electronic states measured by angular-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Such states are organized in the energy-momentum space in a twofold structure: one, bulk-derived, band disperses in the Γ -X direction with an average hole effective mass of (0.43 ±0.02 ) m0 , where m0 is the bare electron mass; a second flatter band, with an effective mass of (2.2 ±0.9 ) m0 , proves that a hole gas confined in the topmost layers is responsible for the conductivity of the (2 ×1 ) hydrogen-terminated diamond (100 ) surface.

  17. Putting structure into context: fitting of atomic models into electron microscopic and electron tomographic reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Niels

    2012-02-01

    A complete understanding of complex dynamic cellular processes such as cell migration or cell adhesion requires the integration of atomic level structural information into the larger cellular context. While direct atomic-level information at the cellular level remains inaccessible, electron microscopy, electron tomography and their associated computational image processing approaches have now matured to a point where sub-cellular structures can be imaged in three dimensions at the nanometer scale. Atomic-resolution information obtained by other means can be combined with this data to obtain three-dimensional models of large macromolecular assemblies in their cellular context. This article summarizes some recent advances in this field.

  18. Simulation of Sintering of Layered Structures

    SciTech Connect

    OLEVSKY,EUGENE; TIKARE,VEENA; GARINO,TERRY J.; BRAGINSKY,MICHAEL V.

    2000-11-22

    An integrated approach, combining the continuum theory of sintering and Potts model based mesostructure evolution analysis, is used to solve the problem of bi-layered structure sintering. Two types of bi-layered structures are considered: layers of the same material with different initial porosity, and layers of two different materials. The effective sintering stress for the bi-layer powder sintering is derived, both at the meso- and the macroscopic levels. Macroscopic shape distortions and spatial distributions of porosity are determined as functions of the dimensionless specific time of sintering. The effect of the thickness of the layers on shrinkage, warpage, and pore-grain structure is studied. Ceramic ZnO powders are employed as a model experimental system to assess the model predictions.

  19. Elucidation of Photoisomerization-Related Structural Changes in an Acrylamide-Bridged Binaphthalene-Diazene Macrocyclic Chiroptical Switch by Experimental Electronic Circular Dichroism Spectra Simulation: Role of Dispersion Corrections.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Lukáš; Kicková, Anna; Filo, Juraj; Kedžuch, Stanislav; Putala, Martin

    2015-08-13

    Nondestructive readout of light-driven molecular memory devices can be achieved by monitoring the alterations in the chiroptical properties of 1,1'-binaphthalene as a conformationally responsive chiral group. In our system, this signaling unit is connected via acrylamide linkers to the receiving diphenyldiazene fragment, which undergoes significant geometrical changes upon (E)/(Z)-photoisomerization. The compound functions as a stable photochromic switch by alternating irradiation at 365/465 nm, with fully reversible modulation of circular dichroism (CD) signal intensity (up to 1:3) and extended thermal stability of the (Z)-isomer. According to molecular modeling, the acrylamide spacers are due to the imposed cyclic strain upon photoisomerization forced to switch amide conformations, which is markedly reflected in the CD spectra, whereas binaphthalene conformational changes are mostly neglected both by theory and by experiment. In CD simulation by TD-DFT, CAM-B3LYP outperforms B3LYP and M06 by means of similarity analysis, whereas the last mentioned functional also delivers satisfactory performance qualitatively. The inclusion of dispersion corrections during geometry optimization was crucial to retain consistency with the measured spectra. By carefully considering all relevant conformations of this 20-membered macrocycle, reasonable agreement with the experiment is reached not only for the CD simulation of the individual conformers but also of the photoisomerization process of their admixture. PMID:26172026

  20. Design of Accelerator Online Simulator Server Using Structured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Guobao; Chu, Chungming; Wu, Juhao; Kraimer, Martin; /Argonne

    2012-07-06

    Model based control plays an important role for a modern accelerator during beam commissioning, beam study, and even daily operation. With a realistic model, beam behaviour can be predicted and therefore effectively controlled. The approach used by most current high level application environments is to use a built-in simulation engine and feed a realistic model into that simulation engine. Instead of this traditional monolithic structure, a new approach using a client-server architecture is under development. An on-line simulator server is accessed via network accessible structured data. With this approach, a user can easily access multiple simulation codes. This paper describes the design, implementation, and current status of PVData, which defines the structured data, and PVAccess, which provides network access to the structured data.

  1. Electronic structure of solid uranium tetrafluoride UF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teterin, A. Yu.; Teterin, Yu. A.; Maslakov, K. I.; Panov, A. D.; Ryzhkov, M. V.; Vukcevic, L.

