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Sample records for simulated main magnetic

  1. Three-dimensional simulations of near-surface convection in main-sequence stars. III. The structure of small-scale magnetic flux concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeck, B.; Schüssler, M.; Cameron, R. H.; Reiners, A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The convective envelopes of cool main-sequence stars harbour magnetic fields with a complex global and local structure. These fields affect the near-surface convection and the outer stellar atmospheres in many ways and are responsible for the observable magnetic activity of stars. Aims: Our aim is to understand the local structure in unipolar regions with moderate average magnetic flux density. These correspond to plage regions covering a substantial fraction of the surface of the Sun (and likely also the surface of other Sun-like stars) during periods of high magnetic activity. Methods: We analyse the results of 18 local-box magnetohydrodynamics simulations covering the upper layers of the convection zones and the photospheres of cool main-sequence stars of spectral types F to early M. The average vertical field in these simulations ranges from 20 to 500 G. Results: We find a substantial variation of the properties of the surface magnetoconvection between main-sequence stars of different spectral types. As a consequence of a reduced efficiency of the convective collapse of flux tubes, M dwarfs lack bright magnetic structures in unipolar regions of moderate field strength. The spatial correlation between velocity and the magnetic field as well as the lifetime of magnetic structures and their sizes relative to the granules vary significantly along the model sequence of stellar types. Movies associated to Fig. A.1 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. CBA main magnet power supply ripple reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Bagley, G.; Edwards, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The preliminary results of a development program to minimize beam perturbation resulting from ripple current generated by the CBA Main Magnet Power Supply are presented. The assessment of the magnitude and causes of the ripple generated led to a modification of the SCR Gate Driver and the addition of a bandpass amplifier correction loop which gave significant improvement. A description of the changes made and the results obtained are included. A second design approach was developed in which the timing of the SCR gate pulses is directly determined by a VCO. The results reported with this VCO Loop indicate superior performance particularly at frequencies below 60 Hz. A shunt transistor regulator design is proposed to minimize higher SCR switching frequency harmonics.

  3. Three-dimensional simulations of near-surface convection in main-sequence stars. IV. Effect of small-scale magnetic flux concentrations on centre-to-limb variation and spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeck, B.; Schüssler, M.; Cameron, R. H.; Reiners, A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. Magnetic fields affect the local structure of the photosphere of stars. They can considerably influence the radiative properties near the optical surface, flow velocities, and the temperature and pressure profiles. This has an impact on observables such as limb darkening and spectral line profiles. Aims: We aim at understanding qualitatively the influence of small magnetic flux concentrations in unipolar plage regions on the centre-to-limb variation of the intensity and its contrast and on the shape of spectral line profiles in cool main-sequence stars. Methods: We analyse the bolometric and continuum intensity and its angular dependence of 24 radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the near-surface layers of main-sequence stars with six different sets of stellar parameters (spectral types F to early M) and four different average magnetic field strengths (including the non-magnetic case). We also calculated disc-integrated profiles of three spectral lines. Results: The small magnetic flux concentrations formed in the magnetic runs of simulations have a considerable impact on the intensity and its centre-to-limb variation. In some cases, the difference in limb darkening between magnetic and non-magnetic runs is larger than the difference between the spectral types. Spectral lines are not only broadened owing to the Zeeman effect, but are also strongly affected by the modified thermodynamical structure and flow patterns. This indirect magnetic impact on the line profiles is often bigger than that of the Zeeman effect. Conclusions: The effects of the magnetic field on the radiation leaving the star can be considerable and is not restricted to spectral line broadening and polarisation by the Zeeman effect. The inhomogeneous structure of the magnetic field on small length scales and its impact on (and spatial correlation with) the local thermodynamical structure and the flow field near the surface influence the measurement of the global field properties

  4. Space shuttle main engine hardware simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vick, H. G.; Hampton, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    The Huntsville Simulation Laboratory (HSL) provides a simulation facility to test and verify the space shuttle main engine (SSME) avionics and software system using a maximum complement of flight type hardware. The HSL permits evaluations and analyses of the SSME avionics hardware, software, control system, and mathematical models. The laboratory has performed a wide spectrum of tests and verified operational procedures to ensure system component compatibility under all operating conditions. It is a test bed for integration of hardware/software/hydraulics. The HSL is and has been an invaluable tool in the design and development of the SSME.

  5. A simulated magnetic induction investigation of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bills, B. G.; Khurana, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    We will present results of a simulated magnetic induction experiment designed to measure the electrical conductivity structure within Europa, as seen from a series of spacecraft flyby encounters. As Europa moves in its orbit about Jupiter, it experiences a time varying magnetic field, which induces electrical currents in any conductive layers. These currents produce induced magnetic fields, whose spatio-temporal pattern is diagnostic of Europa's internal conductivity structure. The main frequencies at which the imposed magnetic field changes at Europa are low order integer linear combinations of Jupiter's rotation (9.925 hour period) and Europa's orbit (85.228 hour period). Longer period oscillations penetrate more deeply, as they have more time to diffuse into the interior. At each forcing period, we define the admittance as the amplitude ratio (induced/imposed) of the associated magnetic fields. Each measurement of the admittance constrains the conductance (product of conductivity and thickness) of the main internal conductor, at the appropriate period. With measurements at multiple periods, a low frequency magnetic tomography inversion becomes possible. A spacecraft orbiting Europa could almost certainly constrain ice shell thickness, and both the depth extent and salinity of the ocean. The main challenge of a flyby version of that experiment is to have a sampling cadence which adequately separates the main signal frequencies. The magnetometer on Galileo has already detected an induction signal which is consistent with the presence of a salty ocean. However, the low number of flybys restricts the ability of that data-set to say more. We have simulated a time series of magnetometer measurements which could be acquired by the Europa Clipper mission concept, along a hypothetical planning trajectory, which would involve a total of 45 encounters with Europa. This trajectory has been designed to satisfy numerous instrument requirements, including that it encounter

  6. Simulation of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Veitzer, Seth A.; Stoltz, Peter; Spentzouris, Panagiotis G.; Cary, John R.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2011-05-01

    We present results from a precision simulation of the electron cloud (EC) problem in the Fermilab Main Injector using the code VORPAL. This is a fully 3d and self consistent treatment of the EC. Both distributions of electrons in 6D phase-space and EM field maps have been generated. Various configurations of the magnetic fields found around the machine have been studied. Plasma waves associated to the fluctuation density of the cloud have been analyzed. Our results have been successfully benchmarked against the POSINST code for the 2D electrostatic case. The response of a Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) to the EC has been simulated as well as the more challenging microwave absorption experiment. While numerically accurate predictions can be made for a given secondary emission yield (SEY) and initial conditions, the large uncertainties in this SEY and in the spatial distribution of the EC prior to the exponential growth of the EC do make ab-initio prediction difficult. Note also that the RFA response is also uncertain due to the collection efficiency in unknown stray magnetic fields. Nonetheless, our simulations do provide guidance to the experimental program. Moreover, for a reasonable set of initial condition, this calculation shows that no dramatic, non-linear, increase of the EC density will occur when the bunch charges increases by a factor of three. Finally, electric field maps or parametric functions are being provided to the Synergia tracking code such that instabilities due to the EC can be simulated over much longer periods of time.

  7. LARGE SCALE DISTRIBUTED PARAMETER MODEL OF MAIN MAGNET SYSTEM AND FREQUENCY DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,W.; MARNERIS, I.; SANDBERG, J.

    2007-06-25

    Large accelerator main magnet system consists of hundreds, even thousands, of dipole magnets. They are linked together under selected configurations to provide highly uniform dipole fields when powered. Distributed capacitance, insulation resistance, coil resistance, magnet inductance, and coupling inductance of upper and lower pancakes make each magnet a complex network. When all dipole magnets are chained together in a circle, they become a coupled pair of very high order complex ladder networks. In this study, a network of more than thousand inductive, capacitive or resistive elements are used to model an actual system. The circuit is a large-scale network. Its equivalent polynomial form has several hundred degrees. Analysis of this high order circuit and simulation of the response of any or all components is often computationally infeasible. We present methods to use frequency decomposition approach to effectively simulate and analyze magnet configuration and power supply topologies.

  8. Magnetic main sequence stars as progenitors of blue supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petermann, I.; Castro, N.; Langer, N.

    2015-01-01

    Blue supergiants (BSGs) to the right the main sequence band in the HR diagram can not be reproduced by standard stellar evolution calculations. We investigate whether a reduced convective core mass due to strong internal magnetic fields during the main sequence might be able to recover this population of stars. We perform calculations with a reduced mass of the hydrogen burning convective core of stars in the mass range 3-30 M ⊙ in a parametric way, which indeed lead to BSGs. It is expected that these BSGs would still show large scale magnetic fields in the order of 10 G.

  9. A mobile magnetic sensor unit for the KATRIN main spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipowicz, A.; Seller, W.; Letnev, J.; Marte, P.; Müller, A.; Spengler, A.; Unru, A.

    2012-06-01

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) aims to measure the electron neutrino mass with an unprecedented sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2, using β decay electrons from tritium decay. For the control of magnetic field in the main spectrometer area of the KATRIN experiment a mobile magnetic sensor unit is constructed and tested at the KATRIN main spectrometer site. The unit moves on inner rails of the support structures of the low field shaping coils which are arranged along the the main spectrometer. The unit propagates on a caterpillar drive and contains an electro motor, battery pack, board electronics, 2 triaxial flux gate sensors and 2 inclination senors. During operation all relevant data are stored on board and transmitted to the master station after the docking station is reached.

  10. Simulations of Magnetic Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robert; Nordlund, Aake

    Magnetic flux emerges from the solar surface on a wide range of scales. We review recent simulations of both large and small scale flux emergence. In our own simulations, we represent the magnetic flux produced by the global dynamo as uniform, untwisted, horizontal field advected into the simulation domain by supergranule scale inflows at the bottom. Our computational domain extends from the temperature minimum (half a megameter above the visible surface) to 20 Mm below the surface, which is 10% of the depth of the convection zone, but contains 2/3 of its scale heights. We investigate how magnetic flux rises through the upper solar convection zone and emerges through the surface. Convective up-flows and magnetic buoyancy bring field toward the surface. Convective down-flows pin down field and prevent its rise. Most of the field gets pumped downward by the convection, but some field rises to the surface. The convective motions both confine the flux concentrations (without the need for twist) and shred them. This process creates a hierarchy of magnetic loops with smaller loops riding "piggy-back", in a serpentine pattern, on larger loops. As a result, magnetic flux emerges in a mixed polarity, "pepper and salt" pattern. The small loops appear as horizontal field over granules with their vertical legs in the bounding intergranular lanes. The fields are quickly swept into the intergranular lanes. As the larger, parent, flux concentrations reach the surface with their legs rooted in the the downflow boundaries of the underlying, supergranule-scale, convective cells near the bottom of the simulation domain, the surface field counter-streams into separate, opposite polarity concentrations, creating pores and spots. The subsurface magnetic field lines of the pores and spots formed by the magneto-convection (without being imposed as an initial condition) are braided, some tightly, some loosely and they connect in complicated ways to the surrounding field at large depths

  11. Blue supergiants as descendants of magnetic main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petermann, I.; Langer, N.; Castro, N.; Fossati, L.

    2015-12-01

    About 10% of the massive main sequence stars have recently been found to host a strong, large scale magnetic field. Both, the origin and the evolutionary consequences of these fields are largely unknown. We argue that these fields may be sufficiently strong in the deep interior of the stars to suppress convection near the outer edge of their convective core. We performed parametrised stellar evolution calculations and assumed a reduced size of the convective core for stars in the mass range 16M⊙ to 28M⊙ from the zero age main sequence until core carbon depletion. We find that such models avoid the coolest part of the main sequence band, which is usually filled by evolutionary models that include convective core overshooting. Furthermore, our "magnetic" models populate the blue supergiant region during core helium burning, i.e., the post-main sequence gap left by ordinary single star models, and some of them end their life in a position near that of the progenitor of Supernova 1987A in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Further effects include a strongly reduced luminosity during the red supergiant stage, and downward shift of the limiting initial mass for white dwarf and neutron star formation.

  12. Are blue supergiants descendants of magnetic main sequence stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petermann, Ilka; Langer, Norbert

    2013-06-01

    Red and blue supergiants are, together with luminous blue variables and Wolf-Rayet stars, evolved phases of massive (OB) stars. The position of blue supergiants (BSG) near the main sequence band cannot be reproduced by standard stellar evolution calculations. However, the assumption of a reduced convective core mass during the main sequence (MS) due to strong internal magnetic fields, established in roughly 10% of all stars on the upper MS, can recover this BSG population. For our calculations of the (non-rotating) massive stars at solar metallicity we used the 1D stellar evolution code MESA and compare their evolutionary tracks with positions from stars obtained from the VLT Flames survey of massive stars.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of turbulent magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Quanlin; Feng Xueshang; Xiang Changqing

    2004-12-01

    Turbulent reconnection process in a one-dimensional current sheet is investigated by means of a two-dimensional compressible one-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation with spatially uniform, fixed resistivity. Turbulence is set up by adding to the sheet pinch small but finite level of broadband random-phased magnetic field components. To clarify the nonlinear spatial-temporal nature of the turbulent reconnection process the reconnection system is treated as an unforced initial value problem without any anomalous resistivity model adopted. Numerical results demonstrate the duality of turbulent reconnection, i.e., a transition from Sweet-Parker-like slow reconnection to Petschek-like fast reconnection in its nonlinear evolutionary process. The initial slow reconnection phase is characterized by many independent microreconnection events confined within the sheet region and a global reconnection rate mainly dependent on the initially added turbulence and insensitive to variations of the plasma {beta} and resistivity. The formation and amplification of the major plasmoid leads the following reconnection process to a rapid reconnection stage with a fast reconnection rate of the order of 0.1 or even larger, drastically changing the topology of the global magnetic field. That is, the presence of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in large-scale current sheets can raise the reconnection rate from small values on the order of the Sweet-Parker rate to high values on the order of the Petscheck rate through triggering an evolution toward fast magnetic reconnection. Meanwhile, the backward coupling between the small- and large-scale magnetic field dynamics has been properly represented through the present high resolution simulation. The undriven turbulent reconnection model established here expresses a solid numerical basis for the previous schematic two-step magnetic reconnection models and a possible explanation of two-stage energy release process of solar explosives.

  14. Simulations of space charge in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-03-01

    The Fermilab Project X plan for future high intensity operation relies on the Main Injector as the engine for delivering protons in the 60-120 GeV energy range. Project X plans call for increasing the number of protons per Main Injector bunch from the current value of 1.0 x 10{sup 11} to 3.0 x 10{sup 11}. Space charge effects at the injection energy of 8 GeV have the potential to seriously disrupt operations. We report on ongoing simulation efforts with Synergia, MARYLIE/Impact, and IMPACT, which provide comprehensive capabilities for parallel, multi-physics modeling of beam dynamics in the Main Injector including 3D space-charge effects.

  15. Analysis of the Space Shuttle main engine simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deabreu-Garcia, J. Alex; Welch, John T.

    1993-01-01

    This is a final report on an analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Program, a digital simulator code written in Fortran. The research was undertaken in ultimate support of future design studies of a shuttle life-extending Intelligent Control System (ICS). These studies are to be conducted by NASA Lewis Space Research Center. The primary purpose of the analysis was to define the means to achieve a faster running simulation, and to determine if additional hardware would be necessary for speeding up simulations for the ICS project. In particular, the analysis was to consider the use of custom integrators based on the Matrix Stability Region Placement (MSRP) method. In addition to speed of execution, other qualities of the software were to be examined. Among these are the accuracy of computations, the useability of the simulation system, and the maintainability of the program and data files. Accuracy involves control of truncation error of the methods, and roundoff error induced by floating point operations. It also involves the requirement that the user be fully aware of the model that the simulator is implementing.

  16. Main drive selection for the Windstorm Simulation Center

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, J.M.; Earl, J.S.

    1998-02-01

    Operated by the Partnership for Natural Disaster Reduction, the Windstorm Simulation Center (WSC) will be a structural test center dedicated to studying the performance of civil structural systems subjected to hurricanes, tornadoes, and other storm winds. Within the WSC, a bank of high-power fans, the main drive, will produce the high velocity wind necessary to reproduce these storms. Several options are available for the main drive, each with advantages and liabilities. This report documents a study to identify and evaluate all candidates available, and to select the most promising system such that the best possible combination of real-world performance attributes is achieved at the best value. Four broad classes of candidate were identified: electric motors, turbofan aircraft engines, turboshaft aircraft engines, and turboshaft industrial engines. Candidate systems were evaluated on a basis of technical feasibility, availability, power, installed cost, and operating cost.

  17. Simulation of magnetophoresis of magnetic nanoparticles in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zongqian; Sun, Jiajia; Jia, Shenli; Zhang, Pengbo

    2016-08-01

    Magnetophoresis, which is known as a process of driving magnetic particles to depart from the dispersion in the presence of an external inhomogeneous magnetic field, has gained substantial investigations due to its significance in various fields. The main objective of this paper is to analyze the magnetophoretic mechanism of magnetic nanoparticles in fluids with a Lagrangian approach. The equivalent current source method is used to calculate the magnetic field of a cylindrical permanent magnet, which provides a feasible way to simulate the magnetophoresis process. Then the magnetophoretic velocity of particles and the influence of various key factors, e.g. the dimension of a cylindrical permanent magnet, the saturation magnetization of particles and the viscosity of fluid, are investigated. Furthermore, an efficient algorithm is proposed to calculate the trajectory of particles, and to describe the capture efficiency of the particles and the distribution of the captured particles at different times. In addition, the applicability of the Lagrangian approach is also discussed.

  18. Simulation of magnetic coatings on textile fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowicz, T.; Ehrmann, A.

    2016-08-01

    While the properties of conductive fibres and coatings on textiles can easily be measured and calculated, magnetic coatings of fibres, yarns and fabrics still lack descriptions of their physical properties. Since magnetic textiles can be used for a variety of applications, from magnetic filters to invisible water-marks to magnetic coils and sensors, simulations would be supportive to understand and utilize their properties. The article gives an overview of different coatings on textile fibres, varying the magnetic materials as well as the fibre composition, giving rise to the interactions between neighbouring coated fibres. In this way, it is possible to understand the strong shape anisotropy which must be taken into account when the magnetic properties of textiles are to be tailored. Additionally, the differences between several possible magnetic coating materials become visible. This study can help adjusting the magnetic properties of textile fabrics to a desired application.

  19. Magnetized plasma jets in experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrafel, Peter; Greenly, John; Gourdain, Pierre; Seyler, Charles; Blesener, Kate; Kusse, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a thing (20 micron) Al foil driven on the 1 MA-in-100 ns COBRA through a 5 mm diameter cathode in a radial configuration. In these experiments, ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet can be observed developing midway through current-rise. Our goal is to establish the relationship between the ASP and the jet. These jets are of interest for their potential relevance to astrophysical phenomena. An independently pulsed 200 μF capacitor bank with a Helmholtz coil pair allows for the imposition of a slow (150 μs) and strong (~1 T) axial magnetic field on the experiment. Application of this field eliminates significant azimuthal asymmetry in extreme ultraviolet emission of the ASP. This asymmetry is likely a current filamentation instability. Laser-backlit shadowgraphy and interferometry confirm that the jet-hollowing is correlated with the application of the axial magnetic field. Visible spectroscopic measurements show a doppler shift consistent with an azimuthal velocity in the ASP caused by the applied B-field. Computational simulations with the XMHD code PERSEUS qualitatively agree with the experimental results.

  20. Nonlinear simulations to optimize magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Daniel B. Weaver, John B.

    2014-03-10

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is an attractive emerging cancer treatment, but the acting microscopic energy deposition mechanisms are not well understood and optimization suffers. We describe several approximate forms for the characteristic time of Néel rotations with varying properties and external influences. We then present stochastic simulations that show agreement between the approximate expressions and the micromagnetic model. The simulations show nonlinear imaginary responses and associated relaxational hysteresis due to the field and frequency dependencies of the magnetization. This suggests that efficient heating is possible by matching fields to particles instead of resorting to maximizing the power of the applied magnetic fields.

  1. Booster main magnet power supply, present operation and potential future upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Bajon, E.; Bannon, M.; Marneris, I.; Danowski, G.; Sandberg, J.; Savatteri, S.

    2011-03-28

    The Brookhaven Booster Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) is a 24 pulse thyristor control supply, rated at 5500 Amps, +/-2000 Volts, or 3000 Amps, +/-6000 Volts. The power supply is fed directly from the power utility and the peak magnet power is 18 MWatts. This peak power is seen directly at the incoming ac line. This power supply has been in operation for the last 18 years. This paper will describe the present topology and operation of the power supply, the feedback control system and the different modes of operation of the power supply. Since the power supply has been in operation for the last 18 years, upgrading this power supply is essential. A new power supply topology has been studied where energy is stored in capacitor banks. DC to DC converters are used to convert the dc voltage stored in the capacitor banks to pulsed DC voltage into the magnet load. This enables the average incoming power from the ac line to be constant while the peak magnet power is pulsed to +/- 18 MWatts. Simulations and waveforms of this power supply will be presented.

  2. Entropy conservation in simulations of magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.; Schindler, K.

    2006-09-15

    Entropy and mass conservation are investigated for the dynamic field evolution associated with fast magnetic reconnection, based on the 'Newton Challenge' problem [Birn et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 32, L06105 (2005)]. In this problem, the formation of a thin current sheet and magnetic reconnection are initiated in a plane Harris-type current sheet by temporally limited, spatially varying, inflow of magnetic flux. Using resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, specifically the entropy and mass integrated along the magnetic flux tubes are compared between the simulations. In the MHD simulation these should be exactly conserved quantities, when slippage and Ohmic dissipation are negligible. It is shown that there is very good agreement between the conservation of these quantities in the two simulation approaches, despite the effects of dissipation, provided that the resistivity in the MHD simulation is strongly localized. This demonstrates that dissipation is highly localized in the PIC simulation also, and that heat flux across magnetic flux tubes has negligible effect as well, so that the entropy increase on a full flux tube remains small even during reconnection. The mass conservation also implies that the frozen-in flux condition of ideal MHD is a good integral approximation outside the reconnection site. This result lends support for using the entropy-conserving MHD approach not only before and after reconnection but even as a constraint connecting the two phases.

  3. Thermal conditions on the International Space Station: Effects of operations of the station Main Radiators on the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Min; Burger, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    A thermal model of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station (ISS) has been developed, and Thermal Desktop® (with RadCAD®) and SINDA/FLUINT software have been used to calculate the effects of the operations of the ISS Main Radiators on AMS temperatures. We find that the ISS Starboard Main Radiator has significant influence on temperatures on the port side of AMS. The simulation results are used in AMS thermal control operations.

  4. Geodynamics branch data base for main magnetic field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, Robert A.; Baldwin, R. T.

    1991-01-01

    The data sets used in geomagnetic field modeling at GSFC are described. Data are measured and obtained from a variety of information and sources. For clarity, data sets from different sources are categorized and processed separately. The data base is composed of magnetic observatory data, surface data, high quality aeromagnetic, high quality total intensity marine data, satellite data, and repeat data. These individual data categories are described in detail in a series of notebooks in the Geodynamics Branch, GSFC. This catalog reviews the original data sets, the processing history, and the final data sets available for each individual category of the data base and is to be used as a reference manual for the notebooks. Each data type used in geomagnetic field modeling has varying levels of complexity requiring specialized processing routines for satellite and observatory data and two general routines for processing aeromagnetic, marine, land survey, and repeat data.

  5. Accuracy estimates for some global analytical models of the Earth's main magnetic field on the basis of data on gradient magnetic surveys at stratospheric balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Yu. P.; Brekhov, O. M.; Bondar, T. N.; Filippov, S. V.; Petrov, V. G.; Tsvetkova, N. M.; Frunze, A. Kh.

    2014-03-01

    Two global analytical models of the main magnetic field of the Earth (MFE) have been used to determine their potential in deriving an anomalous MFE from balloon magnetic surveys conducted at altitudes of ˜30 km. The daily mean spherical harmonic model (DMSHM) constructed from satellite data on the day of balloon magnetic surveys was analyzed. This model for the day of magnetic surveys was shown to be almost free of errors associated with secular variations and can be recommended for deriving an anomalous MFE. The error of the enhanced magnetic model (EMM) was estimated depending on the number of harmonics used in the model. The model limited by the first 13 harmonics was shown to be able to lead to errors in the main MFE of around 15 nT. The EMM developed to n = m = 720 and constructed on the basis of satellite and ground-based magnetic data fails to adequately simulate the anomalous MFE at altitudes of 30 km. To construct a representative model developed to m = n = 720, ground-based magnetic data should be replaced by data of balloon magnetic surveys for altitudes of ˜30 km. The results of investigations were confirmed by a balloon experiment conducted by Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Moscow Aviation Institute.

  6. First-principles simulation and comparison with beam tests for transverse instabilities and damper performance in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Nicklaus, Dennis; Foster, G.William; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    An end-to-end performance calculation and comparison with beam tests was performed for the bunch-by-bunch digital transverse damper in the Fermilab Main Injector. Time dependent magnetic wakefields responsible for ''Resistive Wall'' transverse instabilities in the Main Injector were calculated with OPERA-2D using the actual beam pipe and dipole magnet lamination geometry. The leading order dipole component was parameterized and used as input to a bunch-by-bunch simulation which included the filling pattern and injection errors experienced in high-intensity operation of the Main Injector. The instability growth times, and the spreading of the disturbance due to newly misinjected batches was compared between simulations and beam data collected by the damper system. Further simulation models the effects of the damper system on the beam.

  7. Accurate simulation of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John R.; Stoltz, Peter; Veitzer, Seth A.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2011-01-01

    We present results from a precision simulation of the electron cloud (EC) in the Fermilab Main Injector using the code VORPAL. This is a fully 3d and self consistent treatment of the EC. Both distributions of electrons in 6D phase-space and E.M. field maps have been generated. This has been done for various configurations of the magnetic fields found around the machine have been studied. Plasma waves associated to the fluctuation density of the cloud have been analyzed. Our results are compared with those obtained with the POSINST code. The response of a Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) to the EC has been simulated, as well as the more challenging microwave absorption experiment. Definite predictions of their exact response are difficult to obtain,mostly because of the uncertainties in the secondary emission yield and, in the case of the RFA, because of the sensitivity of the electron collection efficiency to unknown stray magnetic fields. Nonetheless, our simulations do provide guidance to the experimental program.

  8. Aroostook Sunshine: An Educational Simulation about Life in Maine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Aroostook Indians, Houlton, ME.

    Designed for instruction at the secondary level, this curriculum guide focuses on simulated classroom experiences in prejudice and minority race relations and content materials relative to Northeast Woodland American Indian history and culture. Knowledge of the following are cited as major unit objectives: (1) Indian cultural contributions; (2)…

  9. Magnet reliability in the Fermilab Main Injector and implications for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, M.A.; Blowers, J.; Capista, D.; Harding, D.J.; Kiemschies, O.; Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh, S.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    The International Linear Collider reference design requires over 13000 magnets, of approximately 135 styles, which must operate with very high reliability. The Fermilab Main Injector represents a modern machine with many conventional magnet styles, each of significant quantity, that has now accumulated many hundreds of magnet-years of operation. We review here the performance of the magnets built for this machine, assess their reliability and categorize the failure modes, and discuss implications for reliability of similar magnet styles expected to be used at the ILC.

  10. The design and manufacture of the Fermilab Main Injector Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.; Chester, N.S.; Harding, D.J.; Martin, P.S.

    1992-03-01

    Fermilab`s new Main Injector Ring (MIR) will replace the currently operating Main Ring to provide 150 GeV Proton and Antiproton beams for Tevetron injection, and rapid cycling, high intensity, 120 GeV Proton beams for Antiproton production. To produce and maintain the required high beam quality, high intensity, and high repetition rate, conventional dipole magnets with laminated iron core and water cooled copper conductor were chosen as the bending magnet. A new magnet design having low inductance, large copper cross section, and field uniformity sufficient for high intensity injection and efficient slow resonant extraction, is required to obtain the needed geometric aperture, dynamic aperture, and operational reliability. The current Main Injector Ring lattice design requires the use of 344 of these magnets. 216 of these magnets are to be 6 m long, and 128 are to be 4 m long.

  11. The design and manufacture of the Fermilab Main Injector Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.; Chester, N.S.; Harding, D.J.; Martin, P.S.

    1992-03-01

    Fermilab's new Main Injector Ring (MIR) will replace the currently operating Main Ring to provide 150 GeV Proton and Antiproton beams for Tevetron injection, and rapid cycling, high intensity, 120 GeV Proton beams for Antiproton production. To produce and maintain the required high beam quality, high intensity, and high repetition rate, conventional dipole magnets with laminated iron core and water cooled copper conductor were chosen as the bending magnet. A new magnet design having low inductance, large copper cross section, and field uniformity sufficient for high intensity injection and efficient slow resonant extraction, is required to obtain the needed geometric aperture, dynamic aperture, and operational reliability. The current Main Injector Ring lattice design requires the use of 344 of these magnets. 216 of these magnets are to be 6 m long, and 128 are to be 4 m long.

  12. Field errors introduced by eddy currents in Fermilab main injector magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, D.G.C.; Brown, B.C.; Dinanco, J.B.; Sharoran, S.A.; Sim, J.W.

    1997-10-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector ramps from 8 GeV to 120 GeV in about half a second. The rapidly changing magnetic field induces eddy currents in the stainless steel vacuum tubes, which in turn produce error fields that can affect the beam. Field calculations and measurements are presented for the dipole and quadrupole magnets.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Numerical Simulations of Magnetic Reconnection in Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Syuniti

    2000-03-01

    reconnection, triggered by a supernova explosion, creates hot plasmas and magnetic islands (helical tubes), and how the magnetic islands confine the hot plasmas in Galaxy. The supernova shock is one of the possible mechanisms to trigger reconnection in Galaxy. We conclude that magnetic reconnection is able to heat the GRXE plasma if the magnetic field is localized in an intense flux tube with Blocal sim 30 muG. Part III This is the main part of the thesis. We examine the magnetic reconnection triggered by a supernova shock (or a point explosion) in interstellar medium, by performing 2D MHD numerical simulations with high spatial resolution. The magnetic reconnection starts long after the supernova shock (fast-mode MHD shock wave) passes a current sheet. The current sheet evolves as follows: (i) The tearing-mode instability is excited by the supernova shock. The current sheet becomes thin in the nonlinear phase of tearing instability. (ii) The current-sheet thinning is saturated when the current-sheet thickness becomes comparable to that of Sweet-Parker current sheet. After that, Sweet-Parker type reconnection starts, and the current-sheet length increases. (iii) The secondary tearing-mode instability occurs in the thin Sweet-Parker current sheet. (iv) As a result, further current-sheet thinning occurs, because gas density decreases in the current sheet. The anomalous resistivity sets in, and Petschek type reconnection starts. The interstellar gas is accelerated and heated. The magnetic energy is released quickly while magnetic islands are moving in the current sheet during Petschek type reconnection. (v) Magnetic reconnection stops because the gas pressure increases in the current sheet near left and right boundaries. The released magnetic energy is determined by the interstellar magnetic field strength, not by the energy of initial supernova nor distance between the supernova and the current sheet. We suggest that magnetic reconnection is a possible mechanism to generate X

  14. Evidence of magnetic field decay in massive main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Castro, N.; Langer, N.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Müller, A.; de Koter, A.; Morel, T.; Petit, V.; Sana, H.; Wade, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    A significant fraction of massive main-sequence stars show strong, large-scale magnetic fields. The origin of these fields, their lifetimes, and their role in shaping the characteristics and evolution of massive stars are currently not well understood. We compile a catalogue of 389 massive main-sequence stars, 61 of which are magnetic, and derive their fundamental parameters and ages. The two samples contain stars brighter than magnitude 9 in the V-band and range in mass between 5 and 100 M⊙. We find that the fractional main-sequence age distribution of all considered stars follows what is expected for a magnitude limited sample, while that of magnetic stars shows a clear decrease towards the end of the main sequence. This dearth of old magnetic stars is independent of the choice of adopted stellar evolution tracks, and appears to become more prominent when considering only the most massive stars. We show that the decreasing trend in the distribution is significantly stronger than expected from magnetic flux conservation. We also find that binary rejuvenation and magnetic suppression of core convection are unlikely to be responsible for the observed lack of older magnetic massive stars, and conclude that its most probable cause is the decay of the magnetic field, over a time span longer than the stellar lifetime for the lowest considered masses, and shorter for the highest masses. We then investigate the spin-down ages of the slowly rotating magnetic massive stars and find them to exceed the stellar ages by far in many cases. The high fraction of very slowly rotating magnetic stars thus provides an independent argument for a decay of the magnetic fields.

  15. Laboratory simulation of astrophysical magnetic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gattamraju, Ravindra Kumar; Chatterjee, Gourab; Singh, Prahshant; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Schoeffler, K. M.; Silva, L. O.; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, P. K.; Das, Amita

    2015-11-01

    Giant magnetic fields (102-103 megagauss) are created when a relativistic intensity (>= 1018 W cm-2), ultrashort laser pulse interacts with plasma created on a solid. Here, we map out the temporal evolution of turbulence in magnetic field. We measure giant magnetic field on a micron scale spatial and femtosecond time resolution using pump-probe Cotton-Mouton polarimetry. The plasma created by an 800 nm laser is probed at density of ~1022 electrons/cc at 266 nm. This density is so far the highest at which plasma probing has been performed. Fourier spectra of the spatial polarigrams show power law behavior indicative of turbulence. Interestingly, the exponent of the power law changes from one value for the initial, fast electron dominated regime to another value at 10s of picoseconds, where ions dominate the behavior. This may be the first time such a transition of the mediation of turbulence has been captured. We present a model and particle-in-cell simulations which reproduce the data very well. Our results mimic observations of kinetic Alfven wave turbulence in earth's magnetosheath, solar flares and solar wind, indicating that we are now opening earth bound laboratory for simulating astrophysical magnetic environments.

  16. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS OF DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Springel, Volker

    2014-03-01

    Observationally, magnetic fields reach equipartition with thermal energy and cosmic rays in the interstellar medium of disk galaxies such as the Milky Way. However, thus far cosmological simulations of the formation and evolution of galaxies have usually neglected magnetic fields. We employ the moving-mesh code AREPO to follow for the first time the formation and evolution of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy in its full cosmological context while taking into account magnetic fields. We find that a prescribed tiny magnetic seed field grows exponentially by a small-scale dynamo until it saturates around z = 4 with a magnetic energy of about 10% of the kinetic energy in the center of the galaxy's main progenitor halo. By z = 2, a well-defined gaseous disk forms in which the magnetic field is further amplified by differential rotation, until it saturates at an average field strength of ∼6 μG in the disk plane. In this phase, the magnetic field is transformed from a chaotic small-scale field to an ordered large-scale field coherent on scales comparable to the disk radius. The final magnetic field strength, its radial profile, and the stellar structure of the disk compare well with observational data. A minor merger temporarily increases the magnetic field strength by about a factor of two, before it quickly decays back to its saturation value. Our results are highly insensitive to the initial seed field strength and suggest that the large-scale magnetic field in spiral galaxies can be explained as a result of the cosmic structure formation process.

  17. Spatial-temporal dynamics of auroras during the magnetic storm main phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilova, T. A.; Kornilov, I. A.

    2009-12-01

    The structure and dynamics of auroras in the midnight sector during substorms, which develop during the magnetic storm main phase as compared to the characteristics of a typical auroral substorm, have been studied using the ground-based and satellite observations. It has been found out that a difference from the classical substorm is observed in auroras during the magnetic storm main phase. At the beginning of the storm main phase, the series of pseudobreakups with the most pronounced jump-like motion toward the equator shifts to lower latitudes. The substorm expansion phase can be observed not only as arc jumps to higher latitudes but also as an explosive expansion of a bright diffuse luminosity in all directions. During the magnetic storm main phase, auroras are mainly characterized by the presence of stable extensive rayed structures and by the simultaneous existence of different auroral forms, typical of different substorm phases, in the TV camera field of view.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of global accretion disks with vertical magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2014-04-01

    We report results of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of global accretion disks threaded with weak vertical magnetic fields. We perform the simulations in the spherical coordinates with different temperature profiles and accordingly different rotation profiles. In the cases with a spatially constant temperature, because the rotation frequency is vertically constant in the equilibrium condition, general properties of the turbulence excited by magnetorotational instability are quantitatively similar to those obtained in local shearing box simulations. On the other hand, in the cases with a radially variable temperature profile, the vertical differential rotation, which is inevitable in the equilibrium condition, winds up the magnetic field lines in addition to the usual radial differential rotation. As a result, the coherent wound magnetic fields contribute to the Maxwell stress in the surface regions. We obtain nondimensional density and velocity fluctuations ∼0.1-0.2 at the midplane. The azimuthal power spectra of the magnetic fields show shallower slopes, ∼m {sup 0} – m {sup –1}, than those of velocity and density. The Poynting flux associated with the MHD turbulence drives intermittent and structured disk winds as well as sound-like waves toward the midplane. The mass accretion mainly occurs near the surfaces, and the gas near the midplane slowly moves outward in the time domain of the present simulations. The vertical magnetic fields are also dragged inward in the surface regions, while they stochastically move outward and inward around the midplane. We also discuss an observational implication of induced spiral structure in the simulated turbulent disks.

  19. Recent electron-cloud simulation results for the main damping rings of the NLC and TESLA linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Furman, M.A.

    2003-05-01

    In the beam pipe of the Main Damping Ring (MDR) of the Next Linear Collider (NLC), ionization of residual gases and secondary emission give rise to an electron-cloud which stabilizes to equilibrium after few bunch trains. In this paper, we present recent computer simulation results for the main features of the electron cloud at the NLC and preliminary simulation results for the TESLA main damping rings, obtained with the code POSINST that has been developed at LBNL, and lately in collaboration with SLAC, over the past 7 years. Possible remedies to mitigate the effect are also discussed. We have recently included the possibility to simulate different magnetic field configurations in our code including solenoid, quadrupole, sextupole and wiggler.

  20. Kinetic simulations of magnetized capacitively coupled discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Shihab, Mohammed; Eremin, Denis; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Schulze, Julian; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Capacitive high frequency discharges are of crucial importance in the context of plasma etching, deposition and surface modification. As these single or multiple frequency discharges are oftentimes operated at low pressures of less than a few pascal, a high plasma density is commonly achieved with the use of external magnetic fields. In this work kinetic simulations are used to investigate the effect of inhomogeneous external magnetic fields on the discharge dynamics in a strongly nonlocal pressure regime. We found that capacitively coupled discharges can be largely asymmetrized by applying strong magnetic fields in front of a given target electrode. This not only has an effect on the plasma density, but also on the ion energy distribution functions (IEDF) at the electrodes and on the acceleration of fast electrons in the plasma sheath regions. In consequence in the discharge currents a generation of higher harmonics of the driving frequency can be observed. We investigate these scenarios in terms of 1D-3V Particle in Cell simulations.

  1. Exchange interaction energy in magnetic recording simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Masukazu Tonooka, Shun; Katada, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Maki; Hara, Miki; Wood, Roger

    2015-05-07

    Based on a phenomenological theory, micromagnetic simulations and experiments are used to evaluate an improved function for the exchange interaction between magnetic particles in perpendicular recording media. Assuming diluted spin layers in the particle boundary and a gradual rather than abrupt rotation of magnetization between grain cores, the exchange energy is better described by an even power series of θ, rather than a cosine function. The conventional cosine function does not have a restoring torque near θ = π and adjacent grains tend to align strictly antiparallel. In contrast, using a power series of θ, adjacent grains tend to align at a small angle away from θ = π. This gives rise to a small in-plane magnetization component and therefore a distinct peak in in-plane susceptibility is observed around H = 0. From magnetization measurements of a real medium, a peak is observed around H = 0, which matches with an assumption of 2 or 3 spin layers. In some situations, the exchange interaction between discretized cells for numerical calculation is better described by a power series rather than a cosine function.

  2. Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RRMHD) simulations are applied to investigate the system evolution of relativistic magnetic reconnection. A time-split Harten-Lan-van Leer method is employed. Under a localized resistivity, the system exhibits a fast reconnection jet with an Alfv enic Lorentz factor inside a narrow Petschek-type exhaust. Various shock structures are resolved in and around the plasmoid such as the post-plasmoid vertical shocks and the "diamond-chain" structure due to multiple shock reflections. Under a uniform resistivity, Sweet-Parker-type reconnection slowly evolves. Under a current-dependent resistivity, plasmoids are repeatedly formed in an elongated current sheet. It is concluded that the resistivity model is of critical importance for RRMHD modeling of relativistic magnetic reconnection.

  3. Magnetic stochasticity in gyrokinetic simulations of plasma microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W M; Wang, E; Candy, J

    2010-02-12

    Analysis of the magnetic field structure from electromagnetic simulations of tokamak ion temperature gradient turbulence demonstrates that the magnetic field can be stochastic even at very low plasma pressure. The degree of magnetic stochasticity is quantified by evaluating the magnetic diffusion coefficient. We find that the magnetic stochasticity fails to produce a dramatic increase in the electron heat conductivity because the magnetic diffusion coefficient remains small.

  4. Multiscale Simulations of Magnetic Island Coalescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorelli, John C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new interactive parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) framework written in the Python programming language. This new framework, PyAMR, hides the details of parallel AMR data structures and algorithms (e.g., domain decomposition, grid partition, and inter-process communication), allowing the user to focus on the development of algorithms for advancing the solution of a systems of partial differential equations on a single uniform mesh. We demonstrate the use of PyAMR by simulating the pairwise coalescence of magnetic islands using the resistive Hall MHD equations. Techniques for coupling different physics models on different levels of the AMR grid hierarchy are discussed.

  5. The magnetic field of the pre-main sequence Herbig Ae star HD 190073

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catala, C.; Alecian, E.; Donati, J.-F.; Wade, G. A.; Landstreet, J. D.; Böhm, T.; Bouret, J.-C.; Bagnulo, S.; Folsom, C.; Silvester, J.

    2007-01-01

    Context: The general context of this paper is the study of magnetic fields in the pre-main sequence intermediate mass Herbig Ae/Be stars. Magnetic fields are likely to play an important role in pre-main sequence evolution at these masses, in particular in controlling the gains and losses of stellar angular momentum. Aims: The particular aim of this paper is to announce the detection of a structured magnetic field in the Herbig Ae star HD 190073, and to discuss various scenarii for the geometry of the star, its environment and its magnetic field. Methods: We have used the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at CFHT in 2005 and 2006 to obtain high-resolution, high signal-to-noise circular polarization spectra which demonstrate unambiguously the presence of a magnetic field in the photosphere of this star. Results: Nine circular polarization spectra were obtained, each one showing a clear Zeeman signature. This signature is suggestive of a magnetic field structured on large scales. The signature, which corresponds to a longitudinal magnetic field of 74± 10 G, does not vary detectably on a one-year timeframe, indicating either an azimuthally symmetric field, a zero inclination angle between the rotation axis and the line of sight, or a very long rotation period. The optical spectrum of HD 190073 exhibits a large number of emission lines. We discuss the formation of these emission lines in the framework of a model involving a turbulent heated region at the base of the stellar wind, possibly powered by magnetic accretion. Conclusions: .This magnetic detection contributes an important new observational discovery which will aid our understanding of stellar magnetism at intermediate masses. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  6. Numerical simulation of solar coronal magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Zang, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    Many aspects of solar activity are believed to be due to the stressing of the coronal magnetic field by footpoint motions at the photosphere. The results are presented of a fully spectral numerical simulation which is the first 3-D time dependent simulation of footpoint stressing in a geometry appropriate for the corona. An arcade is considered that is initially current-free and impose a smooth footpoint motion that produces a twist in the field of approx 2 pi. The footprints were fixed and the evolution was followed until the field relaxes to another current-free state. No evidence was seen for any instability, either ideal or resistive and no evidence for current sheet formation. The most striking feature of the evolution is that in response to photospheric motions, the field expands rapidly upward to minimize the stress. The expansion has two important effects. First, it suppresses the development of dips in the field that could support dense, cool material. For the motions assumed, the magnetic field does not develop a geometry suitable for prominence formation. Second, the expansion inhibits ideal instabilities such as kinking. The results indicate that simple stearing of a single arcade is unlikely to lead to solar activity such as flares or prominences. Effects are discussed that might possibly lead to such activity.

  7. Integrated simulation and modeling capability for alternate magnetic fusion concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B. I.; Hooper, E.B.; Jarboe, T. R.; LoDestro, L. L.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Prager, S. C.; Sarff, J. S.

    1998-11-03

    This document summarizes a strategic study addressing the development of a comprehensive modeling and simulation capability for magnetic fusion experiments with particular emphasis on devices that are alternatives to the mainline tokamak device. A code development project in this area supports two defined strategic thrust areas in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program: (1) comprehensive simulation and modeling of magnetic fusion experiments and (2) development, operation, and modeling of magnetic fusion alternate- concept experiment

  8. Kinetic Vlasov simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, H.; Grauer, R.

    2006-09-15

    A fully kinetic Vlasov simulation of the Geospace Environment Modeling Magnetic Reconnection Challenge is presented. Good agreement is found with previous kinetic simulations using particle in cell (PIC) codes, confirming both the PIC and the Vlasov code. In the latter the complete distribution functions f{sub k} (k=i,e) are discretized on a numerical grid in phase space. In contrast to PIC simulations, the Vlasov code does not suffer from numerical noise and allows a more detailed investigation of the distribution functions. The role of the different contributions of Ohm's law are compared by calculating each of the terms from the moments of the f{sub k}. The important role of the off-diagonal elements of the electron pressure tensor could be confirmed. The inductive electric field at the X line is found to be dominated by the nongyrotropic electron pressure, while the bulk electron inertia is of minor importance. Detailed analysis of the electron distribution function within the diffusion region reveals the kinetic origin of the nongyrotropic terms.

  9. Characteristics on electodynamic suspension simulator with HTS levitation magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Bae, D. K.; Sim, K.; Chung, Y. D.; Lee, Y.-S.

    2009-10-01

    High- Tc superconducting (HTSC) electrodynamic suspension (EDS) system basically consists of the HTSC levitation magnet and the ground conductor. The levitation force of EDS system is forms by the interaction between the moving magnetic field produced by the onboard levitation magnet and the induced magnetic field produced by eddy current in the ground conductor. This paper deals with the characteristics of the EDS simulators with high- Tc superconducting (HTS) levitation magnet. Two EDS simulator systems, rotating type EDS simulator and static type EDS simulator, were studied in this paper. The rotating type EDS simulator consists of a HTS levitation magnet and a 1.5 m diameter rotating ground conductor, a motor, the supporting structure and force measuring devices. In the static type EDS simulator, instead of moving magnetic field, AC current was applied to the fixed HTS levitation magnet to induce the eddy current. The static type EDS simulator consists of a HTS levitation magnet, a ground conductor, force measuring devices and supporting structure. The double-pancake type HTSC levitation magnet was designed, manufactured and tested in the EDS simulator.

  10. Reduction of Marine Magnetic Data for Modeling the Main Field of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, R. T.; Ridgway, J. R.; Davis, W. M.

    1992-01-01

    The marine data set archived at the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) consists of shipborne surveys conducted by various institutes worldwide. This data set spans four decades (1953, 1958, 1960-1987), and contains almost 13 million total intensity observations. These are often less than 1 km apart. These typically measure seafloor spreading anomalies with amplitudes of several hundred nanotesla (nT) which, since they originate in the crust, interfere with main field modeling. The source for these short wavelength features are confined within the magnetic crust (i.e., sources above the Curie isotherm). The main field, on the other hand, is of much longer wavelengths and originates within the earth's core. It is desirable to extract the long wavelength information from the marine data set for use in modeling the main field. This can be accomplished by averaging the data along the track. In addition, those data which are measured during periods of magnetic disturbance can be identified and eliminated. Thus, it should be possible to create a data set which has worldwide data distribution, spans several decades, is not contaminated with short wavelengths of the crustal field or with magnetic storm noise, and which is limited enough in size to be manageable for the main field modeling. The along track filtering described above has proved to be an effective means of condensing large numbers of shipborne magnetic data into a manageable and meaningful data set for main field modeling. Its simplicity and ability to adequately handle varying spatial and sampling constraints has outweighed consideration of more sophisticated approaches. This filtering technique also provides the benefits of smoothing out short wavelength crustal anomalies, discarding data recorded during magnetically noisy periods, and assigning reasonable error estimates to be used in the least square modeling. A useful data set now exists which spans 1953-1987.

  11. MHD Simulation Heliospheric Magnetic Fields and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2005-01-01

    This talk will present a summary of our results on simulations of heliospheric structure and dynamics. We use a three-dimensional MHD code in spherical coordinates to produce a solar wind containing a rotating, tilted heliospheric current sheet, fast-slow stream and microstream shear layers, waves, 2-D turbulence, and pressure balanced structures that are input to the inner (superAlfvenic) boundary. The evolution of various combinations of these has led to a deeper understanding of sector structure, magnetic holes, fluctuation anisotropies, and general turbulent evolution. We show how the sectors are likely to be connected, how spiral fields can arise, and how field line diffusion can be caused by waves with transverse structure and microstream shears.

  12. Hierarchical Fast Multipole Simulation of Magnetic Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günal, Yüksel; Visscher, Pieter

    1997-03-01

    We have extended the well-known "fast multipole"footnote L. F. Greengard and V. Rokhlin, J. Comp. Phys. 73 p. 325, 1987. methods for molecular-dynamics simulation of large systems of point charges to continuum systems, such as magnetic films or particulate suspensions. (These methods reduce the computational labor from O(N^2) to O(N log N) or O(N), the number of particles). We apply the method to the particular case of a colloidal dispersion of magnetized cylindrical particles. Our method is fully hierarchical, both upward and downward from the particle size scale. The force on each particle is calculated by grouping distant particles into large clusters, nearer particles into smaller clusters, and dividing the nearest particles into segments. The fineness with which the particles are divided is controlled by an error tolerance parameter. The field of each cluster or segment is computed from a multipole expansion. Distant periodic images are also treated as multipoles - this is much faster than standard Fourier-transform or Ewald summation techniques.

  13. Accurate simulation of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector with VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Cary, John R.; Stoltz, Peter; Veitzer, Seth A.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2010-05-01

    Precision simulations of the electron cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector have been studied using the plasma simulation code VORPAL. Fully 3D and self consistent solutions that includes E.M. field maps generated by the cloud and the proton bunches have been obtained, as well detailed distributions of the electron's 6D phase space. We plan to include such maps in the ongoing simulation of the space charge effects in the Main Injector. Simulations of the response of beam position monitors, retarding field analyzers and microwave transmission experiments are ongoing.

  14. The Fermilab main injector dipole construction techniques and prototype magnet measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bleadon, M.; Brown, B.; Chester, N.; Desavouret, E.; Garvey, J.; Glass, H.; Harding, D.; Harfoush, F.; Holmes, S.; Humbert, J.; Kerby, J.; Knauf, A.; Kobliska, G.; Lipski, A.; Martin, P.; Mazur, P.; Orris, D.; Ostiguy, J.; Peggs, S.; Pachnik, J.; Pewitt, E.; Satti, J.; Schmidt, E.; Sim, J.; Snowdon, S.; Walbridge, D.

    1991-09-01

    The Fermilab Main Injector Project will provide 120--150 GeV Proton and Antiproton Beams for Fermilab Fixed Target Physics and Colliding Beams Physics use. A dipole magnet has been designed and prototypes constructed for the principal bending magnets of this new accelerator. The design considerations and fabrication techniques are described. Measurement results on prototypes are reported, emphasizing the field uniformity achieved in both body field and end field at excitation levels from injection at 0.1 T to full field of 1.7 T. 6 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Study of road dust magnetic phases as the main carrier of potentially harmful trace elements.

    PubMed

    Bourliva, Anna; Papadopoulou, Lambrini; Aidona, Elina

    2016-05-15

    Mineralogical and morphological characteristics and heavy metal content of different fractions (bulk, non-magnetic fraction-NMF and magnetic fraction-MF) of road dusts from the city of Thessaloniki (Northern Greece) were investigated. Main emphasis was given on the magnetic phases extracted from these dusts. High magnetic susceptibility values were presented, whereas the MFs content of road dust samples ranged in 2.2-14.7 wt.%. Thermomagnetic analyses indicated that the dominating magnetic carrier in all road dust samples was magnetite, while the presence of hematite and iron sulphides in the investigated samples cannot be excluded. SEM/EDX analyses identified two groups of ferrimagnetic particles: spherules with various surface morphologies and textures and angular/aggregate particles with elevated heavy metal contents, especially Cr. The road dusts (bulk samples) were dominated by calcium, while the mean concentrations of trace elements decreased in the order Zn > Mn > Cu > Pb > Cr > Ni > V > Sn > As > Sb > Co > Mo > W > Cd. MFs exhibited significantly higher concentrations of trace elements compared to NMFs indicating that these potentially harmful elements (PHEs) are preferentially enriched in the MFs and highly associated with the ferrimagnetic particles. Hazard Index (HI) obtained for both adults and children through exposure to bulk dust samples were lower or close to the safe level (=1). On the contrary, the HIs for the magnetic phases indicated that both children and adults are experiencing potential health risk since HI for Cr was significantly higher than safe level. Cancer risk due to road dust exposure is low.

  16. Status of Electron-Cloud Build-Up Simulations for the Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M. A.; Kourbanis, I.; Zwaska, R. M.

    2009-05-04

    We provide a brief status report on measurements and simulations of the electron cloud in the Fermilab Main Injector. Areas of agreement and disagreement are spelled out, along with their possible significance.

  17. Simulation of Electron Cloud Multipacting in Solenoidal Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Novokhatski, A

    2004-01-27

    A simulation algorithm is based on a numerical solution of the Vlasov equation for the distribution function of an electron cloud density in a cylindrical vacuum chamber with solenoidal magnetic field. The algorithm takes into consideration space charge effects. This approach improves the simulation of multipacting effects as it is free of statistical fluctuations. Simulation studies were carried for the SLAC B-factory vacuum chamber for different bunch patterns and solenoidal field strength. Space charge and the magnetic field limit the maximum density of the electron cloud. Magnetic resonant damping of multipacting was found in special cases of positron beam parameters and magnetic field amplitude.

  18. Computer simulation of spectrometer magnets for some experimental installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhidkov, E. P.; Poljakova, R. V.; Voloshina, I. G.; Perepelkin, E. E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Shavrina, T. V.; Yudin, I. P.

    2009-03-01

    The significance of numerical simulation in the research of magnetic systems is determined by not only known advantages of the computing experiment, but also by the fact that the measurement of a magnetic field is a labour-consuming and expensive problem. Mathematical simulation allows one to investigate those parts of the magnet’s design where the measurements of the magnetic field are extremely complicated or even impossible. This work is aimed to generalize experience of the mathematical simulation of magnetic systems of various-type physical and electromechanical installations and to work out some recommendations of the optimal use of some software products for the numerical modeling of magnetostatic problems. This work also presents some results of a numerical analysis of the magnetic systems of the JINR’s physical installation MARUSYA with the purpose of studying an opportunity of designing magnetic systems with predetermined characteristics of the magnetic field.

  19. Control and performance of the AGS and AGS Booster Main Magnet Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Casella, R.; Culwick, B.; Geller, J.; Marneris, I.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques for precision control of the main magnet power supplies for the AGS and AGS Booster synchrotron will be discussed. Both synchrotrons are designed to operate in a Pulse-to-Pulse Modulation (PPM) environment with a Supercycle Generator defining and distributing global timing events for the AGS Facility. Details of modelling, real-time feedback and feedforward systems, generation and distribution of real time field data, operational parameters and an overview of performance for both machines are included.

  20. Control and performance of the AGS and AGS Booster Main Magnet Power Supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, R.K.; Casella, R.; Culwick, B.; Geller, J.; Marneris, I.; Sandberg, J.; Soukas, A.; Zhang, S.Y.

    1993-06-01

    Techniques for precision control of the main magnet power supplies for the AGS and AGS Booster synchrotron will be discussed. Both synchrotrons are designed to operate in a Pulse-to-Pulse Modulation (PPM) environment with a Supercycle Generator defining and distributing global timing events for the AGS Facility. Details of modelling, real-time feedback and feedforward systems, generation and distribution of real time field data, operational parameters and an overview of performance for both machines are included.

  1. 3D Design, Contruction, and Field Analysis of CIS Main Dipole Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, G. P. A.; Fox, W.; Friesel, D. L.; Rinckel, T.

    1997-05-01

    The lattice for CIS ( Cooler Injection Synchroton ) requires four laminated 90^circ main dipole magnets with bending radius ρ = 1.273 m, EFL = 2 m, and an edge angle of 12^circ. Optimum Cooler injection and injection in the planned 15 GeV LISS ring requires operation up to about 1.75 T. Initial operation of 1 Hz, with later upgrade to 5 Hz is planned. We will present 2D and 3D field calculations used to optimize the shape of laminations and endpacks of the magnet. Endpacks are designed to determine edge angle and to compensate hexapole components, in particular above 1.4 T where saturation becomes significant. The large dipole curvature required a new type of dipole construction. Each magnet consists of wedge shaped blocks fabricated from stamped lamination of cold rolled low carbon iron. B-stage (dry) epopy was used for bonding and insulation. The end blocks are machined to include the calculated 3D shape of the endpacks. All four magnets were mapped in the field range from 0.3 T - 1.8 T. Comparison of calculations and data in terms of B(I) curves, EFL, edge angle, and hexapole component as function of field excitation will be presented. The constructed magnets are well within expected specifications.

  2. Numerical simulation of high-gradient magnetic filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, B. A.; Semenov, V. G.; Panchuk, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    We have reported on the results of a numerical simulation of high-gradient magnetic filtration of ultradisperse corrosion products from water coolants. These results have made it possible to establish optimal technical characteristics of high-gradient magnetic filters. The results have been used to develop test samples of high-gradient magnetic filters (HGMFs) with different magnetic systems to purify technological water media of atomic power plants from activated corrosion products.

  3. Main-Sequence CMEs as Magnetic Explosions: Compatibility with Observed Kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2004-01-01

    We examine the kinematics of 26 CMEs of the morphological main sequence of CMEs, those having the classic three-part bubble structure of (1) a bright front eveloping (2) a dark cavity within which rides (3) a bright blob/filamentary feature. Each CME is observed in Yohkoh/SXT images to originate from near the limb (> or equal to 0.7 R(sub Sun) from disk center). The basic data (from the SOHO LASCO CME Catalog) for the kinematics of each CME are the sequence of LASCO images of the CME, the time of each image, the measured radial distance of the front edge of the CME in each image, and the measured angular extent of the CME. About half of our CMEs (12) occur with a flare, and the rest (14) occur without a flare. While the average linear-fit speed of the flare CMEs (1000 km/s) is twice that of the non-flare CMEs (510 km/s), the flare CMEs and the non-flare CMEs are similar in that some have nearly flat velocity-height (radial extent) profiles (little acceleration), some have noticeably falling velocity profiles (noticeable deceleration), and the rest have velocity profiles that rise considerably through the outer corona (blatant acceleration). This suggests that in addition to sharing similar morphology, main-sequence CMEs all have basically the same driving mechanism. The observed radial progression of each of our 26 CMEs is fit by a simple model magnetic plasmoid that is in pressure balance with the radial magnetic field in the outer corona and that propels itself outward by magnetic expansion, doing no net work on its surroundings. On average over the 26 CMEs, this model fits the observations as well as the assumption of constant acceleration. This is compatible with main-sequence CMEs being magnetically driven, basically magnetic explosions, with the velocity profile in the outer corona being largely dictated by the initial Alfien speed in the CME (when the front is at approx. 3 (sub Sun), analogous to the mass of a main-sequence star dictating the luminosity.

  4. The MAIN Shirt: A Textile-Integrated Magnetic Induction Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Teichmann, Daniel; Kuhn, Andreas; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2014-01-01

    A system is presented for long-term monitoring of respiration and pulse. It comprises four non-contact sensors based on magnetic eddy current induction that are textile-integrated into a shirt. The sensors are technically characterized by laboratory experiments that investigate the sensitivity and measuring depth, as well as the mutual interaction between adjacent pairs of sensors. The ability of the device to monitor respiration and pulse is demonstrated by measurements in healthy volunteers. The proposed system (called the MAIN (magnetic induction) Shirt) does not need electrodes or any other skin contact. It is wearable, unobtrusive and can easily be integrated into an individual's daily routine. Therefore, the system appears to be a suitable option for long-term monitoring in a domestic environment or any other unsupervised telemonitoring scenario. PMID:24412900

  5. Performance of the cold powered diodes and diode leads in the main magnets of the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willering, G. P.; Giloux, C.; Bajko, M.; Bednarek, M.; Bottura, L.; Charifoulline, Z.; Dahlerup-Petersen, K.; Dib, G.; D'Angelo, G.; Gharib, A.; Grand-Clement, L.; Izquierdo Bermudez, S.; Prin, H.; Roger, V.; Rowan, S.; Savary, F.; Tock, J.-Ph; Verweij, A.

    2015-12-01

    During quench tests in 2011 variations in resistance of an order of magnitude were found in the diode by-pass circuit of the main LHC magnets. An investigation campaign was started to understand the source, the occurrence and the impact of the high resistances. Many tests were performed offline in the SM18 test facility with a focus on the contact resistance of the diode to heat sink contact and the diode wafer temperature. In 2014 the performance of the diodes and diode leads of the main dipole bypass systems in the LHC was assessed during a high current qualification test. In the test a current cycle similar to a magnet circuit discharge from 11 kA with a time constant of 100 s was performed. Resistances of up to 600 μΩ have been found in the diode leads at intermediate current, but in general the high resistances decrease at higher current levels and no sign of overheating of diodes has been seen and the bypass circuit passed the test. In this report the performance of the diodes and in particular the contact resistances in the diode leads are analysed with available data acquired over more than 10 years from acceptance test until the main dipole training campaign in the LHC in 2015.

  6. Microwave Transmission Through the Electron Cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector: Simulation and Comparison with Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Veitzer, Seth Andrew; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2009-04-01

    Simulations of the microwave transmission properties through the electron cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector have been implemented using the plasma simulation code 'VORPAL'. Phase shifts and attenuation curves have been calculated for the lowest frequency TE mode, slightly above the cutoff frequency, in field free regions, in the dipoles and quadrupoles. Preliminary comparisons with experimental results for the dipole case are showed and will guide the next generation of experiments.

  7. Preliminary Results of Laboratory Simulation of Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shou-Biao; Xie, Jin-Lin; Hu, Guang-Hai; Li, Hong; Huang, Guang-Li; Liu, Wan-Dong

    2011-10-01

    In the Linear Magnetized Plasma (LMP) device of University of Science and Technology of China and by exerting parallel currents on two parallel copper plates, we have realized the magnetic reconnection in laboratory plasma. With the emissive probes, we have measured the parallel (along the axial direction) electric field in the process of reconnection, and verified the dependence of reconnection current on passing particles. Using the magnetic probe, we have measured the time evolution of magnetic flux, and the measured result shows no pileup of magnetic flux, in consistence with the result of numerical simulation.

  8. Simulations of magnetic nanoparticle Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Weaver, John B.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful in many medical applications because they interact with biology on a cellular level thus allowing microenvironmental investigation. An enhanced understanding of the dynamics of magnetic particles may lead to advances in imaging directly in magnetic particle imaging or through enhanced MRI contrast and is essential for nanoparticle sensing as in magnetic spectroscopy of Brownian motion. Moreover, therapeutic techniques like hyperthermia require information about particle dynamics for effective, safe, and reliable use in the clinic. To that end, we have developed and validated a stochastic dynamical model of rotating Brownian nanoparticles from a Langevin equation approach. With no field, the relaxation time toward equilibrium matches Einstein's model of Brownian motion. In a static field, the equilibrium magnetization agrees with the Langevin function. For high frequency or low amplitude driving fields, behavior characteristic of the linearized Debye approximation is reproduced. In a higher field regime where magnetic saturation occurs, the magnetization and its harmonics compare well with the effective field model. On another level, the model has been benchmarked against experimental results, successfully demonstrating that harmonics of the magnetization carry enough information to infer environmental parameters like viscosity and temperature.

