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Sample records for simulating early rheumatoid

  1. Rheumatoid vasculitis: early presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Abdulqader, Yasir; Al-Ani, Muhsen; Parperis, Konstantinos

    2016-11-08

    Rheumatoid vasculitis is a rare and late complication of rheumatoid arthritis and may affect small-to-medium-sized vessels. Here, we report a case of a 49-year-old man who presented with amaurosis fugax in the left eye, symmetric polyarthritis, Raynaud's symptoms and paraesthesia in both lower extremities. The patient subsequently experienced right foot drop, nail fold infracts and gangrene of his right second toe. He was found to have a high titre of rheumatoid factor and treatment with rituximab and high dose of corticosteroids led to significant improvement of his symptoms. This is rare case describing the early onset of rheumatoid vasculitis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Early rheumatoid disease. I. Onset.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, A; Crown, J M; Corbett, M

    1976-01-01

    We describe features with onset in 102 patients seen within the first year of rheumatoid disease. The male:female ratio was approximately 3:4, suggesting a near equal sex incidence at onset. The disease started more often in the colder months and was usually insodious, symmetrical, and involved the upper limbs. The patients were followed prospectively and outcome was assessed after a mean of 4.5 years. Older patients fared worse and there was a trend for a poorer prognosis to be indicated by an insidious onset and early progression to symmetrical involvement. PMID:970994

  3. MR imaging of early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Narváez, José A; Narváez, Javier; De Lama, Eugenia; De Albert, Matías

    2010-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment have been recognized as essential for improving clinical outcomes in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. However, diagnosis is somewhat difficult in the early stages of the disease because the diagnostic criteria were developed from data obtained in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis and therefore are not readily applicable. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is increasingly being used in the assessment of rheumatoid arthritis due to its capacity to help identify the key pathologic features of this disease entity at presentation. MR imaging has demonstrated greater sensitivity for the detection of synovitis and erosions than either clinical examination or conventional radiography and can help establish an early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. It also allows the detection of bone marrow edema, which is thought to be a precursor for the development of erosions in early rheumatoid arthritis as well as a marker of active inflammation. In addition, MR imaging can help differentiate rheumatoid arthritis from some clinical subsets of peripheral spondyloarthropathies by allowing identification of inflammation at the insertions of ligaments and tendons (enthesitis).

  4. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Fiona M

    2013-08-01

    Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone extraordinary change in recent years and new techniques are now available to help the clinician diagnose and manage patients much more effectively than previously. While established modalities such as plain radiography (X-Ray) remain important, especially for detection of erosions and determining the progression of joint damage, there are many instances where ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scanning provide added information. MRI and US are now used regularly by clinicians to help diagnose RA in the pre-radiographic stage as they offer improved visualisation of joint erosions. They also have the potential to provide prognostic information as MRI bone oedema/osteitis is linked to the later development of erosions and power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) joint positivity is also a predictor of joint damage. Nuclear imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are also highly sensitive for detecting joint change in early RA and pre-RA but not yet used clinically mainly because of accessibility and radiation exposure. MRI, US, scintigraphy, SPECT and PET have all been shown to detect sub-clinical joint inflammation in patients in clinical remission, a state that is now the goal of most treat-to-target management strategies. Thus, imaging may be used to direct therapeutic decision making and MRI is also now being used in clinical trials to determine the impact of disease-suppressing therapy on the course of synovitis and osteitis. As is the case for all tests, it would be unwise to rely completely on any one imaging result, as false positives and negatives can occur for all modalities. Thus, the clinician needs to choose the most relevant and reliable imaging test, while also striving to minimise patient discomfort, radiation burden and economic impact.

  5. Preclinical lung disease in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Robles-Perez, Alejandro; Luburich, Patricio; Rodriguez-Sanchon, Benigno; Dorca, Jordi; Nolla, Joan Miquel; Molina-Molina, Maria; Narvaez-Garcia, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may ameliorate disease progression. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of asymptomatic lung abnormalities in early RA patients and the potential association of positive RA blood reactive biomolecules with lung involvement. A prospective observational study was performed in a cohort of patients with early RA (joint symptoms < 2 years) without respiratory symptoms, who were included in a screening program for lung disease with a baseline chest radiograph (CR) and complete pulmonary function tests (PFTs). In those patients with lung abnormalities on the CR or PFTs, a high-resolution chest computed tomography scan (HRCT) was performed. We included 40 patients (30 women). Altered PFTs were detected in 18 (45%) of these patients. These cases had a diffusion lung transfer capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) of <80% of predicted, without a significant reduction in the forced vital capacity. The HRCT detected abnormalities in 11 of the 18 patients. Diffuse bronchiectasis was the main finding. An inverse correlation between the anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) levels and DLCO was found. Asymptomatic lung disease is present in up to 45% of early RA patients and can be determined by PFTs and ACPA levels.

  6. Development of a multi-wavelength diffuse optical tomography system for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis: simulation, phantoms and healthy human studies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao Yang; Filer, Andrew; Styles, Iain; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A multi-wavelength diffuse optical tomography (DOT) system has been developed to directly extract physiological information, such as total haemoglobin concentration, from tissue in human hand joints. Novel methods for 3D surface imaging and spectrally constrained image reconstruction are introduced and their potential application to imaging of rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. Results are presented from simulation studies as well as experiments using phantoms and data from imaging of three healthy volunteers. The image features are recovered partially for phantom data using transmission measurements only. Images that reveal joint regions and surrounding features within the hand are shown to co-register with co–acquired ultrasound images which are shown to be related to total haemoglobin concentration. PMID:27896015

  7. Ultrasonography applications in diagnosis and management of early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Ralf G

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasonography is an elegant tool for the detection of tenosynovitis, synovitis, and erosions very early in rheumatoid arthritis, and the presence of a power Doppler signal is one of the best predictors of joint damage. Although clinical scores remain the mainstay of disease activity assessment, ultrasonography has proved to be a remarkably robust tool for reliable assessment of changes in rheumatoid arthritis. There is no evidence to suggest that problems with operator dependence would be greater than with other imaging modalities or physical examination, if performed by trained providers.

  8. Prognostic value of early features in rheumatoid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, A; Crown, J M; Corbett, M

    1976-01-01

    Extensive data on 102 patients who presented with rheumatoid disease within a year of onset were gathered by a prospective study to assess the prognostic value of early features. Outcome was evaluated at a mean 4-5 years from onset on the basis of functional grade, extent of joint disease, early morning stiffness, and grip strength. Twenty-six patients improved, 14 pursued a mild steady course, and 62 had a persistently severe or deteriorating condition. The features recorded at the first visit were correlated with outcome. Those indicating a poor prognosis were: older age at onset, being underweight, poor grip strength, many affected joints, involvement of wrist or metatarsophalangeal joints, poor functional status, fulfilment of many of the American Rheumatism Association criteria for rheumatoid disease, raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate, seropositivity on sheep cell agglutination or latex tests, low haemoglobin level, raised blood urea level, and early erosions on x-ray films. PMID:1083760

  9. Extra-articular features in early rheumatoid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, A; Dodman, S; Crown, J M; Corbett, M

    1976-01-01

    One hundred and two patients who presented with rheumatoid disease within the first year of onset were studied prospectively every four months for a mean 4.5 years to assess the incidence of extra-articular features. The features that seemed to be common in the early stages included hand-muscle wasting, carpal tunnel syndrome, lymphadenopathy, non-specific ankle swelling, and rheumatoid nodules, and to a lesser extent hepatomegaly, being underweight, conjunctivitis, skin transparency, and a palpable thyroid gland. Those features which seldom occurred early included scleromalacia, temporal artery inolvement, salivary gland enlargement, distal-motor neuropathy, splenomegaly, digital vasculitis, and pulmonary and cardiac complications. Being underweight indicated a significantly more severe outcome. PMID:1083759

  10. Treatment Strategies in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis and Prevention of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Demoruelle, M. Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Data now suggest that current strategies in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) should focus on early identification and diagnosis, followed by early initiation of DMARD therapy. Initiation of treatment in early RA—ideally, less than 3–6 months after symptom onset—improves the success of achieving disease remission and reduces joint damage and disability. While the optimal treatment regimen in early RA is unclear, use of initial DMARD mono- or combination therapy with prompt escalation to achieve low disease activity or remission is an appropriate approach. Ultimately, the goal of RA management should be the prevention of inflammatory joint disease and, thereby, prevention of disability. To date, studies have shown that pharmacologic interventions can delay progression from undifferentiated inflammatory arthritis to classifiable RA. However, further investigation is needed to identify asymptomatic individuals at high risk for future RA and to intervene early enough in the pathogenesis of RA to prevent progression to clinical disease. PMID:22773387

  11. Hemochromatosis simulating rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Fabíola Brasil; Callegari, Amanda; Sarinho, José Célso; Lucena, Juliana; Casagrande, Renielly; de Souza, Branca Dias Batista

    2014-01-01

    This is a report of a patient who had a previous diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, nonerosive, rheumatoid factor negative, that despite the therapeutic approach presented progressive worsening of the articular and general condition. After extensive research, she had a diagnosis of hemochromatosis. Joint symptoms are common manifestations in hemochromatosis. The arthropathy of hemochromatosis may resemble inflammatory arthropathy mimicking RA, particularly in the most common sites as 2nd and 3rd metacarpophalangeal. Radiologically are observed decreased joint space, subchondral sclerosis, cyst formation and chondrocalcinosis. Treatment with disease modifying drugs for rheumatoid arthritis tend to worsen the clinical picture, since the liver is the major site of deposition of iron in hemochromatosis and these medications are known to be hepatotoxic. Phlebotomy treatment for hemochromatosis is apparently ineffective in reversing the articular manifestations, which requires the association with iron chelating drugs. Due to the apparent difficulty in differentiating between the two diseases, a screening profile of iron in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with atypical progression is necessary.

  12. Early biomarkers of joint damage in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mc Ardle, Angela; Flatley, Brian; Pennington, Stephen R; FitzGerald, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Joint destruction, as evidenced by radiographic findings, is a significant problem for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. Inherently irreversible and frequently progressive, the process of joint damage begins at and even before the clinical onset of disease. However, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthropathies are heterogeneous in nature and not all patients progress to joint damage. It is therefore important to identify patients susceptible to joint destruction in order to initiate more aggressive treatment as soon as possible and thereby potentially prevent irreversible joint damage. At the same time, the high cost and potential side effects associated with aggressive treatment mean it is also important not to over treat patients and especially those who, even if left untreated, would not progress to joint destruction. It is therefore clear that a protein biomarker signature that could predict joint damage at an early stage would support more informed clinical decisions on the most appropriate treatment regimens for individual patients. Although many candidate biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis have been reported in the literature, relatively few have reached clinical use and as a consequence the number of prognostic biomarkers used in rheumatology has remained relatively static for several years. It has become evident that a significant challenge in the transition of biomarker candidates to clinical diagnostic assays lies in the development of suitably robust biomarker assays, especially multiplexed assays, and their clinical validation in appropriate patient sample cohorts. Recent developments in mass spectrometry-based targeted quantitative protein measurements have transformed our ability to rapidly develop multiplexed protein biomarker assays. These advances are likely to have a significant impact on the validation of biomarkers in the future. In this review, we have comprehensively compiled a list of candidate

  13. Biomarkers of early stage osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and musculoskeletal health.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Usman; Anwar, Attia; Savage, Richard S; Costa, Matthew L; Mackay, Nicola; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Watts, Richard A; Winyard, Paul G; Tarr, Joanna; Haigh, Richard C; Thornalley, Paul J; Rabbani, Naila

    2015-03-19

    There is currently no biochemical test for detection of early-stage osteoarthritis (eOA). Tests for early-stage rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) such as rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies require refinement to improve clinical utility. We developed robust mass spectrometric methods to quantify citrullinated protein (CP) and free hydroxyproline in body fluids. We detected CP in the plasma of healthy subjects and surprisingly found that CP was increased in both patients with eOA and eRA whereas anti-CCP antibodies were predominantly present in eRA. A 4-class diagnostic algorithm combining plasma/serum CP, anti-CCP antibody and hydroxyproline applied to a cohort gave specific and sensitive detection and discrimination of eOA, eRA, other non-RA inflammatory joint diseases and good skeletal health. This provides a first-in-class plasma/serum-based biochemical assay for diagnosis and type discrimination of early-stage arthritis to facilitate improved treatment and patient outcomes, exploiting citrullinated protein and related differential autoimmunity.

  14. Evidence for early disease-modifying drugs in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David L

    2004-01-01

    Some research evidence supports early aggressive treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using combination therapy with two or more disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) plus steroids, or even DMARDs plus an anti-TNF. By contrast, conservatively delayed DMARD monotherapy, given after non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have failed, has been criticised. However, recent long-term studies highlight the complexities in evaluating whether to abandon pyramidal treatment in favour of early DMARDs. Although patients given early DMARD therapy show short-term benefits, longer-term results show no prolonged clinical advantages from early DMARDs. By 5 years patients receiving early DMARDs had similar disease activity and comparable health assessment questionnaire scores to patients who received DMARDs later in their disease course. X-ray progression was persistent and virtually identical in both groups. These negative findings do not invalidate the case for early DMARD therapy, as it is gives sustained reductions in disease activity in the early years of treatment without excessive risks from adverse effects. However, early DMARDs alone do not adequately control RA in the longer term. This may require starting with very aggressive therapy or treating patients more aggressively after early DMARD therapy has been initiated. PMID:14979927

  15. Raised granzyme B levels are associated with erosions in patients with early rheumatoid factor positive rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Goldbach-Mansky, R; Suson, S; Wesley, R; Hack, C; El-Gabalawy, H; Tak, P

    2005-01-01

    Background: Raised granzyme B in serum and synovium of patients with rheumatoid arthritis suggests a role for cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells in the pathogenesis of this disease. Objective: To evaluate serum granzyme B in patients with early arthritis and correlate it with specific diagnosis and clinical indices of disease severity. Methods: 257 patients with inflammatory arthritis for less than one year (46% rheumatoid arthritis, 17% spondyloarthropathy, 37% undifferentiated arthritis) had a prospective clinical, serological, and radiographic evaluation. Granzyme B was measured in initial sera by ELISA. Patients were HLA typed for DR alleles using sequence specific primers. A logistic regression model was used to evaluate the potential prognostic value of serum granzyme B in predicting radiographic erosions after one year of follow up. Results: Granzyme B values were similar in rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathy, and undifferentiated arthritis. Concentrations were higher in rheumatoid factor (RF) positive patients than in RF negative patients (mean (SD): 3.15 (0.92) v 2.89 (0.71) pg/ml; p<0.05). After one year, erosions were present in 30% of patients in the overall cohort, and in 44% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In the entire cohort, serum granzyme B did not predict erosions independently. However, high granzyme B was an independent predictor of early erosions in patients with RF positive rheumatoid arthritis (odds ratio = 4.83 (95% confidence interval, 1.13 to 20.59)) (p<0.05). Conclusions: Granzyme B may be a useful prognostic marker in early rheumatoid arthritis and may provide important clues to the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:15471892

  16. Combination therapy for early rheumatoid arthritis: a treatment holiday perspective.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shintaro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    To date, the significance of early intervention with methotrexate and biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not been realized. Longitudinal safety and cost have arisen as new concerns. The concept of a treatment holiday, drug discontinuation after achieving remission, may solve these problems. The authors performed a systematic literature review and identified 13 reports from 10 studies (TNF20, BeSt, OPITMA, HIT-HARD, IMPROVED, PRIZE, IDEA, EMPIRE, tREACH and AVERT) for early RA (≤2 years). Eight out of 13 reports (61.5%) were published in 2013 or 2014, indicating emerging interest in recent years. Also, the authors performed a sub-analysis of the HONOR study (n = 51) to compare early (≤2 years) and established RA. The proportions of remission (REM) and low disease activity were higher in early RA (REM: 63.0 vs 33.3%, p = 0.0346; low disease activity: 77.8 vs 45.8%, p = 0.0185). In conclusion, early intervention is beneficial for successful treatment holiday, which may lead to risk and cost reduction. However, further investigation is required.

  17. Combination DMARD therapy including corticosteroids in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Möttönen, T T; Hannonen, P J; Boers, M

    1999-01-01

    A number of reports indicating the growing acceptance of simultaneous therapy with multiple disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), as well as the use of more aggressive treatment measures in the early phases of disease to combat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), have appeared during the last decade. However, only a few randomized controlled clinical trials have been conducted on the use of DMARD combinations in early RA. We review these trials in this article. In two separate one-year studies combination therapy with sulphasalazine (SSZ) and methotrexate (MTX) seemed to offer no benefits compared to either drug used as monotherapy. On the other hand, the DMARD combinations so far proven to be superior to single DMARDs have initially also included a corticosteroid component. In the COBRA study (Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis) the combination of SSZ (2 gm/day), MTX (7.5 mg/week for 40 weeks), and prednisolone (Prd) (initially 60 mg/day, tapered in 6 weekly steps to 7.5 mg/day and stopped after 28 weeks) compared to SSZ alone (2 gm/day) resulted in significantly better clinical outcomes at week 28. Although the difference in clinical response between the treatment arms was lost at week 58, the progression of joint damage remained statistically significantly slower at week 80 in the patients initially assigned to the combination therapy. Furthermore, in the FIN-RACo trial (Finnish Rheumatoid Arthritis Combination Therapy Trial), therapy using a "tailored-steps" strategy with SSZ (1-2 gm/day), MTX (7.5-1.5 mg/week), hydroxychloroquine (300 mg/day), and Prd (up to 10 mg/day) yielded a significantly increased remission rate and less peripheral joint damage at two years than the single DMARD treatment strategy (initially SSZ 2 gm/day), with or without Prd. Adverse effects in both study arms were comparable. Two additional preliminary reports (in abstract form) suggest that intensive local therapy in the form of intra-articular injections added to single or

  18. Remaining Pain in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Treated With Methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    Altawil, Reem; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Wedrén, Sara; Alfredsson, Lars; Klareskog, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the frequency of remaining pain in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after 3 months of treatment with methotrexate as the only disease modifying antirheumatic drug, with a special focus on patients with a good clinical response. Methods The study base was cases reported to a population‐based early RA cohort who had followup data from the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register (n = 1,241). The Disease Activity Score in 28 joints European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria were used to evaluate clinical response to treatment as good, moderate, and no response. The primary end point was remaining pain at the 3‐months followup visit, defined as pain >20 mm on a 100‐mm visual analog scale (VAS). Results Remaining pain in spite of a EULAR good response at followup was associated with higher baseline disability, using the Health Assessment Questionnaire (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.2 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.4–3.4] per unit increase), and less baseline inflammation, using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (adjusted OR 0.81 [95% CI 0.70–0.93] per 10‐mm increase). Similar associations were detected for remaining pain at followup in spite of low inflammatory activity, defined as a C‐reactive protein level <10. Increase in VAS pain during the treatment period was observed in 19% of the whole cohort, with frequencies in the EULAR response groups of 9% (good response), 15% (moderate response), and 45% (no response). Conclusion These results are in line with the hypothesis that a subgroup of early RA patients exhibits pain that is not inflammatory mediated, where alternative treatment strategies to traditional antiinflammatory medications need to be considered. PMID:26784398

  19. Prospective study of early rheumatoid arthritis. II. Association of rheumatoid factor isotypes with fluctuations in disease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Withrington, R H; Teitsson, I; Valdimarsson, H; Seifert, M H

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three patients with early peripheral synovitis were followed up for two to four years in order to study the relationship between fluctuations in rheumatoid factor (RF) levels and indices of clinical activity. Twenty-eight of these patients developed classical/definite rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Seventeen patients developed erosive disease of their hands and wrists and thirteen had a positive RF agglutination test. Nineteen patients had raised levels of IgM, RF, IgA, RF, or IgG RF as measured by isotype-specific ELISA techniques. The within-patient fluctuations in IgA RF levels correlated significantly with the corresponding fluctuations in grip strength (p less than 0.05), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (p less than 0.01), and a composite index of disease activity (p less than 0.02). IgG RF levels were also associated with changes in ESR and grip strength, but IgM RF showed only a weak association with fluctuations in ESR and not with any other clinical parameters. It is suggested that serum IgA RF may be a useful marker of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:6497460

  20. Circulating T helper and T regulatory subsets in untreated early rheumatoid arthritis and healthy control subjects.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Jayesh M; Lundell, Anna-Carin; Hallström, Magnus; Andersson, Kerstin; Nordström, Inger; Rudin, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The pathogenic role and frequency of T cell subtypes in early rheumatoid arthritis are still unclear. We therefore performed a comprehensive analysis of the circulating T cell subtype pattern in patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis compared to healthy control subjects. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from 26 patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis and from with 18 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. T helper cell types Th0, Th1, Th2, Th17, and Th1/17 and nonclassic T helper subsets were defined by flow cytometry based on the expression of chemokine receptors CCR4, CCR6, and CXCR3. Regulatory T cells were defined by expression of CD25(+) CD127(low) and also FOXP3 CXCR5(+) cells among regulatory and nonregulatory T cells were defined as T follicular regulatory and T follicular helper cells, respectively. The phenotype of T cell subsets was confirmed by transcription factor and cytokine secretion analyses. Multivariate discriminant analysis showed that patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis were segregated from healthy control subjects based on the circulating T cell subset profile. Among the discriminator subsets, CCR4(+)CXCR3(-) (Th2 and Th17), CTLA4(+) and FOXP3(+) subsets were present in significantly higher frequencies, whereas CCR4(-) (Th1/Th17, CCR6(+)CCR4(-)CXCR3(-), and Th1) subsets were present in lower frequencies in patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis compared with healthy control subjects. The proportions of Th2 and Th17 subsets associated positively with each other and negatively with the CXCR3(+)/interferon γ-secreting subsets (Th1 and Th1/Th17) in patients with untreated rheumatoid arthritis. The proportions of Th2 cells increased with age in patients with untreated early rheumatoid arthritis and healthy control subjects. The dominance of circulating CCR4(+)CXCR3(-) T helper subsets (Th2 and Th17) in untreated early rheumatoid arthritis point toward a pathogenic role of

  1. Approaches to the treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Sizova, Lyudmila

    2008-08-01

    This paper reviews recent approaches to treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The literature on treatment the early RA published between 1995 and 2007 was accessed through the PubMed database from the National Library of Medicine. Keywords were 'early rheumatoid arthritis', 'disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs', 'biologic agents' and 'combination therapy'. Only results of trials on human subjects that directly measured the effects of DMARDs or biological agents on clinical, laboratory parameters and radiological progression of early RA were selected. Combination therapy suppresses RA activity and radiological progression more effectively than monotherapy. If better control of RA is evident after 3-6 months of treatment with the combination of DMARDs, one must still decide whether to stop the first DMARD, stop the second, or continue with the combination. Combination therapy biological agents (infliximab, adalimumab) with methotrexate and etanercept therapy alone may induce remission in many patients with early RA. It is a method of choice in patients with an adverse prognosis. The main indications for combination therapy 'standard' DMARDs or combination 1 DMARDs with a biological agent are such variables as detection of a shared epitope, increase of concentration of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, rheumatoid factor, C-reactive protein, 28-joint disease activity score, Sharp score and presence of erosion in joints. The majority of rheumatologists believe that patients with RA should be treated with DMARDs earlier rather than later in the disease process. Further trials should establish the optimal approaches to early RA therapy.

  2. Prognostic factors for remission in early rheumatoid arthritis: a multiparameter prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Gossec, L; Dougados, M; Goupille, P; Cantagrel, A; Sibilia, J; Meyer, O; Sany, J; Daures, J; Combe, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine prognostic factors for remission in early rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: 191 patients with rheumatoid arthritis whose disease duration was less than one year were followed up prospectively for five years. Remission, defined by a disease activity score (DAS) of <1.6, was used as the outcome measure. Baseline clinical, laboratory, genetic, and radiographic data (with radiographic scores determined by Sharp's method, modified by van der Heijde) were obtained. Results: 48 patients (25.1%) fulfilled the remission criteria at the three year follow up visit, and 30 (15.7%) at three and five years. On univariate analysis by Fisher's exact test, remission at three years and persistent remission at five years were closely correlated with baseline DAS values, C reactive protein level, Ritchie score, health assessment questionnaire score, duration of morning stiffness, and to a lesser extent baseline total radiological scores and rheumatoid factor negativity. No significant correlation was found with sex, age, extra-articular manifestations, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, anti-cyclic citrullinated protein antibodies, anti-keratin antibodies, anti-HSP 90, anticalpastatin antibodies, antinuclear antibodies, or HLA-DRB1* genotypes. Logistic regression analysis showed that the baseline independent variables predictive of remission were low DAS, Ritchie score, morning stiffness duration, and total radiographic score. Conclusions: Baseline prognostic factors for remission in early rheumatoid arthritis were mainly clinical markers of disease activity and radiological scores. PMID:15140774

  3. Early rheumatoid disease. II. Patterns of joint involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, A; Benn, R T; Corbett, M; Wood, P H

    1976-01-01

    Data from the first research clinic visit (Fleming and others, 1976) have been subjected to factor analysis to identify early patterns of joint involvement. Nine patterns emerged. Two patterns, if present early, were found to have prognostic significance. An eventually more severe disease was associated with a pattern of large joint involvement (shoulder, elbow, wrist, knee) and a pattern based on metatarsophalangeal joints I and III. PMID:970995

  4. Approaches to the treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Sizova, Lyudmila

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews recent approaches to treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The literature on treatment the early RA published between 1995 and 2007 was accessed through the PubMed database from the National Library of Medicine. Keywords were ‘early rheumatoid arthritis’, ‘disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs’, ‘biologic agents’ and ‘combination therapy’. Only results of trials on human subjects that directly measured the effects of DMARDs or biological agents on clinical, laboratory parameters and radiological progression of early RA were selected. Combination therapy suppresses RA activity and radiological progression more effectively than monotherapy. If better control of RA is evident after 3–6 months of treatment with the combination of DMARDs, one must still decide whether to stop the first DMARD, stop the second, or continue with the combination. Combination therapy biological agents (infliximab, adalimumab) with methotrexate and etanercept therapy alone may induce remission in many patients with early RA. It is a method of choice in patients with an adverse prognosis. The main indications for combination therapy ‘standard’ DMARDs or combination 1 DMARDs with a biological agent are such variables as detection of a shared epitope, increase of concentration of anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, rheumatoid factor, C-reactive protein, 28-joint disease activity score, Sharp score and presence of erosion in joints. The majority of rheumatologists believe that patients with RA should be treated with DMARDs earlier rather than later in the disease process. Further trials should establish the optimal approaches to early RA therapy. PMID:18537958

  5. Anti-CCP Antibody, a Marker for the Early Detection of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    van Venrooij, Walther J; van Beers, Joyce J B C; Pruijn, Ger J M

    2008-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of synovial joints. In most cases this will lead to the formation of pannus tissue, ultimately leading to joint destruction. Early diagnosis, coupled with aggressive use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, has been shown to have a favorable effect on the course of the disease. Therefore, early and accurate diagnosis has become increasingly important. Several sets of criteria have been published to achieve such an early diagnosis, and all of them include measurement of antibodies directed to citrullinated peptides or proteins. This review summarizes our present knowledge about the most well-known and established test to measure these antibodies, the anti-CCP test, which measures antibodies directed to cyclic citrullinated peptides. We describe the current views on how these antibodies are generated and how genetic and environmental parameters are important in this process. The anti-CCP test is more specific than the commonly used RF test (95% versus less than 90%) and has a comparable sensitivity (more than 70%). These antibodies are detectable very early in the disease and are reported to predict the development of erosive RA. Increasing evidence supports a role for these antibodies in the pathology of the disease. In conclusion, testing for anti-CCP autoantibodies is widely accepted as an indispensable tool for diagnosis and early treatment in the management of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... also cause side effects, such as easy bruising, bone thinning, cataracts and diabetes. Antirheumatic (say: "anti-roo-mat-ick") medicines can help fight RA. If these medicines are started early ... arthritis, osteoarthritis, RA, rheumatic disease, rheumatoid nodules, ...

  7. Remission-induction therapies for early rheumatoid arthritis: evidence to date and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Francisco; Fabre, Sylvie; Pers, Yves-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Recent guidelines on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) point to the importance of achieving remission as soon as possible during the course of the disease. The appropriate use of antirheumatic drugs is critical, particularly in early RA patients, before 24 weeks, since this is a ‘window of opportunity’ for treatment to modify disease progression. A treat-to-target strategy added to an aggressive therapeutic approach increases the chance of early remission, particularly in early RA patients. We conducted an overview of current therapeutic strategies leading to remission in early RA patients. We also provide interesting predictive factors that can guide the RA management strategy with regard to disease-modifying treatment and/or drug-free remission. PMID:27493689

  8. Remission-induction therapies for early rheumatoid arthritis: evidence to date and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Francisco; Fabre, Sylvie; Pers, Yves-Marie

    2016-08-01

    Recent guidelines on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) point to the importance of achieving remission as soon as possible during the course of the disease. The appropriate use of antirheumatic drugs is critical, particularly in early RA patients, before 24 weeks, since this is a 'window of opportunity' for treatment to modify disease progression. A treat-to-target strategy added to an aggressive therapeutic approach increases the chance of early remission, particularly in early RA patients. We conducted an overview of current therapeutic strategies leading to remission in early RA patients. We also provide interesting predictive factors that can guide the RA management strategy with regard to disease-modifying treatment and/or drug-free remission.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging applications in early rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Troum, Orrin M; Pimienta, Olga; Olech, Ewa

    2012-05-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment have been recognized as essential for improving clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive modality that can assess both inflammatory and structural lesions. MRI can assist in following the disease course in patients treated with traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biological therapies both in the clinic and in research trials. Therefore, it is anticipated that MRI becomes the diagnostic imaging modality of choice in RA clinical trials while remaining a useful tool for clinicians evaluating patients with RA.

  10. [The ultrasonography of the capsular ligamentous apparatus of the knee joint in the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Herasymenko, S I; Huzhevs'kyĭ, I V; Vovchenko, H Ia; Babko, A N

    1999-07-01

    With the purpose of finding out informative value of the ultrasound investigation designed to study the capsular and ligamentous apparatus of the knee joint in its instability during the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis and correlating clinical symptoms with ultrasonographic findings an examination was done of twenty joints of patients in early stages of rheumatoid arthritis presenting with clinical signs of anterior-medial instability. Sonography confirmed the presence of instability and permitted the qualitative assessment of its degree to be done. The method allows us to disclose relative incompetence of the anterior-medial sector of the knee joint in those patients presenting with early stages of rheumatoid arthritis, which is one of causes of instability, with the cruciate and lateral ligaments remaining uninjured. Ultrasonography makes it possible to perform a quantitative assessment of the degree of instability of the joint irrespective of the clinical test used and experience of the orthopedist.

  11. Genetic Variants Associated with Methotrexate Efficacy and Toxicity in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from the Treatment of Early Aggressive Rheumatoid Arthritis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aslibekyan, Stella; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Redden, David T.; Morgan, Sarah; Baggott, Joseph; Sha, Jin; Moreland, Larry W.; O’Dell, James R.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Mikuls, Ted R.; Bridges, S. Louis; Arnett, Donna K.

    2013-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) has emerged as first-line therapy for early moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but individual variation in treatment response remains unexplained. We tested the associations between 863 known pharmacogenetic variants and MTX response in 471 TEAR Trial participants with early RA. Efficacy and toxicity were modeled using multiple regression, adjusted for demographic and clinical covariates. Penalized regression models were used to test joint associations of markers and/or covariates with the outcomes. The strongest genetic associations with efficacy were in CHST11 (five markers with P <0.003), encoding carbohydrate (chondroitin 4) sulfotransferase 11. Top markers associated with MTX toxicity were in the cytochrome p450 genes CYP20A1 and CYP39A1, solute carrier genes SLC22A2 and SLC7A7, and the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALDH2. The selected markers explained a consistently higher proportion of variation in toxicity than efficacy. These findings could inform future development of personalized therapeutic approaches. PMID:23545897

  12. Prediction of radiological outcome in early rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice: role of antibodies to citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP)

    PubMed Central

    Forslind, K; Ahlmen, M; Eberhardt, K; Hafstrom, I; Svensson, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP) for the prediction of radiological outcome in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Anti-CCP was assessed at baseline in 379 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (disease duration <1 year). Radiological joint damage and progression were assessed by Larsen score after two years of follow up (end point) and used as outcome variables. The prognostic value of anti-CCP and other demographic and disease related baseline variables were assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses, including calculation of odds ratios (OR), predictive values, and multiple logistic regression models. Results: The presence of anti-CCP was associated with significantly higher Larsen score both at baseline and at end point. Univariate predictor analysis showed that anti-CCP had the highest significant OR for radiological joint damage and progression after baseline Larsen score, followed by rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C reactive protein, age, smoking status, and sex. In stepwise multiple regression analyses, baseline Larsen score, anti-CCP, and ESR were selected as significant independent predictors of the radiological outcomes. Conclusions: There is good evidence for an association of anti-CCP with radiological joint changes in rheumatoid arthritis. Anti-CCP is an independent predictor of radiological damage and progression. Though prediction in early rheumatoid arthritis is still far from perfect, the use of anti-CCP in clinical practice should make it easier for rheumatologists to reach judicious treatment decisions. PMID:15308518

  13. Prototype system of laser transillumination computed tomography for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yoshiaki; Tanosaki, Shinji; Suzuki, Jota; Emori, Ryota; Inage, Hiroki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Takagi, Michiaki; Ishikawa, Akira; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Devaraj, Balasigamani; Akatsuka, Takao

    2003-07-01

    So far we have shown, through various preliminary imaging experiments with small-animal ankle"s and human finger"s joints both healthy and joint-diseased, that early diagnosis for joint disease such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is feasible using a transillumination laser CT. For a practical purpose, we have recently proposed and developed a transillumination laser CT imaging system using optical fibers based on the optical heterodyne detection method for a clinical use. In the proposed system, motion-artifact free images can be obtained because measurements can be performed with the object fixed. In addition, use of fiber-optics enables portability, and robustness against environmental changes in a room, such as variable temperature, air-flow shifts, and unexpected vibrations. The imaging system has the following sensing properties: spatial resolution of 500 μm, a dynamic range of approximately 120 dB, and a minimum-detectable-optical power of 10-14 W as a result of the excellent properties of the heterodyne detection technique. In the present paper, we describe a prototype laser CT imaging system using optical fibers for early diagnosis of joint disease such as rheumatoid arthritis by demonstrating the first in vivo tomographic image of a volunteer"s index finger joint as well as the fundamental imaging properties.