    2006-07-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and conversion electron spectra of the outer (0-15eV) and inner (15-40eV) valence electrons for UF4 were measured. Relativistic Xα discrete variation ( RXα DV) calculation data for the UF84-(C4v) cluster reflecting uranium close environment in solid UF4 were used for the quantitative interpretation of the fine spectral structure. Quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data was established. The U5f electrons ( ≈1 U5f electron) were shown to participate directly in the chemical bond formation. This U 5 f electron was shown to be delocalized within the outer valence molecular orbitals (OVMO) range (1-15eV) . The other U5f electrons were shown to be localized and to participate weakly in the chemical bond formation. The XPS line associated with these electrons was observed at 3.8eV . The vacant U5f states are generally delocalized in the range of the low positive energies (0-7 eV). The contribution of the U6p electronic density to the molecular orbitals of UF4 was experimentally and theoretically evaluated. The U6p electrons were experimentally shown to participate significantly ( 0.6U6p electrons) in the formation of the OVMO beside the formation of the inner valence molecular orbitals (IVMO). IVMO composition and sequence order in the binding energy range 15-40eV in UF4 were determined.

  2. Effects of front-surface target structures on properties of relativistic laser-plasma electrons.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Krygier, A G; Schumacher, D W; Akli, K U; Freeman, R R

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a study of the role of prescribed geometrical structures on the front of a target in determining the energy and spatial distribution of relativistic laser-plasma electrons. Our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation studies apply to short-pulse, high-intensity laser pulses, and indicate that a judicious choice of target front-surface geometry provides the realistic possibility of greatly enhancing the yield of high-energy electrons while simultaneously confining the emission to narrow (<5°) angular cones.

  3. Electronic structure of trypsin inhibitor from squash seeds in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haoping

    2000-10-01

    The electronic structure of the trypsin inhibitor from seeds of the squash Cucurbita maxima (CMTI-I) in aqueous solution is obtained by ab initio, all-electron, full-potential calculations using the self-consistent cluster-embedding (SCCE) method. The reactive site of the inhibitor is explained theoretically, which is in agreement with the experimental results. It is shown that the coordinates of oxygen atoms in the inhibitor, determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and combination of distance geometry and dynamical simulated annealing, are systematically less accurate than that of other kinds of heavy atoms.

  4. On the versatility of electronic structures in polymethine dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Simon; Haefele, Alexandre; Monnereau, Cyrille; Charaf-Eddin, Azzam; Jacquemin, Denis; Le Guennic, Boris; Maury, Olivier; Andraud, Chantal

    2014-10-01

    This article provides an overview of the photophysical behavior diversity of polymethine chromophores which are ubiquitous in biological imaging and material sciences. One major challenge in this class of chromophore is to correlate the chemical structure to the observed optical properties, especially when symmetry-breaking phenomena occur. With the constant concern for rationalization of their spectroscopy, we propose an extended classification of polymethine dyes based on their ground state electronic configuration using three limit forms namely: cyanine, dipole and bis-dipole. The chemical modifications of the dye and the influence of exogenous parameters can promote dramatic spectroscopic changes that can be correlated to significant electronic reorganization between the three-abovementioned forms. The deep understanding of such phenomena should allow to identify, predict and take advantage of the versatile electronic structure of polymethines.

  5. Electronic structure of the superconducting layered perovskite niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Izumi; Nishihara, Yoshikazu

    1998-07-01

    The electronic energy-band structure for RbLaNb2O7, which is closely related to the layered perovskite niobate superconducting KCa2Nb3O10 and metallic KLaNb2O7 with Li intercalation, has been calculated by using the scalar-relativistic full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave method within the local-density approximation. The result of the calculation shows that this compound is a band insulator with a small gap, and its conduction band is a typical two-dimensional one and the valence band is rather three dimensional. We can conclude that the layered perovskite niobate KCa2Nb3O10 is a band insulator that can be superconducting with electron doping, and have the highly two-dimensional electronic structure.