  9. Atomistic simulation of static magnetic properties of bit patterned media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbeláez-Echeverri, O. D.; Agudelo-Giraldo, J. D.; Restrepo-Parra, E.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present a new design of Co based bit pattern media with out-of-plane uni-axial anisotropy induced by interface effects. Our model features the inclusion of magnetic impurities in the non-magnetic matrix. After the material model was refined during three iterations using Monte Carlo simulations, further simulations were performed using an atomistic integrator of Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with Langevin dynamics to study the behavior of the system paying special attention to the super-paramagnetic limit. Our model system exhibits three magnetic phase transitions, one due to the magnetically doped matrix material and the weak magnetic interaction between the nano-structures in the system. The different magnetic phases of the system as well as the features of its phase diagram are explained.

  10. Simulation and optimization of the magnetic field in an electroplated copper micro-coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Maher; Al-Halhouli, Alaaldeen T.; Büttgenbach, Stephanus; Dietzel, Andreas H.

    2013-05-01

    This work aims at simulating and optimizing the magnetic field intensity in different electroplated copper micro-coil designs that can be integrated in a recently developed electromagnetic micro-pump. The results of this study will be used in fabricating new optimized micro-coil designs that may enhance the performance of the developed synchronous micro-pump (i.e., the maximum back pressures and flow rates). The synchronous micro-pump concept depends on managing the movement of two magnets in an annular fluidic channel. Magnet rotation is achieved by sequentially activating a set of planar micro-coils to repel or attract the first magnet (traveling magnet) through the channel, while the second one is anchored between the inlet and the outlet ports. At the end of each pumping cycle, the magnets exchange their anchored and traveling functions. To achieve the maximum back pressure and flow rate (highest performance) in such micro-pump, higher magnetic fields without exceeding the material temperature limitation are required. The stronger the magnetic fields that can be generated, the higher the hydraulic power that can the pump deliver. This study presents extensive numerical simulations using the commercial software package COMSOL and presents also optimizations for the effect of the main micro-coil parameters on the generated magnetic field: coil wire width and height, the coil turns offset distance, the effect of including an iron core inside the coil area, and the number of coil turns. The main analyzed results are: the normal magnetic flux contours at the top (upper) surface of the coil - where the permanent magnets rotate in the micro-pump channel -, the distribution of the magnetic field streams and the area averaging of the magnetic field intensity all over the micro-coil sector.

  11. Magnetic Activity of Pre-main Sequence Stars near the Stellar-Substellar Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Principe, David; Kastner, Joel. H.; Rodriguez, David

    2016-01-01

    X-ray observations of pre-main sequence (pre-MS) stars of M-type probe coronal emission and offer a means to investigate magnetic activity at the stellar-substellar boundary. Recent observations of main sequence (MS) stars at this boundary display a decrease in fractional X-ray luminosity (L X /L bol ) by almost two orders of magnitude for spectral types M7 and later. We investigate magnetic activity and search for a decrease in X-ray emission in the pre-MS progenitors of these MS stars. We present XMM-Newton X-ray observations and preliminary results for ~10 nearby (30-70 pc), very low mass pre-MS stars in the relatively unexplored age range of 10-30 Myr. We compare the fractional X-ray luminosities of these 10-30 Myr old stars to younger (1-3 Myr) pre-MS brown dwarfs and find no dependence on spectral type or age suggesting that X-ray activity declines at an age later than ~30 Myr in these very low-mass stars.

  12. Probing intergalactic magnetic fields with simulations of electromagnetic cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves Batista, Rafael; Saveliev, Andrey; Sigl, Günter; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2016-10-01

    We determine the effect of intergalactic magnetic fields on the distribution of high-energy gamma rays by performing three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations of the development of gamma-ray-induced electromagnetic cascades in the magnetized intergalactic medium. We employ the so-called "Large Sphere Observer" method to efficiently simulate blazar gamma ray halos. We study magnetic fields with a Batchelor spectrum and with maximal left- and right-handed helicities. We also consider the case of sources whose jets are tilted with respect to the line of sight. We verify the formation of extended gamma ray halos around the source direction, and observe spiral-like patterns if the magnetic field is helical. We apply the Q -statistics to the simulated halos to extract their spiral nature and also propose an alternative method, the S -statistics. Both methods provide a quantitative way to infer the helicity of the intervening magnetic fields from the morphology of individual blazar halos for magnetic field strengths B ≳10-15 G and magnetic coherence lengths Lc≳100 Mpc . We show that the S -statistics has a better performance than the Q -statistics when assessing magnetic helicity from the simulated halos.

  13. A magnet-based vibrating wire sensor: design and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourquin, Frédéric; Joly, Michel

    2005-02-01

    Vibrating strings help in measuring relative displacements in a mechanical system. Since the ground natural frequency of a string increases when it is stretched, monitoring the ground frequency yields the current length of the string. Therefore a wire able to vibrate between two anchor points of a system acts as a relative displacement sensor. Excitation is usually achieved by means of an active coil, which is very close to the vibrating iron wire. Vibrating wire sensors (VWS) based on this excitation may prove obtrusive and one is limited to wires of small length. The new VWS takes advantage of distributed passive magnets, which force the wire to vibrate mainly in its fundamental mode. The sensor proves scalable and much less obtrusive when fully embedded, since it can be made flat and very flexible. On the basis of a simplified electromechanical modelling of the measurement process, a suitable distribution of magnets is proposed, which is proved numerically and experimentally to make the measurement robust with respect to mechanical uncertainties. Moreover, numerical simulations suggest measuring not the voltage in the vibrating wire but the current in an auxiliary circuit.

  14. Comparison Of The Global Analytic Models Of The Main Geomagnetic Field With The Stratospheric Balloon Magnetic Data 335

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Yu.; Filippov, S.; Frunze, A.

    2013-12-01

    Three global analytical models of a main geomagnetic field constructed by satellite data are used: model IGRF, Daily Mean Spherical Harmonic Models (DMSHM), and model EMM/2010, and also scalar data of geomagnetic field and its gradients, received in stratospheric balloon gradient magnetic surveys at altitudes of ~30 km. At these altitudes the regional magnetic field is formed from all sources of the Earth's crust. It enables to receive along lengthy routes of surveys the fullest data on regional and longwave-lenght magnetic anomalies. Model DMSHM is used at extracting of magnetic anomalies for elimination of a secular variation up to significant value 0,2 nT. The model can be constructed within the limits of ± 1 months from the moment stratospheric balloon surveys with beneficial day terms with magnetic activity up to Kp <20, that leads to an error of representation of main MFE equal ±5 нТл. It is possible at presence acting for the period of stratospheric balloon magnetic survey of the satellite, for example, Swarm. On stratospheric balloon data it is shown, that model EMM/2010 unsatisfactorily displays MFE at altitude of 30 km. Hence, the qualitative model of the constant (main and anomaly) magnetic field cannot be constructed only with use of satellite and ground data. The improved model constant MFE, constructed according to satellite and stratospheric balloon magnetic surveys, developed up to a degree and the order m=n=720, will have a reliable data about regional crust magnetic field, hence, and about deep magnetic structure of the Earth's crust. The use gradient magnetic surveys aboard stratospheric balloons allows to find the places alternating approximately through 3000 km in which there are no magnetic anomalies. In these places probably to supervise satellite magnetic models for a range of altitude of 20-40 km, timed to stratospheric balloon magnetic surveys.

  15. Main magnetic focus ion source: Basic principles, theoretical predictions and experimental confirmations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsyannikov, V. P.; Nefiodov, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    It is proposed to produce highly charged ions in the local potential traps formed by the rippled electron beam in a focusing magnetic field. In this method, extremely high electron current densities can be attained on short length of the ion trap. The design of very compact ion sources of the new generation is presented. The computer simulations predict that for such ions as, for example, Ne8+ and Xe44+, the intensities of about 109 and 106 ions per second, respectively, can be obtained. The experiments with pilot example of the ion source confirm efficiency of the suggested method. The X-ray emission from Ir59+, Xe44+ and Ar16+ ions was detected. The control over depth of the local ion trap is shown to be feasible.

  16. Efficient Analysis of Simulations of the Sun's Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, C. W.; Martínez-Sykora, J.

    2014-12-01

    Dynamics in the solar atmosphere, including solar flares, coronal mass ejections, micro-flares and different types of jets, are powered by the evolution of the sun's intense magnetic field. 3D Radiative Magnetohydrodnamics (MHD) computer simulations have furthered our understanding of the processes involved: When non aligned magnetic field lines reconnect, the alteration of the magnetic topology causes stored magnetic energy to be converted into thermal and kinetic energy. Detailed analysis of this evolution entails tracing magnetic field lines, an operation which is not time-efficient on a single processor. By utilizing a graphics card (GPU) to trace lines in parallel, conducting such analysis is made feasible. We applied our GPU implementation to the most advanced 3D Radiative-MHD simulations (Bifrost, Gudicksen et al. 2011) of the solar atmosphere in order to better understand the evolution of the modeled field lines.

  17. Simulation of magnetic active polymers for versatile microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusenbauer, Markus; Özelt, Harald; Fischbacher, Johann; Reichel, Franz; Exl, Lukas; Bance, Simon; Kataeva, Nadezhda; Binder, Claudia; Brückl, Hubert; Schrefl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We propose to use a compound of magnetic nanoparticles (20-100 nm) embedded in a flexible polymer (Polydimethylsiloxane PDMS) to filter circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The analysis of CTCs is an emerging tool for cancer biology research and clinical cancer management including the detection, diagnosis and monitoring of cancer. The combination of experiments and simulations lead to a versatile microfluidic lab-on-chip device. Simulations are essential to understand the influence of the embedded nanoparticles in the elastic PDMS when applying a magnetic gradient field. It combines finite element calculations of the polymer, magnetic simulations of the embedded nanoparticles and the fluid dynamic calculations of blood plasma and blood cells. With the use of magnetic active polymers a wide range of tunable microfluidic structures can be created. The method can help to increase the yield of needed isolated CTCs.

  18. MHD Simulation of Plasma Flow through the VASIMR Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarditi, A. G.; Shebalin, J. V.

    2003-10-01

    The VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket, [1]) concept is currently in the experimental development phase at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center. The current experimental effort is mainly focused on the demonstration of the efficient plasma production (light ion helicon source, [2]) and energy boosting (ion cyclotron resonance heating section). Two other critical issues, the plasma detachment process and the collimation of the plasma plume in the magnetic nozzle, are essential for the near term experimental development and are being addressed through an MHD simulation modeling effort with the NIMROD code [3,4]. The model follows the plasma flow up to few meters from the nozzle throat: at that distance the plasma exhaust parameters reach values comparable with the ionospheric plasma background [5]. Results from two-dimensional simulation runs (cylindrical geometry, assuming azimuthal symmetry) aimed in particular at testing the effectiveness of different open-end boundary condition schemes are presented. [1] F. R. Chang-Diaz, Scientific American, p. 90, Nov. 2000 [2] M. D. Carter, et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 5097-5110, 2002 [3] http://www.nimrodteam.org [4] A. Tarditi et al., 28th Int. Electric Propulsion Conf., IEPC 2003, Toulouse, France, March 2003 [5] A. V. Ilin et al., Proc. 40th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, NV, Jan. 2002

  19. Simulation of magnetization process of Pure-type superconductor magnet undulator based on T-method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deri, Yi; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Tsuchimoto, Masanori; Tanaka, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    For the next generation Free Electron Laser, Pure-type undulator made of high Tc superconductors (HTSs) was considered to achieve a small size and high intensity magnetic field undulator. In general, it is very difficult to adjust the undulator magnet alignment after the HTS magnetization since the entire undulator is installed inside a cryostat. The appropriate HTS alignment has to be determined in the design stage. This paper presents the development of a numerical simulation code for magnetization process of the Pure-type HTS undulator to assist the design of the optimal size and alignment of the HTS magnets.

  20. Measurements of beam pipe eddy current effects in Main Injector dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, D.G.C.; Bleadon, M.E.; Brown, B.C.; Glass, H.D.; Harding, D.J.; Mazur, P.O.; Sim, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    The dipole magnets for the proposed Main Injector project at Fermilab are designed to ramp to maximum field (1.7 T) at rates over 2.5 T/s. These ramp rates will produce eddy current effects which degrade overall field quality. A harmonics probe was constructed for the purpose of measuring eddy current field components during the ramp cycle. Three separate ramp rates were employed ranging from 1.3 T/s to 2.7 T/s. Tests were performed using beam pipes with two different resistivities. The dominant multipole contribution resulting from eddy current effects in each beam pipe was sextupole. The sextupole component closely matched the calculated prediction.

  1. Bunch coalescing and bunch rotation in the Fermilab Main Ring: Operational experience and comparison with simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.S.; Wildman, D.W.

    1988-07-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron I proton-antiproton collider project requires that the Fermilab Main Ring produce intense bunches of protons and antiprotons for injection into the Tevatron. The process of coalescing a small number of harmonic number h=1113 bunches into a single bunch by bunch-rotating in a lower harmonic rf system is described.The Main Ring is also required to extract onto the antiproton production target bunches with as narrow a time spread as possible. This operation is also discussed. The operation of the bunch coalescing and bunch rotation are compared with simulations using the computer program ESME. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domainsmore » on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.« less

  3. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-07-01

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domains on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.

  4. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang; Li, Yulan

    2015-07-15

    The magnetic hysteresis loops and Barkhausen noise of a single α-iron with nonmagnetic particles are simulated to investigate into the magnetic hardening due to Cu-rich precipitates in irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Phase field method basing Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is used for this simulation. The results show that the presence of the nonmagnetic particle could result in magnetic hardening by making the nucleation of reversed domains difficult. The coercive field is found to increase, while the intensity of Barkhausen noise voltage is decreased when the nonmagnetic particle is introduced. Simulations demonstrate the impact of nucleation field of reversed domains on the magnetization reversal behavior and the magnetic properties.

  5. Simulations of the electron cloud buildups and suppressions in Tevatron and main injector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Ostiguy, Jean-Francois; Chou, Weiren; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    To assess the effects of the electron cloud on Main Injector intensity upgrades, simulations of the cloud buildup were carried out using POSINST and compared with ECLOUD. Results indicate that even assuming an optimistic 1.3 maximum secondary electron yield, the electron cloud remains a serious concern for the planned future operational mode with 500 bunches, 3e11 proton per bunch. Electron cloud buildup can be mitigated in various ways. We consider a plausible scenario involving solenoids in straight section and a single clearing strip electrode (like SNEG in Tevatron) held at a potential of 500V. Simulations with parameters corresponding to Tevatron and Main Injector operating conditions at locations where special electron cloud detectors have been installed have been carried out and are in satisfactory agreement with preliminary measurements.

  6. Simulating functional magnetic materials on supercomputers.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Markus Ernst; Entel, Peter

    2009-07-22

    The recent passing of the petaflop per second landmark by the Roadrunner project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory marks a preliminary peak of an impressive world-wide development in the high-performance scientific computing sector. Also, purely academic state-of-the-art supercomputers such as the IBM Blue Gene/P at Forschungszentrum Jülich allow us nowadays to investigate large systems of the order of 10(3) spin polarized transition metal atoms by means of density functional theory. Three applications will be presented where large-scale ab initio calculations contribute to the understanding of key properties emerging from a close interrelation between structure and magnetism. The first two examples discuss the size dependent evolution of equilibrium structural motifs in elementary iron and binary Fe-Pt and Co-Pt transition metal nanoparticles, which are currently discussed as promising candidates for ultra-high-density magnetic data storage media. However, the preference for multiply twinned morphologies at smaller cluster sizes counteracts the formation of a single-crystalline L1(0) phase, which alone provides the required hard magnetic properties. The third application is concerned with the magnetic shape memory effect in the Ni-Mn-Ga Heusler alloy, which is a technologically relevant candidate for magnetomechanical actuators and sensors. In this material strains of up to 10% can be induced by external magnetic fields due to the field induced shifting of martensitic twin boundaries, requiring an extremely high mobility of the martensitic twin boundaries, but also the selection of the appropriate martensitic structure from the rich phase diagram.

  7. Experimental simulation of a magnetic refrigeration cycle in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilmieva, E. T.; Kamantsev, A. P.; Koledov, V. V.; Mashirov, A. V.; Shavrov, V. G.; Cwik, J.; Tereshina, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    The complete magnetic refrigeration cycle has been simulated on a sample of gadolinium in magnetic fields of a Bitter coil magnet up to 12 T. The total change of temperature of the sample during the cycle is a consequence of magnetic refrigeration, and the dependence of the magnetization of the sample on the magnetic field exhibits a hysteretic behavior. This makes it possible to determine the work done by the magnetic field on the sample during the magnetic refrigeration cycle and to calculate the coefficient of performance of the process. In a magnetic field of 2 T near the Curie temperature of gadolinium, the coefficient of performance of the magnetic refrigeration is found to be 92. With an increase in the magnetic field, the coefficient of performance of the process decreases sharply down to 15 in a magnetic field of 12 T. The reasons, for which the coefficient of performance of the magnetic refrigeration is significantly below the fundamental limitations imposed by the reversed Carnot theorem, have been discussed.

  8. Magnetic stochasticity in gyrokinetic simulations of plasma microturbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Eric

    2010-11-01

    One of the fundamental components of a steady state tokamak or stellerator fusion reactor is the structural integrity of nested magnetic surfaces. The consequences of losing this integrity can have very serious implications, ranging from sawtooth crashes to disruptions. In the present work, we use GYRO to examine the perturbed magnetic field structure generated by electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations of the CYCLONE base case as β is varied from .1% to .7%, as first investigated in [J. Candy, Phys. Plasmas 12, 072307 (2005)]. By integrating the self-consistent magnetic field lines to produce Poincare surface of section plots, we demonstrate destruction of magnetic surfaces for all nonzero values of β. Despite widespread stochasticity of the perturbed magnetic fields, no significant increase in electron transport is observed. We can quantify the stochastic electron heat transport by using test particles to estimate the magnetic diffusion coefficient Dst [A.B. Rechester and M.N. Rosenbluth, PRL 40, 38 (1978)] for hundreds of time slices in each simulation and find the time-history of Dst to be highly correlated with the electron heat transport due to ``magnetic-flutter'' computed in the simulations. The mechanism that couples electromagnetic turbulence to the linearly damped high-n tearing modes that are responsible for reconnection will be discussed.

  9. OVERVIEW OF A RECONFIGURABLE SIMULATOR FOR MAIN CONTROL ROOM UPGRADES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-10-01

    This paper provides background on a reconfigurable control room simulator for nuclear power plants. The main control rooms in current nuclear power plants feature analog technology that is growing obsolete. The need to upgrade control rooms serves the practical need of maintainability as well as the opportunity to implement newer digital technologies with added functionality. There currently exists no dedicated research simulator for use in human factors design and evaluation activities for nuclear power plant modernization in the U.S. The new research simulator discussed in this paper provides a test bed in which operator performance on new control room concepts can be benchmarked against existing control rooms and in which new technologies can be validated for safety and usability prior to deployment.

  10. Simulations of magnetic fields in isolated disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmor, Rüdiger; Springel, Volker

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic fields are known to be dynamically important in the interstellar medium of our own Galaxy, and they are ubiquitously observed in diffuse gas in the haloes of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Yet, magnetic fields have typically been neglected in studies of the formation of galaxies, leaving their global influence on galaxy formation largely unclear. Here we extend our magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) implementation in the moving-mesh code AREPO to cosmological problems which include radiative cooling and the formation of stars. In particular, we replace our previously employed divergence cleaning approach with a Powell eight-wave scheme, which turns out to be significantly more stable, even in very dynamic environments. We verify the improved accuracy through simulations of the magneto-rotational instability in accretion discs, which reproduce the correct linear growth rate of the instability. Using this new MHD code, we simulate the formation of isolated disc galaxies similar to the Milky Way using idealized initial conditions with and without magnetic fields. We find that the magnetic field strength is quickly amplified in the initial central starburst and the differential rotation of the forming disc, eventually reaching a saturation value. At this point, the magnetic field pressure in the interstellar medium becomes comparable to the thermal pressure, and a further efficient growth of the magnetic field strength is prevented. The additional pressure component leads to a lower star formation rate at late times compared to simulations without magnetic fields, and induces changes in the spiral arm structures of the gas disc. In addition, we observe highly magnetized fountain-like outflows from the disc. These results are robust with numerical resolution and are largely independent of the initial magnetic seed field strength assumed in the initial conditions, as the amplification process is rapid and self-regulated. Our findings suggest an important influence of

  11. Simulation of Electromagnetic and Thermal Processes in Fastcycling Magnets for Calculation Parameters of Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, V.; Kozub, S.; Tkachenko, L.

    SIS300 fast-cycling superconducting quadrupole magnet is developed at IHEP. Temperature margin and minimum quench energy are main parameters of stability of superconducting magnets. These parameters are important for the design and safe operation of superconducting magnets. But additional understanding for fast-cycling superconducting magnets is needed. To calculate the temperature margin one needs coupled numerical transient simulation of electromagnetic and thermal processes in the coil because critical temperature, operating temperature and AC losses are nonuniform over turns and their magnitudes vary in time during accelerator cycles. For calculation of the minimum quench energy the combination of the network model with thermal analysis is necessary, which allows one to model quench dynamics, including the effects of a current redistribution between strands of cable and spatial inhomogeneity of cable. Results for the temperature margin and the minimum quench energy for the magnet are presented and theirs dependence on various parameters is discussed.

  12. Magnetic inhibition of convection and the fundamental properties of low-mass stars. II. Fully convective main-sequence stars

    SciTech Connect

    Feiden, Gregory A.; Chaboyer, Brian E-mail: brian.chaboyer@dartmouth.edu

    2014-07-01

    We examine the hypothesis that magnetic fields are inflating the radii of fully convective main-sequence stars in detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs). The magnetic Dartmouth stellar evolution code is used to analyze two systems in particular: Kepler-16 and CM Draconis. Magneto-convection is treated assuming stabilization of convection and also by assuming reductions in convective efficiency due to a turbulent dynamo. We find that magnetic stellar models are unable to reproduce the properties of inflated fully convective main-sequence stars, unless strong interior magnetic fields in excess of 10 MG are present. Validation of the magnetic field hypothesis given the current generation of magnetic stellar evolution models therefore depends critically on whether the generation and maintenance of strong interior magnetic fields is physically possible. An examination of this requirement is provided. Additionally, an analysis of previous studies invoking the influence of star spots is presented to assess the suggestion that star spots are inflating stars and biasing light curve analyses toward larger radii. From our analysis, we find that there is not yet sufficient evidence to definitively support the hypothesis that magnetic fields are responsible for the observed inflation among fully convective main-sequence stars in DEBs.

  13. HSX: Engineering Design and Fabrication of the main Magnet Coils, Vacuum Vessel and Support/Alignment Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F. Simon B.; Anderson, D. T.; Almagri, A. F.; Matthews, P. G.; Probert, P. H.; Shohet, J. L.; Talmadge, J. N.

    1996-11-01

    The HSX device, with a magnetic field consisting of a SINGLE dominant HELICAL component, has a set of 48 twisted main magnetic field coils. Engineering analysis (ANSYS) has resulted in a set of construction and alignment constraints and goals for field accuracy and coil structural strength. Close proximity of the main coil set to the magnetic separatrix imposes space restrictions on the vacuum vessel. Fabrication of the vessel using explosive techniques, and the structural analysis for the stresses in the vacuum chamber will be discussed. Crucial to the integrity of the quasihelical magnetic field is the accurate positioning of the magnet coils and maintenance of the position during operation. The design and construct- ion of the completed support structure for HSX coils will also be presented. *** Work supported by U.S Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG02-93ER54222

  14. Non-contact main cable NDE technique for suspension bridge using magnetic flux-based B-H loop measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seunghee; Kim, Ju-Won; Moon, Dae-Joong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a noncontact main cable NDE method has been developed. This cable NDE method utilizes the direct current (DC) magnetization and a searching coil-based total flux measurement. A total flux sensor head prototype was fabricated that consists of an electro-magnet yoke and a searching coil sensor. To obtain a B-H loop, a magnetic field was generated by applying a cycle of low frequency direct current to the electro-magnet yoke. During the magnetization, a search coil sensor measures the electromotive force from magnetized cable. During the magnetization process, a search coil sensor was measured the magnetic flux density. Total flux was calculated by integrating the measured magnetic flux using a fluxmeter. A B-H loop is obtained by using relationship between a cycle of input DC voltage and measured total flux. The B-H loop can reflect the property of the ferromagnetic materials. Therefore, the cross-sectional loss of cable can be detected using variation of features from the B-H curve. To verify the feasibility of the proposed steel cable NDE method, a series of experimental studies using a main-cable mock-up specimen has been performed in this study.

  15. A model of the AGS based on stepwise ray-tracing through the measured field maps of the main magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Dutheil Y.; Meot, F.; Tsoupas, N.

    2012-05-20

    Two-dimensional mid-plane magnetic field maps of two of the main AGS magnets were produced, from Hall probe measurements, for a series of different current settings. The analysis of these data yielded the excitation functions [1] and the harmonic coefficients [2] of the main magnets which have been used so far in all the models of the AGS. The constant increase of the computation power makes it possible today to directly use a stepwise raytracing through these measured field maps with a reasonable computation time. We describe in detail how these field maps have allowed the generation of models of the 6 different types of AGS main magnets, and how they are being handled with the Zgoubi ray-tracing code [3]. We give and discuss a number of results obtained regarding both beam and spin dynamics in the AGS, and we provide comparisons with other numerical and analytical modelling methods.

  16. Magnetized laboratory plasma jets: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Schrafel, Peter; Bell, Kate; Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radial foils on a 1 MA, 100 ns current driver can be used to study the ablation of thin foils and liners, produce extreme conditions relevant to laboratory astrophysics, and aid in computational code validation. This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a 20 μm Al foil (8111 alloy), in a radial configuration, driven by Cornell University's COBRA pulsed power generator. In these experiments ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top side of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet are observed developing midway through the current rise. With experimental and computational results this work gives a detailed description of the role of the ASP in the formation of the plasma jet with and without an applied axial magnetic field. This ∼1 T field is applied by a Helmholtz-coil pair driven by a slow, 150 μs current pulse and penetrates the load hardware before arrival of the COBRA pulse. Several effects of the applied magnetic field are observed: (1) without the field extreme-ultraviolet emission from the ASP shows considerable azimuthal asymmetry while with the field the ASP develops azimuthal motion that reduces this asymmetry, (2) this azimuthal motion slows the development of the jet when the field is applied, and (3) with the magnetic field the jet becomes less collimated and has a density minimum (hollowing) on the axis. PERSEUS, an XMHD code, has qualitatively and quantitatively reproduced all these experimental observations. The differences between this XMHD and an MHD code without a Hall current and inertial effects are discussed. In addition the PERSEUS results describe effects we were not able to resolve experimentally and suggest a line of future experiments with better diagnostics. PMID:25679726

  17. Magnetized laboratory plasma jets: Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrafel, Peter; Bell, Kate; Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radial foils on a 1 M A , 100 n s current driver can be used to study the ablation of thin foils and liners, produce extreme conditions relevant to laboratory astrophysics, and aid in computational code validation. This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a 20 μ m Al foil (8111 alloy), in a radial configuration, driven by Cornell University's COBRA pulsed power generator. In these experiments ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top side of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet are observed developing midway through the current rise. With experimental and computational results this work gives a detailed description of the role of the ASP in the formation of the plasma jet with and without an applied axial magnetic field. This ˜1 T field is applied by a Helmholtz-coil pair driven by a slow, 150 μ s current pulse and penetrates the load hardware before arrival of the COBRA pulse. Several effects of the applied magnetic field are observed: (1) without the field extreme-ultraviolet emission from the ASP shows considerable azimuthal asymmetry while with the field the ASP develops azimuthal motion that reduces this asymmetry, (2) this azimuthal motion slows the development of the jet when the field is applied, and (3) with the magnetic field the jet becomes less collimated and has a density minimum (hollowing) on the axis. PERSEUS, an XMHD code, has qualitatively and quantitatively reproduced all these experimental observations. The differences between this XMHD and an MHD code without a Hall current and inertial effects are discussed. In addition the PERSEUS results describe effects we were not able to resolve experimentally and suggest a line of future experiments with better diagnostics.

  18. Magnetic domain patterns on strong perpendicular magnetization of Co/Ni multilayers as spintronics materials: II. Numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Kazue; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kojima, Kazuki; Yasue, Tsuneo; Akutsu, Noriko; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Kasai, Hideaki; Bauer, Ernst; Koshikawa, Takanori

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic domains in ultrathin films form domain patterns, which strongly depend on the magnetic anisotropy. The magnetic anisotropy in Co/Ni multilayers changes with the number of layers. We provide a model to simulate the experimentally observed domain patterns. The model assumes a layer-dependent magnetic anisotropy. With the anisotropy parameter estimated from experimental data, we reproduce the magnetic domain patterns.

  19. MD Simulation of Particle Orientation in Magnetic Inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher; Günal

    1997-03-01

    We have done molecular-dynamics type simulations of particle re-orientation in a magnetic colloid, by a magnetic field during tape and disk manufacture. The model takes into account switching (in a Stoner- Wohlfarth model) as well as particle translation and rotation in response to magnetic, steric, Brownian, and hydrodynamic drag forces and torques. Magnetic interactions are fully included; hysteresis loops with and without magnetic interaction will be displayed, with corresponding Δ M curves. Images of the network structure at various points of the hysteresis loop will be shown. Further information is available at http:// www.mint.ua.edu/colloids/march.html.

  20. A hybrid simulation study of magnetic reconnection in anisotropic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jun; Li, Yi; Lu, Quan-ming; Wang, Shui

    2003-10-01

    The process of magnetic reconnection in anisotropic plasmas is studied numerically using a 2-dimensional, 3-component hybrid simulation. The results of the calculation show that, when the plasma pressure in the direction perpendicular to magnetic field is larger than that in the parallel direction (e.g. P ⊥/P ‖ = 1.5 ), instability may greatly increase, speeding up the rate of reconnection. When P⊥ is smaller than P‖, (e.g., when P ⊥/P ‖ = 0.6 ), fire hose instability appears, which will restrain the tearing mode instability and the process of magnetic reconnection.

  1. VERA-CS Modeling and Simulation of PWR Main Steam Line Break Core Response to DNB

    SciTech Connect

    Salko, Robert K; Sung, Yixing; Kucukboyaci, Vefa; Xu, Yiban; Cao, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications core simulator (VERA-CS) being developed by the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) includes coupled neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel temperature components with an isotopic depletion capability. The neutronics capability employed is based on MPACT, a three-dimensional (3-D) whole core transport code. The thermal-hydraulics and fuel temperature models are provided by the COBRA-TF (CTF) subchannel code. As part of the CASL development program, the VERA-CS (MPACT/CTF) code system was applied to model and simulate reactor core response with respect to departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) at the limiting time step of a postulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) main steamline break (MSLB) event initiated at the hot zero power (HZP), either with offsite power available and the reactor coolant pumps in operation (high-flow case) or without offsite power where the reactor core is cooled through natural circulation (low-flow case). The VERA-CS simulation was based on core boundary conditions from the RETRAN-02 system transient calculations and STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) core inlet distribution calculations. The evaluation indicated that the VERA-CS code system is capable of modeling and simulating quasi-steady state reactor core response under the steamline break (SLB) accident condition, the results are insensitive to uncertainties in the inlet flow distributions from the CFD simulations, and the high-flow case is more DNB limiting than the low-flow case.

  2. A comprehensive set of simulations of high-velocity collisions between main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Marc; Benz, Willy

    2005-04-01

    We report on a very large set of simulations of collisions between two main-sequence (MS) stars. These computations were carried out with the smoothed particle hydrodynamics method. Realistic stellar structure models for evolved MS stars were used. In order to sample an extended domain of initial parameters space (masses of the stars, relative velocity and impact parameter), more than 14000 simulations were carried out. We considered stellar masses ranging between 0.1 and 75 Msolar and relative velocities up to a few thousand km s-1. To limit the computational burden, a resolution of 1000-32000 particles per star was used. The primary goal of this study was to build a complete data base from which the result of any collision can be interpolated. This allows us to incorporate the effects of stellar collisions with an unprecedented level of realism into dynamical simulations of galactic nuclei and other dense stellar clusters. We make the data describing the initial condition and outcome (mass and energy loss, angle of deflection) of all our simulations available on the Internet. We find that the outcome of collisions depends sensitively on the stellar structure and that, in most cases, using polytropic models is inappropriate. Published fitting formulae for the collision outcomes, established from a limited set of collisions, prove of limited use because they do not allow robust extrapolation to other stellar structures or relative velocities.

  3. Propulsion simulation for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Prakash B.; Beerman, Henry P.; Chen, James; Krech, Robert H.; Lintz, Andrew L.; Rosen, David I.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of simulating propulsion-induced aerodynamic effects on scaled aircraft models in wind tunnels employing Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems. The investigation concerned itself with techniques of generating exhaust jets of appropriate characteristics. The objectives were to: (1) define thrust and mass flow requirements of jets; (2) evaluate techniques for generating propulsive gas within volume limitations imposed by magnetically-suspended models; (3) conduct simple diagnostic experiments for techniques involving new concepts; and (4) recommend experiments for demonstration of propulsion simulation techniques. Various techniques of generating exhaust jets of appropriate characteristics were evaluated on scaled aircraft models in wind tunnels with MSBS. Four concepts of remotely-operated propulsion simulators were examined. Three conceptual designs involving innovative adaptation of convenient technologies (compressed gas cylinders, liquid, and solid propellants) were developed. The fourth innovative concept, namely, the laser-assisted thruster, which can potentially simulate both inlet and exhaust flows, was found to require very high power levels for small thrust levels.

  4. Feature-oriented regional modeling and simulations in the Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Avijit; Robinson, Allan R.; Haley, Patrick J.; Leslie, Wayne G.; Lozano, Carlos J.; Bisagni, James J.; Yu, Zhitao

    2003-03-01

    The multiscale synoptic circulation system in the Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank (GOMGB) region is presented using a feature-oriented approach. Prevalent synoptic circulation structures, or 'features', are identified from previous observational studies. These features include the buoyancy-driven Maine Coastal Current, the Georges Bank anticyclonic frontal circulation system, the basin-scale cyclonic gyres (Jordan, Georges and Wilkinson), the deep inflow through the Northeast Channel (NEC), the shallow outflow via the Great South Channel (GSC), and the shelf-slope front (SSF). Their synoptic water-mass ( T- S) structures are characterized and parameterized in a generalized formulation to develop temperature-salinity feature models. A synoptic initialization scheme for feature-oriented regional modeling and simulation (FORMS) of the circulation in the coastal-to-deep region of the GOMGB system is then developed. First, the temperature and salinity feature-model profiles are placed on a regional circulation template and then objectively analyzed with appropriate background climatology in the coastal region. Furthermore, these fields are melded with adjacent deep-ocean regional circulation (Gulf Stream Meander and Ring region) along and across the SSF. These initialization fields are then used for dynamical simulations via the primitive equation model. Simulation results are analyzed to calibrate the multiparameter feature-oriented modeling system. Experimental short-term synoptic simulations are presented for multiple resolutions in different regions with and without atmospheric forcing. The presented 'generic and portable' methodology demonstrates the potential of applying similar FORMS in many other regions of the Global Coastal Ocean.

  5. Magnetic fields of chemically peculiar and related stars. 2. Main results of 2015 and near-future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, I. I.

    2016-07-01

    We present an analytical survey of key publications concerned with the study of stellar magnetism published in 2015. We considered about 80 publications, the most significant from our point of view, presented brief reviews of them, and made generalizations. The paper considers: instruments, techniques of observations and analysis; large-scale magnetic fields of OBA stars on the Main Sequence (MS) (formation and evolution, field topology, search for new magnetic stars including the projects MiMeS, BOB, and BinaMIcS and observations with the Russian 6-m telescope, rotation and chemical abundance analysis of magnetic CP stars); magnetic fields, chemical abundance and variability of stars related to peculiar, primarily, active cool stars, solar-type stars and white dwarfs; multiple magnetic stars including interferometry data, exoplanets in a system of magnetic stars. We make a conclusion that the accuracy of magnetic field measurements has grown due to universal application of the multilinear method of observations especially with high-resolution spectropolarimeters. Usage of Zeeman-Doppler imaging technique (ZDI) when analyzing the obtained data allows us to confidently search and measure fields of complex topology of the order of 10 Gs. For the first time, a magnetic field has been detected for post-AGB stars and some other types of objects.

  6. Magnetic levitation-based Martian and Lunar gravity simulator.

    PubMed

    Valles, J M; Maris, H J; Seidel, G M; Tang, J; Yao, W

    2005-01-01

    Missions to Mars will subject living specimens to a range of low gravity environments. Deleterious biological effects of prolonged exposure to Martian gravity (0.38 g), Lunar gravity (0.17 g), and microgravity are expected, but the mechanisms involved and potential for remedies are unknown. We are proposing the development of a facility that provides a simulated Martian and Lunar gravity environment for experiments on biological systems in a well controlled laboratory setting. The magnetic adjustable gravity simulator will employ intense, inhomogeneous magnetic fields to exert magnetic body forces on a specimen that oppose the body force of gravity. By adjusting the magnetic field, it is possible to continuously adjust the total body force acting on a specimen. The simulator system considered consists of a superconducting solenoid with a room temperature bore sufficiently large to accommodate small whole organisms, cell cultures, and gravity sensitive bio-molecular solutions. It will have good optical access so that the organisms can be viewed in situ. This facility will be valuable for experimental observations and public demonstrations of systems in simulated reduced gravity.

  7. Magnetic levitation-based Martian and Lunar gravity simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valles, J. M. Jr; Maris, H. J.; Seidel, G. M.; Tang, J.; Yao, W.

    2005-01-01

    Missions to Mars will subject living specimens to a range of low gravity environments. Deleterious biological effects of prolonged exposure to Martian gravity (0.38 g), Lunar gravity (0.17 g), and microgravity are expected, but the mechanisms involved and potential for remedies are unknown. We are proposing the development of a facility that provides a simulated Martian and Lunar gravity environment for experiments on biological systems in a well controlled laboratory setting. The magnetic adjustable gravity simulator will employ intense, inhomogeneous magnetic fields to exert magnetic body forces on a specimen that oppose the body force of gravity. By adjusting the magnetic field, it is possible to continuously adjust the total body force acting on a specimen. The simulator system considered consists of a superconducting solenoid with a room temperature bore sufficiently large to accommodate small whole organisms, cell cultures, and gravity sensitive bio-molecular solutions. It will have good optical access so that the organisms can be viewed in situ. This facility will be valuable for experimental observations and public demonstrations of systems in simulated reduced gravity. c2005 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  8. Magnetic levitation-based Martian and Lunar gravity simulator.

    PubMed

    Valles, J M; Maris, H J; Seidel, G M; Tang, J; Yao, W

    2005-01-01

    Missions to Mars will subject living specimens to a range of low gravity environments. Deleterious biological effects of prolonged exposure to Martian gravity (0.38 g), Lunar gravity (0.17 g), and microgravity are expected, but the mechanisms involved and potential for remedies are unknown. We are proposing the development of a facility that provides a simulated Martian and Lunar gravity environment for experiments on biological systems in a well controlled laboratory setting. The magnetic adjustable gravity simulator will employ intense, inhomogeneous magnetic fields to exert magnetic body forces on a specimen that oppose the body force of gravity. By adjusting the magnetic field, it is possible to continuously adjust the total body force acting on a specimen. The simulator system considered consists of a superconducting solenoid with a room temperature bore sufficiently large to accommodate small whole organisms, cell cultures, and gravity sensitive bio-molecular solutions. It will have good optical access so that the organisms can be viewed in situ. This facility will be valuable for experimental observations and public demonstrations of systems in simulated reduced gravity. PMID:16252445

  9. Hunting for millimeter flares from magnetic reconnection in pre-main sequence spectroscopic binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kóspál, Á.; Salter, D. M.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Moór, A.; Blake, G. A.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Recent observations of the low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS), eccentric spectroscopic binaries DQ Tau and V773 Tau A reveal that their millimeter spectrum is occasionally dominated by flares from non-thermal emission processes. The transient activity is believed to be synchrotron in nature, resulting from powerful magnetic reconnection events when the separate magnetic structures of the binary components are briefly capable of interacting and forced to reorganize, typically near periastron. Aims: We conducted the first systematic study of the millimeter variability toward a sample of 12 PMS spectroscopic binaries with the aim to characterize the proliferation of flares amongst sources likely to experience similar interbinary reconnection events. The source sample consists entirely of short-period, close-separation binaries that possess either a high orbital eccentricity (e > 0.1) or a circular orbit (e ≈ 0). Methods: Using the MAMBO2 array on the IRAM 30 m telescope, we carried out continuous monitoring at 1.25 mm (240 GHz) over a 4-night period during which all of the high-eccentricity binaries approached periastron. We also obtained simultaneous optical VRI measurements, since a strong link is often observed between stellar reconnection events (traced via X-rays) and optical brightenings. Results: UZ Tau E is the only source to be detected at millimeter wavelengths, and it exhibited significant variation (F1.25mm = 87-179 mJy); it is also the only source to undergo strong simultaneous optical variability (ΔR ≈ 0.9 mag). The binary possesses the largest orbital eccentricity in the current sample, a predicted factor in star-star magnetic interaction events. With orbital parameters and variable accretion activity similar to DQ Tau, the millimeter behavior of UZ Tau E draws many parallels to the DQ Tau model for colliding magnetospheres. However, on the basis of our observations alone, we cannot determine whether the variability is repetitive, or if it

  10. The brain and its main anatomical subdivisions in living hominoids using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Semendeferi, K; Damasio, H

    2000-02-01

    Primary comparative data on the hominoid brain are scarce and major neuroanatomical differences between humans and apes have not yet been described satisfactorily, even at the gross level. Basic questions that involve the evolution of the human brain cannot be addressed adequately unless the brains of all extant hominoid species are analyzed. Contrary to the scarcity of original data, there is a rich literature on the topic of human brain evolution and several debates exist on the size of particular sectors of the brain, e.g., the frontal lobe. In this study we applied a non-invasive imaging technique (magnetic resonance) on living human, great ape and lesser ape subjects in order to investigate the overall size of the hominoid brain. The images were reconstructed in three dimensions and volumetric estimates were obtained for the brain and its main anatomical sectors, including the frontal and temporal lobes, the insula, the parieto-occipital sector and the cerebellum.A remarkable homogeneity is present in the relative size of many of the large sectors of the hominoid brain, but interspecific and intraspecific variation exists in certain parts of the brain. The human cerebellum is smaller than expected for an ape brain of human size. It is suggested that the cerebellum increased less than the cerebrum after the split of the human lineage from the African ancestral hominoid stock. In contrast, humans have a slightly larger temporal lobe and insula than expected, but differences are not statistically significant. Humans do not have a larger frontal lobe than expected for an ape brain of human size and gibbons have a relatively smaller frontal lobe than the rest of the hominoids. Given the fact that the frontal lobe in humans and great apes has similar relative size, it is parsimonious to suggest that the relative size of the whole of the frontal lobe has not changed significantly during hominid evolution in the Plio-Pleistocene. PMID:10656781

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the ejection of a magnetic flux rope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Mackay, D. H.; Poedts, S.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Coronal mass ejections (CME's) are one of the most violent phenomena found on the Sun. One model to explain their occurrence is the flux rope ejection model. In this model, magnetic flux ropes form slowly over time periods of days to weeks. They then lose equilibrium and are ejected from the solar corona over a few hours. The contrasting time scales of formation and ejection pose a serious problem for numerical simulations. Aims: We simulate the whole life span of a flux rope from slow formation to rapid ejection and investigate whether magnetic flux ropes formed from a continuous magnetic field distribution, during a quasi-static evolution, can erupt to produce a CME. Methods: To model the full life span of magnetic flux ropes we couple two models. The global non-linear force-free field (GNLFFF) evolution model is used to follow the quasi-static formation of a flux rope. The MHD code ARMVAC is used to simulate the production of a CME through the loss of equilibrium and ejection of this flux rope. Results: We show that the two distinct models may be successfully coupled and that the flux rope is ejected out of our simulation box, where the outer boundary is placed at 2.5 R⊙. The plasma expelled during the flux rope ejection travels outward at a speed of 100 km s-1, which is consistent with the observed speed of CMEs in the low corona. Conclusions: Our work shows that flux ropes formed in the GNLFFF can lead to the ejection of a mass loaded magnetic flux rope in full MHD simulations. Coupling the two distinct models opens up a new avenue of research to investigate phenomena where different phases of their evolution occur on drastically different time scales. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Simulation of fluid flow induced by opposing ac magnetic fields in a continuous casting mold

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.C.; Hull, J.R.; Beitelman, L.

    1995-07-01

    A numerical simulation was performed for a novel electromagnetic stirring system employing two rotating magnetic fields. The system controls stirring flow in the meniscus region of a continuous casting mold independently from the stirring induced within the remaining volume of the mold by a main electromagnetic stirrer (M-EMS). This control is achieved by applying to the meniscus region an auxiliary electromagnetic field whose direction of rotation is opposite to that of the main magnetic field produced by the M-EMS. The model computes values and spatial distributions of electromagnetic parameters and fluid flow in the stirred pools of mercury in cylindrical and square geometries. Also predicted are the relationships between electromagnetics and fluid flows pertinent to a dynamic equilibrium of the opposing stirring swirls in the meniscus region. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from experiments with mercury pools.

  13. Vlasov simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection without background density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, H.; Grauer, R.

    2008-02-01

    A standard starting point for the simulation of collisionless reconnection is the Harris equilibrium which is made up of a current sheet that separates two regions of opposing magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of collisionless reconnection usually include a homogeneous background density for reasons of numerical stability. While, in some cases, this is a realistic assumption, the background density may introduce new effects both due to the more involved structure of the distribution function or due to the fact that the Alfvèn speed remains finite far away from the current sheet. We present a fully kinetic Vlasov simulation of the perturbed Harris equilibrium using a Vlasov code. Parameters are chosen to match the Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) Magnetic Reconnection Challenge but excluding the background density. This allows to compare with earlier simulations [Schmitz H, Grauer R. Kinetic Vlasov simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection. Phys Plasmas 2006;13:092309] which include the background density. It is found that the absence of a background density causes the reconnection rate to be higher. On the other hand, the time until the onset of reconnection is hardly affected. Again the off diagonal elements of the pressure tensor are found to be important on the X-line but with modified importance for the individual terms.

  14. Variations of the ISM Compactness Across the Main Sequence of Star Forming Galaxies: Observations and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Galarza, J. R.; Smith, H. A.; Lanz, L.; Hayward, Christopher C.; Zezas, A.; Rosenthal, L.; Weiner, A.; Hung, C.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Groves, B.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of star-forming galaxies follow a simple empirical correlation in the star formation rate (SFR) versus stellar mass (M*) plane, of the form {{SFR}}\\propto {M}*α , usually referred to as the star formation main sequence (MS). The physics that sets the properties of the MS is currently a subject of debate, and no consensus has been reached regarding the fundamental difference between members of the sequence and its outliers. Here we combine a set of hydro-dynamical simulations of interacting galactic disks with state-of-the-art radiative transfer codes to analyze how the evolution of mergers is reflected upon the properties of the MS. We present Chiburst, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo spectral energy distribution (SED) code that fits the multi-wavelength, broad-band photometry of galaxies and derives stellar masses, SFRs, and geometrical properties of the dust distribution. We apply this tool to the SEDs of simulated mergers and compare the derived results with the reference output from the simulations. Our results indicate that changes in the SEDs of mergers as they approach coalescence and depart from the MS are related to an evolution of dust geometry in scales larger than a few hundred parsecs. This is reflected in a correlation between the specific star formation rate, and the compactness parameter { C }, that parametrizes this geometry and hence the evolution of dust temperature ({T}{{dust}}) with time. As mergers approach coalescence, they depart from the MS and increase their compactness, which implies that moderate outliers of the MS are consistent with late-type mergers. By further applying our method to real observations of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), we show that the merger scenario is unable to explain these extreme outliers of the MS. Only by significantly increasing the gas fraction in the simulations are we able to reproduce the SEDs of LIRGs.

  15. Thermal conditions on the International Space Station: Heat flux and temperature investigation of main radiators for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Min; Gao, Jianmin; Wu, Shaohua; Qin, Yukun

    2016-09-01

    The investigation on heat flux can clarify the thermal condition and explain temperature behavior on the main radiators of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). In this paper, a detailed investigation of heat flux on the AMS main radiators is proposed. The heat transfer process of the AMS main radiators is theoretically analyzed. An updated thermal model of the AMS on the International Space Station (ISS) is developed to calculate the external heat flux density on the AMS main radiators. We conclude the ISS components and operations affect on the solar flux density of the AMS main radiators by reflecting or shading solar illumination. According to the energy conservation on the AMS main radiators, the temperature variation mainly depends on the solar flux change. The investigations are conducive to reference for the long-duration thermal control of the AMS, and knowledge for the thermal conditions on the ISS.

  16. Simulation of magnetic hysteresis loops and magnetic Barkhausen noise of α-iron containing nonmagnetic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Li, Qiulin; Liu, Wei

    2015-09-25

    Hysteresis loops and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise in a single crystal α-iron containing a nonmagnetic particle were simulated based on the Laudau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The analyses of domain morphologies and hysteresis loops show that reversal magnetization process is control by nucleation of reversed domains at nonmagnetic particle when the particle size reaches a particle value. In such a situation, the value of nucleation field is determined by the size of nonmagnetic particles, and moreover, coercive field and Magnetic Barkhausen Noise signal are strongly affected by the nucleation field of reversed domains.

  17. Classical simulations of magnetic structures for chromium clusters: Size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proykova, Ana; Stauffer, Dietrich

    2005-06-01

    Classical (Heisenberg) simulations show that the total magnetization of the lowest-energy states of clusters made of antiferromagnetically coupled chromium atoms is planar, rather than collinear, depending on the arrangement of the atoms. Although the model Hamiltonian is not restrictive, many cluster configurations of various numbers of atoms do not use all three directions for the spins. This result confirms the conclusion drawn from the local-spin DFT calculation by Kohl and Bertsch that clusters of N≤13 have non-collinear magnetic moments. The present simulations show non-collinear spin ordering also for bigger clusters, designed to be as spherical as possible following the bcc arrangement, when atoms interact both with the nearest and next-nearest neighbours. Depending on the signs of the coupling constants frustration appears. The advantage of the discrete model, despite the simplicity, is that very large clusters and magnetization at finite temperatures can be studied. This model predicts that clusters with specific numbers of atoms interacting only with the nearest neighbours have collinear spins as in the bulk. We also apply the model to simulate the destruction of the anti-ferromagnetic ordering by thermal fluctuations. This model shows no unique magnetization of mixed Fe 0.33 Cr 0.67, which is consistent with experimental observations.

  18. Design method of the layered active magnetic regenerator (AMR) for hydrogen liquefaction by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Inmyong; Kim, Youngkwon; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2015-09-01

    The design procedure of an active magnetic regenerator (AMR) operating between liquid nitrogen temperature and liquid hydrogen temperature is discussed with the selected magnetic refrigerants. Selected magnetic refrigerants (GdNi2, Dy0.85Er0.15Al2, Dy0.5Er0.5Al2, and Gd0.1Dy0.9Ni2) that have different transition temperatures are layered in an AMR to widen the temperature span. The optimum volume fraction of the layered refrigerants for the maximum COP with minimum volume is designed in a two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) using one dimensional numerical simulation. The entropy generation in each stage of the AMR is calculated by the numerical simulation to optimize the proposed design. The main sources of the entropy generation in the AMR are pressure drop, convection and conduction heat transfers in the AMR. However, the entropy generation by the convective heat transfer is mostly dominant in the optimized cases. In this paper, the design parameters and the operating conditions such as the distribution of the selected refrigerants in the layered AMR, the intermediate temperature between two stages and the mass flow rate of heat transfer fluid are specifically determined to maximize the performance of the AMR. The proposed design method will facilitate the construction of AMR systems with various magnetic refrigerants and conditions such as AMR size, operating temperature range, and magnetic field variation.

  19. A mathematical model of a single main rotor helicopter for piloted simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, P. D.; Tinling, B. E.; Decker, W. A.; Chen, R. T. N.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical model, suitable for piloted simulation of the flying qualities of helicopters, is a nonlinear, total force and moment model of a single main rotor helicopter. The model has ten degrees of freedom: six rigid body, three rotor flapping, and the rotor rotational degrees of freedom. The rotor model assumes rigid blades with rotor forces and moments radially integrated and summed about the azimuth. The fuselage aerodynamic model uses a detailed representation over a nominal angle of attack and sideslip range of + or - 15 deg., as well as a simplified curve fit at large angles of attack or sideslip. Stabilizing surface aerodynamics are modeled with a lift curve slope between stall limits and a general curve fit for large angles of attack. A generalized stability and control augmentation system is described. Additional computer subroutines provide options for a simplified engine/governor model, atmospheric turbulence, and a linearized six degree of freedom dynamic model for stability and control analysis.

  20. Improvements in the simulation of a main steam line break with steam generator tube rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, Sergio; Querol, Andrea; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2014-06-01

    The result of simultaneous Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) and a Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is a depressurization in the secondary and primary system because both systems are connected through the SGTR. The OECD/NEA ROSA-2 Test 5 performed in the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) reproduces these simultaneous breaks in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). A simulation of this Test 5 was made with the thermal-hydraulic code TRACE5. Some discrepancies found, such as an underestimation of SG-A secondary pressure during the depressurization and overestimation of the primary pressure drop after the first Power Operated Relief Valve (PORV) opening can be improved increasing the nodalization of the Upper Head in the pressure vessel and meeting the actual fluid conditions of Upper Head during the transient.

  1. Simulations of Filament Channel Formation in a Coronal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, Kalman; DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2016-05-01

    A major unanswered problem in solar physics has been explaining the presence of sheared filament channels above photospheric polarity inversion lines (PILs) and the simultaneous lack of structure in the ‘loop’ portion of the coronal magnetic field. The shear inherent in filament channels represents not only a form of magnetic energy, but also magnetic helicity. As a result, models of filament channel formation need to explain not only why helicity is observed above PILs, but also why it is apparently not observed anywhere else in the corona. Previous results (Knizhnik, Antiochos & DeVore, 2015) have suggested that any helicity injected into the coronal field inverse-cascades in scale, a process known as magnetic helicity condensation (Antiochos, 2013). In this work, we present high resolution numerical simulations of photospheric helicity injection into a coronal magnetic field that contains both a PIL and a coronal hole (CH). We show conclusively that the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity terminates at the PIL, resulting in the formation of highly sheared filament channels and a smooth, untwisted corona. We demonstrate that even though magnetic helicity is injected throughout the flux system, it accumulates only at the PIL, where it manifests itself in the form of highly sheared filament channels, while any helicity obtained by the CH is ejected out of the system. We show that the formation of filament channels is both qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with observations and discuss the implications of our simulations for observations.This work was supported by the NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship, LWS TR&T and H-SR Programs.

  2. Magnetic properties for cobalt nanorings: Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qingying; Chen, Shuiyuan; Zhong, Kehua; Huang, Zhigao

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, two structure models of cobalt nanoring cells (double-nanorings and four-nanorings, named as D-rings and F-rings, respectively) have been considered. Base on Monte Carlo simulation, the magnetic properties of the D-rings and F-rings, such as hysteresis loops, spin configuration, coercivity, etc., have been studied. The simulated results indicate that both D-rings and F-rings with different inner radius ( r) and separation of ring centers ( d) display interesting magnetization behavior and spin configurations (onion-, vortex- and crescent shape vortex-type states) in magnetization process. Moreover, it is found that the overlap between the nearest single nanorings connect can result in the deviation of the vortex-type states in the connected regions. Therefore, the appropriate d should be well considered in the design of nanoring device. The simulated results can be explained by the competition between exchange energy and dipolar energy in Co nanorings system. Furthermore, it is found that the simulated temperature dependence of the coercivity for the D-rings with different d can be well described by Hc= H0 exp[-( T/ T0) p].

  3. A spatio-temporal dipole simulation of gastrointestinal magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, L Alan; Myers, Andrew; Wikswo, John P; Richards, William O

    2003-07-01

    We have developed a simulation of magnetic fields from gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscle. Current sources are modeled as depolarization dipoles at the leading edge of the isopotential ring of electrical control activity (ECA) that is driven by coupled cells in the GI musculature. The dipole moment resulting from the known transmembrane potential distribution varies in frequency and phase depending on location in the GI tract. Magnetic fields in a homogeneous volume conductor are computed using the law of Biot-Savart and characterized by their spatial and temporal variation. The model predicts that the natural ECA frequency gradient may be detected by magnetic field detectors outside the abdomen. It also shows that propagation of the ECA in the gastric musculature results in propagating magnetic field patterns. Uncoupling of gastric smooth muscle cells disrupts the normal magnetic field propagation pattern. Intestinal ischemia, which has been experimentally characterized by lower-than-normal ECA frequencies, also produces external magnetic fields with lower ECA frequencies. PMID:12848351

  4. High frequency variations of the main magnetic field: convergence of observations and theory (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jault, Dominique

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the main magnetic field variations has been hindered by the discrepancy between the periods (from months to years) of the simplest linear wave phenomena and the relatively long time intervals (10 to 100 years) over which magnetic field changes can be confidently monitored. A theoretical description of short-period waves within the Earth's fluid core is at hand. Quasi-geostrophic inertial waves (akin to Rossby waves in the atmosphere) are slightly modified in the presence of magnetic fields and torsional oscillations consist of differential motion between coaxial rigid cylindrical annuli. Torsional oscillations are sensitive to the whole magnetic field that they shear in the course of their propagation. From their modelling, we have thus gained an estimate for the magnetic field strength in the core interior. There is now ongoing work to extend the theoretical framework to longer times. Furthermore, data collected from the Swarm constellation of three satellites to be launched this year by ESA will permit to better separate the internal and external magnetic signals. We may thus dream to detect quasi-geostrophic inertial waves. As the spectral ranges of theoretical models and observations begin to overlap, we can now go beyond the understanding of the magnetic field variations as the juxtaposition of partial models, arranged as a set of nested Matryoshka dolls. This talk will give illustrations for this statement, among which the question of induction in the lower mantle.

  5. Simulation of groundwater conditions and streamflow depletion to evaluate water availability in a Freeport, Maine, watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Martha G.; Locke, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    In order to evaluate water availability in the State of Maine, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Maine Geological Survey began a cooperative investigation to provide the first rigorous evaluation of watersheds deemed "at risk" because of the combination of instream flow requirements and proportionally large water withdrawals. The study area for this investigation includes the Harvey and Merrill Brook watersheds and the Freeport aquifer in the towns of Freeport, Pownal, and Yarmouth, Maine. A numerical groundwater- flow model was used to evaluate groundwater withdrawals, groundwater-surface-water interactions, and the effect of water-management practices on streamflow. The water budget illustrates the effect that groundwater withdrawals have on streamflow and the movement of water within the system. Streamflow measurements were made following standard USGS techniques, from May through September 2009 at one site in the Merrill Brook watershed and four sites in the Harvey Brook watershed. A record-extension technique was applied to estimate long-term monthly streamflows at each of the five sites. The conceptual model of the groundwater system consists of a deep, confined aquifer (the Freeport aquifer) in a buried valley that trends through the middle of the study area, covered by a discontinuous confining unit, and topped by a thin upper saturated zone that is a mixture of sandy units, till, and weathered clay. Harvey and Merrill Brooks flow southward through the study area, and receive groundwater discharge from the upper saturated zone and from the deep aquifer through previously unknown discontinuities in the confining unit. The Freeport aquifer gets most of its recharge from local seepage around the edges of the confining unit, the remainder is received as inflow from the north within the buried valley. Groundwater withdrawals from the Freeport aquifer in the study area were obtained from the local water utility and estimated for other categories. Overall

  6. Plasma transport in a simulated magnetic-divertor configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Strawitch, C. M.

    1981-03-01

    The transport properties of plasma on magnetic field lines that intersect a conducting plate are studied experimentally in the Wisconsin internal ring D.C. machine. The magnetic geometry is intended to simulate certain aspects of plasma phenomena that may take place in a tokamak divertor. It is found by a variety of measurements that the cross field transport is non-ambipolar; this may have important implications in heat loading considerations in tokamak divertors. The undesirable effects of nonambipolar flow make it preferable to be able to eliminate it. However, we find that though the non-ambipolarity may be reduced, it is difficult to eliminate entirely. The plasma flow velocity parallel to the magnetic field is found to be near the ion acoustic velocity in all cases. The experimental density and electron temperature profiles are compared to the solutions to a one dimensional transport model that is commonly used in divertor theory.

  7. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  8. FLASH magnetohydrodynamic simulations of shock-generated magnetic field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2012-12-01

    We report the results of benchmark FLASH magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. We first outline the implementation of 2D cylindrical geometry in the unsplit MHD solver in FLASH and present results of verification tests. We then describe the results of benchmark 2D cylindrical MHD simulations of the LULI experiments using FLASH that explore the impact of external fields along with the possibility of magnetic field amplification by turbulence that is associated with the shock waves and that is induced by a grid placed in the gas-filled chamber.

  9. Simulating Magnetized Laboratory Plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2009-01-01

    The creation of plasmas in the laboratory continues to generate excitement in the physics community. Despite the best efforts of the intrepid plasma diagnostics community, the dynamics of these plasmas remains a difficult challenge to both the theorist and the experimentalist. This dissertation describes the simulation of strongly magnetized laboratory plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a method born of astrophysics but gaining broad support in the engineering community. We describe the mathematical formulation that best characterizes a strongly magnetized plasma under our circumstances of interest, and we review the SPH method and its application to astrophysical plasmas based on research by Phillips [1], Buerve [2], and Price and Monaghan [3]. Some modifications and extensions to this method are necessary to simulate terrestrial plasmas, such as a treatment of magnetic diffusion based on work by Brookshaw [4] and by Atluri [5]; we describe these changes as we turn our attention toward laboratory experiments. Test problems that verify the method are provided throughout the discussion. Finally, we apply our method to the compression of a magnetized plasma performed by the Compact Toroid Injection eXperiment (CTIX) [6] and show that the experimental results support our computed predictions.

  10. Simulations of the bootstrap current in small rotating magnetic islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, A.; Poli, E.; Peeters, A. G.

    2008-11-01

    The bootstrap current in small magnetic islands of neoclassical tearing modes is studied in numerical simulations whith the guiding center particle code HAGIS. The contributions of both, electrons and ions, are included, as well as the island rotation and its electric field. The case of islands that are smaller than the ion banana orbit width is studied. We find that the size of the bootstrap current in small islands depends strongly on the rotation frequency of the island.