  14. The Influence of Early Menopause on Cardiovascular Risk in Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Emily C; Crowson, Cynthia S; Amin, Shreyasee; Gabriel, Sherine E; Matteson, Eric L

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Early menopause is associated with an increased risk for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women increases following menopause. Since RA is associated with an increased risk of CVD, this study was undertaken to determine if early menopause affects the risk of developing CVD in women with RA. Methods: A population-based inception cohort of 600 women with RA who fulfilled 1987 ACR criteria for RA between 1955 and 2007 and were age ≥ 45 years at diagnosis was assembled and followed. Age at menopause and duration of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), along with occurrence of CVD was ascertained by review of medical records. Cox proportional hazard models compared women who underwent early menopause (natural or artificial menopause at age ≤ 45 years) to those within the cohort who did not undergo early menopause. Results: Of 600 women, 79 exprienced early menopause. Women who underwent early menopause were at significantly higher risk for developing CVD when compared to women who did not (hazard ratio (HR): 1.56; 95% CI: 1.08-2.26). Conclusion: The risk of CVD in women with RA was higher in those who experience early menopause, and like other known risk factors should increase clinician concern for development of CVD in these patients. PMID:24882842

  15. What can we learn from the synovium in early rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Katrib, A; McNeil, H P; Youssef, P P

    2002-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects approximately 1% of the population and is a chronic inflammatory joint disease resulting in joint destruction, increased morbidity and mortality. Although the aetiology of this disease is unknown, the pivotal role played by cytokines and degradative enzymes in mediating inflammation and joint destruction, particularly early in the disease process, has been the focus of recent literature and will be the focus of this review. Up until recently, studies on early RA were limited as there was an inherent delay in patients reaching the rheumatologist's care and initial diagnostic confusion may have compounded these problems. In particular, the observation that early intervention improves outcome, has driven the study of early RA. It is difficult to define early RA but most studies have defined this as disease duration of less than 12 months from symptom onset. Clearly, it is important to study the synovial membrane in early disease, in particular to try and answer the important questions: (1) What are the earliest changes to occur in the RA synovium? (2) Can we distinguish RA on the basis of synovial membrane pathology? (3) Can synovial immunopathology predict outcome? (4) What is the role of arthroscopic biopsy in early RA?

  16. Immune complexes in early arthritis. L Detection of immune complexes before rheumatoid arthritis is definite.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, V E; Jacoby, R K; Wallington, T; Holt, P

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-three patients with early arthritis were studied longitudinally for up to 3 years. During this time, 24 developed sufficient features for definite rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to be diagnosed. The other (arthralgia patients) differed from the RA patients as, in the majority, C-reactive protein and ESR were normal and anti-nuclear antibodies or rheumatoid factors were rarely found. Moreover, in time their signs and symptoms improved or disappeared. Circulating immune complexes were detected in both groups of patients by the platelet aggregation test whereas complexes detected by abnormal Clq-binding activity were found mainly in the RA patients. Platelet-aggregating complexes were usually present in the first samples studied and disappeared in the arthralgia patients with recovery from their symptoms. In the RA patients, Clq-binding complexes appeared simultaneously or later than platelet-aggregating complexes but both tests were positive several months before RA could be diagnosed. These results suggest that immune complexes are one of the first immunological abnormalities to appear in patients with arthritis. Although the constituent antigen and antibody of complexes detected by either test are unknown, their possible nature is discussed. PMID:6976861

  17. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF): genetic evidence for participation in early onset and early stage rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Llamas-Covarrubias, MA; Valle, Y; Bucala, R; Navarro-Hernández, RE; Palafox-Sánchez, CA; Padilla-Gutiérrez, JR; Parra-Rojas, I; Bernard-Medina, AG; Reyes-Castillo, Z; Muñoz-Valle, JF

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an upstream pro-inflammatory cytokine that is associated with the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Two polymorphisms in the upstream region exist in the MIF gene and are associated with RA susceptibility or severity in different populations. In this case-control study, we investigated whether MIF polymorphisms are associated with RA susceptibility or activity in a western Mexican population .The relationship of MIF levels with clinical features of disease also was assessed. Genotyping of the -794 CATT5-8(rs5844572) and the -173 G>C (s755622) polymorphisms was performed by PCR and PCR-RFLP respectively on 226 RA patients and 210 healthy subjects. Serum MIF levels were determined by ELISA. We found a significant association between the -794 CATT5-8 6,7 MIF genotype with RA. Moreover, we detected an association between the -794 CATT7 allele with early onset RA. The -794 CATT7 and -173*C alleles, which are in linkage disequilibrium, were associated with high disease activityon RA patients. A positive correlation between circulating MIF levels and C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated protein/peptides antibodies and TNFα was detected. MIF levels appear to be associated with disease progression rather than disease activity, which is distinct from the established relationship between disease activity and TNFα levels. In conclusion, the MIF gene and protein are associated with RA in a western Mexican population, with a main contribution onto early onset and early stages of disease. PMID:23402792

  18. Early BHs: simulations and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelluti, Nico; di-Matteo, Tiziana; Schawinski, Kevin; Fragos, Tassos

    We report recent investigations in the field of Early Black Holes. We summarize recent theoretical and observational efforts to understand how Black Holes formed and eventually evolved into Super Massive Black Holes at high-z. This paper makes use of state of the art computer simulations and multiwavelength surveys. Although non conclusive, we present results and hypothesis that pose exciting challenges to modern astrophysics and to future facilities.

  19. Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Abdul Hadi; Raghavendra Rao, Nidagurthi Guggilla; Avanapu, Srinivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of present research was to develop matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam filled in capsule for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and Methods: Matrix-mini-tablets of lornoxicam were prepared by direct compression method using microsomal enzyme dependent and pH-sensitive polymers which were further filled into an empty HPMC capsule. To assess the compatibility, FT-IR and DSC studies for pure drug, polymers and their physical mixture were performed. The formulated batches were subjected to physicochemical studies, estimation of drug content, in vitro drug release, drug release kinetics, and stability studies. Results: When FTIR and DSC studies were performed it was found that there was no interaction between lornoxicam and polymers which used. All the physicochemical properties of prepared matrix-mini-tablets were found to be in normal limits. The percentage of drug content was found to be 99.60±0.07%. Our optimized matrix mini-tablets-filled-capsule formulation F30 released lornoxicam after a lag time of 5.02±0.92 hr, 95.48±0.65 % at the end of 8 hr and 99.90±0.83 % at the end of 12 hr. Stability was also found for this formulation as per the guidelines of International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. Conclusion: A novel colon targeted delivery system of lornoxicam was successfully developed by filling matrix-mini-tablets into an empty HPMC capsule shell for targeting early morning peak symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24967065

  20. Mining Disease Risk Patterns from Nationwide Clinical Databases for the Assessment of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Chu Yu; Weng, Meng Yu; Lin, Tzu Chieh; Cheng, Shyr Yuan; Yang, Yea Huei Kao; Tseng, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune rheumatic disease that can cause painful swelling in the joint lining, morning stiffness, and joint deformation/destruction. These symptoms decrease both quality of life and life expectancy. However, if RA can be diagnosed in the early stages, it can be controlled with pharmacotherapy. Although many studies have examined the possibility of early assessment and diagnosis, few have considered the relationship between significant risk factors and the early assessment of RA. In this paper, we present a novel framework for early RA assessment that utilizes data preprocessing, risk pattern mining, validation, and analysis. Under our proposed framework, two risk patterns can be discovered. Type I refers to well-known risk patterns that have been identified by existing studies, whereas Type II denotes unknown relationship risk patterns that have rarely or never been reported in the literature. These Type II patterns are very valuable in supporting novel hypotheses in clinical trials of RA, and constitute the main contribution of this work. To ensure the robustness of our experimental evaluation, we use a nationwide clinical database containing information on 1,314 RA-diagnosed patients over a 12-year follow-up period (1997–2008) and 965,279 non-RA patients. Our proposed framework is employed on this large-scale population-based dataset, and is shown to effectively discover rich RA risk patterns. These patterns may assist physicians in patient assessment, and enhance opportunities for early detection of RA. The proposed framework is broadly applicable to the mining of risk patterns for major disease assessments. This enables the identification of early risk patterns that are significantly associated with a target disease. PMID:25875441

  1. Mining disease risk patterns from nationwide clinical databases for the assessment of early rheumatoid arthritis risk.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chu Yu; Weng, Meng Yu; Lin, Tzu Chieh; Cheng, Shyr Yuan; Yang, Yea Huei Kao; Tseng, Vincent S

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune rheumatic disease that can cause painful swelling in the joint lining, morning stiffness, and joint deformation/destruction. These symptoms decrease both quality of life and life expectancy. However, if RA can be diagnosed in the early stages, it can be controlled with pharmacotherapy. Although many studies have examined the possibility of early assessment and diagnosis, few have considered the relationship between significant risk factors and the early assessment of RA. In this paper, we present a novel framework for early RA assessment that utilizes data preprocessing, risk pattern mining, validation, and analysis. Under our proposed framework, two risk patterns can be discovered. Type I refers to well-known risk patterns that have been identified by existing studies, whereas Type II denotes unknown relationship risk patterns that have rarely or never been reported in the literature. These Type II patterns are very valuable in supporting novel hypotheses in clinical trials of RA, and constitute the main contribution of this work. To ensure the robustness of our experimental evaluation, we use a nationwide clinical database containing information on 1,314 RA-diagnosed patients over a 12-year follow-up period (1997-2008) and 965,279 non-RA patients. Our proposed framework is employed on this large-scale population-based dataset, and is shown to effectively discover rich RA risk patterns. These patterns may assist physicians in patient assessment, and enhance opportunities for early detection of RA. The proposed framework is broadly applicable to the mining of risk patterns for major disease assessments. This enables the identification of early risk patterns that are significantly associated with a target disease.

  2. Efficacy of tofacitinib monotherapy in methotrexate-naive patients with early or established rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fleischmann, Roy M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Kavanaugh, Arthur F; Wilkinson, Bethanie; Kwok, Kenneth; DeMasi, Ryan; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tofacitinib monotherapy was previously shown to inhibit structural damage, reduce clinical signs and symptoms of RA, and improve physical functioning over 24 months in methotrexate (MTX)-naive adult patients with RA. In this post hoc analysis, we compared efficacy and safety of tofacitinib in patients with early (disease duration <1 year) versus established (≥1 year) RA. Methods MTX-naive patients ≥18 years with active RA received tofacitinib monotherapy (5 or 10 mg two times a day, or MTX monotherapy, in a 24-month Phase 3 trial. Results Of 956 patients (tofacitinib 5 mg two times a day, n=373; tofacitinib 10 mg two times a day, n=397; MTX, n=186), 54% had early RA. Baseline disease activity and functional disability were similar in both groups; radiographic damage was greater in patients with established RA. At month 24, clinical response rates were significantly greater in patients with early versus established RA in the tofacitinib 5 mg two times a day group. Both tofacitinib doses had greater effects on clinical, functional and radiographic improvements at 1 and 2 years compared with MTX, independent of disease duration. No new safety signals were observed. Conclusions Treatment response was generally similar in early and established RA; significantly greater improvements were observed at month 24 with tofacitinib 5 mg two times a day in early versus established RA. Tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg two times a day demonstrated greater efficacy versus MTX irrespective of disease duration. No difference in safety profiles was observed between patients with early or established RA. Trial registration number NCT01039688; Results. PMID:27493790

  3. The performance of a point of care test for detection of anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin and rheumatoid factor in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rojanasantikul, Preeda; Pattrapornpisut, Prapa; Anuruckparadorn, Kulvara; Katchamart, Wanruchada

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of a point-of-care test (POCT) for detection of anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV) and rheumatoid factor (RF) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with 2 years of disease duration or less. Additionally, we evaluated the agreement of these tests when using EDTA whole blood and capillary blood. Patients with RA and other rheumatic disorders were consecutively recruited from the rheumatology outpatient clinic. The POCT for detection of anti-MCV and RF using capillary blood and EDTA whole blood was performed in 78 patients with early RA, 55 patients with other rheumatic disorders, and 55 healthy blood donors. The sensitivity and specificity of anti-MCV POCT in patients with early RA were 64 and 97 %, respectively, while the sensitivity and specificity of RF POCT were 51 and 95 %, respectively. The positive likelihood ratio of the POCT for anti-MCV was higher than those for RF (23.5 vs 9.4). The negative likelihood was 0.37 for anti-MCV and 0.52 for RF. There were three cases with false positive for anti-MCV including a patient with psoriatic arthritis and the other two with systemic sclerosis. The agreement between capillary blood and EDTA whole blood testing for anti-MCV and RF was low to moderate with Cohen's kappa of 0.58 and 0.49, respectively. This POCT for detection of anti-MCV and RF yielded high specificity and may be a valuable tool for the diagnosis of early RA. Using this POCT with EDTA whole blood instead of capillary blood is not recommended.

  4. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J; Kvien, Tore K; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Abadie, Eric C; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-07-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft 'Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA' released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria.

  5. Automatic Quantification of Radiographic Finger Joint Space Width of Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yinghe; Vincken, Koen L; van der Heijde, Desiree; De Hair, Maria J H; Lafeber, Floris P; Viergever, Max A

    2016-10-01

    The assessment of joint space width (JSW) on hand X-ray images of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a time-consuming task. Manual assessment is semiquantitative and is observer dependent which hinders an accurate evaluation of joint damage, particularly in the early stages. Automated analysis of the JSW is an important step forward since it is observer independent and might improve the assessment sensitivity in the early RA stage. This study proposes a fully automatic method for both joint location and margin detection in RA hand radiographs. The location detection procedure is based on image features of the joint region and is aided by geometric relationship of finger joints. More than 99% of joint locations are detected with an error smaller than 3 mm with respect to the manually indicated gold standard. The joint margins are detected by combining intensity values and spatially constrained intensity derivatives, refined by an active contour model. More than 96% of the joints are successfully delineated. The JSW is calculated over the middle 60% of a landmark-defined joint span. The overall JSW error compared with the ground truth is 6.8%. In conclusion, the proposed method is able to automatically locate the finger joints in RA hand radiographs, and to quantify the JSW of these joints.

  6. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease

    PubMed Central

    Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J; Kvien, Tore K; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Abadie, Eric C; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft ‘Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA’ released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria. PMID:27037326

  7. Diagnostic value of high-frequency ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Yu; Wang, Xian-Bin; Sun, Xue-Hui; Liu, Feng-Li; Huang, Sheng-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis and management improve the outcome of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study explored the application of high-frequency ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of early RA. Thirty-nine patients (20 males and 19 females) diagnosed with early RA were enrolled in the study. A total of 1,248 positions, including 858 hand joints and 390 tendons, were examined by high-frequency US and MRI to evaluate the presence of bone erosion, bone marrow edema (BME), synovial proliferation, joint effusion, tendinitis and tendon sheath edema. The imaging results of the above abnormalities, detected by US, were compared with those identified using MRI. No statistically significant overall changes were observed between high-frequency US and MRI in detecting bone erosion [44 (5.1%) vs. 35 (4.1%), respectively; P>0.05], tendinitis [18 (4.6%) vs. 14 (1.5%), respectively; P>0.05] and tendon sheath edema [37 (9.5%) vs. 30 (7.7%), respectively; P>0.05]. Significant differences were observed between high-frequency US and MRI with regards to the detection of synovial proliferation [132 (15.4%) vs. 66 (7.7%), respectively; P<0.05] and joint effusion [89 (10.4%) vs. 52 (6.1%), respectively; P<0.05]. In addition, significant differences were identified between the detection of BME using MRI compared with high-frequency US (5.5 vs. 0%, respectively; P<0.05). MRI and high-frequency US of the dominant hand and wrist joints were comparably sensitive to bone erosion, tendinitis and tendon sheath edema. However, MRI was more sensitive in detecting bone marrow edema in early RA, while US was more sensitive in the evaluation of joint effusion and synovial proliferation. In conclusion, US and MRI are promising for the detection and diagnosis of inflammatory activity in patients with RA. PMID:27882112

  8. Terminal monosaccharide screening of synovial immunoglobulins G and A for the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Ewa Maria; Borysewicz, Krzysztof; Katnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2010-08-01

    The expressions of some terminal glycotopes of synovial immunoglobulins G, A, and M were analysed in relation to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) progression defined according to early and advanced radiological changes in patients' hands. The relative amounts of terminal monosaccharides were determined by lectin-immunoblotting of immunoglobulin preparations using appropriate lectins able to recognize alpha2,6-linked (Sambucus nigra agglutinin) and alpha2,3-linked (Maackia amurensis agglutinin) sialic acid, galactose (Ricinus communis agglutinin I), N-acetylglucosamine (Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin II) as well as alpha1,6-linked (Aleuria aurantia lectin), alpha1,3-linked (Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin), and alpha1,2-linked (Ulex europaeus agglutinin) fucose. The results indicate differences between early and advanced RA stages in the terminal sugar exposition of synovial IgG and IgA, but not IgM. The galactose-deficient glycotope with exposed N-acetylglucosamine of the synovial 33.1-kDa IgG fragment appeared exclusively in the early stage of RA. In contrast, this glycotope of intact synovial IgG and IgA was present in both groups, although with higher proportions in advanced RA. The proportions of the sialyl and fucosyl determinants of intact synovial A and G immunoglobulins were clearly lower in the early RA group than in the advanced. The analysis of terminal oligosaccharide exposition in IgG, IgG fragments, and IgA present in the synovial fluid of RA patients might be applicable as a stage-specific marker in the diagnosis and therapy of RA patients.

  9. Diagnostic value of high-frequency ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Yu; Wang, Xian-Bin; Sun, Xue-Hui; Liu, Feng-Li; Huang, Sheng-Chuan

    2016-11-01

    Early diagnosis and management improve the outcome of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The present study explored the application of high-frequency ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of early RA. Thirty-nine patients (20 males and 19 females) diagnosed with early RA were enrolled in the study. A total of 1,248 positions, including 858 hand joints and 390 tendons, were examined by high-frequency US and MRI to evaluate the presence of bone erosion, bone marrow edema (BME), synovial proliferation, joint effusion, tendinitis and tendon sheath edema. The imaging results of the above abnormalities, detected by US, were compared with those identified using MRI. No statistically significant overall changes were observed between high-frequency US and MRI in detecting bone erosion [44 (5.1%) vs. 35 (4.1%), respectively; P>0.05], tendinitis [18 (4.6%) vs. 14 (1.5%), respectively; P>0.05] and tendon sheath edema [37 (9.5%) vs. 30 (7.7%), respectively; P>0.05]. Significant differences were observed between high-frequency US and MRI with regards to the detection of synovial proliferation [132 (15.4%) vs. 66 (7.7%), respectively; P<0.05] and joint effusion [89 (10.4%) vs. 52 (6.1%), respectively; P<0.05]. In addition, significant differences were identified between the detection of BME using MRI compared with high-frequency US (5.5 vs. 0%, respectively; P<0.05). MRI and high-frequency US of the dominant hand and wrist joints were comparably sensitive to bone erosion, tendinitis and tendon sheath edema. However, MRI was more sensitive in detecting bone marrow edema in early RA, while US was more sensitive in the evaluation of joint effusion and synovial proliferation. In conclusion, US and MRI are promising for the detection and diagnosis of inflammatory activity in patients with RA.

  10. A European chart review study on early rheumatoid arthritis treatment patterns, clinical outcomes, and healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Emery, Paul; Solem, Caitlyn; Majer, Istvan; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Tarallo, Miriam

    2015-11-01

    This retrospective medical chart review aimed to provide a current, real-world overview of biologic usage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Germany, Spain, and the UK, and estimate clinical and healthcare utilization outcomes associated with early versus late treatment. Adults (≥18 years) with a confirmed RA diagnosis between January 2008 and December 2010, who received biologic treatment for ≥3 months and had ≥12 months of follow-up were included. Early treatment was receipt of biologic agent ≤1 year after RA diagnosis. Outcomes included 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) reduction of ≥1.2 from biologic start and remission (DAS28 < 2.6). Time to outcome was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Of 328 patients enrolled (Germany [n = 111], Spain [n = 106], UK [n = 111]), 58.2 % received early biologic (Germany: 55.0 %, UK: 55.9 %, Spain: 64.2 %; p = 0.321). First-line biologics were more frequent in Spain (26.4 %) and Germany (19.8 %) versus the UK (7.2 %; p < 0.001). Late-treated patients were hospitalized more often than early-treated patients (10.5 vs 2.9 % [p = 0.006] for 9.0 vs 5.4 mean inpatient days [p = 0.408]). DAS28 was 5.1 at biologic initiation (n = 310); 73.5 % of patients had a DAS28 decrease of ≥1.2 and 44.5 % achieved remission. More patients had DAS28 decrease of ≥1.2 (79.2 vs 65.9 %; p = 0.009) and remission (51.1 vs 35.6 %; p = 0.007) with early versus late treatment, with a significant difference in Kaplan-Meier curves when indexing on time since diagnosis (p < 0.001) and biologic start (p = 0.024). In RA patients receiving biologic therapy, over half received biologic therapy early. Early initiation was associated with improved clinical outcomes and reduced hospitalization rates versus late treatment.

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Rheumatoid Arthritis Small Text Medium Text Large Text Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease affecting about ...

  12. Why are Dutch rheumatologists reluctant to use the COBRA treatment strategy in early rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Plass, Anne Marie C; Lems, Willem F; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Dijkmans, Ben A C; Boers, Maarten

    2007-01-01

    Background The Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoide Artritis (COBRA) trial has proved that combination therapy with prednisolone, methotrexate and sulphasalazine is superior to sulphasalazine monotherapy in suppressing disease activity and radiological progression of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, 5 years of follow‐up proved that COBRA therapy results in sustained reduction of the rate of radiological progression. Despite this evidence, Dutch rheumatologists seem reluctant to prescribe COBRA therapy. Objective To explore the reasons for the reluctance in Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe COBRA therapy. Methods A short structured questionnaire based on social–psychological theories of behaviour was sent to all Dutch rheumatologists (n = 230). Results The response rate was 50%. COBRA therapy was perceived as both effective and safe, but complex to administer. Furthermore, rheumatologists expressed their concern about the large number of pills that had to be taken, the side effects of high‐dose prednisolone and the low dose of methotrexate. Although the average attitude towards the COBRA therapy was slightly positive (above the neutral point), the majority of responding rheumatologists had a negative intention (below the neutral point) to prescribe COBRA therapy in the near future. Conclusion The reluctance of Dutch rheumatologists to prescribe effective COBRA therapy may be due to perceptions of complexity of the treatment schedule and negative patient‐related consequences of the therapy. PMID:17392349

  13. Detection of Viral Citrullinated Peptide Antibodies Directed Against EBV or VCP: In Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients of Indian Origin

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Sudha S; Shetty, Rashmi R; Mistry, Kejal J; Chogle, Arun R

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Study was undertaken to analyze the frequency of anti-viral citrullinated peptide (anti-VCP) antibodies in sera from patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA). Materials and Methods: Viral citrullinated peptide (VCP) and Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA-1) peptide were commercially prepared and antibodies to these were determined in 25 patients of ERA, 40 disease control patients constituting 25 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 7 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 2 scleroderma, 1 spondyloarthritis (SpA), 1 juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), 1 osteoarthritis (OA), 1 psoriatic arthritis (PsA), 1 undifferentiated arthritis (UA), and 1 gout and 25 healthy controls (HCs) were taken for comparison. In-house ELISA was established for both the antibodies while cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody was detected by commercial ELISA kit. Results: Significant increase in VCP antibody by ERA and disease controls than healthy normal was observed. VCP IgM antibody was significantly increased in RA patients than HC. The presence of VCP antibody signifies a good marker for ERA. We observed significant difference in the VCP IgG and IgM antibody when compared to EBNA-1. In-house ELISA established for EBNA-1 and VCP antibodies showed low sensitivity but 96% specificity. Conclusions: We observed that sera from early RA patients reacted to the deiminated protein encoded by Epstain Barr Virus (EBV). Thus a possible role of virus in inducing an anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) response reveals viral etiology in this disease. PMID:21346905

  14. Responsiveness of the core set, response criteria, and utilities in early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, A; Boers, M; van der Linden, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Validation of responsiveness and discriminative power of the World Health Organisation/International League of Associations for Rheumatology (WHO/ILAR) core set, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), and European League for Rheumatology (EULAR) criteria for improvement/response, and other single and combined measures (indices) in a trial in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—Ranking of measures by response (standardised response means and effect sizes) and between-group discrimination (unpaired t test and χ2 values) at two time points in the COBRA study. This study included 155 patients with early RA randomly allocated to two treatment groups with distinct levels of expected response: combined treatment, high response; sulfasalazine treatment, moderate response.
RESULTS—At week 16, standardised response means of core set measures ranged between 0.8 and 3.5 for combined treatment and between 0.4 and 1.2 for sulfasalazine treatment (95% confidence interval ±0.25). Performance of patient oriented measures (for example, pain, global assessment) was best when the questions were focused on the disease. The most responsive single measure was the patient's assessment of change in disease activity, at 3.5. Patient utility, a generic health status measure, was moderately (rating scale) to poorly (standard gamble) responsive. Response means of most indices (combined measures) exceeded 2.0, the simple count of core set measures improved by 20% was most responsive at 4.1. Discrimination performance yielded similar but not identical results: best discrimination between treatment groups was achieved by the EULAR response and ACR improvement criteria (at 20% and other percentage levels), the pooled index, and the disease activity score (DAS), but also by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and grip strength.
CONCLUSIONS—Responsiveness and discrimination between levels of response are not identical concepts, and

  15. Tocilizumab in early progressive rheumatoid arthritis: FUNCTION, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Burmester, Gerd R; Rigby, William F; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Rubbert-Roth, Andrea; Kelman, Ariella; Dimonaco, Sophie; Mitchell, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The efficacy of tocilizumab (TCZ), an anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody, has not previously been evaluated in a population consisting exclusively of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods In a double-blind randomised controlled trial (FUNCTION), 1162 methotrexate (MTX)-naive patients with early progressive RA were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) to one of four treatment groups: 4 mg/kg TCZ+MTX, 8 mg/kg TCZ+MTX, 8 mg/kg TCZ+placebo and placebo+MTX (comparator group). The primary outcome was remission according to Disease Activity Score using 28 joints (DAS28–erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) <2.6) at week 24. Radiographic and physical function outcomes were also evaluated. We report results through week 52. Results The intent-to-treat population included 1157 patients. Significantly more patients receiving 8 mg/kg TCZ+MTX and 8 mg/kg TCZ+placebo than receiving placebo+MTX achieved DAS28-ESR remission at week 24 (45% and 39% vs 15%; p<0.0001). The 8 mg/kg TCZ+MTX group also achieved significantly greater improvement in radiographic disease progression and physical function at week 52 than did patients treated with placebo+MTX (mean change from baseline in van der Heijde–modified total Sharp score, 0.08 vs 1.14 (p=0.0001); mean reduction in Health Assessment Disability Index, −0.81 vs −0.64 (p=0.0024)). In addition, the 8 mg/kg TCZ+placebo and 4 mg/kg TCZ+MTX groups demonstrated clinical efficacy that was at least as effective as MTX for these key secondary endpoints. Serious adverse events were similar among treatment groups. Adverse events resulting in premature withdrawal occurred in 20% of patients in the 8 mg/kg TCZ+MTX group. Conclusions TCZ is effective in combination with MTX and as monotherapy for the treatment of patients with early RA. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01007435 PMID:26511996

  16. Detection of bone erosions in early rheumatoid arthritis: 3D ultrasonography versus computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Peluso, G; Bosello, S L; Gremese, E; Mirone, L; Di Gregorio, F; Di Molfetta, V; Pirronti, T; Ferraccioli, G

    2015-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) volumetric ultrasonography (US) is an interesting tool that could improve the traditional approach to musculoskeletal US in rheumatology, due to its virtual operator independence and reduced examination time. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of 3DUS in the detection of bone erosions in hand and wrist joints of early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients, with computed tomography (CT) as the reference method. Twenty ERA patients without erosions on standard radiography of hands and wrists underwent 3DUS and CT evaluation of eleven joints: radiocarpal, intercarpal, ulnocarpal, second to fifth metacarpo-phalangeal (MCP), and second to fifth proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints of dominant hand. Eleven (55.0%) patients were erosive with CT and ten of them were erosive also at 3DUS evaluation. In five patients, 3DUS identified cortical breaks that were not erosions at CT evaluation. Considering CT as the gold standard to identify erosive patients, the 3DUS sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 0.9, 0.55, 0.71, and 0.83, respectively. A total of 32 erosions were detected with CT, 15 of them were also observed at the same sites with 3DUS, whereas 17 were not seen on 3DUS evaluation. The majority of these 3DUS false-negative erosions were in the wrist joints. Furthermore, 18 erosions recorded by 3DUS were false positive. The majority of these 3DUS false-positive erosions were located at PIP joints. This study underlines the limits of 3DUS in detecting individual bone erosion, mostly at the wrist, despite the good sensitivity in identifying erosive patients.