  6. Electronic Structure and Properties of Organic Bulk-Heterojunction Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Street, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure and physical mechanisms of carrier generation and transport in the organic bulk heterojunction are reviewed. The electronic structure describes the bands and band-tail states, the band alignment at the bulk-heterojunction interface, and the overall density-of-states model. The different electronic character of excitons and mobile charge is discussed, the former being highly molecular and the latter more delocalized. Dissociation of the exciton via the charge-transfer (CT) states is attributed to weak binding of the CT state arising from charge delocalization. Carrier transport and charge collection is strongly influenced by the presence of localized band-tail states. Recombination is attributed primarily to transitions from mobile carriers to band-tail or deep trap states. PMID:26603977

  7. Controlling electron-phonon scattering with metamaterial plasmonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof; Wu, Xueyuan; Kong, Jiantao; Broido, David

    Electron-plasmon scattering can be faster than electron-phonon scattering. While in metals plasmons occur in the UV range, phonons dominate behavior at much lower frequencies (far IR range), and this typically decouples these phenomena. In metamaterial plasmonic structures, however, plasma effects can be tuned down to the far IR range, allowing for their interference with phonons. It was recently shown, that such interference can protect hot electron energy induced in a solar cell, from dissipation into heat. In this work we explore the possibility of using such an effect to control the electron-phonon interaction and transport in semiconductors. We demonstrate, that this could lead to a novel path to enhancing the electrical and thermal conductivities and the thermoelectric figure of merit.

  8. Electronic Structure of Crystalline 4He at High Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Ho Kwang; Shirley, Eric L.; Ding, Yang; Eng, Peter; Cai, Yong Q.; Chow, Paul; Xiao, Yuming; Jinfu Shu, A=Kao, Chi-Chang; Hemley, Russell J.; Kao, Chichang; Mao, Wendy L.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC

    2011-01-10

    Using inelastic X-ray scattering techniques, we have succeeded in probing the high-pressure electronic structure of helium crystal at 300 K which has the widest known electronic energy bandgap of all materials, that was previously inaccessible to measurements due to the extreme energy and pressure range. We observed rich electron excitation spectrum, including a cut-off edge above 23 eV, a sharp exciton peak showing linear volume dependence, and a series of excitations and continuum at 26 to 45 eV. We determined electronic dispersion along the {Gamma}-M direction over two Brillouin zones, and provided a quantitative picture of the helium exciton beyond the simplified Wannier-Frenkel description.

  9. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications.

  10. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  11. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications. PMID:27601992

  12. Superconducting properties and electronic structure of NaBi.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, S K; Krizan, J W; Xiong, J; Klimczuk, T; Gibson, Q D; Liang, T; Ong, N P; Cava, R J

    2014-05-28

    Resistivity, dc magnetization, and heat capacity measurements are reported for superconducting NaBi. T(c), the electronic contribution to the specific heat γ, the ΔC(p)/γT(c) ratio, and the Debye temperature are found to be 2.15 K, 3.4 mJ mol(-1) K(-2), 0.78, and 140 K respectively. The calculated electron-phonon coupling constant (λ(ep) = 0.62) implies that NaBi is a moderately coupled superconductor. The upper critical field and coherence length are found to be 250 Oe and 115 nm, respectively. Electronic structure calculations show NaBi to be a good metal, in agreement with the experiments; the p(x) and p(y) orbitals of Bi dominate the electronic states at the Fermi Energy. PMID:24804822

  13. Superconducting properties and electronic structure of NaBi.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, S K; Krizan, J W; Xiong, J; Klimczuk, T; Gibson, Q D; Liang, T; Ong, N P; Cava, R J

    2014-05-28

    Resistivity, dc magnetization, and heat capacity measurements are reported for superconducting NaBi. T(c), the electronic contribution to the specific heat γ, the ΔC(p)/γT(c) ratio, and the Debye temperature are found to be 2.15 K, 3.4 mJ mol(-1) K(-2), 0.78, and 140 K respectively. The calculated electron-phonon coupling constant (λ(ep) = 0.62) implies that NaBi is a moderately coupled superconductor. The upper critical field and coherence length are found to be 250 Oe and 115 nm, respectively. Electronic structure calculations show NaBi to be a good metal, in agreement with the experiments; the p(x) and p(y) orbitals of Bi dominate the electronic states at the Fermi Energy.

  14. Correlative Light Electron Microscopy: Connecting Synaptic Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Begemann, Isabell; Galic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Many core paradigms of contemporary neuroscience are based on information obtained by electron or light microscopy. Intriguingly, these two imaging techniques are often viewed as complementary, yet separate entities. Recent technological advancements in microscopy techniques, labeling tools, and fixation or preparation procedures have fueled the development of a series of hybrid approaches that allow correlating functional fluorescence microscopy data and ultrastructural information from electron micrographs from a singular biological event. As correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) approaches become increasingly accessible, long-standing neurobiological questions regarding structure-function relation are being revisited. In this review, we will survey what developments in electron and light microscopy have spurred the advent of correlative approaches, highlight the most relevant CLEM techniques that are currently available, and discuss its potential and limitations with respect to neuronal and synapse-specific applications.