  11. Simulation of streamflow in the Pleasant, Narraguagus, Sheepscot, and Royal Rivers, Maine, using watershed models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dudley, Robert W.; Nielsen, Martha G.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a study in 2008 to investigate anticipated changes in summer streamflows and stream temperatures in four coastal Maine river basins and the potential effects of those changes on populations of endangered Atlantic salmon. To achieve this purpose, it was necessary to characterize the quantity and timing of streamflow in these rivers by developing and evaluating a distributed-parameter watershed model for a part of each river basin by using the USGS Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS). The GIS (geographic information system) Weasel, a USGS software application, was used to delineate the four study basins and their many subbasins, and to derive parameters for their geographic features. The models were calibrated using a four-step optimization procedure in which model output was evaluated against four datasets for calibrating solar radiation, potential evapotranspiration, annual and seasonal water balances, and daily streamflows. The calibration procedure involved thousands of model runs that used the USGS software application Luca (Let us calibrate). Luca uses the Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE) global search algorithm to calibrate the model parameters. The calibrated watershed models performed satisfactorily, in that Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) statistic values for the calibration periods ranged from 0.59 to 0.75 (on a scale of negative infinity to 1) and NSE statistic values for the evaluation periods ranged from 0.55 to 0.73. The calibrated watershed models simulate daily streamflow at many locations in each study basin. These models enable natural resources managers to characterize the timing and amount of streamflow in order to support a variety of water-resources efforts including water-quality calculations, assessments of water use, modeling of population dynamics and migration of Atlantic salmon, modeling and assessment of habitat, and simulation of anticipated changes to streamflow and water temperature

  12. Electron-Cloud Build-Up Simulations for the FNAL Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel .A.

    2008-08-25

    We present a summary on ongoing simulation results for the electron-cloud (EC) buildup in the context of the proposed FNAL Main Injector (MI) intensity upgrade effort [1]. Most of the results presented here are for the field-free region at the location of the retarding field analyzer (RFA) electron detector [2-4]. The primary input variable we exercise is the peak secondary electron yield (SEY) {delta}{sub max}, which we let vary in the range 1.2 {le} {delta}{sub max} {le} 1.7. By combining our simulated results for the electron flux at the vacuum chamber wall with the corresponding RFA measurements we infer that 1.25 {approx}< {delta}{sub max} {approx}< 1.35 at this location. From this piece of information we estimate features of the EC distribution for various fill patterns, including the average electron number density n{sub e}. We then compare the behavior of the EC for a hypothetical RF frequency f{sub RF} = 212 MHz with the current 53 MHz for a given total beam population N{sub tot}. The density n{sub e} goes through a clear threshold as a function of N{sub tot} in a field-free region. As expected, the higher frequency leads to a weaker EC effect: the threshold in N{sub tot} is a factor {approx} 2 higher for f{sub RF} = 212 MHz than for 53 MHz, and ne is correspondingly lower by a factor {approx} 2 when N{sub tot} is above threshold. We briefly describe further work that needs to be carried out, sensitivities in the calculation, and puzzles in the results that remain to be addressed.

  13. Simulation of magnetic field line stochasticity at the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhi; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1994-01-01

    We have conducted a three-dimensional particle simulation to study the magnetic field line stochasticity at the magnetopause current layer. Our results show that the magnetic field lines become stochastic due to the overlap of the destabilized multiple tearing mode islands, which agrees with the percolation model suggested by Galeev et al. (1986). After the field lines become stochastic, these tearing modes grow even 2-3 times faster than in the linear stage and saturate at an amplitude level 3-4 times bigger than the single tearing mode without mode-mode coupling. The field line stochasticity also causes a strong particle diffusion across the current layer. The diffusion coefficient reaches to 10(exp 9) sq m/s for typical magnetopause parameters. Associated with the particle diffusion, the current layer becomes broader in width. As a result, the magnetic energy is dissipated into particle energy by heating parallel to the local magnetic field. The particle energy increases by 60%, while the magnetic helicity, which has always been regarded as a good invariant, changes by 20%.

  14. Analysing a magnetic molecule detection system--computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Schepper, W; Schotter, J; Brückl, H; Reiss, G

    2004-08-26

    The detection of single molecules, e.g. in biology is possible by marking the interesting molecules with magnetic beads and detect the influence of the beads on giant magnetoresistance (GMR)/tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR)/spin valve (SV) sensors. The development of suitable multilayers has been studied experimentally as well as theoretically in order to optimize the sensor parameters. A finite difference (FD) method including the usually used contributions to the total energy [exchange, antiferromagnetically (af) coupling, anisotropy and magnetostatic] is used for the simulation with additional contributions to the local field according to the stray fields of the beads. In this work, we will show the results of micromagnetic calculations of the magnetization behavior of GMR/TMR sensors considering also the interaction between the domains in the magnetic layers of the sensor and the bead area. We can present first calculations where the bead particles (signal source) and the magnetic layers (sensor device) are considered as a whole magnetic ensemble. PMID:15288939

  15. 3D Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Magnetized Spine-Sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Philip; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations of weakly magnetized and strongly magnetized relativistic jets embedded in a weakly magnetized and strongly magnetized stationary or weakly relativistic (v = c/2) sheath have been performed. A magnetic field parallel to the flow is used in these simulations performed by the new GRMHD numerical code RAISHIN used in its RMHD configuration. In the numerical simulations the Lorentz factor gamma = 2.5 jet is precessed to break the initial equilibrium configuration. In the simulations sound speeds are less than or equal to c/the square root of 3 in the weakly magnetized simulations and less than or equal to 0.56 c in the strongly magnetized simulations. The Alfven wave speed is less than or equal to 0.07 c in the weakly magnetized simulations and less than or equal to 0.56 c in the strongly magnetized simulations. The results of the numerical simulations are compared to theoretical predictions from a normal mode analysis of the linearized relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations capable of describing a uniform axially magnetized cylindrical relativistic jet embedded in a uniform axially magnetized relativistically moving sheath. The theoretical dispersion relation allows investigation of effects associated with maximum possible sound speeds, Alfven wave speeds near light speed and relativistic sheath speeds. The prediction of increased stability of the weakly magnetized system resulting from c/2 sheath speeds and the stabilization of the strongly magnetized system resulting from c/2 sheath speeds is verified by the numerical simulation results.

  16. MHD Simulations of the Plasma Flow in the Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. E. R.; Keidar, M.; Sankaran, K.; olzin, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of plasma through a magnetic nozzle is simulated by solving the governing equations for the plasma flow in the presence of an static magnetic field representing the applied nozzle. This work will numerically investigate the flow and behavior of the plasma as the inlet plasma conditions and magnetic nozzle field strength are varied. The MHD simulations are useful for addressing issues such as plasma detachment and to can be used to gain insight into the physical processes present in plasma flows found in thrusters that use magnetic nozzles. In the model, the MHD equations for a plasma, with separate temperatures calculated for the electrons and ions, are integrated over a finite cell volume with flux through each face computed for each of the conserved variables (mass, momentum, magnetic flux, energy) [1]. Stokes theorem is used to convert the area integrals over the faces of each cell into line integrals around the boundaries of each face. The state of the plasma is described using models of the ionization level, ratio of specific heats, thermal conductivity, and plasma resistivity. Anisotropies in current conduction due to Hall effect are included, and the system is closed using a real-gas equation of state to describe the relationship between the plasma density, temperature, and pressure.A separate magnetostatic solver is used to calculate the applied magnetic field, which is assumed constant for these calculations. The total magnetic field is obtained through superposition of the solution for the applied magnetic field and the self-consistently computed induced magnetic fields that arise as the flowing plasma reacts to the presence of the applied field. A solution for the applied magnetic field is represented in Fig. 1 (from Ref. [2]), exhibiting the classic converging-diverging field pattern. Previous research was able to demonstrate effects such as back-emf at a super-Alfvenic flow, which significantly alters the shape of the

  17. Simulation of a main steam line break with steam generator tube rupture using trace

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Verdu, G.

    2012-07-01

    A simulation of the OECD/NEA ROSA-2 Project Test 5 was made with the thermal-hydraulic code TRACE5. Test 5 performed in the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) reproduced a Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) with a Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The result of these simultaneous breaks is a depressurization in the secondary and primary system in loop B because both systems are connected through the SGTR. Good approximation was obtained between TRACE5 results and experimental data. TRACE5 reproduces qualitatively the phenomena that occur in this transient: primary pressure falls after the break, stagnation of the pressure after the opening of the relief valve of the intact steam generator, the pressure falls after the two openings of the PORV and the recovery of the liquid level in the pressurizer after each closure of the PORV. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis has been performed to know the effect of varying the High Pressure Injection (HPI) flow rate in both loops on the system pressures evolution. (authors)

  18. Magnetic Braking of the Main Component of θ^{1} Ori C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balega, Yu. Yu.; Leushin, V. V.; Weigelt, G.

    θ^{1} Ori C is the nearest massive O star at the early phase of the evolution. Interferometric study of the star at the 6-m BTA telescope showed that it is a binary system with an orbital period of 11 yr (Weigelt et al., 1999). It was also found that θ^{1} Ori C is an oblique magnetic rotator (Donati et al., 2002; Wade et al., 2006). From high resolution spectra of the binary collected with the 6-m telescope we succeeded to separate week lines of the secondary component and to measure its rotation velocity. It was found that the secondary rotates three times faster than the primary. We discuss the possibility of magnetic braking of the primary star as the mechanism explaining the difference of rotation.

  19. Fokker-Planck formalism in magnetic resonance simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuprov, Ilya

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Fokker-Planck formalism for non-biological magnetic resonance simulations, describes its existing applications and proposes some novel ones. The most attractive feature of Fokker-Planck theory compared to the commonly used Liouville - von Neumann equation is that, for all relevant types of spatial dynamics (spinning, diffusion, stationary flow, etc.), the corresponding Fokker-Planck Hamiltonian is time-independent. Many difficult NMR, EPR and MRI simulation problems (multiple rotation NMR, ultrafast NMR, gradient-based zero-quantum filters, diffusion and flow NMR, off-resonance soft microwave pulses in EPR, spin-spin coupling effects in MRI, etc.) are simplified significantly in Fokker-Planck space. The paper also summarises the author's experiences with writing and using the corresponding modules of the Spinach library - the methods described below have enabled a large variety of simulations previously considered too complicated for routine practical use.

  20. Propulsion simulator for magnetically-suspended wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Prakash B.; Goldey, C. L.; Sacco, G. P.; Lawing, Pierce L.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of phase two of a current investigation sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center is to demonstrate the measurement of aerodynamic forces/moments, including the effects of exhaust gases, in magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) wind tunnels. Two propulsion simulator models are being developed: a small-scale and a large-scale unit, both employing compressed, liquified carbon dioxide as propellant. The small-scale unit was designed, fabricated, and statically-tested at Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI). The large-scale simulator is currently in the preliminary design stage. The small-scale simulator design/development is presented, and the data from its static firing on a thrust stand are discussed. The analysis of this data provides important information for the design of the large-scale unit. A description of the preliminary design of the device is also presented.

  1. Simulation of groundwater conditions and streamflow depletion to evaluate water availability in a Freeport, Maine, watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Martha G.; Locke, Daniel B.

    2012-01-01

    In order to evaluate water availability in the State of Maine, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Maine Geological Survey began a cooperative investigation to provide the first rigorous evaluation of watersheds deemed "at risk" because of the combination of instream flow requirements and proportionally large water withdrawals. The study area for this investigation includes the Harvey and Merrill Brook watersheds and the Freeport aquifer in the towns of Freeport, Pownal, and Yarmouth, Maine. A numerical groundwater- flow model was used to evaluate groundwater withdrawals, groundwater-surface-water interactions, and the effect of water-management practices on streamflow. The water budget illustrates the effect that groundwater withdrawals have on streamflow and the movement of water within the system. Streamflow measurements were made following standard USGS techniques, from May through September 2009 at one site in the Merrill Brook watershed and four sites in the Harvey Brook watershed. A record-extension technique was applied to estimate long-term monthly streamflows at each of the five sites. The conceptual model of the groundwater system consists of a deep, confined aquifer (the Freeport aquifer) in a buried valley that trends through the middle of the study area, covered by a discontinuous confining unit, and topped by a thin upper saturated zone that is a mixture of sandy units, till, and weathered clay. Harvey and Merrill Brooks flow southward through the study area, and receive groundwater discharge from the upper saturated zone and from the deep aquifer through previously unknown discontinuities in the confining unit. The Freeport aquifer gets most of its recharge from local seepage around the edges of the confining unit, the remainder is received as inflow from the north within the buried valley. Groundwater withdrawals from the Freeport aquifer in the study area were obtained from the local water utility and estimated for other categories. Overall

  2. Terrestrial Microgravity Model and Threshold Gravity Simulation using Magnetic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    What is the threshold gravity (minimum gravity level) required for the nominal functioning of the human system? What dosage is required? Do human cell lines behave differently in microgravity in response to an external stimulus? The critical need for such a gravity simulator is emphasized by recent experiments on human epithelial cells and lymphocytes on the Space Shuttle clearly showing that cell growth and function are markedly different from those observed terrestrially. Those differences are also dramatic between cells grown in space and those in Rotating Wall Vessels (RWV), or NASA bioreactor often used to simulate microgravity, indicating that although morphological growth patterns (three dimensional growth) can be successfully simulated using RWVs, cell function performance is not reproduced - a critical difference. If cell function is dramatically affected by gravity off-loading, then cell response to stimuli such as radiation, stress, etc. can be very different from terrestrial cell lines. Yet, we have no good gravity simulator for use in study of these phenomena. This represents a profound shortcoming for countermeasures research. We postulate that we can use magnetic levitation of cells and tissue, through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients, as a terrestrial microgravity model to study human cells. Specific objectives of the research are: 1. To develop a tried, tested and benchmarked terrestrial microgravity model for cell culture studies; 2. Gravity threshold determination; 3. Dosage (magnitude and duration) of g-level required for nominal functioning of cells; 4. Comparisons of magnetic levitation model to other models such as RWV, hind limb suspension, etc. and 5. Cellular response to reduced gravity levels of Moon and Mars. The paper will discuss experiments md modeling work to date in support of this project.

  3. Terrestrial Microgravity Model and Threshold Gravity Simulation sing Magnetic Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    What is the threshold gravity (minimum gravity level) required for the nominal functioning of the human system? What dosage is required? Do human cell lines behave differently in microgravity in response to an external stimulus? The critical need for such a gravity simulator is emphasized by recent experiments on human epithelial cells and lymphocytes on the Space Shuttle clearly showing that cell growth and function are markedly different from those observed terrestrially. Those differences are also dramatic between cells grown in space and those in Rotating Wall Vessels (RWV), or NASA bioreactor often used to simulate microgravity, indicating that although morphological growth patterns (three dimensional growth) can be successiblly simulated using RWVs, cell function performance is not reproduced - a critical difference. If cell function is dramatically affected by gravity off-loading, then cell response to stimuli such as radiation, stress, etc. can be very different from terrestrial cell lines. Yet, we have no good gravity simulator for use in study of these phenomena. This represents a profound shortcoming for countermeasures research. We postulate that we can use magnetic levitation of cells and tissue, through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients, as a terrestrial microgravity model to study human cells. Specific objectives of the research are: 1. To develop a tried, tested and benchmarked terrestrial microgravity model for cell culture studies; 2. Gravity threshold determination; 3. Dosage (magnitude and duration) of g-level required for nominal functioning of cells; 4. Comparisons of magnetic levitation model to other models such as RWV, hind limb suspension, etc. and 5. Cellular response to reduced gravity levels of Moon and Mars.

  4. Ensemble simulations of the ocean induced magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgang, Christopher; Saynisch, Jan; Hagedoorn, Jan M.; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    The recent advent of new high-resolution datasets of electromagnetic induction allows novel combinations of observations and models. The ocean induced magnetic field provides the potential to indirectly observe the ocean general circulation and may be utilized by data assimilation techniques. The modelling of the ocean induced magnetic field is affected by various uncertainties that originate from errors in the input data and from the applied model itself. The amount of aggregated uncertainties and their effect on the modelling of electromagnetic induction in the ocean is unknown. However, the knowledge of model uncertainties is essential for many research questions. To investigate the uncertainty in the modelling of motional induction, ensemble simulations with an ocean general circulation model and an electromagnetic induction model are performed on the basis of different error scenarios. This approach allows to estimate both the spatial distribution and temporal variation of the uncertainty. The largest uncertainty in the motionally induced magnetic field occurs in the area of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Local maxima reach values of up to 0.7 nano Tesla (nT). The estimated global annual mean uncertainty in the motionally induced magnetic field ranges from 0.1 to 0.4 nT. The relative amount of uncertainty reaches up to 30 % of the induced magnetic signal strength with largest values in regions in the northern hemisphere. The major source of uncertainty is found to be introduced by the wind stress from the atmospheric forcing of the ocean model. In addition, the temporal evolution of the uncertainty in the motionally induced magnetic field shows distinct seasonal variations. Specific regions are identified which are robust with respect to the introduced uncertainties.

  5. Simulations of magnetic hysteresis loops at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Plumer, M. L.; Whitehead, J. P.; Fal, T. J.; Ek, J. van; Mercer, J. I.

    2014-09-28

    The kinetic Monte-Carlo algorithm as well as standard micromagnetics are used to simulate MH loops of high anisotropy magnetic recording media at both short and long time scales over a wide range of temperatures relevant to heat-assisted magnetic recording. Microscopic parameters, common to both methods, were determined by fitting to experimental data on single-layer FePt-based media that uses the Magneto-Optic Kerr effect with a slow sweep rate of 700 Oe/s. Saturation moment, uniaxial anisotropy, and exchange constants are given an intrinsic temperature dependence based on published atomistic simulations of FePt grains with an effective Curie temperature of 680 K. Our results show good agreement between micromagnetics and kinetic Monte Carlo results over a wide range of sweep rates. Loops at the slow experimental sweep rates are found to become more square-shaped, with an increasing slope, as temperature increases from 300 K. These effects also occur at higher sweep rates, typical of recording speeds, but are much less pronounced. These results demonstrate the need for accurate determination of intrinsic thermal properties of future recording media as input to micromagnetic models as well as the sensitivity of the switching behavior of thin magnetic films to applied field sweep rates at higher temperatures.

  6. First discovery of a magnetic field in a main-sequence δ Scuti star: the Kepler star HD 188774

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiner, C.; Lampens, P.

    2015-11-01

    The Kepler space mission provided a wealth of δ Sct-γ Dor hybrid candidates. While some may be genuine hybrids, others might be misclassified due to the presence of a binary companion or to rotational modulation caused by magnetism and related surface inhomogeneities. In particular, the Kepler δ Sct-γ Dor hybrid candidate HD 188774 shows a few low frequencies in its light and radial velocity curves, whose origin is unclear. In this work, we check for the presence of a magnetic field in HD 188774. We obtained two spectropolarimetric measurements with an Echelle SpectroPolarimetric Device for the Observation of Stars (ESPaDOnS) at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The data were analysed with the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) method. We detected a clear magnetic signature in the Stokes V LSD profiles. The origin of the low frequencies detected in HD 188774 is therefore most probably the rotational modulation of surface spots possibly related to the presence of a magnetic field. Consequently, HD 188774 is not a genuine hybrid δ Sct-γ Dor star, but the first known magnetic main-sequence δ Sct star. This makes it a prime target for future asteroseismic and spot modelling. This result casts new light on the interpretation of the Kepler results for other δ Sct-γ Dor hybrid candidates.

  7. PIC Simulations of the Omega-EP Magnetic Reconnection Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenda; Blackman, Eric; Yan, Rui; Ren, Chuang

    2014-10-01

    In an Omega EP experiment on magnetic reconnection, two laser beams with peak intensity of 7 × 1018 W/cm2 are focused on a Cu-target. Here we report 2D PIC simulation results with parameters derived from the experiment including a realistic ion-electron mass ratio. We find that 1) toroidal and mega-gauss-scale magnetic fields are generated and a bubble of high-energy-density plasma is produced from single beam-target interactions and 2) the magnetic topology changes as two such bubbles expand and interact with each other indicating the occurrence of magnetic reconnection. The reconnection can occur even when the bubble expansion velocity is subsonic. Flux pileup is observed when the expansion velocity is supersonic. Energetic Cu-ions with energy up to 12 MeV are also observed in the outflow. This work was supported by NNSA under Corporate Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302 and Grant No. DE-NA0002205; by DOE under Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER54789; and by NSF under Grant No. PHY-1314734.

  8. Simulation study of magnetic reconnection in high magnetic Reynolds number plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakabo, T.; Kusano, K.; Miyoshi, T.; Vekstein, G.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important process for dynamics in space and laboratory plasmas. Magnetic reconnection is basically dominated by magnetic diffusion at thin current sheet as proposed by Sweet (1958) and Parker (1963). According to their theory, the reconnection rate must be inversely proportional to the square root of the magnetic Reynolds number (S). In magnetosphere and the solar corona, however, in spite of high magnetic Reynolds number (>10^12), reconnection rate is measured to be about 10^-2 that is much higher than the Sweet and Parker's prediction. Although Petschek proposed that the slow mode shock may accelerate reconnection, numerical simulations suggested that the Petschek's type reconnection cannot be sustained with uniform resistivity. On the other hand, it is pointed out that in high magnetic Reynolds number, the thin current sheet becomes unstable to the so-called secondary tearing instability, which generates many plasmoids and drives a sort of fast reconnection. Although Baty (2012) recently investigated the possibility of Petschek-like structure in relatively high-S (~10^4) regime, it is still unclear whether and how the magnetic reconnection is able to be accelerated in higher-S regime (S>10^5). In this paper, we developed the high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of magnetic reconnection for very high-S (S~10^4-10^6) aiming at revealing the acceleration mechanism of magnetic reconnection. We applied the HLLD Riemann solver, which was developed by Miyoshi and Kusano (2005), to the high resolution two-dimensional MHD simulation of current sheet dynamics. In our model, the initial state is given by the Harris sheet equilibrium plus perturbation. As a result, in the case for S=10^5, multiple X-line reconnection appears as a result of the secondary tearing instability and magnetic reconnection is accelerated through the formation of multiple magnetic islands as pointed out by the previous studies. Furthermore, we found that

  9. Effects of simulated cosmological magnetic fields on the galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinacci, Federico; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the effects of varying the intensity of the primordial magnetic seed field on the global properties of the galaxy population in ideal magnetohydrodynamic cosmological simulations performed with the moving-mesh code AREPO. We vary the seed field in our calculations in a range of values still compatible with the current cosmological upper limits. We show that above a critical intensity of ≃10-9 G, the additional pressure arising from the field strongly affects the evolution of gaseous structures, leading to a suppression of the cosmic star formation history, which is stronger for larger seed fields. This directly reflects into a lower total galaxy count above a fixed stellar mass threshold at all redshifts, and a lower galaxy number density at fixed stellar mass and a less massive stellar component at fixed virial mass at all mass scales. These signatures may be used, in addition to the existing methods, to derive tighter constraints on primordial magnetic seed field intensities.

  10. Simulating Magnetic Nanoparticle Behavior in Low-field MRI under Transverse Rotating Fields and Imposed Fluid Flow.

    PubMed

    Cantillon-Murphy, P; Wald, L L; Adalsteinsson, E; Zahn, M

    2010-09-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle's time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle's magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad/s. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid's temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4°C and 7°C above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid's temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B(0). Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B(0). Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors (~1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002 to 0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1 to 10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful The goal of this work is to examine, by means of analysis and simulation, the concept of interactive fluid magnetization using the dynamic behavior of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle suspensions in the MRI environment. In addition to the usual magnetic fields associated with MRI, a rotating magnetic field is applied transverse to the main B(0) field of the MRI. Additional or modified magnetic fields have been previously proposed for hyperthermia and targeted drug delivery within MRI. Analytical predictions and numerical simulations

  11. Simulating magnetic nanoparticle behavior in low-field MRI under transverse rotating fields and imposed fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantillon-Murphy, P.; Wald, L. L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2010-09-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle's time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle's magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad s -1. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid's temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4 and 7 °C above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid's temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors ( ˜1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002-0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1-10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful the goal of this work is to examine, by means of analysis and simulation, the concept of interactive fluid magnetization using the dynamic behavior of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle suspensions in the MRI environment. In addition to the usual magnetic fields associated with MRI, a rotating magnetic field is applied transverse to the main B0 field of the MRI. Additional or modified magnetic fields have been previously proposed for hyperthermia and targeted drug delivery within MRI. Analytical predictions and numerical simulations of the

  12. An efficient simulation method of a cyclotron sector-focusing magnet using 2D Poisson code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad Elmowla, Khaled Mohamed M.; Chai, Jong Seo; Yeon, Yeong H.; Kim, Sangbum; Ghergherehchi, Mitra

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we discuss design simulations of a spiral magnet using 2D Poisson code. The Independent Layers Method (ILM) is a new technique that was developed to enable the use of two-dimensional simulation code to calculate a non-symmetric 3-dimensional magnetic field. In ILM, the magnet pole is divided into successive independent layers, and the hill and valley shape around the azimuthal direction is implemented using a reference magnet. The normalization of the magnetic field in the reference magnet produces a profile that can be multiplied by the maximum magnetic field in the hill magnet, which is a dipole magnet made of the hills at the same radius. Both magnets are then calculated using the 2D Poisson SUPERFISH code. Then a fully three-dimensional magnetic field is produced using TOSCA for the original spiral magnet, and the comparison of the 2D and 3D results shows a good agreement between both.

  13. Simulating magnetic nanotubes using a chain of ellipsoid-rings model with a magnetization reversal process by fanning rotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieqiong; Yang, Sen; Gong, Junfeng; Xu, Minwei; Adil, Murtaza; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yin; Song, Xiaoping; Zeng, Hao

    2015-04-21

    Recently, magnetic nanotubes have attracted great attention owing to the advantages of tubular geometry. Of all the physical properties of magnetic nanotubes, the magnetic behavior plays a pivotal role in potential applications, particularly in biotechnology. Modeling magnetic nanotubes provides an effective way to determine the geometry dependent magnetic properties. In the present article, we model the nanotube as a chain of ellipsoid-rings; thus the magnetic behavior of nanotubes is simulated by the fanning rotation of magnetic moments. Based on this model, we further discuss the influence of tubular geometric parameters on the magnetic properties. The calculated magnetic properties of Fe, Co, Ni, Fe3O4 and CoFe2O4 nanotubes are all consistent with their experimental data. Consequently, our model provides an easy and general approach to magnetic nanotubes.

  14. A simulation study of magnetic vortex structures and spin dynamic modes in permalloy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao

    Transverse spin wave modes of a long thin-film permalloy stripe have been studied using micromagnetic simulations and a semi-analytical theory. Lower frequency modes were found localized near the edge of the stripe and higher frequency modes exhibited a crossover property. These features result from the inhomogeneous distribution of the equilibrium magnetization and internal field across the stripe, which is adjusted by an applied field across the width of the stripe. Mode frequencies and wave profiles show distinct characteristics under different applied fields. Mode softening happens at two critical fields corresponding to a symmetry transition of the magnetic system. Spin dynamic modes of a magnetic antivortex in asteroid-shaped permalloy samples were systematically explored using micromagnetic simulations. A gyrotropic mode was found due to the shift of the antivortex from its equilibrium position. Azimuthal and radial spin wave modes have been excited by a pulsed magnetic field in different directions. Coupling between gyrotropic and azimuthal modes splits the degeneracy of paired azimuthal modes. Frequencies of the spin wave modes decrease with asteroid size and thickness while the frequency of the gyrotropic mode increases with asteroid thickness but decreases with asteroid size. The vortex dynamics of a magnetic vortex-antivortex-vortex structure in elliptical permalloy samples was studied using a theoretical model and micromagnetic simulations. Three gyrotropic modes were found to exist and each of them can be excited by a special initial configuration of core displacements. The polarizations of three cores play an important role on the mode frequencies and relative core movements in each mode. The annihilation process of a magnetic vortex pair confined in stadium-shaped permalloy samples was investigated using micromagnetic simulations. With the strength of an applied magnetic field across the width of stadia increasing, the equilibrium magnetization of

  15. Combining micromagnetism and magnetostatic Maxwell equations for multiscale magnetic simulations.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, Florian; Vogler, Christoph; Bergmair, Bernhard; Huber, Thomas; Fuger, Markus; Suess, Dieter; Feischl, Michael; Fuehrer, Thomas; Page, Marcus; Praetorius, Dirk

    2013-10-01

    Magnetostatic Maxwell equations and the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation are combined to a multiscale method, which allows to extend the problem size of traditional micromagnetic simulations. By means of magnetostatic Maxwell equations macroscopic regions can be handled in an averaged and stationary sense, whereas the LLG allows to accurately describe domain formation as well as magnetization dynamics in some microscopic subregions. The two regions are coupled by means of their strayfield and the combined system is solved by an optimized time integration scheme. PMID:24092951

  16. Reinventing atomic magnetic simulations with spin-orbit coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N.; Eisenbach, Markus; Nicholson, Don M.; Stocks, George Malcolm; Landau, David P.

    2016-02-10

    We propose a powerful extension to the combined molecular and spin dynamics method that fully captures the coupling between the atomic and spin subsystems via spin-orbit interactions. Moreover, the foundation of this method lies in the inclusion of the local magnetic anisotropies that arise as a consequence of the lattice symmetry breaking due to phonons or crystallographic defects. By using canonical simulations of bcc iron with the system coupled to a phonon heat bath, we show that our extension enables the previously unachievable angular momentum exchange between the atomic and spin degrees of freedom.

  17. Simulating Magnetic Nanoparticle Behavior in Low-field MRI under Transverse Rotating Fields and Imposed Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Wald, L.L.; Adalsteinsson, E.; Zahn, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the presence of alternating-sinusoidal or rotating magnetic fields, magnetic nanoparticles will act to realign their magnetic moment with the applied magnetic field. The realignment is characterized by the nanoparticle’s time constant, τ. As the magnetic field frequency is increased, the nanoparticle’s magnetic moment lags the applied magnetic field at a constant angle for a given frequency, Ω, in rad/s. Associated with this misalignment is a power dissipation that increases the bulk magnetic fluid’s temperature which has been utilized as a method of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia, particularly suited for cancer in low-perfusion tissue (e.g., breast) where temperature increases of between 4°C and 7°C above the ambient in vivo temperature cause tumor hyperthermia. This work examines the rise in the magnetic fluid’s temperature in the MRI environment which is characterized by a large DC field, B0. Theoretical analysis and simulation is used to predict the effect of both alternating-sinusoidal and rotating magnetic fields transverse to B0. Results are presented for the expected temperature increase in small tumors (~1 cm radius) over an appropriate range of magnetic fluid concentrations (0.002 to 0.01 solid volume fraction) and nanoparticle radii (1 to 10 nm). The results indicate that significant heating can take place, even in low-field MRI systems where magnetic fluid saturation is not significant, with careful The goal of this work is to examine, by means of analysis and simulation, the concept of interactive fluid magnetization using the dynamic behavior of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle suspensions in the MRI environment. In addition to the usual magnetic fields associated with MRI, a rotating magnetic field is applied transverse to the main B0 field of the MRI. Additional or modified magnetic fields have been previously proposed for hyperthermia and targeted drug delivery within MRI. Analytical predictions and numerical simulations

  18. Local simulations of the magnetized Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in neutron-star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obergaulinger, M.; Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Global magnetohydrodynamic simulations show the growth of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the contact surface of two merging neutron stars. That region has been identified as the site of efficient amplification of magnetic fields. However, these global simulations, due to numerical limitations, were unable to determine the saturation level of the field strength, and thus the possible back-reaction of the magnetic field onto the flow. Aims: We investigate the amplification of initially weak magnetic fields in Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable shear flows, and the back-reaction of the field onto the flow. Methods: We use a high-resolution finite-volume ideal MHD code to perform 2D and 3D local simulations of hydromagnetic shear flows, both for idealized systems and simplified models of merger flows. Results: In 2D, the magnetic field is amplified on time scales of less than 0.01 ms until it reaches locally equipartition with the kinetic energy. Subsequently, it saturates due to resistive instabilities that disrupt the Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable vortex and decelerate the shear flow on a secular time scale. We determine scaling laws of the field amplification with the initial field strength and the grid resolution. In 3D, the hydromagnetic mechanism seen in 2D may be dominated by purely hydrodynamic instabilities leading to less filed amplification. We find maximum magnetic fields ~1016 G locally, and rms maxima within the box ~1015 G. However, due to the fast decay of the shear flow such strong fields exist only for a short period (<0.1 ms). In the saturated state of most models, the magnetic field is mainly oriented parallel to the shear flow for rather strong initial fields, while weaker initial fields tend to lead to a more balanced distribution of the field energy among the components. In all models the flow shows small-scale features. The magnetic field is at most in energetic equipartition with the decaying shear flow. Conclusions: The magnetic field may be

  19. Thermo-electromagnetic properties of a magnetically shielded superconductor strip: theoretical foundations and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, G. T.; Rauh, H.

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulations of thermo-electromagnetic properties of a thin type-II superconductor strip surrounded by open cavity soft-magnetic shields and exposed to an oscillating transverse magnetic field are performed by resorting to the quasistatic approximation of a vector potential approach in conjunction with the classical description of conduction of heat. The underlying definition of the superconducting constituent makes use of an extended ‘smoothed’ Bean model of the critical state, which includes the field and temperature dependence of the induced supercurrent as well. The delineation of the magnetic shields exploits the reversible-paramagnet approximation in the Langevin form, as appropriate for magnetizations with narrow Z-type loops, and considers induced eddy currents too. The coolant is envisaged as acting like a bath that instantly takes away surplus heat. Based on the Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov approach and the backward Euler scheme, the numerical analysis at hand is tailored to the problem of a high width/thickness aspect ratio of the superconductor strip. Assigning representative materials characteristics and conditions of the applied magnetic field, the main findings for a practically relevant magnet configuration include: (i) an overall rise of the maximum temperature of the superconductor strip tending to saturation in a superconducting thermo-electromagnetic steady state above the operating temperature, magnetic shielding lending increased stability and smoothing the temperature profile along the width of the superconductor strip; (ii) a washing out of the profile of the magnetic induction and a lowering of its strength, a relaxation of the profile of the supercurrent density and an increase of its strength, a tightening of the power loss density and a reduction of its strength, all inside the superconductor strip. The hysteretic ac loss suffered by the superconductor strip is seen to be cut back or, at most, to converge on that of an

  20. Inter-grain interaction in random magnetic anisotropy simulation in magnetic nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.-J.; Inami, Nobuhito; Yanagihara, Hideto; Kita, Eiji; Mitsumata, Chiharu; Ono, Kanta

    2015-05-01

    Effect of inter-grain exchange interaction on the coercive forces was analyzed with a numerical simulation in magnetic materials with random magnetic anisotropy. The magnetization of an assembly of magnetically interacting grains with randomly oriented uniaxial anisotropy was calculated using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We supposed a single spin model where the magnetizations in a grain were aligned in the same direction, for simplicity. Calculations were carried out for an N ×N ×N system, where the number of grains on a side, N ranged from 16 to 128. The relation between the coercive forces HC and the grain size D is represented by HC∝Dk . With the increase of N, k decreased gradually and tended to reach a saturated value around k = 4.5-5, which dose not correspond to the primitive theory of the random anisotropy model where k = 6. The deviation was discussed in terms of the inter-grain interaction, essentially proportional to the inverse of D.

  1. Inter-grain interaction in random magnetic anisotropy simulation in magnetic nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.-J.; Yanagihara, Hideto; Kita, Eiji; Inami, Nobuhito; Ono, Kanta; Mitsumata, Chiharu

    2015-05-07

    Effect of inter-grain exchange interaction on the coercive forces was analyzed with a numerical simulation in magnetic materials with random magnetic anisotropy. The magnetization of an assembly of magnetically interacting grains with randomly oriented uniaxial anisotropy was calculated using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We supposed a single spin model where the magnetizations in a grain were aligned in the same direction, for simplicity. Calculations were carried out for an N×N×N system, where the number of grains on a side, N ranged from 16 to 128. The relation between the coercive forces H{sub C} and the grain size D is represented by H{sub C}∝D{sup k}. With the increase of N, k decreased gradually and tended to reach a saturated value around k = 4.5–5, which dose not correspond to the primitive theory of the random anisotropy model where k = 6. The deviation was discussed in terms of the inter-grain interaction, essentially proportional to the inverse of D.

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of kagome lattices with magnetic dipolar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumer, Martin; Holden, Mark; Way, Andrew; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Southern, Byron

    Monte Carlo simulations of classical spins on the two-dimensional kagome lattice with only dipolar interactions are presented. In addition to revealing the sixfold-degenerate ground state, the nature of the finite-temperature phase transition to long-range magnetic order is discussed. Low-temperature states consisting of mixtures of degenerate ground-state configurations separated by domain walls can be explained as a result of competing exchange-like and shape-anisotropy-like terms in the dipolar coupling. Fluctuations between pairs of degenerate spin configurations are found to persist well into the ordered state as the temperature is lowered until locking in to a low-energy state. Results suggest that the system undergoes a continuous phase transition at T ~ 0 . 43 in agreement with previous MC simulations but the nature of the ordering process differs. Preliminary results which extend this analysis to the 3D fcc ABC-stacked kagome systems will be presented.

  3. Simulating physiological conditions to evaluate nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shihwei; Chiang, Chen-li; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2010-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles with high self-heating capacity and low toxicity characteristics are a promising candidate for cancer hyperthermia treatment. In order to achieve minimum dosage to a patient, magnetic nanoparticles with high heating capacity are needed. In addition, the influence of physiological factors on the heat capacity of a material should be investigated in order to determine the feasibility. In this study, magnetite nanoparticles coated with lauric acid were prepared by co-precipitation of Fe 3+:Fe 2+ in a ratio of 2:1, 5:3, 3:2, and 4:3, and the pH was controlled using NaOH. Structural and magnetization characterization by means of X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) revealed that the main species was Fe 3O 4 and further showed that most of the nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic properties. All of the magnetic nanoparticles showed a specific absorption rate (SAR) increase that was linear with the magnetic field strength and frequency of the alternating magnetic field. Among all, the magnetic nanoparticles prepared in a 3:2 ratio showed the highest SAR. To further test the influence of physiological factors on the 3:2 ratio magnetic nanoparticles, we simulated the environment with protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA), blood sugar (dextrose), electrolytes (commercial norm-saline) and viscosity (glycerol) to examine the heating capacity under these conditions. Our results showed that the SAR value was unaffected by the protein and blood sugar environments. On the other hand, the SAR value was significantly reduced in the electrolyte environment, due to precipitation and aggregation with sodium ions. For the simulated viscous environment with glycerol, the result showed that the SAR values reduced with increasing glycerol concentration. We have further tested the heating capacity contribution from the Néel mechanism by trapping the magnetic nanoparticles in a solid form of polydimethylsiloxane

  4. Global MHD simulation of magnetic erosion and flux transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    It has long been known that when the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) turns from a northward orientation to a southward orientation that the dayside magnetopause moves earthward. This phenomenon is termed "magnetic erosion". Simultaneously, the nightside magnetopause flaring angle changes as the flux removed from the dayside is added to the nightside. A simple picture of erosion is an "onion-peeling" model, in which a newly merged field line is transported by the solar wind to the nightside and the dayside magnetopause is now one field line closer to the Earth. This model however ignores pressure balance considerations, and in fact the agent of erosion is the Region 1 current system. In this presentation we present an analysis of several MHD simulations, driven with real IMF conditions, in which the IMF switched from northward to southward producing erosion. We will show that the increasing Region 1 current system produced a perturbation that reduces the dayside field magnitude, causing the pressure balance condition to be satisfied closer to Earth, while simultaneously increasing the nightside magnetic flux. The increased flaring angle causes the nightside field magnitude to increase as well due to pressure balance considerations.

  5. Simulation of magnetic flux leakage: Application to tube inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prémel, Denis; Fnaeich, E. A.; Djafa, S.; Pichon, L.; Trillon, A.; Bisiaux, B.

    2012-05-01

    The detection of flaws in steel pipes using Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) consists in detecting magnetic flux leaks outside the pipe, either with a magnetic sensor or with an induction coil, while the pipe is rotating. In the Vallourec group, many NDT units use MFL for testing ferromagnetic pipes. In order to improve the performances of flaw detection, CEA LIST and the Vallourec Research Aulnoye (VRA) group are collaborating on MFL modelling. The aim is to be able to perform parametric studies thanks to a fast 3D numerical model dedicated to MFL systems. A simplified 2D geometry has already been derived for the development of first simulation tools. When considering the B-H curve of ferromagnetic materials, the non-linear magnetostatic problem can be solved with the generalized boundary element method (BEMG), which comes to the evaluation of two equivalent scalar potentials: the surface charge density and the volume charge density. When applying the Galerkin method for the discretization of integral equations, the particularity of this numerical model lies in the implementation of high order basis functions for the interpolation of the scalar unknowns. This paper presents some first numerical results for the numerical validation of the semi-analytical model.

  6. Simulations of the Inspiral and Merger of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, M.; Hirschman, E. W.; Lehner, L.; Liebling, S. L.; Neilsen, D.; Palenzuela, C.; Tohline, J. E.

    2008-05-01

    We present simulations of the inspiral, merger and eventual collapse of neutron star binaries calculated in full general relativity. The Einstein equations are solved in a first order reduction of the general harmonic formulation while the matter is evolved in the MHD approximation. Each binary component initially has a dipole magnetic field perpendicular to the orbital plane. We use the adaptive mesh refinement package HAD to resolve the disparate length scales in the problem ranging from the radiation zone down to the internal dynamics of the neutron stars. For aligned fields and our chosen field strength, we find that magnetic effects delay the merger somewhat - thus boosting the gravitational wave signal from the binary. As we will discuss, the magnetic field significantly impacts the distribution of matter and angular momentum in the super-massive, merged object after merger. This work has been supported in part by NSF grants AST 04-07070 and PHY 03-26311, and in part through NASA's ATP program grants NAG5-8497, NAG5-13430 and NNX07AG84G. The computations were performed on computer facilities provided through the Teragrid, LONI, LSU and BYU.

  7. Propulsion simulator for magnetically-suspended wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, P. B.; Malonson, M. R.; Sacco, G. P.; Goldey, C. L.; Garbutt, Keith; Goodyer, M.

    1992-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the measurement of aerodynamic forces/moments, including the effects of exhaust jets in Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (MSBS) wind tunnels, two propulsion simulator models were developed at Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI). Both the small-scale model (1 in. diameter X 8 in. long) and the large-scale model (2.5 in. diameter X 15 in. long) employed compressed, liquefied carbon dioxide as a propellant. The small-scale simulator, made from a highly magnetizable iron alloy, was demonstrated in the 7 in. MSBS wind tunnel at the University of Southampton. It developed a maximum thrust of approximate 1.3 lbf with a 0.098 in. diameter nozzle and 0.7 lbf with a 0.295 in. diameter nozzle. The Southampton MSBS was able to control the simulator at angles-of attack up to 20 deg. The large-scale simulator was demonstrated to operate in both a steady-state and a pulse mode via a miniaturized solinoid valve. It developed a stable and repeatable thrust of 2.75 lbf over a period of 4s and a nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) of 5.

  8. Simulation studies of FRC with rotating magnetic field current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, E. V.; Davidson, R. C.

    2007-11-01

    The HYM code has been modified to include the effects of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive. Initial 3D two-fluid and hybrid simulations have been performed for even-parity RMF and different plasma parameters. Simulations show that the RMF pushes the plasma radially inward, resulting in a reduced plasma density outside the separatrix. Lower plasma density and larger RMF amplitudes result in faster RMF field penetration, in agreement with previous studies [R. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 8, 2804 (2001)]. Effects of the applied RMF field on particle confinement have been studied using 3D test particle simulations. Simulations of stationary RMFs show that for relatively large ion Larmor radius (S^*<20), there is very little difference between even- and odd-parity RMFs in terms of the ion losses. The rate of particle losses is larger in larger FRCs, and increases with the RMF amplitude. In contrast, high-frequency RMF can reduce ion losses provided φrmfφci, and the RMF is of even-parity. The improved particle confinement is related to ponderomotive forces due to the rapidly oscillating, inhomogeneous electromagnetic field. It is also found that high-frequency, odd-parity RMFs force particles away from the midplane toward the FRC ends.

  9. Hybrid simulations of magnetic reconnection with kinetic ions and fluid electron pressure anisotropy

    DOE PAGES

    Le, A.; Daughton, W.; Karimabadi, H.; Egedal, J.

    2016-03-16

    We present the first hybrid simulations with kinetic ions and recently developed equations of state for the electron fluid appropriate for reconnection with a guide field. The equations of state account for the main anisotropy of the electron pressure tensor.Magnetic reconnection is studied in two systems, an initially force-free current sheet and a Harris sheet. The hybrid model with the equations of state is compared to two other models, hybrid simulations with isothermal electrons and fully kinetic simulations. Including the anisotropicequations of state in the hybrid model provides a better match to the fully kinetic model. In agreement with fullymore » kinetic results, the main feature captured is the formation of an electron current sheet that extends several ion inertial lengths. This electron current sheet modifies the Hall magnetic field structure near the X-line, and it is not observed in the standard hybrid model with isotropic electrons. The saturated reconnection rate in this regime nevertheless remains similar in all three models. Here, implications for global modeling are discussed.« less

  10. Full Two-Fluid Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, D. O.; Andres, N.; Dmitruk, P.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is an important energy conversion process in space environments such as the solar corona or planetary magnetospheres. At the theoretical level of resistive one-fluid MHD, the Sweet-Parker model leads to extremely low reconnection rates for virtually all space physics applications. Kinetic plasma effects introduce new spatial and temporal scales into the theoretical description, which are expected to increase the reconnection rates. Within the theoretical framework of two-fluid MHD, we retain the effects of the Hall current and electron inertia and neglect dissipative effects such as viscosity and electric resistivity. This level of description brings two new spatial scales into play, namely, the ion and electron inertial scales. In absence of resistive dissipation, reconnection can only be attained by the action of electron inertia. We performed 2.5D two-fluid simulations using a pseudo-spectral code which yields exact conservation (to round-off errors) of the ideal invariants. Our simulations show that when the effects of electron inertia are retained, magnetic reconnection takes place. In a stationary regime, the reconnection rate is simply proportional to the ion inertial length, as also emerges from a scaling law derived from dimensional arguments.

  11. Numerical simulations of self-gravitating magnetized disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromang, S.; de Villiers, J.-P.; Balbus, S.

    In the early phases of their evolution, protoplanetary disks are massive enough for self-gravitating effects to be important. This is for example the case of disks around Class 0 and some Class I protostars, but other peculiar and more evolved cases may exist, like the circumbinary disk of GG Tau. On larger scales, the central parts of our galaxy show an m=1 density wave, and the disks feeding supermassive black holes in the heart of AGNs are certainly self-gravitating. At the same time, these objects are prone to the development of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) if a weak magnetic field is present. It is therefore relevant to address the question of the evolution of a system under the simultaneous effects of the MRI and gravitational instabilities. These instabilities may dramatically influence the early evolution of protoplanetary disks, and, as a result, planet formation itself. In this talk, I will present a first view on these issues, by means of 2D and 3D MHD numerical simulations of self-gravitating magnetized torii. To date, these simulations are the first examples of the behaviour of the MRI in a self-gravitating environment.

  12. Three-Dimensional Magnetic Fields in Realistic Simulations of Stellar Core Collapse and Bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebendoerfer, Matthias

    2005-08-01

    The evolution of massive stars ends with an inner iron core that is unstable to gravitational collapse. Its dynamics is determined by electron capture on nuclei in the condensing matter. When the energydependent neutrino mean free path becomes short, emitted neutrinos escape in a competition between thermalization and diffusion. This process is accurately captured in spherically symmetric simulations with Boltzmann neutrino transport (e.g. Liebendoerfer et al. 2005, ApJ, 620, 840). Here, I present a simple parameterization of the comprehensive treatment of neutrino physics so that multi-dimensional simulations {of the collapse phase} can include the results of stateof- the-art neutrino transport in an efficient and accurate way (Liebendoerfer, astro-ph/0504072). With the application to the 3-D MHD simulations of Liebendoerfer, Pen, & Thompson (2005, to be published in Nucl. Phys. A), realistic three-dimensional simulations of slowly rotating collapse with magnetic fields become feasible to narrow the configuration space at bounce, i.e. at the onset of the not fully understood supernova explosion. The evolution of the magnetic field is followed for different choices of the uncertain initial values at the onset of collapse. Until a few milliseconds after bounce, a mainly compression-induced field amplification of about two orders of magnitude is found in the hot material layered around the protoneutron star. Larger magnetic fields are trapped within the protoneutron star. After bounce, the magnetic field lines entangle in the layers where convection is driven by entropy gradients. Cross-view stereograms are shown to visualize their evolution in 3-D.

  13. Multiscale dynamics based on kinetic simulation of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Keizo; Takamoto, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a natural energy converter which allows explosive energy release of the magnetic field energy into plasma kinetic energy. The reconnection processes inherently involve multi-scale process. The breaking of the field lines takes place predominantly in a small region called the diffusion region formed near the x-line, while the fast plasma jets resulting from reconnection extend to a distance far beyond the ion kinetic scales from the x-line. There has been a significant gap in understanding of macro-scale and micro-scale processes. The macro-scale model of reconnection has been developed using the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, while the micro-scale processes around the x-line have been based on kinetic equations including the ion and electron inertia. The problem is that these two kinds of model have significant discrepancies. It has been believed without any guarantee that the microscopic model near the x-line would connect to the macroscopic model far downstream of the x-line. In order to bridge the gap between the macro and micro-scale processes, we have performed large-scale particle-in-cell simulations with the adaptive mesh refinement. The simulation results suggest that the microscopic processes around the x-line do not connect to the previous MHD model even in the region far downstream of the x-line. The slow mode shocks and the associated plasma acceleration do not appear at the exhaust boundary of kinetic reconnection. Instead, the ions are accelerated due to the Speiser motion in the current layer extending to a distance beyond the kinetic scales. The different acceleration mechanisms between the ions and electrons lead to the Hall current system in broad area of the exhaust. Therefore, the previous MHD model could be inappropriate for collisionless magnetic reconnection. Ref. K. Fujimoto & M. Takamoto, Phys. Plasmas, 23, 012903 (2016).

  14. Electron heating during magnetic reconnection: A simulation scaling study

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, M. A. Haggerty, C. C.; Phan, T. D.; Oieroset, M.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Cassak, P. A.; Wu, P.; Malakit, K.

    2014-12-15

    Electron bulk heating during magnetic reconnection with symmetric inflow conditions is examined using kinetic particle-in-cell simulations. Inflowing plasma parameters are varied over a wide range of conditions, and the increase in electron temperature is measured in the exhaust well downstream of the x-line. The degree of electron heating is well correlated with the inflowing Alfvén speed c{sub Ar} based on the reconnecting magnetic field through the relation ΔT{sub e}=0.033 m{sub i} c{sub Ar}{sup 2}, where ΔT{sub e} is the increase in electron temperature. For the range of simulations performed, the heating shows almost no correlation with inflow total temperature T{sub tot}=T{sub i}+T{sub e} or plasma β. An out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field of similar magnitude to the reconnecting field does not affect the total heating, but it does quench perpendicular heating, with almost all heating being in the parallel direction. These results are qualitatively consistent with a recent statistical survey of electron heating in the dayside magnetopause (Phan et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 4475, 2013), which also found that ΔT{sub e} was proportional to the inflowing Alfvén speed. The net electron heating varies very little with distance downstream of the x-line. The simulations show at most a very weak dependence of electron heating on the ion to electron mass ratio. In the antiparallel reconnection case, the largely parallel heating is eventually isotropized downstream due a scattering mechanism, such as stochastic particle motion or instabilities. The simulation size is large enough to be directly relevant to reconnection in the Earth's magnetosphere, and the present findings may prove to be universal in nature with applications to the solar wind, the solar corona, and other astrophysical plasmas. The study highlights key properties that must be satisfied by an electron heating mechanism: (1) preferential heating in the parallel direction; (2) heating

  15. Magnetic microscopy and simulation of strain-mediated control of magnetization in PMN-PT/Ni nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Ian; Chavez, Andres C.; Pierce, Daniel T.; Unguris, John; Sun, Wei-Yang; Liang, Cheng-Yen; Carman, Gregory P.

    2016-10-01

    Strain-mediated thin film multiferroics comprising piezoelectric/ferromagnetic heterostructures enable the electrical manipulation of magnetization with much greater efficiency than other methods; however, the investigation of nanostructures fabricated from these materials is limited. Here we characterize ferromagnetic Ni nanostructures grown on a ferroelectric [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3]0.68[PbTiO3]0.32 substrate using scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis (SEMPA) and micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization of the Ni nanostructures can be controlled with a combination of sample geometry and applied electric field, which strains the ferroelectric substrate and changes the magnetization via magnetoelastic coupling. We evaluate two types of simulations of ferromagnetic nanostructures on strained ferroelectric substrates: conventional micromagnetic simulations including a simple uniaxial strain, and coupled micromagnetic-elastodynamic simulations. Both simulations qualitatively capture the response of the magnetization changes produced by the applied strain, with the coupled solution providing more accurate representation.

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor-Unstable Accretion and Variability of Magnetized Stars: Global Three-Dimensional Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, A. K.; Romanova, M. M.

    2008-10-29

    We present results of 3D simulations of MHD instabilities at the accretion disk-magnetosphere boundary. The instability is Rayleigh-Taylor, and develops for a fairly broad range of accretion rates and stellar rotation rates and magnetic fields. It produces tall, thin tongues of plasma that penetrate the magnetosphere in the equatorial plane. The shape and number of the tongues changes with time on the inner-disk dynamical timescale. In contrast with funnel flows, which deposit matter mainly in the polar region, the tongues deposit matter much closer to the stellar equator. The instability appears for relatively small misalignment angles, {theta} < or approx. 30 deg., between the star's rotation and magnetic axes, and is associated with higher accretion rates. The hot spots and light curves during accretion through instability are generally much more chaotic than during stable accretion. The unstable state of accretion has possible implications for quasi-periodic oscillations and intermittent pulsations from accreting systems.

  17. Simulation of interplanetary magnetic field B{sub y} penetration into the magnetotail

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiuling; Shen, Chao; Liu, Zhenxing

    2014-07-15

    Based on our global 3D magnetospheric MHD simulation model, we investigate the phenomena and physical mechanism of the B{sub y} component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) penetrating into the magnetotail. We find that the dayside reconnected magnetic field lines move to the magnetotail, get added to the lobe fields, and are dragged in the IMF direction. However, the B{sub y} component in the plasma sheet mainly originates from the tilt and relative slippage of the south and north lobes caused by plasma convection, which results in the original B{sub z} component in the plasma sheet rotating into a B{sub y} component. Our research also shows that the penetration effect of plasma sheet B{sub y} from the IMF B{sub y} during periods of northward IMF is larger than that during periods of southward IMF.

  18. Numerical Relativity Simulations of Magnetized Black Hole-Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, Zachariah B.; Liu, Yuk Tung; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    We present new numerical techniques we developed for launching the first parameter study of magnetized black hole-neutron star (BHNS) mergers, varying the magnetic fields seeded in the initial neutron star. We found that magnetic fields have a negligible impact on the gravitational waveforms and bulk dynamics of the system during merger, regardless of magnetic field strength or BH spin. In a recent simulation, we seeded the remnant disk from an unmagnetized BHNS merger simulation with large-scale, purely poloidal magnetic fields, which are otherwise absent in the full simulation. The outcome appears to be a viable sGRB central engine.

  19. Simulation of electromagnetically and magnetically induced transparency in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, M. S.; Wurtele, J. S.; Shvets, G.

    2003-07-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), a phenomenon well known in atomic systems, has a natural analogy in a classical magnetized plasma. The magnetized plasma has a resonance for right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves at the electron cyclotron frequency Ω0, so that a probe wave with frequency ω1=Ω0 cannot propagate through the plasma. The plasma can be made transparent to such a probe by the presence of a pump wave. The pump may be an electromagnetic wave or magnetostatic wiggler. Simulations and theory show that the physical reason for the transparency is that the beating of the probe wave with the pump wave sets up a plasma oscillation, and the upper sideband of the pump wave cancels the resonant plasma current due to the probe. The theory of plasma EIT derived here extends that found in the earlier work to include the effects of the lower sideband of the pump and renormalization of the plasma frequency and an analysis of the transient response. A detailed comparison of theory to one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations is presented and estimates for the performance ion accelerator using the EIT interaction are given. The dispersion relation and estimates for the phase velocity and amplitude of the plasma wave are in good agreement with particle-in-cell simulations.

  20. Kinetic simulations of the Chodura and Debye sheaths for magnetic fields with grazing incidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulette, David; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    When an unmagnetized plasma comes in contact with a material surface, the difference in mobility between the electrons and the ions creates a non-neutral layer known as the Debye sheath (DS). However, in magnetic fusion devices, the open magnetic field lines intersect the structural elements of the device with near grazing incidence angles. The magnetic field tends to align the particle flow along its own field lines, thus counteracting the mechanism that leads to the formation of the DS. Recent work using a fluid model (Stangeby 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 083012) showed that the DS disappears when the incidence angle is smaller than a critical value (around {{5}{^\\circ}} for ITER-like parameters). Here, we study this transition by means of numerical simulations of a kinetic model both in the collisionless and weakly collisional regimes. We show that the main features observed in the fluid model are preserved: for grazing incidence, the space charge density near the wall is reduced or suppressed, the ion flow velocity is subsonic, and the electric field and plasma density profiles are spread out over several ion Larmor radii instead of a few Debye lengths as in the unmagnetized case. As there is no singularity at the DS entrance in the kinetic model, this phenomenon depends smoothly on the magnetic field incidence angle and no particular critical angle arises. The simulation results and the predictions of the fluid model are in good agreement, although some discrepancies subsist, mainly due to the assumptions of isothermal closure and diagonality of the pressure tensor in the fluid model.

  1. The virtual morphology and the main movements of the human neck simulations used for car crash studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciunel, St.; Tica, B.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the studies made on a similar biomechanical system composed by neck, head and thorax bones. The models were defined in a CAD environment which includes Adams algorithm for dynamic simulations. The virtual models and the entire morphology were obtained starting with CT images made on a living human subject. The main movements analyzed were: axial rotation (left-right), lateral bending (left-right) and flexion- extension movement. After simulation was obtained the entire biomechanical behavior based on data tables or diagrams. That virtual model composed by neck and head can be included in complex system (as a car system) and supposed to several impact simulations (virtual crash tests). Also, our research team built main components of a testing device for dummy car crash neck-head system using anatomical data.

  2. Cluster expansion modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of alnico 5–7 permanent magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-03-05

    The concerns about the supply and resource of rare earth (RE) metals have generated a lot of interests in searching for high performance RE-free permanent magnets. Alnico alloys are traditional non-RE permanent magnets and have received much attention recently due their good performance at high temperature. In this paper, we develop an accurate and efficient cluster expansion energy model for alnico 5–7. Monte Carlo simulations using the cluster expansion method are performed to investigate the structure of alnico 5–7 at atomistic and nano scales. The alnico 5–7 master alloy is found to decompose into FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases at lowmore » temperature. The boundary between these two phases is quite sharp (~2 nm) for a wide range of temperature. The compositions of the main constituents in these two phases become higher when the temperature gets lower. Both FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases are in B2 ordering with Fe and Al on α-site and Ni and Co on β-site. The degree of order of the NiAl-rich phase is much higher than that of the FeCo-rich phase. In addition, a small magnetic moment is also observed in NiAl-rich phase but the moment reduces as the temperature is lowered, implying that the magnetic properties of alnico 5–7 could be improved by lowering annealing temperature to diminish the magnetism in NiAl-rich phase. Furthermore, the results from our Monte Carlo simulations are consistent with available experimental results.« less

  3. Cluster expansion modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of alnico 5–7 permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-03-07

    The concerns about the supply and resource of rare earth (RE) metals have generated a lot of interests in searching for high performance RE-free permanent magnets. Alnico alloys are traditional non-RE permanent magnets and have received much attention recently due their good performance at high temperature. In this paper, we develop an accurate and efficient cluster expansion energy model for alnico 5–7. Monte Carlo simulations using the cluster expansion method are performed to investigate the structure of alnico 5–7 at atomistic and nano scales. The alnico 5–7 master alloy is found to decompose into FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases at low temperature. The boundary between these two phases is quite sharp (∼2 nm) for a wide range of temperature. The compositions of the main constituents in these two phases become higher when the temperature gets lower. Both FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases are in B2 ordering with Fe and Al on α-site and Ni and Co on β-site. The degree of order of the NiAl-rich phase is much higher than that of the FeCo-rich phase. A small magnetic moment is also observed in NiAl-rich phase but the moment reduces as the temperature is lowered, implying that the magnetic properties of alnico 5–7 could be improved by lowering annealing temperature to diminish the magnetism in NiAl-rich phase. The results from our Monte Carlo simulations are consistent with available experimental results.

  4. Cluster expansion modeling and Monte Carlo simulation of alnico 5–7 permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Ho, Kai -Ming

    2015-03-05

    The concerns about the supply and resource of rare earth (RE) metals have generated a lot of interests in searching for high performance RE-free permanent magnets. Alnico alloys are traditional non-RE permanent magnets and have received much attention recently due their good performance at high temperature. In this paper, we develop an accurate and efficient cluster expansion energy model for alnico 5–7. Monte Carlo simulations using the cluster expansion method are performed to investigate the structure of alnico 5–7 at atomistic and nano scales. The alnico 5–7 master alloy is found to decompose into FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases at low temperature. The boundary between these two phases is quite sharp (~2 nm) for a wide range of temperature. The compositions of the main constituents in these two phases become higher when the temperature gets lower. Both FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases are in B2 ordering with Fe and Al on α-site and Ni and Co on β-site. The degree of order of the NiAl-rich phase is much higher than that of the FeCo-rich phase. In addition, a small magnetic moment is also observed in NiAl-rich phase but the moment reduces as the temperature is lowered, implying that the magnetic properties of alnico 5–7 could be improved by lowering annealing temperature to diminish the magnetism in NiAl-rich phase. Furthermore, the results from our Monte Carlo simulations are consistent with available experimental results.

  5. General Relativistic Simulations of Magnetized Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno

    2011-04-01

    Binary neutron stars are among the most important sources of gravitational waves which are expected to be detected by the current or next generation of gravitational wave detectors, such as LIGO and Virgo, and they are also thought to be at the origin of very important astrophysical phenomena, such as short gamma-ray bursts. I will report on some recent results obtained using the fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code Whisky in simulating equal-mass binary neutron star systems during the last phases of inspiral, merger and collapse to black hole surrounded by a torus. I will in particular describe how magnetic fields can affect the gravitational wave signal emitted by these sources and their possible role in powering short gamma-ray bursts.

  6. Colloidal Suspensions of Rodlike Nanocrystals and Magnetic Spheres under an External Magnetic Stimulus: Experiment and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    May, Kathrin; Eremin, Alexey; Stannarius, Ralf; Peroukidis, Stavros D; Klapp, Sabine H L; Klein, Susanne

    2016-05-24

    Using experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we explore magnetic field-induced phase transformations in suspensions of nonmagnetic rodlike and magnetic sphere-shaped particles. We experimentally demonstrate that an external uniform magnetic field causes the formation of small, stable clusters of magnetic particles that, in turn, induce and control the orientational order of the nonmagnetic subphase. Optical birefringence was studied as a function of the magnetic field and the volume fractions of each particle type. Steric transfer of the orientational order was investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations; the results are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. By reproducing the general experimental trends, the MD simulation offers a cohesive bottom-up interpretation of the physical behavior of such systems, and it can also be regarded as a guide for further experimental research. PMID:27119202

  7. Numerical Simulations on Origin of Galilean Moons' Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiao, LiQuo; Kuang, WeiJia; Ma, ShiZhuang

    2011-01-01

    Galileo mission detected the magnetic anomalies originated from Galilean moons. These anomalies are likely generated in the moons interiors, under the influence of a strong ambient Jovian field. Among various possible generation mechanisms of the anomalies, we focus on magneto-convection and dynamos in the interiors via numerical simulation. To mimic the electromagnetic environment of the moons, we introduce in our numerical model an external uniform magnetic field B(sub 0) with a fixed orientation but varying field strength. Our results show that a finite B(sub 0) can substantially alter the dynamo processes inside the core. When the ambient field strength B(sub 0) increases to approximately 40% of the field generated by the pure dynamo action, the convective state in the core changes significantly: the convective flow decreases by 80% in magnitude, but the differential rotation becomes stronger in much of the fluid layer, leading to a stronger field generated in the core. The field morphologies inside the core tend to align with the ambient field, while the flow patterns show the symmetry-breaking effect under the influence of B(sub 0). Furthermore, the generated field tends to be temporally more stable.

  8. Numerical simulations of a shock interacting with multiple magnetized clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alūzas, R.; Pittard, J. M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Hartquist, T. W.