  17. The Relationship of Cytokines IL-13 and IL-17 with Autoantibodies Profile in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Siloşi, Isabela; Boldeanu, Mihail Virgil; Cojocaru, Manole; Badea, Ramona Georgiana

    2016-01-01

    Aims. In the present study, we aimed to assess the concentrations of IL-13 and IL-17 in serum of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA), the investigation of correlation between the concentrations of these cytokines and disease activity score, and the concentration of some autoantibodies and the evaluation of the utility of IL-13 and -17 concentration measurements as markers of disease activity. Materials and Methods. Serum samples were collected from 30 patients and from 28 controls and analysed parameters. Results. The serum concentrations of IL-13, IL-17, anti-CCP, and IgM-RF were statistically significantly higher in patients with eRA, compared to the controls. IL-13 concentrations in the severe and moderate groups with eRA were statistically higher than in the mild and control groups. Also, in the case of IL-17, serum concentrations increased proportionally with the disease activity of eRA. We observe that concentrations of IL-13 and -17 did not correlate with autoantibodies. IL-17 concentration significantly positively correlated with CRP, while IL-13 concentration significantly negatively correlated with CRP. Disease activity score, DAS28, was strongly positively correlated with levels of ESR and weakly positively correlated with concentrations of anti-RA33 autoantibodies. IL-13 has a higher diagnostic utility than IL-17, CRP, ESR, IgM-RF, and anti-CCP as markers of disease activity. Conclusions. The presence of higher IL-13 and IL-17 serum levels in patients, compared with those of controls, confirms that these markers, found with high specificity, might be involved in the pathogenesis of eRA. IL-13 and IL-17 might be of better usefulness in the prediction of eRA activity status than IgM-RF and anti-CCP. PMID:27579330

  18. Early detection of rheumatoid arthritis in rats and humans with 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy: imaging synovial neoangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangcheng; Zhao, Zhenfang; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xuemei; Li, Xiao-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To validate 99mTc-labeled arginylglycylaspartic acid (99mTc-3PRGD2) scintigraphy as a means to image synovial neoangiogenesis in joints afflicted by rheumatoid arthritis and to investigate its potential in the early detection and management of rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis were generated in Sprague Dawley rats by type II collagen immunization and papain injection, respectively. Rats were imaged with 99mTc-3PRGD2 and 99mTc- methyl diphosphonate (99mTc MDP). X-ray images were also obtained and assessed by a radiologist. Immunohistochemistry of αvβ3 and CD31confirmed the onset of synovial neoangiogenesis. The effect of bevacizumab on rheumatoid arthritis was followed with 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy. A patient with rheumatoid arthritis and a healthy volunteer were scanned with 99mTc-3PRGD2. Results: Two weeks after immunization, a significant increase in 99mTc-3PRGD2 was observed in the joints of the rheumatoid arthritis model though uptake in osteoarthritis model and untreated controls was low. 99mTc-MDP whole body scans failed to distinguish early rheumatoid arthritis joints from healthy controls. The expression of αvβ3 and CD31was significantly higher in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis rats compared to normal controls. In serial 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy studies, 99mTc-3PRGD2 uptake increased in parallel with disease progression. Bevacizumab anti-angiogenetic therapy both improved the symptoms of the rheumatoid arthritis rats and significantly decreased 99mTc-3PRGD2 uptake. Significantly higher 99mTc-3PRGD2 accumulation was also observed in rheumatoid arthritis joints in the patient. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that 99mTc-3PRGD2 scintigraphy could detect early rheumatoid arthritis by imaging the associated synovial neoangiogenesis, and may be useful in disease management. PMID:27992368

  19. Periodontitis in early and chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective follow-up study in Finnish population

    PubMed Central

    Äyräväinen, Leena; Leirisalo-Repo, Marjatta; Kuuliala, Antti; Ahola, Kirsi; Koivuniemi, Riitta; Meurman, Jukka H; Heikkinen, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis with special emphasis on the role of antirheumatic drugs in periodontal health. Design Prospective follow-up study. Patients with early untreated RA and chronic active RA were examined at baseline and 16 months later. Controls were examined once. Settings and participants The study was conducted in Finland from September 2005 to May 2014 at the Helsinki University Hospital. Overall, 124 participants were recruited for dental and medical examinations: 53 were patients with early disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) naїve RA (ERA), 28 were patients with chronic RA (CRA) with insufficient response to conventional DMARDs. After baseline examination, patients with ERA started treatment with synthetic DMARDs and patients with CRA with biological DMARDs. Controls were 43 age-matched, gender-matched and community-matched participants. Outcome measures Degree of periodontitis (defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Periodontology). Prevalence of periodontal bacteria (analysed from plaque samples), clinical rheumatological status by Disease Activity Score, 28-joint count (DAS28), function by Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and treatment response by European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria. Results Moderate periodontitis was present in 67.3% of patients with ERA, 64.3% of patients with CRA and 39.5% of control participants (p=0.001). Further, patients with RA had significantly more periodontal findings compared with controls, recorded with common periodontal indexes. In the re-examination, patients with RA still showed poor periodontal health in spite of treatment with DMARDs after baseline examination. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis was higher in patients with ERA with periodontal probing depth ≥4 mm compared with patients with CRA and controls. Antirheumatic medication did not seem

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-10-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, which can cause cartilage and bone damage as well as disability. Early diagnosis is key to optimal therapeutic success, particularly in patients with well-characterised risk factors for poor outcomes such as high disease activity, presence of autoantibodies, and early joint damage. Treatment algorithms involve measuring disease activity with composite indices, applying a treatment-to-target strategy, and use of conventional, biological, and newz non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. After the treatment target of stringent remission (or at least low disease activity) is maintained, dose reduction should be attempted. Although the prospects for most patients are now favourable, many still do not respond to current therapies. Accordingly, new therapies are urgently required. In this Seminar, we describe current insights into genetics and aetiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, assessment, therapeutic agents, and treatment strategies together with unmet needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Perinatal and early childhood risk factors associated with rheumatoid factor positivity in a healthy paediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Young, Kendra A; Parrish, Lezlie A; Zerbe, Gary O; Rewers, Marian; Deane, Kevin D; Holers, V Michael; Norris, Jill M

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine perinatal and childhood risk factors for the presence of rheumatoid factor in healthy children. Methods The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) is a longitudinal study of children at increased risk of type 1 diabetes, based on possession of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)‐DR4 and DR3 alleles or a family history of diabetes. 651 children who participated in DAISY, with an average age of 6.4 (range 1–15) years, were tested for the presence of rheumatoid factor in their most recent serum sample. 23 children were positive for rheumatoid factor. Exposure data were collected prospectively by interview. HLA‐DR4 alleles were identified using polymerase chain reaction‐based Class II genotyping. Results While exploring risk factors for rheumatoid factor positivity in a multivariate model, several important interaction terms involving HLA‐DR4 status suggested the need to evaluate risk factors in HLA‐DR4‐positive and HLA‐DR4‐negative children separately. In HLA‐DR4‐negative children, rheumatoid factor‐positive infants were less likely to have been breast fed for >3 months (odds ratio (OR) 0.18; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04 to 0.99), more likely to have been exposed to non‐parental tobacco smoke (OR 5.38; 95% CI 0.93 to 31.27) and more likely to be a race/ethnicity other than non‐Hispanic white (OR 6.94; 95% CI 1.10 to 43.88) compared with rheumatoid factor‐negative children, after adjusting for age, sex and maternal education. In HLA‐DR4‐positive children, there were no significantly associated risk factors for rheumatoid factor positivity. Conclusions Risk factors for rheumatoid factor positivity in children vary by HLA‐DR4 genotype. In HLA‐DR4‐negative children, breast feeding may decrease the risk, and environmental tobacco smoke may increase the risk, of autoimmunity. PMID:17242018

  2. Initial high-dose prednisolone combination therapy using COBRA and COBRA-light in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Linda A; van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Lems, Willem F; Boers, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with initial high-dose prednisolone and a combination of methotrexate (MTX) and sulfasalazine (SSZ) according to the COBRA regimen (Dutch acronym for combinatietherapie bij reumatoide artritis, 'combination therapy for rheumatoid arthritis'), has repeatedly been demonstrated to be very effective in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). COBRA combination therapy is superior to initial monotherapy of SSZ and MTX, is also associated with a good long-term outcome, is as safe as other treatment regimes, and performs as well as the combination of high-dose MTX and the tumor necrosis factor antagonist infliximab. A pilot study with an intensified version of the COBRA combination therapy showed that strict monitoring and aggressive treatment intensification based on the Disease Activity Score can result in a remission rate of 90% in patients with active early RA. Also, the first results indicate that an attenuated variation on COBRA combination therapy, called 'COBRA-light', is effective in decreasing disease activity and is generally well tolerated. Based on these results, we conclude that initial high-dose prednisolone in combination with MTX and SSZ could or should be the first choice in early active RA since it is effective and safe, and the cost price of the drugs is low.

  3. The 1st National Clinical audit for Rheumatoid and Early Inflammatory Arthritis: findings and implications for nursing practice

    PubMed Central

    Firth, J; Snowden, N; Ledingham, J; Rivett, A; Galloway, J; Dennison, EM; MacPhie, E; Ide, Z; Rowe, I; Kandala, N; Jameson, K

    2016-01-01

    The first national audit for rheumatoid and early inflammatory arthritis has benchmarked care for the first three months of follow up activity from first presentation to a rheumatology service. Access to care, management of early RA and support for self care were measured against NICE quality standards and impact of early arthritis and experience of care were measured using patient reported outcome and experience measures. The results demonstrate delays in referral and accessing specialist care and the need for service improvement in treating to target, suppression of high levels of disease activity and support for self-care. Improvements in patient -reported outcomes within three months and high levels of overall satisfaction were reported but these results were affected by low response rates. Here we present a summary of the national data from the audit and discuss the implications for nursing practice. PMID:27281595

  4. Relation between bone mineral density and IL-17 serum levels in Serbian patients with early Rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dimic, Aleksandar; Milenkovic, Sasa; Krtinic, Dane; Aleksic, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial inflammation and destruction of joint cartilage and bone. Different cytokines play important role in the processes that cause articular destruction and extra-articular manifestations in RA. The contribution of cytokines representing the Th1 (INF-γ), Th2 (IL-4) and IL-17A to the pathogenesis of early RA and bone mineral density (BMD) loss in still poorly understood. Serum samples of 38 early RA patients were evaluated for erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), rheumatoid factor (RF), C-reactive protein (CRP), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) and for the tested cytokines (IL-17A, IL-4 and INF-γ). BMD was evaluated by dualenergy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Disease activity score (DAS28) calculation was assessed for all patients. Control serum samples were obtained from 34 healthy volunteers. The levels of tested cytokines were significantly higher (IL-17A, p<0.001; INF-γ, P<0.001; IL-4, P<0.01) in patients with early RA, compared to the healthy controls. In early RA patients, strong correlation of serum IL-17A was found with DAS28, ESR and CRP. Also, a significant negative correlation was found between serum INF-γ levels and the DAS28 score. Significantly positive correlation of BMD values and CRP, DAS28 IL-17A were also demonstrated. DXA analysis revealed that the most common site for osteoporosis was the lumbar spine followed by the femoral neck. BMD values significantly correlated with CRP, DAS28 score and IL-17A serum levels. The mean serum IL-17A levels, in patients with early RA, corresponded with disease activity, severity and BMD loss, indicating the potential usefulness of serum IL-17A in defining the disease activity and bone remodeling. PMID:28352685

  5. Rheumatoid Vasculitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... RV) is an unusual complication of longstanding, severe rheumatoid arthritis. The active vasculitis associated with rheumatoid disease occurs ... a manifestation of “extra-articular” (beyond the joint)rheumatoid arthritis and involves the small and medium-sized arteries ...

  6. Diagnostic performance of the Forced Oscillation Technique in the detection of early respiratory changes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Faria, A D; Lopes, A J; Jansen, J M; Pinheiro, G C; Melo, P L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical potential of the Forced Oscillation Technique (FOT) in the detection of the early alterations in respiratory mechanics of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients. A total of 36 individuals were analyzed, 18 healthy and 18 with RA. The clinical usefulness of the parameters was evaluated investigating sensibility (Se), specificity (Sp) and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). In the RA group, all the 3 studied parameters obtained high accuracy for clinical use (AUC>0.9), while in spirometric parameters, no parameter obtained appropriate accuracy for clinical use (AUC < 0.7). In conclusion, the parameters obtained by FOT presented adequate Se and Sp, indicating that this technique can be helpful in the evaluation of the early respiratory mechanical alterations in patients with RA.

  7. Diagnosis of early-stage rheumatoid arthritis: usefulness of unenhanced and gadolinium-enhanced MR images at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takatoshi; Yamashita, Yoshiko; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Korogi, Yukunori

    2013-01-01

    Forty-one consecutive unclassified arthritis patients with polyarthralgia including wrist joint were evaluated with 3-T MRI as possible early-stage rheumatoid arthritis (RA). After prospective follow-up, 21 of 41 patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Synovitis was detected in all 21 RA patients (sensitivity=100%) with postcontrast MRI and in 14 patients (67%) with unenhanced MRI when none of them fulfilled ACR diagnostic criteria. Fat-suppressed intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) image showed high detection rate of synovitis and bone erosion, whereas FIESTA image clearly delineated joint fluid and bone trabeculae. MRI at 3 T is a potentially powerful tool for discriminating and managing early-stage RA patients.

  8. A new strategy for the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis: a combined approach.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, A; D'Agostino, D; Soriente, I; Amato, P; Piccoli, R; Sabatini, P

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis [RA] is one of the most common and severe autoimmune rheumatic diseases, diagnosed primarily according to clinical manifestations and radiological reports. For many years, laboratory diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis has relied on the detection of rheumatoid factor [RF], as established by the ACR criteria. A recent test to detect antibodies towards citrullinated peptides, called the anti-CCP assay, showed a similar sensitivity but a more elevated specificity than the RF test. Our intention was the recognition of an optimal diagnostic strategy that exhibits the highest sensitivity and specificity for RA detection. To this purpose, we examine the usefulness of autoantibodies in RA testing, evaluating the diagnostic performance of conventional and innovative assays for RF detection, and ELISA anti-CCP test, for anti-CCP antibodies detection, by a prospective study. Multiplex cytofluorimetric test appeared to be more sensitive and specific than nephelometric assay for RF detection. Hence, a novel combined approach, significantly increasing the diagnostic sensitivity for RA, was planned, employing the multiplex RF test in combination with the anti-CCP test.

  9. Dietary Intake of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Pain in spite of Inflammatory Control among Methotrexate Treated Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Lourdudoss, Cecilia; Di Giuseppe, Daniela; Wolk, Alicja; Westerlind, Helga; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Lampa, Jon

    2017-03-28

    Objective To investigate potential associations between dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and pain patterns in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after three months of methotrexate (MTX) treatment. Methods We included 591 early RA patients with MTX monotherapy from a population based prospective case-control study, the Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA). Dietary data on PUFA (food frequency questionnaires) were linked with data on unacceptable pain (visual analogue scale (VAS) >40mm), non-inflammatory/refractory pain (VAS >40mm and C-reactive protein (CRP) <10mg/L) and inflammatory pain (VAS >40mm and CRP >10mg/L) after three months. Statistical analysis included logistic regression. Results After three months of MTX treatment, 125 patients (21.2%) had unacceptable pain, of which 92 patients had refractory pain and 33 patients had inflammatory pain. Omega-3 fatty acid (FA) intake was inversely associated with unacceptable pain and refractory pain (OR=0.57 [95% CI 0.35-0.95] and OR=0.47 [95% CI 0.26-0.84], respectively). Omega-6 to -3 FA ratio, but not omega-6 FA alone, was directly associated with unacceptable pain and refractory pain (OR=1.70 [95% CI 1.03-2.82] and OR=2.33 [95% CI 1.28-4.24], respectively). Furthermore, PUFA was not associated with neither inflammatory pain nor CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate at follow-up. Omega-3 FA supplementation was not associated with any pain patterns. Conclusion Omega-3 FA was inversely associated with, and omega-6 to -3 FA ratio was directly associated with unacceptable and refractory pain, but not with inflammatory pain or systemic inflammation. The inverse association between omega-3 FA and refractory pain may have a role in pain suppression in RA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Sustained improvements in MRI outcomes with abatacept following the withdrawal of all treatments in patients with early, progressive rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Peterfy, Charles; Burmester, Gerd R; Bykerk, Vivian P; Combe, Bernard G; DiCarlo, Julie C; Furst, Daniel E; Huizinga, Tom W J; Wong, Dennis A; Conaghan, Philip G; Emery, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess structural damage progression with subcutaneous abatacept (ABA) in the Assessing Very Early Rheumatoid arthritis Treatment (AVERT) trial following abrupt withdrawal of all rheumatoid arthritis (RA) medication in patients achieving Disease Activity Score (DAS)-defined remission or low disease activity. Methods Patients with early, active RA were randomised to ABA plus methotrexate (ABA/MTX) 125 mg/week, ABA 125 mg/week or MTX for 12 months. All RA treatments were withdrawn after 12 months in patients with DAS28 (C reactive protein (CRP)) <3.2. Adjusted mean changes from baseline in MRI-based synovitis, osteitis and erosion were calculated for the intention-to-treat population. Results 351 patients were randomised and treated: ABA/MTX (n=119), ABA (n=116) or MTX (n=116). Synovitis and osteitis improved, and progression of erosion was statistically less with ABA/MTX versus MTX at month 12 (−2.35 vs −0.68, −2.58 vs −0.68, 0.19 vs 1.53, respectively; p<0.01 for each) and month 18 (−1.34 vs −0.49 −2.03 vs 0.34, 0.13 vs 2.0, respectively; p<0.01 for erosion); ABA benefits were numerically intermediate to those for ABA/MTX and MTX. Conclusions Structural benefits with ABA/MTX or ABA may be maintained 6 months after withdrawal of all treatments in patients who have achieved remission or low disease activity. Trial registration number NCT01142726; Results. PMID:26865601

  11. Clinical efficacy and safety of abatacept in methotrexate-naive patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and poor prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Westhovens, R; Robles, M; Ximenes, A C; Nayiager, S; Wollenhaupt, J; Durez, P; Gomez-Reino, J; Grassi, W; Haraoui, B; Shergy, W; Park, S-H; Genant, H; Peterfy, C; Becker, J-C; Covucci, A; Helfrick, R; Bathon, J

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the efficacy and safety of abatacept in methotrexate-naive patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and poor prognostic factors. Methods: In this double-blind, phase IIIb study, patients with RA for 2 years or less were randomly assigned 1 : 1 to receive abatacept (∼10 mg/kg) plus methotrexate, or placebo plus methotrexate. Patients were methotrexate-naive and seropositive for rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-cyclic citrullinated protein (CCP) type 2 or both and had radiographic evidence of joint erosions. The co-primary endpoints were the proportion of patients achieving disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28)-defined remission (C-reactive protein) and joint damage progression (Genant-modified Sharp total score; TS) at year 1. Safety was monitored throughout. Results: At baseline, patients had a mean DAS28 of 6.3, a mean TS of 7.1 and mean disease duration of 6.5 months; 96.5% and 89.0% of patients were RF or anti-CCP2 seropositive, respectively. At year 1, a significantly greater proportion of abatacept plus methotrexate-treated patients achieved remission (41.4% vs 23.3%; p<0.001) and there was significantly less radiographic progression (mean change in TS 0.63 vs 1.06; p = 0.040) versus methotrexate alone. Over 1 year, the frequency of adverse events (84.8% vs 83.4%), serious adverse events (7.8% vs 7.9%), serious infections (2.0% vs 2.0%), autoimmune disorders (2.3% vs 2.0%) and malignancies (0.4% vs 0%) was comparable for abatacept plus methotrexate versus methotrexate alone. Conclusions: In a methotrexate-naive population with early RA and poor prognostic factors, the combination of abatacept and methotrexate provided significantly better clinical and radiographic efficacy compared with methotrexate alone and had a comparable, favourable safety profile. PMID:19124524

  12. Increased detection of latent tuberculosis by tuberculin skin test and booster phenomenon in early rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Barbosa, L; Esquivel-Valerio, J A; Arana-Guajardo, A C; Vega-Morales, D; Riega-Torres, J; Garza-Elizondo, M A

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients is up to four times higher when compared to the general population, but their risk increases with the use of TNF-a drugs. Appropriate screening of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and proper management of such cases substantially reduce the incidence of active TB. Tuberculin skin test (TST) is a widely used method for the detection of LTBI. The time of diagnosis of RA as well as the age of the patient might modify the TST performance. We did an observational, comparative study of RA patients with early and established disease, with the objective to know the prevalence of LTBI using the TST and booster test; an induration ≥5 mm was considered reactive. We evaluated 143 patients (83 [58 %] early RA patients). We found 31.3 and 21.7 % TST positivity in early and established RA patients, respectively. With the use of booster test, the positivity increased to 46.5 and 28.8 %, respectively (p = 0.048, OR 1.33, 95 % CI 1.01-1.75). In conclusion, we found that TST and booster test increased LTBI detection in early RA patients, which may suggest that time of RA diagnosis might affect cellular immunity and therefore the TST response.

  13. Prediction of erosiveness and rate of development of new erosions in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Möttönen, T T

    1988-01-01

    Fifty eight patients suffering from a recent onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were studied. Fifty six patients were followed up for 24 months and two for 18 months. Erosions were detected in 17 patients at the onset and at the end of the follow up period the number of patients with erosions was 44. The erosiveness in the joint groups studied was as follows: metatarsophalangeal (MTP) (36 patients), metacarpophalangeal (MCP) (22), proximal interphalangeal (PIP) (21), interphalangeal (IP) joints of first toes and wrists (13), elbows and knees (two), and shoulders, ankles, and hips (one). Erosiveness in the feet was twice that in the fingers, and the erosions in the feet appeared at an earlier phase of disease. Destructions favoured the dominant hand. Swelling in the PIP joints appeared to be a better predictor of erosiveness than joint tenderness. The number of joints to become eroded was significantly increased in the patients with flexor tenosynovitis in the hands. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was more closely related to progression of joint damage than C reactive protein (CRP) or haemoglobin. The rate of development of new erosions was the same in seronegative and seropositive patients. In addition, HLA-DR4 allele did not correlate either with seropositivity or with erosiveness. Adequate antirheumatic drug treatment (gold in most instances) was not able to restrain the erosive process despite decreased rheumatoid disease activity. PMID:3137902

  14. Arthritis instantaneously causes collagen type I and type II degradation in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Landewé, R B M; Geusens, P; van der Heijde, D M F M; Boers, M; van der Linden, S J; Garnero, P

    2006-01-01

    Background Markers of collagen type I (CTX‐1) and type II (CTX‐II) degradation, reflecting bone and cartilage breakdown, appear to predict long term radiographic progression in chronic persistent arthritis. Objective To analyse longitudinally whether changes in arthritis severity are linked to immediate changes in the level of CTX‐I and CTX‐II degradation. Methods CTX‐I and CTX‐II were measured in urine samples from 105 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis who had participated in the COBRA trial at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the start of treatment. The course of the biomarkers over time was compared with the course of ESR, swollen and tender joint counts, and 28 joint disease activity score (DAS28), measured at the same time points, with adjustment for rheumatoid factor, treatment, and baseline radiographic damage, by generalised estimating equations (GEE) with first order autoregression. Results GEE showed that CTX‐I was longitudinally associated with DAS28, but not with ESR, swollen joint count, or tender joint count. CTX‐II, however, was longitudinally associated with ESR, swollen joint count and DAS28, but not with tender joint count. The longitudinal association implies that an increase in the extent of arthritis is immediately followed by an increase in collagen type II degradation, and to a lesser extent collagen type I degradation. Conclusions Cartilage degradation as measured by CTX‐II and to a lesser extent bone degradation as measured by CTX‐I closely follows indices of arthritis. Clinically perceptible arthritis is responsible for immediate damage, which will become visible on plain x rays only much later. PMID:16126801

  15. Detection of bone erosion in early rheumatoid arthritis: ultrasonography and conventional radiography versus non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Maryam; Chegini, Hosein; Najafizadeh, Seyed Reza; Azimi, Mohammad; Habibollahi, Peiman; Shakiba, Madjid

    2010-08-01

    Nowadays, there is a trend toward early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) especially in patients with early signs of bone erosion which can be detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of following study is to compare the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography (US) and conventional radiography (CR) compared to MRI for early detection of bone erosion in RA patients. In 12 patients with RA diagnosis, 120 first to fifth metacarpophalangeal joints and 96 second to fifth proximal interphalangeal joints were examined. Non-contrast MRI, US and CR were performed for bone erosion evaluation. For further analysis, the patients were divided in two equal groups according to disease activity score (DAS28). The overall sensitivity and specificity of US compared to MRI in detecting bone erosion were 0.63 and 0.98, respectively with a considerable agreement (kappa = 0.68, p < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of CR compared to MRI in detecting bone erosion were 0.13 and 1.00, respectively (kappa = 0.20, p < 0.001). In patients with more active disease, the sensitivity and specificity were 0.67 and 0.99 (kappa = 0.74, p < 0.001) compared to 0.59 and 0.97 (kappa = 0.61, p < 0.001) for the rest of patients according to DAS28. Conclusively, these findings reveal an acceptable agreement between US and MRI for detection of bone erosion in patients with early RA but not CR. US might be considered as a valuable tool for early detection of bone erosion especially when MRI is not available or affordable. Besides, it seems the US could be more reliable when the disease is more active.

  16. Anomalies of intra-synovial citrullination: is there any interest in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Mrabet, Dalila; Laadhar, Lilia; Haouet, Slim; Sahli, Héla; Zouari, Béchir; Makni, Sondès; Sellami, Slaheddine

    2013-03-01

    Autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins (ACPA) are specifically associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seem to play an important role in its pathogenesis. The specific immunological conflict between ACPA and citrullinated fibrin plays a major role in the self-maintenance of synovial inflammation by forming fibrin deposits in the synovial tissue. These deposits, secondarily citrullinated by a local peptidylarginine deiminase (PADI) enzyme activity, seem to maintain the immunological conflict and the inflammation. Our objective in this work is to study the anomalies of citrullination in a group of patients with early RA, in comparison with a control group of patients suffering from undetermined inflammatory arthritis, osteoarthritis and spondyloarthropathy. For this purpose, we used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the levels of ACPA in serum and synovial fluid. By immunohistochemistry, subtype 4 of PADI was also sought in the synovial biopsies taken from all our patients. We found that the ACPA levels in serum and synovial fluid were significantly higher in patients with RA. The enzyme PADI4 was found only in the group with RA and was statistically correlated with ACPA mean levels in sera and synovial fluid. The expression of PADI4 seems to correlate with intra-synovial deposits of fibrin in RA. However, determination of synovial ACPA levels and detection of intra-synovial PADI4 deposits are of no additional benefit compared with assessment of ACPA levels in serum for the diagnosis of early RA.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  18. Early lessons from the recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis cohort ESPOIR.

    PubMed

    Combe, Bernard; Rincheval, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    ESPOIR is a French multicenter cohort of patients with undifferentiated arthritis enrolled within six months of symptom onset, naive to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and corticosteroid therapy, and either having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or being at risk for progression to RA. The cohort is sponsored by the French Society for Rheumatology (Société française de rhumatologie [SFR]). Between December 2002 and March 2005, 813 patients were enrolled at 14 regional university hospitals, with the participation of a network of community-based rheumatologists. The objective was to establish a database on recent-onset inflammatory joint disease and, more specifically, on RA to serve for scientific research in the clinical, epidemiological, pathophysiological, and healthcare-cost fields. Ten years after enrolment were started, the cohort still has about 500 patients. The scientific committee has approved 104 clinical research projects, of which many are ongoing, and 54 original articles written by numerous French and international groups have been published. These projects cover a vast spectrum of topics including environmental factors, diagnosis, outcomes, prognosis, disease evaluation, imaging, genetics, biomarkers, costs, and RA management strategies.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... men. About two to three times as many women as men have the disease. Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis Video length: 2 min 54 sec Click to watch this video Learn more about how rheumatoid arthritis occurs. Effects Vary Rheumatoid arthritis affects people differently. Some people ...

  20. Validating IC early-failure simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosa, Mohamod S.; Poole, Kelvin F.; Grams, Michael L.

    1995-09-01

    Early failures are the dominant concern as integrated circuit technology matures into consistently producing systems of high reliability. These failures are attributed to the presence of randomly occurring defects in elementary objects (contacts, vias, metal runs, gate oxides, bonds etc.) that result in extrinsic rather than intrinsic (wearout-related) mortality. A model relating system failure to failure at the elementary objective level has been developed. Reliability is modeled as a function of circuit architecture, mask layout, material properties, life-test data, worst-case use-conditions and the processing environment. The effects of competing failure mechanisms and the presence of redundant sub-systems are accounted for. Hierarchy is exploited in the analysis, allowing large scale designs to be simulated. Experimental validation of the modeling of oxide leakage related failure, based on correlation between actual failures reported for a production integrated circuit and Monte Carlo simulations that incorporate wafer-level test results and process defect monitor data, is presented. The state of the art in IC reliability simulation is advanced in that a methodology that provides the capability to design-in reliability while accounting for early failures has been developed; applications include process qualification, design assessment and fabrication monitoring.

  1. Early cardiovascular adaptation to simulated zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, J. V.; Murray, R. G.; Bryant, C.; Johnson, R. L., Jr.; Mitchell, J. H.; Holland, O. B.; Gomez-Sanchez, C.; Vergne-Marini, P.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1979-01-01

    A study was conducted on five normal male volunteers (23-29 yr), under controlled conditions, to evaluate early adaptive responses to zero gravity. Specific objectives are (1) to characterize the hemodynamic, renal and hormonal responses to a central fluid shift, and (2) to compare data obtained during and after head-down tilt with corresponding data from actual space flight to validate tilt as a physiological model for simulation of zero gravity. Zero gravity is simulated by a 24-hr period of head-down tilt at 5 deg. The results suggest that hemodynamic adaptation occurs rapidly and is essentially accomplished by 6 hr, and that adaptation includes diuresis and reduction in blood volume. The validity of head-down tilt at 5 deg as an experimental model is established by comparing the results obtained with data from Apollo and Skylab astronauts on body fluid distributions and postflight responses to orthostatic and exercise stress.

  2. IgG rheumatoid factors against the four human Fc-gamma subclasses in early rheumatoid arthritis (the Swedish TIRA project).

    PubMed

    Kanmert, D; Kastbom, A; Almroth, G; Skogh, T; Enander, K; Wetterö, J

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid factor (RF), i.e. a family of autoantibodies against the Fc part of IgG, is an important seromarker of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Traditional particle agglutination without disclosing the antibody isotype remains the predominating diagnostic method in clinical routine. Although IgG-RF attracts pathogenic interest, its detection remains technically challenging. The present study aimed at developing a set of tests identifying IgG-RFs directed against the four IgG subclasses. IgG-RF against either subclass of human IgG-Fc were analysed with four novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) utilizing four recombinant human Fc-gamma fragments (hIgG1-4) as sources of antigen. Sera from 40 patients with recent onset RA (20 seropositive and 20 seronegative by IgM-RF and IgA-RF-isotype-specific ELISA) were analysed. Sera from 20 healthy blood donors served as reference. Among the IgM-/IgA-RF-positive RA-sera, IgG-RF was found directed against hIgG1 and hIgG2, but not against hIgG3 or hIgG4. Significant correlations were seen between IgG-RF against hIgG2-Fc and IgM-RF (r = 0.666) levels. Further prospective studies are warranted to elucidate any correlation to disease course and outcome.

  3. Rheumatoid lung disease

    MedlinePlus

    Lung disease - rheumatoid arthritis; Rheumatoid nodules; Rheumatoid lung ... Lung problems are common in rheumatoid arthritis. They often cause no symptoms. The cause of lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis is unknown. Sometimes, the medicines used to ...

  4. Impact of intensive treatment and remission on health-related quality of life in early and established rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scott, I C; Ibrahim, F; Lewis, C M; Scott, D L; Strand, V

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To establish if using intensive treatment to reduce synovitis and attain remission in active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) improves all aspects of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Methods A secondary analysis of two randomised clinical trials (CARDERA and TACIT) was undertaken. CARDERA randomised 467 patients with early active RA to different disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) regimens, including high-dose tapering corticosteroids. TACIT randomised 205 established patients with active RA to combination DMARDs (cDMARDs) or tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors (TNFis). Short-Form 36 (SF-36) measured HRQoL across eight domains, generating physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) component summary scores. Linear regression evaluated 6-month intensive treatment impacts. Mean SF-36 scores, stratified by end point disease activity category, were compared with age/gender-matched population scores. Results In CARDERA, intensive corticosteroid treatment gave significantly greater improvements in PCS but not MCS scores relative to placebo. In TACIT, all eight SF-36 domains had improvements from baseline exceeding minimal clinically important differences with cDMARDs and TNFis. Significantly greater improvements with TNFi relative to cDMARDs were reported in PCS only (p=0.034), after adjusting for covariates. Remission provided the best SF-36 profiles, but scores in physical functioning, role physical and general health in both trials remained below normative values. Patient global assessment of disease activity had a greater association with HRQoL than other disease activity score (DAS28) components. Conclusions Intensive corticosteroid treatment in early RA improves physical but not mental health, relative to placebo. In established RA, cDMARDs and TNFi provide similar improvements in HRQoL. As remission optimises but fails to normalise HRQoL, a focus on treatment strategies targeting HRQoL is required. Trial registration numbers CARDERA was registered as

  5. Determining the Minimally Important Difference in the Clinical Disease Activity Index For Improvement and Worsening in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, JR; Yang, S; Chen, L; Pope, JE; Keystone, EC; Haraoui, B; Boire, G; Thorne, JC; Tin, D; Hitchon, CA; Bingham, CO; Bykerk, VP

    2015-01-01

    Background Simplified measures to quantify rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity are increasingly used. The minimally clinically important differences (MCID) for some measures, such as the clinical disease activity index (CDAI), have not been well-defined in real-world clinic settings, especially for early RA patients with low/moderate disease activity. Methods Data from Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort patients were used to examine absolute change in CDAI in the first year after enrollment, stratified by disease activity. MCID cutpoints were derived to optimize the sum of sensitivity and specificity versus the gold standard of patient self-reported improvement or worsening. Specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive values were calculated against patient self-reported improvement (gold standard) and for change in pain, HAQ and DAS28 improvement. Discrimination was examined using area under receiver operator curves (ROC). Similar methods were used to evaluate MCIDs for worsening for patients who achieved low disease activity. Results A total of 578 patients (mean (SD) age 54.1 (15.3) years; 75% women, median (IQR) disease duration 5.3 (3.3, 8.0) months) contributed 1169 visit pairs to the improvement analysis. The MCID cutpoints for improvement were 12 (patients starting in high disease activity, CDAI>22), 6 (moderate, CDAI 10–22), and 1 (low disease activity, CDAI <10). Performance characteristics were acceptable using these cutpoints for pain, HAQ, and DAS28. The MCID for CDAI worsening among patients who achieved low disease activity was 2 units. Conclusions These minimally important absolute differences in CDAI can be used to evaluate improvement and worsening and increase the utility of CDAI in clinical practice. PMID:25988705

  6. Glucocorticoid use in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Harris, E D

    1983-09-01

    Although the early hopes and enthusiasm held for glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis therapy have been greatly modified, there is still a secondary therapeutic role for these drugs, one which has been refined by clinical experience.