  15. Electronic Structure of Endohedral Metallofullerenes: Evidences of the Ionic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Fortea, Antonio; Valencia, Ramón; Poblet, Josep M.

    2009-08-01

    The electronic structure of the metal nitride M3N and metal carbide M2C2 endohedral fullerenes is rationalized by means of the simple ionic model that assumes a charge transfer from the internal metal cluster to the carbon framework. Experimental evidences of such an ionic model are also presented.

  16. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast.

  17. Electron Heat Flux in Pressure Balance Structures at Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Sakurai, Takashi; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude solar wind near solar minimum. Rom previous studies, PBSs are believed to be remnants of coronal plumes and be related to network activity such as magnetic reconnection in the photosphere. We investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs, applying a minimum variance analysis to Ulysses/Magnetometer data. At 2001 AGU Spring meeting, we reported that PBSs have structures like current sheets or plasmoids, and suggested that they are associated with network activity at the base of polar plumes. In this paper, we have analyzed high-energy electron data at Ulysses/SWOOPS to see whether bi-directional electron flow exists and confirm the conclusions more precisely. As a result, although most events show a typical flux directed away from the Sun, we have obtained evidence that some PBSs show bi-directional electron flux and others show an isotropic distribution of electron pitch angles. The evidence shows that plasmoids are flowing away from the Sun, changing their flow direction dynamically in a way not caused by Alfven waves. From this, we have concluded that PBSs are generated due to network activity at the base of polar plumes and their magnetic structures axe current sheets or plasmoids.

  18. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B.

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  19. Flat pack interconnection structure simplifies modular electronic assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzin, L.

    1967-01-01

    Flat pack interconnection structure composed of stick modules simplifies modular electronic assemblies by allowing a single axis mother board. Two of the wiring planes are located in the stick module, which is the lower level of assembly, with the third wiring plane in the mother board.

  20. Electronic Structure, Localization and 5f Occupancy in Pu Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, John J.; Beaux, Miles F.; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; Graham, Kevin S.; Bauer, Eric D.; Mitchell, Jeremy N.; Tobash, Paul H.; Richmond, Scott

    2012-05-03

    The electronic structure of delta plutonium ({delta}-Pu) and plutonium compounds is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy (PES). Results for {delta}-Pu show a small component of the valence electronic structure which might reasonably be associated with a 5f{sup 6} configuration. PES results for PuTe are used as an indication for the 5f{sup 6} configuration due to the presence of atomic multiplet structure. Temperature dependent PES data on {delta}-Pu indicate a narrow peak centered 20 meV below the Fermi energy and 100 meV wide. The first PES data for PuCoIn5 indicate a 5f electronic structure more localized than the 5fs in the closely related PuCoGa{sub 5}. There is support from the PES data for a description of Pu materials with an electronic configuration of 5f{sup 5} with some admixture of 5f{sup 6} as well as a localized/delocalized 5f{sup 5} description.

  1. Gas phase structures and charge localization in small aluminum oxide anions: Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Asmis, Knut R; Bischoff, Florian A; Berger, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-06-28

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study the structure of mono- and dialuminum oxide anions. The infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged AlO1-4 (-) and Al2O3-6 (-) are measured in the region from 400 to 1200 cm(-1). Structures are assigned based on a comparison to simulated harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra derived from electronic structure calculations. The monoaluminum anions contain an even number of electrons and exhibit an electronic closed-shell ground state. The Al2O3-6 (-) anions are oxygen-centered radicals. As a result of a delicate balance between localization and delocalization of the unpaired electron, only the BHLYP functional is able to qualitatively describe the observed IR spectra of all species with the exception of AlO3 (-). Terminal Al-O stretching modes are found between 1140 and 960 cm(-1). Superoxo and peroxo stretching modes are found at higher (1120-1010 cm(-1)) and lower energies (850-570 cm(-1)), respectively. Four modes in-between 910 and 530 cm(-1) represent the IR fingerprint of the common structural motif of dialuminum oxide anions, an asymmetric four-member Al-(O)2-Al ring. PMID:27369513