    2014-10-01

    We present 2D adiabatic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a shock interacting with groups of two or three cylindrical clouds. We study how the presence of a nearby cloud influences the dynamics of this interaction, and explore the resulting differences and similarities in the evolution of each cloud. The understanding gained from this small-scale study will help to interpret the behaviour of systems with many 10s or 100s of clouds. We observe a wide variety of behaviour in the interactions studied, which is dependent on the initial positions of the clouds and the orientation and strength of the magnetic field. We find (i) some clouds are stretched along their field lines, whereas others are confined by their field lines; (ii) upstream clouds may accelerate past downstream clouds (though magnetic tension can prevent this); (iii) clouds may also change their relative positions transverse to the direction of shock propagation as they `slingshot' past each other; (iv) downstream clouds may be offered some protection from the oncoming flow as a result of being in the lee of an upstream cloud; (v) the cycle of cloud compression and re-expansion is generally weaker when there are nearby neighbouring clouds; (vi) the plasma β in cloud material can vary rapidly as clouds collide with one another, but low values of β are always transitory. This work is relevant to studies of multiphase regions, where fast, low-density gas interacts with dense clouds, such as in circumstellar bubbles, supernova remnants, superbubbles and galactic winds.

  9. Simulation of electric-field and spin-transfer-torque induced magnetization switching in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiangli; Zhang, Zongzhi; Liu, Yaowen; Jin, Q. Y.

    2015-05-07

    Macrospin simulations are performed to model the magnetization switching driven by the combined action of electric-field and spin-polarized electric current (spin-transfer torque; STT) in MgO/CoFeB based magnetic tunnel junctions with interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The results indicate that at low current case, the free layer magnetization shows a fast toggle-like switching, the final parallel or antiparallel magnetization state is determined by the electric-field effect, and the STT just helps or resists it to reach the final state depending on the current direction. However, with the increase of current strength, the contribution of STT effect gradually increases, which eventually achieves a deterministic magnetization switching state. Simulations further demonstrate that by appropriately tuning the parameters of applied electric-field and current the power consumption can be easily reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  10. Monte Carlo Simulations of the Post-Common-Envelope White-Dwarf Main-Sequence Binary Population

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, Judit; Torres, Santiago; Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Schreiber, Matthias R.

    2010-12-22

    We present a detailed Monte Carlo simulator of the population of binary systems within the solar neighborhood. We have used the most up-to-date stellar evolutionary models, a complete treatment of the Roche lobe overflow episode, as well as a full implementation of the orbital evolution of the binary system. Preliminary results are presented for the population of white-dwarf main-sequence binaries, resulting from a common envelope episode. We also study the role played by the binding energy parameter, {lambda}, and by the common envelope efficiency, {alpha}{sub CE}. Finally, results are compared with the population of identified white-dwarf main-sequence binaries.

  11. Main directions in the simulation of physical characteristics of the World Ocean and seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    A brief analysis of the oceanographic papers printed in this issue is presented. For convenience of the reader, the paper by K. Bryan, a prominent scientist and expert in modeling the physical characteristics of the ocean, is discussed in detail. The remaining studies are described briefly in several sections: direct prognostic modeling, diagnosis-adaptation, four-dimensional analysis, and operational oceanography. At the end of the study, we separately discuss the problem of the reproduction of coastal intensification of temperature, salinity, density, and currents. We believe that the quality of the simulation results can be best assessed in terms of the intensity of coastal currents. In conclusion, this opinion is justified in detail.

  12. Quasi-One-Dimensional Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Magnetic Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebersohn, Frans H.; Sheehan, J. P.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Shebalin, John V.

    2015-01-01

    A method for the quasi-one-dimensional simulation of magnetic nozzles is presented and simulations of a magnetic nozzle are performed. The effects of the density variation due to plasma expansion and the magnetic field forces on ion acceleration are investigated. Magnetic field forces acting on the electrons are found to be responsible for the formation of potential structures which accelerate ions. The effects of the plasma density variation alone are found to only weakly affect ion acceleration. Strongly diverging magnetic fields drive more rapid potential drops.

  13. Comparison between theory and simulations for the magnetization and the susceptibility of polydisperse ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Szalai, I; Nagy, S; Dietrich, S

    2013-11-20

    The influence of polydispersity on the magnetization of ferrofluids is studied based on a previously published magnetization equation of state (Szalai and Dietrich, 2011 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 23 326004) and computer simulations. The polydispersity of the particle diameter is described by the gamma distribution function. Canonical ensemble Monte Carlo simulations have been performed in order to test these theoretical results for the initial susceptibility and the magnetization. The results for the magnetic properties of the polydisperse systems turn out to be in quantitative agreement with our present simulation data. In addition, we find good agreement between our theory and experimental data for magnetite-based ferrofluids. PMID:24153397

  14. 3D Relativistic MHD Simulations of Magnetized Spine-Sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Philip E.; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2007-01-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of weakly and strongly magnetized relativistic jets embedded in a weakly and strongly magnetized stationary or mildly relativistic (0.5c) sheath using the RAISHIN code. In the numerical simulations a jet with Lorentz factor gamma=2.5 is precessed to break the initial equilibrium configuration. Results of the numerical simulations are compared to theoretical predictions from a normal mode-analysis of the linearized RMHD equations describing a uniform axially magnetized cylindrical relativistic jet embedded in a uniform axially magnetized moving sheath. The prediction of increased stability of a weakly-magnetized system with mildly relativistic sheath flow to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and the stabilization of a strongly-magnetized system with mildly relativistic sheath flow is confirmed by the numerical simulations.

  15. 3D RMHD Simulations of Magnetized Spine-Sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Philip; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2008-01-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of weakly and strongly magnetized relativistic jets embedded in a weakly and strongly magnetized stationary or mildly relativistic (0.5c) sheath flow using the RAISHIN code. In the numerical simulations a jet with Lorentz factor gamma=2.5 is processed to break the initial equilibrium configuration. Results of the numerical simulations are compared to theoretical predictions from a normal mode analysis of the linearized RMHD equations describing a uniform axially magnetized cylindrical relativistic jet embedded in a uniform axially magnetized sheath flow. The prediction of increased stability of a weakly-magnetized system with mildly relativistic sheath flow to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and the stabilization of a strongly magnetized system with mildly relativistic sheath flow is confirmed by the numerical simulations.

  16. 3D RMHD Simulations of Magnetized Spine-sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Hardee, Phillip; Ken-Ichi, Nishikawa

    2008-01-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of weakly and strongly magnetized relativistic jets embedded in a weakly and strongly magnetized stationary or mildly relativistic'(0.5c) sheath flow using the RAISHIN code. In the numerical simulations a jet with Lorentz factor gamma=2.5 is processed to break the initial equilibrium configuration. Results of the numerical simulations are compared to theoretical predictions from a normal mode analysis of the linearized RMHD equations describing a uniform axially magnetized cylindrical relativistic jet embedded in a uniform axially magnetized sheath flow. The prediction of increased stability of a weakly-magnetized system with mildly relativistic sheath flow to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and the stabilization of a strongly-magnetized system with mildly relativistic sheath flow is confirmed by the numerical simulations.

  17. Numerical simulation of the 12 May 1997 CME Event: The role of magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, O.; Attrill, G. D. R.; Schwadron, N. A.; Crooker, N. U.; Owens, M. J.; Downs, C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2010-10-01

    We perform a numerical study of the evolution of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) and its interaction with the coronal magnetic field based on the 12 May 1997, CME event using a global MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) model for the solar corona. The ambient solar wind steady-state solution is driven by photospheric magnetic field data, while the solar eruption is obtained by superimposing an unstable flux rope onto the steady-state solution. During the initial stage of CME expansion, the core flux rope reconnects with the neighboring field, which facilitates lateral expansion of the CME footprint in the low corona. The flux rope field also reconnects with the oppositely orientated overlying magnetic field in the manner of the breakout model. During this stage of the eruption, the simulated CME rotates counter-clockwise to achieve an orientation that is in agreement with the interplanetary flux rope observed at 1 AU. A significant component of the CME that expands into interplanetary space comprises one of the side lobes created mainly as a result of reconnection with the overlying field. Within 3 hours, reconnection effectively modifies the CME connectivity from the initial condition where both footpoints are rooted in the active region to a situation where one footpoint is displaced into the quiet Sun, at a significant distance (≈1R$\\odot$) from the original source region. The expansion and rotation due to interaction with the overlying magnetic field stops when the CME reaches the outer edge of the helmet streamer belt, where the field is organized on a global scale. The simulation thus offers a new view of the role reconnection plays in rotating a CME flux rope and transporting its footpoints while preserving its core structure.

  18. Investigation of magnetic properties of thin films using computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakirev, N. A.; Zhikharev, V. A.; Gumarov, G. G.

    2012-03-01

    A two-dimensional dendrite is generated within the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model in the presence of an external magnetic field. The magnetic interaction between a grown dendrite and diffusing atoms results in the elongation of the dendrite in the direction of the magnetic field. The dependence is studied of the dendrite elongation on the grid occupation. The energy of the magnetic anisotropy is calculated for an elongated dendrite. The FMR spectra are calculated in geometries when the static magnetic field is either perpendicular or parallel to dendrite plane. It is shown that the FMR signals in latter case depend on the static magnetic field orientation with respect to the elongation direction.

  19. Simulation of systematic errors in the SLC magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, J.

    1983-08-08

    The distance (iron to iron) between a focusing and a defocusing magnet in the SLC-arcs is 6.7056 cm and the iron length of each of them is 2.52914 m. To represent these magnets by a hard-edge model in computer codes TRANSPORT or TURTLE the magnetic length rather than the core length of these magnets is of interest. In the present lattice the magnetic length for the field and the gradient of each of these magnets is assumed to be 2.5462 m.

  20. A numerical simulation of the geomagnetic sudden commencement: 2. Plasma processes in the main impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, S.; Tanaka, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Fujimoto, K.; Itonaga, M.

    2003-12-01

    A geomagnetic sudden commencement (SC) is studied numerically based on a model of buffeting the magnetosphere by a solar wind density impulse. This paper treats two successive current systems in the main impulse (MI) phase. The two current systems have different current generating mechanisms. The first current generator appears behind the wavefront of a compressional disturbance launched by the impulse. The inertia current of the compressional mode is generated by free energy due to deceleration of plasma flows. A field-aligned current (FAC) is excited through mode conversion from the compressional wave in a VA gradient region. The magnetospheric flows and the ionospheric flows are not connected self-consistently to each other. The second generator is located in the tailward side of the cusp. It is the same as the generator of the region 1 current system. The current generated there is connected with the FAC with the region 1 sense via a diamagnetic current flowing around an isolated enhancement of pressure in the nightside equatorial magnetosphere. The pressure enhancement is induced through compression of the magnetospheric flank due to the solar wind impulse. In this period, plasma convection vortices appear both in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere, which are correspondent to each other. This is a peculiar convection confined within the magnetosphere (the SC transient cell convection). This convection is driven though compression of the magnetospheric flank due to the solar wind impulse.

  1. MHD simulation of a propagation of loop-like and bubble-like magnetic clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandas, M.; Fischer, S.; Pelant, P.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.; Detman, T.

    1995-01-01

    Propagation and evolution of magnetic clouds in the ambient solar wind flow is studied self-consistently using ideal MHD equations in three dimensions. Magnetic clouds as ideal force-free objects (cylinders or spheres) are ejected near the Sun and followed beyond the Earth's orbit. We investigate the influence of various initial parameters like the injection velocity, magnetic field strength, magnetic helicity, orientation of the clouds' axis, etc., on their propagation and evolution. We demonstrate that the injection velocity and magnetic field strength have a major influence on propagation. Simulation results are compared with analytical solutions of magnetic cloud evolution.

  2. Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic flows driven by a moving permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz, S.; Bandaru, V.; Kolesnikov, Y.; Krasnov, D.; Boeck, T.

    2016-08-01

    We present results from numerical reconstructions of magnetic obstacle experiments performed in liquid metal flows. The experimental setup consists of an open rectangular container filled with a thin layer of liquid metal (GaInSn). A permanent magnet is installed on a rail beneath the container and is moved with a constant velocity U0, which in turn induces a flow inside the liquid metal due to Lorentz forces. The setup allows experiments in a parameter range that is accessible by direct numerical simulations (DNS). We present results from realizations with four different parameter sets, covering flows with stable stationary vortex structures in the reference system of the moving magnet as well as time-dependent flow regimes. Although the liquid metal layer is very thin, the flow shows a highly three-dimensional character in the near and in the far wake of the magnetic obstacle. We conclude that the streamline visualization in the experiment (using gas bubbles at the surface of the liquid metal layer) is insufficient to picture the flow structure occurring in the liquid metal. To underpin our conclusions, we introduce a modified numerical model which aims to mimic the movement of these gas bubbles. Although this model is a strong simplification of the highly complicated behavior of bubbles at a fluid-fluid interface, it captures the main effects and provides a good reproduction of the experimental results. Furthermore, transient effects are investigated when the flow is initiated, i.e., when the magnet approaches the container and crosses its front wall. We conclude that the process of vortex formation is accompanied by a decrease of the streamwise component of the Lorentz force compared to the time when the fluid is still quiescent. This decrease occurs only for flows with stable vortex structures, which might be of interest for practical applications like Lorentz force velocimetry. The Lorentz forces obtained from our DNS are in good agreement with the values

  3. GLOBAL SIMULATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION IN BARRED GALAXIES UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF THE COSMIC-RAY-DRIVEN DYNAMO

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa-Dybel, K.; Otmianowska-Mazur, K.; Kulesza-Zydzik, B.; Kowal, G.; Hanasz, M.; Woltanski, D.; Kowalik, K.

    2011-06-01

    We present three-dimensional global numerical simulations of the cosmic-ray (CR) driven dynamo in barred galaxies. We study the evolution of the interstellar medium of the barred galaxy in the presence of non-axisymmetric component of the potential, i.e., the bar. The magnetohydrodynamical dynamo is driven by CRs, which are continuously supplied to the disk by supernova (SN) remnants. No magnetic field is present at the beginning of simulations but one-tenth of SN explosions is a source of a small-scale randomly oriented dipolar magnetic field. In all models we assume that 10% of 10{sup 51} erg SN kinetic energy output is converted into CR energy. To compare our results directly with the observed properties of galaxies, we construct realistic maps of polarized radio emission. The main result is that the CR-driven dynamo can amplify weak magnetic fields up to a few {mu}G within a few Gyr in barred galaxies. The obtained e-folding time is equal to 300 Myr and the magnetic field reaches equipartition at time t {approx} 4.0 Gyr. Initially, the completely random magnetic field evolves into large-scale structures. An even (quadrupole-type) configuration of the magnetic field with respect to the galactic plane can be observed. Additionally, the modeled magnetic field configuration resembles maps of the polarized intensity observed in barred galaxies. Polarization vectors are distributed along the bar and between spiral arms. Moreover, the drift of magnetic arms with respect to the spiral pattern in the gas density distribution is observed during the entire simulation time.

  4. Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly I: Root of the main crustal decollement for the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly extends for at least 4000 km from south-central Texas to offshore Newfoundland as one of the longest continuous tectonic features in North America and a major crustal element of the entire North Atlantic-Gulf Coast region. Analysis of 28 profiles spaced at 100km intervals and four computed models demonstrate that the anomaly may be explained by a thick zone of mafic and ultramafic rocks averaging 13-15 km in depth. The trend of the anomaly closely follows the trend of main Appalachian features: in the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, the anomaly is as far south of the Ouachita front as it is east of the western limit of deformation through the central Appalachians. Because the anomaly continues across well-known continental crust in northern Florida and onshore Texas, it cannot plausibly be ascribed to an edge effect at the boundary of oceanic with continental crustal compositions. The northwest-verging, deep-crustal events discovered in COCORP data from the Ouachitas and Appalachians suggest an analogy with the main suture of the Himalayan orogen in the Tibetan Plateau. In this paper the anomaly is identified with the late Paleozoic Alleghenian megasuture, in which the northwest-verging crustal-detachment surfaces ultimately root.

  5. 3D Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Lapenta, G.; Divin, A. V.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Unlike the Earth and Mercury, our Moon has no global magnetic field and is therefore not shielded from the impinging solar wind by a magnetosphere. However, lunar magnetic field measurements made by the Apollo missions provided direct evidence that the Moon has regions of small-scale crustal magnetic fields, ranging up to a few 100km in scale size with surface magnetic field strengths up to hundreds of nanoTeslas. More recently, the Lunar Prospector spacecraft has provided high-resolution observations allowing to construct magnetic field maps of the entire Moon, confirming the earlier results from Apollo, but also showing that the lunar plasma environment is much richer than earlier believed. Typically the small-scale magnetic fields are non-dipolar and rather tiny compared to the lunar radius and mainly clustered on the far side of the moon. Using iPic3D we present the first 3D fully kinetic and electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies. We study the behaviour of a dipole model with variable surface magnetic field strength under changing solar wind conditions and confirm that lunar crustal magnetic fields may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind and form a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by MHD and hybrid simulations and spacecraft observations. 3D-PIC simulations reveal to be very helpful to analyze the diversion/braking of the particle flux and the characteristics of the resulting particles accumulation. The particle flux to the surface is significantly reduced at the magnetic anomaly, surrounded by a region of enhanced density due to the magnetic mirror effect. Second, the ability of iPic3D to resolve all plasma components (heavy ions, protons and electrons) allows to discuss in detail the electron physics leading to the highly non-adiabatic interactions expected as well as the implications for solar wind shielding of the lunar surface, depending on the scale size (solar wind protons

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of magnetic properties of a nano-graphene bilayer in a longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Ruijia; Lv, Dan; Luo, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulation has been used to study the magnetic properties of a nano-graphene bilayer which consists of the upper layer A with spin-3/2 and the bottom layer B with spin-5/2. The effects of the single-ion anisotropy, the intralayer exchange coupling and the longitudinal magnetic field on the magnetization, the susceptibility, the blocking temperature and hysteresis loops of the mixed-spin nano-graphene bilayer system have been examined detailedly. In particular, the variations of the blocking temperature with different intralayer exchange couplings, single-ion anisotropies, and the longitudinal magnetic field are obtained for the present system. Many multiple hysteresis loop behaviors have also been found, depending on the combinations of both the upper and bottom layer magnetizations in the longitudinal magnetic field. Through a comparison, our results obtained are according well with other theoretical researches and experimental results.

  7. Role of surfactant molecules in magnetic fluid: comparison of Monte Carlo simulation and electron magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Castro, L L; Gonçalves, G R R; Neto, K Skeff; Morais, P C; Bakuzis, A F; Miotto, R

    2008-12-01

    We investigate a magnetic fluid composed of magnetite nanoparticles surfacted with dodecanoic acid molecules and stably dispersed in a hydrocarbon solvent. A comparison between Monte Carlo simulation and different experimental techniques allows us to validate our methodology and investigate the behavior of the surfactant molecules. Our analysis, based on the Langmuir model, suggests that the surfactant grafting number on isolate nanoparticles increases with the nanoparticle concentration, while the grafting on agglomerated nanoparticles presents a more complicated behavior. Our results suggests that, if properly coated and at a certain concentration range, colloids can become stable even in the presence of agglomerates. The role of the Hamaker constant, which controls the van der Waals interaction intensity, was also investigated. We have found that the ratio between grafting and Hamaker constant governs the level of nanoparticle agglomeration. PMID:19256846

  8. Object-Oriented Fast Multipole Simulation: Magnetic Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visscher, Pieter; Günal, Yüksel

    1997-08-01

    In simulating a system of N particles, if the interaction is long-ranged all pair interactions must be calculated, requiring CPU time of order N^2. Recently-developed ``fast multipole'' methods (FMM) can reduce this time to order N, at the cost of considerable programming complexity. We have developed an object-oriented approach which uses similar ideas but is conceptually much simpler. The system is represented by a hierarchical tree whose root is the entire system and whose lowest nodes are the particles. The entire calculation of the particle interactions consists of a single call to a recursive function CalculateInteractions(A,B) with A=B=root, which uses a simple opening-angle criterion to choose between multipole expansion and calling itself (subdividing A and B.) The resulting algorithm is essentially equivalent to the FMM, but the choice of when to subdivide (which is laboriously hard-wired in FMM) is made automatically. We will discuss the implementation of periodic BCs and the application of the method to continuum systems (cylindrical magnetic particles).

  9. MiR-103 inhibits osteoblast proliferation mainly through suppressing Cav1.2 expression in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongyang; Cao, Xinsheng; Hu, Zebing; Zhang, Lianchang; Wang, Han; Zhou, Hua; Li, Dongtao; Zhang, Shu; Xie, Manjiang

    2015-07-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in modulating osteoblast function and bone formation. However, the influence of miRNA on osteoblast proliferation and the possible mechanisms underlying remain to be defined. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether miR-103 regulates osteoblast proliferation under simulated microgravity condition through regulating Cav1.2, the primary subunit of L-type voltage sensitive calcium channels (LTCCs). We first investigated the effect of simulated microgravity on osteoblast proliferation and the outcomes clearly demonstrated that the mechanical unloading inhibits MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell proliferation. Using quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR), we provided data showing that miR-103 was up-regulated in response to simulated microgravity. In addition, we observed that up-regulation of miR-103 inhibited and down-regulation of miR-103 promoted osteoblast proliferation under simulated microgravity condition. Furthermore, knocking-down or over-expressing miR-103, respectively, up- or down-regulated the level of Cav1.2 expression and LTCC currents, suggesting that miR-103 acts as an endogenous attenuator of Cav1.2 in osteoblasts under simulated microgravity condition. More importantly, we showed that the effect of miR-103 on osteoblast proliferation was diminished in simulated microgravity, when co-transfecting miR-103 mimic or inhibitor with Cav1.2 siRNA. Taken together, our data suggest that miR-103 inhibits osteoblast proliferation mainly through suppression of Cav1.2 expression under simulated microgravity condition. This work may provide a novel mechanism of microgravity-induced detrimental effects on osteoblast proliferation, identifying miR-103 as a novel possible therapeutic target in bone remodeling disorders in this mechanical unloading.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Disk-Magnetized Star Interactions in the Quiescent Regime: Funnel Flows and Angular Momentum Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, M. M.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Koldoba, A. V.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2002-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations have been used to study disk accretion to a rotating magnetized star with an aligned dipole moment. Quiescent initial conditions were developed in order to avoid the fast initial evolution seen in earlier studies. A set of simulations was performed for different stellar magnetic moments and rotation rates. Simulations have shown that the disk structure is significantly changed inside a radius rbr where magnetic braking is significant. In this region the disk is strongly inhomogeneous. Radial accretion of matter slows as it approaches the area of strong magnetic field, and a dense ring and funnel flow (FF) form at the magnetospheric radius rm, where the magnetic pressure is equal to the total, kinetic plus thermal, pressure of the matter. FFs, where the disk matter moves away from the disk plane and flows along the stellar magnetic field, are found to be stable features during many rotations of the disk. The dominant force driving matter into the FF is the pressure gradient force, while gravitational force accelerates it as it approaches the star. The magnetic force is much smaller than the other forces. The FF is found to be strongly sub-Alfvénic everywhere. The FF is subsonic close to the disk, but it becomes supersonic well above the disk. Matter reaches the star with a velocity close to that of free fall. Angular momentum is transported to the star dominantly by the magnetic field. In the disk the transport of angular momentum is mainly by the matter, but closer to the star the matter transfers its angular momentum to the magnetic field, and the magnetic field is dominant in transporting angular momentum to the surface of the star. For slowly rotating stars we observed that magnetic braking leads to the deceleration of the inner regions of the disk, and the star spins up. For a rapidly rotating star, the inner regions of the disk rotate with a super-Keplerian velocity, and the star spins down. The average torque is found to

  11. Numerical simulation and performance improvement of a multi-polar concentric Halbach cylindrical magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yonghua; Guo, Yue; Xiao, Shuifang; Yu, Shen; Ji, Hu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-05-01

    Multi-polar concentric Halbach cylinders of magnets could generate the magnetic field varying considerably in the annular gaps, thus were applied in the rotary magnetic refrigerators. In the current investigation, a six-polar concentric Halbach cylinder is developed based on the ideal concentric one by the numerical simulation with COMSOL Multiphysics. Cylinder radii are optimized and magnet material profiles are adjusted for a better overall performance (Λcool). Moreover, the segmentation on the concentric cylinder is conducted for an easy fabrication, and the edge effect of finite-length device is studied. With the present investigation, it is found that a larger external radius of external cylinder facilitates a larger flux density in the high field region (| B | bar high), while Λcool could be worse. Meanwhile, with the removal of magnet materials enclosed by the equipotential lines of magnetic vector potential, the magnetic flux density in low field region (| B | bar low) drops from 0.271 to 0.0136 T, and Λcool rises from 1.36 to 1.85 T0.7. Moreover, a proper segmentation would not degrade the difference between | B | bar high and | B | bar low, on the contrary, Λcool rises by about 20.2% due to magnet materials lack for efficiency replaced by soft irons. Finally, current 3D simulation indicates the edge effect on Λcool could be trivial.

  12. Subsolar magnetopause observation and kinetic simulation of a tripolar guide magnetic field perturbation consistent with a magnetic island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Cassak, P. A.; Retinò, A.; Mozer, F. S.

    2016-04-01

    The Polar satellite recorded two reconnection exhausts within 6 min on 1 April 2001 across a subsolar magnetopause that displayed a symmetric plasma density, but different out-of-plane magnetic field signatures for similar solar wind conditions. The first magnetopause crossing displayed a bipolar guide field variation in a weak external guide field consistent with a symmetric Hall field from a single X line. The subsequent crossing represents the first observation of a tripolar guide field perturbation at Earth's magnetopause in a strong guide field. This perturbation consists of a significant guide field enhancement between two narrow guide field depressions. A particle-in-cell simulation for the prevailing conditions across this second event resulted in a magnetic island between two simulated X lines across which a tripolar guide field developed consistent with the observation. The simulated island supports a scenario whereby Polar encountered the asymmetric quadrupole Hall magnetic fields between two X lines for symmetric conditions across the magnetopause.

  13. Simulation And Design Of A Reflection Magnet For The EAST Neutral Beam System

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Liangli; Dong Huchun

    2011-09-26

    The simulation and design of a reflection magnet to be installed in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) neutral beam injection system are reported. A parametric design and simulation for the reflection magnet was carried out. For a deuterium beam with 42 cm as the bending radius, the intensity of reflection magnet field is about 1376 Gs at the energy of 80 keV. In order to determine position of the ion dump and the surface power load, a particle simulation with Monte Carlo was developed to study ion trajectories. In addition, the louver design is introduced.

  14. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Bobra, M. G.; Sun, X. D.; Norton, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of a polytropic gas with specific-heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on a daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimensional, covering heliocentric distances from 1.025 to 4.975 solar radii, and contain all eight MHD variables: the plasma density, temperature, and three components of motion velocity, and three components of the magnetic field. This article describes details of the MHD simulations as well as the production of the input magnetic-field maps, and details of the products available at the JSOC database interface. To assess the merits and limits of the model, we show the simulated data in early 2011 and compare with the actual coronal features observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the near-Earth in-situ data.

  15. Galactic ménage à trois: simulating magnetic fields in colliding galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotarba, H.; Lesch, H.; Dolag, K.; Naab, T.; Johansson, P. H.; Donnert, J.; Stasyszyn, F. A.

    2011-08-01

    We present high-resolution simulations of a multiple merger of three disc galaxies, including the evolution of magnetic fields, performed with the N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code GADGET. For the first time, we embed the galaxies in a magnetized, low-density medium, thus modelling an ambient intergalactic medium (IGM). The simulations include radiative cooling and a model for star formation and supernova feedback. Magnetohydrodynamics is followed using the SPH method. The progenitor discs have initial magnetic seed fields in the range 10-9-10-6 G and the IGM has initial fields of 10-12-10-9 G. The simulations are compared to a run excluding magnetic fields. We show that the propagation of interaction-driven shocks depends significantly on the initial magnetic field strength. The shocks propagate faster in simulations with stronger initial field, suggesting that the shocks are supported by magnetic pressure. The Mach numbers of the shocks range from approximately M= 1.5 for the non-magnetized case up to M= 6 for the highest initial magnetization, resulting in higher temperatures of the shock-heated IGM gas. The magnetic field in the system saturates rapidly after the mergers at ˜10-6 G within the galaxies and ˜10-8 G in the IGM independent of the initial value. These field strengths agree with observed values and correspond to the equipartition value of the magnetic pressure with the turbulent pressure in the system. We also present synthetic radio and polarization maps for different phases of the evolution, showing that shocks driven by the interaction produce a high amount of polarized emission. These idealized simulations indicate that magnetic fields play an important role for the hydrodynamics of the IGM during galactic interactions. We also show that even weak seed fields are efficiently strengthened during multiple galactic mergers. This interaction-driven amplification might have been a key process for the magnetization of the Universe.

  16. Relativistic MHD simulations of core-collapse GRB jets: 3D instabilities and magnetic dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromberg, Omer; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Relativistic jets are associated with extreme astrophysical phenomena, like the core collapse of massive stars in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and the accretion on to supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei. It is generally accepted that these jets are powered electromagnetically, by the magnetized rotation of a central compact object (black hole or neutron star). However, how the jets produce the observed emission and survive the propagation for many orders of magnitude in distance without being disrupted by current-driven instabilities is the subject of active debate. We carry out time-dependent 3D relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of relativistic, Poynting-flux-dominated jets. The jets are launched self-consistently by the rotation of a strongly magnetized central object. This determines the natural degree of azimuthal magnetic field winding, a crucial factor that controls jet stability. We find that the jets are susceptible to two types of instability: (i) a global, external kink mode that grows on long time-scales. It bodily twists the jet, reducing its propagation velocity. We show analytically that in flat density profiles, like the ones associated with galactic cores, the external mode grows and may stall the jet. In the steep profiles of stellar envelopes the external kink weakens as the jet propagates outward. (ii) a local, internal kink mode that grows over short time-scales and causes small-angle magnetic reconnection and conversion of about half of the jet electromagnetic energy flux into heat. We suggest that internal kink instability is the main dissipation mechanism responsible for powering GRB prompt emission.

  17. A magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the formation of magnetic flux tubes at the earth's dayside magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogino, Tatsuki; Walker, Raymond J.; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1989-01-01

    Dayside magnetic reconnection was studied by using a three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. Two different mechanisms were found for the formation of magnetic flux tubes at the dayside magnetopause, which depend on the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The dayside magnetic flux tubes occur only when the IMF has a southward component. A strongly twisted and localized magnetic flux tube similar to magnetic flux ropes appears at the subsolar magnetopause when the IMF has a large B(y) component. When the B(y) component is small, twin flux tubes appear at the dayside magnetopause. Both types of magnetic flux tube are consistent with several observational features of flux transfer events and are generated by antiparallel magnetic reconnection.

  18. Comparisons of Simulated and Observed Stormtime Magnetic Intensities and Ion Plasma Parameters in the Ring Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Guild, T. B.; Lemon, C.; Roeder, J. L.; Le, G.; Schulz, M.

    2009-12-01

    Recent progress in ring current and plasma sheet modeling has shown the importance of a self-consistent treatment of particle transport and magnetic and electric fields in the inner magnetosphere. Models with and without self-consistency can lead to significantly different magnitudes and spatial distributions of plasma pressure and magnetic intensity during disturbed times. In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities (GOES and Polar/MFE) and ion densities (LANL/MPA and Polar/CAMMICE) to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet for conditions corresponding to the 11 August 2000 storm using the self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a constant magnetopause location. Using the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003], we specify the plasma sheet pressure and density at 10 RE as the plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. The simulated ion densities at different magnetic local times agree fairly well with those from the re-analysis model of LANL/MPA densities of O’Brien and Lemon [Space Weather, 2007]. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous altitude (6.6 RE) and on the Polar satellite. Agreement between the simulated and observed magnetic intensities tends to agree better on the nightside than on the dayside in the inner magnetosphere. In particular, the model cannot account for observed drops in the dayside magnetic intensity during decreases in the solar wind pressure. We will modify the RCM-E to include a time-varying magnetopause location to simulate compressions and expansions associated with variations in the solar wind pressure. We investigate whether this will lead to improved agreement between the simulated and model magnetic intensities.

  19. Simulation of the magnetic field generated by wires with stationary current and magnets with constant magnetization applied to the mirror trap, minimum-B and zero-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, M. T.; Otero, O.

    2016-02-01

    As a contribution to the computational simulation of magnetic confinement and heating of plasmas ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance), this work is dedicated to the calculation and subsequent analysis of the magnetic fields generated by permanent magnets and coils required in magnetic traps between which we can mention the mirror trap, minimum- B and zero-B. To do this, we solved numerically the Biot-Savart law in the case of the coils with stationary current and the Ampere law in the case of the permanent magnets. The study includes the characterization of the ECR areas as well as the display of the vector field all of this applied to the magnetic traps mentioned above. Additionally, in the case of the mirror type trap and minimum-B trap, it is determined the ratio of the mirror, because it is important in the description of confinement.

  20. Effect of Object Orientation Angle on T2* Image and Reconstructed Magnetic Susceptibility: Numerical Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic field resulting from material magnetization in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has an object orientation effect, which produces an orientation dependence for acquired T2* images. On one hand, the orientation effect can be exploited for object anisotropy investigation (via multi-angle imaging); on the other hand, it is desirable to remove the orientation dependence using magnetic susceptibility reconstruction. In this report, we design a stick-star digital phantom to simulate multiple orientations of a stick-like object and use it to conduct various numerical simulations. Our simulations show that the object orientation effect is not propagated to the reconstructed magnetic susceptibility distribution. This suggests that accurate susceptibility reconstruction methods should be largely orientation independent. PMID:25114542

  1. Relativistic radiation belt electron responses to GEM magnetic storms: Comparison of CRRES observations with 3-D VERB simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri; Subbotin, Dmitriy; Ni, Binbin

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the dynamics of relativistic electron acceleration, loss, and transport in the Earth's radiation belt during magnetic storms is a challenging task. The U.S. National Science Foundation's Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) has identified five magnetic storms for in-depth study that occurred during the second half of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission in the year 1991. In this study, we show the responses of relativistic radiation belt electrons to the magnetic storms by comparing the time-dependent 3-D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) simulations with the CRRES MEA 1 MeV electron observations in order to investigate the relative roles of the competing effects of previously proposed scattering mechanisms at different storm phases, as well as to examine the extent to which the simulations can reproduce observations. The major scattering processes in our model are radial transport due to Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) electromagnetic fluctuations, pitch angle and energy diffusion including mixed diffusion by whistler mode chorus waves outside the plasmasphere, and pitch angle scattering by plasmaspheric hiss inside the plasmasphere. The 3-D VERB simulations show that during the storm main phase and early recovery phase the estimated plasmapause is located deep in the inner region, indicating that pitch angle scattering by chorus waves can be a dominant loss process in the outer belt. We have also confirmed the important role played by mixed energy-pitch angle diffusion by chorus waves, which tends to reduce the fluxes enhanced by local acceleration, resulting in comparable levels of computed and measured fluxes. However, we cannot reproduce the more pronounced flux dropout near the boundary of our simulations during the main phase, which indicates that non-adiabatic losses may extend toL-shells lower than our simulation boundary. We also provide a detailed description of simulations for each of the GEM storm events.

  2. Magnetic fields of chemically peculiar and related stars. I. Main results of 2014 and near-future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, I. I.

    2015-04-01

    We make a critical analysis of the results of studies of magnetic fields in chemically peculiar and related stars, published mostly in 2014. Methodological matters are discussed, and research results are analyzed. Most of the measurements of magnetic fields were obtained with well-known instruments. In 2014 a large observational project MiMeS was accomplished, the observations of more than 500 objects were performed, magnetic fields were found in 35 of them. Twenty new magnetic stars have been detected from the observations with the SAORAS 6-m telescope. Regular measurements of magnetic fields with an accuracy of units of gauss are conducted on a number of telescopes using the HARPS, ESPaDOnS, and NARVAL spectropolarimeters. The fields of complex topology have been studied, magnetic maps have been built, a connection with the distribution of anomalies of chemical composition has been found. The debate about the existence of a magnetic field of about 1 G in Vega and some other objects is ongoing. Apparently, the absence of a large-scale magnetic field greater than tens of gauss in the mercury-manganese and Am stars is confirmed. First CP stars were detected outside the Galaxy, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Observations of magnetic fields in solar-type stars are continued, a strong correlation between the field strength and the degree of chromospheric activity was discovered.

  3. Electronic and magnetic properties of second main-group and second sub-group metals substitution for Al in delafossite CuAlO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi-Jun; Liu, Fu-Sheng; Liu, Zheng-Tang

    2015-07-01

    A systematic theoretical investigation has been carried out for the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of second main-group and second sub-group metals substitution for Al in delafossite CuAlO2 in the framework of density functional theory. The structural parameters and formation energies were calculated and discussed. The appearance of enhanced p-type conductivity after doping has been analyzed. Moreover, it is shown that all dopants have relatively large magnetic moments, but their ferromagnetic states are unstable, showing that their potential application in dilute magnetic semiconductors is not applicable.

  4. Comparative analysis of dayside magnetic reconnection models in global magnetosphere simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, C. M.; Fermo, R. L.; Cassak, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    We test and compare a number of existing models predicting the location of magnetic reconnection at Earth's dayside magnetopause for various solar wind conditions. We employ robust image processing techniques to determine the locations where each model predicts reconnection to occur. The predictions are then compared to the magnetic separators, the magnetic field lines separating different magnetic topologies. The predictions are tested in distinct high-resolution simulations with interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) clock angles ranging from 30 to 165° in global magnetohydrodynamic simulations using the three-dimensional Block Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme code with a uniform resistivity, although the described techniques can be generally applied to any self-consistent magnetosphere code. Additional simulations are carried out to test location model dependence on IMF strength and dipole tilt. We find that most of the models match large portions of the magnetic separators when the IMF has a southward component, with the models saying reconnection occurs where the local reconnection rate and reconnection outflow speed are maximized performing best. When the IMF has a northward component, none of the models tested faithfully map the entire magnetic separator, but the maximum magnetic shear model is the best at mapping the separator in the cusp region where reconnection has been observed. Predictions for some models with northward IMF orientations improve after accounting for plasma flow shear parallel to the reconnecting components of the magnetic fields. Implications for observations are discussed.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the static magnetic field distortion caused by magnetic nanoparticles: Simulation and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogola, Daniel; Štrbák, Oliver; Krafčík, Andrej; Škrátek, Martin; Frollo, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are widely used as a contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Nanoparticles in contrast agents possess a magnetic moment which generates local inhomogeneities in the static magnetic field of the MR scanner. These inhomogeneities cause a rapid loss of phase coherence which leads to the fast decay of the MR signal and thus produce a negative contrast in MR images. This article is focused on the interaction of magnetic nanoparticles aligned in a thin layer with the external homogeneous magnetic field, which changes the uniform distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in the carrier liquid. The goal of this study is to investigate the influence of the arrangement of magnetic nanoparticles on the final image contrast during MRI.

  6. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron energization in laser-driven magnetic reconnection

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Guo, Fan; Sheng, Zhengming; Wang, Huanyu; Wang, Shui

    2016-01-25

    Electrons can be energized during laser-driven magnetic reconnection, and the energized electrons form three super-Alfvénic electron jets in the outflow region (Lu et al 2014 New J. Phys. 16 083021). In this paper, by performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we find that the electrons can also be significantly energized before magnetic reconnection occurs. When two plasma bubbles with toroidal magnetic fields expand and squeeze each other, the electrons in the magnetic ribbons are energized through betatron acceleration due to the enhancement of the magnetic field, and an electron temperature anisotropymore » $${T}_{{\\rm{e}}\\perp }\\gt {T}_{{\\rm{e}}| | }$$ develops. Meanwhile, some electrons are trapped and bounced repeatedly between the two expanding/approaching bubbles and get energized through a Fermi-like process. Furthermore, the energization before magnetic reconnection is more significant (or important) than that during magnetic reconnection.« less

  7. General Relativistic Simulations of Magnetized Plasmas around Merging Supermassive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Baker, John G.; Miller, M. Coleman; Reynolds, Christopher S.; van Meter, James R.

    2012-06-01

    Coalescing supermassive black hole binaries are produced by the mergers of galaxies and are the most powerful sources of gravitational waves accessible to space-based gravitational observatories. Some such mergers may occur in the presence of matter and magnetic fields and hence generate an electromagnetic counterpart. In this Letter, we present the first general relativistic simulations of magnetized plasma around merging supermassive black holes using the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code Whisky. By considering different magnetic field strengths, going from non-magnetically dominated to magnetically dominated regimes, we explore how magnetic fields affect the dynamics of the plasma and the possible emission of electromagnetic signals. In particular, we observe a total amplification of the magnetic field of ~2 orders of magnitude, which is driven by the accretion onto the binary and that leads to much stronger electromagnetic signals, more than a factor of 104 larger than comparable calculations done in the force-free regime where such amplifications are not possible.

  8. General Relativistic Simulations of Magnetized Plasmas around Merging Supermassive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Baker, John; Miller, M. Coleman; Reynolds, Christopher; van Meter, James

    2012-03-01

    Coalescing supermassive black hole binaries are produced by the mergers of galaxies and they are among the most powerful sources of gravitational waves that can be detected by space gravitational observatories. In many cases it is believed that the merger of supermassive black holes may happen in presence of matter and magnetic fields and in this case the gravitational wave signal may be accompanied by an electro-magnetic counterpart. We present the first general relativistic simulations of a magnetized plasma around merging supermassive black holes using the general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic code Whisky. By considering different magnetic field strengths, going from non-magnetically dominated to magnetically dominated regimes, we explore how magnetic fields affect the dynamics of the plasma and the possible emission of electromagnetic signals.

  9. Accretion and Magnetic Reconnection in the Pre-Main Sequence Binary DQ Tau as Revealed through High-Cadence Optical Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofflemire, Benjamin M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Ardila, David R.; Akeson, Rachel L.; Ciardi, David R.; Herczeg, Gregory; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Vodniza, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Protostellar disks are integral to the formation and evolution of low-mass stars and planets. A paradigm for the star-disk interaction has been extensively developed through theory and observation in the case of single stars. Most stars, however, form in binaries or higher order systems where the distribution of disk material and mass flows are more complex. Pre-main sequence (PMS) binary stars can have up to three accretion disks: two circumstellar disks and a circumbinary disk separated by a dynamically cleared gap. Theory suggests that mass may periodically flow in an accretion stream from a circumbinary disk across the gap onto circumstellar disks or stellar surfaces.The archetype for this theory is the eccentric, PMS binary DQ Tau. Moderate-cadence broadband photometry (~10 observations per orbital period) has shown pulsed brightening events near most periastron passages, just as numerical simulations would predict for a binary of similar orbital parameters. While this observed behavior supports the accretion stream theory, it is not exclusive to variable accretion rates. Magnetic reconnection events (flares) during the collision of stellar magnetospheres at periastron (when separated by 8 stellar radii) could produce the same periodic, broadband behavior when observed at a one-day cadence. Further evidence for magnetic activity comes from gyrosynchrotron, radio flares (typical of stellar flares) observed near multiple periastron passages. To reveal the physical mechanism seen in DQ Tau's moderate-cadence observations, we have obtained continuous, moderate-cadence, multi-band photometry over 10 orbital periods (LCOGT 1m network), supplemented with 32 nights of minute-cadence photometry centered on 4 separate periastron passages (WIYN 0.9m; APO ARCSAT). With detailed lightcurve morphologies we distinguish between the gradual rise and fall on multi-day time-scales predicted by the accretion stream theory and the hour time-scale, rapid-rise and exponential

  10. Simulation of runaway electrons, transport affected by J-TEXT resonant magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Wang, X. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Sun, X. F.; Xu, T.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-09-01

    The topology of a magnetic field and transport properties of runaway electrons can be changed by a resonant magnetic perturbation field. The J-TEXT magnetic topology can be effectively altered via static resonant magnetic perturbation (SRMP) and dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation (DRMP). This paper studies the effect of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the confinement of runaway electrons via simulating their drift orbits in the magnetic perturbation field and calculating the orbit losses for different runaway initial energies and different runaway electrons, initial locations. The model adopted is based on Hamiltonian guiding center equations for runaway electrons, and the J-TEXT magnetic turbulences and RMP are taken into account. The simulation indicates that the loss rate of runaway electrons is sensitive to the radial position of electrons. The loss of energetic runaway beam is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region. Outside the shrinkage region of the runaway electrons are lost rapidly. Inside the shrinkage region the runaway beam is confined very well and is less sensitive to the magnetic perturbation. The experimental result on the response of runaway transport to the application RMP indicates that the loss of runaway electrons is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region, other than the external magnetic perturbation.

  11. Numerical simulation of magnetic nanoparticles targeting in a bifurcation vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larimi, M. M.; Ramiar, A.; Ranjbar, A. A.

    2014-08-01

    Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the principle behind the development of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as novel drug delivery vehicles. The present paper is devoted to study on MDT (Magnetic Drug Targeting) technique by particle tracking in the presence of magnetic field in a bifurcation vessel. The blood flow in bifurcation is considered incompressible, unsteady and Newtonian. The flow analysis applies the time dependent, two dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for Newtonian fluids. The Lagrangian particle tracking is performed to estimate particle behavior under influence of imposed magnetic field gradients along the bifurcation. According to the results, the magnetic field increased the volume fraction of particle in target region, but in vessels with high Reynolds number, the efficiency of MDT technique is very low. Also the results showed that in the bifurcation vessels with lower angles, wall shear stress is higher and consequently the risk of the vessel wall rupture increases.

  12. Digital quantum simulation of the statistical mechanics of a frustrated magnet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingfu; Yung, Man-Hong; Laflamme, Raymond; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Baugh, Jonathan

    2012-06-06

    Many problems of interest in physics, chemistry and computer science are equivalent to problems defined on systems of interacting spins. However, most such problems require computational resources that are out of reach with classical computers. A promising solution to overcome this challenge is quantum simulation. Several 'analogue' quantum simulations of interacting spin systems have been realized experimentally, where ground states were prepared using adiabatic techniques. Here we report a 'digital' quantum simulation of thermal states; a three-spin frustrated magnet was simulated using a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum information processor, and we were able to explore the phase diagram of the system at any simulated temperature and external field. These results help to identify the challenges for performing quantum simulations of physical systems at finite temperatures, and suggest methods that may be useful in simulating thermal open quantum systems.

  13. Impeller shroud to casing leakage flow simulations in the Space Shuttle Main Engine high pressure fuel pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindir, Munir M.

    1987-01-01

    Quasi-three-dimensional Navier-Stokes calculations were carried out for the Space Shuttle Main Engine high-pressure fuel pump to simulate the impeller shroud to casing leakage flow. This flow geometry was modeled as an axisymmetric cavity flow with a stationary surface representing the casing, and a rotating surface denoting the impeller. A 63 x 81-node mesh provided sufficient resolution in the regions of greatest flow variations and reduced the effects of numerical diffusion. The turbulence field was closed with the high Reynolds number form of the k-epsilon model supplemented with wall functions in the vicinity of the walls. Finally, a parametric study quantified the effects of through mass flow changes on this leakage flow.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of a cesium atom beam in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiang Zhu, Hongwei; Ma, Yinguang; Li, Detian; Liu, Zhidong; Wang, Ji

    2015-03-07

    We present Monte Carlo simulations of the deflection of a beam of {sup 133}Cs atoms in a two wire magnetic field. Our results reveal the relationship between transmission rate of the atoms and incident parameters. Incident angle and position of the beam with maximum transmission are obtained from the simulations. The effect of the deflection field on the spatial distribution (beam profile) of {sup 133}Cs is derived. The method will help with the design of magnetic deflection experiments and to extract the magnetic properties from such experiments.

  15. Effects of the magnetic equilibrium on gyrokinetic simulations of tokamak microinstabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Weigang; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott E.; Groebner, Richard J.

    2015-06-15

    The general geometry of the experimental tokamak magnetic equilibrium is implemented in the global gyrokinetic simulation code GEM. Compared to the general geometry, the well used Miller parameterization of the magnetic equilibrium is a good approximation in the core region and up to the top of the pedestal. Linear simulations indicate that results with the two geometries agree for r/a ≤ 0.9. However, in the edge region, the instabilities are sensitive to the magnetic equilibrium in both the L-mode and the H-mode plasmas. A small variation of the plasma shaping parameters leads to large changes to the edge instability.

  16. Water pollution risk simulation and prediction in the main canal of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Caihong; Yi, Yujun; Yang, Zhifeng; Cheng, Xi

    2014-11-01

    The middle route of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project (MRP) will divert water to Beijing Tuancheng Lake from Taocha in the Danjiangkou reservoir located in the Hubei province of China. The MRP is composed of a long canal and complex hydraulic structures and will transfer water in open channel areas to provide drinking water for Beijing, Shijiazhuang and other cities under extremely strict water quality requirements. A large number of vehicular accidents, occurred on the many highway bridges across the main canal would cause significant water pollution in the main canal. To ensure that water quality is maintained during the diversion process, the effects of pollutants on water quality due to sudden pollution accidents were simulated and analyzed in this paper. The MIKE11 HD module was used to calculate the hydraulic characteristics of the 42-km Xishi-to-Beijuma River channel of the MRP. Six types of hydraulic structures, including inverted siphons, gates, highway bridges, culverts and tunnels, were included in this model. Based on the hydrodynamic model, the MIKE11 AD module, which is one-dimensional advection dispersion model, was built for TP, NH3-N, CODMn and F. The validated results showed that the computed values agreed well with the measured values. In accordance with transportation data across the Dianbei Highway Bridge, the effects of traffic accidents on the bridge on water quality were analyzed. Based on simulated scenarios with three discharge rates (ranged from 12 m3/s to 17 m3/s, 40 m3/s, and 60 m3/s) and three pollution loading concentration levels (5 t, 10 t and 20 t) when trucks spill their contents (i.e., phosphate fertilizer, cyanide, oil and chromium solution) into the channel, emergency measures were proposed. Reasonable solutions to ensure the water quality with regard to the various types of pollutants were proposed, including treating polluted water, maintaining materials, and personnel reserves.

  17. Theory and simulation of anisotropic pair correlations in ferrofluids in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfimova, Ekaterina A.; Ivanov, Alexey O.; Camp, Philip J.

    2012-05-01

    Anisotropic pair correlations in ferrofluids exposed to magnetic fields are studied using a combination of statistical-mechanical theory and computer simulations. A simple dipolar hard-sphere model of the magnetic colloidal particles is studied in detail. A virial-expansion theory is constructed for the pair distribution function (PDF) which depends not only on the length of the pair separation vector, but also on its orientation with respect to the field. A detailed comparison is made between the theoretical predictions and accurate simulation data, and it is found that the theory works well for realistic values of the dipolar coupling constant (λ = 1), volume fraction (φ ⩽ 0.1), and magnetic field strength. The structure factor is computed for wavevectors either parallel or perpendicular to the field. The comparison between theory and simulation is generally very good with realistic ferrofluid parameters. For both the PDF and the structure factor, there are some deviations between theory and simulation at uncommonly high dipolar coupling constants, and with very strong magnetic fields. In particular, the theory is less successful at predicting the behavior of the structure factors at very low wavevectors, and perpendicular Gaussian density fluctuations arising from strongly correlated pairs of magnetic particles. Overall, though, the theory provides reliable predictions for the nature and degree of pair correlations in ferrofluids in magnetic fields, and hence should be of use in the design of functional magnetic materials.

  18. Theory and simulation of anisotropic pair correlations in ferrofluids in magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Elfimova, Ekaterina A; Ivanov, Alexey O; Camp, Philip J

    2012-05-21

    Anisotropic pair correlations in ferrofluids exposed to magnetic fields are studied using a combination of statistical-mechanical theory and computer simulations. A simple dipolar hard-sphere model of the magnetic colloidal particles is studied in detail. A virial-expansion theory is constructed for the pair distribution function (PDF) which depends not only on the length of the pair separation vector, but also on its orientation with respect to the field. A detailed comparison is made between the theoretical predictions and accurate simulation data, and it is found that the theory works well for realistic values of the dipolar coupling constant (λ = 1), volume fraction (φ ≤ 0.1), and magnetic field strength. The structure factor is computed for wavevectors either parallel or perpendicular to the field. The comparison between theory and simulation is generally very good with realistic ferrofluid parameters. For both the PDF and the structure factor, there are some deviations between theory and simulation at uncommonly high dipolar coupling constants, and with very strong magnetic fields. In particular, the theory is less successful at predicting the behavior of the structure factors at very low wavevectors, and perpendicular Gaussian density fluctuations arising from strongly correlated pairs of magnetic particles. Overall, though, the theory provides reliable predictions for the nature and degree of pair correlations in ferrofluids in magnetic fields, and hence should be of use in the design of functional magnetic materials. PMID:22612098

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Disk GalaxyFormation: the Magnetization of The Cold and Warm Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Santa Barbara, KITP

    2007-12-18

    Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) adaptive mesh refinement simulations, we study the formation and early evolution of disk galaxies with a magnetized interstellar medium. For a 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} halo with initial NFW dark matter and gas profiles, we impose a uniform 10{sup -9} G magnetic field and follow its collapse, disk formation and evolution up to 1 Gyr. Comparing to a purely hydrodynamic simulation with the same initial condition, we find that a protogalactic field of this strength does not significantly influence the global disk properties. At the same time, the initial magnetic fields are quickly amplified by the differentially rotating turbulent disk. After the initial rapid amplification lasting {approx} 500 Myr, subsequent field amplification appears self-regulated. As a result, highly magnetized material begin to form above and below the disk. Interestingly, the field strengths in the self-regulated regime agrees well with the observed fields in the Milky Way galaxy both in the warm and the cold HI phase and do not change appreciably with time. Most of the cold phase shows a dispersion of order ten in the magnetic field strength. The global azimuthal magnetic fields reverse at different radii and the amplitude declines as a function of radius of the disk. By comparing the estimated star formation rate (SFR) in hydrodynamic and MHD simulations, we find that after the magnetic field strength saturates, magnetic forces provide further support in the cold gas and lead to a decline of the SFR.

  20. Magnetic field draping in the Comet Halley coma - Comparison of VEGA observations with computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Yeroshenko, Ye.; Phillips, J. L.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Fedder, J. A.

    1987-06-01

    During the Vega-1 encounter with Comet Halley, the magnetometer observed draping and compression of the interplanetary magnetic field. These are reproduced well by a three-dimensional MHD simulation of the cometary interaction. Rotations in the magnetic field similar to those at closest approach are also observed 2.75 hours earlier. It is suggested that both rotations correspond to the same IMF interval and that the spacecraft had overtaken the plasma and encountered 'older' magnetic field as it penetrated the coma. Analysis of the MHD model indicates that it should take about 3 to 5 hours for a solar wind parcel to pass from the unperturbed solar wind to Vega-1 at closest approach. A simulated magnetic field profile composed of nested sections for different IMF orientations closely resembles the observations. This result supports the hypothesis of layered magnetic orientations in the coma.

  1. Simulation of the magnetization dynamics of diluted ferrofluids in medical applications.

    PubMed

    Rogge, Henrik; Erbe, Marlitt; Buzug, Thorsten M; Lüdtke-Buzug, Kerstin

    2013-12-01

    Ferrofluids, which are stable, colloidal suspensions of single-domain magnetic nanoparticles, have a large impact on medical technologies like magnetic particle imaging (MPI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hyperthermia. Here, computer simulations promise to improve our understanding of the versatile magnetization dynamics of diluted ferrofluids. A detailed algorithmic introduction into the simulation of diluted ferrofluids will be presented. The algorithm is based on Langevin equations and resolves the internal and the external rotation of the magnetic moment of the nanoparticles, i.e., the Néel and Brown diffusion. The derived set of stochastic differential equations are solved by a combination of an Euler and a Heun integrator and tested with respect to Boltzmann statistics. PMID:24163220

  2. 3D Kinetic Simulation of Plasma Jet Penetration in Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galkin, Sergei A.; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, J. S.

    2009-11-01

    A high velocity plasmoid penetration through a magnetic barrier is a problem of a great experimental and theoretical interest. Our LSP PIC code 3D fully kinetic numerical simulations of high density (10^16 cm-3) high velocity (30-140 km/sec) plasma jet/bullet, penetrating through the transversal magnetic field, demonstrate three different regimes: reflection by field, penetration by magnetic field expulsion and penetration by magnetic self-polarization. The behavior depends on plasma jet parameters and its composition: hydrogen, carbon (A=12) and C60-fullerene (A=720) plasmas were investigated. The 3D simulation of two plasmoid head-on injections along uniform magnetic field lines is analyzed. Mini rail plasma gun (accelerator) modeling is also presented and discussed.

  3. Fully Kinetic Simulations of Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection at the Magnetopause with Different Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    This work aim at presenting fully kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection with the current sheet acrossed by asymmetric profiles in density and magnetic. Unlike traditional single layer o double mirrored layers, we here wanted to study the different behavior between a typical current sheet with continous profiles and a layer with a steep gradient profile. The former clearly represents those conditions standing at the nose of the magnetopause, where shocked solar wind encounters the magnetospheric plasma, which is currently widely studied given the imminent launch of the NASA MMS satellite's cluster completely devoted to the reconnection occurring in this area. The second layer, however, resembles the typical Riemann's problem conventionally used for studying formation and propagation of waves in aforementioned magnetospheric region. Additionally, steep gradient may also recall those conditions during the inflowing northward IMF, when a pure tangential discontinuity is present. We here mainly focus on this second configuration, where interesting features are observed from simulation. In fact, a very steep profile gradient seems to give origin to explosive multiple reconnection events all over the layer, which in turn lead to a rapid island merging and relevant energy release. Manifold analysis turns out to be addressed. First step concerns to better study the glaring and quick island merging, where presence of anti-reconnections may lead to the generation of vertical outflow jets and further particles heating. This latter point is intimately linked to the energetics of the process. Either ions and electrons normally increase energy thanks to the stored magnetic energy released by the reconnection event. However, it soon appears that separatrixes seem to play a more fundamental and spatially extensive role in increasing either ions or electrons thermal and bulk energy with respect to the reconnection region, which is the ultimate scale where magnetic

  4. Three-Dimensional EMHD Simulation Studies of Nonlinear Magnetic Structures in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eliasson, B.; Shukla, P. K.

    2008-10-15

    We present a numerical study of strongly nonlinear magnetic vortex-like structures, denoted whistler spheromaks, which have recently been observed in laboratory experiments. The whistler spheromaks are excited with a ring antenna immersed in the magnetized plasma, and are propagating away from the antenna with a constant speed along the ambient magnetic field lines. The wave magnetic field of the spheromaks are of the same order or larger than the ambient magnetic field, and consists of two parts, the poloidal field which is strong enough to reverse the magnetic field in the center of the spheromak, and the toroidal field. We demonstrate numerically that the latter is crucial for the propagation speed and direction of the spheromak, and that the whistler spheromaks are long-lived structures.

  5. Simulating and detecting artificial magnetic fields in trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenkranz, Matthias; Klein, Alexander; Jaksch, Dieter

    2010-01-15

    A Bose-Einstein condensate exhibiting a nontrivial phase induces an artificial magnetic field in immersed impurity atoms trapped in a stationary, ring-shaped optical lattice. We present an effective Hamiltonian for the impurities for two condensate setups: the condensate in a rotating ring and in an excited rotational state in a stationary ring. We use Bogoliubov theory to derive analytical formulas for the induced artificial magnetic field and the hopping amplitude in the limit of low condensate temperature where the impurity dynamics is coherent. As methods for observing the artificial magnetic field we discuss time-of-flight imaging and mass current measurements. Moreover, we compare the analytical results of the effective model to numerical results of a corresponding two-species Bose-Hubbard model. We also study numerically the clustering properties of the impurities and the quantum chaotic behavior of the two-species Bose-Hubbard model.

  6. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Electron Beams Focused by Periodic Permanent Magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1999-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional (3D) model of an electron beam focused by a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stack has been developed. First, the simulation code MAFIA was used to model a PPM stack using the magnetostatic solver. The exact geometry of the magnetic focusing structure was modeled; thus, no approximations were made regarding the off-axis fields. The fields from the static solver were loaded into the 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) solver of MAFIA where fully 3D behavior of the beam was simulated in the magnetic focusing field. The PIC solver computes the time-integration of electromagnetic fields simultaneously with the time integration of the equations of motion of charged particles that move under the influence of those fields. Fields caused by those moving charges are also taken into account; thus, effects like space charge and magnetic forces between particles are fully simulated. The electron beam is simulated by a number of macro-particles. These macro-particles represent a given charge Q amounting to that of several million electrons in order to conserve computational time and memory. Particle motion is unrestricted, so particle trajectories can cross paths and move in three dimensions under the influence of 3D electric and magnetic fields. Correspondingly, there is no limit on the initial current density distribution of the electron beam, nor its density distribution at any time during the simulation. Simulation results including beam current density, percent ripple and percent transmission will be presented, and the effects current, magnetic focusing strength and thermal velocities have on beam behavior will be demonstrated using 3D movies showing the evolution of beam characteristics in time and space. Unlike typical beam optics models, this 3D model allows simulation of asymmetric designs such as non- circularly symmetric electrostatic or magnetic focusing as well as the inclusion of input/output couplers.

  7. THREE-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS OF GYROSYNCHROTRON EMISSION FROM MILDLY ANISOTROPIC NONUNIFORM ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS IN SYMMETRIC MAGNETIC LOOPS

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Alexey A.; Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory D.

    2011-12-01

    Microwave emission of solar flares is formed primarily by incoherent gyrosynchrotron radiation generated by accelerated electrons in coronal magnetic loops. The resulting emission depends on many factors, including pitch-angle distribution of the emitting electrons and the source geometry. In this work, we perform systematic simulations of solar microwave emission using recently developed tools (GS Simulator and fast gyrosynchrotron codes) capable of simulating maps of radio brightness and polarization as well as spatially resolved emission spectra. A three-dimensional model of a symmetric dipole magnetic loop is used. We compare the emission from isotropic and anisotropic (of loss-cone type) electron distributions. We also investigate effects caused by inhomogeneous distribution of the emitting particles along the loop. It is found that the effect of the adopted moderate electron anisotropy is the most pronounced near the footpoints and it also depends strongly on the loop orientation. Concentration of the emitting particles at the looptop results in a corresponding spatial shift of the radio brightness peak, thus reducing effects of the anisotropy. The high-frequency ({approx}> 50 GHz) emission spectral index is specified mainly by the energy spectrum of the emitting electrons; however, at intermediate frequencies (around 10-20 GHz), the spectrum shape is strongly dependent on the electron anisotropy, spatial distribution, and magnetic field nonuniformity. The implications of the obtained results for the diagnostics of the energetic electrons in solar flares are discussed.

  8. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    Hotta, H; Rempel, M; Yokoyama, T

    2016-03-25

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲10 (12) square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities-that is, large Reynolds numbers.

  9. Hysteresis in magnetic shape memory composites: Modeling and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Lenz, Martin; Rumpf, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloys are characterized by the coupling between the reorientation of structural variants and the rearrangement of magnetic domains. This permits to control the shape change via an external magnetic field, at least in single crystals. Composite materials with single-crystalline particles embedded in a softer matrix have been proposed as a way to overcome the blocking of the reorientation at grain boundaries. We investigate hysteresis phenomena for small NiMnGa single crystals embedded in a polymer matrix for slowly varying magnetic fields. The evolution of the microstructure is studied within the rate-independent variational framework proposed by Mielke and Theil (1999). The underlying variational model incorporates linearized elasticity, micromagnetism, stray field and a dissipation term proportional to the volume swept by the twin boundary. The time discretization is based on an incremental minimization of the sum of energy and dissipation. A backtracking approach is employed to approximately ensure the global minimality condition. We illustrate and discuss the influence of the particle geometry (volume fraction, shape, arrangement) and the polymer elastic parameters on the observed hysteresis and compare with recent experimental results.

  10. FEA Simulations of Magnets with Grain Oriented Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Witte H.

    2012-08-06

    One of the potential successors of the Large Hadron Collider is a Muon Col- lider. Muons are short-lived particles, which therefore require fast acceleration. One potential avenue is a very fast cycling cyclotron, where the bending is sup- plied by a combination of fixed-field superconducting magnets and fast ramping normal conducting iron-cored coils. Due to the high ramping rate (around 1 kHz) eddy current and hysteresis losses are a concern. One way to overcome these is by using grain-oriented soft-iron, which promises superior magnetic properties in the direction of the grains. This note summarizes efforts to include the anisotropic material properties of grain-oriented steel in finite element analysis to predict the behaviour of the dipole magnets for this accelerator. It was found that including anisotropic material properties has a detrimental effect on model convergence. During this study it was not possible to include grain oriented steel with an accuracy necessary to study the field quality of a dipole magnet.