  7. Standard treatment in daily clinical practice for early rheumatoid arthritis improved disease activity from 2001 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ayako; Inoue, Eisuke; Shidara, Kumi; Hoshi, Daisuke; Sato, Eri; Seto, Yohei; Tanaka, Eiichi; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Momohara, Shigeki; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2011-12-01

    We aimed to clarify the degree of improvement in disease control following early treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in daily clinical practice in 2006 compared to that in 2001. Using a large observational Japanese RA cohort (IORRA), we analyzed changes in clinical parameters, including disease activity assessed by the disease activity score 28 (DAS28) and physical disability assessed by the Japanese version of the Health Assessment Questionnaire (J-HAQ), which occurred within 2 years of cohort inception. All patients had enrolled in the IORRA cohort within 1 year of RA onset, in either 2001 (2001-cohort) or 2006 (2006-cohort). For both cohorts, changes in clinical features over 2 years were compared by Fisher's exact test or the Wilcoxon test. The 2001-cohort included 71 patients and the 2006-cohort included 56 patients. Over the 2-year period for each cohort, DAS28 significantly decreased from 3.9 to 3.5 in the 2001-cohort (p < 0.001) and from 4.1 to 3.1 in the 2006-cohort (p < 0.0001), and J-HAQ significantly decreased from 0.62 to 0.49 (p < 0.02) in the 2001-cohort and from 0.71 to 0.41 (p < 0.001) in the 2006-cohort. Greater improvement in disease activity over 2 years occurred in the 2006-cohort than in the 2001-cohort (p < 0.05). Better disease control was obtained following changes in RA treatment strategy that occurred in Japan between 2001 and 2006.

  8. Multifactorial intervention to prevent cardiovascular disease in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Annemarie Lyng; Løgstrup, Brian Bridal; Giraldi, Annamaria; Graugaard, Christian; Blegvad, Jesper; Thygesen, Tina; Sheetal, Ekta; Svendsen, Lone; Emmertsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular morbidity is a major burden in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we compare the effect of a targeted, intensified, multifactorial intervention with that of conventional treatment of modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with early RA fulfilling the 2010 American College of Rheumatology European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) criteria. Methods and analysis The study is a prospective, randomised, open label trial with blinded end point assessment and balanced randomisation (1:1) conducted in 10 outpatient clinics in Denmark. The primary end point after 5 years of follow-up is a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke and cardiac revascularisation. Secondary outcomes are: the proportion of patients achieving low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <2.5 mmol/L, glycated haemoglobin <48 mmol/mol, blood pressure <140/90 mm  Hg for patients without diabetes and <130/80 mm Hg for patients with diabetes and normoalbuminuria (urinary albumin creatinine ratio <30 mg/g) after 1 year of follow-up and the proportion of patients in each treatment group achieving low RA disease activity after 1 year, defined as a disease activity score C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) <3.2 and a DAS28-CRP score <2.6 after 12, 24 and 60 months. Furthermore, all hospitalisations for acute and elective reasons will be adjudicated by the event committee after 12, 24 and 60 months. Three hundred treatment-naive patients with early RA will be randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either conventional treatment administered and monitored by their general practitioner according to national guidelines (control group) or a stepwise implementation administered and monitored in a quarterly rheumatological nurse-administered set-up of behaviour modification and pharmacological therapy targeting (1) hyperlipidaemia, (2) hypertension, (3) hyperglycaemia

  9. Immune response profiling in early rheumatoid arthritis: discovery of a novel interaction of treatment response with viral immunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction It remains challenging to predict the outcomes of therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to identify immune response signatures that correlate with clinical treatment outcomes in patients with RA. Methods A cohort of 71 consecutive patients with early RA starting treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) was recruited. Disease activity at baseline and after 21 to 24 weeks of follow-up was measured using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28). Immune response profiling was performed by analyzing multi-cytokine production from peripheral blood cells following incubation with a panel of stimuli, including a mixture of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lysates. Profiles identified via principal components analysis (PCA) for each stimulus were then correlated with the ΔDAS28 from baseline to follow-up. A clinically meaningful improvement in the DAS28 was defined as a decrease of ≥1.2. Results A profile of T-cell cytokines (IL-13, IL-4, IL-5, IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ) produced in response to CMV/EBV was found to correlate with the ΔDAS28 from baseline to follow-up. At baseline, a higher magnitude of the CMV/EBV immune response profile predicted inadequate DAS28 improvement (mean PCA-1 scores: 65.6 versus 50.2; P = 0.029). The baseline CMV/EBV response was particularly driven by IFN-γ (P = 0.039) and IL-4 (P = 0.027). Among patients who attained clinically meaningful DAS28 improvement, the CMV/EBV PCA-1 score increased from baseline to follow-up (mean +11.6, SD 25.5), whereas among patients who responded inadequately to DMARD therapy, the CMV/EBV PCA-1 score decreased (mean -12.8, SD 25.4; P = 0.002). Irrespective of the ΔDAS28, methotrexate use was associated with up-regulation of the CMV/EBV response. The CMV/EBV profile was associated with positive CMV IgG (P <0.001), but not EBV IgG (P = 0.32), suggesting this response was related to

  10. Further Optimization of the Reliability of the 28-Joint Disease Activity Score in Patients with Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Siemons, Liseth; ten Klooster, Peter M.; Vonkeman, Harald E.; van de Laar, Mart A. F. J.; Glas, Cees A. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) combines scores on a 28-tender and swollen joint count (TJC28 and SJC28), a patient-reported measure for general health (GH), and an inflammatory marker (either the erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR] or the C-reactive protein [CRP]) into a composite measure of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study examined the reliability of the DAS28 in patients with early RA using principles from generalizability theory and evaluated whether it could be increased by adjusting individual DAS28 component weights. Methods Patients were drawn from the DREAM registry and classified into a “fast response” group (N = 466) and “slow response” group (N = 80), depending on their pace of reaching remission. Composite reliabilities of the DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP were determined with the individual components' reliability, weights, variances, error variances, correlations and covariances. Weight optimization was performed by minimizing the error variance of the index. Results Composite reliabilities of 0.85 and 0.86 were found for the DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP, respectively, and were approximately equal across patients groups. Component reliabilities, however, varied widely both within and between sub-groups, ranging from 0.614 for GH (“slow response” group) to 0.912 for ESR (“fast response” group). Weight optimization increased composite reliability even further. In the total and “fast response” groups, this was achieved mostly by decreasing the weight of the TJC28 and GH. In the “slow response” group, though, the weights of the TJC28 and SJC28 were increased, while those of the inflammatory markers and GH were substantially decreased. Conclusions The DAS28-ESR and the DAS28-CRP are reliable instruments for assessing disease activity in early RA and reliability can be increased even further by adjusting component weights. Given the low reliability and weightings of the general health

  11. The Computer Assisted Management in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis programme tool used in the CAMERA-I and CAMERA-II studies.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Johannes W G

    2016-01-01

    The history, issues and result of the development of the computer decision software tool used for the two tight control and treat-to-target CAMERA (Computer Assisted Management in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis) studies are described. The software tool is simple and can be used with various protocolled strategies and visit intervals both in clinical trials and daily practice, because it does not dictate strategy steps and is independent of visit intervals. The tool gives information on whether enough improvement since the last visit is present and whether there is remission or not. With this information, strategy steps according to various protocols and treatment arms can be taken.

  12. The rheumatoid thumb.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Aron T; Rozental, Tamara D

    2008-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis of the thumb is a common source of disability. Obtaining an understanding of the underlying biologic and physical manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis is essential in the choice of treatment of the disease. In the early stages of the disease, conservative and less invasive measures can be used. In the more advanced stages, arthrodesis and arthroplasty are often used. Isolated interphalangeal involvement is best managed with arthrodesis. Metacarpophalangeal involvement in low-demand patients can be treated with arthroplasty, whereas arthrodesis can be used in more active patients. Patients who have carpometacarpal joint damage are best treated with trapezium resection arthroplasty.

  13. Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER).

    PubMed

    Generoso, Jose Roberto; Latoures, Renee Elizabeth; Acar, Yahya; Miller, Dean Scott; Ciano, Mark; Sandrei, Renan; Vieira, Marlon; Luong, Sean; Hirsch, Jan; Fidler, Richard Lee

    2016-06-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER)," found on pages 255-263, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until May 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Define the purpose of the Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER) study. Review the outcome of the STEER study. DISCLOSURE

  14. Onset, Early Stages, and Prognosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Clinical Study of 100 Patients with 11-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, R. K.; Jayson, M. I. V.; Cosh, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    One hundred patients with “definite” or “classical” rheumatoid arthritis were followed in a hospital clinic from within one year of the onset of the arthritis. The average interval between onset and first attendance was 3·7 months. Onset was commoner in the winter, transient prodromal symptoms being noted in 23, with possible precipitating factors in 14. The serum rheumatoid factor test was positive at some time in 88. The patients were reassessed between eight and 14 years later. Seventeen died during this period, five possibly as a result of the disease or its treatment. The remaining patients had improved as a whole in terms of the blood sedimentation rate, haemoglobin, titre of the rheumatoid factor test, and status of the disease, but there was an overall deterioration in functional capacity. Both the rheumatoid factor titre and the functional capacity at an earlier review could be directly correlated with the outcome, but other factors were not found to influence the ultimate prognosis. PMID:4700332

  15. Expression and Functions of Immediate Early Response Gene X-1 (IEX-1) in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Morinobu, Akio; Tanaka, Shino; Nishimura, Keisuke; Takahashi, Soshi; Kageyama, Goichi; Miura, Yasushi; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Saegusa, Jun; Kumagai, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), synovial fibroblasts (RA-SFs) accumulate in affected joints, where they play roles in inflammation and joint destruction. RA-SFs exhibit tumor-like proliferation and are resistant to apoptosis. Although RA-SF activation is well described, negative regulators of RA-SF activation are unknown. We previously reported that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors facilitate apoptosis in RA-SFs. Here we found that RA-SFs treated with the HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) exhibited an upregulation of the immediate early response gene X-1 (IEX-1). IEX-1 has roles in apoptosis sensitivity, cell-cycle progression, and proliferation, and is reported to be involved in immune responses, inflammation, and tumorigenesis, and to have anti-arthritic properties. To investigate IEX-1’s role in RA-SFs, we used in vitro-cultured synovial fibroblasts from RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We confirmed that TSA upregulated the IEX-1 protein and mRNA expressions in RA-SFs by western blotting and quantitative RT-PCR. Inhibiting HDAC1, 2, and 3 (but not 6 or 8) also upregulated IEX-1. The IEX-1 mRNA levels were higher in RA-SFs than in OA-SFs, and were further upregulated in RA-SFs by the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β. The staining of surgical specimens showed that IEX-1 was present in the pannus from affected RA joints. Si-RNA-mediated IEX-1 knockdown upregulated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of TNFα and various chemokine mRNAs, indicating that IEX-1 downregulates TNFα and chemokines. Furthermore, apoptosis analysis showed that IEX-1 knockdown protected RA-SFs from apoptosis induced by TSA or by an anti-Fas mAb, indicating that IEX-1 is pro-apoptotic in RA-SFs. Collectively, our results showed that IEX-1 is induced by TNFα and IL-1β in RA-SFs, in which it suppresses TNFα and chemokine production and induces apoptosis; thus, IEX-1 negatively regulates RA-SF activation. Further investigation of IEX1’s functions in RA

  16. Can rheumatoid vasculitis predate a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Sarah; Steuer, Alan

    2017-01-01

    We report regarding a male patient who presented with a systemic vasculitis that was consistent with a diagnosis of polyarteritis nodosa. At presentation, he had no features of inflammatory arthritis but had a high rheumatoid factor titer and low C4 level. Withdrawal of immunosuppression after 6 years resulted in the development of classical rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This case supports previous reports that revealed that vasculitis may predate the development or occur very early in the course of articular RA. PMID:28293454

  17. Combination therapy in early rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised, controlled, double blind 52 week clinical trial of sulphasalazine and methotrexate compared with the single components

    PubMed Central

    Dougados, M.; Combe, B.; Cantagrel, A.; Goupille, P.; Olive, P.; Schattenkirchner, M.; Meusser, S; Paimela, L; Rau, R.; Zeidler, H.; Leirisalo-Repo, M.; Peldan, K.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the potential clinical benefit of a combination therapy.
METHODS—205 patients fulfilling the ACR criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), not treated with disease modifying anti-rheumatoid drugs previously, with an early (⩽1 year duration), active (Disease Activity Score (DAS) > 3.0), rheumatoid factor and/or HLA DR 1/4 positive disease were randomised between sulphasalazine (SASP) 2000 (maximum 3000) mg daily (n = 68), or methotrexate (MTX) 7.5 (maximum 15) mg weekly (n = 69) or the combination (SASP + MTX) of both (n = 68).
RESULTS—The mean changes in the DAS during the one year follow up of the study was −1.15, −0.87, −1.26 in the SASP, MTX, and SASP + MTX group respectively (p = 0.019). However, there was no statistically significant difference in terms of either EULAR good responders 34%, 38%, 38% or ACR criteria responders 59%, 59%, 65% in the SASP, MTX, and SASP + MTX group respectively. Radiological progression evaluated by the modified Sharp score was very modest in the three groups: mean changes in erosion score: +2.4, +2.4, +1.9, in narrowing score: +2.3, +2.1, +1.6 and in total damage score: +4.6, +4.5, +3.5, in the SASP, MTX, and SASP + MTX groups respectively. Adverse events occurred more frequently in the SASP + MTX group 91% versus 75% in the SASP and MTX group (p = 0.025). Nausea was the most frequent side effect: 32%, 23%, 49% in the SASP, MTX, and SASP + MTX groups respectively (p = 0.007).
CONCLUSION—This study suggests that an early initiation therapy of disease modifying drug seems to be of benefit. However, this study was unable to demonstrate a clinically relevant superiority of the combination therapy although several outcomes were in favour of this observation. The tolerability of the three treatment modalities seems acceptable.

 Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis; combination therapy; sulphasalazine; methotrexate PMID:10364900

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Wolfe, Frederick; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2010-09-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and autoantibodies (particularly to rheumatoid factor and citrullinated peptide). 50% of the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis is attributable to genetic factors. Smoking is the main environmental risk. In industrialised countries, rheumatoid arthritis affects 0·5-1·0% of adults, with 5-50 per 100 000 new cases annually. The disorder is most typical in women and elderly people. Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis causes joint damage, disability, decreased quality of life, and cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the key therapeutic agents, reduce synovitis and systemic inflammation and improve function. The leading DMARD is methotrexate, which can be combined with other drugs of this type. Biological agents are used when arthritis is uncontrolled or toxic effects arise with DMARDs. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors were the first biological agents, followed by abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab. Infections and high costs restrict prescription of biological agents. Long-term remission induced by intensive, short-term treatment selected by biomarker profiles is the ultimate goal.

  19. Rheumatoid anemia.

    PubMed

    Masson, Charles

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid anemia is a typical example of anemia of chronic disease. It differs from other forms of anemia, such as iron deficiency anemia or iatrogenic anemia. Rheumatoid anemia is normochromic, normocytic or, less often, microcytic, aregenerative, and accompanied with thrombocytosis. Serum transferrin levels are normal or low, transferrin saturation is decreased, serum ferritin levels are normal or high, the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is not increased (a distinguishing feature with iron deficiency anemia), and the sTfR/log ferritin ratio is lower than 1. This review discusses the prevalence and impact of rheumatoid anemia based on a review of the literature. Iron metabolism, absorption, diffusion, storage, and use by the bone marrow are described using published data on transferrin, ferritin, and hepcidin. Hepcidin is now recognized as a key factor in rheumatoid anemia, in conjunction with the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). Hepcidin is a hormone that lowers serum iron levels and regulates iron transport across membranes, preventing iron from exiting the enterocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes. In addition, hepcidin inhibits intestinal iron absorption and iron release from macrophages and hepatocytes. The action of hepcidin is mediated by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin. Hepcidin expression in the liver is dependent on the protein hemojuvelin. Inflammation leads to increased hepcidin production via IL-6, whereas iron deficiency and factors associated with increased erythropoiesis (hypoxia, bleeding, hemolysis, dyserythropoiesis) suppress the production of hepcidin. Data from oncology studies and the effects of recombinant human IL-6 support a causal link between IL-6 production and the development of anemia in patients with chronic disease. IL-6 diminishes the proportion of nucleated erythroid cells in the bone marrow and lowers the serum iron level, and these abnormalities can be corrected by administering an IL-6 antagonist. IL-6 stimulates

  20. The Impact of Low-Dose Disease-modifying Anti-rheumatics Drugs (DMARDs) on Bone Mineral Density of Premenopausal Women in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rexhepi, Sylejman; Rexhepi, Mjellma; Sahatçiu-Meka, Vjollca; Mahmutaj, Vigan; Boshnjaku, Shkumbin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by symmetrical polyarthritis and multisystemic involvement. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of low dose of methotrexate on bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Materials and methods: This paper follows a retrospective study, which involves 60 female patients with early onset RA diagnosed according to the American Rheumatism Association Criteria (ACR/EULAR 2010). The patients were divided into two groups group I was composed of thirty patients treated with dose of 7.5 mg/weekly methotrexate (MTX), while group II included thirty patients treated with dose of 2 g/daily sulfasalazine (SSZ). The Disease Activity was measured by a combination of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and Disease Activity Score (DAS-28). Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (L2–4), and femoral neck, was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) (Stratos 800). Laboratory findings included: In this study, we found no negative effect on BMD in RA patients treated with low dose MTX in comparison to patients treated with SSZ. There was not observed significant difference in BMD of the lumbar spine, femur neck or trochanter, of MTX and SSZ patients in the pretreatment phase, nor after 12 months of treatment. No significant change in the biochemical parameters of the both groups. Conclusion: Based on the results of our study, low dose of methotrexate has no negative effect on BMD in premenopausal RA patients. We believe that these results might provide new insights and that further longitudinal studies with larger groups of premenopausal RA patients are required. PMID:27147781

  1. Early development of Xenopus embryos is affected by simulated gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokota, Hiroki; Neff, Anton W.; Malacinski, George M.

    1994-01-01

    Early amphibian (Xenopus laevis) development under clinostat-simulated weightlessness and centrifuge-simulated hypergravity was studied. The results revealed significant effects on (i) 'morphological patterning' such as the cleavage furrow pattern in the vegetal hemisphere at the eight-cell stage and the shape of the dorsal lip in early gastrulae and (ii) 'the timing of embryonic events' such as the third cleavage furrow completion and the dorsal lip appearance. Substantial variations in sensitivity to simulated force fields were observed, which should be considered in interpreting spaceflight data.

  2. Emotions related to participation restrictions as experienced by patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a qualitative interview study (the Swedish TIRA project).

    PubMed

    Östlund, Gunnel; Björk, Mathilda; Thyberg, Ingrid; Thyberg, Mikael; Valtersson, Eva; Stenström, Birgitta; Sverker, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Psychological distress is a well-known complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but knowledge regarding emotions and their relationship to participation restrictions is scarce. The objective of the study was to explore emotions related to participation restrictions by patients with early RA. In this study, 48 patients with early RA, aged 20-63 years, were interviewed about participation restrictions using the critical incident technique. Information from transcribed interviews was converted into dilemmas and linked to International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) participation codes. The emotions described were condensed and categorized. Hopelessness and sadness were described when trying to perform daily activities such as getting up in the mornings and getting dressed, or not being able to perform duties at work. Sadness was experienced in relation to not being able to continue leisure activities or care for children. Examples of fear descriptions were found in relation to deteriorating health and fumble fear, which made the individual withdraw from activities as a result of mistrusting the body. Anger and irritation were described in relation to domestic and employed work but also in social relations where the individual felt unable to continue valued activities. Shame or embarrassment was described when participation restrictions became visible in public. Feelings of grief, aggressiveness, fear, and shame are emotions closely related to participation restrictions in everyday life in early RA. Emotions related to disability need to be addressed both in clinical settings in order to optimize rehabilitative multi-professional interventions and in research to achieve further knowledge.

  3. Looking through the 'window of opportunity': is there a new paradigm of podiatry care on the horizon in early rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the clinical understanding and care of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Major paradigm changes include earlier disease detection and introduction of therapy, and 'tight control' of follow-up driven by regular measurement of disease activity parameters. The advent of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors and other biologic therapies have further revolutionised care. Low disease state and remission with prevention of joint damage and irreversible disability are achievable therapeutic goals. Consequently new opportunities exist for all health professionals to contribute towards these advances. For podiatrists relevant issues range from greater awareness of current concepts including early referral guidelines through to the application of specialist skills to manage localised, residual disease activity and associated functional impairments. Here we describe a new paradigm of podiatry care in early RA. This is driven by current evidence that indicates that even in low disease activity states destruction of foot joints may be progressive and associated with accumulating disability. The paradigm parallels the medical model comprising early detection, targeted therapy, a new concept of tight control of foot arthritis, and disease monitoring. 'Podiatrists are experts on foot disorders: both patients and rheumatologists can profit from the involvement of a podiatrist' - Korda and Balint, 2004 [1]. PMID:20478038

  4. Validation of Methotrexate-First Strategy in Patients with Early, Poor-Prognosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results From a Two-Year Randomized, Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, James R.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Mikuls, Ted R.; Cofield, Stacey S.; Bridges, S. Louis; Ranganath, Veena K.; Moreland, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Objective Methotrexate (MTX) taken as monotherapy is recommended as the initial disease-modifying antirheumatic drug for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The purpose of this study was to examine outcomes of a blinded trial of initial MTX monotherapy with the option to step-up to combination therapy as compared to immediate combination therapy in patients with early, poor-prognosis RA. Methods In the Treatment of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis (TEAR) trial, 755 participants with early, poor-prognosis RA were randomized to receive MTX monotherapy or combination therapy (MTX + etanercept or MTX + sulfasalazine + hydroxychloroquine). Participants randomized to receive MTX monotherapy stepped up to combination therapy at 24 weeks if the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) was ≥ 3.2. Results Attrition at 24 weeks was similar in the MTX monotherapy and combination groups. Of the 370 evaluable participants in the initial MTX group, 28% achieved low levels of disease activity and did not step-up to combination therapy (MTX monotherapy group). The mean ± SD DAS28-ESR in participants continuing to take MTX monotherapy at week 102 was 2.7 ± 1.2, which is similar to that in participants who were randomized to immediate combination therapy (2.9 ± 1.2). Participants who received MTX monotherapy had less radiographic progression at week 102 as compared to those who received immediate combination therapy (mean ± SD change in modified Sharp score 0.2 ± 1.1 versus 1.1 ± 6.4. Participants assigned to initial MTX who required step-up to combination therapy at 24 weeks (72%) demonstrated similar DAS28-ESR values (3.5 ± 1.3 vs 3.2 ± 1.3 at week 48) and radiographic progression (change in modified Sharp score 1.2 ± 4.1 vs 1.1 ± 6.4 at week 102) as those assigned to immediate combination therapy. The results for either of the immediate combination approaches, whether triple therapy or MTX + etanercept, were similar. Conclusion These

  5. The dimeric form of HLA-G molecule is associated with the response of early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients to methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Roberta; Farina, Ilaria; Bortolotti, Daria; Galuppi, Elisa; Padovan, Melissa; Di Luca, Dario; Govoni, Marcello

    2017-03-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates a possible involvement of HLA (human leukocyte antigen)-G antigens in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), mainly in the HLA-G dimeric isoform, the most active HLA-G form with the strongest immunosuppression, that showed an excellent anti-inflammatory effect in collagen-induced arthritis model mice. However, the relevance of HLA-G dimers in RA response to methotrexate (MTX) treatment is still unknown. We analyzed the HLA-G dimers' amount in plasma samples from early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients before MTX therapy and evaluated the role of these molecules as biomarker of the different response to the treatment. Plasma sHLA-G levels were detected by ELISA, and HLA-G dimeric and monomeric forms were revealed by Western blot in 12 MTX responder (reaching DAS28 remission <2.6) and 8 MTX non-responder (DAS28 ≥5.1) patients before the therapy. The response to MTX was evaluated after 6 months of treatment. All ERA patients reaching remission showed higher plasma sHLA-G levels and the 78 kDa HLA-G dimeric form. Unresponsive ERA patients were characterized by lower plasma sHLA-G levels, and only one patient presented the 78 kDa HLA-G dimeric form (DAS28 5.1). Our preliminary results support the hypothesis that in ERA patients, sHLA-G and, in particular, the presence of the dimeric form in plasma samples before MTX therapy could be an a priori biomarker for the response to MTX treatment.

  6. Performance of matrices developed to identify patients with early rheumatoid arthritis with rapid radiographic progression despite methotrexate therapy: an external validation study based on the ESPOIR cohort data

    PubMed Central

    Granger, Benjamin; Combe, Bernard; Le Loet, Xavier; Saraux, Alain; Guillemin, Francis; Fautrel, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Use of prediction matrices of risk or rapid radiographic progression (RRP) for early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice could help to better rationalise the first line of treatment. Before use, they must be validated in populations that have not participated in their construction. The main objective is to use the ESPOIR cohort to validate the performance of 3 matrices (ASPIRE, BEST and SONORA) to predict patients at high risk of RRP at 1 year of disease despite initial treatment with methotrexate (MTX). Methods We selected from the ESPOIR cohort 370 patients receiving MTX or leflunomide (LEF) for ≥3 months within the first year of follow-up. Patients were assessed clinically every 6 months, and structural damage progression seen on radiography was measured by the van der Heijde-modified Sharp score (vSHS) at 1 year. RRP was defined as an increase in the vSHS≥5 points during the first year. Results At 1 year, the mean vSHS score was 1.7±5.0 and 46 patients had RRP. The ASPIRE matrix had only moderate validity in the ESPOIR population, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) <0.7. The AUC for the BEST and SONORA matrices were 0.73 and 0.76. Presence of rheumatoid factor (RF)—or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) and initial structural damage were always predictive of RRP at 1 year. Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) and C reactive protein (ASPIRE threshold) were not associated with RRP. Conclusions Matrices to identify patients at risk of RRP tested in the ESPOIR cohort seem to perform moderately. There is no matrix that shows clearly superior performance. PMID:27252898

  7. The gap between practice and guidelines in the choice of first-line disease modifying antirheumatic drug in early rheumatoid arthritis: results from the ESPOIR cohort

    PubMed Central

    Benhamou, Mathilde; Rincheval, Nathalie; Roy, Carine; Foltz, Violaine; Rozenberg, Sylvie; Sibilia, Jean; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Bourgeois, Pierre; Ravaud, Philippe; Fautrel, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Introduction To compare rheumatologists’ prescription for first disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in real-life settings with two clinical practice guidelines (CPG), STPR [1] and EULAR [2] and thus assess the gap between practices and guidelines. Methods ESPOIR is a French multicentre cohort study that included 813 early arthritis patients between 2002 and 2005. ‘Definite’ and ‘probable’ RA were defined according to ACR criteria and the level of diagnostic certainty. The objectives were to: 1/assess conformity between the observed first-line DMARD prescribed for those patients and the guidelines’ recommended DMARD; and 2/conduct a mail survey of patients’ usual rheumatologists to explore the reasons for their non-conformity with guidelines. Results 627 patients with definite or probable RA were identified. Conformity rates were 58% for STPR guidelines and 54% for EULAR guidelines. At 6 months, 83 (34%) patients with early RA did not receive any DMARD. Main determinants associated with conformity to guidelines were: disease activity and presence of severity predictive factors. The main reason leading to a discrepancy between guidelines and daily practice appeared to be diagnostic uncertainty, i.e., the difficulty to reliably assess RA diagnosis as soon as the first visits to the rheumatologist. Conclusion There is a substantial gap between CPG and rheumatologists’ daily practice concerning the first DMARD to prescribe in early RA. It is explained mainly by diagnostic uncertainty. More attention should be paid in future guidelines to the diagnostic difficulties of early RA. PMID:19286850

  8. Rheumatoid factor seropositivity is inversely associated with oral contraceptive use in women without rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shailaja S; Majka, Darcy S; Kittelson, John M; Parrish, Lezlie A; Ferucci, Elizabeth D; Deane, Kevin D; Arend, William P; Rewers, Marian; Holers, V Michael; Norris, Jill M

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether oral contraceptive use is associated with the presence of serum rheumatoid factor in women of reproductive age without rheumatoid arthritis. Methods 304 women selected from parents of children who were at increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes were studied, because they were enriched with the human leucocyte antigen‐DR4 allele, a susceptibility marker for both type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. Participants visited a clinic where blood was drawn for rheumatoid factor testing, and exposure data were collected via questionnaires. A medical history and joint examination were performed to rule out rheumatoid arthritis. Participants and examiners were unaware of the participants' rheumatoid factor status at the time of examination and questionnaire. Results Use of oral contraceptives at any time was inversely associated with rheumatoid factor positivity (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07 to 0.52) independent of age, education and smoking. Smoking ⩾20 pack‐years was also associated with rheumatoid factor positivity (adjusted OR 56.38, 95% CI 4.31 to 736.98) compared with never smoking. Smoking 1–19 pack‐years was not associated with a positive rheumatoid factor. Conclusions Our results suggest that oral contraceptive use, and possibly cigarette smoking, act early in the development of the immune dysregulation that occurs in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:16868018

  9. Current Therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kamin, Edward J.; Multz, Carter V.

    1969-01-01

    The well informed and well motivated patient with rheumatoid arthritis today has an excellent chance of avoiding serious disability and deformity. No available pharmacologic agent can permanently alter the course of the disease, and no pharmacologic agent can preclude the need for a balanced program emphasizing moderation, rest and constant attention to physical therapy. Early synovectomy is enjoying increasing popularity although the long-term benefits have yet to be established. The several drugs now undergoing trial hold little promise of materially altering the management of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future. The skills of physician, surgeon, and physiatrist must be brought to bear to provide optimal care. PMID:4883503

  10. Maintenance of remission following 2 years of standard treatment then dose reduction with abatacept in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Westhovens, Rene; Robles, Manuel; Ximenes, Antonio Carlos; Wollenhaupt, Jurgen; Durez, Patrick; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Grassi, Walter; Haraoui, Boulos; Shergy, William; Park, Sung-Hwan; Genant, Harry; Peterfy, Charles; Becker, Jean-Claude; Murthy, Bindu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate maintenance of response while reducing intravenous abatacept dose from ∼10 mg/kg to ∼5 mg/kg in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who achieved disease activity score (DAS)28 (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, ESR) <2.6. Methods This 1-year, multinational, randomised, double-blind substudy evaluated the efficacy and safety of ∼10 mg/kg and ∼5 mg/kg abatacept in patients with early RA with poor prognosis who had reached DAS28 (ESR) <2.6 at year 2 of the AGREE study. The primary outcome was time to disease relapse (defined as additional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, ≥2 courses high-dose steroids, return to open-label abatacept ∼10 mg/kg, or DAS28 (C reactive protein) ≥3.2 at two consecutive visits). Results 108 patients were randomised (∼10 mg/kg, n=58; ∼5 mg/kg, n=50). Three and five patients, respectively, discontinued, and four per group returned to open-label abatacept. Relapse over time and the proportion of patients relapsing were similar in both groups (31% (∼10 mg/kg) vs 34% (∼5 mg/kg); HR: 0.87 (95% CI 0.45 to 1.69)). Mean steady-state trough serum concentration for the ∼10 mg/kg group was 20.3–24.1 µg/mL, compared with 8.8–12.0 µg/mL for the ∼5 mg/kg group. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that abatacept dose reduction may be an option in patients with poor prognosis early RA who achieve DAS28 (ESR) <2.6 after ≥1 year on abatacept (∼10 mg/kg). Trial registration number NCT00989235. PMID:25550337

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  12. Medication persistence over 2 years of follow-up in a cohort of early rheumatoid arthritis patients: associated factors and relationship with disease activity and with disability

    PubMed Central

    Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Contreras-Yáñez, Irazú; Villa, Antonio R; Cabiedes, Javier; Rull-Gabayet, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Aggressive treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) plays a major role in improving early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patient outcomes. Persistence and adherence with medication occurs variably (20% to 70%). The objectives of the study were to determine medication persistence (MP) in early RA patients over 13 consecutive visits each 2 months apart, to investigate the relationship between MP and disease activity, disability and structural damage, and to identify baseline prognosticators. Methods Charts from 75 patients of an early RA cohort were reviewed. At each visit, a rheumatologist interviewed patients regarding therapy, scored disease activity with the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28) and disability with the health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), and recorded comorbidities and treatment. A complete medical history was obtained at baseline. MP was defined as the duration of time from initiation to discontinuation of at least one DMARD and/or corticosteroids for at least 1 week and was reported as a dichotomous variable at consecutive evaluations. Structural damage was defined by detection of new erosions on radiography. Descriptive statistics, Student's t test, the chi-squared test, and logistic regression analyses were used. Results The proportion of MP patients decreased from 98% at 2 months to 34% at 2 years. MP patients (n = 32) had similar DAS28 to non-MP patients (n = 53) at initial visits, lower DAS28 and greater DAS28 improvements at follow-ups (P ≤ 0.05 at visits 4, 6, 7 and 9) and reached sustained remission (≥ 3 consecutive visits with DAS28 < 2.6) more frequently (82.8% versus 46.5%, P = 0.003) and earlier (7.7 ± 4.6 versus 13.6 ± 5.7 months, P = 0.001) than non-MP patients. MP patients had similar baseline HAQ scores, but lower HAQ scores at follow-up (P ≤ 0.05 at visits 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10 and 13). More non-MP patients developed erosive disease than MP patients (26.8% versus 17.9%, P = 0.56). Older age

  13. Evaluation of HLA-G 14 bp Ins/Del and +3142G>C Polymorphism with Susceptibility and Early Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sandoughi, Mahnaz; Fazeli, Seyed Amirhossein; Bahari, Gholamreza; Rezaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Background. Mounting evidence designates that HLA-G plays a role in the regulation of inflammatory processes and autoimmune diseases. There are controversial reports concerning the impact of HLA-G gene polymorphism on rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was aimed at examining the impact of 14 bp ins/del and +3142G>C polymorphism with susceptibility and early disease activity in RA patients in a sample of the Iranian population. Methods. This case-control study was done on 194 patients with RA and 158 healthy subjects. The HLA-G rs1063320 (+3142G>C) and rs66554220 (14 bp ins/del) variants were genotype by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFP) and PCR method, respectively. Results. The HLA-G +3142G>C polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in codominant (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.38–0.97, p = 0.038, GC versus GG; OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.14–0.92, p = 0.034, CC versus GG), dominant (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.36–0.87, p = 0.011, GC + CC versus GG), and allele (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.41–0.84, p = 0.004, C versus G) inheritance models tested. Our finding did not support an association between HLA-G 14 bp ins/del variant and risk/protection of RA. In addition, no significant association was found between the polymorphism and early disease activity. Conclusion. In summary, our results showed that HLA-G +3142G>C gene polymorphism significantly decreased the risk of RA in a sample of the Iranian population. PMID:27610404

  14. My treatment approach to rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Davis, John M; Matteson, Eric L

    2012-07-01

    The past decade has brought important advances in the understanding of rheumatoid arthritis and its management and treatment. New classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, better definitions of treatment outcome and remission, and the introduction of biologic response-modifying drugs designed to inhibit the inflammatory process have greatly altered the approach to managing this disease. More aggressive management of rheumatoid arthritis early after diagnosis and throughout the course of the disease has resulted in improvement in patient functioning and quality of life, reduction in comorbid conditions, and enhanced survival.