  2. Gas phase structures and charge localization in small aluminum oxide anions: Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaowei; Fagiani, Matias R.; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Asmis, Knut R.; Bischoff, Florian A.; Berger, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations to study the structure of mono- and dialuminum oxide anions. The infrared photodissociation spectra of D2-tagged AlO1-4- and Al2O3-6- are measured in the region from 400 to 1200 cm-1. Structures are assigned based on a comparison to simulated harmonic and anharmonic IR spectra derived from electronic structure calculations. The monoaluminum anions contain an even number of electrons and exhibit an electronic closed-shell ground state. The Al2O3-6- anions are oxygen-centered radicals. As a result of a delicate balance between localization and delocalization of the unpaired electron, only the BHLYP functional is able to qualitatively describe the observed IR spectra of all species with the exception of AlO3-. Terminal Al-O stretching modes are found between 1140 and 960 cm-1. Superoxo and peroxo stretching modes are found at higher (1120-1010 cm-1) and lower energies (850-570 cm-1), respectively. Four modes in-between 910 and 530 cm-1 represent the IR fingerprint of the common structural motif of dialuminum oxide anions, an asymmetric four-member Al-(O)2-Al ring.

  3. Numerical simulation of electron energy loss near inhomogeneous dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    The nonrelativistic energy loss suffered by fast electrons passing near dielectric interfaces of arbitrary shape is calculated by solving Poisson{close_quote}s equation using the boundary-charge method. The potential induced by a moving electron is expressed in terms of surface-charge distributions placed at the interfaces. These surface charges, obtained by self-consistently solving the resulting integral equation, act back on the electron producing a retarding force and hence energy loss. The dielectrics are described by frequency-dependent dielectric functions. Two particular cases are discussed in further detail: interfaces invariant under translation along one particular direction and axially symmetric interfaces. Previous results for simple geometries, such as planes, spheres, and cylinders, based upon analytical solutions, are fully reproduced within this approach. Calculations are presented for electrons moving near wedges, coupled parallel cylinders, coupled spheres, and toroidal surfaces. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Small Scale Reconnection : Structure and Electron Jet Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, I.

    2012-04-01

    The effects of small scale processes on the formation and evolution of macroscopic inhomogeneous magnetic configurations and the resulting super-Alfvenic jets have been investigated in space and lab over many years. Various satellite measurements at the magneto-sheath crossings observe features with small spatial scale of the order of electron skin depth, indicating the importance of processes dominated by electron dynamics. The data show structures which are (a) spatially non-symmetric with densities and magnetic field differing substantially on both sides of the region, while (b) the inhomogeneous magnetic and electric field structures consist of narrow, three-dimensional electron diffusion regions, with (c) bifurcated current over electron skin depth or below and (d) ejection of energetic, super-Alfvenic, non-Gaussian electrons perpendicularly to the magnetic field, away from the X-line. At small scales the main Alfven mode which describes the MHD regime is replaced by a helicon/whistler. The eMHD model, which includes the full dynamics of the electrons and stationary ions, with density gradients and asymptotically different values of the magnetic field is implemented for the experimentally observed configurations. Over the small scales the electron fluid follows the lines of the generalized vorticity (GV) as it decouples from the magnetic field. The regions of a significant deviation of the GV from the magnetic field become the potential sites for non-adiabatic electron acceleration. Effects of geometry, compressibility and thermal effects on this deviation will be discussed. The non-thermal jet distribution is conjectured to form when the standard diffusion is replaced by a non Markovian with large jumps random walk process, describing its evolution through the fractional diffusion equation and resulting in a non-Gaussian distribution.

  5. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-01

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data.

  6. Two-dimensional simulation research of secondary electron emission avalanche discharge on vacuum insulator surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Libing; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Xiangqin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Dianhui

    2015-01-15

    Based on the secondary electron emission avalanche (SEEA) model, the SEEA discharge on the vacuum insulator surface is simulated by using a 2D PIC-MCC code developed by ourselves. The evolutions of the number of discharge electrons, insulator surface charge, current, and 2D particle distribution are obtained. The effects of the strength of the applied electric field, secondary electron yield coefficient, rise time of the pulse, length of the insulator on the discharge are investigated. The results show that the number of the SEEA electrons presents a quadratic dependence upon the applied field strength. The SEEA current, which is on the order of Ampere, is directly proportional to the field strength and secondary electron yield coefficient. Finally, the electron-stimulated outgassing is included in the simulation code, and a three-phase discharge curve is presented by the simulation, which agrees with the experimental data.