  11. Simulation of power flow in magnetically insulated convolutes for pulsed modular accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, D. B.; Goplen, B. C.; VanDevender, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    Two distinct simulation approaches for magnetic insulation are developed which can be used to address the question of nonsimultaneity. First, a two-dimensional model for a two-module system is simulated using a fully electromagnetic, two-dimensional, time-dependent particle code. Next, a nonlinear equivalent circuit approach is used to compare with the direct simulation for the two module case. The latter approach is then extended to a more interesting three-dimensional geometry with several MITL modules.

  12. Simulation of magnetic circular dichroism in the electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, Stefano; Schattschneider, Peter; Rusz, Jan; Verbeeck, Johan; Leifer, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    As electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probe the same transitions from core-shell states to unoccupied states above the Fermi energy, it should always be possible to apply the two techniques to the same physical phenomena, such as magnetic dichroism, and obtain the same information. Indeed, the similarity in the expression of the electron and x-ray cross-sections had been already exploited to prove the equivalence of x-ray magnetic linear dichroism and anisotropy in EELS, by noting that the polarization vector of a photon plays the same role as the momentum transfer in electron scattering. Recently, the same was proven true for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) by establishing a new TEM technique called EMCD (electron energy-loss magnetic chiral dichroism) (Schattschneider P et al 2006 Nature 441 486-8), which makes use of special electron scattering conditions to force the absorption of a circularly polarized virtual photon. The intrinsic advantage of EMCD over XMCD is the high spatial resolution of electron microscopes, which are readily available. Among the particular obstacles in EMCD that do not exist for synchrotron radiation, is the notoriously low signal and the very particular scattering conditions necessary to observe a chiral dichroic signal. In spite of that, impressive progress has been made in recent years. The signal strength could be considerably increased, and some innovations such as using a convergent beam have been introduced. EMCD has evolved into several techniques, which make full use of the versatility of the TEM and energy filtering, spectroscopy or STEM conditions (Rubino S 2007 Magnetic circular dichroism in the transmission electron microscope PhD Thesis Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria).

  13. BUOYANT MAGNETIC LOOPS IN A GLOBAL DYNAMO SIMULATION OF A YOUNG SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Nicholas J.; Toomre, Juri; Brown, Benjamin P.; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2011-10-01

    The current dynamo paradigm for the Sun and Sun-like stars places the generation site for strong toroidal magnetic structures deep in the solar interior. Sunspots and starspots on Sun-like stars are believed to arise when sections of these magnetic structures become buoyantly unstable and rise from the deep interior to the photosphere. Here, we present the first three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation in which turbulent convection, stratification, and rotation combine to yield a dynamo that self-consistently generates buoyant magnetic loops. We simulate stellar convection and dynamo action in a spherical shell with solar stratification, but rotating three times faster than the current solar rate. Strong wreaths of toroidal magnetic field are realized by dynamo action in the convection zone. By turning to a dynamic Smagorinsky model for subgrid-scale turbulence, we here attain considerably reduced diffusion in our simulation. This permits the regions of strongest magnetic field in these wreaths to rise toward the top of the convection zone via a combination of magnetic buoyancy instabilities and advection by convective giant cells. Such a global simulation yielding buoyant loops represents a significant step forward in combining numerical models of dynamo action and flux emergence.

  14. Simulation of Magnetic Field Assisted Finishing (MFAF) Process Utilizing Smart MR Polishing Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Anwesa; Das, Manas

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field assisted finishing process is an advanced finishing process. This process is capable of producing nanometer level surface finish. In this process magnetic field is applied to control the finishing forces using magnetorheological polishing medium. In the current study, permanent magnet is used to provide the required magnetic field in the finishing zone. The working gap between the workpiece and the magnet is filled with MR fluid which is used as the polishing brush to remove surface undulations from the top surface of the workpiece. In this paper, the distribution of magnetic flux density on the workpiece surface and behaviour of MR polishing medium during finishing are analyzed using commercial finite element packages (Ansys Maxwell® and Comsol®). The role of magnetic force in the indentation of abrasive particles on the workpiece surface is studied. A two-dimensional simulation study of the steady, laminar, and incompressible MR fluid flow behaviour during finishing process is carried out. The material removal and surface roughness modelling of the finishing process are also presented. The indentation force by a single active abrasive particle on the workpiece surface is modelled during simulation. The velocity profile of MR fluid with and without application of magnetic field is plotted. It shows non-Newtonian property without application of magnetic field. After that the total material displacement due to one abrasive particle is plotted. The simulated roughness profile is in a good agreement with the experimental results. The conducted study will help in understanding the fluid behavior and the mechanism of finishing during finishing process. Also, the modelling and simulation of the process will help in achieving better finishing performance.

  15. Development of Modeling and Simulation for Magnetic Particle Inspection Using Finite Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Jun-Youl Lee

    2003-05-31

    Magnetic particle inspection (MPI) is a widely used nondestructive inspection method for aerospace applications essentially limited to experiment-based approaches. The analysis of MPI characteristics that affect sensitivity and reliability contributes not only reductions in inspection design cost and time but also improvement of analysis of experimental data. Magnetic particles are easily attracted toward a high magnetic field gradient. Selection of a magnetic field source, which produces a magnetic field gradient large enough to detect a defect in a test sample or component, is an important factor in magnetic particle inspection. In this work a finite element method (FEM) has been employed for numerical calculation of the MPI simulation technique. The FEM method is known to be suitable for complicated geometries such as defects in samples. This thesis describes the research that is aimed at providing a quantitative scientific basis for magnetic particle inspection. A new FEM solver for MPI simulation has been developed in this research for not only nonlinear reversible permeability materials but also irreversible hysteresis materials that are described by the Jiles-Atherton model. The material is assumed to have isotropic ferromagnetic properties in this research (i.e., the magnetic properties of the material are identical in all directions in a single crystal). In the research, with a direct current field mode, an MPI situation has been simulated to measure the estimated volume of magnetic particles around defect sites before and after removing any external current fields. Currently, this new MPI simulation package is limited to solving problems with the single current source from either a solenoid or an axial directional current rod.

  16. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation prevents chronic epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinxu; Wang, Xiaoming; Ke, Sha; Tan, Juan; Hu, Litian; Zhang, Yaodan; Cui, Wenjuan

    2013-09-25

    Although low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation can potentially treat epilepsy, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the influence of low-frequency re-petitive transcranial magnetic simulation on changes in several nonlinear dynamic electroence-phalographic parameters in rats with chronic epilepsy and explored the mechanism underlying petitive transcranial magnetic simulation-induced antiepileptic effects. An epilepsy model was es-tablished using lithium-pilocarpine intraperitoneal injection into adult Sprague-Dawley rats, which were then treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation for 7 consecutive days. Nonlinear electroencephalographic parameters were obtained from the rats at 7, 14, and 28 days post-stimulation. Results showed significantly lower mean correlation-dimension and Kolmogo-rov-entropy values for stimulated rats than for non-stimulated rats. At 28 days, the complexity and point-wise correlation dimensional values were lower in stimulated rats. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation has suppressive effects on electrical activity in epileptic rats, thus explaining its effectiveness in treating epilepsy. PMID:25206567

  17. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, J; Steciw, S; Fallone, B G

    2010-08-21

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 +/- 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically. PMID:20679699

  18. Effect of transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Aubin, J.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-08-01

    The effects of a transverse magnetic field on an in-line side-coupled 6 MV linear accelerator are given. The results are directly applicable to a linac-MR system used for real-time image guided adaptive radiotherapy. Our previously designed end-to-end linac simulation incorporated the results from the axisymmetric 2D electron gun program EGN2w. However, since the magnetic fields being investigated are non-axisymmetric in nature for the work presented here, the electron gun simulation was performed using OPERA-3d/SCALA. The simulation results from OPERA-3d/SCALA showed excellent agreement with previous results. Upon the addition of external magnetic fields to our fully 3D linac simulation, it was found that a transverse magnetic field of 6 G resulted in a 45 ± 1% beam loss, and by 14 G, no electrons were incident on the target. Transverse magnetic fields on the linac simulation produced a highly asymmetric focal spot at the target, which translated into a 13% profile asymmetry at 6 G. Upon translating the focal spot with respect to the target coordinates, profile symmetry was regained at the expense of a lateral shift in the dose profiles. It was found that all points in the penumbra failed a 1%/1 mm acceptance criterion for fields between 4 and 6 G. However, it was also found that the lateral profile shifts were corrected by adjusting the jaw positions asymmetrically.

  19. Simulation of the Magnetic Characteristics and Properties of the Neodymium Compensator of the Stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurova, E. G.; Gurov, M. G.; Panchenko, Y. V.

    2016-08-01

    This research is devoted to consideration of the possibility to use the software ELCUT for development of the magnetic compensator of the stiffness based on neodymium magnets. The software represents precision enough apparatus to solve the issues of the magnetostatic. The solution of these issues is the most important phase at the stage of the designing and calculation of the magnetic compensator of the stiffness, so as at the beginning we need to find the traction force of the interaction between magnet and magnetic materials to provide necessary falling traction characteristic of the compensator. In this paper the simulated models of the neodymium magnets are shown; the view of the field are calculated, the plots of the distribution and directions of the magnetic field strength and induction vectors are presented. Results, which were obtained during of the simulation, further will be used for designing and creation of the magnetic compensator of the stiffness based on supermagnets. Research & Development is under the scholarship of the President of Russian Federation, order №184 from 10th of March 2015.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of post-common-envelope white dwarf + main sequence binaries: The effects of including recombination energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorotovic, M.; Schreiber, M. R.; García-Berro, E.; Camacho, J.; Torres, S.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Gänsicke, B. T.

    2014-08-01

    Context. Detached white dwarf + main sequence (WD+MS) post-common-envelope binaries (PCEBs) are perhaps the most suitable objects for testing predictions of close-compact binary-star evolution theories, in particular, common-envelope (CE) evolution. Consequently, the population of WD+MS PCEBs has been simulated by several authors in the past and the predictions have been compared with the observations. However, most of those theoretical predictions did not take into account the possible contributions to the envelope ejection from additional sources of energy (mostly recombination energy) stored in the envelope. Aims: Here we update existing binary population models of WD+MS PCEBs by assuming that in addition to a fraction αCE of the orbital energy, a fraction αrec of the recombination energy available within the envelope contributes to ejecting the envelope. Methods: We performed Monte Carlo simulations of 107 MS+MS binaries for 9 different combinations of αCE and αrec using standard assumptions for the initial primary mass function, binary separations, and initial-mass-ratio distribution and evolved these systems using the publicly available binary star evolution (BSE) code. Results: Including a fraction of the recombination energy leads to a clear prediction of a large number of long orbital period (≳10 days) systems mostly containing high-mass WDs. The fraction of systems with He-core WD primaries (MWD ≲ 0.5 M⊙) increases with the CE efficiency and the existence of very low-mass He WDs (≲0.3 M⊙) is only predicted for high values of the CE efficiency, i.e. αCE ≳ 0.5. All models predict on average longer orbital periods for PCEBs containing C/O-core WDs (MWD ≳ 0.5 M⊙) than for PCEBs containing He WDs. This effect increases with increasing values of both efficiencies, i.e., αCE and αrec. Longer periods after the CE phase are also predicted for systems containing more massive secondary stars. The initial-mass-ratio distribution affects the

  1. Investigation of the application in the simulation program 'PSpice' of the Jiles-Atherton model for nonlinear magnetic materials in order to predict the degaussing of magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinden, Ad

    1990-03-01

    The MicroSim computer code PSpice for the simulation of electrical circuits was used for the description of nonlinear magnetic properties, applying the Jiles-Atherton model. The PSpice results show no agreement with the obvious relation between the parameters of the model and the well known microscopic and macroscopic theory of magnetism. However, the results of a trial and error PSpice simulation of a degaussing circuit show quantitative agreement with experimental data of magnet steel of the firm 'Sigma phi'. Based onthese results, the degaussing behavior of the AFBU magnet B401 and the ESC magnets M1 and M4 are described.

  2. Morphology and magnetism of multifunctional nanostructured γ-Fe2O3 films: Simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. F.; Bahiana, M.; Paterno, L. G.; Soler, M. A. G.; Sinnecker, J. P.; Wen, J. G.; Morais, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for simulating magnetic properties of nanocomposites comprising magnetic particles embedded in a non-magnetic matrix, taking into account the 3D structure of the system in which particles’ positions correctly mimic real samples. The proposed approach develops a multistage simulation procedure in which the size and distribution of particles within the host matrix is firstly attained by means of the Cell Dynamic System (CDS) model. The 3D structure provided by the CDS step is further employed in a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of zero-field-cooled/field-cooled (ZFC/FC) and magnetic hysteresis loops (M×H curves) for the system. Simulations are aimed to draw a realistic picture of the as-produced ultra-thin films comprising maghemite nanoparticles dispersed in polyaniline. Comparison (ZFC/FC and M×H curves) between experiments and simulations regarding the maximum of the ZFC curve (TMAX), remanence (MR/Ms) and coercivity (HC) revealed the accuracy of the multistage approach proposed here while providing information about the system's morphology and magnetic properties. For a typical sample the value we found experimentally for TMAX (54 K) was very close to the value provided by the simulation (53 K). For the parameters depending on the nanoparticle clustering the experimental values were consistently lower (MR/Ms=0.32 and HC=210 Oe) than the values we found in the simulation (MR/Ms=0.53 and HC=274 Oe). Indeed, the approach introduced here is very promising for the design of real magnetic nanocomposite samples with optimized features.

  3. Computer simulation of magnetic field circuits in ATF

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.A.; Googe, J.M.; Nickels, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    The proposed design of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) contains several closely coupled magnetic field circuits that are being modeled using the SUPER*SCEPTRE computer program in order to predict their transient behavior. The results of this transient analysis study will be used to determine component values and/or special precautions that may be required for power supply and other circuit element protection due to the mutual coupling between circuits. ATF is a continuous-coil torsatron device using resistive coils in a pulsed mode of operation in which a current fluctuation in one coil induces voltages in the other circuit element protection due to the mutual coupling between circuits. ATF is a continuous-coil torsatron device using resistive coils in a pulsed mode of operation in which a current fluctuation in one coil induces voltages in the other circuit that may not be desirable. The model contains the solid-state power supplies' equivalent circuits, the resistance and self-inductance of each magnetic field coil, and the mutual inductances of every coil combination. The SUPER*SCEPTRE program allows for the direct input of all electrical components as well as the mutual inductances. The power supply voltages are entered as preprogrammed wave shapes designed to achieve the desired magnetic field strengths. The outputs of this program are tables and plots of voltages and currents associated with each circuit component.

  4. Transport and entry of plasma clouds/jets across transverse magnetic discontinuities: Three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitcu, Gabriel; Echim, Marius

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we use three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the interaction of a small Larmor radius plasma cloud/jet with a transverse nonuniform magnetic field typical to a tangential discontinuity in a parallel geometry. The simulation setup corresponds to an idealized, yet relevant, magnetospheric configuration likely to be observed at the magnetopause during northward orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field. The numerical simulations are adapted to study the kinetic effects and their role on the transport and entry of localized plasma jets similar to those identified inside the Earth's magnetosheath propagating toward the magnetopause. The simulations reveal the formation of a perpendicular polarization electric field inside the main bulk of the plasma cloud that enables its forward transport and entry across the transverse magnetic field. The jet is able to penetrate the transition region when the height of the magnetic barrier does not exceed a certain critical threshold. Otherwise, the forward transport along the injection direction is stopped before full penetration of the magnetopause. Moreover, the jet is pushed back and simultaneously deflected in the perpendicular plane to the magnetic field. Our simulations evidence physical processes advocated previously by the theoretical model of impulsive penetration and revealed in laboratory experiments.

  5. Finite element calculations on detailed 3D models for the superferric main magnets of the FAIR SIS100 synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E.; Shcherbakov, P.; Kurnyshov, R.

    2007-11-01

    The synchrotron SIS100 is one of the two basic accelerators of the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI in Darmstadt. This accelerator should provide high intensity U28+ and proton beams with a pulse repetition rate of 1 Hz (i.e. a ramp rate of 4 T/s). The magnetic system of the accelerator uses superferric 2.1 T dipoles of about 3 m length and 32 T/m quadrupoles of about 1 m length. The magnet coils are made of a hollow tube cable wrapped with Cu/NbTi composite wire cooled with two phase helium flow at 4.5 K. The bore dimensions were defined to 130 × 60 mm for the dipole and 135 × 65 mm for the quadrupole. We present the developed ANSYS models for different important aspects: AC loss, magnetic field quality and mechanical stability. Preliminary studies verified the approaches and these models were applied to calculate the effects for the coil, the yoke and the beam pipe structures. We outline further steps to fully describe the SIS100 magnets including mechanical and thermal properties.

  6. Multi-moment advection scheme in three dimension for Vlasov simulations of magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, Takashi; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Amano, Takanobu

    2013-03-01

    We present an extension of the multi-moment advection scheme [T. Minoshima, Y. Matsumoto, T. Amano, Multi-moment advection scheme for Vlasov simulations, Journal of Computational Physics 230 (2011) 6800–6823] to the three-dimensional case, for full electromagnetic Vlasov simulations of magnetized plasma. The scheme treats not only point values of a profile but also its zeroth to second order piecewise moments as dependent variables, and advances them on the basis of their governing equations. Similar to the two-dimensional scheme, the three-dimensional scheme can accurately solve the solid body rotation problem of a gaussian profile with little numerical dispersion or diffusion. This is a very important property for Vlasov simulations of magnetized plasma. We apply the scheme to electromagnetic Vlasov simulations. Propagation of linear waves and nonlinear evolution of the electron temperature anisotropy instability are successfully simulated with a good accuracy of the energy conservation.

  7. Simulation of magnetic drug targeting through tracheobronchial airways in the presence of an external non-uniform magnetic field using Lagrangian magnetic particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmehran, O.; Rahimi-Gorji, M.; Gorji-Bandpy, M.; Gorji, T. B.

    2015-11-01

    Drug delivery technologies are an important area within biomedicine. Targeted drug delivery aims to reduce the undesired side effects of drug usage by directing or capturing the active agents near a desired site within the body. Herein, a numerical investigation of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) using aerosol drugs named polystyrene particle (PMS40) in human lung is presented considering one-way coupling on the transport and capture of the magnetic particle. A realistic 3D geometry based on CT scan images is provided for CFD simulation. An external non-uniform magnetic field is applied. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of particle diameter, magnetic source position, and magnetic number (Mn) on the deposition efficiency and particle behavior is reported. According to the results, the magnetic field increased deposition efficiency of particles in a target region, the efficiency of deposition and MDT technique has a direct relation with increasing the particle diameter for magnetic number of 1 Tesla (T) and lower (Mn≤1(T)). Also it can be seen that there is an inverse relation between the particle diameter and deposition efficiency when Mn is more than 1 (T).

  8. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  9. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Radiation from Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-positron (electron-ion) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs at shocked regions. Simulations show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields and particle acceleration. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. The jitter'' radiation from deflected electrons in turbulent magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation, which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets in general, and supernova remnants. We will present detailed spectra for conditions relevant of various astrophysical sites of shock formation via the Weibel instability. In particular we will discuss the application to GRBs and SNRs

  10. 3-D RPIC Simulations of Relativistic Jets: Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets into ambient plasmas show that acceleration occurs in relativistic shocks. The Weibel instability created in shocks is responsible for particle acceleration, and generation and amplification of highly inhomogeneous, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection in relativistic jets. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than the synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understand the complex time evolution and spectral structure in relativistic jets and gamma-ray bursts. We will present recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. We will also calculate associated self-consistent emission from relativistic shocks.

  11. Simulations of magnetic field gradients due to micro-magnets on a triple quantum dot circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin-Lamarre, G.; Bureau-Oxton, C.; Kam, A.; Zawadzki, P.; Aers, G.; Studenikin, S.; Pioro-Ladrière, M.; Sachrajda, A. S.

    2013-12-04

    To quantify the effects of local magnetic fields on triple quantum dots, the Heisenberg Hamiltonian has been diagonalized for three electrons coupled via the exchange interaction. In particular, we have investigated different geometries of micro-magnets located on top of the triple dot in order to optimize the field gradient characteristics. In this paper, we focus on two geometries which are candidates for an addressable EDSR triple quantum dot device.

  12. Capture Efficiency of Biocompatible Magnetic Nanoparticles in Arterial Flow: A Computer Simulation for Magnetic Drug Targeting.

    PubMed

    Lunnoo, Thodsaphon; Puangmali, Theerapong

    2015-12-01

    The primary limitation of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) relates to the strength of an external magnetic field which decreases with increasing distance. Small nanoparticles (NPs) displaying superparamagnetic behaviour are also required in order to reduce embolization in the blood vessel. The small NPs, however, make it difficult to vector NPs and keep them in the desired location. The aims of this work were to investigate parameters influencing the capture efficiency of the drug carriers in mimicked arterial flow. In this work, we computationally modelled and evaluated capture efficiency in MDT with COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4. The studied parameters were (i) magnetic nanoparticle size, (ii) three classes of magnetic cores (Fe3O4, Fe2O3, and Fe), and (iii) the thickness of biocompatible coating materials (Au, SiO2, and PEG). It was found that the capture efficiency of small particles decreased with decreasing size and was less than 5 % for magnetic particles in the superparamagnetic regime. The thickness of non-magnetic coating materials did not significantly influence the capture efficiency of MDT. It was difficult to capture small drug carriers (D<200 nm) in the arterial flow. We suggest that the MDT with high-capture efficiency can be obtained in small vessels and low-blood velocities such as micro-capillary vessels. PMID:26515074

  13. Magnetic field and shock effects and remanent magnetization in a hypervelocity impact experiment. [lunar surface magnetization simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srnka, L. J.; Martelli, G.; Newton, G.; Cisowski, S. M.; Fuller, M. D.; Schaal, R. B.

    1979-01-01

    The impact of aluminum projectiles onto high-alumina terrestrial basalt blocks at 13-15 km/s in the presence of a variable magnetic field is studied. Plasma production but not field production was detected, and characteristics of the remanence and the shocked basalt are reported. Mineralogical data suggest that the magnetization acquired in the material near the craters is shock remanence. The experimental results might indicate that shock effects or possibly thermoremanence in ejecta fragments, may be responsible for part of the magnetization of the lunar surface.

  14. Mean-field and direct numerical simulations of magnetic flux concentrations from vertical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, A.; Gressel, O.; Jabbari, S.; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Strongly stratified hydromagnetic turbulence has previously been found to produce magnetic flux concentrations if the domain is large enough compared with the size of turbulent eddies. Mean-field simulations (MFS) using parameterizations of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses show a large-scale negative effective magnetic pressure instability and have been able to reproduce many aspects of direct numerical simulations (DNS) regarding growth rate, shape of the resulting magnetic structures, and their height as a function of magnetic field strength. Unlike the case of an imposed horizontal field, for a vertical one, magnetic flux concentrations of equipartition strength with the turbulence can be reached, resulting in magnetic spots that are reminiscent of sunspots. Aims: We determine under what conditions magnetic flux concentrations with vertical field occur and what their internal structure is. Methods: We use a combination of MFS, DNS, and implicit large-eddy simulations (ILES) to characterize the resulting magnetic flux concentrations in forced isothermal turbulence with an imposed vertical magnetic field. Results: Using DNS, we confirm earlier results that in the kinematic stage of the large-scale instability the horizontal wavelength of structures is about 10 times the density scale height. At later times, even larger structures are being produced in a fashion similar to inverse spectral transfer in helically driven turbulence. Using ILES, we find that magnetic flux concentrations occur for Mach numbers between 0.1 and 0.7. They occur also for weaker stratification and larger turbulent eddies if the domain is wide enough. Using MFS, the size and aspect ratio of magnetic structures are determined as functions of two input parameters characterizing the parameterization of the effective magnetic pressure. DNS, ILES, and MFS show magnetic flux tubes with mean-field energies comparable to the turbulent kinetic energy. These tubes can reach a length of about

  15. Simulation of turbulent magnetic reconnection in the small-scale solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, F.; Hu, Q.; Feng, X.

    Some observational examples for the possible occurrence of the turbulent magnetic reconnection in the solar wind are found by analyzing Helios spacecraft's high resolution data. The phenomena of turbulent magnetic reconnections in small scale solar wind are simulated by introducing a third order accuracy upwind compact difference scheme to the compressible two-dimensional MHD flow. Numerical results verify that the turbulent magnetic reconnection process could occur in small scale solar wind, which is a basic feature characterizing the magnetic reconnection in high-magnetic Reynolds number (RM=2 000--10 000) solar wind. The configurations of the magnetic reconnection could evolve fro m a single X-line to a multiple X-line reconnection, exhibiting a complex picture of the formation, merging and evolution of magnetic islands, and finally the magnetic reconnection would evolve into a low-energy state. Its life-span of evolution is about hour-order of magnitude. Various magnetic and flow signatures are recorded in the numerical test for different evolution stages and along different crossing paths, which could in principle explain and confirm the observational samples from the Helios spacecraft. These results are helpful for revealing the basic physical processes in the solar wind turbulence.

  16. Particle-In-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Crustal Magnetic Anomalies: Magnetic Cusp Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.

    2012-01-01

    As the solar wind is incident upon the lunar surface, it will occasionally encounter lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields. These magnetic fields are small-scale, highly non-dipolar, have strengths up to hundreds of nanotesla, and typically interact with the solar wind in a kinetic fashion. Simulations, theoretical analyses, and spacecraft observations have shown that crustal fields can reflect solar wind protons via a combination of magnetic and electrostatic reflection; however, analyses of surface properties have suggested that protons may still access the lunar surface in the cusp regions of crustal magnetic fields. In this first report from a planned series of studies, we use a 1 1/2-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell code to model the self-consistent interaction between the solar wind, the cusp regions of lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields, and the lunar surface. We describe the self-consistent electrostatic environment within crustal cusp regions and discuss the implications of this work for the role that crustal fields may play regulating space weathering of the lunar surface via proton bombardment.

  17. Hybrid simulations of plasma transport by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause: magnetic shear

    SciTech Connect

    Cowee, Misa M; Winske, Dan; Gary, S Peter

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid (kinetic ions, massless fluid electrons) simulations of the Kelvin Helmholtz Instability (KHI) for a magnetopause configuration with a magnetic shear across the boundary are carried out to examine how the transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere is affected by the shear field. Low magnetic shear conditions where the magnetosheath magnetic field is within 30{sup o} of northward is included in the simulations because KHI is thought to be important for plasma transport only for northward or near-northward interplanetary magnetic field orientations. The simulations show that coherent vortices can grow for these near-northward angles, and that they are sometimes more coherent than for pure northward conditions because the turbulence which breaks-down these vortices is reduced when there are magnetic tension forces. With increasing magnetic shear angle, the growth rate is reduced, and the vortices do not grow to as large of size which reduces the plasma transport. By tracking the individual particle motions diffusion coefficients can be obtained for the system, where the diffusion is not classical in nature but instead has a time dependence resulting from both the increasingly large-scale vortex motion and the small-scale turbulence generated in the break-down of the instabilities. Results indicate that diffusion on the order of 10{sup 9} m{sup 2}/s could possibly be generated by KHI on the flanks of the magnetosphere.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of Lorentz force microscopy in magnetic nano-disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, R. A.; Mello, E. P.; Coura, P. Z.; Leonel, S. A.; Maciel, I. O.; Toscano, D.; Rocha, J. C. S.; Costa, B. V.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a molecular dynamics simulation to model the Lorentz force microscopy experiment. Experimentally, this technique consists in the scattering of electrons by magnetic structures in surfaces and gases. Here, we will explore the behavior of electrons colliding with nano-magnetic disks. The computational molecular dynamics experiment allows us to follow the trajectory of individual electrons all along the experiment. In order to compare our results with the experimental one reported in literature, we model the experimental electron detectors in a simplified way: a photo-sensitive screen is simulated in such way that it counts the number of electrons that collide at a certain position. The information is organized to give in grey scale the image information about the magnetic properties of the structure in the target. Computationally, the sensor is modeled as a square matrix in which we count how many electrons collide at each specific point after being scattered by the magnetic structure. We have used several configurations of the magnetic nano-disks to understand the behavior of the scattered electrons, changing the orientation direction of the magnetic moments in the nano-disk in several ways. Our results match very well with the experiments, showing that this simulation can become a powerful technique to help to interpret experimental results.

  19. Magnetic flux emergence in granular convection: radiative MHD simulations and observational signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2007-05-01

    Aims:We study the emergence of magnetic flux from the near-surface layers of the solar convection zone into the photosphere. Methods: To model magnetic flux emergence, we carried out a set of numerical radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulations. Our simulations take into account the effects of compressibility, energy exchange via radiative transfer, and partial ionization in the equation of state. All these physical ingredients are essential for a proper treatment of the problem. Furthermore, the inclusion of radiative transfer allows us to directly compare the simulation results with actual observations of emerging flux. Results: We find that the interaction between the magnetic flux tube and the external flow field has an important influence on the emergent morphology of the magnetic field. Depending on the initial properties of the flux tube (e.g. field strength, twist, entropy etc.), the emergence process can also modify the local granulation pattern. The emergence of magnetic flux tubes with a flux of 1019 Mx disturbs the granulation and leads to the transient appearance of a dark lane, which is coincident with upflowing material. These results are consistent with observed properties of emerging magnetic flux. Movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Laboratory Simulation of Arched Magnetic Flux Rope Eruptions in the Solar Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, S. K. P.; Gekelman, W.

    2010-08-13

    Dramatic eruption of an arched magnetic flux rope in a large ambient plasma has been studied in a laboratory experiment that simulates coronal loops. The eruption is initiated by laser generated plasma flows from the footpoints of the rope that significantly modify the magnetic-field topology and link the magnetic-field lines of the rope with the ambient plasma. Following this event, the flux rope erupts by releasing its plasma into the background. The resulting impulse excites intense magnetosonic waves that transfer energy to the ambient plasma and subsequently decay.

  1. Laboratory simulation of arched magnetic flux rope eruptions in the solar atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, S K P; Gekelman, W

    2010-08-13

    Dramatic eruption of an arched magnetic flux rope in a large ambient plasma has been studied in a laboratory experiment that simulates coronal loops. The eruption is initiated by laser generated plasma flows from the footpoints of the rope that significantly modify the magnetic-field topology and link the magnetic-field lines of the rope with the ambient plasma. Following this event, the flux rope erupts by releasing its plasma into the background. The resulting impulse excites intense magnetosonic waves that transfer energy to the ambient plasma and subsequently decay. PMID:20868055

  2. Simulation of an improved magnetic-electrostatic detector objective lens for LVSEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knell, G.; Plies, E.

    1999-05-01

    The simulations of the imaging properties of several magnetic-electrostatic detector objective lenses are presented. We have assumed that the magnetic circuit has a radially arranged pole-piece gap. By using this snorkel lens design the specimen is immersed in a strong magnetic field. The calculations show that the chromatic aberration coefficient, which essentially determines the resolution in low-voltage scanning electron microscopy, only decreases with increasing immersion ratio if the radius of the inner pole piece is not too small. Furthermore we determined the collection efficiency of secondary electrons for a lens variant which is optimized with respect to primary electron optics.

  3. MHD simulation of a magnetized target in an imploding conical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Conical imploding magnetic target fusion (MTF) is a new concept, in which the compression comes from both fast mechanic implosion and synchronized theta-pinching or Z-pinching. The compressed magnetized target has a moving end, an increasing external current, and an accumulating high density. Magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) simulation could help revealing the details of the evolving plasma and finding the parameters (imploding speed, fuel amount, theta-pinch or Z-pinch current profile, etc.) required to reach Lawson Criterion. Preliminary 2D MHD simulation results of a conical imploding theta-pinch are presented.

  4. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Radiation from Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Mizuno, Y.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    Using our new 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated long-term particle acceleration associated with a relativistic electron-positron jet propagating in an unmagnetized ambient electron-positron plasma. The simulations were performed using a much longer simulation system than our previous simulations in order to investigate the full nonlinear stage of the Weibel instability and its particle acceleration mechanism. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and ambient electrons are accelerated in the resulting shocks. Acceleration of ambient electrons leads to a maximum ambient electron density three times larger than the original value as predicted by hydrodynamic compression. Behind the bow shock, in the jet shock, strong electromagnetic fields are generated. These fields may lead to time dependent afterglow emission. In order to go beyond the standard synchrotron model used in astrophysical objects we have used PIC simulations and calculated radiation based on first principles. We calculated radiation from electrons propagating in a uniform parallel magnetic field to verify the technique. We also used the technique to calculate emission from electrons based on simulations with a small system. We obtain spectra which are consistent with those generated from electrons propagating in turbulent magnetic fields. This turbulent magnetic field is similar to the magnetic field generated at an early nonlinear stage of the Weibel instability. A fully developed shock within a larger system may generate a jitter/synchrotron spectrum.

  5. MAGNETIC CYCLES IN GLOBAL LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF SOLAR CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Ghizaru, Mihai; Charbonneau, Paul; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2010-06-01

    We report on a global magnetohydrodynamical simulation of the solar convection zone, which succeeds in generating a large-scale axisymmetric magnetic component, antisymmetric about the equatorial plane and undergoing regular polarity reversals on decadal timescales. We focus on a specific simulation run covering 255 years, during which 8 polarity reversals are observed, with a mean period of 30 years. Time-latitude slices of the zonally averaged toroidal magnetic component at the base of the convecting envelope show a well-organized toroidal flux system building up in each solar hemisphere, peaking at mid-latitudes and migrating toward the equator in the course of each cycle, in remarkable agreement with inferences based on the sunspot butterfly diagram. The simulation also produces a large-scale dipole moment, varying in phase with the internal toroidal component, suggesting that the simulation may be operating as what is known in mean-field theory as an {alpha}{Omega} dynamo.

  6. Gyrokinetic particle simulation of microturbulence for general magnetic geometry and experimental profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Yong; Holod, Ihor; Wang, Zhixuan; Lin, Zhihong; Zhang, Taige

    2015-02-15

    Developments in gyrokinetic particle simulation enable the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) to simulate turbulent transport in tokamaks with realistic equilibrium profiles and plasma geometry, which is a critical step in the code–experiment validation process. These new developments include numerical equilibrium representation using B-splines, a new Poisson solver based on finite difference using field-aligned mesh and magnetic flux coordinates, a new zonal flow solver for general geometry, and improvements on the conventional four-point gyroaverage with nonuniform background marker loading. The gyrokinetic Poisson equation is solved in the perpendicular plane instead of the poloidal plane. Exploiting these new features, GTC is able to simulate a typical DIII-D discharge with experimental magnetic geometry and profiles. The simulated turbulent heat diffusivity and its radial profile show good agreement with other gyrokinetic codes. The newly developed nonuniform loading method provides a modified radial transport profile to that of the conventional uniform loading method.

  7. Axisymmetric Simulation of the Magnetorotational Instability in a Magnetized Taylor-Couette Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Goodman, Jeremy; Ji, Hantao

    2007-11-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is probably the main cause of turbulence and accretion in sufficiently ionized astrophysical disks. Despite much theoretical and computational work, however, the nonlinear saturation of the MRI is imperfectly understood. We present non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the Princeton MRI experiment. In vertically infinite or periodic cylinders, MRI saturates in a resistive current-sheet with significant reduction of the mean shear, and with poloidal circulation scaling as the square root of resistivity. Angular momentum transport scales as the reciprocal square root of viscosity but only weakly depends on resistivity. For finite cylinders with insulating end caps, a method to implement full insulating boundary condition is introduced. MRI grows with a clear linear phase from small amplitudes at rates in good agreement with linear analysis. In the final state one inflowing ``jet" opposite to the usual Ekman ``jet" is found near the inner cylinder. Angular momentum transport has a weaker scaling with Reynolds number and is dependent hardly on Lundquist number. Under proper condition our experimental facility is a good testbed to show that MRI could be suppressed by a strong magnetic field.

  8. The Possible Impact of L5 Magnetograms on Non-potential Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Marion; Mackay, Duncan H.; Yeates, Anthony R.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2016-09-01

    The proposed Carrington-L5 mission would bring instruments to the L5 Lagrange point to provide us with crucial data for space weather prediction. To assess the importance of including a magnetograph, we consider the possible differences in non-potential solar coronal magnetic field simulations when magnetograph observations are available from the L5 point, compared with an L1-based field of view (FOV). A timeseries of synoptic radial magnetic field maps is constructed to capture the emergence of two active regions from the L5 FOV. These regions are initially absent in the L1 magnetic field maps, but are included once they rotate into the L1 FOV. Non-potential simulations for these two sets of input data are compared in detail. Within the bipolar active regions themselves, differences in the magnetic field structure can exist between the two simulations once the active regions are included in both. These differences tend to reduce within 5 days of the active region being included in L1. The delayed emergence in L1 can, however, lead to significant persistent differences in long-range connectivity between the active regions and the surrounding fields, and also in the global magnetic energy. In particular, the open magnetic flux and the location of open magnetic footpoints, are sensitive to capturing the real-time of emergence. These results suggest that a magnetograph at L5 could significantly improve predictions of the non-potential corona, the interplanetary magnetic field, and of solar wind source regions on the Sun.

  9. Computer simulation study of dynamics and domain structures in different magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ming

    Spin wave modes in Permalloy stripes with transverse applied field were studied both by micromagnetic simulations and by solving the linearized equation of motion. In high field regime, localized spin wave modes are observed. In low field regime, crossover spin wave modes of mixed Damon-Eshbach and backward volume character are observed. The lowest frequency localized modes completely soften when the magnetization is saturated at very high external field. The hysteresis loops in both easy and hard axes are calculated in simulations for a FeCo thin film rectangle. The reversal process in the easy axis is studied by applying a tipping pulse. With a large applied field in the easy axis, two resonance modes are observed. The higher frequency mode is concentrated at the central part of the rectangle while the lower frequency one is located at the corners. For a Permalloy thin film square, spin wave modes excited from the Kittel structure were studied. Systematic but complex spin wave modes are observed. Unconventional two dimensional magnetic vortex structures, which have the same exchange energy and surface charge density but different volume charge density compared to the conventional vortex structures, are observed at the cross-section area of two Permalloy thin film wires in simulations. Isolated anti-vortex structures are also observed in the same geometry but with a different initial condition. Logic gates are designed using magnetic elements through magnetostatic interaction. Two setups can operate the AND function in simulations. The effect on the magnetization of the magnetic field produced by the electric current passing through the magnetic sample were studied in simulations. The circular field due to the electric current may cause a vortex structure or even change the chirality of the vortex depending on the current density, the material and size of the sample.

  10. B2N2O4: Prediction of a Magnetic Ground State for a Light Main-Group Molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Zoltan; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-09-08

    Cyclobutanetetrone, (CO)4, has a triplet ground state. Here we predict, based on electronic structure calculations, that the B2N2O4 molecule also has a triplet ground state and is therefore paramagnetic; the structure is an analogue of (CO)4 in which the carbon ring is replaced by a (BN)2 ring. Similar to (CO)4, the triplet ground-state structure of B2N2O4 is also thermodynamically unstable. Besides analysis of the molecular orbitals, we found that the partial atomic charges are good indicators for predicting magnetic ground states.

  11. Numerical Simulation on Applicability of Resonant Magnetic Perturbation to KSTAR Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doohyun; Han, Hyunsun; Kim, Ki Min; Hong, Sang Hee

    2009-11-01

    A numerical simulation is carried out to investigate the perturbed magnetic field configurations for a feasibility study on the resonant magnetic perturbation(RMP) to mitigate ELM damages to the divertor in KSTAR tokamak. The perturbed magnetic fields are described by vacuum superposition of equilibrium fields and fluctuating fields induced from the in- vessel control coils (IVCCs) will be installed in KSTAR. The equilibrium and induced fields are calculated using Grad- Shafranov equation and Biot-Savart law, respectively. For visualizing the magnetic field configurations, a field line tracing code has been developed using the 4th-order Runge-Kutta method. Magnetic field perturbations and island configurations can be found with this tracing code by describing poloidal positions of field lines as the increment of toroidal angle. And the Chirikov parameter is calculated to verify the generation of stochastic layer by overlap of magnetic islands. From this numerical work, it is confirmed that stochastic magnetic field lines are formed when the IVCC magnetic fields are generated, and the effect of RMP on KSTAR operation is discussed.

  12. Comparison between simulation and experimentally observed interactions between two magnetic beads in a fluidic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduwole, Olayinka; Grob, David Tim; Sheard, Steve

    2016-06-01

    Continuous flow separation of magnetic particles within a microfluidic device could lead to improved performance of magnetic bead-based assays but the undesirable formation of bead clusters reduces its efficiency; this efficiency refers to the ability to separate bound magnetic beads from a mixture of particles. Such agglomerates are formed due to magnetic binding forces while hydrodynamic interactions strongly influence the particles' movement. This paper presents a model for interactions between a pair of equal sized super-paramagnetic beads suspended in water within a uniform magnetic field. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time a comparison between simulated trajectories and the beads' movement captured on video; the beads were suspended in a stationary fluid placed within a uniform magnetic field. In conclusion, the model is a good approximation for beads interacting with their nearest neighbours and is able to predict the trajectory pattern of these particles in a magnetic bead-based assay. Predicting the magnetically induced interaction of nearby beads will help in determining the density of beads in an assay and in avoiding agglomeration over a fixed time duration.

  13. Numerical simulation of screening current distribution in HTS tape of high field magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Ryusei; Oga, Yuki; Noguchi, So; Igarashi, Hajime; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, properties of high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes, especially in-field performance and mechanical strength, have been continuously improved. The HTS tapes have been widely used for high field (>20 T) magnet researches and there are several technical challenges including field attenuation of an HTS magnet by screening currents induced within the HTS tapes. Several publications reported that the screening currents, induced by penetration of self magnetic fields into HTS tapes within an HTS magnet, weakened a field constant of the HTS magnet. The result may demonstrate that the screening current changes an overall current density distribution in HTS tapes and, as a consequence, the generated magnetic field. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the screening current distribution in an HTS tape. This paper reports numerical simulation of the screening current distribution in an HTS tape of high field magnets using 2D finite element method with the E-J characteristic of the HTS tape taken into account. Self magnetic field distribution and its orientation to the HTS tape are also considered to compute critical currents and locally generated electric fields, two key components to figure out the distribution of screening currents.

  14. Characteristics and computer model simulation of magnetic damping forces in maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.L.; Rote, D.M.; Chen, S.S.

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the magnetic damping force in electrodynamic suspension (EDS) maglev systems. The computer model simulations, which combine electrical system equations with mechanical motion equations on the basis of dynamic circuit theory, were conducted for a loop-shaped coil guideway. The intrinsic damping characteristics of the EDS-type guideway are investigated, and the negative damping phenomenon is confirmed by the computer simulations. The report also presents a simple circuit model to aid in understanding damping-force characteristics.

  15. Verification of Spin Magnetic Attitude Control System using air-bearing-based attitude control simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousaloo, H. S.; Nodeh, M. T.; Mehrabian, R.

    2016-09-01

    This paper accomplishes one goal and it was to verify and to validate a Spin Magnetic Attitude Control System (SMACS) program and to perform Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) air-bearing experiments. A study of a closed-loop magnetic spin controller is presented using only magnetic rods as actuators. The magnetic spin rate control approach is able to perform spin rate control and it is verified with an Attitude Control System (ACS) air-bearing MATLAB® SIMULINK® model and a hardware-embedded LABVIEW® algorithm that controls the spin rate of the test platform on a spherical air bearing table. The SIMULINK® model includes dynamic model of air-bearing, its disturbances, actuator emulation and the time delays caused by on-board calculations. The air-bearing simulator is employed to develop, improve, and carry out objective tests of magnetic torque rods and spin rate control algorithm in the experimental framework and to provide a more realistic demonstration of expected performance of attitude control as compared with software-based architectures. Six sets of two torque rods are used as actuators for the SMACS. It is implemented and simulated to fulfill mission requirement including spin the satellite up to 12 degs-1 around the z-axis. These techniques are documented for the full nonlinear equations of motion of the system and the performances of these techniques are compared in several simulations.

  16. General relativistic simulations of slowly and differentially rotating magnetized neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Etienne, Zachariah B.; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2006-08-15

    We present long-term ({approx}10{sup 4}M) axisymmetric simulations of differentially rotating, magnetized neutron stars in the slow-rotation, weak magnetic field limit using a perturbative metric evolution technique. Although this approach yields results comparable to those obtained via nonperturbative (BSSN) evolution techniques, simulations performed with the perturbative metric solver require about 1/4 the computational resources at a given resolution. This computational efficiency enables us to observe and analyze the effects of magnetic braking and the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at very high resolution. Our simulations demonstrate that (1) MRI is not observed unless the fastest-growing mode wavelength is resolved by (greater-or-similar sign)10 gridpoints; (2) as resolution is improved, the MRI growth rate converges, but due to the small-scale turbulent nature of MRI, the maximum growth amplitude increases, but does not exhibit convergence, even at the highest resolution; and (3) independent of resolution, magnetic braking drives the star toward uniform rotation as energy is sapped from differential rotation by winding magnetic fields.

  17. Tomography based numerical simulation of the demagnetizing field in soft magnetic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Arzbacher, S.; Petrasch, J.; Amann, P.; Weidenfeller, B.; Loerting, T.; Ostermann, A.

    2015-04-28

    The magneto-static behaviour of soft magnetic composites (SMCs) is investigated using tomography based direct numerical simulation. The microgeometry crucially affects the magnetic properties of the composite since a geometry dependent demagnetizing field is established inside the composite, which lowers the magnetic permeability. We determine the magnetic field information inside the SMC using direct numerical simulation of the magnetic field based on high resolution micro-computed tomography data of the SMC's microstructure as well as artificially generated data made of statistically homogeneous systems of identical fully penetrable spheres and prolate spheroids. Quasi-static electromagnetic behaviour and linear material response are assumed. The 3D magnetostatic Maxwell equations are solved using Whitney finite elements. Simulations show that clustering and percolation behaviour determine the demagnetizing factor of SMCs rather than the particle shape. The demagnetizing factor correlates with the slope of a 2-point probability function at its origin, which is related to the specific surface area of the SMC. Comparison with experimental results indicates that the relatively low permeability of SMCs cannot be explained by demagnetizing effects alone and suggests that the permeability of SMC particles has to be orders of magnitude smaller than the bulk permeability of the particle material.

  18. Design and simulation of a 800 Mbit/s data link for magnetic resonance imaging wearables.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Christian; Buthe, Lars; Petti, Luisa; Cantarella, Giuseppe; Munzenrieder, Niko; Daus, Alwin; Troster, Gerhard

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the optimization of electronic circuitry for operation in the harsh electro magnetic (EM) environment during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. As demonstrator, a device small enough to be worn during the scan is optimized. Based on finite element method (FEM) simulations, the induced current densities due to magnetic field changes of 200 T s(-1) were reduced from 1 × 10(10) A m(-2) by one order of magnitude, predicting error-free operation of the 1.8V logic employed. The simulations were validated using a bit error rate test, which showed no bit errors during a MRI scan sequence. Therefore, neither the logic, nor the utilized 800 Mbit s(-1) low voltage differential swing (LVDS) data link of the optimized wearable device were significantly influenced by the EM interference. Next, the influence of ferro-magnetic components on the static magnetic field and consequently the image quality was simulated showing a MRI image loss with approximately 2 cm radius around a commercial integrated circuit of 1×1 cm(2). This was successively validated by a conventional MRI scan.

  19. Hybrid Molecular and Spin Dynamics Simulations for Ensembles of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Magnetoresistive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Teich, Lisa; Schröder, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The development of magnetoresistive sensors based on magnetic nanoparticles which are immersed in conductive gel matrices requires detailed information about the corresponding magnetoresistive properties in order to obtain optimal sensor sensitivities. Here, crucial parameters are the particle concentration, the viscosity of the gel matrix and the particle structure. Experimentally, it is not possible to obtain detailed information about the magnetic microstructure, i.e., orientations of the magnetic moments of the particles that define the magnetoresistive properties, however, by using numerical simulations one can study the magnetic microstructure theoretically, although this requires performing classical spin dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations simultaneously. Here, we present such an approach which allows us to calculate the orientation and the trajectory of every single magnetic nanoparticle. This enables us to study not only the static magnetic microstructure, but also the dynamics of the structuring process in the gel matrix itself. With our hybrid approach, arbitrary sensor configurations can be investigated and their magnetoresistive properties can be optimized. PMID:26580623

  20. The simulation of magnetic resonance elastography through atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Seale, L E J; Hollis, L; Klatt, D; Sack, I; Roberts, N; Pankaj, P; Hoskins, P R

    2016-06-14

    The clinical diagnosis of atherosclerosis via the measurement of stenosis size is widely acknowledged as an imperfect criterion. The vulnerability of an atherosclerotic plaque to rupture is associated with its mechanical properties. The potential to image these mechanical properties using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) was investigated through synthetic datasets. An image of the steady state wave propagation, equivalent to the first harmonic, can be extracted directly from finite element analysis. Inversion of this displacement data yields a map of the shear modulus, known as an elastogram. The variation of plaque composition, stenosis size, Gaussian noise, filter thresholds and excitation frequency were explored. A decreasing mean shear modulus with an increasing lipid composition was identified through all stenosis sizes. However the inversion algorithm showed sensitivity to parameter variation leading to artefacts which disrupted both the elastograms and quantitative trends. As noise was increased up to a realistic level, the contrast was maintained between the fully fibrous and lipid plaques but lost between the interim compositions. Although incorporating a Butterworth filter improved the performance of the algorithm, restrictive filter thresholds resulted in a reduction of the sensitivity of the algorithm to composition and noise variation. Increasing the excitation frequency improved the techniques ability to image the magnitude of the shear modulus and identify a contrast between compositions. In conclusion, whilst the technique has the potential to image the shear modulus of atherosclerotic plaques, future research will require the integration of a heterogeneous inversion algorithm. PMID:27130475

  1. The simulation of magnetic resonance elastography through atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Seale, L E J; Hollis, L; Klatt, D; Sack, I; Roberts, N; Pankaj, P; Hoskins, P R

    2016-06-14

    The clinical diagnosis of atherosclerosis via the measurement of stenosis size is widely acknowledged as an imperfect criterion. The vulnerability of an atherosclerotic plaque to rupture is associated with its mechanical properties. The potential to image these mechanical properties using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) was investigated through synthetic datasets. An image of the steady state wave propagation, equivalent to the first harmonic, can be extracted directly from finite element analysis. Inversion of this displacement data yields a map of the shear modulus, known as an elastogram. The variation of plaque composition, stenosis size, Gaussian noise, filter thresholds and excitation frequency were explored. A decreasing mean shear modulus with an increasing lipid composition was identified through all stenosis sizes. However the inversion algorithm showed sensitivity to parameter variation leading to artefacts which disrupted both the elastograms and quantitative trends. As noise was increased up to a realistic level, the contrast was maintained between the fully fibrous and lipid plaques but lost between the interim compositions. Although incorporating a Butterworth filter improved the performance of the algorithm, restrictive filter thresholds resulted in a reduction of the sensitivity of the algorithm to composition and noise variation. Increasing the excitation frequency improved the techniques ability to image the magnitude of the shear modulus and identify a contrast between compositions. In conclusion, whilst the technique has the potential to image the shear modulus of atherosclerotic plaques, future research will require the integration of a heterogeneous inversion algorithm.

  2. Computer simulation of magnetization-controlled shunt reactors for calculating electromagnetic transients in power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karpov, A. S.

    2013-01-15

    A computer procedure for simulating magnetization-controlled dc shunt reactors is described, which enables the electromagnetic transients in electric power systems to be calculated. It is shown that, by taking technically simple measures in the control system, one can obtain high-speed reactors sufficient for many purposes, and dispense with the use of high-power devices for compensating higher harmonic components.

  3. Simulation investigation of a Ku-band radial line oscillator operating at low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Fangchao Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhong, Huihuang; Li, Yangmei; Qi, Zumin

    2014-06-15

    A novel radial line oscillator operating at Ku-band with low guiding magnetic field is proposed in this paper. By using an oversized radial structure, the power handling capacity is enhanced significantly. Based on the small-signal theory, the π/2 mode in radial TM{sub 01} mode is selected as the working mode. Furthermore, a radial uniform guiding magnetic field, made up of four solenoids, is designed. As indicated in 2.5-dimensional fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation, high power microwaves with a power of 2.2 GW and a frequency of 14.25 GHz are generated with over 40% efficiency when the electron beam voltage is 300 kV, the beam current 18 kA, and the guiding magnetic field is only 0.6 T. There is no angular non-asymmetric mode discovered in three-dimensional simulation.

  4. Study of magnetic properties for co double-nanorings: Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qingying; Chen, Shuiyuan; Liu, Jingyao; Huang, Chao; Huang, Shengkai; Huang, Zhigao

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, cobalt double-nanorings (Co D-N-rings) structure model was constructed. Based on Monte-Carlo simulation (MC) method combining with Fast Fourier Transformation and Micromagnetism (FFTM) method, the magnetic properties of Co D-N-rings with different geometric dimensions have been studied. The simulated results indicate that, the magnetization steps in hysteresis loops is the result of the special spin configurations (SCs), i.e., onion-type state and vortex-type state, which are very different from that in many other nanostructures, such as nanometer thin-films, nanotubes, etc. Besides, Co D-N-rings with different geometric dimensions present interesting magnetization behavior, which is determined by the change of both SCs and exchange interaction in Co D-N-rings.

  5. Classical Magnetic Dipole Moments for the Simulation of Vibrational Circular Dichroism by ab Initio Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Martin; Kirchner, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    We present a new approach for calculating vibrational circular dichroism spectra by ab initio molecular dynamics. In the context of molecular dynamics, these spectra are given by the Fourier transform of the cross-correlation function of magnetic dipole moment and electric dipole moment. We obtain the magnetic dipole moment from the electric current density according to the classical definition. The electric current density is computed by solving a partial differential equation derived from the continuity equation and the condition that eddy currents should be absent. In combination with a radical Voronoi tessellation, this yields an individual magnetic dipole moment for each molecule in a bulk phase simulation. Using the chiral alcohol 2-butanol as an example, we show that experimental spectra are reproduced very well. Our approach requires knowing only the electron density in each simulation step, and it is not restricted to any particular electronic structure method. PMID:26771403

  6. Developing Glassy Magnets from Simulated Composition of Martian Soil for Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Ray, C. S.; Rogers, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    The long-term exploration goals of NASA include developing human habitation on Mars and conducting scientific investigations on Mars and other planetary bodies. In situ resource processing is a key objective in this area. We focus on the possibility of making magnetic glasses in situ for potential applications development. The paper will focus on ongoing work at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on making magnetic glass from Mars soil simulants and its characterization. Analysis of the glass morphology, strength, chemistry and resulting magnetic properties will provide a fundamental understanding of the synthesized material that can be used for potential applications development. in an effort to characterize the magnetic properties of the Mars glasses, a series of tests were performed at NASA MSFC. Preliminary tests indicated that the glasses were attracted to a magnet and also had a small amount of residual magnetism. They were opaque (almost black in color). As the first step, a sample of Mars 1 glass (approx.1 mm x 1 mm x 5 mm length) was machined, weighed and its hysteresis curve was measured using a Vibration Sample Magnetometer (VSM). Next, a small furnace was designed and built and the sample was baked in a graphite (reducing agent) crucible at 800 C in an Argon atmosphere for 3 hours in the presence of a uniform, transverse (transverse to the 5mm length of the sample) magnetic field of 0.37 Tesla. The treated sample showed reddening on the outside and showed substantially increased residual magnetism. This sample was again analyzed in the VSM. The data clearly showed that some chemical change occurred during the heat treatment (color change) and that both the glasses have useful magnetic properties. Although no orientation effects of the magnetic field were considered, the data showed the following: 1. Both glass samples are primarily soft magnets and display ferromagnetic behavior (hysteresis, saturation, etc.) 2. The treated glass has improved saturation

  7. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SOLAR MICROFLARES IN A CANOPY-TYPE MAGNETIC CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, R.-L.; Fang, C.; Chen, P.-F.

    2012-06-01

    Microflares are small activities in the solar low atmosphere; some are in the low corona while others are in the chromosphere. Observations show that some of the microflares are triggered by magnetic reconnection between the emerging flux and a pre-existing background magnetic field. We perform 2.5-dimensional, compressible, resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetic reconnection with gravity considered. The background magnetic field is a canopy-type configuration that is rooted at the boundary of the solar supergranule. By changing the bottom boundary conditions in the simulation, a new magnetic flux emerges at the center of the supergranule and reconnects with the canopy-type magnetic field. We successfully simulate the coronal and chromospheric microflares whose current sheets are located at the corona and the chromosphere, respectively. The microflare with a coronal origin has a larger size and a higher temperature enhancement than the microflare with a chromospheric origin. In the microflares with coronal origins, we also found a hot jet ({approx}1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K), which is probably related to the observational extreme ultraviolet or soft X-ray jets, and a cold jet ({approx}10{sup 4} K), which is similar to the observational H{alpha}/Ca surges. However, there is only a H{alpha}/Ca bright point in the microflares that have chromospheric origins. The study of parameter dependence shows that the size and strength of the emerging magnetic flux are the key parameters that determine the height of the reconnection location, and they further determine the different observational features of the microflares.

  8. In-plane magnetization behaviors in the Shastry-Sutherland system TbB{sub 4}: Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J. J.; Li, W. C.; Qin, M. H. E-mail: liujm@nju.edu.cn; Xie, Y. L.; Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M. E-mail: liujm@nju.edu.cn; Jia, X. T.

    2015-05-07

    The in-plane magnetization behaviors in TbB{sub 4} are theoretically studied using the frustrated classical XY model, including the exchange and biquadratic interactions, and the anisotropy energy. The magnetization curves at various temperatures are simulated, and the magnetic orders are uncovered by the tracking of the spin configurations. In addition, the effects of the in-plane anisotropy and biquadratic interaction on the magnetization curves are investigated in detail. The simulated results suggest that the magnetic anisotropy within the (001) plane owes to the complex interplay between these couplings, and the anisotropy term plays an important role.

  9. Nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection: Results from magnetospheric observations and particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Mariko; Hoshino, Masahiro

    Nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection is investigated by using spacecraft ob-servations in the Earth's magnetotail and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Magnetic recon-nection is believed to be an efficient particle accelerator in various environments in space, such as the pulsar magnetosphere, the solar corona and the Earth's magnetosphere. The Earth's magnetosphere particularly gives crucial clues to understand particle acceleration in magnetic reconnection since precise information on both fields and particles is available from spacecraft observations. Several nonthermal electron acceleration mechanisms, including the acceleration around the X-point and the magnetic pile-up region in the downstream, have been proposed and tested by recent PIC simulations as well as spacecraft observations. However nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection still remains to be poorly understood in both ob-servational and simulation studies. We report on the first ever direct observational evidence of nonthermal ion acceleration in magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail based on the Geotail observations. Nonthermal protons accelerated up to several hundreds keV exhibit a power-law energy spectrum with a typical spectrum index 3-5. By conducting a statistical study on reconnection events in the Earth's magnetotail, we found efficient ion acceleration when the reconnection electric field is strong. On the other hand, the statistical study indicates that the efficiency of electron acceleration is rather controlled by the thickness of the reconnec-tion current sheet. We also performed PIC simulations of driven reconnection to investigate in detail acceleration mechanisms of both ions and electrons. Acceleration mechanisms as well as conditions necessary for the efficient particle acceleration are discussed based on these results.

  10. Simulating Chiral Magnetic and Separation Effects with Spin-Orbit Coupled Atomic Gases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The chiral magnetic and chiral separation effects-quantum-anomaly-induced electric current and chiral current along an external magnetic field in parity-odd quark-gluon plasma-have received intense studies in the community of heavy-ion collision physics. We show that analogous effects occur in rotating trapped Fermi gases with Weyl-Zeeman spin-orbit coupling where the rotation plays the role of an external magnetic field. These effects can induce a mass quadrupole in the atomic cloud along the rotation axis which may be tested in future experiments. Our results suggest that the spin-orbit coupled atomic gases are potential simulators of the chiral magnetic and separation effects. PMID:26868084

  11. Simulating Chiral Magnetic and Separation Effects with Spin-Orbit Coupled Atomic Gases

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-01-01

    The chiral magnetic and chiral separation effects—quantum-anomaly-induced electric current and chiral current along an external magnetic field in parity-odd quark-gluon plasma—have received intense studies in the community of heavy-ion collision physics. We show that analogous effects occur in rotating trapped Fermi gases with Weyl-Zeeman spin-orbit coupling where the rotation plays the role of an external magnetic field. These effects can induce a mass quadrupole in the atomic cloud along the rotation axis which may be tested in future experiments. Our results suggest that the spin-orbit coupled atomic gases are potential simulators of the chiral magnetic and separation effects. PMID:26868084

  12. Spin-lattice dynamics simulation of external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chui, C. P.; Zhou, Yan

    2014-03-15

    Modeling of field-induced magnetization in ferromagnetic materials has been an active topic in the last dozen years, yet a dynamic treatment of distance-dependent exchange integral has been lacking. In view of that, we employ spin-lattice dynamics (SLD) simulations to study the external field effect on magnetic order of ferromagnetic iron. Our results show that an external field can increase the inflection point of the temperature. Also the model provides a better description of the effect of spin correlation in response to an external field than the mean-field theory. An external field has a more prominent effect on the long range magnetic order than on the short range counterpart. Furthermore, an external field allows the magnon dispersion curves and the uniform precession modes to exhibit magnetic order variation from their temperature dependence.

  13. Simulating Chiral Magnetic and Separation Effects with Spin-Orbit Coupled Atomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-02-01

    The chiral magnetic and chiral separation effects—quantum-anomaly-induced electric current and chiral current along an external magnetic field in parity-odd quark-gluon plasma—have received intense studies in the community of heavy-ion collision physics. We show that analogous effects occur in rotating trapped Fermi gases with Weyl-Zeeman spin-orbit coupling where the rotation plays the role of an external magnetic field. These effects can induce a mass quadrupole in the atomic cloud along the rotation axis which may be tested in future experiments. Our results suggest that the spin-orbit coupled atomic gases are potential simulators of the chiral magnetic and separation effects.

  14. Axial Magnetic Field Compression within Radial Foil Plasma Jets, Experiment and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byvank, Tom; Potter, William; Chang, Jae Young; Banasek, Jacob; Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    Compression of an axial magnetic field correlates with density hollowing and azimuthal rotation of a plasma jet generated by the COBRA pulsed power machine (1 MA peak current in 100 ns rise time) in a radial foil (15 μm Al thin disk) configuration. The plasma jet compresses an external 1 T axial magnetic field (Bz) as it collimates along the central z-axis. Experimental measurements use a Bdot magnetic probe placed in the center of the hollow plasma jet. Experimental results show compression of the 1 T Bz field to 2.4 +/- 0.3 T. Predictions made by the extended magnetohydrodynamics (XMHD) code, PERSEUS, show a 5.0 +/- 0.7 T field at the probe location. We overview physical reasons for the discrepancy between the experimental and simulation magnetic field compression measurements.

  15. Simulations of Magnetic Field Generation in Laser-Produced Blast Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D.; Fatenejad, M.; Gregori, G.; Miniati, F.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B.; Ravasio, A.; Koenig, M.; Murphy, C. D.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the Universe. The origin of these fields and process by which they are amplified are not fully understood, although amplification is thought to involve turbulence. Experiments being conducted at medium-scale laser facilities (such as the LULI laser the Janus laser) can investigate the self-generation of magnetic fields under conditions that resemble astrophysical shocks. In these experiments, two 527 nm, 1.5 ns long laser beams are focused onto a 500 μm diameter graphite rod producing an explosion and asymmetric blast wave into a Helium filled chamber. A variety of diagnostics measure the velocity, electron density, and show that a large scale magnetic field is produced. We report preliminary hydrodynamic and MHD simulations using FLASH of a simplified version of the experiment. The results provide insights into the origin and generation of the magnetic field. This work was partially supported by the US DOE, the European Research Council, and Laserlab Europe.