  15. Identification of urinary peptide biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Angelique; Johnsson, Hanna; McInnes, Iain B; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Dakna, Mohammed; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Porter, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are associated with improved outcomes but current diagnostic tools such as rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies have shown limited sensitivity. In this pilot study we set out to establish a panel of urinary biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We compared the urinary proteome of 33 participants of the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis inception cohort study with 30 healthy controls and identified 292 potential rheumatoid arthritis-specific peptides. Amongst them, 39 were used to create a classifier model using support vector machine algorithms. Specific peptidic fragments were differentially excreted between groups; fragments of protein S100-A9 and gelsolin were less abundant in rheumatoid arthritis while fragments of uromodulin, complement C3 and fibrinogen were all increasingly excreted. The model generated was subsequently tested in an independent test-set of 31 samples. The classifier demonstrated a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 93% in diagnosing the condition, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93 (p<0.0001). These preliminary results suggest that urinary biomarkers could be useful in the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies are currently being undertaken in larger cohorts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other athridities to assess the potential of the urinary peptide based classifier in the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Hand pains in women and men in early rheumatoid arthritis, a one year follow-up after diagnosis. The Swedish TIRA project.

    PubMed

    Thyberg, Ingrid; Dahlström, Örjan; Björk, Mathilda; Stenström, Birgitta; Adams, Jo

    2017-02-01

    Purpose This research analysed general pain intensity, hand pain at rest and hand pain during activity in women and men in early rheumatoid arhtritis (RA). Method Out of the 454 patients that were recruited into the Swedish early RA project "TIRA" the 373 patients (67% women) that remained at 12 months follow-up are reported here. Disease activity 28 joint score (DAS-28), disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire = HAQ) and pain (VAS) were recorded at inclusion and after 3 (M3), 6 (M6) and 12 (M12) months. General pain, hand pain during rest, hand pain during test of grip force as assessed by Grippit™, prescribed disease-modifying anti-inflammatory drugs (DMARDs) and hand dominance were recorded. Results DAS-28 and HAQ scores were high at inclusion and improved thereafter in both women and men. There were no significant differences between sexes at inclusion but women had higher DAS-28 and HAQ at all follow-ups. Women were more often prescribed DMARDs than were men. In both women and men all pain types were significantly lower at follow-up compared to at inclusion and women reported higher pain than men at follow-ups. The pain types differed significantly from each other at inclusion into TIRA, general pain was highest and hand pain during rest was lowest. There were no significant differences in hand pain related to hand dominance or between right and left hands. Conclusions Disease activity, disability and pain were high at inclusion and reduced over the first year. Despite more DMARDs prescribed in women than in men, women were more affected than were men. General pain was highest and not surprisingly hand pain during active grip testing was higher than hand pain during rest that was lowest in both sexes. Although our cohort was well controlled, it was evident that hand pain remains a problem. This has implications for rehabilitation and suggests potential ongoing activity limitations that should continue to receive attention from a multi

  17. Predictors of remission, erosive disease and radiographic progression in a Colombian cohort of early onset rheumatoid arthritis: a 3-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Duque, M A; Rondon-Herrera, F; Mantilla, R D; Calvo-Paramo, E; Yunis, J J; Varela-Nariño, A; Restrepo, J F; Iglesias-Gamarra, A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study is to find predictors of remission, radiographic progression (RP), and erosive disease in a cohort of patients with early onset rheumatoid arthritis (EORA) that followed a therapeutic protocol aiming at remission, in a real world tight-control setting. EORA patients were enrolled in a 3-year follow-up study. Clinical, biological, immunogenetic, and radiographical data were analyzed. Radiographs were scored according to Sharp-van der Heijde (SvdH) method. RP was defined by an increase of 3 units in 36 months. Remission was defined as DAS28 <2.6. A stepwise multiple logistic regression model was used to identify independent predictors of the three target outcomes. One hundred twenty-nine patients were included. Baseline disease activity was high. Significant overall improvement was observed, but only 33.3 % achieved remission. At 36 month, 50.4 % (65) of patients showed erosions. RP was observed in 62.7 % (81) of cases. Statistical analysis showed that baseline SvdH score was the only predictive factor associated with the three outcomes evaluated. Lower HAQ-DI and absence of autoantibodies were predictive of remission. Higher levels of ESR and presence of erosions at entry were predictive of RP. Independent baseline predictors of incident erosive disease were anti-CCP and RF positivity, symptom duration at baseline >3 months, and presence of HLA-DRB1 shared epitope. Radiographic damage at baseline was the main predictor of outcomes. Autoantibodies, HAQ and ESR at baseline, symptom duration before diagnosis, and HLA-DRB1 status had influence on clinical course and development of structural joint damage in Colombian RA patients.

  18. Value of ultrasonography as a marker of early response to abatacept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and an inadequate response to methotrexate: results from the APPRAISE study

    PubMed Central

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Wakefield, Richard J; Berner-Hammer, Hilde; Vittecoq, Olivier; Filippou, Georgios; Balint, Peter; Möller, Ingrid; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Naredo, Esperanza; Østergaard, Mikkel; Boers, Maarten; Gaillez, Corine; Van Holder, Karina; Le Bars, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To study the responsiveness of a combined power Doppler and greyscale ultrasound (PDUS) score for assessing synovitis in biologic-naïve patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) starting abatacept plus methotrexate (MTX). Methods In this open-label, multicentre, single-arm study, patients with RA (MTX inadequate responders) received intravenous abatacept (∼10 mg/kg) plus MTX for 24 weeks. A composite PDUS synovitis score, developed by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology–European League Against Rheumatism (OMERACT–EULAR)-Ultrasound Task Force, was used to evaluate individual joints. The maximal score of each joint was added into a Global OMERACT–EULAR Synovitis Score (GLOESS) for bilateral metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPs) 2–5 (primary objective). The value of GLOESS containing other joint sets was explored, along with clinical efficacy. Results Eighty-nine patients completed the 24-week treatment period. The earliest PDUS sign of improvement in synovitis was at week 1 (mean change in GLOESS (MCPs 2–5): −0.7 (95% CIs −1.2 to −0.1)), with continuous improvement to week 24. Early improvement was observed in the component scores (power Doppler signal at week 1, synovial hyperplasia at week 2, joint effusion at week 4). Comparable changes were observed for 22 paired joints and minimal joint subsets. Mean Disease Activity Score 28 (C reactive protein) was significantly reduced from weeks 1 to 24, reaching clinical meaningful improvement (change ≥1.2) at week 8. Conclusions In this first international prospective study, the composite PDUS score is responsive to abatacept. GLOESS demonstrated the rapid onset of action of abatacept, regardless of the number of joints examined. Ultrasound is an objective tool to monitor patients with RA under treatment. Trial registration number NCT00767325. PMID:26590174

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  20. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  1. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: 10:20 Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public Rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  2. Estimating the monetary value of the annual productivity gained in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis receiving etanercept plus methotrexate: interim results from the PRIZE study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bansback, Nick; Sun, Huiying; Pedersen, Ronald; Kotak, Sameer; Anis, Aslam H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To measure and value the impact of combined etanercept (ETN) and methotrexate (MTX) therapy on work productivity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) over 52 weeks. Methods MTX- and biological-naïve patients with RA (symptom onset ≤12 months; Disease Activity Score based on a 28-joint count (DAS28) >3.2) received open-label ETN50/MTX for 52 weeks. The Valuation of Lost Productivity (VOLP) questionnaire, measuring paid and unpaid work productivity impacts, was completed approximately every 13 weeks. Bootstrapping methods were used to test changes in VOLP outcomes over time. One-year productivity impacts were compared between responders (DAS28 ≤3.2) at week 13 and non-responders using zero-inflated models for time loss and two-part models for total costs of lost productivity. Results 196 patients were employed at baseline and had ≥1 follow-up with VOLP. Compared with baseline, at week 52, patients gained 33.4 h per 3 months in paid work and 4.2 h per week in unpaid work. Total monetary productivity gains were €1322 per 3 months. Over the 1-year period, responders gained paid (231 h) and unpaid work loss (122 h) compared with non-responders, which amounted to a gain of €3670 for responders. Conclusions This is the first clinical trial to measure and value the impact of biological treatment on all the labour input components that affect overall productivity. Combination therapy with ETN50/MTX was associated with a significant productivity gain for patients with early RA who were still observed at week 52. Over the 1-year treatment period, responders at week 13 suffered significantly less productivity loss than non-responders suggesting this gain was related to treatment response. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00913458 PMID:26535135

  3. Infliximab therapy increases body fat mass in early rheumatoid arthritis independently of changes in disease activity and levels of leptin and adiponectin: a randomised study over 21 months

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with changes in body composition and bone mineral density (BMD). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether anti-TNF treatment in early RA has an impact on body composition and BMD besides that which could be achieved by intensive disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD) combination therapy. Methods Forty patients with early RA who failed treatment with methotrexate up to 20 mg/week for 3 months were randomised to addition of sulphasalazine and hydroxychloroquine (treatment A) or addition of infliximab (treatment B). At 3, 12 and 24 months, body composition and BMD were assessed by total-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. At the same time points, leptin, adiponectin, apolipoproteins, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and markers of bone remodelling were analysed. Compliance to treatment was considered in the analyses. Data were analysed with a mixed, linear model. Results Patients treated with anti-TNF had a significant increase in fat mass at 2 years, 3.8 (1.6 to 5.9) kg, in contrast to patients in treatment A, 0.4 (-1.5 to 2.2) kg (P = 0.040), despite similar reduction in disease activity. Both treatment strategies prevented loss of muscle mass and bone. Leptin concentrations increased significantly in both groups at 2 years and adiponectin increased significantly at 2 years in treatment A and at 1 year in treatment B. There were no significant changes in apolipoproteins or IGF-1. The markers of bone resorption decreased at 12 months in both treatment groups with no significant difference between the treatment groups. Conclusions Infliximab therapy increased body fat mass, an effect that was not achieved with the combination of DMARDs, despite a similar reduction in disease activity, and thus seemed to be drug specific. The increase of fat mass was not associated with an exacerbated atherogenic lipid profile. Leptin and adiponectin concentrations increased in both treatment groups. The

  4. Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) but not sclerostin or gene polymorphisms is related to joint destruction in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Boman, Antonia; Kokkonen, Heidi; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Berglin, Ewa; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt

    2017-02-11

    The aim of this study was to analyze relationships between receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANKL), sclerostin and their gene polymorphisms with radiological progression in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with early RA (n = 407, symptomatic <1 year) (ARA criteria) examined radiologically at inclusion and after 24 months were consecutively included. Disease activity score and C-reactive protein were regularly recorded. Sclerostin, RANKL, and anti-CCP2 antibodies were analyzed in plasma at baseline using ELISAs. Data on gene polymorphism for sclerostin and RANKL were extracted from Immunochip analysis. Sex- and age-matched controls (n = 71) were identified from the Medical Biobank of Northern Sweden. The concentration of RANKL was significantly higher in patients compared with controls, median (IQR) 0.56 (0.9) nmol/L and 0.20 (0.25) nmol/L (p < 0.001), and in anti-CCP2-positive patients compared with sero-negative individuals. Sclerostin was significantly increased in female patients 0.59 (0.47-0.65) ng/mL compared with female controls 0.49 (0.4-0.65) ng/mL (p < 0.02). RANKL concentration was related to the Larsen score at baseline (p < 0.01), after 24 months (p < 0.001), and to radiological progression at 24 months (p < 0.001). Positivity of RANKL and anti-CCP2 yielded significant risk for progression with negativity for both as reference. No single nucleotide polymorphism encoding TNFSF11 or SOST was associated with increased concentrations of the factors. The concentration of RANKL was related to the Larsen score at baseline, at 24 months, and radiological progression at 24 months particularly in anti-CCP2-positive patients, while the concentration of sclerostin was unrelated to radiological findings.

  5. The effect on treatment response of fibromyalgic symptoms in early rheumatoid arthritis patients: results from the ESPOIR cohort

    PubMed Central

    Combe, Bernard; Niu, Jingbo; Rincheval, Nathalie; Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile; Felson, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate whether patients with RA who belong to the spectrum of fibromyalgic RA (FRA) have an impaired response to treatment measured by traditional activity scores. Methods. Patients from the ESPOIR cohort were analysed. This prospective cohort included 813 patients with early arthritis not initially receiving DMARDs. Among the 697 patients who met RA classification criteria, we studied two groups, one with and the other without FRA. The following endpoints were compared at 6, 12 and 18 months using a mixed linear regression model: 28-joint DAS (DAS28), Simple Disease Activity Index (SDAI), Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) and HAQ. In addition, attainment of low disease activity (LDA; DAS28 <3.2) and remission (DAS28 <2.6, SDAI <3.3, CDAI <2.8) at these time points was analysed. Results. Patients with FRA (n = 120) had higher DAS28, SDAI, CDAI and HAQ scores than patients with RA and no fibromyalgic characteristics (n = 548). DAS28 and other DASs started out higher in subjects with FRA, and while they improved to a similar extent to in the isolated RA group, they remained consistently higher among FRA patients. Achievement of LDA and remission was significantly less likely in subjects with FRA. Conclusion. Patients with FRA and RA will have a similar response to treatment according to the decrease in indexes of disease activity, but may miss the target of remission or LDA. PMID:26175470

  6. Comorbidity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Turesson, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory condition, which is associated with an increased risk of comorbidity from other diseases. RA disease severity is a major predictor of development of cardiovascular disease, serious infections and malignant lymphoma. This reflects the role of chronic inflammation in the underlying pathology. Recent surveys indicate that although clinical outcomes have improved in patients with RA, mainly owing to access to more efficient pharmacotherapy, comorbidity remains a major issue in many patients. Register-based observational studies are useful sources of information on the impact of comorbidity and the efficacy and safety of antirheumatic treatment in patients with coexisting diseases. As a part of strategies to improve further the management of patients with RA, multidisciplinary collaboration for prevention and early detection of comorbidities is of major importance.

  7. Simulation Study Of Early Afterglows Observed With Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hededal, C.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-09-01

    A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell code has been used to simulate the dynamics of forward and reverse shocks with thin and thick shells within the parameter constraints provided by present Swift observations and the present models of GRB emission. Our 3-D RPIC simulations have provided the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields and revealed the importance of ``jitter radiation'' with prompt and afterglow spectra due to the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated by the Weibel instability. It is different from synchrotron radiation, which is usually assumed to be the dominant radiation process. We have investigated gamma-ray burst emissions from prompt, early, and late afterglows considering microscopic processes. Based on our previous investigation of the Weibel instability for each stage of evolution of ejecta propagating in the ISM, we have incorporated the plasma conditions (relativistic jets) with the density and composition of the plasmas, the magnetic field strength ($\\sigma$-values (the ratio of the electromagnetic energy flux to the particle energy flux)) and its direction, and the Lorentz factor for the different stages in prompt and afterglows. Systematic simulation studies of the relativistic collisionless shocks, associated particle acceleration, magnetic field generation and self-consistent radiation provide insight into undetermined issues in prompt and afterglows observed by Swift. Self-consistently calculated lightcurves, spectra, spectral evolutions, and polarization as function of viewing angle will be done to light a shed on recent new observations by Swift, in particular, X-ray flares, early steep decay, and shallow decay.

  8. Early Eocene's climate and ocean circulation from coupled model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias; Thomas, Maik

    2014-05-01

    While proxy data provide a snapshot of climate conditions at a specific location, coupled atmosphere-ocean models are able to expand this knowledge over the globe. Therefore, they are indispensable tools for understanding past climate conditions. We model the dynamical state of atmosphere and ocean during the Early Eocene and pre-industrial times, using the coupled atmosphere-ocean model ECHAM5/MPIOM with realistic reconstructions of vegetation and CO2. The resulting simulated climate variables are compared to terrestrial and oceanic proxies. The Early Eocene climate is in the global mean warmer (~13°C) and wetter (~1 mm/d) than in pre-industrial times. Especially temperatures in the Southern Ocean, the Greenland Sea and Arctic Ocean raise by up to 25K, being in accordance with surface temperature estimates from terrestrial and marine proxy data. The oceans are hereby rendered ice-free, leading to a decrease of polar albedo and thereby facilitating polar warming. This leads to a by 5K diminished equator-to-pole temperature gradient. Warmer temperatures as well as changed bathymetry have an effect on ocean dynamics in the Early Eocene. Although deep-water formation can be found in the Greenland Sea, Weddell Sea, and Tethys Sea, it is weaker than in the pre-industrial run and the resulting circulation is shallower. This is not only visible in water transport through sea gates but also in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), adopting its maximum at 700m depths in the Early Eocene, while maximum transport is reached in the pre-industrial control run at 1200m. Albeit a shallow and weak thermohaline circulation, a global ocean conveyor belt is being triggered, causing a transport from the areas of subduction through the Atlantic and Southern Oceans into the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

  9. Evaluation of hand bone loss by digital X-ray radiogrammetry as a complement to clinical and radiographic assessment in early rheumatoid arthritis: results from the SWEFOT trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate hand bone loss (HBL) measured by digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) receiving different treatment regimens, and to evaluate if DXR change rates during the first 12 months correlate with radiological damage after 24 months. Methods From the total SWEFOT trial population, 159 patients had hand radiographs correctly timed and taken with same modality to be analyzed with DXR. All patients started treatment with methotrexate. After 3–4 months, patients with DAS28 > 3.2 were randomized to add sulfasalazine and hydroxychloroquine (triple therapy) or infliximab (MTX + INF). Those with DAS28 ≤3.2 were followed in regular care. Radiographic progression over 24 months was scored according to the Sharp van der Heijde score (SHS) and defined as >5 increase in T-SHS over 24 months. Hand bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DXR at inclusion and 12 months and a change ≥2.5 mg/cm2/month was used as a cut-off for HBL. Results In the MTX responders, triple therapy, and MTX + INF groups, the proportions with HBL were 4.1%, 22.2% and 16.4%, respectively (p = 0.01), and the mean (SD) radiological progression in these groups was 3.91 (6.72), 7.40 (14.63) and 2.72 (4.55) respectively (p = 0.06). Patients with HBL had significantly greater risk for radiographic progression, compared with patients without HBL (odds ratio 3.09, 95% CI =1.20–7.79, p = 0.02). Conclusions Non-responders to MTX had a significantly greater risk of HBL than MTX-responders, despite the add-on therapies. Patients with HBL during the 12 months had greater risk of radiographic progression after 24 months. Evaluation of HBL may help to identify patients who are at risk of radiographic progression. PMID:23497111

  10. Cachexia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Walsmith, Joseph; Roubenoff, Ronenn

    2002-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a debilitating, chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that causes destruction of joint cartilage and bone. It generally occurs between the fourth and sixth decades of life, and affects two to three times more women than men. It is characterized by joint stiffness, pain, and swelling, and is accompanied by a loss of body cell mass. This loss of cell mass, known as rheumatoid cachexia, predominates in skeletal muscle, but also occurs in the viscera and immune system. Thus, rheumatoid cachexia leads to muscle weakness and a loss of functional capacity, and is believed to accelerate morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis. Currently there is no established mechanism for rheumatoid cachexia, but it is accompanied by elevated resting energy expenditure, accelerated whole-body protein catabolism, and excess production of the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is probably the central mediator of muscle wasting in rheumatoid arthritis, and is known to act synergistically with interleukin-1beta to promote cachexia. In general, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta are thought to alter the balance between protein degradation and protein synthesis in rheumatoid arthritis to cause muscle wasting. The precise mechanism by which they do this is not known. Reduced peripheral insulin action and low habitual physical activity are important consequences of rheumatoid arthritis, and have also been implicated as mediators of rheumatoid cachexia. Insulin inhibits muscle protein degradation. Consequently, reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is thought to be permissive to cytokine-driven muscle loss. The cause of reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is not known, but tumor necrosis factor-alpha has been shown to interfere with insulin receptor signaling and is probably an important contributor. Low habitual physical

  11. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  12. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guide Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... tendons causes pressure on the nearby nerve. How Rheumatoid Arthritis is Diagnosed The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  13. Biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Verheul, M K; Fearon, U; Trouw, L A; Veale, D J

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis are systemic inflammatory conditions characterized by a chronic form of arthritis, often leading to irreversible joint damage. Early treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases is required to reduce or prevent joint injury. However, early diagnosis can be difficult and currently it is not possible to predict which individual patient will develop progressive erosive disease or who may benefit from a specific treatment according to their clinical features at presentation. Biomarkers are therefore required to enable earlier diagnosis and predict prognosis in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In this review we will examine the evidence and current status of established and experimental biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis for three important purposes; disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy.

  14. Hand bone loss in early rheumatoid arthritis during a methotrexate-based treat-to-target strategy with or without adalimumab-a substudy of the optimized treatment algorithm in early RA (OPERA) trial.

    PubMed

    Ørnbjerg, L M; Østergaard, M; Jensen, T; Hørslev-Petersen, K; Stengaard-Pedersen, K; Junker, P; Ellingsen, T; Ahlquist, P; Lindegaard, H; Linauskas, A; Schlemmer, A; Dam, M Y; Hansen, I; Lottenburger, T; Ammitzbøll, C G; Jørgensen, A; Krintel, S B; Raun, J; Hetland, M L; Slot, Ole; Nielsen, Lars Kjær; Skjødt, Henrik; Majgaard, Ole; Lorenzen, Tove; Horn, Hans Christian; Kowalski, Marcin; Johansen, Inger Lauge; Pedersen, Peter Mosborg; Manilo, Natalia; Bliddal, Henning

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to investigate 1-year hand bone loss (HBL1-year) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with a methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular triamcinolone treat-to-target strategy +/- adalimumab and to determine if HBL6months is associated with radiographic progression after 2 years. In a clinical trial (OPERA) of 180 treatment-naive early RA patients, bone mineral density (BMD) was estimated from hand radiographs with digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) at baseline, after 6 (n = 90) and 12 months (n = 70) of follow-up. Baseline and 2-year radiographs were scored according to the Sharp/van der Heijde method. Baseline characteristics and HBL6months (0-6 months changes in DXR-BMD) were investigated as predictors of structural damage by univariate linear (∆ total Sharp/van der Heijde score (TSS) as dependent variable) and logistic (+/-radiographic progression (∆TSS >0) as dependent variable) regression analyses. Variables with p < 0.10 were included in multivariable models. In 70 patients with available HBL1-year data, HBL1-year was median (interquartile range (IQR)) -1.9 (-3.3; -0.26 mg/cm(2)) in the MTX + placebo group and -1.8 (-3.6; 0.06) mg/cm(2) in the MTX + adalimumab group, p = 0.98, Wilcoxon signed-rank. Increased HBL (compared to general population reference values) was found in 26/37 and 23/33 patients in the MTX + placebo and MTX + adalimumab groups, chi-squared = 0.99. In 90 patients with HBL6months data and 2-year radiographic data, HBL6months was independently associated with ∆TSS after 2 years (β = -0.086 (95% confidence interval = -0.15; -0.025) TSS unit/mg/cm(2) increase, p = 0.006) but not with presence of radiographic progression (∆TSS >0) (OR 0.96 (0.92-1.0), p = 0.10). In early RA patients treated with a methotrexate-based treat-to-target strategy, the majority of patients had increased HBL1-year, irrespective of adalimumab; HBL6months was independently associated with ∆TSS after 2 years.

  15. Elevated Ratio of Th17 Cell-Derived Th1 Cells (CD161+Th1 Cells) to CD161+Th17 Cells in Peripheral Blood of Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines. It has been reported that IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. It remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we tried to identify Th17 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells (CD161+Th1 cells) in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the ratio of Th17 cells in early-onset RA patients. The ratio of Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells to CD161+Th17 cells was elevated in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. In addition, MTX reduced the ratio of Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 and Th17 play important roles in the early phase of RA; thus, anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with RA in the early phase. PMID:27123445

  16. Elevated Ratio of Th17 Cell-Derived Th1 Cells (CD161(+)Th1 Cells) to CD161(+)Th17 Cells in Peripheral Blood of Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines. It has been reported that IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. It remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we tried to identify Th17 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells (CD161(+)Th1 cells) in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the ratio of Th17 cells in early-onset RA patients. The ratio of Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells to CD161(+)Th17 cells was elevated in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. In addition, MTX reduced the ratio of Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 and Th17 play important roles in the early phase of RA; thus, anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with RA in the early phase.

  17. Ratio of Circulating IFNγ (+) "Th17 Cells" in Memory Th Cells Is Inversely Correlated with the Titer of Anti-CCP Antibodies in Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Based on Flow Cytometry Methods of the Human Immunology Project.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with chronic joint inflammation characterized by activated T cells. IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. However, it remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we validated the methods of the Human Immunology Project using only the cell-surface marker through measuring the actual expression of IL-17 and IFNγ. We also evaluated the expression of CD161 in human Th17 cells. We then tried to identify Th17 cells, IL-17(+)Th17 cells, and IFNγ (+)Th17 cells in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients using the standardized method of the Human Immunology Project. Our findings validated the method and the expression of CD161. The ratio of IFNγ (+)Th17 cells in memory T cells was inversely correlated to the titers of anti-CCP antibodies in the early-onset RA patients. These findings suggest that Th17 cells play important roles in the early phase of RA and that anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with early phase RA, especially those with high titers of CCP antibodies.

  18. Rheumatoid factor (RF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... test is most often used to help diagnose rheumatoid arthritis or Sjögren syndrome . Normal Results Results are usually ... result) most often means you do not have rheumatoid arthritis or Sjögren syndrome. However, some people who do ...

  19. Reconstruction of the rheumatoid thumb.

    PubMed

    Rozental, Tamara D

    2007-02-01

    Thumb deformities are common manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis and represent a significant source of disability. A clear understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease is essential in directing treatment. Differential diagnosis for flexible deformities includes soft-tissue imbalances as well as tendon ruptures. In its early stages, thumb involvement can be treated nonsurgically or with soft-tissue reconstruction. With more advanced disease, arthrodesis and arthroplasty often are required. Isolated interphalangeal involvement is best addressed with arthrodesis. Metacarpophalangeal involvement can be treated with arthroplasty in low-demand patients or with arthrodesis in more active patients. Trapezium resection arthroplasty provides excellent relief for patients with carpometacarpal joint destruction.

  20. [Tocilizumab in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Rueda Gotor, Javier; Blanco Alonso, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the receptor for IL-6, approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Japan, Europe and the US. Wide clinical development has shown the efficacy of TCZ in most of the possible situations of RA: RA without prior failure to MTX (AMBITION), RA unresponsive to MTX (SATORI, OPTION, LITHE) or any DMARD (TOWARD, ROSE) as well as RA refractory to anti-TNFa agents (RADIATE). In addition to its early onset, efficacy was constant and even increased as time passed (GROWTH95, GROWTH96). TCZ has shown great efficacy in correcting laboratory alterations in RA, both in acute phase reactants as well as anemia of inflammatory disease. Although in RA TCZ us initially indicated in combination with MTX, it has also shown its efficacy as monotherapy (AMBITION). TCZ is equally effective in the prevention of structural damage (SAMURAI, LITHE). In addition, it has shown to be a safe and well-tolerated drug, similar to other biologic therapies. All of these aspects make TCZ an adequate therapeutic alternative to be considered in any RA scenario.

  1. [Prognostic significance of serum iron level, hemoglobin and rheumatoid factor titre in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Fischer, H; Häntzschel, H; Winiecki, P; Otto, W

    1977-02-01

    On the basis of the results of a five-year examination of the course on 120 patients with rheumatoid arthritis the authors adopt a definite attitude to the prognostic significance of hypersiderinaemia, anaemia and height of the titre of the rheumatoid factor. With the help of the chi2-test and the rank correlation after Spearman the statistical relations to stage, activity, clinical and radiological progressing as well as to the number of the affected joints were examined. In seropositive patients we found a correlation of the titre of rheumatoid factor and stage. Furthermore a clear correlation existed to clinical and radiological progressing as well as to the number of the affected joints. Early highly positive titres of the rheumatoid factor as an expression of high immunologic activity suggest an unfavourable prognosis in the majority of cases. Constant anaemia and hyposiderinaemia as symptoms of a high basis activity of the disease also showed close relations to the progressing. From this result indications for the early use of important therapeutic measures. For the prognostic judgement of the course of the disease of rheumatoid arthritis it is necessary to have at disposal further methodically simply determinable parameters for the recognition of the basis activity and the immunologic activity.

  2. Surgery of the rheumatoid elbow.

    PubMed Central

    Souter, W A

    1990-01-01

    I suggest that for too long the problem of the rheumatoid elbow, particularly the need for surgical intervention, has been underestimated. Where the latter has been advocated the philosophy has been adopted that synovectomy and debridement with excision of the head of the radius is probably all that is required, or that in the late case excision arthroplasty may yield an adequate result. I suggest that these approaches are no longer tenable. Synovectomy and debridement with or without excision of the head of the radius does indeed retain an extremely valuable place in the management of stage 1, 2, and early stage 3 disease. In the later stages of the disease, however, serious consideration must now be given to total joint replacement, the results of which can be remarkably successful and durable, and the complications from which can now be contained within acceptable limits provided that the operating team is fully experienced. It must also be stressed how necessary it is in the medical or combined clinic to pursue careful clinical and radiological monitoring of the rheumatoid elbow so that signs of dangerous deterioration can be recognised early, and surgery applied at a time when optimal conditions for the particular surgical weapons to be used still exist. Images PMID:2241304

  3. Refractory rheumatoid vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashok; Goel, Anshul; Lapsiwala, Mehul; Singhal, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Systemic rheumatoid vasculitis (SRV) can develop in rheumatoid arthritis of long duration and high disease activity. It most commonly manifests as cutaneous vasculitis and mononeuritis multiplex. This can involve any organ of the body and carries very high mortality. We report a case of a young male who had rheumatoid arthritis for the past 15 years and became refractory to standard drugs and anti-TNF agents. He subsequently developed SRV, which started as mononeuritis multiplex. Disease progressed to result in gangrene of hands and feet despite receiving intravenous cyclophosphamide. Intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab also could not provide any response. Prolonged ICU stay resulted in critical care neuromyopathy. Central nervous system vasculitis developed even after repeated infusions of intravenous immunoglobulins and at last he died of complications. In this case report, we have presented rare and chronic protracted presentation of rheumatoid vasculitis involving skin, nerves, brain and testis, which was refractory to the recommended therapies. PMID:28031844

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Revisited - Advanced Imaging Review.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Surabhi; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Uma; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a multisystem disorder, which causes significant morbidity. An early diagnosis of RA is essential to prevent the development of irreversible bone and joint changes. The disease has characteristic clinical features, but an early evaluation of the quantum of disease may be difficult with plain radiography alone. Recent developments in the imaging of RA have contributed significantly to an early diagnosis of the disease. In this article, we review the role and current status of various imaging modalities including recent advances in the evaluation and follow-up of early RA.