  7. Effect of Structural Relaxation on the Electronic Structure of Graphene on Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    PubMed

    Slotman, G J; van Wijk, M M; Zhao, Pei-Liang; Fasolino, A; Katsnelson, M I; Yuan, Shengjun

    2015-10-30

    We performed calculations of electronic, optical, and transport properties of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride with realistic moiré patterns. The latter are produced by structural relaxation using a fully atomistic model. This relaxation turns out to be crucially important for electronic properties. We describe experimentally observed features such as additional Dirac points and the "Hofstadter butterfly" structure of energy levels in a magnetic field. We find that the electronic structure is sensitive to many-body renormalization of the local energy gap. PMID:26565485

  8. Effect of Structural Relaxation on the Electronic Structure of Graphene on Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotman, G. J.; van Wijk, M. M.; Zhao, Pei-Liang; Fasolino, A.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Yuan, Shengjun

    2015-10-01

    We performed calculations of electronic, optical, and transport properties of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride with realistic moiré patterns. The latter are produced by structural relaxation using a fully atomistic model. This relaxation turns out to be crucially important for electronic properties. We describe experimentally observed features such as additional Dirac points and the "Hofstadter butterfly" structure of energy levels in a magnetic field. We find that the electronic structure is sensitive to many-body renormalization of the local energy gap.

  9. Real-space electronic structure calculations with full-potential all-electron precision for transition metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Tomoya; Heide, Marcus; Atodiresei, Nicolae; Baumeister, Paul; Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Blügel, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    We have developed an efficient computational scheme utilizing the real-space finite-difference formalism and the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method to perform precise first-principles electronic-structure simulations based on the density-functional theory for systems containing transition metals with a modest computational effort. By combining the advantages of the time-saving double-grid technique and the Fourier-filtering procedure for the projectors of pseudopotentials, we can overcome the egg box effect in the computations even for first-row elements and transition metals, which is a problem of the real-space finite-difference formalism. In order to demonstrate the potential power in terms of precision and applicability of the present scheme, we have carried out simulations to examine several bulk properties and structural energy differences between different bulk phases of transition metals and have obtained excellent agreement with the results of other precise first-principles methods such as a plane-wave-based PAW method and an all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FLAPW) method.

  10. Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Hyunjin

    2008-01-01

    In solid state chemistry, numerous investigations have been attempted to address the relationships between chemical structure and physical properties. Such questions include: (1) How can we understand the driving forces of the atomic arrangements in complex solids that exhibit interesting chemical and physical properties? (2) How do different elements distribute themselves in a solid-state structure? (3) Can we develop a chemical understanding to predict the effects of valence electron concentration on the structures and magnetic ordering of systems by both experimental and theoretical means? Although these issues are relevant to various compound classes, intermetallic compounds are especially interesting and well suited for a joint experimental and theoretical effort. For intermetallic compounds, the questions listed above are difficult to answer since many of the constituent atoms simply do not crystallize in the same manner as in their separate, elemental structures. Also, theoretical studies suggest that the energy differences between various structural alternatives are small. For example, Al and Ga both belong in the same group on the Periodic Table of Elements and share many similar chemical properties. Al crystallizes in the fcc lattice with 4 atoms per unit cell and Ga crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell lattice with 8 atoms per unit cell, which are both fairly simple structures (Figure 1). However, when combined with Mn, which itself has a very complex cubic crystal structure with 58 atoms per unit cell, the resulting intermetallic compounds crystallize in a completely different fashion. At the 1:1 stoichiometry, MnAl forms a very simple tetragonal lattice with two atoms per primitive unit cell, while MnGa crystallizes in a complicated rhombohedral unit cell with 26 atoms within the primitive unit cell. The mechanisms influencing the arrangements of atoms in numerous crystal structures have been studied theoretically by calculating electronic

  11. Dynamics of adaptive structures: Design through simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, S.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a helical bi-morph actuator/sensor concept by mimicking the change of helical waveform in bacterial flagella is perhaps the first application of bacterial motions (living species) to longitudinal deployment of space structures. However, no dynamical considerations were analyzed to explain the waveform change mechanisms. The objective is to review various deployment concepts from the dynamics point of view and introduce the dynamical considerations from the outset as part of design considerations. Specifically, the impact of the incorporation of the combined static mechanisms and dynamic design considerations on the deployment performance during the reconfiguration stage is studied in terms of improved controllability, maneuvering duration, and joint singularity index. It is shown that intermediate configurations during articulations play an important role for improved joint mechanisms design and overall structural deployability.

  12. Multi-scale simulation of electron emission from a triode-type electron source with a carbon-nanotube column array cathode.