  16. Novel Applications of Magnetic Fields for Fluid Flow Control and for Simulating Variable Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.

    2005-01-01

    . The use of strong magnetic fields for terrestrially simulating variable gravity environments and applications supporting the NASA Exploration Initiative will also be briefly discussed.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation for thermal assisted reversal process of micro-magnetic torus ring with bistable closure domain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Kenichi; Suzuki, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed for temperature dependences of closure domain parameter for a magnetic micro-torus ring cluster under magnetic field on limited temperature regions. Simulation results show that magnetic field on tiny limited temperature region can reverse magnetic closure domain structures when the magnetic field is applied at a threshold temperature corresponding to intensity of applied magnetic field. This is one of thermally assisted switching phenomena through a self-organization process. The results show the way to find non-wasteful pairs between intensity of magnetic field and temperature region for reversing closure domain structure by temperature dependence of the fluctuation of closure domain parameter. Monte Carlo method for this simulation is very valuable to optimize the design of thermally assisted switching devices.

  18. Modeling of the corrected D st * index temporal profile on the main phase of the magnetic storms generated by different types of solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, N. S.; Yermolaev, Yu. I.; Lodkina, I. G.

    2015-03-01

    A modeling of the corrected (taking into account the magnetopause currents [9]) D st * index during the main phase of magnetic storms generated by four types of the solar wind (SW), namely MC (10 storms), CIR (28 storms), Sheath (21 storms), and Ejecta (31 storms), is performed similarly to our previous work on the simple D st index [8]. The "Catalog of large-scale solar wind phenomena during 1976-2000" ([1], ftp://ftp.iki.rssi.ru/pub/omni/) prepared on the basis of the OMNI database, was used for the identification of SW types. The time behavior of D st * is approximated by a linear dependence on the integral electric field (sum E y ), dynamic pressure ( P d ), and fluctuation level (s B) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Three types of D st * modeling are performed: (1) by individual values of the approximation coefficients; (2) by approximation coefficients averaged over SW type, and (3) in the same way as in (2) but with allowance for the D st *-index values preceding the beginning of the main phase of the magnetic storm. The results of modeling the corrected D st * index are compared to modeling of the usual D st index. In the conditions of a strong statistical scatter of the approximation coefficients, the use of D st instead of D st * insignificantly influences the accuracy of the modeling and correlation coefficient.

  19. Large-Eddy Simulation of Conductive Flows at Low Magnetic Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knaepen, B.; Moin, P.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the LES method with dynamic procedure in the context of conductive flows subject to an applied external magnetic field at low magnetic Reynolds number R(sub m). These kind of flows are encountered in many industrial applications. For example, in the steel industry, applied magnetic fields can be used to damp turbulence in the casting process. In nuclear fusion devices (Tokamaks), liquid-lithium flows are used as coolant blankets and interact with the surrounding magnetic field that drives and confines the fusion plasma. Also, in experimental facilities investigating the dynamo effect, the flow consists of liquid-sodium for which the Prandtl number and, as a consequence, the magnetic Reynolds number is low. Our attention is focused here on the case of homogeneous (initially isotropic) decaying turbulence. The numerical simulations performed mimic the thought experiment described in Moffatt in which an initially homogeneous isotropic conductive flow is suddenly subjected to an applied magnetic field and freely decays without any forcing. Note that this flow was first studied numerically by Schumann. It is well known that in that case, extra damping of turbulence occurs due to the Joule effect and that the flow tends to become progressively independent of the coordinate along the direction of the magnetic field. Our comparison of filtered direct numerical simulation (DNS) predictions and LES predictions show that the dynamic Smagorinsky model enables one to capture successfully the flow with LES, and that it automatically incorporates the effect of the magnetic field on the turbulence. Our paper is organized as follows. In the next section we summarize the LES approach in the case of MHD turbulence at low R(sub m) and recall the definition of the dynamic Smagorinsky model. In Sec. 3 we describe the parameters of the numerical experiments performed and the code used. Section 4 is devoted to the comparison of filtered DNS results and LES results

  20. Simulations of super-structure domain walls in two dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanovic, J.; Frandsen, C.; Beleggia, M.; Schiøtz, J.

    2015-07-28

    We simulate the formation of domain walls in two-dimensional assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles. Particle parameters are chosen to match recent electron holography and Lorentz microscopy studies of almost monodisperse cobalt nanoparticles assembled into regular, elongated lattices. As the particles are small enough to consist of a single magnetic domain each, their magnetic interactions can be described by a spin model in which each particle is assigned a macroscopic “superspin.” Thus, the magnetic behaviour of these lattices may be compared to magnetic crystals with nanoparticle superspins taking the role of the atomic spins. The coupling is, however, different. The superspins interact only by dipolar interactions as exchange coupling between individual nanoparticles may be neglected due to interparticle spacing. We observe that it is energetically favorable to introduce domain walls oriented along the long dimension of nanoparticle assemblies rather than along the short dimension. This is unlike what is typically observed in continuous magnetic materials, where the exchange interaction introduces an energetic cost proportional to the area of the domain walls. Structural disorder, which will always be present in realistic assemblies, pins longitudinal domain walls when the external field is reversed, and makes a gradual reversal of the magnetization by migration of longitudinal domain walls possible, in agreement with previous experimental results.

  1. Magnetic field evolution in magnetar crusts through three-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Wood, Toby S.; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    Current models of magnetars require extremely strong magnetic fields to explain their observed quiescent and bursting emission, implying that the field strength within the star’s outer crust is orders of magnitude larger than the dipole component inferred from spin-down measurements. This presents a serious challenge to theories of magnetic field generation in a proto-neutron star. Here, we present detailed modeling of the evolution of the magnetic field in the crust of a neutron star through 3D simulations. We find that, in the plausible scenario of equipartition of energy between global-scale poloidal and toroidal magnetic components, magnetic instabilities transfer energy to nonaxisymmetric, kilometer-sized magnetic features, in which the local field strength can greatly exceed that of the global-scale field. These intense small-scale magnetic features can induce high-energy bursts through local crust yielding, and the localized enhancement of Ohmic heating can power the star’s persistent emission. Thus, the observed diversity in magnetar behavior can be explained with mixed poloidal-toroidal fields of comparable energies.

  2. Magnetic field evolution in magnetar crusts through three-dimensional simulations

    PubMed Central

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Wood, Toby S.; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Current models of magnetars require extremely strong magnetic fields to explain their observed quiescent and bursting emission, implying that the field strength within the star’s outer crust is orders of magnitude larger than the dipole component inferred from spin-down measurements. This presents a serious challenge to theories of magnetic field generation in a proto-neutron star. Here, we present detailed modeling of the evolution of the magnetic field in the crust of a neutron star through 3D simulations. We find that, in the plausible scenario of equipartition of energy between global-scale poloidal and toroidal magnetic components, magnetic instabilities transfer energy to nonaxisymmetric, kilometer-sized magnetic features, in which the local field strength can greatly exceed that of the global-scale field. These intense small-scale magnetic features can induce high-energy bursts through local crust yielding, and the localized enhancement of Ohmic heating can power the star’s persistent emission. Thus, the observed diversity in magnetar behavior can be explained with mixed poloidal−toroidal fields of comparable energies. PMID:27035962

  3. Magnetic field evolution in magnetar crusts through three-dimensional simulations.

    PubMed

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N; Wood, Toby S; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2016-04-12

    Current models of magnetars require extremely strong magnetic fields to explain their observed quiescent and bursting emission, implying that the field strength within the star's outer crust is orders of magnitude larger than the dipole component inferred from spin-down measurements. This presents a serious challenge to theories of magnetic field generation in a proto-neutron star. Here, we present detailed modeling of the evolution of the magnetic field in the crust of a neutron star through 3D simulations. We find that, in the plausible scenario of equipartition of energy between global-scale poloidal and toroidal magnetic components, magnetic instabilities transfer energy to nonaxisymmetric, kilometer-sized magnetic features, in which the local field strength can greatly exceed that of the global-scale field. These intense small-scale magnetic features can induce high-energy bursts through local crust yielding, and the localized enhancement of Ohmic heating can power the star's persistent emission. Thus, the observed diversity in magnetar behavior can be explained with mixed poloidal-toroidal fields of comparable energies.

  4. Magnetic field evolution in magnetar crusts through three-dimensional simulations.

    PubMed

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N; Wood, Toby S; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2016-04-12

    Current models of magnetars require extremely strong magnetic fields to explain their observed quiescent and bursting emission, implying that the field strength within the star's outer crust is orders of magnitude larger than the dipole component inferred from spin-down measurements. This presents a serious challenge to theories of magnetic field generation in a proto-neutron star. Here, we present detailed modeling of the evolution of the magnetic field in the crust of a neutron star through 3D simulations. We find that, in the plausible scenario of equipartition of energy between global-scale poloidal and toroidal magnetic components, magnetic instabilities transfer energy to nonaxisymmetric, kilometer-sized magnetic features, in which the local field strength can greatly exceed that of the global-scale field. These intense small-scale magnetic features can induce high-energy bursts through local crust yielding, and the localized enhancement of Ohmic heating can power the star's persistent emission. Thus, the observed diversity in magnetar behavior can be explained with mixed poloidal-toroidal fields of comparable energies. PMID:27035962

  5. Numerical simulation of dielectric bubbles coalescence under the effects of uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadidi, Amin; Jalali-Vahid, Davood

    2016-06-01

    In this research, the co-axial coalescence of a pair of gas bubbles rising in a viscous liquid column under the effects of an external uniform magnetic field is simulated numerically. Considered fluids are dielectric, and applied magnetic field is uniform. Effects of different strengths of magnetic field on the interaction of in-line rising bubbles and coalescence between them were investigated. For numerical modeling of the problem, a computer code was developed to solve the governing equations which are continuity, Navier-Stokes equation, magnetic field equation and level set and reinitialization of level set equations. The finite volume method is used for the discretization of the continuity and momentum equations using SIMPLE scheme where the finite difference method is used to discretization of the magnetic field equations. Also a level set method is used to capture the interface of two phases. The results are compared with available numerical and experimental results in the case of no-magnetic field effect which show a good agreement. It is found that uniform magnetic field accelerates the coalescence of the bubbles in dielectric fluids and enhances the rise velocity of the coalesced bubble.

  6. Analysis and simulation of a magnetic bearing suspension system for a laboratory model annular momentum control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, N. J.; Woolley, C. T.; Joshi, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    A linear analysis and the results of a nonlinear simulation of a magnetic bearing suspension system which uses permanent magnet flux biasing are presented. The magnetic bearing suspension is part of a 4068 N-m-s (3000 lb-ft-sec) laboratory model annular momentum control device (AMCD). The simulation includes rigid body rim dynamics, linear and nonlinear axial actuators, linear radial actuators, axial and radial rim warp, and power supply and power driver current limits.

  7. Study of the internal magnetic field of Mercury through 3D hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Ludivine; Marcel Chanteur, Gerard; Modolo, Ronan; Leblanc, Francois; Schmidt, Carl; Langlais, Benoît; Thebault, Erwan

    2016-10-01

    In 1974, Mariner 10 discovered the intrinsic magnetic field of Mercury which interacts with the solar wind, leading to the formation of a magnetosphere. In spite of the recent MESSENGER observations, this magnetosphere remains quite unknown, especially in the Southern hemisphere. In order to improve our understanding of the Hermean magnetosphere, and to prepare the Bepi-Colombo mission (ESA/JAXA), we simulated the magnetized environment of Mercury using the model named LatHyS (LATMOS Hybrid Simulation). LatHyS is a 3D parallel multi-species hybrid code which has been applied to Mars, Titan and Ganymede, which has recently be improved by the implementation of a multi-grid method allowing to refine the spatial resolution near the planetary object (40 km in the case of Mercury). In order to investigate the Hermean environment, several hybrid simulations have been performed considering different internal field models, and results are compared with MESSENGER observations.

  8. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Bruce E; Kidder, Louis S; Williams, Philip C; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-11-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentially expressed under these conditions. The murine calvarial osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1, grown on Cytodex-3 beads, were subjected to a net gravitational force of 0, 1 and 2 g in a 17 T superconducting magnet for 2 days. Microarray analysis of these cells indicated that gravitational stress leads to up and down regulation of hundreds of genes. The methodology of sustaining long-term magnetic levitation of biological systems are discussed. PMID:20052306

  9. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Bruce E; Kidder, Louis S; Williams, Philip C; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-11-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentially expressed under these conditions. The murine calvarial osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1, grown on Cytodex-3 beads, were subjected to a net gravitational force of 0, 1 and 2 g in a 17 T superconducting magnet for 2 days. Microarray analysis of these cells indicated that gravitational stress leads to up and down regulation of hundreds of genes. The methodology of sustaining long-term magnetic levitation of biological systems are discussed.

  10. Magnetic Levitation of MC3T3 Osteoblast Cells as a Ground-Based Simulation of Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Kidder, Louis S.; Williams, Philip C.; Xu, Wayne Wenzhong

    2009-01-01

    Diamagnetic samples placed in a strong magnetic field and a magnetic field gradient experience a magnetic force. Stable magnetic levitation occurs when the magnetic force exactly counter balances the gravitational force. Under this condition, a diamagnetic sample is in a simulated microgravity environment. The purpose of this study is to explore if MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells can be grown in magnetically simulated hypo-g and hyper-g environments and determine if gene expression is differentially expressed under these conditions. The murine calvarial osteoblastic cell line, MC3T3-E1, grown on Cytodex-3 beads, were subjected to a net gravitational force of 0, 1 and 2 g in a 17 T superconducting magnet for 2 days. Microarray analysis of these cells indicated that gravitational stress leads to up and down regulation of hundreds of genes. The methodology of sustaining long-term magnetic levitation of biological systems are discussed. PMID:20052306

  11. Simulation of magnetic island dynamics under resonant magnetic perturbation with the TEAR code and validation of the results on T-10 tokamak data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, N. V.; Kakurin, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    Simulation of the magnetic island evolution under Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP) in rotating T-10 tokamak plasma is presented with intent of TEAR code experimental validation. In the T-10 experiment chosen for simulation, the RMP consists of a stationary error field, a magnetic field of the eddy current in the resistive vacuum vessel and magnetic field of the externally applied controlled halo current in the plasma scrape-off layer (SOL). The halo-current loop consists of a rail limiter, plasma SOL, vacuum vessel, and external part of the circuit. Effects of plasma resistivity, viscosity, and RMP are taken into account in the TEAR code based on the two-fluid MHD approximation. Radial distribution of the magnetic flux perturbation is calculated with account of the externally applied RMP. A good agreement is obtained between the simulation results and experimental data for the cases of preprogrammed and feedback-controlled halo current in the plasma SOL.

  12. Simulation of magnetic island dynamics under resonant magnetic perturbation with the TEAR code and validation of the results on T-10 tokamak data

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, N. V.; Kakurin, A. M.

    2014-10-15

    Simulation of the magnetic island evolution under Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP) in rotating T-10 tokamak plasma is presented with intent of TEAR code experimental validation. In the T-10 experiment chosen for simulation, the RMP consists of a stationary error field, a magnetic field of the eddy current in the resistive vacuum vessel and magnetic field of the externally applied controlled halo current in the plasma scrape-off layer (SOL). The halo-current loop consists of a rail limiter, plasma SOL, vacuum vessel, and external part of the circuit. Effects of plasma resistivity, viscosity, and RMP are taken into account in the TEAR code based on the two-fluid MHD approximation. Radial distribution of the magnetic flux perturbation is calculated with account of the externally applied RMP. A good agreement is obtained between the simulation results and experimental data for the cases of preprogrammed and feedback-controlled halo current in the plasma SOL.

  13. MAGNETIC CYCLES IN A CONVECTIVE DYNAMO SIMULATION OF A YOUNG SOLAR-TYPE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Benjamin P.; Miesch, Mark S.; Browning, Matthew K.; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2011-04-10

    Young solar-type stars rotate rapidly and many are magnetically active. Some appear to undergo magnetic cycles similar to the 22 yr solar activity cycle. We conduct simulations of dynamo action in rapidly rotating suns with the three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to explore dynamo action achieved in the convective envelope of a solar-type star rotating at five times the current solar rotation rate. We find that dynamo action builds substantial organized global-scale magnetic fields in the midst of the convection zone. Striking magnetic wreaths span the convection zone and coexist with the turbulent convection. A surprising feature of this wreath-building dynamo is its rich time dependence. The dynamo exhibits cyclic activity and undergoes quasi-periodic polarity reversals where both the global-scale poloidal and toroidal fields change in sense on a roughly 1500 day timescale. These magnetic activity patterns emerge spontaneously from the turbulent flow and are more organized temporally and spatially than those realized in our previous simulations of the solar dynamo. We assess in detail the competing processes of magnetic field creation and destruction within our simulations that contribute to the global-scale reversals. We find that the mean toroidal fields are built primarily through an {Omega}-effect, while the mean poloidal fields are built by turbulent correlations which are not well represented by a simple {alpha}-effect. During a reversal the magnetic wreaths propagate toward the polar regions, and this appears to arise from a poleward propagating dynamo wave. As the magnetic fields wax and wane in strength and flip in polarity, the primary response in the convective flows involves the axisymmetric differential rotation which varies on similar timescales. Bands of relatively fast and slow fluid propagate toward the poles on timescales of roughly 500 days and are associated with the magnetic structures that propagate

  14. Does the duration of the magnetic storm recovery phase depend on the development rate in its main phase? 2. A new method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaev, Yu. I.; Lodkina, I. G.; Nikolaeva, N. S.; Yermolaev, M. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    In contrast to our previous work (Yermolaev et al., 2015), in which we used the magnetic storm recovery phase duration, the exponential time of the recovery phase of magnetic storms generated by three interplanetary driver types (CIR, Sheath, and ICME) is introduced in the present work. The dependence of these times on the storm development rate | Dst min|/Δ T (where Δ T is the storm main phase duration) is studied. A similar physical result has been achieved despite the different data analysis method used: the times of the storm recovery and development rates correlate for storms induced by CIR and Sheath compression regions, and any relation between these parameters is absent for storms induced by ICME.

  15. Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution in magnetic shape memory alloys: Phase field simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yongmei M.

    2009-02-09

    Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution during magnetic field-induced deformation in magnetic shape memory alloys are studied by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The simulations show that different twin boundary mobilities lead to drastically different domain microstructures and evolution pathways, yielding very different magnetization and strain responses, even with opposite signs. The study also reveals complex domain phenomena in magnetic shape memory alloys.

  16. 3-D simulations of magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection has recently been observed and studied in high-energy-density, laser-produced plasmas, in a regime characterized by extremely high magnetic fields, high plasma beta and strong, supersonic plasma inflow. These experiments are interesting both for obtaining fundamental data on reconnection, and may also be relevant for inertial fusion, as this magnetic reconnection geometry, with multiple, colliding, magnetized plasma bubbles occurs naturally inside ICF hohlraums. Previous 2-d particle-in-cell reconnection simulations, with parameters and geometry relevant to the experiments, identified key ingredients for obtaining the very fast reconnection rates, namely two-fluid reconnection mediated by collisionless effects (the Hall current and electron pressure tensor), and strong flux pile-up of the inflowing magnetic field [1]. We present results from extending the previous simulations to 3-d, and discuss 3-d effects in the experiments, including instabilities in the reconnection layer, the topological skeleton of null-null lines, and field-generation from the Biermann battery effect. [4pt] [1] W. Fox, A. Bhattacharjee, and K. Germaschewski, PRL 106, 215003 (2011).

  17. Velocity-Shear Driven Magnetic Reconnection in Particle-In-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Carrie; Antiochos, Spiro; DeVore, Rick; Karpen, Judy; Germaschewski, Kai

    2012-10-01

    In the standard model for coronal mass ejections (CME) and/or solar flares, the free energy for the event resides in the strongly sheared magnetic field of a filament channel. The pre-eruption force balance consists of an upward force due to the magnetic pressure of the sheared field balanced by a downward tension due to overlying un-sheared field. Magnetic reconnection is widely believed to be the mechanism that disrupts this force balance, leading to explosive eruption. For understanding CME/flare initiation, therefore, it is critical to model the onset of reconnection that is driven by the buildup of magnetic shear. In MHD simulations, the application of a magnetic field shear is a trivial matter. However, kinetic effects are important in the diffusion region and thus, it is important to examine this process with PIC simulations as well. The implementation of such a driver in PIC methods is nontrivial: it must be done in a self-consistent manner that avoids the generation of waves that destroy the applied shear. In this work, we discuss methods for applying a velocity shear perpendicular to the plane of reconnection within a 2.5D, aperiodic, PIC system. We also discuss the implementation of boundary conditions that allow a net electric current to flow through the walls.

  18. MHD Simulation of the Global Solar Corona Using the Synoptic Frame of the Photospheric Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.; Zhao, X.; Liu, Y.

    2005-12-01

    As the proxy of the entire surface distribution of the photospheric magnetic field at a specific time, the synoptic frame of the photospheric magnetic field [Zhao et al., 1999] consists of a magnetogram that contains the real field configuration and newly emerging magnetic features at the observational time, and a part of synoptic charts around the time of interest. Recently we improve the synoptic frame by removing the effect of differential rotation existing in the part of synoptic charts around the specific time. In this work, we will present the results of the time-dependent three-dimensional MHD simulation using this improved synoptic frame of photospheric magnetic field. The MHD simulation code we have developed is based on the TVD-MUSCL strategy, and the projected normal characteristic method is used to deal with the sub-Alfvenic boundary at 1 R_s to obtain the trans-alfvenic nonlinear-MHD solution of the solar wind and corona. The calculated solar coronal quantities are compared with the observations, in terms of the magnetic field topology, such as the shape of the coronal hole.

  19. FLASH Hydrodynamic Simulations of Experiments to Explore the Generation of Cosmological Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, Anthony; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Don; Lee, Dongwook; Meineke, Jena; Tzeferacos, Petros; Weide, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous throughout the universe. However, the origin and strength of these fields are not fully understood. A promising mechanism for the origin of seed fields is the asymmetric shocks that occur in hierarchical structure formation when smaller halos merge to form galaxies and galaxies merge to form clusters of galaxies. The seed fields are generated by the Biermann battery mechanism. The COSMOLAB team are conducting experiments to investigate the generation of magnetic fields by asymmetric shocks. These experiments involve laser illumination of a foil target, driving a shock into a gas-filled chamber, and a variety of plasma and magnetic field diagnostics. Hydrodynamic-only simulations are useful because the shock-generated magnetic fields are not dynamically important. In this paper, we describe hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment conducted using the FLASH code. The scientific objective of these simulations is to explore the sensitivity of the properties of the jet-like shock to target composition, thickness, and lateral extent.

  20. Propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in extragalactic magnetic fields: a view from cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackstein, S.; Vazza, F.; Brüggen, M.; Sigl, G.; Dundovic, A.

    2016-11-01

    We use the CRPROPA code to simulate the propagation of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (with energy ≥1018eV and pure proton composition) through extragalactic magnetic fields that have been simulated with the cosmological ENZO code. We test both primordial and astrophysical magnetogenesis scenarios in order to investigate the impact of different magnetic field strengths in clusters, filaments and voids on the deflection of cosmic rays propagating across cosmological distances. We also study the effect of different source distributions of cosmic rays around simulated Milky Way-like observers. Our analysis shows that the arrival spectra and anisotropy of events are rather insensitive to the distribution of extragalactic magnetic fields, while they are more affected by the clustering of sources within an ˜50 Mpc distance to observers. Finally, we find that in order to reproduce the observed degree of isotropy of cosmic rays at ˜EeV energies, the average magnetic fields in cosmic voids must be ˜ 0.1 nG, providing limits on the strength of primordial seed fields.

  1. GRMHD/RMHD Simulations and Stability of Magnetized Spine-Sheath Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardee, Philip; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2007-01-01

    A new general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD ) code "RAISHIN" used to simulate jet generation by rotating and non-rotating black holes with a geometrically thin Keplarian accretion disk finds that the jet develops a spine-sheath structure in the rotating black hole case. Spine-sheath structure and strong magnetic fields significantly modify the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) velocity shear driven instability. The RAISHIN code has been used in its relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) configuration to study the effects of strong magnetic fields and weakly relativistic sheath motion, cl2, on the KH instability associated with a relativistic, Y = 2.5, jet spine-sheath interaction. In the simulations sound speeds up to ? c/3 and Alfven wave speeds up to ? 0.56 c are considered. Numerical simulation results are compared to theoretical predictions from a new normal mode analysis of the RMHD equations. Increased stability of a weakly magnetized system resulting from c/2 sheath speeds and stabilization of a strongly magnetized system resulting from d 2 sheath speeds is found.

  2. Generation of shear Alfven waves by a rotating magnetic field source: Three-dimensional simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Karavaev, A. V.; Gumerov, N. A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, Xi; Sharma, A. S.; Gekelman, W.; Wang, Y.; Van Compernolle, B.; Pribyl, P.; Vincena, S.

    2011-03-15

    The paper discusses the generation of polarized shear Alfven waves radiated from a rotating magnetic field source created via a phased orthogonal two-loop antenna. A semianalytical three-dimensional cold two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics model was developed and compared with recent experiments in the University of California, Los Angeles large plasma device. Comparison of the simulation results with the experimental measurements and the linear shear Alfven wave properties, namely, spatiotemporal wave structure, a dispersion relation with nonzero transverse wave number, the magnitude of the wave dependences on the wave frequency, show good agreement. From the simulations it was found that the energy of the Alfven wave generated by the rotating magnetic field source is distributed between the kinetic energy of ions and electrons and the electromagnetic energy of the wave as: {approx}1/2 is the energy of the electromagnetic field, {approx}1/2 is the kinetic energy of the ion fluid, and {approx}2.5% is the kinetic energy of electron fluid for the experiment. The wave magnetic field power calculated from the experimental data and using a fluid model differ by {approx}1% and is {approx}250 W for the experimental parameters. In both the experiment and the three-dimensional two-fluid magnetohydrodynamics simulations the rotating magnetic field source was found to be very efficient for generating shear Alfven waves.

  3. Helioseismic Holography of Simulated Sunspots: Magnetic and Thermal Contributions to Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felipe, T.; Braun, D. C.; Crouch, A. D.; Birch, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    Wave propagation through sunspots involves conversion between waves of acoustic and magnetic character. In addition, the thermal structure of sunspots is very different than that of the quiet Sun. As a consequence, the interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge. With the aim of understanding these measurements, we carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through sunspots. Helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. We use additional numerical experiments to determine, separately, the influence of the thermal structure of the sunspot and the direct effect of the sunspot magnetic field. We use the ray approximation to show that the travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurface structure of sunspots must account for local changes in the density. In some ranges of horizontal phase speed and frequency there is agreement (within the noise level in the simulations) between the travel times measured in the full magnetic sunspot model and the thermal model. If this conclusion proves to be robust for a wide range of models, it would suggest a path toward inversions for sunspot structure.

  4. Magnetic field line random walk in models and simulations of reduced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Snodin, A. P.; Ruffolo, D.; Oughton, S.; Servidio, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2013-12-10

    The random walk of magnetic field lines is examined numerically and analytically in the context of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) turbulence, which provides a useful description of plasmas dominated by a strong mean field, such as in the solar corona. A recently developed non-perturbative theory of magnetic field line diffusion is compared with the diffusion coefficients obtained by accurate numerical tracing of magnetic field lines for both synthetic models and direct numerical simulations of RMHD. Statistical analysis of an ensemble of trajectories confirms the applicability of the theory, which very closely matches the numerical field line diffusion coefficient as a function of distance z along the mean magnetic field for a wide range of the Kubo number R. This theory employs Corrsin's independence hypothesis, sometimes thought to be valid only at low R. However, the results demonstrate that it works well up to R = 10, both for a synthetic RMHD model and an RMHD simulation. The numerical results from the RMHD simulation are compared with and without phase randomization, demonstrating a clear effect of coherent structures on the field line random walk for a very low Kubo number.

  5. Combined simulation of a micro permanent magnetic linear contactless displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Müller, Wolfgang F O; Greiner, Felix; Eicher, Dirk; Weiland, Thomas; Schlaak, Helmut F

    2010-01-01

    The permanent magnetic linear contactless displacement (PLCD) sensor is a new type of displacement sensor operating on the magnetic inductive principle. It has many excellent properties and has already been used for many applications. In this article a Micro-PLCD sensor which can be used for microelectromechanical system (MEMS) measurements is designed and simulated with the CST EM STUDIO(®) software, including building a virtual model, magnetostatic calculations, low frequency calculations, steady current calculations and thermal calculations. The influence of some important parameters such as air gap dimension, working frequency, coil current and eddy currents etc. is studied in depth.

  6. Coupling Magnetic Fields and ALE Hydrodynamics for 3D Simulations of MFCG's

    SciTech Connect

    White, D; Rieben, R; Wallin, B

    2006-09-20

    We review the development of a full 3D multiphysics code for the simulation of explosively driven Magnetic Flux Compression Generators (MFCG) and related pulse power devices. In a typical MFCG the device is seeded with an initial electric current and the device is then detonated. The detonation compresses the magnetic field and amplifies the current. This is a multiphysics problem in that detonation kinetics, electromagnetic diffusion and induction, material deformation, and thermal effects are all important. This is a tightly coupled problem in that the different physical quantities have comparable spatial and temporal variation, and hence should be solved simultaneously on the same computational mesh.

  7. Theory and simulation of high-power microwave generation in a magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Raymond W.; Clark, Collins M.

    1987-10-01

    The magnetically insulated transmission line (MITE-LINE) oscillator is an electron beam diode comprised of a field emitting cathode and a corrugated anode. The device is similar to a linear magnetron except that the insulating magnetic field is self-generated. The self-insulating property makes this device a robust high-power microwave tube. Using the thin-beam approximation a dispersion relation for a cylindrical MITE-LINE oscillator is derived. The dispersion relation is used to predict frequency and growth rate of the microwave generating instability. Analytical results are compared with CCUBE particle simulations.

  8. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography.

    PubMed

    Hashemiyan, Z; Packo, P; Staszewski, W J; Uhl, T

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  9. Rescaled Local Interaction Simulation Approach for Shear Wave Propagation Modelling in Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Packo, P.; Staszewski, W. J.; Uhl, T.

    2016-01-01

    Properties of soft biological tissues are increasingly used in medical diagnosis to detect various abnormalities, for example, in liver fibrosis or breast tumors. It is well known that mechanical stiffness of human organs can be obtained from organ responses to shear stress waves through Magnetic Resonance Elastography. The Local Interaction Simulation Approach is proposed for effective modelling of shear wave propagation in soft tissues. The results are validated using experimental data from Magnetic Resonance Elastography. These results show the potential of the method for shear wave propagation modelling in soft tissues. The major advantage of the proposed approach is a significant reduction of computational effort. PMID:26884808

  10. Crash simulation of rayleigh-taylor, richtmyer-meshkov, and magnetic rayleigh-taylor instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Jason Chuan-Chih

    The research discussed in this thesis was motivated by the supernova Rayleigh-Taylor (SNRT) experiments conducted in 2009. Originally designed as laboratory astrophysics experiments relevant to the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) at the He-H interface during supernova explosion, these experiments exhibited unusual late-time morphology development, characterized by the lack of mushroom caps and uniform width of the spikes. In response, a "Magnetic Straitjacket" hypothesis was proposed to explain the discrepancy, based on the Biermann Battery mechanism. In order to test this hypothesis, we used the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code developed for a sufficiently similar problem and with the necessary capabilities. We validated this alternative usage of the CRASH code with simulations of pure hydrodynamic RTI and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) and identified the suitable combinations of numerical schemes and parameters. For the RTI, we compared the results of simulations to the analytical solution for the early time behavior, examined the late-time morphology, and tested the low-resolution limit for the RTI simulations using CRASH. For the RMI, we modeled Collins and Jacobs' experiment and compared the results of CRASH simulations to the experimental observations as well as to the simulation results of several other code packages. Finally, we modeled the original SNRT experiments with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and Biermann battery effect. Unfortunately, the results were inconclusive due to insufficiently resolved simulations, limited by the explicit time integration of the magnetic diffusion. Furthermore, pilot runs with higher resolution indicated that simulations that fully resolve the gradients necessary to calculate the Biermann battery effect may be susceptible to the development of extraneous small-wavelength instabilities. Developments of implicit time integration of the magnetic diffusion and possibly new numerical schemes are

  11. Simulation of micro-magnet stray-field dynamics for spin qubit manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, R.; Schreiber, L. R.

    2015-05-21

    High-fidelity control and unprecedented long dephasing times in silicon-based single spin qubits have recently confirmed the prospects of solid-state quantum computation. We investigate the feasibility of using a micro-magnet stray field for all-electrical, addressable spin qubit control in a Si/SiGe double quantum dot. For a micro-magnet geometry optimized for high Rabi-frequency, addressability, and robustness to fabrication misalignment as previously demonstrated by Yoneda et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 267601 (2014)], we simulate the qubit decoherence due to magnetic stray-field fluctuations, which may dominate in nuclear spin-free systems, e.g., quantum dots in Si/SiGe, Si-MOS structures and (bilayer) graphene. With calculated Rabi-frequencies of 15 MHz, a qubit addressability error below 10{sup −3} is achievable. Magnetic fluctuations from a micro-magnet limits the spin relaxation time to T{sub 1} ≳ 3 s, while pure spin dephasing is negligible. Our results show that micro-magnets are a promising tool for spin qubit computation in nuclear spin-free systems.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of a Quadrupole Magnetic Sorter Flow Channel: Effect of Splitter Position on Nonspecific Crossover

    PubMed Central

    Sajja, V. S. K.; Kennedy, David J.; Todd, Paul W.; Hanley, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    In the Quadrupole Magnetic Sorter (QMS) magnetic particles enter a vertical flow annulus and are separated from non-magnetic particles by radial deflection into an outer annulus where the purified magnetic particles are collected via a flow splitter. The purity of magnetically isolated particles in QMS is affected by the migration of nonmagnetic particles across transport lamina in the annular flow channel. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were used to predict the flow patterns, pressure drop and nonspecific crossover in QMS flow channel for the isolation of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Simulation results were compared with the experimental results to validate the CFD model. Results of the simulations were used to show that one design gives up to 10% less nonspecific crossover than another and this model can be used to optimise the flow channel design to achieve maximum purity of magnetic particles. PMID:21984840

  13. Waveguide detuning caused by transverse magnetic fields on a simulated in-line 6 MV linac

    SciTech Connect

    St Aubin, J.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Due to the close proximity of the linear accelerator (linac) to the magnetic resonance (MR) imager in linac-MR systems, it will be subjected to magnet fringe fields larger than the Earth's magnetic field of 5x10{sup -5} T. Even with passive or active shielding designed to reduce these fields, some magnitude of the magnetic field is still expected to intersect the linac, causing electron deflection and beam loss. This beam loss, resulting from magnetic fields that cannot be eliminated with shielding, can cause a detuning of the waveguide due to excessive heating. The detuning, if significant, could lead to an even further decrease in output above what would be expected strictly from electron deflections caused by an external magnetic field. Thus an investigation of detuning was performed through various simulations. Methods: According to the Lorentz force, the electrons will be deflected away from their straight course to the target, depositing energy as they impact the linac copper waveguide. The deposited energy would lead to a heating and deformation of the copper structure resulting in resonant frequency changes. PARMELA was used to determine the mean energy and fraction of total beam lost in each linac cavity. The energy deposited into the copper waveguide from the beam losses caused by transverse magnetic fields was calculated using the Monte Carlo program DOSRZnrc. From the total energy deposited, the rise in temperature and ultimately the deformation of the structure was estimated. The deformed structure was modeled using the finite element method program COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS to determine the change in cavity resonant frequency. Results: The largest changes in resonant frequency were found in the first two accelerating cavities for each field strength investigated. This was caused by a high electron fluence impacting the waveguide inner structures coupled with their low kinetic energies. At each field strength investigated, the total change in

  14. Developing Glassy Magnets from Simulated Composition of Martian Soil for Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan; Ray, Chandra; Rogers, Jan

    2004-01-01

    The long-term exploration goals of NASA include developing human habitation on Mars and conducting scientific investigations on Mars and other planetary bodies. In situ resource processing is a key objective in this area We focus OR the possibility of making magnetic glasses in situ for potential applications development. The paper will focus on ongoing work at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on making magnetic glass h m Mars soil simulants and its characterization. Analysis of the glass morphology, strength, chemistry and resulting magnetic properties will provide a fi.mdamenta1 understanding ofthe synthesized materiai that can be used for pomtiai appiications cieveiopment. In an effort to characterize the magnetic properbes of the Mars glasses, a series of tests were performed at NASA MSFC. Preliminary tests indicated that the glasses were attracted to a magnet and also had a small amount of residual magnetism. They were opaque (almost black in color). As the first step, a sample of Mars 1 glass (-lm x lmm x 5 mm length) was machined, weighed and its hysteresis curve was measured using a Vibration Sample Magnetometer 0. Next, a small furnace was designed and built and the sample was baked in a graphite (reducing agent) crucible at 800 C in an Argon atmosphere for 3 hours in the presence of a uniform, transverse (transverse to the 5mm length of the sample) magnetic field of 0.37 Tesla. The treated sample showed reddening on the outside and showed substantially increased residual magnetism. This sample was again analyzed in the VSM. The data clearly showed that some chemical change occurred during the heat treatment (color change) and that both the glasses have useful magnetic properties. Although no orientation effects of the magnetic field were considered, the data showed the following: 1. Both glass samples are primarily soft magnets and display ferromagnetic behavior (hysteresis, saturation, etc.) 2. The treated glass has improved saturation magnetism (order

  15. Simulation of an Ar/O2/Cl2 magnetized direct current discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Zhao, Zhen; Wu, Chuan; Zhou, Zhonghao

    2016-08-01

    A homemade 2D hybrid model (coupling particle in cell model with fluid model) is used to investigate the effect of the reaction chamber radius, the mixing ratio and pressure on the plasma properties in an Ar/O2/Cl2 magnetized DC (direct current) discharge. The results show that the main products are Ar**, Ar*, e, \\text{Ar}2+ , Cl, \\text{Cl}2+ , O(3P) and \\text{O}2+ . The densities of oxygen species are slightly lower than those of Cl2 species. If the magnetic field strength of the central magnetic pole is slightly weaker than those of the edge magnetic poles, it will improve the uniformity of the plasma species at the film basal position. Even the mixing ratio of Ar/O2/Cl2 is varied from 9 : 0.2 : 1 to 9 : 1 : 0.2, the main particles are hardly changed, but the concentrations of \\text{Cl}2+ ions and Cl atoms significantly decrease. The main ion densities at 3 mTorr appear to be lower, but more inhomogeneous than those at 6 mTorr.

  16. Explosive Turbulent Magnetic Reconnection: A New Approach of MHD-Turbulent Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masahiro; Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Higashimori, Katsuaki

    2013-04-01

    Turbulent flows are often observed in association with magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas, and it is often hypothesized that the turbulence can contribute to the fast magnetic reconnection through the enhancement of magnetic dissipation. In this presentation, we demonstrate that an explosive turbulent reconnection can happen by using a new turbulent MHD simulation, in which the evolution of the turbulent transport coefficients are self-consistently solved together with the standard MHD equations. In our model, the turbulent electromotive force defined by the correlation of turbulent fluctuations between v and B is added to the Ohm's law. We discuss that the level of turbulent can control the topology of reconnection, namely the transition from the Sweet-Parker reconnection to the Petscheck reconnection occurs when the level of fluctuations becomes of order of the ambient physical quantities, and show that the growth of the turbulent Petscheck reconnection becomes much faster than the conventional one.

  17. Three-dimensional Simulations of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in Magnetized Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigeesh, G.; Fedun, V.; Hasan, S. S.; Erdélyi, R.

    2012-08-01

    We present results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation in a solar magnetic flux tube. Our study aims at understanding the properties of a range of MHD wave modes generated by different photospheric motions. We consider two scenarios observed in the lower solar photosphere, namely, granular buffeting and vortex-like motion, among the simplest mechanism for the generation of waves within a strong, localized magnetic flux concentration. We show that granular buffeting is likely to generate stronger slow and fast magnetoacoustic waves as compared to swirly motions. Correspondingly, the energy flux transported differs as a result of the driving motions. We also demonstrate that the waves generated by granular buffeting are likely to manifest in stronger emission in the chromospheric network. We argue that different mechanisms of wave generation are active during the evolution of a magnetic element in the intergranular lane, resulting in temporally varying emission at chromospheric heights.

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN MAGNETIZED SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Vigeesh, G.; Fedun, V.; Erdelyi, R.; Hasan, S. S.

    2012-08-10

    We present results of three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave propagation in a solar magnetic flux tube. Our study aims at understanding the properties of a range of MHD wave modes generated by different photospheric motions. We consider two scenarios observed in the lower solar photosphere, namely, granular buffeting and vortex-like motion, among the simplest mechanism for the generation of waves within a strong, localized magnetic flux concentration. We show that granular buffeting is likely to generate stronger slow and fast magnetoacoustic waves as compared to swirly motions. Correspondingly, the energy flux transported differs as a result of the driving motions. We also demonstrate that the waves generated by granular buffeting are likely to manifest in stronger emission in the chromospheric network. We argue that different mechanisms of wave generation are active during the evolution of a magnetic element in the intergranular lane, resulting in temporally varying emission at chromospheric heights.

  19. THREE-DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETIZED WINDS OF SOLAR-LIKE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Vidotto, A. A.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Opher, M.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2009-07-01

    By means of self-consistent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) numerical simulations, we analyze magnetized solar-like stellar winds and their dependence on the plasma-{beta} parameter (the ratio between thermal and magnetic energy densities). This is the first study to perform such analysis solving the fully ideal three-dimensional MHD equations. We adopt in our simulations a heating parameter described by {gamma}, which is responsible for the thermal acceleration of the wind. We analyze winds with polar magnetic field intensities ranging from 1 to 20 G. We show that the wind structure presents characteristics that are similar to the solar coronal wind. The steady-state magnetic field topology for all cases is similar, presenting a configuration of helmet streamer-type, with zones of closed field lines and open field lines coexisting. Higher magnetic field intensities lead to faster and hotter winds. For the maximum magnetic intensity simulated of 20 G and solar coronal base density, the wind velocity reaches values of {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} at r {approx} 20r {sub 0} and a maximum temperature of {approx}6 x 10{sup 6} K at r {approx} 6r {sub 0}. The increase of the field intensity generates a larger 'dead zone' in the wind, i.e., the closed loops that inhibit matter to escape from latitudes lower than {approx}45 deg. extend farther away from the star. The Lorentz force leads naturally to a latitude-dependent wind. We show that by increasing the density and maintaining B {sub 0} = 20 G the system recover back to slower and cooler winds. For a fixed {gamma}, we show that the key parameter in determining the wind velocity profile is the {beta}-parameter at the coronal base. Therefore, there is a group of magnetized flows that would present the same terminal velocity despite its thermal and magnetic energy densities, as long as the plasma-{beta} parameter is the same. This degeneracy, however, can be removed if we compare other physical parameters of the

  20. The simulation of a propulsive jet and force measurement using a magnetically suspended wind tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbutt, K. S.; Goodyer, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    Models featuring the simulation of exhaust jets were developed for magnetic levitation in a wind tunnel. The exhaust gas was stored internally producing a discharge of sufficient duration to allow nominal steady state to be reached. The gas was stored in the form of compressed gas or a solid rocket propellant. Testing was performed with the levitated models although deficiencies prevented the detection of jet-induced aerodynamic effects. Difficulties with data reduction led to the development of a new force calibration technique, used in conjunction with an exhaust simulator and also in separate high incidence aerodynamic tests.

  1. FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of experiments to explore the generation of cosmological magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopatz, A.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Ravasio, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    We report the results of FLASH hydrodynamic simulations of the experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation de Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. The simulations show that the result of the laser illuminating the target is a series of complex hydrodynamic phenomena.

  2. A simulation study on the resolution and sensitivity of magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Weizenecker, J; Borgert, J; Gleich, B

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents the first detailed simulation approach to evaluate the proposed imaging method called 'magnetic particle imaging' with respect to resolution and sensitivity. The simulated scanner is large enough to accept human bodies. Together with the choice of field strength and noise the setup is representative for clinical applications. Good resolution, fast image acquisition and high sensitivity are demonstrated for various tracer concentrations, acquisition times, tracer properties and fields of view. Scaling laws for the simple prediction of image quality under the variation of these parameters are derived. PMID:17951848

  3. Microwave-assisted shingled magnetic recording simulations on an exchange-coupled composite medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, T.; Kashiwagi, S.; Kanai, Y.; Matsuyama, K.

    2016-10-01

    The potential of microwave-assisted magnetic recording combined with the shingled recording scheme has been studied by simulating read/write processes on exchange-coupled composite media focusing on recording characteristics in the cross-track direction. Microwave fields enhance writability, especially at the track edge, resulting in lower noise and higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which enables higher track density in the shingled recording scheme. Read/write simulations of microwave-assisted shingled recording achieve 1.4 Mtracks/in. while retaining high SNR. Further increases in SNR and track density will require either a narrower reader or track edge noise reduction.

  4. Formation of antihydrogen atoms and ions in a strongly magnetized plasma: A molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Vrinceanu, D.; Hu, S.X.; Mazevet, S.; Collins, L.A.

    2005-10-15

    Formation of antihydrogen atoms in a magnetized plasma of positrons and antiprotons is explicitly demonstrated in a molecular dynamics simulation. The parameters chosen are compatible with the experimental setup. We employ a special, adaptive time step symplectic integrator to perform full dynamics simulation, without using the guiding center approximation, for very long times (of the order of {mu}s). The large number of antihydrogen atoms formed allows detailed statistical analysis and distributions for the binding energy, pseudomomentum, sizes, and other quantities that characterize these atoms. We also find that a significantly smaller number of antihydrogen positive ions form during the free expansion of the plasma.

  5. Simulation of 3-D Magnetic Reconnection by Gyrokinetic Electron and Fully Kinetic Ion Particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Lin, Y.; Chen, L.

    2015-12-01

    3-D collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated using the gyrokinetic electron and fully-kinetic ion (GeFi) particle simulation model. The simulation is carried out for cases with various finite guide field BG in a current sheet as occurring in space and laboratory plasmas. Turbulence power spectrum of magenetic field is found in the reconnection current sheet, with a clear k-5/3 dependence. The wave properties are analyzed. The anomalous resistivity in the electron diffusion region is estimated. The Dependence of the reconnection physics on the ion-to-electron mass ratio mi/me, beta values, and the half-width of the current sheet are also investigated.

  6. Numerical simulations of quiet sun magnetism: On the contribution from a small-scale dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Rempel, M.

    2014-07-10

    We present a series of radiative MHD simulations addressing the origin and distribution of the mixed polarity magnetic field in the solar photosphere. To this end, we consider numerical simulations that cover the uppermost 2-6 Mm of the solar convection zone and we explore scales ranging from 2 km to 25 Mm. We study how the strength and distribution of the magnetic field in the photosphere and subsurface layers depend on resolution, domain size, and boundary conditions. We find that 50% of the magnetic energy at the τ = 1 level comes from fields with the less than 500 G strength and that 50% of the energy resides on scales smaller than about 100 km. While the probability distribution functions are essentially independent of resolution, properly describing the spectral energy distribution requires grid spacings of 8 km or smaller. The formation of flux concentrations in the photosphere exceeding 1 kG requires a mean vertical field strength greater than 30-40 G at τ = 1. The filling factor of kG flux concentrations increases with overall domain size as the magnetic field becomes organized by larger, longer-lived flow structures. A solution with a mean vertical field strength of around 85 G at τ = 1 requires a subsurface rms field strength increasing with depth at the same rate as the equipartition field strength. We consider this an upper limit for the quiet Sun field strength, which implies that most of the convection zone is magnetized close to the equipartition. We discuss these findings in view of recent high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of quiet Sun magnetism.

  7. Numerical simulations of impulsively generated Alfvén waves in solar magnetic arcades

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielewski, P.; Murawski, K.; Musielak, Z. E.; Srivastava, A. K.

    2014-09-20

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated Alfvén waves in an isolated solar arcade, which is gravitationally stratified and magnetically confined. We study numerically the propagation of Alfvén waves along the magnetic structure that extends from the lower chromosphere, where the waves are generated, to the solar corona, and analyze the influence of the arcade size and the width of the initial pulses on the wave propagation and reflection. Our model of the solar atmosphere is constructed by adopting the temperature distribution based on the semi-empirical VAL-C model and specifying the curved magnetic field lines that constitute the asymmetric magnetic arcade. The propagation and reflection of Alfvén waves in this arcade is described by 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations that are numerically solved by the FLASH code. Our numerical simulations reveal that the Alfvén wave amplitude decreases as a result of a partial reflection of Alfvén waves in the solar transition region, and that the waves that are not reflected leak through the transition region and reach the solar corona. We also find the decrement of the attenuation time of Alfvén waves for wider initial pulses. Moreover, our results show that the propagation of Alfvén waves in the arcade is affected by the spatial dependence of the Alfvén speed, which leads to phase mixing that is stronger for more curved and larger magnetic arcades. We discuss the processes that affect the Alfvén wave propagation in an asymmetric solar arcade and conclude that besides phase mixing in the magnetic field configuration, the plasma properties of the arcade, the size of the initial pulse, and the structure of the solar transition region all play a vital role in the Alfvén wave propagation.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow over a cylinder using axial- and transverse-oriented magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Guarendi, Andrew N; Chandy, Abhilash J

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow over a cylinder are presented for axial- and transverse-oriented dipoles with different strengths. ANSYS CFX is used to carry out calculations for steady, laminar flows at a Mach number of 6.1, with a model for electrical conductivity as a function of temperature and pressure. The low magnetic Reynolds number (<1) calculated based on the velocity and length scales in this problem justifies the quasistatic approximation, which assumes negligible effect of velocity on magnetic fields. Therefore, the governing equations employed in the simulations are the compressible Navier-Stokes and the energy equations with MHD-related source terms such as Lorentz force and Joule dissipation. The results demonstrate the ability of the magnetic field to affect the flowfield around the cylinder, which results in an increase in shock stand-off distance and reduction in overall temperature. Also, it is observed that there is a noticeable decrease in drag with the addition of the magnetic field. PMID:24307870

  9. THE IMPRINT OF THE VERY LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD IN SIMULATED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM MAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Prested, C.; Schwadron, N.; Opher, M. E-mail: nathanas@bu.ed

    2010-06-10

    The interaction of the solar wind with the very local interstellar medium (VLISM) forms the boundaries of the heliosphere. A strong asymmetry of the heliosphere was found both directly by the Voyager probes and indirectly from measurements of the deflection of neutral hydrogen. The most likely source of this asymmetry is from the interstellar magnetic field, the properties of which are highly unconstrained. Energetic neutral atom (ENA) images will provide an additional method to view the heliosphere and infer the interstellar magnetic field. This paper investigates the imprint of the interstellar magnetic field on simulated energetic neutral atom all-sky maps. We show that a significant source of 0.5-1 keV ENAs may originate from the outside of the heliopause, if a strong suprathermal population exists in the VLISM. In simulations, a strong outer heliosheath ENA feature appears near the nose of the heliosphere. A weaker, complementary feature is also present consisting entirely of inner heliosheath ENAs. From this feature the direction of the interstellar magnetic field can be easily inferred.

  10. FLASH MHD simulations of experiments that study shock-generated magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Graziani, C.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2015-12-01

    We summarize recent additions and improvements to the high energy density physics capabilities in FLASH, highlighting new non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) capabilities. We then describe 3D Cartesian and 2D cylindrical FLASH MHD simulations that have helped to design and analyze experiments conducted at the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a laser illuminates a carbon rod target placed in a gas-filled chamber. A magnetic field diagnostic (called a Bdot) employing three very small induction coils is used to measure all three components of the magnetic field at a chosen point in space. The simulations have revealed that many fascinating physical processes occur in the experiments. These include megagauss magnetic fields generated by the interaction of the laser with the target via the Biermann battery mechanism, which are advected outward by the vaporized target material but decrease in strength due to expansion and resistivity; magnetic fields generated by an outward expanding shock via the Biermann battery mechanism; and a breakout shock that overtakes the first wave, the contact discontinuity between the target material and the gas, and then the initial expanding shock. Finally, we discuss the validation and predictive science we have done for this experiment with FLASH.

  11. FLASH Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Experiments to Explore the Generation of Cosmological Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald Q.; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous throughout the universe. However, the origin and strength of these fields are not fully understood. A promising mechanism for the origin of seed fields is the asymmetric shocks that occur in hierarchical structure formation when smaller halos merge to form galaxies and galaxies merge to form clusters of galaxies. The seed fields are generated by the Biermann battery mechanism. The COSMOLAB team of the University of Oxford is conducting experiments to investigate the generation of magnetic fields by asymmetric shocks. These experiments involve the laser illumination of a foil target, driving a shock into a gas-filled chamber, and a variety of plasma and magnetic field diagnostics. In this paper, we describe magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiment carried out using the FLASH code. The scientific objective of these simulations is to explore the morphology and strength of the magnetic fields generated by ablation of target material by the laser, and by the jet-like shock that is produced on the opposite side of the target.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow over a cylinder using axial- and transverse-oriented magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Guarendi, Andrew N; Chandy, Abhilash J

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow over a cylinder are presented for axial- and transverse-oriented dipoles with different strengths. ANSYS CFX is used to carry out calculations for steady, laminar flows at a Mach number of 6.1, with a model for electrical conductivity as a function of temperature and pressure. The low magnetic Reynolds number (<1) calculated based on the velocity and length scales in this problem justifies the quasistatic approximation, which assumes negligible effect of velocity on magnetic fields. Therefore, the governing equations employed in the simulations are the compressible Navier-Stokes and the energy equations with MHD-related source terms such as Lorentz force and Joule dissipation. The results demonstrate the ability of the magnetic field to affect the flowfield around the cylinder, which results in an increase in shock stand-off distance and reduction in overall temperature. Also, it is observed that there is a noticeable decrease in drag with the addition of the magnetic field.

  13. Alignment of Velocity and Magnetic Fluctuations in Simulations of Anisotropic MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. S.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2007-11-01

    There has been recent theoretical interest in the effect of the alignment of velocity and magnetic fluctuations in three-dimensional (3D) MHD turbulence with a large-scale magnetic field [Boldyrev 2005, 2006]. This theory predicts that the angle θ between the velocity and magnetic fluctuation vectors has a scaling of θ&1/4circ;, where λ is the spatial scale of the fluctuations. There have also been simulations on 3D forced MHD turbulence that supports this prediction [Mason et al. 2006, 2007]. The scaling has also been tested against observations of solar wind turbulence [Podesta et al. 2007]. We report here simulation results based on decaying 2D turbulence. The scaling of θ&1/4circ; and Iroshnikov-Kraichnan scaling has also been observed within a range of time interval and spatial scales, despite the fact that Boldyrev's theory was developed for fully 3D turbulence in the presence of a strong external field. As the external field is reduced in magnitude and becomes comparable to the magnitude of magnetic fluctuations or lower, the scale-dependent alignment is weakened. Implications for observations of solar wind turbulence will be discussed.

  14. Multi-dimensional simulations of Magnetic Field Seeding of Plasma via Laser Beatwave Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Dale; Thoma, Carsten; Bruner, Nichelle; Hwang, David; Hsu, Scott

    2011-10-01

    Assembling magnetized plasma for inertial fusion permits longer duration and smaller density-radius product fuel implosions by reducing the energy transport significantly. For fusion energy, however, the field must be created with a significant standoff distance. A promising technique for magnetic field production is the beat-wave interaction. Some theoretical results have been confirmed by microwave experiments. Recently, fully-kinetic 2D and 3D simulations of the interaction have been simulated using the LSP particle-in-cell code. We inject 2 CO2 100-micron transverse-extent lasers both with 1013 W/cm2 intensity into a peak 3 × 1016 cm-3 density plasma at various angles. The calculated interaction produces beatwaves at the predicted wavelength and frequency and drives magnetic fields up to 2.5 kG. We will examine the sensitivity of the efficiency of magnetic field production to laser parameters and plasma density scale length and discuss the application to the Plasma Liner eXperiment at LANL. Work supported by US DOE, OFES.

  15. 3D MHD Simulations of Laser Plasma Guiding in Curved Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roupassov, S.; Rankin, R.; Tsui, Y.; Capjack, C.; Fedosejevs, R.

    1999-11-01

    The guiding and confinement of laser produced plasma in a curved magnetic field has been investigated numerically. These studies were motivated by experiments on pulsed laser deposition of diamond-like films [1] in which a 1kG magnetic field in a curved solenoid geometry was utilized to steer a carbon plasma around a curved trajectory and thus to separate it from unwanted macroparticles produced by the laser ablation. The purpose of the modeling was to characterize the plasma dynamics during the propagation through the magnetic guide field and to investigate the effect of different magnetic field configurations. A 3D curvilinear ADI code developed on the basis of an existing Cartesian code [2] was employed to simulate the underlying resistive one-fluid MHD model. Issues such as large regions of low background density and nonreflective boundary conditions were addressed. Results of the simulations in a curved guide field will be presented and compared to experimental results. [1] Y.Y. Tsui, D. Vick and R. Fedosejevs, Appl. Phys. Lett. 70 (15), pp. 1953-57, 1997. [2] R. Rankin, and I. Voronkov, in "High Performance Computing Systems and Applications", pp. 59-69, Kluwer AP, 1998.

  16. 2D PIC simulations for an EN discharge with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, Michael A.; Kawamura, Emi; Lichtenberg, Allan J.

    2009-10-01

    We conducted 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for an electronegative (EN) discharge with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions, and compared the results to a previously developed 1D (radial) analytical model of an EN plasma with strongly magnetized electrons and weakly magnetized ions [1]. In both cases, there is a static uniform applied magnetic field in the axial direction. The 1D radial model mimics the wall losses of the particles in the axial direction by introducing a bulk loss frequency term νL. A special (desired) solution was found in which only positive and negative ions but no electrons escaped radially. The 2D PIC results show good agreement with the 1D model over a range of parameters and indicate that the analytical form of νL employed in [1] is reasonably accurate. However, for the PIC simulations, there is always a finite flux of electrons to the radial wall which is about 10 to 30% of the negative ion flux.[4pt] [1] G. Leray, P. Chabert, A.J. Lichtenberg and M.A. Lieberman, J. Phys. D, accepted for publication 2009.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Hypersonic Flow over a Cylinder Using Axial- and Transverse-Oriented Magnetic Dipoles

    PubMed Central

    Guarendi, Andrew N.; Chandy, Abhilash J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow over a cylinder are presented for axial- and transverse-oriented dipoles with different strengths. ANSYS CFX is used to carry out calculations for steady, laminar flows at a Mach number of 6.1, with a model for electrical conductivity as a function of temperature and pressure. The low magnetic Reynolds number (≪1) calculated based on the velocity and length scales in this problem justifies the quasistatic approximation, which assumes negligible effect of velocity on magnetic fields. Therefore, the governing equations employed in the simulations are the compressible Navier-Stokes and the energy equations with MHD-related source terms such as Lorentz force and Joule dissipation. The results demonstrate the ability of the magnetic field to affect the flowfield around the cylinder, which results in an increase in shock stand-off distance and reduction in overall temperature. Also, it is observed that there is a noticeable decrease in drag with the addition of the magnetic field. PMID:24307870

  18. Simulations of Gyrosynchrotron Microwave Emission from an Oscillating 3D Magnetic Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. A.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Reznikova, V. E.

    2015-04-01

    Radio observations of solar flares often reveal various periodic or quasi-periodic oscillations. Most likely, these oscillations are caused by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations of flaring loops which modulate the emission. Interpreting the observations requires comparing them with simulations. We simulated the gyrosynchrotron radio emission from a semicircular (toroidal-shaped) magnetic loop containing sausage-mode MHD oscillations. The aim was to detect the observable signatures specific to the considered MHD mode and to study their dependence on the various source parameters. The MHD waves were simulated using a linear three-dimensional model of a magnetized plasma cylinder; both standing and propagating waves were considered. The curved loop was formed by replicating the MHD solutions along the plasma cylinder and bending the cylinder; this model allowed us to study the effect of varying the viewing angle along the loop. The radio emission was simulated using a three-dimensional model, and its spatial and temporal variations were analyzed. We considered several loop orientations and different parameters of the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic electrons in the loop. In the model with low plasma density, the intensity oscillations at all frequencies are synchronous (with the exception of a narrow spectral region below the spectral peak). In the model with high plasma density, the emission at low frequencies (where the Razin effect is important) oscillates in anti-phase with the emissions at higher frequencies. The oscillations at high and low frequencies are more pronounced in different parts of the loop (depending on the loop orientation). The layers where the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field changes sign can produce additional peculiarities in the oscillation patterns.

  19. Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection with guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, M. E.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Markidis, S.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    The long term evolution of large domain Particle In Cell simulations of collisionless magnetic reconnection is investigated following observations that show two possible outcomes for collisionless reconnection: towards a Petschek-like configuration (Gosling 2007) or towards multiple X points (Eriksson et al. 2014). In the simulations presented here and described in [Innocenti2015*], a mixed scenario develops. At earlier time, plasmoids are emitted, disrupting the formation of Petschek-like structures. Later, an almost stationary monster plasmoid forms, preventing the emission of other plasmoids. A situation reminding of Petschek's switch-off then ensues. Switch-off is obtained through a slow shock / rotational discontinuity (SS/RD) compound structure, with the rotation discontinuity downstreamthe slow shock. Two external slow shocks located in correspondence of the separatrices reduce the in plane tangential component of the magnetic field, but not to zero. Two transitions reminding of rotational discontinuities in the internal part of the exhausts then perform the final switch-off. Both the slow shocks and the rotational discontinuities are characterized as such through the analysis of their Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions. A moderate guide field is used to suppress the development of the firehose instability in the exhaust that prevented switch off in [Liu2012]. Compound SS/RD structures, with the RD located downstream the SS, have been observed in both the solar wind and the magnetosphere in Wind and Geotail data respectively [Whang1998, Whang2004]. Ion trajectiories across the SS/RD structure are followed and the kinetic origin of the SS/RD structure is investigated. * Innocenti, Goldman, Newman, Markidis, Lapenta, Evidence of magnetic field switch-off in collisionless magnetic reconnection, accepted in Astrophysical Journal Letters, 2015 Acknowledgements: NERSC, a DOE Office of Science User Facility supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of

  20. MULTI-FLUID SIMULATIONS OF CHROMOSPHERIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN A WEAKLY IONIZED REACTING PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, James E.; Lukin, Vyacheslav S.; Linton, Mark G.; Meier, Eric T.

    2012-12-01

    We present results from the first self-consistent multi-fluid simulations of chromospheric magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized reacting plasma. We simulate two-dimensional magnetic reconnection in a Harris current sheet with a numerical model which includes ion-neutral scattering collisions, ionization, recombination, optically thin radiative loss, collisional heating, and thermal conduction. In the resulting tearing mode reconnection the neutral and ion fluids become decoupled upstream from the reconnection site, creating an excess of ions in the reconnection region and therefore an ionization imbalance. Ion recombination in the reconnection region, combined with Alfvenic outflows, quickly removes ions from the reconnection site, leading to a fast reconnection rate independent of Lundquist number. In addition to allowing fast reconnection, we find that these non-equilibria partial ionization effects lead to the onset of the nonlinear secondary tearing instability at lower values of the Lundquist number than has been found in fully ionized plasmas. These simulations provide evidence that magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere could be responsible for jet-like transient phenomena such as spicules and chromospheric jets.