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Revisited – Advanced Imaging Review

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Surabhi; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Ranjan, Piyush; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Uma; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a multisystem disorder, which causes significant morbidity. An early diagnosis of RA is essential to prevent the development of irreversible bone and joint changes. The disease has characteristic clinical features, but an early evaluation of the quantum of disease may be difficult with plain radiography alone. Recent developments in the imaging of RA have contributed significantly to an early diagnosis of the disease. In this article, we review the role and current status of various imaging modalities including recent advances in the evaluation and follow-up of early RA. PMID:28105245

  6. Cray XT4: An Early Evaluation for Petascale Scientific Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Sadaf R; Barrett, Richard F; Fahey, Mark R; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Sankaran, Ramanan; Worley, Patrick H; Larkin, Jeffrey M

    2007-01-01

    The scientific simulation capabilities of next generation high-end computing technology will depend on striking a balance among memory, processor, I/O, and local and global network performance across the breadth of the scientific simulation space. The Cray XT4 combines commodity AMD dual core Opteron processor technology with the second generation of Cray's custom communication accelerator in a system design whose balance is claimed to be driven by the demands of scientific simulation. This paper presents an evaluation of the Cray XT4 using microbenchmarks to develop a controlled understanding of individual system components, providing the context for analyzing and comprehending the performance of several petascale-ready applications. Results gathered from several strategic application domains are compared with observations on the previous generation Cray XT3 and other high-end computing systems, demonstrating performance improvements across a wide variety of application benchmark problems.

  7. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Raciborski, Filip; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5–1%). According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000–157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems): M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment. PMID:27407258

  8. Computational Simulations of the Early Steps of Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-01-01

    There is strong evidence that the oligomers of key proteins, formed during the early steps of aggregation, could be the primary toxic species associated with human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Here, we review recent progress in the development of computational approaches in order to understand the structures, dynamics and free energy surfaces of oligomers. We also discuss possible research directions for the coming years. PMID:19164927

  9. Practicing Parenting? Effects of Computerized Infant Simulators on Teenage Attitudes toward Early Parenthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallery, Janet G.

    2002-01-01

    Computerized infant simulators may deter early parenthood. A survey of 1,285 teenagers before and after simulation showed a significant change in some attitudes toward parenting. Males reported the strongest attitude change, while females began with more realistic understandings of parenting. Further study is needed to determine whether attitude…

  10. Just Running Around: Some Reminiscences of Early Simulation/Gaming in the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ments, Morry

    2011-01-01

    The article begins with an abbreviated CV of the author and then recounts the formation of Society for the Advancement of Games and Simulation in Education and Training (SAGSET) and the early days of simulation and gaming in the United Kingdom. Four strands of elements of development are described together with the key events of the 1970s and…

  11. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

    2003-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early Site Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, Juan; Hubbard, Susan; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Moulton, David; Denham, Miles E.

    2011-03-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, Technology Innovation and Development (EM-32), is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high performance computing tool will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. As part of the initial development process, a series of demonstrations were defined to test ASCEM components and provide feedback to developers, engage end users in applications, and lead to an outcome that would benefit the sites. The demonstration was implemented for a sub-region of the Savannah River Site General Separations Area that includes the F-Area Seepage Basins. The physical domain included the unsaturated and saturated zones in the vicinity of the seepage basins and Fourmile Branch, using an unstructured mesh fit to the hydrostratigraphy and topography of the site. The calculations modeled variably saturated flow and the resulting flow field was used in simulations of the advection of non-reactive species and the reactive-transport of uranium. As part of the demonstrations, a new set of data management, visualization, and uncertainty quantification tools were developed to analyze simulation results and existing site data. These new tools can be used to provide summary statistics, including information on which simulation parameters were most important in the prediction of uncertainty and to visualize the relationships between model input and output.

  13. Healthcare consumption and direct costs of rheumatoid arthritis in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Westhovens, R; Boonen, A; Verbruggen, L; Durez, P; De Clerck, L; Malaise, M; Mielants, H

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the socioeconomic consequences of early and late rheumatoid arthritis in Belgium and to assess the patient out-of-pocket contributions. This multicentre longitudinal study in Belgium evaluated patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Early disease was defined as diagnosis since less than 1 year. At baseline sociodemographic and disease characteristics were assessed and during the following year patients recorded all healthcare- and non-healthcare-related direct costs and out-of-pocket contributions. The study included 48 patients with early and 85 patients with late rheumatoid arthritis. Mean disease duration was 0.5 vs 12.5 years in patients with early and late rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. The disease activity score (DAS28) was comparable between both groups (4.1 vs 4.5, p = 0.14), but physical function (Health Assessment Questionnaire, HAQ) was more impaired in patients with long-standing disease (1.0 vs 1.7, p < 0.001). Work disability had increased from 2% in patients with early to 18% in patients with late disease. The annual societal direct costs per patient were 3055 Euros (median: 1518 Euros) opposed to 9946 Euros (median: 4017 Euros) for early and late rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. The higher direct cost for patients with long-standing disease was seen for all categories, but especially for physiotherapy and need for devices and adaptations. Patients with early as well as late disease contribute out of pocket about one-third to the direct healthcare costs. Within each group, HAQ was a strong determinant of costs. In Belgium, patients with long-standing rheumatoid arthritis are nine times more likely to be work disabled than patients with less than 1 year disease duration and have a threefold increase in costs. Differences in healthcare consumption between patients could be mainly explained by differences in physical function (HAQ).

  14. Multiple pulmonary rheumatoid nodules.

    PubMed

    Sargin, Gokhan; Senturk, Taskin

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of 45-year-old female patient with the diagnosis of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, who was admitted to our rheumatology department with exacerbation of the disease. The patient's disease activity score (DAS 28) was 6.9. Physical examination revealed changes in the lung auscultation as a rough breathing sound at the middle and lower lobe of the right lung. Chest X-ray revealed multiple nodular densities in both lungs. Lung biopsy was performed for the diagnosis and revealed necrotizing granulomas with central fibrinoid necrosis surrounded by epithelioid cells. Such a histopathological picture is typical for rheumatoid nodules. Finally the patient was treated with rituximab, with significant improvement.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Suggests Possible Interaction Patterns at Early Steps of β2-Microglobulin Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Viglino, Paolo; Zuccato, Pierfrancesco; Pieri, Lidia; Faccioli, Pietro; Bellotti, Vittorio; Esposito, Gennaro

    2007-01-01

    Early events in aggregation of proteins are not easily accessible by experiments. In this work, we perform a 5-ns molecular dynamics simulation of an ensemble of 27 copies of β2-microglobulin in explicit solvent. During the simulation, the formation of intermolecular contacts is observed. The simulation highlights the importance of apical residues and, in particular, of those at the N-terminus end of the molecule. The most frequently found pattern of interaction involves a head-to-head contact arrangement of molecules. Hydrophobic contacts appear to be important for the establishment of long-lived (on the simulation timescale) contacts. Although early events on the pathway to aggregation and fibril formation are not directly related to the end-state of the process, which is reached on a much longer timescale, simulation results are consistent with experimental data and in general with a parallel arrangement of intermolecular β-strand pairs. PMID:17158575

  16. Dapsone in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, D J; Lamothe, M; Stevens, R M; Sigal, L H

    1996-06-01

    Dapsone, a synthetic sulfone with chemical similarities to sulfapyridine, has been used for a number of years to treat leprosy and dermatitis herpetiformis. Recently, a number of prospective, randomized, double-blind trials have shown their success in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, with dapsone being superior to placebo and comparable to chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. Its mode of anti-inflammatory actions in rheumatoid arthritis is not clearly understood, but modulation of neutrophil activity or inhibition of neutrophil inflammatory product formation or release appear to play a role. The major limiting side effect is hemolytic anemia, which may be mitigated through careful patient selection, conservative drug dosing, close monitoring, and possibly, concurrent administration of antioxidants or cytochrome P450 inhibitors. Methemoglobinemia is another common finding among patients receiving dapsone therapy, but rarely does it result in prominent symptoms other than transient pallor. Less common adverse events to dapsone include the idiosyncratic reactions of leukopenia and agranulocytosis, cutaneous eruptions, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis, toxic hepatitis, cholestatic jaundice, nephrotic syndrome, renal papillary necrosis, severe hypoalbuminemia without proteinuria, an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome, and minor neurological and gastrointestinal complaints. In this report, two patients with advanced rheumatoid arthritis, who were safely and effectively treated with dapsone after failure with other second-line agents, are described and the literature is reviewed. We suggest that dapsone is an effective second-line agent in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Treating the Rheumatoid Hand

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, D. E.; Welsh, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Deformities in the rheumatoid hand will vary according to whether the joints or the tendons are involved. Frequently both will be involved and several different deformities will be present in the same hand. However, a logical approach to examination and treatment, as outlined in this article, will simplify decision making and ensure prompt, appropriate treatment. PMID:21304805

  18. Comparing the effects of tofacitinib, methotrexate and the combination, on bone marrow oedema, synovitis and bone erosion in methotrexate-naive, early active rheumatoid arthritis: results of an exploratory randomised MRI study incorporating semiquantitative and quantitative techniques

    PubMed Central

    Conaghan, Philip G; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bowes, Michael A; Wu, Chunying; Fuerst, Thomas; Irazoque-Palazuelos, Fedra; Soto-Raices, Oscar; Hrycaj, Pawel; Xie, Zhiyong; Zhang, Richard; Wyman, Bradley T; Bradley, John D; Soma, Koshika; Wilkinson, Bethanie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the effects of tofacitinib—an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)—with or without methotrexate (MTX), on MRI endpoints in MTX-naive adult patients with early active RA and synovitis in an index wrist or hand. Methods In this exploratory, phase 2, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study, patients received tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily + MTX, tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily + placebo (tofacitinib monotherapy), or MTX + placebo (MTX monotherapy), for 1 year. MRI endpoints (Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials RA MRI score (RAMRIS), quantitative RAMRIS (RAMRIQ) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI) were assessed using a mixed-effect model for repeated measures. Treatment differences with p<0.05 (vs MTX monotherapy) were considered significant. Results In total, 109 patients were randomised and treated. Treatment differences in RAMRIS bone marrow oedema (BME) at month 6 were −1.55 (90% CI −2.52 to −0.58) for tofacitinib + MTX and −1.74 (−2.72 to −0.76) for tofacitinib monotherapy (both p<0.01 vs MTX monotherapy). Numerical improvements in RAMRIS synovitis at month 3 were −0.63 (−1.58 to 0.31) for tofacitinib + MTX and −0.52 (−1.46 to 0.41) for tofacitinib monotherapy (both p>0.05 vs MTX monotherapy). Treatment differences in RAMRIQ synovitis were statistically significant at month 3, consistent with DCE MRI findings. Less deterioration of RAMRIS and RAMRIQ erosive damage was seen at months 6 and 12 in both tofacitinib groups versus MTX monotherapy. Conclusions These results provide consistent evidence using three different MRI technologies that tofacitinib treatment leads to early reduction of inflammation and inhibits progression of structural damage. Trial registration number NCT01164579. PMID:27002108

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  1. Early genetic responses in rat vascular tissue after simulated diving.

    PubMed

    Eftedal, Ingrid; Jørgensen, Arve; Røsbjørgen, Ragnhild; Flatberg, Arnar; Brubakk, Alf O

    2012-12-18

    Diving causes a transient reduction of vascular function, but the mechanisms behind this are largely unknown. The aim of this study was therefore to analyze genetic reactions that may be involved in acute changes of vascular function in divers. Rats were exposed to 709 kPa of hyperbaric air (149 kPa Po(2)) for 50 min followed by postdive monitoring of vascular bubble formation and full genome microarray analysis of the aorta from diving rats (n = 8) and unexposed controls (n = 9). Upregulation of 23 genes was observed 1 h after simulated diving. The differential gene expression was characteristic of cellular responses to oxidative stress, with functions of upregulated genes including activation and fine-tuning of stress-responsive transcription, cytokine/cytokine receptor signaling, molecular chaperoning, and coagulation. By qRT-PCR, we verified increased transcription of neuron-derived orphan receptor-1 (Nr4a3), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (Serpine1), cytokine TWEAK receptor FN14 (Tnfrsf12a), transcription factor class E basic helix-loop-helix protein 40 (Bhlhe40), and adrenomedullin (Adm). Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF1 subunit HIF1-α was stabilized in the aorta 1 h after diving, and after 4 h there was a fivefold increase in total protein levels of the procoagulant plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI1) in blood plasma from diving rats. The study did not have sufficient power for individual assessment of effects of hyperoxia and decompression-induced bubbles on postdive gene expression. However, differential gene expression in rats without venous bubbles was similar to that of all the diving rats, indicating that elevated Po(2) instigated the observed genetic reactions.

  2. Classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, A J

    1995-05-01

    The development of classification schemes for RA in the last 40 years has followed the increasingly precise understanding of the nature of the clinical disease and the recognition of the different requirements of classification methods in clinic and population settings. In published studies of RA in clinic patients the most widely used criteria sets have been the 1958 ARA (ACR) criteria and its 1961 adaptation (the Rome (active) criteria). These sets classified disease as 'classical', 'definite', 'probable' and 'possible' RA based on criteria comprising clinical, serological, radiological and histological features (the latter were dropped from the Rome criteria set because of their impracticality). More recently, a new criteria set (the 1987 ARA criteria) has been developed using statistical techniques. This set was derived using RA cases and controls attending hospital clinics. It is based on the earlier criteria sets but accommodates the characteristic pattern of joint involvement in RA more precisely. The criteria recognize only the single disease category of 'rheumatoid arthritis'. In validation studies, the 1987 criteria set has been found to have enhanced specificity over earlier schemes in clinic-based studies of RA. The sensitivity may, however, be reduced, in particular in studies of early disease. The application of classification criteria for case recognition in the population and family studies of RA has proved more problematic. In these settings, there is the additional requirement to recognize individuals with remitted and inactive disease as RA cases. The 1966 New York criteria were developed for this specific purpose, however their format proved cumbersome and they have not been widely adopted. The 1987 criteria set is insufficiently sensitive to recognize inactive disease if the criteria are applied exactly as they have been defined. The sensitivity of the 1987 criteria set is, however, substantially enhanced if the criteria are adapted to

  3. Conceptual Design of Simulation Models in an Early Development Phase of Lunar Spacecraft Simulator Using SMP2 Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoon Hee; Koo, Cheol Hea; Moon, Sung Tae; Han, Sang Hyuck; Ju, Gwang Hyeok

    2013-08-01

    The conceptual study for Korean lunar orbiter/lander prototype has been performed in Korea Aerospace Research Institute (KARI). Across diverse space programs around European countries, a variety of simulation application has been developed using SMP2 (Simulation Modelling Platform) standard related to portability and reuse of simulation models by various model users. KARI has not only first-hand experience of a development of SMP compatible simulation environment but also an ongoing study to apply the SMP2 development process of simulation model to a simulator development project for lunar missions. KARI has tried to extend the coverage of the development domain based on SMP2 standard across the whole simulation model life-cycle from software design to its validation through a lunar exploration project. Figure. 1 shows a snapshot from a visualization tool for the simulation of lunar lander motion. In reality, a demonstrator prototype on the right-hand side of image was made and tested in 2012. In an early phase of simulator development prior to a kick-off start in the near future, targeted hardware to be modelled has been investigated and indentified at the end of 2012. The architectural breakdown of the lunar simulator at system level was performed and the architecture with a hierarchical tree of models from the system to parts at lower level has been established. Finally, SMP Documents such as Catalogue, Assembly, Schedule and so on were converted using a XML(eXtensible Mark-up Language) converter. To obtain benefits of the suggested approaches and design mechanisms in SMP2 standard as far as possible, the object-oriented and component-based design concepts were strictly chosen throughout a whole model development process.

  4. Canine rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Heuser, W

    1980-11-01

    A miniature poodle was presented with a history of a chronic, insidious hind limb lameness. As part of the clinical approach to the case, a serum electrophoresis was done which revealed a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Analysis of stife and carpal joint fluid revealed an elevated white cell count, that consisted of about 75% neutrophils and 25% monocytes. The joint fluid was sterile on bacteriological culture. Radiographs of the carpal joints indicated some narrowing of joint spaces and subchondral lucencies. Rheumatoid factor was identified on serological testing. Histopathology of carpal joint biopsies indicated a nonsuppurative synovitis. These findings are consistent with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The dog was treated with prednisone on a long term basis. Response to treatment has been good.

  5. Oxidation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hitchon, Carol A; El-Gabalawy, Hani S

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen metabolism has an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the course of cellular oxidative phosphorylation, and by activated phagocytic cells during oxidative bursts, exceed the physiological buffering capacity and result in oxidative stress. The excessive production of ROS can damage protein, lipids, nucleic acids, and matrix components. They also serve as important intracellular signaling molecules that amplify the synovial inflammatory–proliferative response. Repetitive cycles of hypoxia and reoxygenation associated with changes in synovial perfusion are postulated to activate hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and nuclear factor-κB, two key transcription factors that are regulated by changes in cellular oxygenation and cytokine stimulation, and that in turn orchestrate the expression of a spectrum of genes critical to the persistence of synovitis. An understanding of the complex interactions involved in these pathways might allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:15535839

  6. [The pulmonological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bernscherer, György; Karabélyos, Csaba; Tarján, Zsolt

    2008-07-20

    In their review article the authors overview the primary and secondary pulmonary complications of rheumatoid arthritis with the help of bibliographic data. They emphasize the pulmonological complications of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs used for the pharmaceutical therapy of rheumatoid arthritis, of which they discuss the methotrexate induced pulmonary diseases. Methotrexate participates nearly in all of additive double and triple--O'Dell-scheme--combined disease modifying antirheumatic drugs therapy. Because of that, the early detection of drug-induced pulmonological complications is important. For rheumatologists the treatment of methotrexate resistant rheumatoid arthritis is always getting a higher and higher challenge. Biological therapeutical drugs act as cytokine antagonists, by blocking TNF-alpha and, compared to disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, they can more effectively inhibit the progression of the disease. These are the biological response modifiers. Their main representatives are infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept. At the end, the authors discuss secondary pulmonary complications caused by biological response modifiers, e.g. the biological response modifiers associated pulmonary tuberculosis, bacterial tracheobronchitis, bacterial pneumonia, bronchiectasia, pulmonary oedema, rapid fibrosing alveolitis, and coccidioidomycosis. At 3% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, treated with biological response modifiers, who live in Arizona, California, Nevada, pulmonary and systemic mycosis--coccidioidomycosis can appear with a 15% of mortality. As a consequence of frequent earthquakes, the spores getting into the air from the ground infect immunosuppressed patients treated with biological response modifiers. The authors draw attention to the fact that patients who receive biological therapy and travel to the above-mentioned endemic or earthquake-active regions, have a potential high risk, so it is indispensable that they are informed by the

  7. Presence of Rheumatoid Factor during Chronic HCV Infection Is Associated with Expansion of Mature Activated Memory B-Cells that Are Hypo-Responsive to B-Cell Receptor Stimulation and Persist during the Early Stage of IFN Free Therapy.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Avilés, Elane; Kostadinova, Lenche; Rusterholtz, Anne; Cruz-Lebrón, Angelica; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Anthony, Donald D

    2015-01-01

    Approximately half of those with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have circulating rheumatoid factor (RF), and a portion of these individuals develop cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. B cell phenotype/function in relation to RF in serum has been unclear. We examined B cell subset distribution, activation state (CD86), cell cycle state (Ki67), and ex-vivo response to BCR, TLR9 and TLR7/8 stimulation, in chronic HCV-infected donors with or without RF, and uninfected donors. Mature-activated B-cells of HCV-infected donors had lower CD86 expression compared to uninfected donors, and in the presence of RF they also showed reduced CD86 expression in response to BCR and TLR9 stimulation. Additionally, mature activated memory B cells of HCV RF+ donors less commonly expressed Ki67+ than HCV RF- donors, and did not proliferate as well in response to BCR stimulation. Proportions of mature-activated B cells were enhanced, while naïve B-cells were lower in the peripheral blood of HCV-RF+ compared to RF- and uninfected donors. None of these parameters normalize by week 8 of IFN free direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapy in HCV RF+ donors, while in RF- donors, mature activated B cell proportions did normalize. These data indicate that while chronic HCV infection alone results in a lower state of activation in mature activated memory B cells, the presence of RF in serum is associated with a more pronounced state of unresponsiveness and an overrepresentation of these B cells in the blood. This phenotype persists at least during the early time window after removal of HCV from the host.

  8. Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carette, Simon

    1984-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common disease, for which every physician should have a sound approach. This paper details the global management of the disease. Guidelines are given for educating the patient and assessing the level of disease activity. Common questions about the indications and uses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, local corticosteroid injections, slow-acting agents, immunosuppressive drugs and steroids are discussed. PMID:21278947

  9. Proposed Planning Procedures: Gaming-Simulation as a Method for Early Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smit, Peter H.

    1982-01-01

    Examines the use of simulation gaming as a research tool in the early assessment of proposed planning procedures in urban renewal projects. About one-half of the citations in the 36-item bibliography are in Dutch; the remainder are in English. (Author/JJD)

  10. [Sarcopenia in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena

    The clinical picture of rheumatoid arthritis covers the condition of chronic inflammation connected to the increased concentration of inflammatory mediators, reduced physical activity, immobilization caused by pain, stiffness and joint destruction as well as accompanying hormonal and metabolic disorders. It all may lead to extra-articular complications, also to the loss of muscle mass with the weakness of muscle strength, adding to the disability and significantly lowering the patients' quality of life. Sarcopenia is an advanced form of muscle mass loss which constitutes an independent and vital threat for dexterity. Attempts are made to define and classify sarcopenia basing on the measurements of muscle mass where the examinations are conducted by the method of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, absorptiometry of two X-ray beams of various energies, electric bioimpedance and anthropometric methods. The data gained in few studies conducted in order to estimate the reduction of muscle mass in patients with rheumatoid arthritis confirm the significant increase of sarcopenia occurence in this group. Procedure with rheumatoid arthritis covers primarily treatment of the inflammatory process with traditional and biological medicaments that modify the course of illness. Such treatment seems to diminish the risk of equal sarcopenia occurrence. The effectiveness of using anabolic medicaments and high protein diet has not been proved. Currently, regular physical activity including aerobic exercise and exercises with load is considered a good method of muscle mass loss prevention and a procedure in case of confirmed muscle mass loss.

  11. Early Validation of Failure Detection, Isolation, and Recovery Design Using Heterogeneous Modelling and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Plas, Peter; Guerriero, Suzanne; Cristiano, Leorato; Rugina, Ana

    2012-08-01

    Modelling and simulation can support a number of use cases across the spacecraft development life-cycle. Given the increasing complexity of space missions, the observed general trend is for a more extensive usage of simulation already in the early phases. A major perceived advantage is that modelling and simulation can enable the validation of critical aspects of the spacecraft design before the actual development is started, as such reducing the risk in later phases.Failure Detection, Isolation, and Recovery (FDIR) is one of the areas with a high potential to benefit from early modelling and simulation. With the increasing level of required spacecraft autonomy, FDIR specifications can grow in such a way that the traditional document-based review process soon becomes inadequate.This paper shows that FDIR modelling and simulation in a system context can provide a powerful tool to support the FDIR verification process. It is highlighted that FDIR modelling at this early stage requires heterogeneous modelling tools and languages, in order to provide an adequate functional description of the different components (i.e. FDIR functions, environment, equipment, etc.) to be modelled.For this reason, an FDIR simulation framework is proposed in this paper. This framework is based on a number of tools already available in the Avionics Systems Laboratory at ESTEC, which are the Avionics Test Bench Functional Engineering Simulator (ATB FES), Matlab/Simulink, TASTE, and Real Time Developer Studio (RTDS).The paper then discusses the application of the proposed simulation framework to a real case-study, i.e. the FDIR modelling of a satellite in support of actual ESA mission. Challenges and benefits of the approach are described. Finally, lessons learned and the generality of the proposed approach are discussed.

  12. Robust regression and posterior predictive simulation increase power to detect early bursts of trait evolution.

    PubMed

    Slater, Graham J; Pennell, Matthew W

    2014-05-01

    A central prediction of much theory on adaptive radiations is that traits should evolve rapidly during the early stages of a clade's history and subsequently slowdown in rate as niches become saturated--a so-called "Early Burst." Although a common pattern in the fossil record, evidence for early bursts of trait evolution in phylogenetic comparative data has been equivocal at best. We show here that this may not necessarily be due to the absence of this pattern in nature. Rather, commonly used methods to infer its presence perform poorly when when the strength of the burst--the rate at which phenotypic evolution declines--is small, and when some morphological convergence is present within the clade. We present two modifications to existing comparative methods that allow greater power to detect early bursts in simulated datasets. First, we develop posterior predictive simulation approaches and show that they outperform maximum likelihood approaches at identifying early bursts at moderate strength. Second, we use a robust regression procedure that allows for the identification and down-weighting of convergent taxa, leading to moderate increases in method performance. We demonstrate the utility and power of these approach by investigating the evolution of body size in cetaceans. Model fitting using maximum likelihood is equivocal with regards the mode of cetacean body size evolution. However, posterior predictive simulation combined with a robust node height test return low support for Brownian motion or rate shift models, but not the early burst model. While the jury is still out on whether early bursts are actually common in nature, our approach will hopefully facilitate more robust testing of this hypothesis. We advocate the adoption of similar posterior predictive approaches to improve the fit and to assess the adequacy of macroevolutionary models in general.

  13. [FEATURES OF THE TREATMENT OF THE SPINE IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS].

    PubMed

    Selezneva, S; Sinyachenko, O; Zabara, А

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) refers to the most common inflammatory joint disease, which can lead to persistent disability and early mortality of patients, and one of the manifestations of RA is a frequent lesion of the spine, which significantly affects the quality of life of these patients.

  14. Visceral leishmaniasis in a rheumatoid arthritis patient receiving methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Reina, Delia; Cerdà, Dacia; Güell, Elena; Martínez Montauti, Joaquín; Pineda, Antonio; Corominas, Hèctor

    2016-08-11

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are susceptible to severe infections such as leishmaniasis. As L. infantum is endemic in the Mediterranean region, it is necessary to rule this infectious process out in any RA patient presenting with fever and pancytopenia. An early diagnosis based on a high suspicion can prevent a fatal outcome.

  15. Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

    1977-12-01

    Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding.

  16. Kartagener syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rébora, Martin Esteban; Cuneo, Julia Ana; Marcos, Josefina; Marcos, Juan Carlos

    2006-02-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old female patient, affected with Kartagener syndrome (primary ciliary dyskinesia), who developed seropositive and erosive rheumatoid arthritis. According to our review, there are only 6 cases reported so far with this association without a definite etiopathogenic linkage recognized in common. Chronic infections resulting from the ciliary dysfunction might be a trigger for rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. The Early Jurassic climate: General circulation model simulations and the paleoclimate record

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of several general circulation model simulations of the Early Jurassic climate. The general circulation model employed was developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies while most paleoclimate data were provided by the Paleographic Atlas Project of the University of Chicago. The first chapter presents an Early Jurassic base simulation, which uses detailed reconstructions of paleogeography, vegetation, and sea surface temperature as boundary condition data sets. The resulting climatology reveals an Earth 5.2[degrees]C warmer, globally, than at present and a latitudinal temperature gradient dominated by high-latitude warming (+20[degrees]C) and little tropical change (+1[degrees]C). Comparisons show a good correlation between simulated results and paleoclimate data. Sensitivity experiments are used to investigate any model-data mismatches. Chapters two and three discuss two important aspects of Early Jurassic climate, continental aridity and global warming. Chapter two focuses on the hydrological capabilities of the general circulation model. The general circulation model's hydrologic diagnostics are evaluated, using the distribution of modern deserts and Early Jurassic paleoclimate data as validating constraints. A new method, based on general circulation model diagnostics and empirical formulae, is proposed for evaluating moisture balance. Chapter three investigates the cause of past global warming, concentrating on the role of increased ocean heat transport. Early Jurassic simulations show that increased ocean heat transports may have been a major factor in past climates. Increased ocean heat transports create latitudinal temperature gradients that closely approximate paleoclimate data and solve the problem of tropical overheating that results from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. Increased carbon dioxide cannot duplicate the Jurassic climate without also including increased ocean heat transports.

  18. Gold nephropathy in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Shuler, S E

    1979-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl was treated with gold salts for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Treatment had to be discontinued when persistent proteinuria was detected. As this case report indicates, close monitoring of the urine is mandatory during treatment with gold salts to detect early signs of toxicity: hematuria followed by casts and then proteinuria as therapy is continued. Histologic examination with electron microscopy will help to differentiate the different forms of gold toxicity. When the findings are consistent with gold-induced renal involvement, therapy should be discontinued. The gold nephropathy usually resolves in time, with no permanent renal damage.

  19. [The role of biomarkers in diagnostics and forecasting of effectiveness of modern therapy of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, E N; Novikov, A A; Nasonov, E L

    2013-08-01

    The rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most severe and widespread systemic inflammatory autoimmune diseases. The modern laboratory diagnostic of rheumatoid arthritis includes detection of large spectrum of biomarkers (autoantibodies, indicators of acute phase of inflammation, cytokines, markers of activation of endothelium, subpopulations of lymphocytes, products of metabolism of bone and cartilaginous tissue, genetic markers) in blood, synovial fluid, and synovial tissue. Alongside with common techniques of immunodiagnostics, the multiplex analysis of biomarkers based on genetic, transcript and proteomic technologies is applied. The results of identification of biomarkers are an important instrument of early diagnostics, activity evaluation, severity of disease course and disease prognosis and effectiveness of applied therapy. Among biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis the most clinical value have antibodies (rheumatoid factor class IgM, antibodies to citrullinized proteins) and acute phase indicators (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein) which are diagnostic criteria of rheumatoid arthritis and can be used in evaluation of prognosis of this disease. On basis of multi-parametric analysis of 12 key proteins of blood serum the new index of activity of rheumatoid arthritis (Vectra DA) is developed Nowadays, the potential biomarkers are detected providing to implement immunologic monitoring and prognosis of effectiveness of therapy of rheumatoid arthritis with genetic engineering biologic preparations. The laboratory tests are developed to evaluate immunogenicity of genetic engineering biologic preparations and diagnostic of latent tuberculosis infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis against the background of therapy with using this group of pharmaceuticals.

  20. Objectives and strategies for rheumatoid arthritis therapy: yesterday vs. today.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S

    2003-01-01

    The goals for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis have changed from slowing the disease process only after a definitive diagnosis is made, to intervening early to minimize disease activity and achieve and maintain remission. To meet the new goals, both monotherapy and combination therapy must be administered not only early but aggressively, and aggressive therapy must be sustained. In addition, the efficacy of this treatment design can only be achieved if disease activity is monitored.

  1. Cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J B M; Tak, Paul P

    2002-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterized by synovial inflammation that leads to the destruction of cartilage and bone. In the last decade, there was a lot of successful research in the field of cytokine expression and regulation. It has become clear that pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, derived predominantely from cells of macrophage lineage, play a major role in the initiation and perpetuation of the chronic inflammatory process in the RA synovial membrane. Monokines are abundant in rheumatoid synovial tissue, whereas low amounts of lymphokines are found. The involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin (IL)-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, in the pathogenesis of RA is well accepted. Recent data provide evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18 plays a crucial role in the development and sustenance of inflammatory joint diseases. There also appears to be a compensatory anti-inflammatory response in RA synovial membrane. It has become clear in the last few years that T cell-derived cytokines expressed preferentially by Th1 cells contribute to joint destruction and inflammation in RA. However, products from Th2 cells may be protective.

  2. An Early Warning System for Loan Risk Assessment Based on Rare Event Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hong; Qiu, Yue; Wu, Yueqin

    System simulation is one of important tool for risk assessment. In this paper, a new method is presented to deal with credit risk assessment problems for commercial banks based on rare event simulation. The failure probability of repaying loans of listed company is taken as the criterion to measure the level of credit risk. The rare-event concept is adopted to construct the model of credit risk identification in commercial banks, and cross-entropy scheme is designed to implement the rare event simulation, based on which the loss probability can be assessed. Numerical experiments have shown that the method has a strong capability to identify the credit risk for commercial banks and offers a good tool for early warning.

  3. Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or changes in certain hormones, may promote the development of rheumatoid arthritis in a genetically susceptible person who has been exposed to a triggering agent from the environment. Even though all the answers are not known, ...

  4. The Argo simulation - II. The early build-up of the Hubble sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Feldmann, Robert; Mayer, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    The Hubble sequence is a common classification scheme for the structure of galaxies. Despite the tremendous usefulness of this diagnostic, we still do not fully understand when, where, and how this morphological ordering was put in place. Here, we investigate the morphological evolution of a sample of 22 high-redshift (z ≥ 3) galaxies extracted from the Argo simulation. Argo is a cosmological zoom-in simulation of a group-sized halo and its environment. It adopts the same high-resolution (˜104 M⊙, ˜100 pc) and sub-grid physical model that was used in the Eris simulation but probes a sub-volume almost 10 times bigger with as many as 45 million gas and star particles in the zoom-in region. Argo follows the early assembly of galaxies with a broad range of stellar masses (log M⋆/M⊙ ˜ 8-11 at z ≃ 3), while resolving properly their structural properties. We recover a diversity of morphologies, including late-type/irregular disc galaxies with flat rotation curves, spheroid dominated early-type discs, and a massive elliptical galaxy, already established at z ˜ 3. We identify major mergers as the main trigger for the formation of bulges and the steepening of the circular velocity curves. Minor mergers and non-axisymmetric perturbations (stellar bars) drive the bulge growth in some cases. The specific angular momenta of the simulated disc components fairly match the values inferred from nearby galaxies of similar M⋆ once the expected redshift evolution of disc sizes is accounted for. We conclude that morphological transformations of high-redshift galaxies of intermediate mass are likely triggered by processes similar to those at low redshift and result in an early build-up of the Hubble sequence.