    PubMed

    Becker, Joel; Hong, Nguyen Tuan; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Leblanc, Francois; Lee, Soonil; Cipriani, Fabrice

    2013-11-22

    We have designed and fabricated a new type of field electron source for a novel onboard mass spectrometer. The new electron source, which is a field effect emitter in a triode configuration, consists of a CNT-column array cathode and an extraction gate with holes that are aligned concentrically with respect to the cylindrical CNT columns. In triode mode operation, cathode currents as large as ~420 μA have been emitted with an anode-to-gate current ratio of ~1.5. To account for the observed emission characteristics of the new electron source, we have carried out multi-scale simulations that combine a three-dimensional (3D) microscopic model in the vicinity of an actual emission site with a two-dimensional (2D) macroscopic model that covers the whole device structure. Because the mesh size in the microscopic 3D model is as small as 100 nm, the contributions of the extruding CNT bundle at the top edge of an electron column can be examined in detail. Unlike the macroscopic 2D simulation that shows only small field enhancement at CNT column's top edge, the multi-scale simulation successfully reproduced the local electric field strongly enough to emit the measured cathode currents and the electric field distribution which is consistent with the measured anode-to-gate current ratio.

  13. Computer Simulation of Electron Thermalization in CsI and CsI(Tl)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Xie, YuLong; Cannon, Bret D.; Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2011-09-15

    A Monte Carlo (MC) model was developed and implemented to simulate the thermalization of electrons in inorganic scintillator materials. The model incorporates electron scattering with both longitudinal optical and acoustic phonons. In this paper, the MC model was applied to simulate electron thermalization in CsI, both pure and doped with a range of thallium concentrations. The inclusion of internal electric fields was shown to increase the fraction of recombined electron-hole pairs and to broaden the thermalization distance and thermalization time distributions. The MC simulations indicate that electron thermalization, following {gamma}-ray excitation, takes place within approximately 10 ps in CsI and that electrons can travel distances up to several hundreds of nanometers. Electron thermalization was studied for a range of incident {gamma}-ray energies using electron-hole pair spatial distributions generated by the MC code NWEGRIM (NorthWest Electron and Gamma Ray Interaction in Matter). These simulations revealed that the partition of thermalized electrons between different species (e.g., recombined with self-trapped holes or trapped at thallium sites) vary with the incident energy. Implications for the phenomenon of nonlinearity in scintillator light yield are discussed.

  14. A Method of Simulating Fluid Structure Interactions for Deformable Decelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidzak, Vladimyr Mykhalo

    A method is developed for performing simulations that contain fluid-structure interactions between deployable decelerators and a high speed compressible flow. The problem of coupling together multiple physical systems is examined with discussion of the strength of coupling for various methods. A non-monolithic strongly coupled option is presented for fluid-structure systems based on grid deformation. A class of algebraic grid deformation methods is then presented with examples of increasing complexity. The strength of the fluid-structure coupling is validated against two analytic problems, chosen to test the time dependent behavior of structure on fluid interactions, and of fluid on structure interruptions. A one-dimentional material heating model is also validated against experimental data. Results are provided for simulations of a wind tunnel scale disk-gap-band parachute with comparison to experimental data. Finally, a simulation is performed on a flight scale tension cone decelerator, with examination of time-dependent material stress, and heating.

  15. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-01-01

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects. PMID:24277840

  16. Structural electronic and phonon properties of some transition metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Bushra; Pandit, Premlata; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    2012-06-01

    The structural and electronic properties of some Transition metal Aluminides (TMAl) namely ruthenium aluminide (RuAl), nickel aluminide (NiAl) and cobalt aluminide (CoAl) have been studied using plane wave pseudopotential method (PWSCF) within the local density approximation (LDA). The three TMAl's crystallizes in the CsCl-type structure (B2 phase). From the analysis of band structure and density of state, we found that these TMAl's are metallic in nature. The vibrational properties in terms of phonon dispersion curves and density of state have also been reported for RuAl using density functional perturbation theory (DFPT).

  17. THz wiggler applied for measurements of electron bunch longitudinal structure in FEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syresin, E.; Kostromin, S.; Krasilnikov, M.; Makarov, R.; Morozov, N.; Petrov, D.