  1. Radiation Belt Simulation in the Tsyganenko Magnetic Field Including Magnetospheric Convection and Wave-Particles Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbotin, D.; Shprits, Y.; Orlova, K.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of the radiation belt electrons can be described by the Fokker-Planck equation which consists of the diffusion due to wave-particles resonance interaction, sources from magnetospheric convection, and losses to the magnetopause and atmosphere. To better understand the global magnetospheric dynamics we present a simulation of the convection and diffusion processes with 4D Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB 4D) code in the realistic Tsyganenko magnetic field. The simulation includes radial diffusion due to ULF waves, energy and pitch-angle scattering due to day- and night-side Chorus waves outside of the plasmasphere and hiss waves inside of the plasmasphere, losses to the atmosphere and magnetopause. Magnetospheric convection in the time-dependent Tsyganenko magnetic field provides electron seed population. Energy, pitch-angle, and mixed diffusion coefficients are bounce-averaged in Tsyganenko magnetic field. Outer radial boundary condition in the magnetotail is taken from satellite observations. The results of the 4D simulation allow, among other things, to distinguish between losses to magnetopause and atmosphere of outer radiation belt electrons during a geomagnetic storm.

  2. Simulation Study of Magnetic Fields generated by the Electromagnetic Filamentation Instability driven by Pair Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hededal, C.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2007-01-01

    Using a 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell (RPIC) code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic electron-positron (cold) jet propagating into ambient electron-positron and electron-ion plasmas without initial magnetic fields in order to investigate the nonlinear stage of the Weibel instability. We have also performed simulations with broad Lorentz factor distribution of jet electrons and positrons, which are assumed to be created by the photon annihilation. The growth time and nonlinear saturation levels depend on the initial jet parallel velocity distributions and ambient plasma. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shocks accelerates jet and ambient particles both perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. The nonlinear fluctuation amplitude of densities, currents, electric, and magnetic fields in the electron-ion ambient plasma are larger than those in the electron-positron ambient plasma. We have shown that plasma instabilities driven by these streaming electron-positron pairs are responsible for the excitation of near-equipartition, turbulent magnetic fields. These fields maintain a strong saturated level on timescales much longer than the electron skin depth at least for the duration of the simulations. Our results reveal the importance of the electromagnetic filamentation instability in ensuring an effective coupling between electron-positron pairs and ions, and may help explain the origin of large upstream fields in GRB shock.

  3. 3-D RPIC simulations of relativistic jets: Particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing (relativistic) jets and shocks, e.g., supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the .shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration in jets.

  4. 2D/3D quench simulation using ANSYS for epoxy impregnated Nb3Sn high field magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2002-09-19

    A quench program using ANSYS is developed for the high field collider magnet for three-dimensional analysis. Its computational procedure is explained. The quench program is applied to a one meter Nb{sub 3}Sn high field model magnet, which is epoxy impregnated. The quench simulation program is used to estimate the temperature and mechanical stress inside the coil as well as over the whole magnet. It is concluded that for the one meter magnet with the presented cross section and configuration, the thermal effects due to the quench is tolerable. But we need much more quench study and improvements in the design for longer magnets.

  5. DETERMINING THE MAGNETIZATION OF THE QUIET SUN PHOTOSPHERE FROM THE HANLE EFFECT AND SURFACE DYNAMO SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shchukina, Nataliya; Trujillo Bueno, Javier E-mail: jtb@iac.es

    2011-04-10

    The bulk of the quiet solar photosphere is thought to be significantly magnetized, due to the ubiquitous presence of a tangled magnetic field at subresolution scales with an average strength (B) {approx} 100 G. This conclusion was reached through detailed three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer modeling of the Hanle effect in the Sr I 4607 A line, using the microturbulent field approximation and assuming that the shape of the probability density function of the magnetic field strength is exponential. Here, we relax both approximations by modeling the observed scattering polarization in terms of the Hanle effect produced by the magnetic field of a 3D photospheric model resulting from a (state-of-the-art) magneto-convection simulation with surface dynamo action. We show that the scattering polarization amplitudes observed in the Sr I 4607 A line can be explained only after enhancing the magnetic strength of the photospheric model by a sizable scaling factor, F {approx} 10, which implies (B) {approx} 130 G in the upper photosphere. We also argue that in order to explain both the Hanle depolarization of the Sr I 4607 A line and the Zeeman signals observed in Fe I lines, we need to introduce a height-dependent scaling factor, such that the ensuing (B) {approx} 160 G in the low photosphere and (B) {approx} 130 G in the upper photosphere.

  6. SImulator of GAlaxy Millimetre/submillimetre Emission (SÍGAME): CO emission from massive z = 2 main-sequence galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Karen P.; Greve, Thomas R.; Brinch, Christian; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Jesper; Toft, Sune; Zirm, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    We present SÍGAME (SImulator of GAlaxy Millimetre/submillimetre Emission), a new numerical code designed to simulate the 12CO rotational line spectrum of galaxies. Using sub-grid physics recipes to post-process the outputs of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations, a molecular gas phase is condensed out of the hot and partly ionized SPH gas. The gas is subjected to far-UV radiation fields and cosmic ray ionization rates which are set to scale with the local star formation rate volume density. Level populations and radiative transport of the CO lines are solved with the 3D radiative transfer code LIME. We have applied SÍGAME to cosmological SPH simulations of three disc galaxies at z = 2 with stellar masses in the range ˜0.5-2 × 1011 M⊙ and star formation rates ˜40-140 M⊙ yr-1. Global CO luminosities and line ratios are in agreement with observations of disc galaxies at z ˜ 2 up to and including J = 3-2 but falling short of the few existing J=5-4 observations. The central 5 kpc regions of our galaxies have CO 3 - 2/1 - 0 and 7 - 6/1 - 0 brightness temperature ratios of ˜0.55-0.65 and ˜0.02-0.08, respectively, while further out in the disc the ratios drop to more quiescent values of ˜0.5 and <0.01. Global CO-to-H2 conversion (αCO) factors are {˜eq } 1.5 {{M_{⊙}} pc^{-2} (K km s^{-1})^{-1}}, i.e. ˜2-3 times below the typically adopted values for disc galaxies, and αCO increases with radius, in agreement with observations of nearby galaxies. Adopting a top-heavy Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) mass spectrum does not significantly change the results. Steepening the GMC density profiles leads to higher global line ratios for Jup ≥ 3 and CO-to-H2 conversion factors [{˜eq } 3.6 {{M_{⊙}} pc^{-2} (K km s^{-1})^{-1}}].

  7. Hydrodynamic simulations of the interaction between an AGB star and a main-sequence companion in eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Jan E.; De Marco, Orsola; Macdonald, Daniel; Galaviz, Pablo; Passy, Jean-Claude; Iaconi, Roberto; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2016-02-01

    The Rotten Egg Nebula has at its core a binary composed of a Mira star and an A-type companion at a separation >10 au. It has been hypothesized to have formed by strong binary interactions between the Mira and a companion in an eccentric orbit during periastron passage ˜800 yr ago. We have performed hydrodynamic simulations of an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star interacting with companions with a range of masses in orbits with a range of initial eccentricities and periastron separations. For reasonable values of the eccentricity, we find that Roche lobe overflow can take place only if the periods are ≪100 yr. Moreover, mass transfer causes the system to enter a common envelope phase within several orbits. Since the central star of the Rotten Egg nebula is an AGB star, we conclude that such a common envelope phase must have lead to a merger, so the observed companion must have been a tertiary companion of a binary that merged at the time of nebula ejection. Based on the mass and time-scale of the simulated disc formed around the companion before the common envelope phase, we analytically estimate the properties of jets that could be launched. Allowing for super-Eddington accretion rates, we find that jets similar to those observed are plausible, provided that the putative lost companion was relatively massive.

  8. Direct Simulation of Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Rates and Line Shapes from Molecular Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, David P.; Baveye, Philippe C.; Robinson, Bruce H.

    2012-01-01

    We simulate spin relaxation processes, which may be measured by either continuous wave or pulsed magnetic resonance techniques, using trajectory-based simulation methodologies. The spin–lattice relaxation rates are extracted numerically from the relaxation simulations. The rates obtained from the numerical fitting of the relaxation curves are compared to those obtained by direct simulation from the relaxation Bloch–Wangsness–Abragam– Redfield theory (BWART). We have restricted our study to anisotropic rigid-body rotational processes, and to the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) and a single spin–spin dipolar (END) coupling mechanisms. Examples using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) nitroxide and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) deuterium quadrupolar systems are provided. The objective is to compare those rates obtained by numerical simulations with the rates obtained by BWART. There is excellent agreement between the simulated and BWART rates for a Hamiltonian describing a single spin (an electron) interacting with the bath through the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) mechanism undergoing anisotropic rotational diffusion. In contrast, when the Hamiltonian contains both the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) and the spin–spin dipolar (END) mechanisms, the decay rate of a single exponential fit of the simulated spin–lattice relaxation rate is up to a factor of 0.2 smaller than that predicted by BWART. When the relaxation curves are fit to a double exponential, the slow and fast rates extracted from the decay curves bound the BWART prediction. An extended BWART theory, in the literature, includes the need for multiple relaxation rates and indicates that the multiexponential decay is due to the combined effects of direct and cross-relaxation mechanisms. PMID:22540276

  9. Wiggler improvement based on single axis magnetic measurement, synthesized 3-D field simulation of trajectories and sorting of lateral focusing magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, H. S.; Volshonok, M.; Dyunin, E.; Gover, A.; Lasser, Y.; Shershevski, R.; Yahalom, A.

    2011-12-01

    A method is presented for correcting magnetic field imperfections in an assembled wiggler of the Halbach configuration. The method is employed in a configuration in which lateral focusing is needed along the wiggler (at low beam energies and large length) and is provided by external magnet bars alongside the wiggler. Field deviations in both vertical and lateral dimensions due to wiggler imperfections are repaired by sorting and reassembly of the focusing magnets. A single Hall probe measurement along the wiggler axis and individual measurements of the focusing magnet bars provide sufficient data for sorting and optimal choice of the positions of the focusing magnets. Moreover, this data enables 3D simulation of the e-beam transport trajectories in the virtually synthesized field of the wiggler with the contemplated repair configuration of the focusing magnet bars before actually assembling them. It thus provides in advance a realistic prediction of the quality of the repair.

  10. Thermal Modeling of the Main Rings of Saturn through random distribution particle arrays and ray-tracing simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, Alberto; Spilker, Linda; Déau, Estelle

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's rings are a complex collection of icy particles with diameters from 1 m to few meters. Their natural window of study is the infrared because its temperatures are between 40K and 120K. The main driver of the temperature of these rings is the direct solar radiation as well as the solar radiation reflected off Saturn's atmosphere. The second most important energy source is the infrared radiation coming from Saturn itself. The study of the variations of temperatures of the rings, or, in general, their thermal behavior, may provide important information on their composition, their structure and their dynamics. Models that consider these and other energy sources are able to explain, to a first approximation, the observed temperature variations of the rings. The challenge for these models is to accurately describe the variation of illumination on the rings, i. e., how the illuminated and non-illuminated regions of the ring particles change at the different observation geometries. This shadowing mainly depends on the optical depth, as well as the general structure of the rings.In this work, We show a semi-analytical model that considers the main energy sources of the rings and their average properties (e.g., optical depth, particle size range and vertical distribution). In order to deal with the shadowing at specific geometries, the model uses the ray-tracing technique. The goal is to describe the ring temperatures observed by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer, CIRS, onboard the Cassini spacecraft, which is in orbit around Saturn since 2004. So far, the model is able to reproduce some of the general features of specific regions of the A, B and C rings.

  11. General Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Magnetically Choked Accretion Flows around Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, Jonathan C.; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander; Blandford, Roger D.

    2012-04-26

    Black hole (BH) accretion flows and jets are qualitatively affected by the presence of ordered magnetic fields. We study fully three-dimensional global general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of radially extended and thick (height H to cylindrical radius R ratio of |H/R| {approx} 0.2-1) accretion flows around BHs with various dimensionless spins (a/M, with BH mass M) and with initially toroidally-dominated ({phi}-directed) and poloidally-dominated (R-z directed) magnetic fields. Firstly, for toroidal field models and BHs with high enough |a/M|, coherent large-scale (i.e. >> H) dipolar poloidal magnetic flux patches emerge, thread the BH, and generate transient relativistic jets. Secondly, for poloidal field models, poloidal magnetic flux readily accretes through the disk from large radii and builds-up to a natural saturation point near the BH. While models with |H/R| {approx} 1 and |a/M| {le} 0.5 do not launch jets due to quenching by mass infall, for sufficiently high |a/M| or low |H/R| the polar magnetic field compresses the inflow into a geometrically thin highly non-axisymmetric 'magnetically choked accretion flow' (MCAF) within which the standard linear magneto-rotational instability is suppressed. The condition of a highly-magnetized state over most of the horizon is optimal for the Blandford-Znajek mechanism that generates persistent relativistic jets with and 100% efficiency for |a/M| {approx}> 0.9. A magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable magnetospheric interface forms between the compressed inflow and bulging jet magnetosphere, which drives a new jet-disk oscillation (JDO) type of quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) mechanism. The high-frequency QPO has spherical harmonic |m| = 1 mode period of {tau} {approx} 70GM/c{sup 3} for a/M {approx} 0.9 with coherence quality factors Q {approx}> 10. Overall, our models are qualitatively distinct from most prior MHD simulations (typically, |H/R| << 1 and poloidal flux is limited by

  12. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Radiation from Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Oka, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, J. F.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma instabilities (e.g., Buneman, Weibel and other two-stream instabilities) excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a new 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell code, we have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. The simulation has been performed using a long simulation system in order to study the nonlinear stages of the Weibel instability, the particle acceleration mechanism, and the shock structure. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic (HD) like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of <_ 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. We discuss the possible implication of our simulation results within the AGN and GRB context. We have calculated the time evolution of the spectrum from two electrons propagating in a uniform parallel magnetic field to verify the technique. The same technique will be used to calculate radiation from accelerated electrons (positrons) in turbulent magnetic fields generated by Weibel instability.

  13. Tokamak magneto-hydrodynamics and reference magnetic coordinates for simulations of plasma disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, Leonid E.; Li, Xujing

    2015-06-15

    This paper formulates the Tokamak Magneto-Hydrodynamics (TMHD), initially outlined by X. Li and L. E. Zakharov [Plasma Science and Technology 17(2), 97–104 (2015)] for proper simulations of macroscopic plasma dynamics. The simplest set of magneto-hydrodynamics equations, sufficient for disruption modeling and extendable to more refined physics, is explained in detail. First, the TMHD introduces to 3-D simulations the Reference Magnetic Coordinates (RMC), which are aligned with the magnetic field in the best possible way. The numerical implementation of RMC is adaptive grids. Being consistent with the high anisotropy of the tokamak plasma, RMC allow simulations at realistic, very high plasma electric conductivity. Second, the TMHD splits the equation of motion into an equilibrium equation and the plasma advancing equation. This resolves the 4 decade old problem of Courant limitations of the time step in existing, plasma inertia driven numerical codes. The splitting allows disruption simulations on a relatively slow time scale in comparison with the fast time of ideal MHD instabilities. A new, efficient numerical scheme is proposed for TMHD.

  14. Revealing the sub-structures of the magnetic reconnection separatrix via particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, M.; Deng, X. H.; Pang, Y.; Xu, X. J.; Yao, M.; Huang, S. Y.; Yuan, Z. G.; Li, H. M.; Wang, D. D.; Wang, Y. H.

    2012-07-15

    Magnetic separatrix is an important boundary layer separating the inflow and outflow regions in magnetic reconnection. In this article, we investigate the sub-structures of the separatrix region by using two-and-half dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation. The separatrix region can be divided into two sub-regions in terms of the ion and electron frozen-in conditions. Far from the neutral sheet, ions and electrons are magnetized in magnetic fields. Approaching the neutral sheet, ion frozen-in condition is broken in a narrow region ({approx}c/{omega}{sub pi}) at the edge of a density cavity, while electrons are frozen-in to magnetic fields. In this region, electric field E{sub z} is around zero, and the convective term -(v{sub i} Multiplication-Sign B) is balanced by the Hall term in the generalized Ohm's law because ions carry the perpendicular current. Inside the density cavity, both ion and electron frozen-in conditions are broken. The region consists of two sub-ion or electron-scale layers, which contain intense electric fields. Formation of the two sub-layers is due to the complex electron flow pattern around the separatrix region. In the layer, E{sub z} is balanced by a combination of Hall term and the divergence of electron pressure tensor, with the Hall term being dominant. Our preliminary simulation result shows that the separatrix region in guide field reconnection also contains two sub-regions: the inner region and the outer region. However, the inner region contains only one current layer in contrast with the case without guide field.

  15. 3D hybrid simulations of the interaction of a magnetic cloud with a bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turc, L.; Fontaine, D.; Savoini, P.; Modolo, R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the interaction of a magnetic cloud (MC) with a planetary bow shock using hybrid simulations. It is the first time to our knowledge that this interaction is studied using kinetic simulations which include self-consistently both the ion foreshock and the shock wave dynamics. We show that when the shock is in a quasi-perpendicular configuration, the MC's magnetic structure in the magnetosheath remains similar to that in the solar wind, whereas it is strongly altered downstream of a quasi-parallel shock. The latter can result in a reversal of the magnetic field north-south component in some parts of the magnetosheath. We also investigate how the MC affects in turn the outer parts of the planetary environment, i.e., from the foreshock to the magnetopause. We find the following: (i) The decrease of the Alfvén Mach number at the MC's arrival causes an attenuation of the foreshock region because of the weakening of the bow shock. (ii) The foreshock moves along the bow shock's surface, following the rotation of the MC's magnetic field. (iii) Owing to the low plasma beta, asymmetric flows arise inside the magnetosheath, due to the magnetic tension force which accelerates the particles in some parts of the magnetosheath and slows them down in others. (iv) The quasi-parallel region forms a depression in the shock's surface. Other deformations of the magnetopause and the bow shock are also highlighted. All these effects can contribute to significantly modify the solar wind/magnetosphere coupling during MC events.

  16. SPILADY: A parallel CPU and GPU code for spin-lattice magnetic molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Pui-Wai; Dudarev, S. L.; Woo, C. H.

    2016-10-01

    Spin-lattice dynamics generalizes molecular dynamics to magnetic materials, where dynamic variables describing an evolving atomic system include not only coordinates and velocities of atoms but also directions and magnitudes of atomic magnetic moments (spins). Spin-lattice dynamics simulates the collective time evolution of spins and atoms, taking into account the effect of non-collinear magnetism on interatomic forces. Applications of the method include atomistic models for defects, dislocations and surfaces in magnetic materials, thermally activated diffusion of defects, magnetic phase transitions, and various magnetic and lattice relaxation phenomena. Spin-lattice dynamics retains all the capabilities of molecular dynamics, adding to them the treatment of non-collinear magnetic degrees of freedom. The spin-lattice dynamics time integration algorithm uses symplectic Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of atomic coordinate, velocity and spin evolution operators, and delivers highly accurate numerical solutions of dynamic evolution equations over extended intervals of time. The code is parallelized in coordinate and spin spaces, and is written in OpenMP C/C++ for CPU and in CUDA C/C++ for Nvidia GPU implementations. Temperatures of atoms and spins are controlled by Langevin thermostats. Conduction electrons are treated by coupling the discrete spin-lattice dynamics equations for atoms and spins to the heat transfer equation for the electrons. Worked examples include simulations of thermalization of ferromagnetic bcc iron, the dynamics of laser pulse demagnetization, and collision cascades. Catalogue identifier: AFAN_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AFAN_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Apache License, Version 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1611165 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 367246683

  17. Numerical Simulation of Molten Metal Flow Produced by Induction MHD Pump Using Rotating Twisted Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Tsutomu; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Sawada, Keisuke

    Numerical simulation at the same condition as an experiment is carried out under the magnetic Stokes approximation for small shielding parameter. Results of the simulation compensate for the information of molten metal flow that we could not directly obtain in the experiment. In this paper, we study the molten metal flow at a starting condition and quasi-steady state. Besides, the energy conversion in the MHD pump is discussed. The simulation result shows that the proposed MHD pump causes the spiral induced current in a molten gallium and produces an axial flow with swirl. At quasi-steady state, it is confirmed that the centrifugal force by the excessive swirl flow produces high pressure at a duct wall and low pressure around the central axis. Since the excessive swirl flow results in large viscous dissipation, the mechanical power output of the pump uses only about 1% of the mechanical energy production in the molten gallium.

  18. Numerical simulation of filling a magnetic flux tube with a cold plasma: Anomalous plasma effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Leung, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    Large-scale models of plasmaspheric refilling have revealed that during the early stage of the refilling counterstreaming ion beams are a common feature. However, the instability of such ion beams and its effect on refilling remain unexplored. In order to learn the basic effects of ion beam instabilities on refilling, we have performed numerical simulations of the refilling of an artificial magnetic flux tube. (The shape and size of the tube are assumed so that the essential features of the refilling problem are kept in the simulation and at the same time the small scale processes driven by the ion beams are sufficiently resolved.) We have also studied the effect of commonly found equatorially trapped warm and/or hot plasma on the filling of a flux tube with a cold plasma. Three types of simulation runs have been performed.

  19. A 3D computer simulation of negative ion extraction influenced by electron diffusion and weak magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Turek, M.; Sielanko, J.

    2008-03-19

    The numerical model of negative ion beam extraction from the RF ion source by different kinds of large extraction grid systems is considered. The model takes into account the influence of the transversal magnetic field and the electron diffusion. The magnetic filter field increases H{sup -} yields significantly. The random-walk electron diffusion model enables electrons to travel through magnetic field. The H{sup -} currents obtained from simulations with or without the diffusion are compared.

  20. Modeling and simulation of the main metabolism in Escherichia coli and its several single-gene knockout mutants with experimental verification

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is quite important to simulate the metabolic changes of a cell in response to the change in culture environment and/or specific gene knockouts particularly for the purpose of application in industry. If this could be done, the cell design can be made without conducting exhaustive experiments, and one can screen out the promising candidates, proceeded by experimental verification of a select few of particular interest. Although several models have so far been proposed, most of them focus on the specific metabolic pathways. It is preferred to model the whole of the main metabolic pathways in Escherichia coli, allowing for the estimation of energy generation and cell synthesis, based on intracellular fluxes and that may be used to characterize phenotypic growth. Results In the present study, we considered the simulation of the main metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, and the anapleorotic pathways using enzymatic reaction models of E. coli. Once intracellular fluxes were computed by this model, the specific ATP production rate, the specific CO2 production rate, and the specific NADPH production rate could be estimated. The specific ATP production rate thus computed was used for the estimation of the specific growth rate. The CO2 production rate could be used to estimate cell yield, and the specific NADPH production rate could be used to determine the flux of the oxidative PP pathway. The batch and continuous cultivations were simulated where the changing patterns of extracellular and intra-cellular metabolite concentrations were compared with experimental data. Moreover, the effects of the knockout of such pathways as Ppc, Pck and Pyk on the metabolism were simulated. It was shown to be difficult for the cell to grow in Ppc mutant due to low concentration of OAA, while Pck mutant does not necessarily show this phenomenon. The slower growth rate of the Ppc mutant was properly estimated by taking into account

  1. THE ROLE OF TURBULENCE AND MAGNETIC FIELDS IN SIMULATED FILAMENTARY STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Helen; Pudritz, Ralph; Klassen, Mikhail; Pillsworth, Samantha

    2015-04-01

    We use numerical simulations of turbulent cluster-forming regions to study the nature of dense filamentary structures in star formation. Using four hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic simulations chosen to match observations, we identify filaments in the resulting column density maps and analyze their properties. We calculate the radial column density profiles of the filaments every 0.05 Myr and fit the profiles with the modified isothermal and pressure-confined isothermal cylinder models, finding reasonable fits for either model. The filaments formed in the simulations have similar radial column density profiles to those observed. Magnetic fields provide additional pressure support to the filaments, making “puffier” filaments less prone to fragmentation than in the pure hydrodynamic case, which continue to condense at a slower rate. In the higher density simulations, the filaments grow faster through the increased importance of gravity. Not all of the filaments identified in the simulations will evolve to form stars: some expand and disperse. Given these different filament evolutionary paths, the trends in bulk filament width as a function of time, magnetic field strength, or density are weak, and all cases are reasonably consistent with the finding of a constant filament width in different star-forming regions. In the simulations, the mean FWHM lies between 0.06 and 0.26 pc for all times and initial conditions, with most lying between 0.1 to 0.15 pc; the range in FWHMs is however, larger than seen in typical Herschel analyses. Finally, the filaments display a wealth of substructure similar to the recent discovery of filament bundles in Taurus.

  2. CORSICA: A comprehensive simulation of toroidal magnetic-fusion devices. Final report to the LDRD Program

    SciTech Connect

    Crotinger, J.A.; LoDestro, L.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Tarditi, A.; Casper, T.A.; Hooper, E.B.

    1997-03-21

    In 1992, our group began exploring the requirements for a comprehensive simulation code for toroidal magnetic fusion experiments. There were several motivations for taking this step. First, the new machines being designed were much larger and more expensive than current experiments. Second, these new designs called for much more sophisticated control of the plasma shape and position, as well as the distributions of energy, mass, and current within the plasma. These factors alone made it clear that a comprehensive simulation capability would be an extremely valuable tool for machine design. The final motivating factor was that the national Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) had recently received High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Grand Challenge funding to model turbulent transport in tokamaks, raising the possibility that first-principles simulations of this process might be practical in the near future. We felt that the best way to capitalize on this development was to integrate the resulting turbulence simulation codes into a comprehensive simulation. Such simulations must include the effects of many microscopic length- and time-scales. In order to do a comprehensive simulation efficiently, the length- and time- scale disparities must be exploited. We proposed to do this by coupling the average or quasistatic effects from the fast time-scales to a slow-time-scale transport code for the macroscopic plasma evolution. In FY93-FY96 we received funding to investigate algorithms for computationally coupling such disparate-scale simulations and to implement these algorithms in a prototype simulation code, dubbed CORSICA. Work on algorithms and test cases proceeded in parallel, with the algorithms being incorporated into CORSICA as they became mature. In this report we discuss the methods and algorithms, the CORSICA code, its applications, and our plans for the future.

  3. Magnetic Turbulence and Line Broadening in Simulations of Lyman-Alpha Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurvich, Alex; Burkhart, Blakesley K.; Bird, Simeon

    2016-01-01

    We use the Illustris cosmological AREPO simulations to study the effects of gas turbulence and magnetic fields on measurements from the Lyman-Alpha forest. We generate simulated Lyman-Alpha spectra and plot the distributions of Column Density (CDD) and Doppler Width (b) both by adhering to the canonical method of fitting Voigt profiles to absorption lines and by directly measuring the column density and equivalent widths from snapshot data .We investigate the effects of additional unresolved gas turbulence in Illustris by adding an additional broadening term to the line profiles to mimic turbulent broadening. When we do this, we find a measurable effect in the CDD and an offset in the mean of the b distribution corresponding to the additional turbulence. We also compare different MHD runs in AREPO we find that the CDD can measurably differentiate between magnetic seed field at redshifts as low as z=0.1, but we do not find that the b distribution is affected at a detectable level. Our work suggests that the effects of turbulence and magnetic fields from z=2-0.1 can potentially be measured with these diagnostics. This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  4. Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Deca, J; Divin, A; Lapenta, G; Lembège, B; Markidis, S; Horányi, M

    2014-04-18

    We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier magnetohydrodynamics and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows us to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe for the first time the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under plasma conditions such that only the electron population is magnetized. The fully kinetic treatment identifies electromagnetic modes that alter the magnetic field at scales determined by the electron physics. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Future human exploration as well as lunar science in general therefore hinges on a better understanding of LMAs. PMID:24785022

  5. Collaborative Simulation and Testing of the Superconducting Dipole Prototype Magnet for the FAIR Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yinfeng; Zhu, Zhe; Xu, Houchang; Wu, Weiyue

    2012-08-01

    The superconducting dipole prototype magnet of the collector ring for the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is an international cooperation project. The collaborative simulation and testing of the developed prototype magnet is presented in this paper. To evaluate the mechanical strength of the coil case during quench, a 3-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic (EM) model was developed based on the solid97 magnetic vector element in the ANSYS commercial software, which includes the air region, coil and yoke. EM analysis was carried out with a peak operating current at 278 A. Then, the solid97 element was transferred into the solid185 element, the coupled analysis was switched from electromagnetic to structural, and the finite element model for the coil case and glass-fiber reinforced composite (G10) spacers was established by the ANSYS Parametric Design Language based on the 3D model from the CATIA V5 software. However, to simulate the friction characteristics inside the coil case, the conta173 surface-to-surface contact element was established. The results for the coil case and G10 spacers show that they are safe and have sufficient strength, on the basis of testing in discharge and quench scenarios.

  6. Magnetic-island Contraction and Particle Acceleration in Simulated Eruptive Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, S. E.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.; Lynch, B. J.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed high-energy impulsive emission in solar flares is not well understood. Drake et al. proposed a mechanism for accelerating electrons in contracting magnetic islands formed by kinetic reconnection in multi-layered current sheets (CSs). We apply these ideas to sunward-moving flux ropes (2.5D magnetic islands) formed during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. A simple analytic model is used to calculate the energy gain of particles orbiting the field lines of the contracting magnetic islands in our ultrahigh-resolution 2.5D numerical simulation. We find that the estimated energy gains in a single island range up to a factor of five. This is higher than that found by Drake et al. for islands in the terrestrial magnetosphere and at the heliopause, due to strong plasma compression that occurs at the flare CS. In order to increase their energy by two orders of magnitude and plausibly account for the observed high-energy flare emission, the electrons must visit multiple contracting islands. This mechanism should produce sporadic emission because island formation is intermittent. Moreover, a large number of particles could be accelerated in each magnetohydrodynamic-scale island, which may explain the inferred rates of energetic-electron production in flares. We conclude that island contraction in the flare CS is a promising candidate for electron acceleration in solar eruptions.

  7. Design, simulation and analysis of 3 kW low speed axial flux permanent magnet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasim, Muhammad; Irasari, Pudji; Hikmawan, Muhammad Fathul

    2016-03-01

    Design and simulation of an axial flux permanent magnet generator (AFPMG) have been described in this paper. It was designed using the single rotor - single stator construction. The analytical method was using in the design process. The design process also employed the simulation using Finite Element Method Magnetics (FEMM) 4.2 software for identifying the magnetic characteristic and heat transfer. The effect of fill factor (FF) variation on the generator performances also observed in this paper. The design result shows that using the selected FF, the conductor diameter, power output, efficiency and heat distribution are affected but not for the Bg. The generator output can achieve up to 5.2 kW using the FF 0.4 which is more than assumed power output at the pre-design using FF 0.3. It also can be seen that the increasing FF will increase the power output and the efficiency. Despite a higher temperature compared with FF 0.3 and 0.35, the value of 0.4 is the most appropriate FF for designing the AFPMG.

  8. MHD simulations of magnetized laser-plasma interaction for laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiar, Benjamin; Ciardi, Andrea; Vinci, Tommaso; Revet, Guilhem; Fuchs, Julien; Higginson, Drew

    2015-11-01

    Laser-driven plasmas coupled with externally applied strong, steady-state, magnetic fields have applications that range from ICF to astrophysical studies of jet collimation, accretion shock dynamics in young stars and streaming instabilities in space plasmas. We have recently included the modelling of laser energy deposition in our three-dimensional, resistive two-temperature MHD code GORGON. The model assumes linear inverse-bremsstrahlung absorption and the laser propagation is done in the geometrical optics approximation. We present full scale numerical simulations of actual experiments performed on the ELFIE installation at LULI, including plasma generated from single and multiple laser plasmas embedded in a magnetic field of strength up to 20 T, and experiments and astrophysical simulations that have shown the viability of poloidal magnetic fields to directly result in the collimation of outflows and the formation of jets in astrophysical accreting systems, such as in young stellar objects. The authors acknowledge the support from the Ile-de-France DIM ACAV, from the LABEX Plas@par and from the ANR grant SILAMPA.

  9. Electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar magnetic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Deca, J; Divin, A; Lapenta, G; Lembège, B; Markidis, S; Horányi, M

    2014-04-18

    We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier magnetohydrodynamics and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows us to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe for the first time the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under plasma conditions such that only the electron population is magnetized. The fully kinetic treatment identifies electromagnetic modes that alter the magnetic field at scales determined by the electron physics. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Future human exploration as well as lunar science in general therefore hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.

  10. Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with Lunar Magnetic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A.; Lapenta, G.; Lembège, B.; Markidis, S.; Horányi, M.

    2014-04-01

    We present the first three-dimensional fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies (LMAs). Using the implicit particle-in-cell code iPic3D, we confirm that LMAs may indeed be strong enough to stand off the solar wind from directly impacting the lunar surface forming a mini-magnetosphere, as suggested by spacecraft observations and theory. In contrast to earlier magnetohydrodynamics and hybrid simulations, the fully kinetic nature of iPic3D allows us to investigate the space charge effects and in particular the electron dynamics dominating the near-surface lunar plasma environment. We describe for the first time the interaction of a dipole model centered just below the lunar surface under plasma conditions such that only the electron population is magnetized. The fully kinetic treatment identifies electromagnetic modes that alter the magnetic field at scales determined by the electron physics. Driven by strong pressure anisotropies, the mini-magnetosphere is unstable over time, leading to only temporal shielding of the surface underneath. Future human exploration as well as lunar science in general therefore hinges on a better understanding of LMAs.

  11. Magnetic and Thermal Contributions to Helioseismic Travel times in Simulated Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Douglas; Felipe, Tobias; Birch, Aaron; Crouch, Ashley D.

    2016-05-01

    The interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge, since waves propagating through sunspots are potentially affected by both mode conversion and changes in the thermal structure of the spots. We carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through a variety of models which alternately isolate either the thermal or magnetic structure of the sunspot or include both of these. We find that helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. Using insight from ray theory, we find that travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurface structure of sunspots must account for local changes in the density. In some ranges of horizontal phase speed and frequency there is agreement (within the noise level of the measurements) between the travel times measured in the full magnetic sunspot model and the thermal model. If this conclusion proves to be robust for a wide range of models, it suggests a path towards inversions for sunspot structure. This research has been funded by the Spanish MINECO through grant AYA2014-55078-P, by the NASA Heliophysics Division through NNX14AD42G and NNH12CF23C, and the NSF Solar Terrestrial program through AGS-1127327.

  12. Full kinetic simulations of plasma flow interactions with meso- and microscale magnetic dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Ashida, Y.; Yamakawa, H.; Usui, H.; Miyake, Y.; Shinohara, I.; Funaki, I.; Nakamura, M.

    2014-12-15

    We examined the plasma flow response to meso- and microscale magnetic dipoles by performing three-dimensional full particle-in-cell simulations. We particularly focused on the formation of a magnetosphere and its dependence on the intensity of the magnetic moment. The size of a magnetic dipole immersed in a plasma flow can be characterized by a distance L from the dipole center to the position where the pressure of the local magnetic field becomes equal to the dynamic pressure of the plasma flow under the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) approximation. In this study, we are interested in a magnetic dipole whose L is smaller than the Larmor radius of ions r{sub iL} calculated with the unperturbed dipole field at the distance L from the center. In the simulation results, we confirmed the clear formation of a magnetosphere consisting of a magnetopause and a tail region in the density profile, although the spatial scale is much smaller than the MHD scale. One of the important findings in this study is that the spatial profiles of the plasma density as well as the current flows are remarkably affected by the finite Larmor radius effect of the plasma flow, which is different from the Earth's magnetosphere. The magnetopause found in the upstream region is located at a position much closer to the dipole center than L. In the equatorial plane, we also found an asymmetric density profile with respect to the plasma flow direction, which is caused by plasma gyration in the dipole field region. The ion current layers are created in the inner region of the dipole field, and the electron current also flows in the region beyond the ion current layer because ions with a large inertia can closely approach the dipole center. Unlike the ring current structure of the Earth's magnetosphere, the current layers in the microscale dipole fields are not circularly closed around the dipole center. Since the major current is caused by the particle gyrations, the current is independently determined

  13. Magnetic properties and remanent magnetization of a mixture of Fe-Ni alloys simulated to the Yamato 74646 (LL6) chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, H.; Momose, K.-I.; Funaki, M.

    Magnetic properties of mixtures of two alloys, 5 at pct Ni-Fe and 29 at pct Ni-Fe, containing varying (from 0.0 to 100 at pct) concentrations of the former, were investigated and compared to those of a Ni-Fe alloy mixture simulating the Yamato 74646 (LL6) chondrite; this mixture was prepared in accordance with the analysis data of Nagahara (1979). The original thermoremanent magnetization of alloy mixtures was acquired by heating for 2 h at 850 C and cooling to room temperature in a geomagnetic field. Remanent magnetization (RM) was measured during cooling at 77 K. It was found that the RM of the alloys simulating the Yamato chondrite was thermally stable. The intensity of RM obtained by cooling at 77 K in geomagnetic field increased by about 10 percent compared to the original one, whereas that acquired by cooling at 77 K in zero magnetic field decreased by about 25 percent.

  14. Magnetoviscosity of dilute suspensions of magnetic ellipsoids obtained through rotational Brownian dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J H; Rinaldi, C

    2009-03-15

    The magnetic field dependent viscosity (magnetoviscosity) of dilute suspensions of magnetic tri-axial ellipsoidal particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid and under applied shear and magnetic fields was studied numerically. Brownian dynamics simulations were performed to compute the intrinsic magnetoviscosity of the suspension. Results are presented for the response of dilute suspensions of ellipsoidal particles to constant magnetic and shear flow fields. Suspensions of ellipsoidal particles show a significant effect of aspect ratio on the intrinsic magnetoviscosity of the suspension, and this effect is more pronounced as the aspect ratio becomes more extreme. The use of an effective rotational diffusion coefficient D(r,eff) collapses the normalized intrinsic magnetoviscosity of all suspensions to a master curve as a function of Péclet number with the Langevin parameter alpha=(mu(0)muH)/(k(B)T) as parameter, up to a critical value of alpha for which the results for suspensions of spherical particles deviate from those of suspensions of ellipsoids. This discrepancy is attributed to the action of the shear-torque on the ellipsoidal particles, which tends to orient these particles in the direction of maximum deformation of the simple shear flow, and which does not act on spherical particles. PMID:19100560

  15. Numerical simulation of a helical shape electric arc in the external axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urusov, R. M.; Urusova, I. R.

    2016-10-01

    Within the frameworks of non-stationary three-dimensional mathematical model, in approximation of a partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, a numerical calculation was made of characteristics of DC electric arc burning in a cylindrical channel in the uniform external axial magnetic field. The method of numerical simulation of the arc of helical shape in a uniform external axial magnetic field was proposed. This method consists in that that in the computational algorithm, a "scheme" analog of fluctuations for electrons temperature is supplemented. The "scheme" analogue of fluctuations increases a weak numerical asymmetry of electrons temperature distribution, which occurs randomly in the course of computing. This asymmetry can be "picked up" by the external magnetic field that continues to increase up to a certain value, which is sufficient for the formation of helical structure of the arc column. In the absence of fluctuations in the computational algorithm, the arc column in the external axial magnetic field maintains cylindrical axial symmetry, and a helical form of the arc is not observed.

  16. Effects of stored feed cropping systems and farm size on the profitability of Maine organic dairy farm simulations.

    PubMed

    Hoshide, A K; Halloran, J M; Kersbergen, R J; Griffin, T S; DeFauw, S L; LaGasse, B J; Jain, S

    2011-11-01

    United States organic dairy production has increased to meet the growing demand for organic milk. Despite higher prices received for milk, organic dairy farmers have come under increasing financial stress due to increases in concentrated feed prices over the past few years, which can make up one-third of variable costs. Market demand for milk has also leveled in the last year, resulting in some downward pressure on prices paid to dairy farmers. Organic dairy farmers in the Northeast United States have experimented with growing different forage and grain crops to maximize on-farm production of protein and energy to improve profitability. Three representative organic feed systems were simulated using the integrated farm system model for farms with 30, 120, and 220 milk cows. Increasing intensity of equipment use was represented by organic dairy farms growing only perennial sod (low) to those with corn-based forage systems, which purchase supplemental grain (medium) or which produce and feed soybeans (high). The relative profitability of these 3 organic feed systems was strongly dependent on dairy farm size. From results, we suggest smaller organic dairy farms can be more profitable with perennial sod-based rather than corn-based forage systems due to lower fixed costs from using only equipment associated with perennial forage harvest and storage. The largest farm size was more profitable using a corn-based system due to greater economies of scale for growing soybeans, corn grain, winter cereals, and corn silages. At an intermediate farm size of 120 cows, corn-based forage systems were more profitable if perennial sod was not harvested at optimum quality, corn was grown on better soils, or if milk yield was 10% higher. Delayed harvest decreased the protein and energy content of perennial sod crops, requiring more purchased grain to balance the ration and resulting in lower profits. Corn-based systems were less affected by lower perennial forage quality, as corn silage

  17. Simulations on shifting medium and its application in wireless power transfer system to enhance magnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenwen; Zhang, Yingyi; Yao, Chen; Tang, Houjun

    2016-05-01

    Shifting medium is a kind of an anisotropic but homogeneous metamaterial designed by transformation optics. An object or free space enclosed by the shifting medium could be moved to a certain distance away from the original position. In this paper, we propose a cone-shaped shifting medium shell to move an internal coil to the given position. In this way, the two coils in a wireless power transfer system could be equivalently moved closer; thus, their magnetic coupling is enhanced. The theoretical models and numerical simulations are presented and analyzed to validate the effects of the shifting medium shell. Both ohmic loss and magnetic loss are also considered for practical concerns. Finally, we discuss the simplification of such a shifting medium to facilitate its fabrication.

  18. Steepening of parallel propagating hydromagnetic waves into magnetic pulsations - A simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akimoto, K.; Winske, D.; Onsager, T. G.; Thomsen, M. F.; Gary, S. P.

    1991-01-01

    The steepening mechanism of parallel propagating low-frequency MHD-like waves observed upstream of the earth's quasi-parallel bow shock has been investigated by means of electromagnetic hybrid simulations. It is shown that an ion beam through the resonant electromagnetic ion/ion instability excites large-amplitude waves, which consequently pitch angle scatter, decelerate, and eventually magnetically trap beam ions in regions where the wave amplitudes are largest. As a result, the beam ions become bunched in both space and gyrophase. As these higher-density, nongyrotropic beam segments are formed, the hydromagnetic waves rapidly steepen, resulting in magnetic pulsations, with properties generally in agreement with observations. This steepening process operates on the scale of the linear growth time of the resonant ion/ion instability. Many of the pulsations generated by this mechanism are left-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Solar Spicule Jets at a Magnetic Null-Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, V.; Konkol, P. M.; Solov'ev, A. A.; Murawski, K.

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of jet-like structures in the solar atmosphere are performed. These structures result from a pressure pulse that is launched at the null point of a potential magnetic arcade. The plasma jet exhibits a double structure with two components: (a) dense, cool, and short vertical stream and (b) a less dense, hot and tall part of the jet. The upper part of the hot and tall jet may represent a direct response of the system to the pressure pulse launched at the null point, and the second, slower cool and dense part of the jet is formed later through the stretching up of the stream as a result of plasma evacuation from the top of the magnetic arcade. Numerical results show that jet-like structures mimic some properties of both type I and type II spicules, according to the classification provided by De Pontieu et al. (Publ. Astron. Soc. Japan 59, S655, 2007).

  20. The magnetic topology of the plasmoid flux rope in a MHD-simulation of magnetotail reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of a 3D MHD simulation, the magnetic topology of a plasmoid that forms by a localized reconnection process in a magnetotail configuration (including a net dawn-dusk magnetic field component B sub y N is discussed. As a consequence of B sub y N not equalling 0, the plasmoid assumes a helical flux rope structure rather than an isolated island or bubble structure. Initially all field lines of the plasmoid flux rope remain connected with the earth, while at later times a gradually increasing amount of flux tubes becomes separated, connecting to either the distant boundary or to the flank boundaries. In this stage, topologically different flux tubes become tangled and wrapped around each other, consistent with predictions on the basis of an ad hoc plasmoid model.

  1. Simulating a charged spherical pendulum in time-varying electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellons, Mark; King, Frank; McAlpine, Todd

    2008-03-01

    We simulate and analyze the dynamics of a charged spherical pendulum in time-varying electric and magnetic fields. The time-varying electric field is directed perpendicular to the gravitational field and serves as a driving force for the pendulum. The time-varying magnetic field is directed parallel to the gravitational field and serves to deflect the motion of the pendulum. We analyze the dynamics of the system to determine the conditions for which chaotic behavior is observed. We also include viscosity to look for strange attractors. The equations of motion are integrated using Objective C and the graphical user interface, including the three dimensional graphical representation of the system, is developed using Cocoa.

  2. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low beta compact toroid injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Hsu, Scott; Li, Hui

    2009-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low {beta} compact toroid (CT) injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into CT fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). A regime is identified in terms of CT injection speed and CT-to-background magnetic field ratio that appears promising for precise core fueling. Shock-dominated regimes, which are probably unfavorable for tokamak fueling, are also identified. The CT penetration depth is proportional to the CT injection speed and density. The entire CT evolution can be divided into three stages: (1) initial penetration, (2) compression in the direction of propagation and reconnection, and (3) coming to rest and spreading in the direction perpendicular to injection. Tilting of the CT is not observed due to the fast transit time of the CT across the background plasma.

  3. Photospheric Magnetic Flux Emergence: A comparative study between Hinode/SOT Observations and MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Tarbell, T. D.

    2007-12-01

    With high angular resolution, high temporal cadence and a stable point spread function, the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) onboard the Hinode satellite is the ideal instrument for the study of magnetic flux emergence and its manifestations on the solar surface. In this presentation, we focus on the development of ephemeral regions and small active regions. In many instances, SOT has been able to capture the entire emergence process from beginning to end: i.e. from the initial stages of flux appearance in granule interiors, through the intermediate stages of G-band bright point formation, and finally to the coalescence of small vertical flux elements to form pores. To investigate the physics of the flux emergence process, we performed 3D numerical MHD simulations with the MURaM code. The models are able to reproduce, and help us explain, various observational signatures of magnetic flux emergence.

  4. Three-dimensional model and simulation of vacuum arcs under axial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Jia, Shenli; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Haijing; Shi, Zongqian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional (3d) magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) model of axial magnetic field vacuum arcs (AMFVAs) is established. Based on this model, AMFVAs are simulated and analyzed. Three-dimensional spatial distributions of many important plasma parameters and electric characteristics in AMFVAs can be obtained, such as ion number density, ion temperature, electron temperature, plasma pressure, current densities along different directions (x, y, and z), ion velocities along different directions, electric fields strength along different directions, and so on. Simulation results show that there exist significant spiral-shaped rotational phenomena in the AMFVAs, this kind of rotational phenomenon also can be verified by the many related experiments (AMFVAs photographs, especially for stronger AMF strength). For current simulation results of AMFVAs, the maximal rotational velocity at anode side is about 1100 m/s. Radial electric field is increased from arc center to arc edge; axial electric field is decreased from cathode side to anode side. Radial electric field at arc edge can be larger than axial electric field. Azimuthal electric field in most regions is much smaller than radial and axial electric field, but it can reach about 1.19 kV/m. Radial magnetic field is the smallest one compared with other components, it reaches to maximum value at the position near to anode, it can influence arc characteristics.

  5. Simulation Studies of Field-Reversed Configurations with Rotating Magnetic Field Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belova, E. V.; Davidson, R. C.

    2008-11-01

    Results of 3D kinetic simulations of rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive in field-reversed configuration (FRC) are presented. Self-consistent hybrid simulations have been performed using the HYM code for even- and odd-parity RMF and different FRC parameters and RMF frequencies. Simulations show that the RMF pushes the plasma radially inward, resulting in a reduced plasma density outside separatrix. Lower plasma density and larger RMF amplitudes result in faster RMF field penetration, in agreement with previous two-fluid studies. Generation of axisymmetric toroidal magnetic field during the RMF current drive has been observed. Numerical study of the effects of the applied RMF field on particle confinement shows that the rate of particle losses increases for RMF frequency close to the ion cyclotron frequency. It is also shown that high-frequency even-parity RMF reduces ion losses when it is fully penetrated. It is also found that fully-penetrated, odd-parity RMF forces particles away from the midplane toward the FRC ends. The observed changes in particle confinement are related to ponderomotive forces. Partially penetrated RMF results in mostly radial ponderomotive forces which improve particle confinement in both cases.

  6. A comparison of numerical simulations and analytical theory of the dynamics of interacting magnetic vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Asmat-Uceda, Martin; Buchanan, Kristen S.; Cheng, Xuemei; Wang, Xiao; Clarke, David J.; Tchernyshyov, Oleg

    2015-03-28

    Magnetostatic interactions between vortices in closely spaced planar structures are important for applications including vortex-based magnonic crystals and spin torque oscillator networks. Analytical theories that include magnetostatic interaction effects have been proposed but have not yet been rigorously tested. Here, we compare micromagnetic simulations of the dynamics of magnetic vortices confined in three disks in an equilateral triangle configuration to analytical theories that include coupling. Micromagnetic simulations show that the magnetostatic coupling between the disks leads to splitting of the gyrotropic resonance into three modes and that the frequency splitting increases with decreasing separation. The temporal profiles of the magnetization depend on the vortex polarities and chiralities; however, the frequencies depend only on the polarity combinations and will fall into one of two categories: all polarities equal or one polarity opposite to the others, where the latter leads to a larger frequency splitting. Although the magnitude of the splitting observed in the simulations is larger than what is expected based on purely dipolar interactions, a simple analytical model that assumes dipole-dipole coupling captures the functional form of the frequency splitting and the motion patterns just as well as more complex models.

  7. Emergence of granular-sized magnetic bubbles through the solar atmosphere. I. Spectropolarimetric observations and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, Ada; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Van der Voort, Luc Rouppe; Bellot Rubio, Luis R.; De la Cruz Rodríguez, Jaime

    2014-02-01

    We study a granular-sized magnetic flux emergence event that occurred in NOAA 11024 in 2009 July. The observations were made with the CRISP spectropolarimeter at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope achieving a spatial resolution of 0.''14. Simultaneous full Stokes observations of the two photospheric Fe I lines at 630.2 nm and the chromospheric Ca II 854.2 nm line allow us to describe in detail the emergence process across the solar atmosphere. We report here on three-dimensional (3D) semi-spherical bubble events, where instead of simple magnetic footpoints, we observe complex semi-circular feet straddling a few granules. Several phenomena occur simultaneously, namely, abnormal granulation, separation of opposite-polarity legs, and brightenings at chromospheric heights. However, the most characteristic signature in these events is the observation of a dark bubble in filtergrams taken in the wings of the Ca II 854.2 nm line. There is a clear coincidence between the emergence of horizontal magnetic field patches and the formation of the dark bubble. We can infer how the bubble rises through the solar atmosphere as we see it progressing from the wings to the core of Ca II 854.2 nm. In the photosphere, the magnetic bubble shows mean upward Doppler velocities of 2 km s{sup –1} and expands at a horizontal speed of 4 km s{sup –1}. In about 3.5 minutes it travels some 1100 km to reach the mid chromosphere, implying an average ascent speed of 5.2 km s{sup –1}. The maximum separation attained by the magnetic legs is 6.''6. From an inversion of the observed Stokes spectra with the SIR code, we find maximum photospheric field strengths of 480 G and inclinations of nearly 90° in the magnetic bubble interior, along with temperature deficits of up to 250 K at log τ = –2 and above. To aid the interpretation of the observations, we carry out 3D numerical simulations of the evolution of a horizontal, untwisted magnetic flux sheet injected in the convection zone, using the

  8. Numerical and simulation study of terahertz radiation generation by laser pulses propagating in the extraordinary mode in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Pallavi; Kumar Verma, Nirmal

    2014-06-15

    A one-dimensional numerical model for studying terahertz radiation generation by intense laser pulses propagating, in the extraordinary mode, through magnetized plasma has been presented. The direction of the static external magnetic field is perpendicular to the polarization as well as propagation direction of the laser pulse. A transverse electromagnetic wave with frequency in the terahertz range is generated due to the presence of the magnetic field. Further, two-dimensional simulations using XOOPIC code show that the THz fields generated in plasma are transmitted into vacuum. The fields obtained via simulation study are found to be compatible with those obtained from the numerical model.

  9. Statistical Analysis of Main and Interaction Effects on Cu(II) and Cr(VI) Decontamination by Nitrogen–Doped Magnetic Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xinjiang; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yunguo

    2016-10-01

    A nitrogen–doped magnetic graphene oxide (NMGO) was synthesized and applied as an adsorbent to remove Cu(II) and Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The individual and combined effects of various factors (A: pH, B: temperature, C: initial concentration of metal ions, D: CaCl2, and E: humic acid [HA]) on the adsorption were analyzed by a 25‑1 fractional factorial design (FFD). The results from this study indicated that the NMGO had higher adsorption capacities for Cu(II) ions than for Cr(VI) ions under most conditions, and the five selected variables affected the two adsorption processes to different extents. A, AC, and C were the very important factors and interactions for Cu(II) adsorption. For Cr(VI) adsorption, A, B, C, AB, and BC were found to be very important influencing variables. The solution pH (A) was the most important influencing factor for removal of both the ions. The main effects of A–E on the removal of Cu(II) were positive. For Cr(VI) adsorption, the main effects of A and D were negative, while B, C, and E were observed to have positive effects. The maximum adsorption capacities for Cu(II) and Cr(VI) ions over NMGO were 146.365 and 72.978 mg/g, respectively, under optimal process conditions.

  10. A study on the main periodicities in interplanetary magnetic field Bz component and geomagnetic AE index during HILDCAA events using wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, A. M.; Echer, E.; Bolzan, M. J. A.; Hajra, R.

    2016-11-01

    The interplanetary and geomagnetic characteristics of High-Intensity Long-Duration Continuous AE Activity (HILDCAA) events are studied using wavelet analysis technique. The Morlet wavelet transform was applied to the 1 min interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz component and the geomagnetic AE index during HILDCAA events. We have analyzed the AE data for the events occurring between 1975 and 2011, and the IMF Bz data (both in GSE and GSM) for the events between 1995 and 2011. We analyzed the scalograms and the global wavelet spectrum of the parameters. For 50% of all HILDCAA events, the main periodicities of the AE index are generally between 4 and 12 h. For the Bz component, the main periodicities were found to be less than 8 h for ~56% of times in GSM system and for ~54% of times in GSE system. It is conjectured that the periodicities might be associated with the Alfvén waves which have typical periods between 1 and 10 h. The results are discussed in the light of self organized criticality theory where the physical events have the capacity of releasing a considerable amount of energy in a short interval of time.

  11. Statistical Analysis of Main and Interaction Effects on Cu(II) and Cr(VI) Decontamination by Nitrogen–Doped Magnetic Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xinjiang; Wang, Hui; Liu, Yunguo

    2016-01-01

    A nitrogen–doped magnetic graphene oxide (NMGO) was synthesized and applied as an adsorbent to remove Cu(II) and Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The individual and combined effects of various factors (A: pH, B: temperature, C: initial concentration of metal ions, D: CaCl2, and E: humic acid [HA]) on the adsorption were analyzed by a 25−1 fractional factorial design (FFD). The results from this study indicated that the NMGO had higher adsorption capacities for Cu(II) ions than for Cr(VI) ions under most conditions, and the five selected variables affected the two adsorption processes to different extents. A, AC, and C were the very important factors and interactions for Cu(II) adsorption. For Cr(VI) adsorption, A, B, C, AB, and BC were found to be very important influencing variables. The solution pH (A) was the most important influencing factor for removal of both the ions. The main effects of A–E on the removal of Cu(II) were positive. For Cr(VI) adsorption, the main effects of A and D were negative, while B, C, and E were observed to have positive effects. The maximum adsorption capacities for Cu(II) and Cr(VI) ions over NMGO were 146.365 and 72.978 mg/g, respectively, under optimal process conditions. PMID:27694891

  12. Gyrokinetic simulations with external resonant magnetic perturbations: Island torque and nonambipolar transport with plasma rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Static external resonant magnetic field perturbations (RMPs) have been added to the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comp. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. This allows nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the nonambipolar radial current flow jr, and the corresponding j→×B→ plasma torque (density) R[jrBp/c], induced by magnetic islands that break the toroidal symmetry of a tokamak. This extends the previous GYRO formulation for the transport of toroidal angular momentum (TAM) [R. E. Waltz, G. M. Staebler, J. Candy, and F. L. Hinton, Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009)]. The focus is on electrostatic full torus radial slice simulations of externally induced q =m/n=6/3 islands with widths 5% of the minor radius or about 20 ion gyroradii. Up to moderately strong E ×B rotation, the island torque scales with the radial electric field at the resonant surface Er, the island width w, and the intensity I of the high-n micro-turbulence, as Erw√I . The radial current inside the island is carried (entirely in the n =3 component) and almost entirely by the ion E ×B flux, since the electron E ×B and magnetic flutter particle fluxes are cancelled. The net island torque is null at zero Er rather than at zero toroidal rotation. This means that while the expected magnetic braking of the toroidal plasma rotation occurs at strong co- and counter-current rotation, at null toroidal rotation, there is a small co-directed magnetic acceleration up to the small diamagnetic (ion pressure gradient driven) co-rotation corresponding to the zero Er and null torque. This could be called the residual stress from an externally induced island. At zero Er, the only effect is the expected partial flattening of the electron temperature gradient within the island. Finite-beta GYRO simulations demonstrate almost complete RMP field screening and n =3 mode unlocking at strong Er.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of interplanetary propagation of multiple coronal mass ejections with internal magnetic flux rope (SUSANOO-CME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiota, D.; Kataoka, R.

    2016-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most important drivers of various types of space weather disturbance. Here we report a newly developed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of the solar wind, including a series of multiple CMEs with internal spheromak-type magnetic fields. First, the polarity of the spheromak magnetic field is set as determined automatically according to the Hale-Nicholson law and the chirality law of Bothmer and Schwenn. The MHD simulation is therefore capable of predicting the time profile of the southward interplanetary magnetic field at the Earth, in relation to the passage of a magnetic cloud within a CME. This profile is the most important parameter for space weather forecasts of magnetic storms. In order to evaluate the current ability of our simulation, we demonstrate a test case: the propagation and interaction process of multiple CMEs associated with the highly complex active region NOAA 10486 in October to November 2003, and present the result of a simulation of the solar wind parameters at the Earth during the 2003 Halloween storms. We succeeded in reproducing the arrival at the Earth's position of a large amount of southward magnetic flux, which is capable of causing an intense magnetic storm. We find that the observed complex time profile of the solar wind parameters at the Earth could be reasonably well understood by the interaction of a few specific CMEs.

  14. Canonicalization and symplectic simulation of the gyrocenter dynamics in time-independent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ruili; Tang, Yifa; Zhu, Beibei; Liu, Jian Xiao, Jianyuan; Qin, Hong

    2014-03-15

    The gyrocenter dynamics of charged particles in time-independent magnetic fields is a non-canonical Hamiltonian system. The canonical description of the gyrocenter has both theoretical and practical importance. We provide a general procedure of the gyrocenter canonicalization, which is expressed by the series of a small variable ϵ depending only on the parallel velocity u and can be expressed in a recursive manner. We prove that the truncation of the series to any given order generates a set of exact canonical coordinates for a system, whose Lagrangian approximates to that of the original gyrocenter system in the same order. If flux surfaces exist for the magnetic field, the series stops simply at the second order and an exact canonical form of the gyrocenter system is obtained. With the canonicalization schemes, the canonical symplectic simulation of gyrocenter dynamics is realized for the first time. The canonical symplectic algorithm has the advantage of good conservation properties and long-term numerical accuracy, while avoiding numerical instability. It is worth mentioning that explicitly expressing the canonical Hamiltonian in new coordinates is usually difficult and impractical. We give an iteration procedure that is easy to implement in the original coordinates associated with the coordinate transformation. This is crucial for modern large-scale simulation studies in plasma physics. The dynamics of gyrocenters in the dipole magnetic field and in the toroidal geometry are simulated using the canonical symplectic algorithm by comparison with the higher-order non symplectic Runge-Kutta scheme. The overwhelming superiorities of the symplectic method for the gyrocenter system are evidently exhibited.

  15. Kinetic simulation of the O-X conversion process in dense magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Asgarian, M.; Verboncoeur, J. P.; Parvazian, A.; Trines, R.

    2013-10-15

    One scheme for heating a dense magnetized plasma core, such as in a tokamak, involves launching an ordinary (O) electromagnetic wave at the low density edge. It is converted to a reflected extraordinary (X) electromagnetic wave under certain conditions, and then transformed into an electron Bernstein wave able to reach high density regions inaccessible to most other waves. The O-X mode conversion is important in heating and diagnostic processes in different devices such as tokamaks, stellarators, and some types of pinches. The goal of this study has been to demonstrate that the kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) scheme is suitable for modeling the O-X conversion process as the first step toward a more complete simulation of O-X-B heating. The O-X process is considered and simulated with a kinetic particle model for parameters of the TJ-II stellarator using the PIC code, XOOPIC. This code is able to model the non-monotonic density and the magnetic profile of the TJ-II stellarator. It can also statistically represent the self-consistent distribution function of the plasma, which has not been possible in previous fluid models. By considering the electric and magnetic components of launched and reflected waves, the O-mode and X-mode waves can be detected, and the O-X conversion can be demonstrated. In this work, the optimum angle for conversion efficiency, as predicted by the previous theory and experimentally confirmed, is used. Via considering the power of the launched O-mode wave and the converted X-mode wave, the efficiency of 63% for O-X conversion for the optimum theoretical launch angle of 47{sup ∘} is obtained, which is in good agreement with efficiencies computed via full-wave simulations.

  16. Kinetic simulation of the O-X conversion process in dense magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Asgarian, M.; Verboncoeur, J. P.; Parvazian, A.; Trines, R.

    2013-10-01

    One scheme for heating a dense magnetized plasma core, such as in a tokamak, involves launching an ordinary (O) electromagnetic wave at the low density edge. It is converted to a reflected extraordinary (X) electromagnetic wave under certain conditions, and then transformed into an electron Bernstein wave able to reach high density regions inaccessible to most other waves. The O-X mode conversion is important in heating and diagnostic processes in different devices such as tokamaks, stellarators, and some types of pinches. The goal of this study has been to demonstrate that the kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) scheme is suitable for modeling the O-X conversion process as the first step toward a more complete simulation of O-X-B heating. The O-X process is considered and simulated with a kinetic particle model for parameters of the TJ-II stellarator using the PIC code, XOOPIC. This code is able to model the non-monotonic density and the magnetic profile of the TJ-II stellarator. It can also statistically represent the self-consistent distribution function of the plasma, which has not been possible in previous fluid models. By considering the electric and magnetic components of launched and reflected waves, the O-mode and X-mode waves can be detected, and the O-X conversion can be demonstrated. In this work, the optimum angle for conversion efficiency, as predicted by the previous theory and experimentally confirmed, is used. Via considering the power of the launched O-mode wave and the converted X-mode wave, the efficiency of 63% for O-X conversion for the optimum theoretical launch angle of 47∘ is obtained, which is in good agreement with efficiencies computed via full-wave simulations.

  17. Micromagnetic simulation of the orientation dependence of grain boundary properties on the coercivity of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisaki, Jun; Furuya, Atsushi; Uehara, Yuji; Shimizu, Koichi; Ataka, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Oshima, Hirotaka; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Hirosawa, Satoshi; Hono, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-01

    This paper is focused on the micromagnetic simulation study about the orientation dependence of grain boundary properties on the coercivity of polycrystalline Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets. A multigrain object with a large number of meshes is introduced to analyze such anisotropic grain boundaries and the simulation is performed by combining the finite element method and the parallel computing. When the grain boundary phase parallel to the c-plane is less ferromagnetic the process of the magnetization reversal changes and the coercivity of the multigrain object increases. The simulations with various magnetic properties of the grain boundary phases are executed to search for the way to enhance the coercivity of polycrystalline Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets.

  18. Simulations of ion acceleration at non-relativistic shocks. II. Magnetic field amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, D.; Spitkovsky, A.