  5. The first national clinical audit for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Firth, J; Snowden, N; Ledingham, J; Rivett, A; Galloway, J; Dennison, E M; MacPhie, E; Ide, Z; Rowe, I; Kandala, N; Jameson, K

    The first national audit for rheumatoid and early inflammatory arthritis has benchmarked care for the first 3 months of follow-up activity from first presentation to a rheumatology service. Access to care, management of early rheumatoid arthritis and support for self care were measured against National Institute for Health and Care Excellence quality standards; impact of early arthritis and experience of care were measured using patient-reported outcome and experience measures. The results demonstrate delays in referral and accessing specialist care and the need for service improvement in treating to target, suppression of high levels of disease activity and support for self-care. Improvements in patient-reported outcomes within 3 months and high levels of overall satisfaction were reported but these results were affected by low response rates. This article presents a summary of the national data from the audit and discusses the implications for nursing practice.

  6. Filaggrin peptides with β-hairpin structure bind rheumatoid arthritis antibodies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sabrina; Geyer, Armin

    2014-04-07

    In the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synthetic filaggrin peptides serve as antigens for rheumatoid-specific autoantibodies (anti-citrullinated peptide antibody, ACPA) in ELISA tests. In this work we present a peptide that exhibits the binding epitope of ACPA in the form of a stable folding β-hairpin. The homogeneity of the peptide folding was confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and might lead to the first proposed structure of the antibody-bound conformation of the epitope.

  7. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-05-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented.

  8. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  9. [Understanding rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Sibilia, Jean; Sordet, Christelle; Mrabet, Dalila; Wachsmann, Dominique

    2005-12-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common and severe inflammatory rheumatic disease, for which the immune mechanisms are being decoded little by little. The pathogenic ncludes significant cellular actors of innate immunity (fibroblastic synoviocytes, macrophages, mastocytes...) and adaptive immunity (T and B lymphocytes). These actors interact through the production of and response to specific (cytokines, chemokines and auto-antibodies) and non-specific (prostaglandins, nitrous oxide [NO], complement, proteases) mediators. The chronology of this rheumatoid synovitis is becoming progressively clearer. Its initiation could be the consequence of a precocious activation of the innate immunity, induced by bacterial agents or debris (PAMP). The activation of the synoviocytes and the macrophages via specific receptors (PPR) unleashes an intense inflammatory reaction that triggers a cascade of events. The ongoing nature of this synovitis leads to the intra-articular recruitment of different cells of immunity. This cellular afflux amplifies the macrophagic and synoviocytic activation and proliferation. All of these interactive phenomena end in the production of large quantities of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFa, IL1, IL6, IL15, IL17, IL18) but also other pathogenic mediators (auto-antibodies, complement, prostaglandins, nitrous oxide...). This synovitis persists, as it is no longer regulated by a sufficient production of physiological regulators (soluble receptors and inhibitors of cytokines). The consequence of this intense inflammation and synovial proliferation leads to osteo-articular destruction by the production of proteases and the activation of osteoclasts by the RANK/RANK-ligand pathway under the effect of cytokines (TNFa, IL5, IL1, IL6, IL17) and other mediators (prostaglandins) liberated by synoviocytes, macrophages and lymphocytes. The decryption of this puzzle has already created new therapeutic orientations. The identification of new targets is one of the major

  10. Simulating a Dynamic Antarctic Ice Sheet in the Early to Middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasson, E.; DeConto, R.; Pollard, D.; Levy, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    There are a variety of sources of geological data that suggest major variations in the volume and extent of the Antarctic ice sheet during the early to middle Miocene. Simulating such variability using coupled climate-ice sheet models is problematic due to a strong hysteresis effect caused by height-mass balance feedback and albedo feedback. This results in limited retreat of the ice sheet once it has reached the continental size, as likely occurred prior to the Miocene. Proxy records suggest a relatively narrow range of atmospheric CO2 during the early to middle Miocene, which exacerbates this problem. We use a new climate forcing which accounts for ice sheet-climate feedbacks through an asynchronous GCM-RCM coupling, which is able to better resolve the narrow Antarctic ablation zone in warm climate simulations. When combined with recently suggested mechanisms for retreat into subglacial basins due to ice shelf hydrofracture and ice cliff failure, we are able to simulate large-scale variability of the Antarctic ice sheet in the Miocene. This variability is equivalent to a seawater oxygen isotope signal of ~0.5 ‰, or a sea level equivalent change of ~35 m, for a range of atmospheric CO2 between 280 - 500 ppm.

  11. TLEs and early VLF events: Simulating the important impact of transmitter-disturbance-receiver geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NaitAmor, S.; Ghalila, H.; Cohen, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    Early very low frequency (VLF) events are perturbations to subionospherically propagating VLF radio transmitters which sometimes occur when lightning activity is near the transmitter-receiver path. They are often correlated to Transient Luminous Events (TLEs). Recent analysis have focused on a new type of early events whose recovery time persists for many minutes, called LOng Recovery Events (LOREs). The underlying cause of these events is still unclear. Curiously, LOREs sometimes appear on only one path, while the same event observed on a different transmitter-receiver path does not indicate a LORE. In this paper we observe and simulate two cases of early signal perturbations: The first is a typical early VLF event, and the second is a LORE. Both were recorded by two AWESOME VLF receivers in North Africa on 12 December 2009, during the EuroSprite campaign. We combine observations with theoretical modeling to infer the electron density change that most closely reproduces the observed perturbation. Our results explain the cases where LOREs are detected on only one path as resulting from transmitter-receiver geometry significantly which impacts the modal content and therefore the observed VLF recovery time.

  12. Pro musculoskeletal ultrasonography in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ohrndorf, Sarah; Backhaus, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound has become a widely used imaging diagnostic tool both in the use of daily clinical practice and for clinical studies in monitoring treatment efficiency and predicting disease outcome. By US, detection of inflammatory soft tissue and erosive bone lesions is possible. Grey-scale and power Doppler ultrasound examination is more sensitive and more reliable than clinical examination. Furthermore, patients with unclear arthritic symptoms can be better diagnosed for arthritis by US than by clinical examination. This article gives an overview about the use of US in the diagnosis of early arthritis, especially early rheumatoid arthritis, its role as a prognostic assessor (structural damage), as a monitor for treatment response, as an detector of "real" remission, and a guide to injection procedure.

  13. Virtually simulated social pressure influences early visual processing more in low compared to high autonomous participants.

    PubMed

    Trautmann-Lengsfeld, Sina Alexa; Herrmann, Christoph Siegfried

    2014-02-01

    In a previous study, we showed that virtually simulated social group pressure could influence early stages of perception after only 100  ms. In the present EEG study, we investigated the influence of social pressure on visual perception in participants with high (HA) and low (LA) levels of autonomy. Ten HA and ten LA individuals were asked to accomplish a visual discrimination task in an adapted paradigm of Solomon Asch. Results indicate that LA participants adapted to the incorrect group opinion more often than HA participants (42% vs. 30% of the trials, respectively). LA participants showed a larger posterior P1 component contralateral to targets presented in the right visual field when conforming to the correct compared to conforming to the incorrect group decision. In conclusion, our ERP data suggest that the group context can have early effects on our perception rather than on conscious decision processes in LA, but not HA participants.

  14. Early cardiovascular adaptation to zero gravity simulated by head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, C. G.; Nixon, J. V.; Johnson, R. L., Jr.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1979-01-01

    The early cardiovascular adaptation to zero gravity, simulated by head-down tilt at 5 deg, was studied in a series of 10 normal young men. The validity of the model was confirmed by comparing the results with data from Apollo and Skylab flights. Tilt produced a significant central fluid shift with a transient increase in central venous pressure, later followed by an increase in left ventricular size without changes in cardiac output, arterial pressure, or contractile state. The hemodynamic changes were transient with a nearly complete return to the control state within 6 h. The adaptation included a diuresis and a decrease in blood volume, associated with ADH, renin, and aldosterone inhibition.

  15. A new multi-sensor approach to simulation assisted tsunami early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, J.; Androsov, A.; Babeyko, A. Y.; Harig, S.; Klaschka, F.; Mentrup, L.

    2010-06-01

    A new tsunami forecasting method for near-field tsunami warning is presented. This method is applied in the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System, as part of the Indonesian Tsunami Warning Center in Jakarta, Indonesia. The method employs a rigorous approach to minimize uncertainty in the assessment of tsunami hazard in the near-field. Multiple independent sensors are evaluated simultaneously in order to achieve an accurate estimation of coastal arrival times and wave heights within very short time after a submarine earthquake event. The method is validated employing a synthetic (simulated) tsunami event, and in hindcasting the minor tsunami following the Padang 30 September 2009 earthquake.

  16. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  17. Gut Microbes Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matters November 25, 2013 Gut Microbes Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis The presence of a specific type of gut bacteria correlates with rheumatoid arthritis in newly diagnosed, untreated people. The finding suggests ...

  18. Phase-field simulations of nuclei and early stage solidification microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, B.; Selzer, M.; Danilov, D.

    2009-11-01

    To investigate the local properties of heterogeneous nuclei on substrates, a phase-field model is extended to incorporate volume constraints and a third order line tension in the gradient free energy density formulation. The new model is applied to sessile drop simulations of Cu nuclei on Ni substrates to precisely analyse 3D equilibrium shapes and diffusion processes across the phase boundaries. In particular, the formalism with higher order potentials is used to investigate the length-scale dependent effect of the line tension on Young's force balance at triple lines in 3D. The employment of parallel and adaptive simulation techniques is essential for three-dimensional numerical computations. Early stage solidification microstructures of cubic Ni crystals are simulated by scale-bridging molecular dynamics (MD) and phase-field (PF) simulations. The domain of the PF computations is initialized by transferring MD data of the atomic positions and of the shape of the nuclei. The combined approach can be used to study the responses of microstructures upon nucleation.

  19. Palmar rheumatoid nodulosis associated with local pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Chetrit, E; Enk, C; Rubinow, A

    1992-01-01

    Rheumatoid nodulosis is a term used to describe adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis with little or no clinical joint inflammation who have numerous subcutaneous nodules indistinguishable from those of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. This paper reports the case of a woman with quiescent rheumatoid arthritis who developed palmar nodulosis three weeks after the strenuous activity of painting her apartment. This case illustrates the direct association between the appearance of nodulosis and physical pressure despite inactive disease. Images PMID:1417106

  20. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part II: Imaging studies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Warczyńska, Agnieszka; Matuszewska, Genowefa; Saied, Fadhil; Kunisz, Wojciech

    2012-09-01

    Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis followed by early initiation of treatment, prevent the destruction of joints and progression to disability in the majority of patients. A traditional X-ray fails to capture early inflammatory changes, while late changes (e.g. erosions) appear after a significant delay, once 20-30% of bone mass has been lost. Sonography and magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that erosions are seen in the first 3 months from the appearance of symptoms in 10-26% of patients, while in 75% they are seen in the first 2 years of the disease. Power Doppler ultrasound and dynamic magnetic resonance studies allow for qualitative, semiquantitative and quantitative monitoring of the vascularization of the synovium. In addition, magnetic resonance enables assessment of the bone marrow. The ultrasonographic examination using a state-of-the-art apparatus with a high-frequency probe allows for images with great spatial resolution and for the visualization of soft tissues and bone surfaces. However, the changes seen in ultrasonography (synovial pathologies, the presence of exudate, tendons changes, cartilage and bone lesions, pathologies of tendon attachments and ligaments - enthesopathies) are not only specific for rheumatoid arthritis and occur in other rheumatic diseases. Qualitative methods are sufficient for diagnosing the disease through ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. Whereas semiquantitative and quantitative scales serve to monitor the disease course - efficacy of conservative treatment and qualification for radioisotope synovectomy or surgical synovectomy - and to assess treatment efficacy.

  1. Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0408 TITLE: Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis ...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0408 5c...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT It is now well established that there is a preclinical period of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) development that is

  2. Methods for Detecting Early Warnings of Critical Transitions in Time Series Illustrated Using Simulated Ecological Data

    PubMed Central

    Dakos, Vasilis; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Brock, William A.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Guttal, Vishwesha; Ives, Anthony R.; Kéfi, Sonia; Livina, Valerie; Seekell, David A.; van Nes, Egbert H.; Scheffer, Marten

    2012-01-01

    Many dynamical systems, including lakes, organisms, ocean circulation patterns, or financial markets, are now thought to have tipping points where critical transitions to a contrasting state can happen. Because critical transitions can occur unexpectedly and are difficult to manage, there is a need for methods that can be used to identify when a critical transition is approaching. Recent theory shows that we can identify the proximity of a system to a critical transition using a variety of so-called ‘early warning signals’, and successful empirical examples suggest a potential for practical applicability. However, while the range of proposed methods for predicting critical transitions is rapidly expanding, opinions on their practical use differ widely, and there is no comparative study that tests the limitations of the different methods to identify approaching critical transitions using time-series data. Here, we summarize a range of currently available early warning methods and apply them to two simulated time series that are typical of systems undergoing a critical transition. In addition to a methodological guide, our work offers a practical toolbox that may be used in a wide range of fields to help detect early warning signals of critical transitions in time series data. PMID:22815897

  3. Ratio of Circulating IFNγ+ “Th17 Cells” in Memory Th Cells Is Inversely Correlated with the Titer of Anti-CCP Antibodies in Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Based on Flow Cytometry Methods of the Human Immunology Project

    PubMed Central

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease with chronic joint inflammation characterized by activated T cells. IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. However, it remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we validated the methods of the Human Immunology Project using only the cell-surface marker through measuring the actual expression of IL-17 and IFNγ. We also evaluated the expression of CD161 in human Th17 cells. We then tried to identify Th17 cells, IL-17+Th17 cells, and IFNγ+Th17 cells in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients using the standardized method of the Human Immunology Project. Our findings validated the method and the expression of CD161. The ratio of IFNγ+Th17 cells in memory T cells was inversely correlated to the titers of anti-CCP antibodies in the early-onset RA patients. These findings suggest that Th17 cells play important roles in the early phase of RA and that anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with early phase RA, especially those with high titers of CCP antibodies. PMID:27294146

  4. Comparing stochastic differential equations and agent-based modelling and simulation for early-stage cancer.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Grazziela P; Siebers, Peer-Olaf; Owen, Markus R; Reps, Jenna; Aickelin, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    There is great potential to be explored regarding the use of agent-based modelling and simulation as an alternative paradigm to investigate early-stage cancer interactions with the immune system. It does not suffer from some limitations of ordinary differential equation models, such as the lack of stochasticity, representation of individual behaviours rather than aggregates and individual memory. In this paper we investigate the potential contribution of agent-based modelling and simulation when contrasted with stochastic versions of ODE models using early-stage cancer examples. We seek answers to the following questions: (1) Does this new stochastic formulation produce similar results to the agent-based version? (2) Can these methods be used interchangeably? (3) Do agent-based models outcomes reveal any benefit when compared to the Gillespie results? To answer these research questions we investigate three well-established mathematical models describing interactions between tumour cells and immune elements. These case studies were re-conceptualised under an agent-based perspective and also converted to the Gillespie algorithm formulation. Our interest in this work, therefore, is to establish a methodological discussion regarding the usability of different simulation approaches, rather than provide further biological insights into the investigated case studies. Our results show that it is possible to obtain equivalent models that implement the same mechanisms; however, the incapacity of the Gillespie algorithm to retain individual memory of past events affects the similarity of some results. Furthermore, the emergent behaviour of ABMS produces extra patters of behaviour in the system, which was not obtained by the Gillespie algorithm.

  5. [Pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lequerré, Thierry; Richez, Christophe

    2012-10-01

    These last years were especially marked by the best understanding of the physiopathological mechanisms at the onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the processes of joint inflammation and joint destruction. RA is more and more considered as a syndrome with at least two clinical entities with different phenotype and profiles: seronegative RA and seropositive RA. In RA with ACPA, it is the process of immunization, that is the immunological reaction against citrullinated peptides, that leads to the disease. The peptide citrullination is directly favored by environmental factors such as tobacco, infection to Porphyromonas gingivalis and alcohol. The immunization supposes a genetic predisposition including approximately 22 genetic factors including the molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and PTPN22. Finally, joint damage result at the same time from an excess of destruction (RANK/RANKL, TNFalpha) and from a defect of bone reparation by the way Wnt/Frizzled. It is thanks to the best understanding of RA physiopathology that leads to development of targeted treatments and specially processing for this disease.

  6. Simple mechanisms of early life - simulation model on the origin of semi-cells.

    PubMed

    Klein, Adrian; Bock, Martin; Alt, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The development of first cellular structures played an important role in the early evolution of life. Early evolution of life probably took place on a molecular level in a reactive environment. The iron-sulfur theory postulates the formation of cell-like structures on catalytic surfaces. Experiments show that H2S together with FeS and other metallic centers drive auto-catalytic surface reactions, in which organic molecules such as pyruvic and amino acids occur. It is questionable which mechanisms are needed to form cell-like structures under these conditions. To address this question, we implemented a model system featuring the fundamentals of molecular dynamics: heat, attraction, repulsion and formation of covalent bonds. Our basic model exhibits a series of essential processes: self-organization of lipid micelles and bilayers, formation of fluid filled cavities, flux of molecules along membranes, transport of energized groups towards sinks and whole colonies of cell-like structures on a larger scale. The results demonstrate that only a few features are sufficient for discovering hitherto non described phenomena of self-assembly and dynamics of cell-like structures as candidates for early evolving proto-cells. Significance statement The quest for a possible origin of life continues to be one of the most fascinating problems in biology. In one theoretical scenario, early life originated from a solution of reactive chemicals in the ancient deep sea, similar to conditions as to be found in thermal vents. Experiments have shown that a variety of organic molecules, the building blocks of life, form under these conditions. Based on such experiments, the iron-sulfur theory postulates the growth of cell-like structures at certain catalytic surfaces. For an explanation and proof of such a process we have developed a computer model simulating molecular assembly of lipid bilayers and formation of semi-cell cavities. The results demonstrate the possibility of cell-like self

  7. Early structural development in melt-quenched polymer PTT from atomistic molecular dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Min-Kang; Lin, Shiang-Tai

    2009-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the initial structural development in poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) when quenched below its melting point. The development of local ordering has been observed in our simulations. The thermal properties, such as the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the melting temperature (Tm), determined from our simulations are in reasonable agreement with experimental values. It is found that, between these two temperatures, the number of local structures quickly increases during the thermal relaxation period soon after the system is quenched and starts to fluctuate afterwards. The formation and development of local structures is found to be driven mainly by the torsional and van der Waals forces and follows the classical nucleation-growth mechanism. The variation of local structures' fraction with temperature exhibits a maximum between Tg and Tm, resembling the temperature dependence of the crystallization rate for most polymers. In addition, the backbone torsion distribution for segments within the local structures preferentially reorganizes to the trans-gauche-gauche-trans (t-g-g-t) conformation, the same as that in the crystalline state. As a consequence, we believe that such local structural ordering could be the baby nuclei that have been suggested to form in the early stage of polymer crystallization.

  8. Rheumatoid cachexia and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Summers, Gregory D; Metsios, Giorgos S; Stavropoulos-Kalinoglou, Antonios; Kitas, George D

    2010-08-01

    Both cachexia and cardiovascular disease are strongly associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and linked to the chronic inflammatory process. Typically, rheumatoid cachexia occurs in individuals with normal or increased BMI (reduced muscle mass and increased fat mass). Classic cachexia (reduced muscle mass and reduced fat mass) is rare in RA but is associated with high inflammatory activity and aggressive joint destruction in patients with a poor cardiovascular prognosis. Conversely, obesity is linked to hypertension and dyslipidemia but, paradoxically, lower RA disease activity and less cardiovascular disease-related mortality. Rheumatoid cachexia might represent the 'worst of both worlds' with respect to cardiovascular outcome, but until diagnostic criteria for this condition are agreed upon, its effect on cardiovascular disease risk remains controversial.

  9. Rheumatoid Meningitis Occurring during Etanercept Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takashi; Okumura, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Naoko; Hamano, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    We report a 65-year-old man who had repetitive seizures 6 months after receiving etanercept, methotrexate, and prednisolone for rheumatoid arthritis. Mononuclear cells were mildly increased in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed high intensity along sulci of the frontal and parietal lobes. Brain biopsy revealed lymphocyte and plasma cell infiltration in the meninges, confirming the diagnosis of rheumatoid meningitis. After steroid pulse therapy, seizures resolved and clinical findings improved. When etanercept was replaced by tocilizumab, rheumatoid meningitis did not recur. Although TNF-α inhibitors can control joint symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, they may induce rheumatoid meningitis. PMID:28286682

  10. [Synovial membrane diagnostic assessment in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Ostendorf, B; Dann, P; Friemann, J; Pauly, T; Schneider, M

    2002-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most frequent inflammatory rheumatic disease. At the beginning of the disease, where, based on today's knowledge the therapeutic possibilities are largest, the diagnostic methods do not permit a differentiated estimation of the prognosis. Conventional x-rays are mostly normal and serum markers unspecific. So far--in contrast to other diseases--only little information had been drawn from the pathomorphologic substrate "synovialis" itself to assess the prognosis. Reasons therefor were found in difficulties in obtaining synovial tissue besides surgical interventions, particularly in patients with early arthritis. By minimalizing the diagnostic instruments and improvement of the technique, synovial tissue sampling in RA has become minimally invasive and it is even possible to perform on the smallest joints, such as finger joints. Hereby, synovial analysis is open for detecting pathways of inflammation and joint destruction, which might support the advancement of new therapeutic strategies, followed by a better prognosis and outcome of RA.

  11. Simulating Earthquake Early Warning Systems in the Classroom as a New Approach to Teaching Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessio, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    A discussion of P- and S-waves seems an ubiquitous part of studying earthquakes in the classroom. Textbooks from middle school through university level typically define the differences between the waves and illustrate the sense of motion. While many students successfully memorize the differences between wave types (often utilizing the first letter as a memory aide), textbooks rarely give tangible examples of how the two waves would "feel" to a person sitting on the ground. One reason for introducing the wave types is to explain how to calculate earthquake epicenters using seismograms and travel time charts -- very abstract representations of earthquakes. Even when the skill is mastered using paper-and-pencil activities or one of the excellent online interactive versions, locating an epicenter simply does not excite many of our students because it evokes little emotional impact, even in students located in earthquake-prone areas. Despite these limitations, huge numbers of students are mandated to complete the task. At the K-12 level, California requires that all students be able to locate earthquake epicenters in Grade 6; in New York, the skill is a required part of the Regent's Examination. Recent innovations in earthquake early warning systems around the globe give us the opportunity to address the same content standard, but with substantially more emotional impact on students. I outline a lesson about earthquakes focused on earthquake early warning systems. The introductory activities include video clips of actual earthquakes and emphasize the differences between the way P- and S-waves feel when they arrive (P arrives first, but is weaker). I include an introduction to the principle behind earthquake early warning (including a summary of possible uses of a few seconds warning about strong shaking) and show examples from Japan. Students go outdoors to simulate P-waves, S-waves, and occupants of two different cities who are talking to one another on cell phones

  12. Early stage of critical clusters growth in phenomenological and molecular dynamics simulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzyrewski, Romuald; Rybicki, Jarosław; Białoskórski, Michał

    2006-12-01

    The growth of critical clusters is discussed in the paper according to the classical and molecular dynamics (MD) approaches. A new formula for molecule numbers in critical clusters has been derived within the framework of the classical approach. A set of equations controlling the early stage of growth in a neighborhood of a critical size is presented. As far as molecular dynamics simulation is concerned, a computational technique based on the DL_POLY code is described in brief. Computation results are presented concerning cluster formation of H 2O vapor, distribution of clusters versus time, cluster growth and radial density distribution of isolated clusters. A comparison with the classical results is made for a case of dense vapor, where the mechanism of strong condensation is predominant. The Hertz-Knudsen formula seems to be verified by the molecular dynamics results.

  13. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis using infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frize, Monique; Adéa, Cynthia; Payeur, Pierre; Di Primio, Gina; Karsh, Jacob; Ogungbemile, Abiola

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in joints; it is difficult to diagnose in early stages. An early diagnosis and treatment can delay the onset of severe disability. Infrared (IR) imaging offers a potential approach to detect changes in degree of inflammation. In 18 normal subjects and 13 patients diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), thermal images were collected from joints of hands, wrists, palms, and knees. Regions of interest (ROIs) were manually selected from all subjects and all parts imaged. For each subject, values were calculated from the temperature measurements: Mode/Max, Median/Max, Min/Max, Variance, Max-Min, (Mode-Mean), and Mean/Min. The data sets did not have a normal distribution, therefore non parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Ranksum) were applied to assess if the data from the control group and the patient group were significantly different. Results indicate that: (i) thermal images can be detected on patients with the disease; (ii) the best joints to image are the metacarpophalangeal joints of the 2nd and 3rd fingers and the knees; the difference between the two groups was significant at the 0.05 level; (iii) the best calculations to differentiate between normal subjects and patients with RA are the Mode/Max, Variance, and Max-Min. We concluded that it is possible to reliably detect RA in patients using IR imaging. Future work will include a prospective study of normal subjects and patients that will compare IR results with Magnetic Resonance (MR) analysis.

  14. RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR COLLAPSE: NONIDEAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC EFFECTS AND EARLY FORMATION OF CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Machida, Masahiro N. E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2015-03-10

    The transport of angular momentum by magnetic fields is a crucial physical process in the formation and evolution of stars and disks. Because the ionization degree in star-forming clouds is extremely low, nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects such as ambipolar diffusion and ohmic dissipation work strongly during protostellar collapse. These effects have significant impacts in the early phase of star formation as they redistribute magnetic flux and suppress angular momentum transport by magnetic fields. We perform three-dimensional nested-grid radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion. Without these effects, magnetic fields transport angular momentum so efficiently that no rotationally supported disk is formed even after the second collapse. Ohmic dissipation works only in a relatively high density region within the first core and suppresses angular momentum transport, enabling formation of a very small rotationally supported disk after the second collapse. With both ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion, these effects work effectively in almost the entire region within the first core and significant magnetic flux loss occurs. As a result, a rotationally supported disk is formed even before a protostellar core forms. The size of the disk is still small, about 5 AU at the end of the first core phase, but this disk will grow later as gas accretion continues. Thus, the nonideal MHD effects can resolve the so-called magnetic braking catastrophe while keeping the disk size small in the early phase, which is implied from recent interferometric observations.

  15. Early MIMD experience with a plasma physics simulation program on the CRAY X-MP

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, C.E. Jr.

    1986-02-01

    This paper describes some early experience with converting a plasma physics simulation program to the CRAY X-MP, a current multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computer consisting of two processors with architecture similar to that of the CRAY-1. The computer program used in this study is an all Fortran version of SELF, a two species, one space, two velocity, electromagnetic, Newtonian, particle in cell, plasma simulation code. The approach to converting SELF to use both processors of the CRAY X-MP is described in some detail. The resulting multiprocessor version of SELF is nearly a factor of two faster in real time than the single processor version. The multiprocessor version obtains 58.2+-.1 seconds of central processor time in 30+-.5 seconds of real time. For comparison, the CRAY-1 execution time if 74.5 seconds. For SELF, which is mostly scalar coding, the CRAY X-MP is about 2.5 times faster overall than the CRAY-1.

  16. A phenomenological particle-based platelet model for simulating filopodia formation during early activation.

    PubMed

    Pothapragada, Seetha; Zhang, Peng; Sheriff, Jawaad; Livelli, Mark; Slepian, Marvin J; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2015-03-01

    We developed a phenomenological three-dimensional platelet model to characterize the filopodia formation observed during early stage platelet activation. Departing from continuum mechanics based approaches, this coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) particle-based model can deform to emulate the complex shape change and filopodia formation that platelets undergo during activation. The platelet peripheral zone is modeled with a two-layer homogeneous elastic structure represented by spring-connected particles. The structural zone is represented by a cytoskeletal assembly comprising of a filamentous core and filament bundles supporting the platelet's discoid shape, also modeled by spring-connected particles. The interior organelle zone is modeled by homogeneous cytoplasm particles that facilitate the platelet deformation. Nonbonded interactions among the discrete particles of the membrane, the cytoskeletal assembly, and the cytoplasm are described using the Lennard-Jones potential with empirical constants. By exploring the parameter space of this CGMD model, we have successfully simulated the dynamics of varied filopodia formations. Comparative analyses of length and thickness of filopodia show that our numerical simulations are in agreement with experimental measurements of flow-induced activated platelets. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Insight into the early stages of thermal unfolding of peanut agglutinin by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Hansia, Priti; Dev, Sagarika; Surolia, Avadhesha; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2007-10-01

    Peanut agglutinin is a homotetrameric nonglycosylated protein. The protein has a unique open quaternary structure. Molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to follow the atomistic details of its unfolding at different temperatures. The early events of the deoligomerization of the protein have been elucidated in the present study. Simulation trajectories of the monomer as well as those of the tetramer have been compared and the tetramer is found to be substantially more stable than its monomeric counterpart. The tetramer shows retention of most of its secondary structure but considerable loss of the tertiary structure at high temperature. This observation implies the generation of a molten globule-like intermediate in the later stages of deoligomerization. The quaternary structure of the protein has weakened to a large extent, but none of the subunits are separated. In addition, the importance of the metal-binding to the stability of the protein structure has also been investigated. Binding of the metal ions not only enhances the local stability of the metal-ion binding loop, but also imparts a global stability to the overall structure. The dynamics of different interfaces vary significantly as probed through interface clusters. The differences are substantially enhanced at higher temperatures. The dynamics and the stability of the interfaces have been captured mainly by cluster analysis, which has provided detailed information on the thermal deoligomerization of the protein.

  18. Gage for evaluating rheumatoid hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houge, J. C.; Plautz, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    Two-axis goniometer accurately measures movements of fingers about knuckle joints, diagnosing hands structurally changed by rheumatoid arthritis. Instrument measures lateral movement which is small in normal knuckles but increased in diseased joints. Goniometer is two connected protractors that simultaneously measure angles in perpindicular planes. Dials are offset to clear bony protuberances; extension and offset adjustments span any hand size.

  19. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions...searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send...inflammatory properties in RA pathogenesis. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Citrullination, chemokines, chemotaxis, rheumatoid arthritis, immunology 16. SECURITY

  20. Computer Simulation on the Cooperation of Functional Molecules during the Early Stages of Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wentao; Hu, Jiming

    2012-01-01

    It is very likely that life began with some RNA (or RNA-like) molecules, self-replicating by base-pairing and exhibiting enzyme-like functions that favored the self-replication. Different functional molecules may have emerged by favoring their own self-replication at different aspects. Then, a direct route towards complexity/efficiency may have been through the coexistence/cooperation of these molecules. However, the likelihood of this route remains quite unclear, especially because the molecules would be competing for limited common resources. By computer simulation using a Monte-Carlo model (with “micro-resolution” at the level of nucleotides and membrane components), we show that the coexistence/cooperation of these molecules can occur naturally, both in a naked form and in a protocell form. The results of the computer simulation also lead to quite a few deductions concerning the environment and history in the scenario. First, a naked stage (with functional molecules catalyzing template-replication and metabolism) may have occurred early in evolution but required high concentration and limited dispersal of the system (e.g., on some mineral surface); the emergence of protocells enabled a “habitat-shift” into bulk water. Second, the protocell stage started with a substage of “pseudo-protocells”, with functional molecules catalyzing template-replication and metabolism, but still missing the function involved in the synthesis of membrane components, the emergence of which would lead to a subsequent “true-protocell” substage. Third, the initial unstable membrane, composed of prebiotically available fatty acids, should have been superseded quite early by a more stable membrane (e.g., composed of phospholipids, like modern cells). Additionally, the membrane-takeover probably occurred at the transition of the two substages of the protocells. The scenario described in the present study should correspond to an episode in early evolution, after the

  1. Interest of modelling in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Beresniak, Ariel; Dupont, Danielle M; Becker, Jean-Claude; Merkesdal, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Such as prospective studies can provide evidence-based information for clinicians and regulatory agencies, modelling studies provide useful information when experimental studies are to complex, too long, or too expensive to carry out. If modelling has been widely used in pharmacokinetics, it is in the field of pharmacoeconomics that numerous models have been published in recent years, including models relevant to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The most common modelling techniques published in RA are decision trees and Markov models which are used to perform cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analyses using real or simulated populations. This paper reviews the main types of modelling techniques used in pharmacoeconomic studies with the aim of clarifying their interest and limitations for the clinicians. Generating such evidence is highly relevant to assisting clinical recommendations and reimbursement decisions towards enabling the optimal management of RA and reducing its overall clinical and economic burden, for the benefits of patients and health systems.

  2. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What People With Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: ... focus(); */ } //--> Print-Friendly Page April 2016 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease, a disorder ...