    2015-01-01

    The infrared undulator manufactured at JINR and installed at FLASH in 2007 is used for longitudinal bunch shape measurements in the range of several tenths of a micrometer. The presented electromagnetic wiggler is intended for generating a narrow-band THz radiation to measure the longitudinal electron bunch structure in FELs with an electron energy of several tens of MeV. This is a planar electromagnetic device with six regular periods, each 30 cm long. The K parameter is varied in the range 0.5-7.12 corresponding to the range B = 0.025-0.356 T of the peak field on the axis. The wiggler is simulated for 19.8 MeV/ c corresponding to the possible FEL option at PITZ. The wavelength range is 126 μm - 5.1 mm for this electron beam momentum. The 3D Opera simulations of the THz wiggler are discussed. A new PITZ photocathode laser system is proposed for the optimized performance of the high-brightness electron beam. The main goal is a production of 3D ellipsoidal electron bunches with homogeneous charge density. The electromagnetic wiggler is supposed to be used for measuring the longitudinal shape of these electron bunches.

  18. Nanographene and graphene edges: electronic structure and nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shintaro; Enoki, Toshiaki

    2013-10-15

    Graphene can be referred to as an infinite polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) consisting of an infinite number of benzene rings fused together. However, at the nanoscale, nanographene's properties lie in between those of bulk graphene and large PAH molecules, and its electronic properties depend on the influence of the edges, which disrupt the infinite π-electron system. The resulting modulation of the electronic states depends on whether the nanographene edge is the armchair or zigzag type, corresponding to the two fundamental crystal axes. In this Account, we report the results of fabricating both types of edges in the nanographene system and characterizing their electronic properties using a scanning probe microscope. We first introduce the theoretical background to understand the two types of finite size effects on the electronic states of nanographene (i) the standing wave state and (ii) the edge state which correspond to the armchair and zigzag edges, respectively. Most importantly, characterizing the standing wave and edge states could play a crucial role in understanding the chemical reactivity, thermodynamic stability and magnetism of nanosized graphene--important knowledge in the design and realization of promising functionalized nanocarbon materials. In the second part, we present scanning probe microscopic characterization of both edge types to experimentally characterize the two electronic states. As predicted, we find the armchair-edged nanographene to have an energetically stable electronic pattern. The zigzag-edged nanographene shows a nonbonding (π radical) pattern, which is the source of the material's electronic and magnetic properties and its chemical activity. Precise control of the edge geometry is a practical requirement to control the electronic structure. We show that we can fabricate the energetically unstable zigzag edges using scanning probe manipulation techniques, and we discuss challenges in using these techniques for that

  19. Simulation of magnetic circular dichroism in the electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, Stefano; Schattschneider, Peter; Rusz, Jan; Verbeeck, Johan; Leifer, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    As electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe the same transitions from core-shell states to unoccupied states above the Fermi energy, it should always be possible to apply the two techniques to the same physical phenomena, such as magnetic dichroism, and obtain the same information. Indeed, the similarity in the expression of the electron and x-ray cross-sections had been already exploited to prove the equivalence of x-ray magnetic linear dichroism and anisotropy in EELS, by noting that the polarization vector of a photon plays the same role as the momentum transfer in electron scattering. Recently, the same was proven true for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) by establishing a new TEM technique called EMCD (electron energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism) (Schattschneider P et al 2006 Nature 441 486-8), which makes use of special electron scattering conditions to force the absorption of a circularly polarized virtual photon. The intrinsic advantage of EMCD over XMCD is the high spatial resolution of electron microscopes, which are readily available. Among the particular obstacles in EMCD that do not exist for synchrotron radiation, is the notoriously low signal and the very particular scattering conditions necessary to observe a chiral dichroic signal. In spite of that, impressive progress has been made in recent years. The signal strength could be considerably increased, and some innovations such as using a convergent beam have been introduced. EMCD has evolved into several techniques, which make full use of the versatility of the TEM and energy filtering, spectroscopy or STEM conditions (Rubino S 2007 Magnetic circular dichroism in the transmission electron microscope PhD Thesis Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria).

  20. Biomechanics of DNA structures visualized by 4D electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Ulrich J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2013-01-01

    We present a technique for in situ visualization of the biomechanics of DNA structural networks using 4D electron microscopy. Vibrational oscillations of the DNA structure are excited mechanically through a short burst of substrate vibrations triggered by a laser pulse. Subsequently, the motion is probed with electron pulses to observe the impulse response of the specimen in space and time. From the frequency and amplitude of the observed oscillations, we determine the normal modes and eigenfrequencies of the structures involved. Moreover, by selective “nano-cutting” at a given point in the network, it was possible to obtain Young’s modulus, and hence the stiffness, of the DNA filament at that position. This experimental approach enables nanoscale mechanics studies of macromolecules and should find applications in other domains of biological networks such as origamis. PMID:23382239