    2014-10-10

    We use large hybrid simulations to study ion acceleration and generation of magnetic turbulence due to the streaming of particles that are self-consistently accelerated at non-relativistic shocks. When acceleration is efficient, we find that the upstream magnetic field is significantly amplified. The total amplification factor is larger than 10 for shocks with Alfvénic Mach number M = 100, and scales with the square root of M. The spectral energy density of excited magnetic turbulence is determined by the energy distribution of accelerated particles, and for moderately strong shocks (M ≲ 30) agrees well with the prediction of resonant streaming instability, in the framework of quasilinear theory of diffusive shock acceleration. For M ≳ 30, instead, Bell's non-resonant hybrid (NRH) instability is predicted and found to grow faster than resonant instability. NRH modes are excited far upstream by escaping particles, and initially grow without disrupting the current, their typical wavelengths being much shorter than the current ions' gyroradii. Then, in the nonlinear stage, most unstable modes migrate to larger and larger wavelengths, eventually becoming resonant in wavelength with the driving ions, which start diffuse. Ahead of strong shocks we distinguish two regions, separated by the free-escape boundary: the far upstream, where field amplification is provided by the current of escaping ions via NRH instability, and the shock precursor, where energetic particles are effectively magnetized, and field amplification is provided by the current in diffusing ions. The presented scalings of magnetic field amplification enable the inclusion of self-consistent microphysics into phenomenological models of ion acceleration at non-relativistic shocks.

  19. Turbulence in a Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the Earth's Magnetosphere during Northward and Southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Alaoui, M.; Richard, R. L.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Walker, R. J.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere for idealized steady solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The simulations feature purely northward and southward magnetic fields and were designed to study turbulence in the magnetotail plasma sheet. We found that the power spectral densities (PSDs) for both northward and southward IMF had the characteristics of turbulent flow. In both cases, the PSDs showed the three scale ranges expected from theory: the energy-containing scale, the inertial range, and the dissipative range. The results were generally consistent with in-situ observations and theoretical predictions. While the two cases studied, northward and southward IMF, had some similar characteristics, there were significant differences as well. For southward IMF, localized reconnection was the main energy source for the turbulence. For northward IMF, remnant reconnection contributed to driving the turbulence. Boundary waves may also have contributed. In both cases, the PSD slopes had spatial distributions in the dissipative range that reflected the pattern of resistive dissipation. For southward IMF there was a trend toward steeper slopes in the dissipative range with distance down the tail. For northward IMF there was a marked dusk-dawn asymmetry with steeper slopes on the dusk side of the tail. The inertial scale PSDs had a dusk-dawn symmetry during the northward IMF interval with steeper slopes on the dawn side. This asymmetry was not found in the distribution of inertial range slopes for southward IMF. The inertial range PSD slopes were clustered around values close to the theoretical expectation for both northward and southward IMF. In the dissipative range, however, the slopes were broadly distributed and the median values were significantly different, consistent with a different distribution of resistivity.

  20. Computer simulation of inner magnetospheric dynamics for the magnetic storm of July 29, 1977

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, R. A.; Spiro, R. W.; Voigt, G.-H.; Reiff, P. H.; Chen, C.-K.; Harel, M.

    1982-08-01

    The Rice University convection model is applied to the early main phase of the July 29, 1977 magnetic storm through a computer implementation that self-consistently calculates electric fields, currents, and plasma distributions and velocities in the inner magnetosphere/ionosphere system. On the basis of solar wind parameters and AL index as inputs, the model predicts the injection of plasma sheet plasma to form a substantial storm time ring current whose total predicted strength agrees with the observed Dst index. The possibility that the magnetic field may be sufficiently inflated to make 60 deg field lines extend to the outer magnetosphere is examined. In the model, distortion of the plasma sheet inner edge by magnetospheric compression associated with the sudden commencement temporarily disrupts the normal Birkeland current pattern. Normal Birkeland currents and shielding reassert themselves in about an hour.

  1. Molecular-dynamics simulations of cold antihydrogen formation in strongly magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Vrinceanu, D; Mazevet, S; Collins, L A

    2005-10-14

    Employing a high-order symplectic integrator and an adaptive time-step algorithm, we perform molecular-dynamics simulations of antihydrogen formation, in a cold plasma confined by a strong magnetic field, over time scales of microseconds. Sufficient positron-antiproton recombination events occur to allow a statistical analysis for various properties of the formed antihydrogen atoms. Giant-dipole states are formed in the initial stage of recombination. In addition to neutral atoms, we also observe antihydrogen positive ions (H(+)), in which two positrons simultaneously bind to an antiproton.

  2. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase I: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    In a proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate the feasibility of magnetically shielded (MS) Hall thrusters, an existing laboratory thruster has been modified with the guidance of physics-based numerical simulation. When operated at a discharge power of 6-kilowatts the modified thruster has been designed to reduce the total energy and flux of ions to the channel insulators by greater than 1 and greater than 3 orders of magnitude, respectively. The erosion rates in this MS thruster configuration are predicted to be at least 2-4 orders of magnitude lower than those in the baseline (BL) configuration. At such rates no detectable erosion is expected to occur.

  3. Simulation of tungsten plasma transport along magnetic field under ELM-like heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestchanyi, S.; Arkhipov, N.; Landman, I.; Poznyak, I.; Safronov, V.; Toporkov, D.

    2013-07-01

    Tungsten plasma transport along the magnetic field calculated with the TOKES code has been validated using dedicated experiment in a plasma gun under the ELM-like conditions. The plasma velocity is in a good agreement with the measured one. The ion composition of the simulated tungsten plasma is in a qualitative agreement with the one reconstructed from the measured spectrum of the tungsten plasma, probably because of rather incomplete database for tungsten ions radiation. Nevertheless, it has been identified the radiation from cold and hot tungsten plasma regions with ion composition maxima at W7+-W8+ and W13+-W16+ correspondingly.

  4. Simulating magnetic field of a ferromagnetic pipe underwater in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanova, D.; Baranov, P.; Baranova, V.; Chudinova, A.

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays ecological situation in seas and oceans requires permanent supervision and control. Carrying out building activity such as building hydraulic structures, oil- and gas- pipes in areas of past warfare is the reason for the active usage of geophysical methods to search method of the objects underwater. The paper examines the classification of magnetic search methods and theoretical base statements of electromagnetics. The work represents the investigation of an object influence on geomagnetic field in problem-solving environment “COMSOL Multiphysics”. The article also contains the results of simulating for variations of different object parameters. This paper is connected with the magnetometric

  5. Calculation of Turbine Axial Thrust by Coupled CFD Simulations of the Main Flow Path and Secondary Cavity Flow in an SLI LOX Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, D. J.; Marci, Bogdan; Tran, Ken; Sargent, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Each single reusable Space Launch Initiative (SLI) booster rocket is an engine operating at a record vacuum thrust level of over 730,000 Ibf using LOX and LH2. This thrust is more than 10% greater than that of the Delta IV rocket, resulting in relatively large LOX and LH2 turbopumps. Since the SLI rocket employs a staged combustion cycle the level of pressure is very high (thousands of psia). This high pressure creates many engineering challenges, including the balancing of axial-forces on the turbopumps. One of the main parameters in the calculation of the axial force is the cavity pressure upstream of the turbine disk. The flow in this cavity is very complex. The lack of understanding of this flow environment hinders the accurate prediction of axial thrust. In order to narrow down the uncertainty band around the actual turbine axial force, a coupled, unsteady computational methodology has been developed to simulate the interaction between the turbine main flow path and the cavity flow. The CORSAIR solver, an unsteady three- dimensional Navier-Stokes code for turbomachinery applications, was used to solve for both the main and the secondary flow fields. Turbine axial thrust values are presented in conjunction with the CFD simulation, together with several considerations regarding the turbine instrumentation for axial thrust estimations during test.

  6. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells. PMID:25999971

  7. The expansion of polarization charge layers into magnetized vacuum - Theory and computer simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvez, Miguel; Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1991-01-01

    The formation and evolution of polarization charge layers on cylindrical plasma streams moving in vacuum are investigated using analytic theory and 2D electrostatic particle-in-cell computer simulations. It is shown that the behavior of the electron charge layer goes through three stages. An early time expansion is driven by electrostatic repulsion of electrons in the charge layer. At the intermediate stage, the simulations show that the electron-charge-layer expansion is halted by the positively charged plasma stream. Electrons close to the stream are pulled back to the stream and a second electron expansion follows in time. At the late stage, the expansion of the ion charge layer along the magnetic field lines accompanies the electron expansion to form an ambipolar expansion. It is found that the velocities of these electron-ion expansions greatly exceed the velocities of ambipolar expansions which are driven by plasma temperatures.

  8. Three-Dimensional Signatures of Intermittent Magnetic Reconnection in Global Simulations of Dayside Magnetosphere Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M.M.; Sibeck, D.; Hesse, M.; Rastatter, L.; Toth, G.

    2008-01-01

    We performed high resolution global MHD simulations of THEMIS dayside crossings events in May -June 2007. We found that magnetopause surface is not in steady-state even during extended periods of steady solar wind conditions. The so-called tilted reconnection lines become unstable due to formation of pressure bubbles, strong core field flux tubes, vortices, and traveling magnetic field cavities. The topology of FTEs differ from that in two dimension cartoons representing obliquely oriented quasi-2D flux rope. The structure of FTE is changing at spatial scales of 1 -2 Re. Closely located space probes can observe completely different signatures. Branches of bent flux rope can move in opposite directions. THEMIS and Cluster observations are consistent with signatures predicted by simulations.

  9. Comparison between initial Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments and integrated simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefkow, A. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Geissel, M.; Hahn, K. D.; Hansen, S. B.; Harding, E. C.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Koning, J. M.; Marinak, M. M.

    2014-10-01

    The Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) approach to ICF has obtained thermonuclear fusion yields using the Z facility. Integrated magnetohydrodynamic simulations provided the design for the first neutron-producing experiments using capabilities that presently exist, and the initial experiments measured stagnation radii rstag < 75 μm, temperatures around 3 keV, and isotropic neutron yields up to YnDD = 2 ×1012 from imploded liners reaching peak velocities around 70 km/s over an implosion time of about 60 ns. We present comparisons between the experimental observables and post-shot degraded integrated simulations. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells. PMID:25999971

  11. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells.

  12. A comparative study of divergence cleaning methods of magnetic field in the solar coronal numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueshang; Zhang, Man

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of divergence cleaning methods of magnetic field in the solar coronal three-dimensional numerical simulation. For such purpose, the diffusive method, projection method, generalized Lagrange multiplier method and constrained-transport method are used. All these methods are combined with a finite-volume scheme based on a six-component grid system in spherical coordinates. In order to see the performance between the four divergence cleaning methods, solar coronal numerical simulation for Carrington rotation 2056 has been studied. Numerical results show that the average relative divergence error is around 10^{-4.5} for the constrained-transport method, while about 10^{-3.1}- 10^{-3.6} for the other three methods. Although there exist some differences in the average relative divergence errors for the four employed methods, our tests show they can all produce basic structured solar wind.

  13. Micromagnetic simulations on the grain shape effect in Nd-Fe-B magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Min; Gutfleisch, Oliver; Xu, Bai-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    Micromagnetic simulations were performed to study the effect of grain shape and defect layer in Nd-Fe-B magnets. It was found that the coercivity can be increased by a factor of ˜2 by changing the grain shape from the triangular prism to the spheroid. Both the anisotropy field contribution and the shape contribution to the coercivity, and thus also the final coercivity, were found to decrease in the order: spheroid > circular prism > hexagonal prism > square prism > triangular prism. Sputtered columnar grains and hot-deformed platelet grains with a constant volume were also considered. Results show that the coercivity initially increases with the aspect ratio and then nearly saturates above the ratio of ˜4. Simulations of multigrain ensembles showed that depending on the grain shape, compared to the case of single grain, a further decrease of ˜10%-45% in the coercivity is induced by magnetostatic coupling.

  14. Magnetic Reconnection during Collisionless, Stressed, X-point Collapse using Particle-in-cell Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.; Haruki, T.

    2008-09-01

    Dungey's (1953) work on X-point collapse is the earliest analysis done on magnetic reconnection and predates the tearing mode, Sweet-Parker and Petcheck reconnection models. X-point collapse soon fell out of favour because in the collisional (MHD) regime, for the plausible space plasma parameters, it was found to be inefficient. We however show [Tsiklauri D. and T. Haruki, Phys. of Plasmas, 14, 112905, (2007)] that in the collisionless regime, which is indeed more applicable to space plasmas, the reconnection is efficient. We study magnetic reconnection during collisionless, stressed, X-point collapse using kinetic, 2.5D, fully electromagnetic, relativistic Particle-in-Cell numerical code. Two cases of weakly and strongly stressed X-point collapse were considered. Here descriptors weakly and strongly refer to 20% and 124% unidirectional spatial compression of the X-point, respectively. We found that within about one Alfven time, 2% and 20% of the initial magnetic energy is converted into heat and accelerated particle energy in the case of weak and strong stress, respectively. In the both cases, during the peak of the reconnection, the quadruple out-of-plane magnetic field is generated. These results strongly suggest the importance of the collisionless, stressed X-point collapse as an efficient mechanism of converting magnetic energy into heat and super-thermal particle energy. In the weakly stressed case, the reconnection rate, defined as the out-of-plane electric field in the X-point normalized by the product of external magnetic field and Alfven speeds, peaks at 0.11, with its average over 1.25 Alfven times being 0.04. Electron energy distribution in the current sheet, at the high-energy end of the spectrum, shows a power-law distribution with the index varying in time, attaining a maximal value of -4.1 at the final simulation time step (1.25 Alfven times). In the strongly stressed case, magnetic reconnection peak occurs 3.4 times faster and is more efficient

  15. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman V.; Parks, Paul

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  16. Electronic and magnetic properties of TbNi4Si: Ab initio calculations, mean field approximation and Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensadiq, A.; Zaari, H.; Benyoussef, A.; El Kenz, A.

    2016-09-01

    Using the density functional theory, the electronic structure; density of states, band structure and exchange couplings of Tb Ni4 Si compound have been investigated. Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of this material have been studied using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) and Mean Field Approximation (MFA) within a three dimensional Ising model. We calculated the isothermal magnetic entropy change, adiabatic temperature change and relative cooling power (RCP) for different external magnetic field and temperature. The highest obtained isothermal magnetic entropy change is of -14.52 J kg-1 K-1 for a magnetic field of H=4 T. The adiabatic temperature reaches a maximum value equal to 3.7 K and the RCP maximum value is found to be 125.12 J kg-1 for a field magnetic of 14 T.

  17. Studying dissolved organic carbon export from the Penobscot Watershed in to Gulf of Maine using Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhani, S. F. B. B.; Schaaf, C.; Douglas, E. M.; Choate, J. S.; Yang, Y.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    The movement of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from terrestrial system into aquatic system plays an important role for carbon sequestration in ecosystems and affects the formation of soil organic matters.Carbon cycling, storage, and transport to marine systems have become critical issues in global-change science, especially with regard to northern latitudes (Freeman et al., 2001; Benner et al., 2004). DOC, as an important composition of the carbon cycling, leaches from the terrestrial watersheds is a large source of marine DOC. The Penobscot River basin in north-central Maine is the second largest watershed in New England, which drains in to Gulf of Maine. Approximately 89% of the watershed is forested (Griffith and Alerich, 1996).Studying temporal and spatial changes in DOC export can help us to understand terrestrial carbon cycling and to detect any shifts from carbon sink to carbon source or visa versa in northern latitude forested ecosystems.Despite for the importance of understanding carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic biogeochemistry, the Doc export, especially the combination of DOC production from bio-system and DOC transportation from the terrestrial in to stream has been lightly discussed in most conceptual or numerical models. The Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System (RHESSys), which has been successfully applied in many study sites, is a physical process based terrestrial model that has the ability to simulate both the source and transportation of DOC by combining both hydrological and ecological processes. The focus of this study is on simulating the DOC concentration and flux from the land to the water using RHESSys in the Penobscot watershed. The simulated results will be compared with field measurement of DOC from the watershed to explore the spatial and temporal DOC export pattern. This study will also enhance our knowledge to select sampling locations properly and also improve our understanding on DOC production and transportation in

  18. Self-consistent theory and simulation of quasiuniform states in thin rectangular magnetic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovskaya, E. V.; Tucker, J. W.; Ivanov, B. A.

    2001-06-15

    A self-consistent theory of the ground-state nonuniform magnetization distribution in small magnetic nanoelements is proposed, valid for thicknesses much less than the exchange length, and with natural fulfillment of boundary conditions allowing application to a variety of element shapes. The theory is applied to rectangular 2p{sub 1}l{times}2p{sub 2}l{times}2l permalloy elements. In contrast to that of square elements, there exists a range of particle sizes having an {open_quotes}intermediate{close_quotes} ground state (mixed flower and leaf symmetries) with average magnetization inclined at {var_phi} to the longer edge. With increasing p{sub 1}/p{sub 2} (p{sub 2} fixed), {var_phi} gradually decreases to zero (flower state). This intermediate{r_arrow}flower transition is of the second type, unlike the leaf{r_arrow}flower transition (first type) observed in square elements with reduction in p{sub 1}(=p{sub 2}). Simulation results support the analytic theory. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing–Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing–Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  20. PIC simulations of microturbulence in the presence of a magnetic island

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, E.; Bottino, A.; Peeters, A. G.; Sauter, O.

    2006-11-30

    In tokamak experiments, magnetic islands destroy the axial symmetry of the plasma through a helical magnetic-field perturbation. In the reconnected region the confinement is rather poor, due to the fast parallel transport along the field lines. The behaviour of the plasma turbulence in such a situation needs to be investigated, since it has a significant impact on both the transport in the island region and the stability of the island itself.A first attempt to study this rather rich area is presented in this paper. A (static) island structure is included in the particle-in-cell (PIC) global nonlinear gyrokinetic code ORB5. The perturbed magnetic field due to the island changes the orbits of the ions and influences the structure of the fluctuating potential. The equations of motion and the equation for the distribution-function perturbation are modified accordingly. The first simulations of the perturbed electric potential, heat flux and mode spectrum due to ITG turbulence (without zonal flows) are presented.

  1. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current In Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  2. Accelerating the numerical simulation of magnetic field lines in tokamaks using the GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Kalling, RC; Evans, T.E.; Orlov, D. M.; Schissel, D.; Maingi, Rajesh; Menard, J.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    TRIP3D is a field line simulation code that numerically integrates a set of nonlinear magnetic field line differential equations. The code is used to study properties of magnetic islands and stochastic or chaotic field line topologies that are important for designing non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation coils for controlling plasma instabilities in future machines. The code is very computationally intensive and for large runs can take on the order of days to complete on a traditional single CPU. This work describes how the code was converted from Fortran to C and then restructured to take advantage of GPU computing using NVIDIA's CUDA. The reduction in computing time has been dramatic where runs that previously took clays now take hours allowing a scale of problem to be examined that would previously not have been attempted. These gains have been accomplished without significant hardware expense. Performance, correctness, code flexibility, and implementation time have been analyzed to gauge the success and applicability of these methods when compared to the traditional multi-CPU approach.

  3. SIMULATIONS OF PROMINENCE FORMATION IN THE MAGNETIZED SOLAR CORONA BY CHROMOSPHERIC HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, C.; Chen, P. F.; Keppens, R.

    2012-04-01

    Starting from a realistically sheared magnetic arcade connecting the chromospheric, transition region to coronal plasma, we simulate the in situ formation and sustained growth of a quiescent prominence in the solar corona. Contrary to previous works, our model captures all phases of the prominence formation, including the loss of thermal equilibrium, its successive growth in height and width to macroscopic dimensions, and the gradual bending of the arched loops into dipped loops, as a result of the mass accumulation. Our 2.5 dimensional, fully thermodynamically and magnetohydrodynamically consistent model mimics the magnetic topology of normal-polarity prominences above a photospheric neutral line, and results in a curtain-like prominence above the neutral line through which the ultimately dipped magnetic field lines protrude at a finite angle. The formation results from concentrated heating in the chromosphere, followed by plasma evaporation and later rapid condensation in the corona due to thermal instability, as verified by linear instability criteria. Concentrated heating in the lower atmosphere evaporates plasma from below to accumulate at the top of coronal loops and supply mass to the later prominence constantly. This is the first evaporation-condensation model study where we can demonstrate how the formed prominence stays in a force balanced state, which can be compared to the Kippenhahn-Schlueter type magnetohydrostatic model, all in a finite low-beta corona.

  4. Simulation of bootstrap current in 2D and 3D ideal magnetic fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, M.; Graves, J. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Pedro, M.; Sauter, O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to simulate the bootstrap current for a MAST-like spherical tokamak using two approaches for magnetic equilibria including externally caused 3D effects such as resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs), the effect of toroidal ripple, and intrinsic 3D effects such as non-resonant internal kink modes. The first approach relies on known neoclassical coefficients in ideal MHD equilibria, using the Sauter (Sauter et al 1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834) expression valid for all collisionalities in axisymmetry, and the second approach being the quasi-analytic Shaing-Callen (Shaing and Callen 1983 Phys. Fluids 26 3315) model in the collisionless regime for 3D. Using the ideal free-boundary magnetohydrodynamic code VMEC, we compute the flux-surface averaged bootstrap current density, with the Sauter and Shaing-Callen expressions for 2D and 3D ideal MHD equilibria including an edge pressure barrier with the application of resonant magnetic perturbations, and equilibria possessing a saturated non-resonant 1/1 internal kink mode with a weak internal pressure barrier. We compare the applicability of the self-consistent iterative model on the 3D applications and discuss the limitations and advantages of each bootstrap current model for each type of equilibrium.

  5. Numerical simulations of interfacial instabilities on a rotating miscible magnetic droplet with effects of Korteweg stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Yao; Wu, H.-J.

    2005-04-01

    Interfacial instability of a miscible magnetic droplet in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell is simulated numerically. The influence of magnetic strengths, the Korteweg stresses, and their coupled effects are first discussed qualitatively by fingering patterns and streamlines. Quantitative measurements are evaluated by interfacial length L, number of fingers n, and diameter of gyration Dg. The results confirm with coupling rotational effects more vigorous fingering instability occurs on stronger magnetic strengths and less effective surface tensions (Korteweg stresses). Without the effects of Korteweg stresses, significant nonlinear fingering merges occur which lead to reduction in fingering number, early decay of interfacial length and reversed plane trajectories. Before the occurrence of fingering merges, monotonic growths of interfacial lengths, constant fingering numbers, and nearly linear pattern trajectories are observed. If the significant Korteweg stresses are taken into account, the nonlinear merge is prevented and the features of fingering patterns resemble the immiscible situations remarkably. The fingering behavior can be approximated by a master line of dL /dDg≈0.386n+0.13 within the linear fingering region.

  6. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current in Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Unlisted

    2010-09-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  7. Sustained Magnetorotational Turbulence in Local Simulations of Stratified Disks with Zero Net Magnetic Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Shane W.; Stone, James M.; Pessah, Martin E.

    2010-04-01

    We examine the effects of density stratification on magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability in local simulations that adopt the shearing box approximation. Our primary result is that, even in the absence of explicit dissipation, the addition of vertical gravity leads to convergence in the turbulent energy densities and stresses as the resolution increases, contrary to results for zero net flux, unstratified boxes. The ratio of total stress to midplane pressure has a mean of ~0.01, although there can be significant fluctuations on long (gsim50 orbits) timescales. We find that the time-averaged stresses are largely insensitive to both the radial and the vertical aspect ratios of our simulation domain. For simulations with explicit dissipation, we find that stratification extends the range of Reynolds and magnetic Prandtl numbers for which turbulence is sustained, but the behavior of such simulations on long timescales is highly variable. Confirming the results of previous studies, we find oscillations in the large-scale toroidal field with periods of ~10 orbits and describe the dynamo process that underlies these cycles. We discuss possible origins for the different convergence properties of the stratified and unstratified domains and identify open questions that remain to be answered.

  8. Modeling and simulation of magnetic resonance imaging based on intermolecular multiple quantum coherences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Congbo; Dong, Jiyang; Cai, Shuhui; Cheng, En; Chen, Zhong

    2006-11-01

    Intermolecular multiple quantum coherences (iMQCs) have many potential applications since they can provide interaction information between different molecules within the range of dipolar correlation distance, and can provide new contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because of the non-localized property of dipolar field, and the non-linear property of the Bloch equations incorporating the dipolar field term, the evolution behavior of iMQC is difficult to deduce strictly in many cases. In such cases, simulation studies are very important. Simulation results can not only give a guide to optimize experimental conditions, but also help analyze unexpected experimental results. Based on our product operator matrix and the K-space method for dipolar field calculation, the MRI simulation software was constructed, running on Windows operation system. The non-linear Bloch equations are calculated by a fifth-order Cash-Karp Runge-Kutta formulism. Computational time can be efficiently reduced by separating the effects of chemical shifts and strong gradient field. Using this software, simulation of different kinds of complex MRI sequences can be done conveniently and quickly on general personal computers. Some examples were given. The results were discussed.

  9. 2-D LSP Simulations of the Self Magnetic Pinch Radiographic Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Threadgold, J.; Crotch, I.; Rose, D. V.

    2003-10-01

    The Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) UK has a number of Pulsed Power driven flash X-ray machines which are used to take transmission radiographs of hydrodynamic experiments. Some of the lower voltage x-ray machines (< 2 MV) use the Self Magnetic (SM) Pinch diode for their source. The SM pinch diode has proved to be a reliable source for providing small diameter radiographic spot sizes. With an emphasis on reduction of the x-ray spot size at higher voltages, one part of the diode research project has been to field SM pinch diodes at higher voltages. The SM pinch diode relies upon the magnitude of its own electron current (> 50 kA) to pinch the electron beam to a small diameter onto a high Z converter target. An electromagnetic PIC code, LSP, has been used to carry out 2-D simulations of the diode to support this project. The code has been used to investigate the effect of different target materials within the diode and to investigate the resultant electron trajectories onto the target. Results of these code simulations will be compared to experimental data The simulations show good agreement with measured experimental data on diode performance. The simulations suggest further improvements in spot size reduction could be achieved with changes in the diode geometry.

  10. Experiments and Simulations on Magnetically Driven Implosions in High Repetition Rate Dense Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero Bendixsen, Luis; Bott-Suzuki, Simon; Cordaro, Samuel; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Chapman, Stephen; Coleman, Phil; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    Results will be shown on coordinated experiments and MHD simulations on magnetically driven implosions, with an emphasis on current diffusion and heat transport. Experiments are run at a Mather-type dense plasma focus (DPF-3, Vc: 20 kV, Ip: 480 kA, E: 5.8 kJ). Typical experiments are run at 300 kA and 0.33 Hz repetition rate with different gas loads (Ar, Ne, and He) at pressures of ~ 1-3 Torr, usually gathering 1000 shots per day. Simulations are run at a 96-core HP blade server cluster using 3GHz processors with 4GB RAM per node.Preliminary results show axial and radial phase plasma sheath velocity of ~ 1x105 m/s. These are in agreement with the snow-plough model of DPFs. Peak magnetic field of ~ 1 Tesla in the radial compression phase are measured. Electron densities on the order of 1018 cm-3 anticipated. Comparison between 2D and 3D models with empirical results show a good agreement in the axial and radial phase.

  11. Numerical simulation of cathode plasma dynamics in magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Genoni, T. C.; Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C. L.; Stygar, W. A.; Kiefer, M. L.

    2015-03-15

    A novel algorithm for the simulation of cathode plasmas in particle-in-cell codes is described and applied to investigate cathode plasma evolution in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). The MITL electron sheath is modeled by a fully kinetic electron species. Electron and ion macroparticles, both modeled as fluid species, form a dense plasma which is initially localized at the cathode surface. Energetic plasma electron particles can be converted to kinetic electrons to resupply the electron flux at the plasma edge (the “effective” cathode). Using this model, we compare results for the time evolution of the cathode plasma and MITL electron flow with a simplified (isothermal) diffusion model. Simulations in 1D show a slow diffusive expansion of the plasma from the cathode surface. But in multiple dimensions, the plasma can expand much more rapidly due to anomalous diffusion caused by an instability due to the strong coupling of a transverse magnetic mode in the electron sheath with the expanding resistive plasma layer.

  12. Calculation of Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity with a Particle Simulation in the Tokamak Magnetic Breaking Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kimin Kim, et al

    2013-04-23

    Accurate calculation of perturbed distribution function δf and perturbed magnetic fi eld δB is essential to achieve prediction of non-ambipolar transport and neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) in perturbed tokamaks. This paper reports a study of the NTV with a δf particle code (POCA) and improved understanding of magnetic braking in tokamak experiments. POCA calculates the NTV by computing f with guiding-center orbit motion and using B from the ideal perturbed equilibrium code (IPEC). POCA simulations are compared with experimental estimations for NTV, which are measured from angular momentum balance (DIII-D) and toroidal rotational damping rate (NSTX). The calculation shows good agreement in total NTV torque for the DIII-D discharge, where an analytic neoclassical theory also gives a consistent result thanks to relatively large aspect-ratio and slow toroidal rotations. In NSTX discharges, where the aspect-ratio is small and the rotation is fast, the theory only gives a qualitative guide for predicting NTV. However, the POCA simulation largely improves the quantitative NTV prediction for NSTX. It is discussed that a self- consistent calculation of δ B using general perturbed equilibria is eventually necessary since a non-ideal plasma response can change the perturbed eld and thereby the NTV torque.

  13. Simulations of emerging magnetic flux. I. The formation of stable coronal flux ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.; Török, Tibor

    2013-12-01

    We present results from three-dimensional visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the emergence of a convection zone magnetic flux tube into a solar atmosphere containing a pre-existing dipole coronal field, which is orientated to minimize reconnection with the emerging field. We observe that the emergence process is capable of producing a coronal flux rope by the transfer of twist from the convection zone, as found in previous simulations. We find that this flux rope is stable, with no evidence of a fast rise, and that its ultimate height in the corona is determined by the strength of the pre-existing dipole field. We also find that although the electric currents in the initial convection zone flux tube are almost perfectly neutralized, the resultant coronal flux rope carries a significant net current. These results suggest that flux tube emergence is capable of creating non-current-neutralized stable flux ropes in the corona, tethered by overlying potential fields, a magnetic configuration that is believed to be the source of coronal mass ejections.

  14. Observed and simulated power spectra of kinetic and magnetic energy retrieved with 2D inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilovic, S.; Rempel, M.; van Noort, M.; Cameron, R.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Information on the origin of internetwork magnetic field is hidden at the smallest spatial scales. Aims: We try to retrieve the power spectra with certainty to the highest spatial frequencies allowed by current instrumentation. Methods: To accomplish this, we use a 2D inversion code that is able to recover information up to the instrumental diffraction limit. Results: The retrieved power spectra have shallow slopes that extend further down to much smaller scales than has been found before. They do not seem to show any power law. The observed slopes at subgranular scales agree with those obtained from recent local dynamo simulations. Small differences are found for the vertical component of kinetic energy that suggest that observations suffer from an instrumental effect that is not taken into account. Conclusions: Local dynamo simulations quantitatively reproduce the observed magnetic energy power spectra on the scales of granulation down to the resolution limit of Hinode/SP, within the error bars inflicted by the method used and the instrumental effects replicated.

  15. What Breaks Magnetic Field Lines in 3D Simulations of Low β Plasmas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisdak, M. M.; Che, H.; Drake, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    During magnetic reconnection field lines must break and reconnect to release energy, but specifically how this happens has been unclear. Ion-electron drag arising from turbulence (anomalous resistivity) and thermal momentum transport are two mechanisms that have been widely invoked. Measurements of enhanced turbulence near reconnection sites in space and in the laboratory lend support to the anomalous resistivity idea, but there has been no demonstration from measurements that this turbulence produces the necessary enhanced drag. Here we report 3D computer simulations showing that neither of these mechanisms works in low-β plasmas. Instead, when the current layers that form during magnetic reconnection become too intense, they disintegrate and spread into a complex web of filaments that abruptly increases the transverse momentum transport (anomalous viscosity) and leads to an increase in the rate of reconnection. The filamentation is due to an instability that feeds on the gradient of the reconnection current and for which we derive the linear dispersion relation. We also show computer simulations of the instability and discuss the conditions under which it should appear.

  16. Development of a database-driven system for simulating water temperature in the lower Yakima River main stem, Washington, for various climate scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voss, Frank; Maule, Alec

    2013-01-01

    A model for simulating daily maximum and mean water temperatures was developed by linking two existing models: one developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and one developed by the Bureau of Reclamation. The study area included the lower Yakima River main stem between the Roza Dam and West Richland, Washington. To automate execution of the labor-intensive models, a database-driven model automation program was developed to decrease operation costs, to reduce user error, and to provide the capability to perform simulations quickly for multiple management and climate change scenarios. Microsoft© SQL Server 2008 R2 Integration Services packages were developed to (1) integrate climate, flow, and stream geometry data from diverse sources (such as weather stations, a hydrologic model, and field measurements) into a single relational database; (2) programmatically generate heavily formatted model input files; (3) iteratively run water temperature simulations; (4) process simulation results for export to other models; and (5) create a database-driven infrastructure that facilitated experimentation with a variety of scenarios, node permutations, weather data, and hydrologic conditions while minimizing costs of running the model with various model configurations. As a proof-of-concept exercise, water temperatures were simulated for a "Current Conditions" scenario, where local weather data from 1980 through 2005 were used as input, and for "Plus 1" and "Plus 2" climate warming scenarios, where the average annual air temperatures used in the Current Conditions scenario were increased by 1degree Celsius (°C) and by 2°C, respectively. Average monthly mean daily water temperatures simulated for the Current Conditions scenario were compared to measured values at the Bureau of Reclamation Hydromet gage at Kiona, Washington, for 2002-05. Differences ranged between 1.9° and 1.1°C for February, March, May, and June, and were less than 0.8°C for the remaining months of the year

  17. Numerical simulations of Hall-effect plasma accelerators on a magnetic-field-aligned mesh.

    PubMed

    Mikellides, Ioannis G; Katz, Ira

    2012-10-01

    The ionized gas in Hall-effect plasma accelerators spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and exhibits diverse physics some of which remain elusive even after decades of research. Inside the acceleration channel a quasiradial applied magnetic field impedes the current of electrons perpendicular to it in favor of a significant component in the E×B direction. Ions are unmagnetized and, arguably, of wide collisional mean free paths. Collisions between the atomic species are rare. This paper reports on a computational approach that solves numerically the 2D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law with no assumptions regarding the resistance to classical electron transport in the parallel relative to the perpendicular direction. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations on a computational mesh that is aligned with the applied magnetic field. This approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction and encompasses the cathode boundary where the lines of force can become nonisothermal. It also allows for the self-consistent solution of the plasma conservation laws near the anode boundary, and for simulations in accelerators with complex magnetic field topologies. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for the ion drag in the momentum equation due to ion-neutral (charge-exchange) and ion-ion collisions. The density of the atomic species is determined using an algorithm that eliminates the statistical noise associated with discrete-particle methods. Numerical simulations are presented that illustrate the impact of the above-mentioned features on our understanding of the plasma in these accelerators.

  18. Theory and simulation of electron beam dynamics in the AWE superswarf magnetically immersed diode

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, B.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Rovang, D.C.

    1999-07-01

    Results from numerical simulation and analytic theory of magnetically immersed diode behavior on the United Kingdom's Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) Superswarf accelerator are presented. The immersed diode consists of a cylindrical needle point cathode immersed in a strong {approximately}10--20 T solenoidal magnetic field. The anode-cathode (A-K) accelerating gap is held at vacuum and is {approximately}5--10 cm in length, with the anode/target located at the mid-plane of the solenoid. Typical accelerator parameters are 5--6 MeV and 40 kA. Ions emitted from the anode target stream toward the cathode and interact strongly with the electron beam. Collective oscillations between the beam electrons and counter-streaming ions are driven unstable and results in a corkscrew rotation of the beam, yielding a time-integrated spot size substantially larger than that expected from single particle motion. This magnetized ion-hose instability is three dimensional. On the other hand, beam transverse temperature variations, although slightly enhanced in 3D, are primarily due to changes in the effective potential at the cathode (a combination of both the electrostatic and vector potential) and are manifest in 2D. Simulation studies examining spot and dose variation with varying cathode diameter and A-K gap distance are presented and confirm the above mentioned trends. Conclusions are that the diode current is determined by standard di-polar space-charge limited emissions, the minimum beam spot-size is limited by the ion-hose instability saturation amplitude, and the beam transverse temperature at the target is a function of the initial conditions on the cathode. Comparison to existing data will also be presented.

  19. Numerical simulations of Hall-effect plasma accelerators on a magnetic-field-aligned mesh.

    PubMed

    Mikellides, Ioannis G; Katz, Ira

    2012-10-01

    The ionized gas in Hall-effect plasma accelerators spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and exhibits diverse physics some of which remain elusive even after decades of research. Inside the acceleration channel a quasiradial applied magnetic field impedes the current of electrons perpendicular to it in favor of a significant component in the E×B direction. Ions are unmagnetized and, arguably, of wide collisional mean free paths. Collisions between the atomic species are rare. This paper reports on a computational approach that solves numerically the 2D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law with no assumptions regarding the resistance to classical electron transport in the parallel relative to the perpendicular direction. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations on a computational mesh that is aligned with the applied magnetic field. This approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction and encompasses the cathode boundary where the lines of force can become nonisothermal. It also allows for the self-consistent solution of the plasma conservation laws near the anode boundary, and for simulations in accelerators with complex magnetic field topologies. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for the ion drag in the momentum equation due to ion-neutral (charge-exchange) and ion-ion collisions. The density of the atomic species is determined using an algorithm that eliminates the statistical noise associated with discrete-particle methods. Numerical simulations are presented that illustrate the impact of the above-mentioned features on our understanding of the plasma in these accelerators. PMID:23214706

  20. Resonant principle for operation of energy recuperator for a magnetized electron beam: A numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzhannikov, A. V.; Astrelin, V. T.; Koidan, V. S.; Sinitsky, S. L.

    2002-04-01

    The problem of energy recuperator for a high current sheet electron beam used to drive a millimeter-waves generator is considered. There are two main obstacles to solving the problem. The first one is the presence of a magnetic field guiding beam electrons. The second obstacle is significant energy and angular spreads of the electrons in the waste beam. To overcome these obstacles, we suggest a novel scheme of a recuperator. The main idea of the proposed scheme is the use of a decelerating electrical field together with a guiding magnetic field that has longitudinal and spatial periodic transverse components. Resonance of a bounce electron motion with the cyclotron motion in this field gives a strong increase in the Larmour radius of electrons with the energy in a narrow interval. The decelerated electrons with the resonance energy fall away from the beam and are absorbed by a collector at a proper potential. It is shown that efficiency of this novel scheme can reach about 80% even if the sheet beam has a broad energy spectrum.

  1. Modeling of magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail using global MHD simulation with an effective resistivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, M.; Horiuchi, R.; Fujita, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is considered to play an important role in space phenomena such as substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. Tanaka and Fujita reproduced substorm evolution process by numerical simulation with the global MHD code [1]. In the MHD framework, the dissipation model is introduced for modeling of the kinetic effects. They found that the normalized reconnection viscosity, one of the dissipation model employed there, gave a large effect for the dipolarization, central phenomenon in the substorm development process, though that viscosity was assumed to be a constant parameter. It is well known that magnetic reconnection is controlled by microscopic kinetic mechanism. Frozen-in condition is broken due to particle kinetic effects and collisionless reconnection is triggered when current sheet is compressed as thin as ion kinetic scales under the influence of external driving flow [2, 3]. Horiuchi and his collaborators showed that reconnection electric field generated by microscopic physics evolves inside ion meandering scale so as to balance the flux inflow rate at the inflow boundary, which is controlled by macroscopic physics [2]. That is, effective resistivity generated through this process can be expressed by balance equation between micro and macro physics. In this paper, we perform substorm simulation by using the global MHD code developed by Tanaka [3] with this effective resistivity instead of the empirical resistivity model. We obtain the AE indices from simulation data, in which substorm onset can be seen clearly, and investigate the relationship between the substorm development and the effective resistivity model. [1] T. Tanaka, A, Nakamizo, A. Yoshikawa, S. Fujita, H. Shinagawa, H. Shimazu, T. Kikuchi, and K. K. Hashimoto, J. Geophys. Res. 115 (2010) A05220,doi:10.1029/2009JA014676. [2] W. Pei, R. Horiuchi, and T. Sato, Physics of Plasmas,Vol. 8 (2001), pp. 3251-3257. [3] A. Ishizawa, and R. Horiuchi, Phys. Rev. Lett., Vol. 95, 045003 (2005). [4

  2. CFD simulation of an unbaffled stirred tank reactor driven by a magnetic rod: assessment of turbulence models.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiajia; Deng, Baoqing; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Xiuzhong; Kim, Chang Nyung

    2015-01-01

    A simulation of an unbaffled stirred tank reactor driven by a magnetic stirring rod was carried out in a moving reference frame. The free surface of unbaffled stirred tank was captured by Euler-Euler model coupled with the volume of fluid (VOF) method. The re-normalization group (RNG) k-ɛ model, large eddy simulation (LES) model and detached eddy simulation (DES) model were evaluated for simulating the flow field in the stirred tank. All turbulence models can reproduce the tangential velocity in an unbaffled stirred tank with a rotational speed of 150 rpm, 250 rpm and 400 rpm, respectively. Radial velocity is underpredicted by the three models. LES model and RNG k-ɛ model predict the better tangential velocity and axial velocity, respectively. RNG k-ɛ model is recommended for the simulation of the flow in an unbaffled stirred tank with magnetic rod due to its computational effort.

  3. Test of Shi et al. Method to Infer the Magnetic Reconnection Geometry from Spacecraft Data: MHD Simulation with Guide Field and Antiparallel Kinetic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, R.; Sonnerup, B. U. O.; Swisdak, M.; Birn, J.; Drake, J. F.; Heese, M.

    2012-01-01

    When analyzing data from an array of spacecraft (such as Cluster or MMS) crossing a site of magnetic reconnection, it is desirable to be able to accurately determine the orientation of the reconnection site. If the reconnection is quasi-two dimensional, there are three key directions, the direction of maximum inhomogeneity (the direction across the reconnection site), the direction of the reconnecting component of the magnetic field, and the direction of rough invariance (the "out of plane" direction). Using simulated spacecraft observations of magnetic reconnection in the geomagnetic tail, we extend our previous tests of the direction-finding method developed by Shi et al. (2005) and the method to determine the structure velocity relative to the spacecraft Vstr. These methods require data from four proximate spacecraft. We add artificial noise and calibration errors to the simulation fields, and then use the perturbed gradient of the magnetic field B and perturbed time derivative dB/dt, as described by Denton et al. (2010). Three new simulations are examined: a weakly three-dimensional, i.e., quasi-two-dimensional, MHD simulation without a guide field, a quasi-two-dimensional MHD simulation with a guide field, and a two-dimensional full dynamics kinetic simulation with inherent noise so that the apparent minimum gradient was not exactly zero, even without added artificial errors. We also examined variations of the spacecraft trajectory for the kinetic simulation. The accuracy of the directions found varied depending on the simulation and spacecraft trajectory, but all the directions could be found within about 10 for all cases. Various aspects of the method were examined, including how to choose averaging intervals and the best intervals for determining the directions and velocity. For the kinetic simulation, we also investigated in detail how the errors in the inferred gradient directions from the unmodified Shi et al. method (using the unperturbed gradient

  4. Simulation Study of Surface and Body Waves in a Magnetized Bounded Plasma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Dilruba

    The problem of wave propagation in a magnetized plasma slab has been studied by particle simulation of plasma. In our model, a warm homogeneous plasma slab is bounded by vacuum on two sides. Using a 2-D electrostatic particle code, we simulated two different cases. For the sharp boundary case with wave propagation perpendicular to the external field, two branches of surface waves are found to exist. A theoretical analysis showed that the discreteness of the modes is due to the quantization condition imposed by the boundary. A generalized surface mode which is damped in time appears below the second cyclotron harmonic and it is found that by specifying the complex frequency in the Bernstein wave dispersion relation, the wavelength and attenuation in the direction normal to the slab is predicted accurately. Short time scale phase mixing, damping and recurrence phenomena of Bernstein body modes are also observed. Oblique propagation of the waves are studied by the magnetic field perpendicular to the plasma -vacuum interface. For the free boundary model, the confinement is provided by fixed ion plus the magnetic field. Wave propagation was studied with and without an external magnetic field applied parallel to the slab boundaries. Among the interesting features observed in the case is a continuous spectrum with long wavelength parallel to the boundary (k _{y}lambda_{de} = 0). Transition layer effect is studied and compared with the rigid wall. The dispersion characteristics of the body wave spectrum remain unchanged. They also show the same type of initial phase mixing, damping and recurrence phenomena as for the sharp boundary. The surface wave spectrum shows remarkable differences. The cold plasma surface modes appear nearly at the same frequency. A very low frequency oscillation localized within the transition layer is also observed for all the two-dimensional modes. For the case of the unmagnetized plasma, only a discrete set of body waves appear above the plasma

  5. Warps, bending and density waves excited by rotating magnetized stars: results of global 3D MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, M. M.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Koldoba, A. V.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2013-03-01

    We report results of the first global three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the waves excited in an accretion disc by a rotating star with a dipole magnetic field misaligned from the star's rotation axis (which is aligned with the disc axis). The main results are the following. (1) If the magnetosphere of the star corotates approximately with the inner disc, then we observe a strong one-armed bending wave (a warp). This warp corotates with the star and has a maximum amplitude between corotation radius and the radius of the vertical resonance. The disc's centre of mass can deviate from the equatorial plane up to the distance of zw ≈ 0.1r. However, the effective height of the warp can be larger, hw ≈ 0.3r, due to the finite thickness of the disc. Stars with a range of misalignment angles excite warps. However, the amplitude of the warps is larger for misalignment angles between 15° and 60°. The location and amplitude of the warp do not depend on viscosity, at least for relatively small values of the standard alpha-parameter, up to 0.08. (2) If the magnetosphere rotates slower than the inner disc, then a bending wave is excited at the disc-magnetosphere boundary, but does not form a large-scale warp. Instead, persistent, high-frequency oscillations become strong at the inner region of the disc. These are (a) trapped density waves which form inside the radius where the disc angular velocity has a maximum, and (b) inner bending waves which appear in the case of accretion through magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. These two types of waves are connected with the inner disc and their frequencies will vary with accretion rate. Bending oscillations at lower frequencies are also excited including global oscillations of the disc. In cases where the simulation region is small, slowly precessing warp forms with the maximum amplitude at the vertical resonance. The present simulations are applicable to young stars, cataclysmic variables and

  6. Homologous and cannibalistic coronal mass ejections from twisted magnetic flux rope simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Fan, Yuhong

    We present results from magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the development of homologous sequence of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and demonstrate their so-called cannibalistic behavior. These CMEs originate from the repeated formations and partial eruptions of kink unstable flux ropes as a result of continued emergence of a twisted flux rope across the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. Our simulation shows that a CME erupting into the open magnetic field created by a preceding CME has a higher speed. The second of the three successive CMEs in one of the simulations is cannibalistic, catching up and merging with the first into a single fast CME before exiting the domain. All the CMEs including the leading merged CME, attained speeds of about 1000 km s-1 as they exit the domain. The reformation of a twisted flux rope after each CME eruption during the sustained flux emergence can naturally explain the X-ray observations of repeated reformations of sigmoids and "sigmoid-under-cusp" configurations at a low-coronal source of homologous CMEs. We also investigate the initiation mechanism and ejecta topology of these energetic CMEs as a function of the twist parameter of the flux rope.

  7. Binary black-hole mergers in magnetized disks: simulations in full general relativity.

    PubMed

    Farris, Brian D; Gold, Roman; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Etienne, Zachariah B; Shapiro, Stuart L

    2012-11-30

    We present results from the first fully general relativistic, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of an equal-mass black-hole binary (BHBH) in a magnetized, circumbinary accretion disk. We simulate both the pre- and postdecoupling phases of a BHBH-disk system and both "cooling" and "no-cooling" gas flows. Prior to decoupling, the competition between the binary tidal torques and the effective viscous torques due to MHD turbulence depletes the disk interior to the binary orbit. However, it also induces a two-stream accretion flow and mildly relativistic polar outflows from the BHs. Following decoupling, but before gas fills the low-density "hollow" surrounding the remnant, the accretion rate is reduced, while there is a prompt electromagnetic luminosity enhancement following merger due to shock heating and accretion onto the spinning BH remnant. This investigation, though preliminary, previews more detailed general relativistic, MHD simulations we plan to perform in anticipation of future, simultaneous detections of gravitational and electromagnetic radiation from a merging BHBH-disk system.

  8. Swimming Paramecium in magnetically simulated enhanced, reduced, and inverted gravity environments

    PubMed Central

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Earth's gravity exerts relatively weak forces in the range of 10–100 pN directly on cells in biological systems. Nevertheless, it biases the orientation of swimming unicellular organisms, alters bone cell differentiation, and modifies gene expression in renal cells. A number of methods of simulating different strength gravity environments, such as centrifugation, have been applied for researching the underlying mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate a magnetic force-based technique that is unique in its capability to enhance, reduce, and even invert the effective buoyancy of cells and thus simulate hypergravity, hypogravity, and inverted gravity environments. We apply it to Paramecium caudatum, a single-cell protozoan that varies its swimming propulsion depending on its orientation with respect to gravity, g. In these simulated gravities, denoted by fgm, Paramecium exhibits a linear response up to fgm = 5 g, modifying its swimming as it would in the hypergravity of a centrifuge. Moreover, experiments from fgm = 0 to −5 g show that the response is symmetric, implying that the regulation of the swimming speed is primarily related to the buoyancy of the cell. The response becomes nonlinear for fgm >5 g. At fgm = 10 g, many paramecia “stall” (i.e., swim in place against the force), exerting a maximum propulsion force estimated to be 0.7 nN. These findings establish a general technique for applying continuously variable forces to cells or cell populations suitable for exploring their force transduction mechanisms. PMID:16916937

  9. Simulation of ground-water flow and application to the design of a contaminant removal system, Loring Air Force Base, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starn, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    The fractured-bedrock aquifer underlying the former Fire Training Area at Loring Air Force Base, Maine, has been contaminated with petroleum products as a result of fire training activities. A numerical model of the ground-water-flow system near the Fire Training Area was developed to provide information for the design and operation of a contaminant removal system. The goals of the simulation modeling were to (1) determine the maximum pumping rate that could be sustained, giventhe constraint that water levels not rise above a specified altitude, and (2) determine the effect of seasonal variation in recharge on the ability of a transient pumping scenario to capture contaminants. A steady-state simulation model of ground-water flow was used to determine the optimal pumping rate at the site. The optimal pumping rate was 8,570 ft3/d (44 gal/min). Monthly recharge rates wereestimated for use in a transient simulation model. During a typical year, most recharge probably occurs during two periods-one during snowmelt in early spring and another, possibly less significant period, during the late fall. The transient response of the water table to 8.5 inches of recharge in April, 2 inches of recharge in October, and 0.25 inches of recharge per month for each remaining month wassimulated. Fluctuations in ground-water levels caused by simulated seasonal variation of recharge would have minimal effect on the operation of thecontaminant removal system because the system is not pumped when recharge is lowest, ground-water velocities are lowest, and ground-water flow past the trench is minimal.

  10. Detailed Kinetic Simulations of Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection at the Dayside Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, G.; Cazzola, E.

    2014-12-01

    Unlike symmetric magnetic reconnection, which has been extensively studied over the last decades despite of its rather rareness in space thanks to its relatively intuitiveness, occurrence of strong asymmetric conditions in specific quantities still have to be fully understood. Only recently these new configuration has become of particular interest, mostly in light of the upcoming MMS NASA mission. In improving this knowldege, this work aim thereby at going deeper into detail on the kinetic properties of asymmetric magnetic reconnection applied to some realistic case, such as the dayside magnetopause. Here, low magnetic field and high density magnetosheath plasma comes in contact with high magnetic field and low density magnetosphere plasma. For now, temperature along both regions is kept constant, as often considered in literature.Analysis are performed using the fully kinetic implicit code iPIC3D which allows us to go down at electron kinetic levels within an acceptable computational time, as well as considering considerably larger spatial domains. These hallmarks enable us to use this code for multifolds applications, either in space or space industry. However, the presence of strong gradients, such as on plasma density, makes the computational effort even more extreme, though still fully manageable by iPIC3D.Besided the well-known asymmetric bulges development and the X-line displacement occurring during asymmetric reconnection, one of the first attempt has been to set a very steep gradient to both density and magnetic field outside the current sheet, albeit in compliance of the necessary total pressure balance, simulating thus an eventual intensive and sudden plasma inflow. It is then showns that this particular condition leads to the formation of multiple irregular reconnective points right on the steep gradient. Additionally, marks of electron holes seem to manifest specially along the separatrixes.Finally, it is doubtless that plenty of physics lies

  11. The simulation and experimental analysis of the MFL for cracks inspection in pipelines under mechanics-magnetic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaochun; Xue, Li; Xu, Zhengwang

    2011-12-01

    Since the magnetic flux leakage (MFL) for cracks inspection in pipelines can be influenced by stress concentration, it is very difficult to characterize and size the crack or crack-like defects. Thus, the theory model of magnetization and permeability under mechanics-magnetic coupling was derived by thermodynamic equation firstly, and the effects of the applied stress on magnetization and permeability were analyzed theoretically. The finite element method (FEM) under mechanics-magnetic coupling was studied, and the relationship of the crack"s MFL and loaded stresses were simulated and studied using the 3D FEM. And the simulation results were verified by experiments with the help of material testing system (MTS). The simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the experimental results are basically consistent with simulation results, and the MFL density caused by cracks decreases with the applied stress increasing gradually. Therefore, the higher sensitivity sensors should be employed in the MFL measurement for pipeline cracks and the testing data should be compensated while quantitative interpretation.

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor-unstable accretion to and variability of magnetized stars: Global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkanarni, Akshay Kishor

    We present results of three-dimensional (3D) simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities at the accretion disk-magnetosphere boundary in accreting magnetized stars. The instability is Rayleigh-Taylor, and develops for a fairly broad range of accretion rates and stellar rotation rates and magnetic fields. It manifests itself in the form of tall, thin tongues of plasma that penetrate the magnetosphere in the equatorial plane, instead of flowing around the magnetosphere as in the canonical accretion picture. The shape and number of the tongues changes with time on the inner-disk dynamical timescale. In contrast with funnel flows, which deposit matter mainly in the polar region, the tongues deposit matter much closer to the stellar equator. The instability appears for relatively small misalignment angles, theta ≲ 30°, between the star's rotation and magnetic axes, and is associated with relatively high accretion rates. We then calculate the photometric variability due to emission from the hot spots that the accreting matter produces on the stellar surface. For neutron stars, we take relativistic effects into account in calculating the observed energy flux. Our goal is to compare the features of the lightcurve during stable and unstable accretion, and to look for possible quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), which produce broad peaks in the Fourier power spectra of these objects. The lightcurves during stable accretion show periodicity at the star's frequency and sometimes twice that, due to the presence of two funnel streams that produce antipodal hotspots near the magnetic poles. On the other hand, lightcurves during unstable accretion are more chaotic due to the stochastic behaviour of the tongues, and produce noisier power spectra. However, the power spectra do show some signs of quasi-periodic variability. Most importantly, the rotation frequency of the tongues and the resulting hotspots is close to the inner-disk orbital frequency, except in the most

  13. Simulation Study of Magnetic Fields Generated by the Electromagnetic Filamentation Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of plasma instabilities driven by rapid e(sup plus or minus) pair cascades, which arise in the environment of GRB sources as a result of back-scattering of a seed fraction of the original spectrum. The injection of e(sup plus or minus) pairs induces strong streaming motions in the ambient medium. One therefore expects the pair-enriched medium ahead of the forward shock to be strongly sheared on length scales comparable to the radiation front thickness. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we show that plasma instabilities driven by these streaming e(sup plus or minus) pairs are responsible for the excitation of near-equipartition, turbulent magnetic fields. Our results reveal the importance of the electromagnetic filamentation instability in ensuring an effective coupling between e(sup plus or minus) pairs and ions, and may help explain the origin of large upstream fields in GRB shocks.

  14. Magnetic phase transitions and monopole excitations in spin ice under uniaxial pressure: A Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Y. L. Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M.; Lin, L.

    2015-05-07

    In this work, we explore the spin ice model under uniaxial pressure using the Monte Carlo simulation method. For the known spin ices, the interaction correction (δ) introduced by the uniaxial pressure varies in quite a wide range from positive to negative. When δ is positive, the ground state characterized by the ferromagnetic spin chains is quite unstable, and in real materials it serves as intermediate state connecting the ice state and the long range ordered dipolar spin ice ground state. In the case of negative δ, the system relaxes from highly degenerate ice state to ordered ferromagnetic state via a first order phase transition. Furthermore, the domain walls in such ferromagnetic state are the hotbed of the excitations of magnetic monopoles, thus indicating that the uniaxial pressure can greatly increase the monopole density.

  15. Neurovisualization of the dynamics of real and simulation biofeedback: functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Mazhirina, K G; Pokrovskiy, M A; Rezakova, M V; Savelov, A A; Savelova, O A; Shtark, M B

    2013-04-01

    On-line brain mapping in subjects operating a competitive virtual gameplay was performed using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The interaction between the brain and visceral systems was studied on the model of real and simulated adaptive biofeedback. The immersion into a virtual story leads to a large-scale activation of cortical regions characterized by high values of voxels in the midtemporal, occipital, and frontal areas as well as in cingulate gyrus, cuneus, and precuneus (Brodmann areas 6, 7, 9, 10, 19, 24, 32, 39, 40, 45). The maximum increase in activity was observed during stage 2 of the game biofeedback, when the volumes of activated voxels increased several times in comparison with the starting phase. Qualitative characteristics of real and imitation game periods are discussed.

  16. Simulated structural and magnetic behavior of Mn-Ti intercalated dichalcogenide crystals.

    PubMed

    Roth, M W; Wandling, B; Kidd, T E; Shand, P M; Stollenwerk, A

    2016-05-11

    We present the results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations of intercalated manganese-titanium (Mn-Ti) layered TiS2 crystals. The computational model involves mixtures of Mn and Ti in various percentages placed on a triangular lattice with fixed lattice sites and up to five layers. The range of concentrations of intercalated Mn studied was 5%  ⩽  X Mn  ⩽  33% and for Ti, 0%  ⩽  X Ti  ⩽  15%, where X A denotes the percentage of the total number of lattice sites occupied by species A. The species are allowed to interact spatially through a screened Coulomb potential and magnetically with external and RKKY field terms. Structurally, the pure Mn systems present as disordered at very low densities and evolve through a 2  ×  2 structure (perfect at X Mn  =  25%) up to a [Formula: see text]  ×  [Formula: see text] lattice (perfect at X Mn  =  33%), with variations of the two 'perfect' lattice structures depending on density. Changes in density for pure Mn systems as well as those intercalated with both Mn and Ti dramatically affects the system's structural and magnetic properties, and the magnetic behavior of various morphological features present in the system are discussed. The RKKY interaction is adjusted based on the intercalant compositions and is very sensitive to structural variations in the intercalant layers. The composition ranges studied here encompass and exceed those that are experimentally accessible, which helps place experimentally relevant densities in perspective. PMID:27058645

  17. FOUR-FLUID MODEL AND NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF MAGNETIC STRUCTURES IN THE HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.; Cox, Sean M.; Shaikh, Dastgeer; Zank, G. P.

    2009-04-10

    The first part of this paper extends the three-fluid model of Avinash and Zank for magnetic structures in the heliosheath to a four-fluid model consisting of electrons, pick-up ions (PUIs), solar wind ions (SWIs), and neutral hydrogen. The PUIs are generated by neutrals via charge exchange with SWI. Since the kinetic pressure of PUI is nearly three to four times the pressure of SWI, these are more suited to mediate small-scale structures in the heliosheath such as magnetic holes (MH)/humps etc. The constant energy exchange between these two fluids drives them nonadiabatic. The PUIs are isothermal ({gamma} = 1) while SWIs are nonadiabatic with an index {gamma} {approx} 1.25. The four-fluid model captures these effects via a modified equation of state for PUI and SWI. The phase space of time-independent solutions in terms of the Mach numbers of PUI and SWI is constructed to delineate the parameter space which allows structure formation in the heliosheath. The second part of the paper examines the stability of the time-independent solutions computed in the first part by evolving them via a full system of Hall-MHD equations. The simulation results show that these solutions are not quite stable. As the structure propagates it develops growing oscillations in the wings. Concomitantly, there are changes in the amplitude and width of the structure. This instability could be due to local changes in the velocity of the structure and reflects an exchange between the kinetic and magnetic parts of the total energy. Our results about the presence of growing oscillations in the wings of solitary wave solutions are consistent with the recent analysis of MHs in the heliosheth by Burlaga et al. Their analysis also shows evidence for the presence of oscillations and instabilities in the wings of MHs in the heliosheath.

  18. Simulated structural and magnetic behavior of Mn-Ti intercalated dichalcogenide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M. W.; Wandling, B.; Kidd, T. E.; Shand, P. M.; Stollenwerk, A.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations of intercalated manganese-titanium (Mn-Ti) layered TiS2 crystals. The computational model involves mixtures of Mn and Ti in various percentages placed on a triangular lattice with fixed lattice sites and up to five layers. The range of concentrations of intercalated Mn studied was 5%  ⩽  X Mn  ⩽  33% and for Ti, 0%  ⩽  X Ti  ⩽  15%, where X A denotes the percentage of the total number of lattice sites occupied by species A. The species are allowed to interact spatially through a screened Coulomb potential and magnetically with external and RKKY field terms. Structurally, the pure Mn systems present as disordered at very low densities and evolve through a 2  ×  2 structure (perfect at X Mn  =  25%) up to a \\sqrt{3}   ×  \\sqrt{3} lattice (perfect at X Mn  =  33%), with variations of the two ‘perfect’ lattice structures depending on density. Changes in density for pure Mn systems as well as those intercalated with both Mn and Ti dramatically affects the system’s structural and magnetic properties, and the magnetic behavior of various morphological features present in the system are discussed. The RKKY interaction is adjusted based on the intercalant compositions and is very sensitive to structural variations in the intercalant layers. The composition ranges studied here encompass and exceed those that are experimentally accessible, which helps place experimentally relevant densities in perspective.

  19. Simulated structural and magnetic behavior of Mn-Ti intercalated dichalcogenide crystals.

    PubMed

    Roth, M W; Wandling, B; Kidd, T E; Shand, P M; Stollenwerk, A

    2016-05-11

    We present the results of extensive Monte Carlo simulations of intercalated manganese-titanium (Mn-Ti) layered TiS2 crystals. The computational model involves mixtures of Mn and Ti in various percentages placed on a triangular lattice with fixed lattice sites and up to five layers. The range of concentrations of intercalated Mn studied was 5%  ⩽  X Mn  ⩽  33% and for Ti, 0%  ⩽  X Ti  ⩽  15%, where X A denotes the percentage of the total number of lattice sites occupied by species A. The species are allowed to interact spatially through a screened Coulomb potential and magnetically with external and RKKY field terms. Structurally, the pure Mn systems present as disordered at very low densities and evolve through a 2  ×  2 structure (perfect at X Mn  =  25%) up to a [Formula: see text]  ×  [Formula: see text] lattice (perfect at X Mn  =  33%), with variations of the two 'perfect' lattice structures depending on density. Changes in density for pure Mn systems as well as those intercalated with both Mn and Ti dramatically affects the system's structural and magnetic properties, and the magnetic behavior of various morphological features present in the system are discussed. The RKKY interaction is adjusted based on the intercalant compositions and is very sensitive to structural variations in the intercalant layers. The composition ranges studied here encompass and exceed those that are experimentally accessible, which helps place experimentally relevant densities in perspective.

  20. Computational simulation of breast compression based on segmented breast and fibroglandular tissues on magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Tzu-Ching; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Liu, Dongxu; Nie, Ke; Sun, Lizhi; Lin, Muqing; Chang, Daniel; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Su, Min-Ying

    2010-07-01

    This study presents a finite element-based computational model to simulate</