  3. The Development of Prostate Palpation Skills Through Simulation Training May Impact Early Detection of Prostate Abnormalities and Early Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    to embed the simulator in practice , and continued work in formulating an algorithm to allow computerized adaptive testing principles to be applied to...Reba Moyer Childress, MSN, FNP , School of Nursing and Marcus L. Martin, MD, School of Medicine. We have been working with three graduate students...which to embed the simulator in practice , and continued work in formulating an algorithm to allow computerized adaptive testing principles to be applied

  4. The Development of Prostate Palpation Skills Through Simulation Training May Impact Early Detection of Prostate Abnormalities and Early Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    School of Engineering and two co-Is Reba Moyer Childress, MSN, FNP , School of Nursing and Marcus L. Martin, MD, School of Medicine. We have been...for viewing at: http://www.nbc29.com/global/story.asp?s=9730404 • Cavalier Daily Newspaper Article: “New Simulator Provides Unique Practice ” (January...27th, 2009) Story available for reading at: http://www.cavalierdaily.com/news/2009/jan/27/new-simulator-provides-unique- practice / Presented at

  5. Combination Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Era of Biologicals

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Early, aggressive disease management is critical for halting disease progression and joint destruction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Combination therapy with at least two disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, such as methotrexate (MTX), sulfasalazine, or hydroxychloroquine, is often more effective than monotherapy in reducing disease activity. Biologic therapies represent more effective and tolerable treatment options that, when combined with MTX, have been shown to dramatically reduce inflammation, inhibit radiographic progression, and induce remission. Although several types of treatment strategies are used in clinical practice, the most aggressive approaches that target early disease have shown the most promise in reversing disease progression and reducing disease-related costs. PMID:18751844

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis: a review and dental care considerations.

    PubMed

    Grover, H S; Gaba, N; Gupta, A; Marya, C M

    2011-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is a chronic multisystem disease of presumed autoimmune etiology. Medical complications due to RA and its treatment may affect the provision of oral health care. Associated syndromes may contribute to a patient's susceptibility to infections and impaired hemostasis. Therefore oral health care providers need to recognize and identify modificationsof dental care based on the medical status of patients with RA. As with many other chronic conditions, early intervention can reduce the severity of the disease. Furthermore, oral health care providers play an important role in the overall care of these patients as it relates to early recognition, as well as control of the disease.

  7. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed. PMID:26078691

  8. Tryptase is a candidate autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanyan; Wu, Qiao; Ni, Bing; Mou, Zhirong; Jiang, Qiong; Cao, Yi; Dong, Hui; Wu, Yuzhang

    2014-05-01

    Autoimmune processes have been implicated in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, specific autoantigens that play a role in the aetiology of RA have been lacking. In this study, we found that sera from RA patients were particularly immunoreactive against the protein tryptase. Compared with osteoarthritis (OA) patients and healthy controls, RA patients had relatively higher levels of tryptase and concomitant anti-tryptase antibodies in their synovial tissues and sera. Similarly, synovial fluid from RA patients, but not from OA patients, contained antibodies that recognized tryptase in vitro. In addition, serum tryptase levels in both early and late RA patients significantly correlated with clinical indices usually used to diagnose RA, such as rheumatoid factor, Disease Activity Score using 28 joint counts and autoantibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide. Our results identify tryptase as a candidate autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of RA and monitoring its levels may have diagnostic and prognostic value.

  9. Autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: rheumatoid factors and anticitrullinated protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Song, Y W; Kang, E H

    2010-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease, characterized by chronic, erosive polyarthritis and by the presence of various autoantibodies in serum and synovial fluid. Since rheumatoid factor (RF) was first described, a number of other autoantibodies have been discovered in RA patients. The autoantigens recognized by these autoantibodies include cartilage components, chaperones, enzymes, nuclear proteins and citrullinated proteins. However, the clinical significances and pathogenic roles of these antibodies are largely unknown except for RF and anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), whose clinical usefulness has been acknowledged due to their acceptable sensitivities and specificities, and prognostic values. This review presents and discusses the current state of the art regarding RF and ACPA in RA.

  10. Leptomeningeal rheumatoid nodules: diagnosis and failed therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Cassie; Willshire, Luke; Quan, Doreen; Shaw, Cameron; Batchelor, Peter

    2015-02-01

    A 67-year-old woman presented with recurrent transient ischaemic attack-like episodes over a 2 year period. Nodular enhancing leptomeningeal changes were detected on MRI and were consistent with meningeal rheumatoid nodules on biopsy. The patient's nodular disease continued to progress and regress clinically and radiologically irrespective of disease modifying agents and peripheral and serological rheumatoid arthritis control. This patient's unique presentation and diagnostic work-up is discussed alongside the dilemma of therapeutic management of meningeal rheumatoid nodules.

  11. Certolizumab pegol in combination with dose-optimised methotrexate in DMARD-naïve patients with early, active rheumatoid arthritis with poor prognostic factors: 1-year results from C-EARLY, a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Emery, P; Bingham, C O; Burmester, G R; Bykerk, V P; Furst, D E; Mariette, X; van Vollenhoven, R; Arendt, C; Mountian, I; Purcaru, O; Tatla, D; VanLunen, B; Weinblatt, M E

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the efficacy and safety of certolizumab pegol (CZP)+dose-optimised methotrexate (MTX) versus placebo (PBO)+dose-optimised MTX in inducing and sustaining clinical remission in DMARD-naïve patients with moderate-to-severe, active, progressive rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with poor prognostic factors over 52 weeks. Methods DMARD-naïve patients with ≤1 year of active RA were randomised (3:1) in a double-blind manner to CZP (400 mg Weeks 0, 2, 4, then 200 mg Q2W to Week 52)+MTX or PBO+MTX (the mean optimised-MTX dose=21 and 22 mg/week, respectively). Sustained remission (sREM) and sustained low disease activity (sLDA; DAS28(ESR)<2.6 and DAS28(ESR)≤3.2, respectively, at both Weeks 40 and 52) were the primary and secondary endpoints. Results Patients were randomised to CZP+MTX (n=660) and PBO+MTX (n=219). At Week 52, significantly more patients assigned to CZP+MTX compared with PBO+MTX achieved sREM (28.9% vs 15.0%, p<0.001) and sLDA (43.8% vs 28.6%, p<0.001). Inhibition of radiographic progression and improvements in physical functioning were significantly greater for CZP+MTX versus PBO+MTX (van der Heijde modified total Sharp score (mTSS) mean absolute change from baseline (CFB): 0.2 vs 1.8, p<0.001, rate of mTSS non-progressors: 70.3% vs 49.7%, p<0.001; least squares (LS) mean CFB in Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI): −1.00 vs −0.82, p<0.001). Incidence of adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs was similar between treatment groups. Infection was the most frequent AE, with higher incidence for CZP+MTX (71.8/100 patient-years (PY)) versus PBO+MTX (52.7/100 PY); the rate of serious infection was similar between CZP+MTX (3.3/100 PY) and PBO+MTX (3.7/100 PY). Conclusions CZP+dose-optimised MTX treatment of DMARD-naïve early RA resulted in significantly more patients achieving sREM and sLDA, improved physical function and inhibited structural damage compared with PBO+dose-optimised MTX. Trial registration

  12. Extra-articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Tanasescu, R

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main characteristic is persistent joint inflammation that results in joint damage and loss of function. Although RA is more common in females, extra-articular manifestations of the disease are more common in males. The extra-articular manifestations of RA can occur at any age after onset. It is characterised by destructive polyarthritis and extra-articular organ involvement, including the skin, eye, heart, lung, renal, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. The frequence of extra-articular manifestations in RA differs from one country to another. Extra-articular organ involvement in RA is more frequently seen in patients with severe, active disease and is associated with increased mortality. Incidence and frequence figures for extra-articular RA vary according to study design. Extra-articular involvement is more likely in those who have RF and/or are HLA-DR4 positive. Occasionally, there are also systemic manifestations such as vasculitis, visceral nodules, Sjögren's syndrome, or pulmonary fibrosis present. Nodules are the most common extra-articular feature, and are present in up to 30%; many of the other classic features occur in 1% or less in normal clinic settings. Sjögren's syndrome, anaemia of chronic disease and pulmonary manifestations are relatively common – in 6-10%, are frequently present in early disease and are all related to worse outcomes measures of rheumatoid disease in particular functional impairment and mortality. The occurrence of these systemic manifestations is a major predictor of mortality in patients with RA. This paper focuses on extra-articular manifestations, defined as diseases and symptoms not directly related to the locomotor system. PMID:21977172

  13. Bayesian inference analyses of the polygenic architecture of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Eli A; Wegmann, Daniel; Trynka, Gosia; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Do, Ron; Voight, Benjamin F; Kraft, Peter; Chen, Robert; Kallberg, Henrik J; Kurreeman, Fina A S; Kathiresan, Sekar; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gregersen, Peter K; Alfredsson, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Worthington, Jane; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M

    2012-03-25

    The genetic architectures of common, complex diseases are largely uncharacterized. We modeled the genetic architecture underlying genome-wide association study (GWAS) data for rheumatoid arthritis and developed a new method using polygenic risk-score analyses to infer the total liability-scale variance explained by associated GWAS SNPs. Using this method, we estimated that, together, thousands of SNPs from rheumatoid arthritis GWAS explain an additional 20% of disease risk (excluding known associated loci). We further tested this method on datasets for three additional diseases and obtained comparable estimates for celiac disease (43% excluding the major histocompatibility complex), myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease (48%) and type 2 diabetes (49%). Our results are consistent with simulated genetic models in which hundreds of associated loci harbor common causal variants and a smaller number of loci harbor multiple rare causal variants. These analyses suggest that GWAS will continue to be highly productive for the discovery of additional susceptibility loci for common diseases.

  14. Contrasting diagnosis performance of forced oscillation and spirometry in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and respiratory symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Alvaro Camilo Dias; Barbosa, Wellington Ribeiro; Lopes, Agnaldo José; da Rocha Castelar Pinheiro, Geraldo; de Melo, Pedro Lopes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis is directly responsible for 10% to 20% of all mortality. The best way to improve the prognosis is early detection and treatment. The forced oscillation technique is easy to perform and offers a detailed exam, which may be helpful in the early detection of respiratory changes. This study was undertaken to (1) evaluate the clinical potential of the forced oscillation technique in the detection of early respiratory alterations in rheumatoid arthritis patients with respiratory complaints and (2) to compare the sensitivity of forced oscillation technique and spirometric parameters. METHODS: A total of 40 individuals were analyzed: 20 healthy and 20 with rheumatoid arthritis (90% with respiratory complaints). The clinical usefulness of the parameters was evaluated by investigating the sensibility, the specificity and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01641705. RESULTS: The early adverse respiratory effects of rheumatoid arthritis were adequately detected by the forced oscillation technique parameters, and a high accuracy for clinical use was obtained (AUC>0.9, Se = 80%, Sp = 95%). The use of spirometric parameters did not obtain an appropriate accuracy for clinical use. The diagnostic performance of the forced oscillation technique parameters was significantly higher than that of spirometry. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study provide substantial evidence that the forced oscillation technique can contribute to the easy identification of initial respiratory abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis patients that are not detectable by spirometric exams. Therefore, we believe that the forced oscillation technique can be used as a complementary exam that may help to improve the treatment of breathing disorders in rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:23018292

  15. Retrospect on the tsunami simulation efforts for the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakowsky, Natalja; Androsov, Alexey; Harig, Sven; Immerz, Antonia; Behrens, Jörn; Danilov, Sergey; Hiller, Wolfgang; Schröter, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Starting in 2005, the GITEWS project (German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System) established from scratch a fully operational tsunami warning system at BMKG in Jakarta. GITEWS was succeeded in 2011 by the smaller project PROTECTS for training the Indonesian staff and consolidating the technical system. With the official end in March 2014, it is time to draw a balance and evaluate the approach. This presentation focuses on the contribution of the tsunami modelling group at the Alfred Wegener Institute. We will give a short overview on the developments of the numerical tsunami simulation model TsunAWI, of the scenario database built with TsunAWI, and of the simulation module SIM that interfaces the database to the decision support system. Some distinctive experiences will be highlighted. Topics include the modeling part as well as the matching process after the database is already set up. On the modeling side, unstructured mesh generation with focus on local bathymetric features and inclusion of precise coastline position as well as numerical parametrization and post processing are covered. The matching of pre calculated scenarios with incoming data in case of a tsunamigenic earthquake is performed in the simulation system SIM, which processes the data of multiple sensors and employs various metrics to limit the choice of possible scenarios from the database. One challenge was that the development of the matching algorithm had to start without having access to real sensor data except seismic information on epicenter and magnitude. Therefore, the algorithm is designed with robustness in mind. Still, the conservative approach allows to narrow down the scenario selection even with limited sensor information. Given more experience in the typical behaviour of sensor data in real events, the algorithm parameters can easily be calibrated towards a more restrictive scenario selection. Another challenge was to ensure the quality control of the data products derived from

  16. Meteorite Impact-Induced Rapid NH3 Production on Early Earth: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Kohei; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Nakano, Aiichiro; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-12-14

    NH3 is an essential molecule as a nitrogen source for prebiotic amino acid syntheses such as the Strecker reaction. Previous shock experiments demonstrated that meteorite impacts on ancient oceans would have provided a considerable amount of NH3 from atmospheric N2 and oceanic H2O through reduction by meteoritic iron. However, specific production mechanisms remain unclear, and impact velocities employed in the experiments were substantially lower than typical impact velocities of meteorites on the early Earth. Here, to investigate the issues from the atomistic viewpoint, we performed multi-scale shock technique-based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The results revealed a rapid production of NH3 within several picoseconds after the shock, indicating that shocks with greater impact velocities would provide further increase in the yield of NH3. Meanwhile, the picosecond-order production makes one expect that the important nitrogen source precursors of amino acids were obtained immediately after the impact. It was also observed that the reduction of N2 proceeded according to an associative mechanism, rather than a dissociative mechanism as in the Haber-Bosch process.

  17. Meteorite Impact-Induced Rapid NH3 Production on Early Earth: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, Kohei; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Nakano, Aiichiro; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-12-01

    NH3 is an essential molecule as a nitrogen source for prebiotic amino acid syntheses such as the Strecker reaction. Previous shock experiments demonstrated that meteorite impacts on ancient oceans would have provided a considerable amount of NH3 from atmospheric N2 and oceanic H2O through reduction by meteoritic iron. However, specific production mechanisms remain unclear, and impact velocities employed in the experiments were substantially lower than typical impact velocities of meteorites on the early Earth. Here, to investigate the issues from the atomistic viewpoint, we performed multi-scale shock technique-based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The results revealed a rapid production of NH3 within several picoseconds after the shock, indicating that shocks with greater impact velocities would provide further increase in the yield of NH3. Meanwhile, the picosecond-order production makes one expect that the important nitrogen source precursors of amino acids were obtained immediately after the impact. It was also observed that the reduction of N2 proceeded according to an associative mechanism, rather than a dissociative mechanism as in the Haber-Bosch process.

  18. Meteorite Impact-Induced Rapid NH3 Production on Early Earth: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Shimamura, Kohei; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Nakano, Aiichiro; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    NH3 is an essential molecule as a nitrogen source for prebiotic amino acid syntheses such as the Strecker reaction. Previous shock experiments demonstrated that meteorite impacts on ancient oceans would have provided a considerable amount of NH3 from atmospheric N2 and oceanic H2O through reduction by meteoritic iron. However, specific production mechanisms remain unclear, and impact velocities employed in the experiments were substantially lower than typical impact velocities of meteorites on the early Earth. Here, to investigate the issues from the atomistic viewpoint, we performed multi-scale shock technique-based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The results revealed a rapid production of NH3 within several picoseconds after the shock, indicating that shocks with greater impact velocities would provide further increase in the yield of NH3. Meanwhile, the picosecond-order production makes one expect that the important nitrogen source precursors of amino acids were obtained immediately after the impact. It was also observed that the reduction of N2 proceeded according to an associative mechanism, rather than a dissociative mechanism as in the Haber-Bosch process. PMID:27966594

  19. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina

    2012-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) generally affects people between the ages of 20 and 50. Patients with RA have a significantly higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) compared to the general population. The increased cardiovascular risk (CVR) associated with RA places this disease among the most widely studied. The duration of RA was associated with MS, implicating the role of inflammation in MS development. The presence of MS correlates with increased subclinical atherosclerosis. A positive correlation between prevalence of MS and worsening of functional status was found in patients with RA. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have an increased risk and a higher mortality from cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the rheumatologist should be aware of those MS risk factors and attempt to modify them. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of MS in RA.

  20. Ayurvedic medicine for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Shristi; Kolasinski, Sharon L

    2014-08-01

    Ayurvedic medicine is the traditional medicine of India, which originated over 5,000 years ago. Parts of this alternative medical system have become increasingly popular worldwide as patients seek approaches to medical care that they perceive as more holistic and less toxic than those offered by conventional Western medicine. Despite the advent of highly effective pharmacologic therapy, most individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) continue to use alternative therapy at some point in the treatment of their disease. This report discusses some of the in-vitro data that suggest potential mechanisms through which Ayurvedic herbal medicines might have beneficial actions in rheumatoid arthritis, and the available clinical data evaluating the use of Ayurvedic medicine for RA.

  1. Nutritional considerations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Touger-Decker, R

    1988-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. The severity of the disease process adversely affects nutritional status. Articular changes, such as small joint deformities and temporomandibular joint syndrome, alter the ability to self-feed. The inflammatory process may increase metabolic rate. Ingestion, digestion, absorption, and excretion may be compromised by secondary manifestations of the disease. Comprehensive nutrition assessment incorporates evaluation of disease and treatment-specific factors, along with the usual assessment parameters. Abnormal values for certain assessment parameters do not necessarily reflect nutritional status. Treatment methods, including medications, may have an impact on nutritional status, assessment tools, and self-feeding. Nutrition management goals focus on identification and implementation of feeding strategies. Evaluation of the ability to feed oneself includes consideration of functional status, secondary manifestations, and medical treatment. Multiple feeding modalities may be required. Oral supplements, tube feedings, and parenteral nutrition may be employed to meet the nutrition needs of the individual with rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Application of (1)H NMR-based serum metabolomic studies for monitoring female patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zabek, Adam; Swierkot, Jerzy; Malak, Anna; Zawadzka, Iga; Deja, Stanisław; Bogunia-Kubik, Katarzyna; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2016-01-05

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune-based inflammatory disease that leads to progressive joint degeneration, disability, and an increased risk of cardiovascular complications, which is the main cause of mortality in this population of patients. Although several biomarkers are routinely used in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, there is a high demand for novel biomarkers to further improve the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, stratification of patients, and the prediction of a better response to a specific therapy. In this study, the metabolomics approach was used to provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy. The results indicated that twelve metabolites were important for the discrimination of healthy control and rheumatoid arthritis. Notably, valine, isoleucine, lactate, alanine, creatinine, GPC  APC and histidine relative levels were lower in rheumatoid arthritis, whereas 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, acetate, NAC, acetoacetate and acetone relative levels were higher. Simultaneously, the analysis of the concentration of metabolites in rheumatoid arthritis and 3 months after induction treatment revealed that L1, 3-hydroxyisobutyrate, lysine, L5, acetoacetate, creatine, GPC+APC, histidine and phenylalanine were elevated in RA, whereas leucine, acetate, betaine and formate were lower. Additionally, metabolomics tools were employed to discriminate between patients with different IL-17A genotypes. Metabolomics may provide relevant biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy, define prognosis and predict and monitor treatment efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Two cases of rheumatoid meningitis.

    PubMed

    Magaki, Shino; Chang, Edward; Hammond, Robert R; Yang, Isaac; Mackenzie, Ian R A; Chou, Benedict T; Choi, Soo I; Jen, Joanna C; Pope, Whitney B; Bell, David A; Vinters, Harry V

    2016-02-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the form of rheumatoid meningitis (RM) is rare and most commonly occurs in the setting of longstanding severe RA. Due to a wide range of clinical presentations and nonspecific laboratory findings, it presents a diagnostic challenge often requiring brain biopsy. Only a few histopathologically confirmed cases have been described in the literature. Our aim is to describe two cases of RM and review the literature. The first case is of a previously healthy 37-year-old man who presented with severe headaches and focal neurologic deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement in the left frontal and parietal sulci. The second case is of a 62-year-old woman with a history of mild chronic joint pain who presented with confusion, personality changes and seizures. Both patients ultimately underwent brain biopsy which demonstrated RM on pathologic examination. Administration of corticosteroids resulted in significant clinical improvement in both cases. To our knowledge, our unusual case of RM in the young man is the fifth reported case of rheumatoid meningitis in a patient with no prior history of RA. Such an atypical presentation makes diagnosis even more difficult and highlights the need for awareness of this entity in the diagnostic consideration of a patient presenting with unexplained neurologic symptoms. Our literature review underscores the clinical and pathologic heterogeneity of CNS involvement in RA.

  4. [Anticitrullin antibodies--modern markers of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Shilkina, N P; Luzinova, M S; Vinogradov, A A

    2011-01-01

    Modern diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is based on the ARA criteria with seropositivity detection by the rheumatoid factor (RF). In a clinically evident stage of the disease this factor is highly sensitive and specific (about 90%), but in early RA efficacy of this diagnosis is considerably less. RF-IgM phenotype has limitation: frequent detection of this factor in the absence of RA and unstability of RF-IgM phenotype. Therefore, it is necessary to search for new serological criteria of RA diagnosis at early stage of the disease. Proteins containing citrullin appear only in the course of posttranslation modification of arginin residues. This fact gave rise to an original, available for clinical practice method of enzyme immunoassay for detection of antibodies to cyclic citrullinized (ACCP)--filaggrin derivative with synthetic cyclic citrullinized peptide serves as antigenic substance. According to the results of different studies, ACCP specificity in early RA diagnosis is more than 80%, combination of ACCP with ESR, RF-IgM, CRP, morning stiffness--more than 90%. As specificity of combination of these autoantibodies is almost 100%, their simultaneous determination is indicated in patients with undifferentiated arthritis for specification of the diagnosis. ACCP and antibodies to modified citrullinized vimentin (AMCV) significantly correlate with RA activity, are prognostic factors of rapidly progressive course and can be used for the disease prognosis at its early stage. Present-day data on comparative specificity and sensitivity of ACCP and AMCV are not certain and need further study.

  5. Examining the role of fluctuations in the early stages of homogenous polymer crystallization with simulation and statistical learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a relationship between the dynamics in the amorphous and crystalline domains during polymer crystallization: the fluctuations of ordering-rate about a material-specific value in the amorphous phase drive those fluctuations associated with the increase in percent crystallinity. This suggests a differential equation that satisfies the three experimentally observed time regimes for the rate of crystal growth. To test this postulated expression, we applied a suite of statistical learning tools to molecular dynamics simulations to extract the relevant phenomenology. This study shows that the proposed relationship holds in the early time regime. It illustrates the effectiveness of soft computing tools in the analysis of coarse-grained simulations in which patterns exist, but may not easily yield to strict quantitative evaluation. This ability assists us in characterizing the critical early time molecular arrangement during the primary nucleation phase of polymer melt crystallization. In addition to supporting the validity of the proposed kinetics expression, the simulations show that (i) the classical nucleation and growth mechanism is active in the early stages of ordering; (ii) the number of nuclei and their masses grow linearly during this early time regime; and (iii) a fixed inter-nuclei distance is established.

  6. A Systematic Review of Serum Biomarkers Anti-Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide and Rheumatoid Factor as Tests for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter; Gartemann, Juliane; Hsieh, Jeanie; Creeden, James

    2011-01-01

    This systematic review assesses the current status of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) tests in the diagnosis and prognosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We reviewed publications on tests and biomarkers for early diagnosis of RA from English-language MEDLINE-indexed journals and non-MEDLINE-indexed sources. 85 publications were identified and reviewed, including 68 studies from MEDLINE and 17 non-MEDLINE sources. Anti-CCP2 assays provide improved sensitivity over anti-CCP assays and RF, but anti-CCP2 and RF assays in combination demonstrate a positive predictive value (PPV) nearing 100%, greater than the PPV of either of the tests alone. The combination also appears to be able to distinguish between patients whose disease course is expected to be more severe and both tests are incorporated in the 2010 ACR Rheumatoid Arthritis Classification Criteria. While the clinical value of anti-CCP tests has been established, differences in cut-off values, sensitivities and specificities exist between first-, second- and third-generation tests and harmonization efforts are under way. Anti-CCP and RF are clinically valuable biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of RA patients. The combination of the two biomarkers in conjunction with other clinical measures is an important tool for the diagnosis and management of RA patients. PMID:21915375

  7. Opioid analgesics for rheumatoid arthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Samuel L; Richards, Bethan L; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2013-02-06

    CLINICAL QUESTION Do the benefits of opioid analgesics outweigh the risks in patients with persistent pain due to rheumatoid arthritis? BOTTOM LINE Weak opioids (such as codeine, dextropropoxyphene, and tramadol) may be effective in the short-term management of rheumatoid arthritis pain, but adverse effects are common and may outweigh the benefits; alternative analgesics should be considered first.

  8. TNF inhibition as therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wollheim, Frank A

    2002-07-01

    The introduction of TNF- alpha -inhibiting biologicals has been a major therapeutic breakthrough in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Against a background of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drug experience, this review focuses on present experiences and possible future developments. TNF inhibition results in profound improvement in the majority of rheumatoid arthritis patients, but non-response and adverse effects need attention. Adalimumab is being filed for approval. Other monoclonal antibodies or receptor constructs are in late development. Small molecule inhibitors of TNF production or signalling are a hot topic. One emerging target is nuclear factor kappa B and selective inhibition has proved effective in animal models of arthritis. Synovial proliferation in rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by diminished apoptosis of fibroblasts, whereas bone marrow precursor cells undergo accelerated apoptosis in active rheumatoid arthritis. Both abnormalities are seemingly ameliorated by TNF inhibition. Anti-apoptotic strategies will soon go into development for control of unresponsive rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. [The comparative evaluation of the diagnostic value of methods of detection of antibodies to citrullinized proteins under rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Novikov, A A; Cherkasova, M V; Aleksandrova, E N; Popkova, T V; Luchikhina, E L; Rytikova, N S; Nasonov, E L

    2012-10-01

    The hyper production of large specter of autoantibodies, primarily rheumatoid factors and antibodies to citrullinized proteins, is a characteristic sign of rheumatoid arthritis. The detection of these antibodies plays an important role in diagnosing the disease, especially on its early stages. The study compared the diagnostic accuracy of different methods of detection of antibodies to citrullinized proteins under rheumatoid arthritis. The examined sample included 144 patients aged 33-58 years with reliable diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The patients with systemic lupus erythematous, osteoarthritis, psoriatic arthritis, OVERLAP syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis and conditionally healthy donors consisted the comparative group. To detect antibodies to citrullinized proteins the methods of enzyme immunoassay, electrochemiluminescence, immunochromatography were applied. The study demonstrated that all the methods of detection of antibodies to citrullinized proteins have adequate diagnostic value to be implemented both in a routine clinical diagnostic practice and on the stage of screening of patients.

  10. Purine enzyme activities in recent onset rheumatoid arthritis: are there differences between patients and healthy controls?

    PubMed Central

    Stolk, J N; Boerbooms, A M; De Abreu, R A; Kerstens, P J; de Koning, D G; de Graaf, R; Mulder, J; van de Putte, L B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Purine enzyme activities may predict the effectiveness of azathioprine treatment and be associated with increased deaths from infectious diseases. In rheumatoid arthritis, patients show variable responses to azathioprine and a higher percentage of death is caused by infections. The aim of the study was to investigate possible rheumatoid arthritis associated abnormalities of purine enzyme activities by measuring several of these enzymes in patients with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis before treatment with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs or prednisone. METHODS: 23 patients with recent onset rheumatoid arthritis and 28 healthy controls were studied. Activities of the enzymes 5'-nucleotidase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT), and thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) were measured. Assessment of disease activity and blood sampling for routine measurements and HLA typing were done simultaneously. RESULTS: Purine enzyme activities did not differ between patients and healthy controls. Enzyme activities had no significant relations with indices of disease activity or rheumatoid factor titre or with the rheumatoid arthritis associated HLA types. Activity of 5'nucleotidase decreased with age (P < or = 0.05) and was lower by about 27% (P = 0.007) in males than in females. CONCLUSIONS: In rheumatoid arthritis patients, neither the variability in azathioprine effectiveness nor the increased death rate from infections can be explained by pre-existing abnormalities in the activities of the purine enzymes 5'-nucleotidase, PNP, HGPRT, or TPMT at an early stage of the disease, before disease modifying antirheumatic drugs or prednisone treatment. Besides adjustment for age, results of studies involving purine 5' nucleotidase activity should also be adjusted for sex. PMID:8984938

  11. [Orthopedic treatment of the shoulder joint impairment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Herasymenko, S I; Babko, A M; Poluliakh, M V; Huzhevs'kyĭ, I V; Herasymenko, A S

    2014-12-01

    Brachial joint affection in patients, suffering rheumatoid arthritis, occupies a third place after such of the elbow and the hand. Due to significant reduction of a freedom degree, caused by inflammation, the upper extremity looses function of active instrument for the items transposition. Volume of surgical treatment of such patients depends on stage of the process. On early stages arthroscopic synovectomy of brachial joint is performed and on the late--endoprosthesis. Late results of the treatment are mainly positive. Satisfactory results are based, predominantly, on raising of activity of general rheumatoid inflammation.

  12. Fluorescence imaging of experimental rheumatoid arthritis in vivo using a fast flying-spot scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, J.; Voigt, J.; Seifert, F.; Ebert, B.; Macdonald, R.; Gemeinhardt, I.; Gemeinhardt, O.; Schnorr, J.; Taupitz, M.; Vater, A.; Vollmer, S.; Licha, K.; Schirner, M.

    2007-07-01

    We have developed a flying-spot scanner for fluorescence imaging of rheumatoid arthritis in the near infrared (NIR) spectral range following intravenous administration of contrast agents. The new imaging system has been characterized with respect to linearity, dynamic range and spatial resolution with the help of fluorescent phantoms. In vivo experiments were performed on an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis. Finally, NIR-fluorescence images of early stages of joint inflammation have been compared with findings from contrast enhanced MR imaging and histology.

  13. Randomized controlled trial design in rheumatoid arthritis: the past decade

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Vibeke; Sokolove, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Much progress has occurred over the past decade in rheumatoid arthritis trial design. Recognized challenges have led to the establishment of a clear regulatory pathway to demonstrate efficacy of a new therapeutic. The use of pure placebo beyond 12 to 16 weeks has been demonstrated to be unethical and thus background therapy and/or early rescue has become regular practice. Goals of remission and 'treating to targets' may prove more relevant to identify real-world use of new and existing therapeutics. Identification of rare adverse events associated with new therapies has resulted in intensive safety evaluation during randomized controlled trials and emphasis on postmarketing surveillance and use of registries. PMID:19232061

  14. Management of pregnancy in women with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ngian, Gene-Siew; Briggs, Andrew M; Ackerman, Ilana N; Van Doornum, Sharon

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity may improve during pregnancy but postpartum flares are common. Patients taking disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs should be counselled about effective contraception. Knowledge about drug safety in pregnancy is limited but the Therapeutic Goods Administration categories and online resources are a guide to the data currently available. Begin prepregnancy counselling as early as possible to allow for cessation of teratogenic medications and optimisation of RA disease control. For unplanned pregnancies, cease teratogenic medications immediately and refer to a genetic counsellor and maternal-fetal medicine specialist for risk assessment and advice.

  15. [US evaluation of the hands and feet in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Guerini, H; Ayral, X; Campagna, R; Feydy, A; Pluot, E; Rousseau, J; Gossec, L; Chevrot, A; Dougados, M; Drapé, J-L

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by progressive damage of synovial-lined joints and variable extra-articular manifestations. Synovitis is usually found in the wrist, metacarpophalangeal, proximal interphalangeal and metatarsophalangeal joints. For these reasons, we believe that ultrasound with power doppler can be used for the detection and monitoring of synovitis with a simplified "hands and feet" protocol. In this article, we will describe this protocol used daily in our institution for early diagnosis and therapeutic management of this disease.

  16. Cardiovascular disease risk scores in the current practice: which to use in rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Purcarea, A; Sovaila, S; Gheorghe, A; Udrea, G; Stoica, V

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the highest prevalence disease in the general population (GP) and it accounts for 20 million deaths worldwide each year. Its prevalence is even higher in rheumatoid arthritis. Early detection of subclinical disease is critical and the use of cardiovascular risk prediction models and calculators is widely spread. The impact of such techniques in the GP was previously studied. Despite their common background and similarities, some disagreement exists between most scores and their importance in special high-risk populations like rheumatoid arthritis (RA), having a low level of evidence. The current article aims to single out those predictive models (models) that could be most useful in the care of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  17. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Zifer, S A; Sams, D R; Potter, B J; Jerath, R

    1994-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease of the synovium which may lead to proliferative and degenerative changes in the body's joints, including the temporomandibular joint (TM Joint). Although the exact etiology of rheumatoid arthritis remains unknown, it is suspected that the disease is often initiated by an infectious organism, or by genetic and/or environmental factors. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is a chronic disease of childhood with a spectrum of joint involvement and associated systemic and other organ involvement. Five percent of all rheumatoid arthritis patients are children. In the United States, approximately 150,000 children are affected by JRA. With upper limb involvement, routine oral hygiene procedures become difficult. Dental evaluations/screenings may not be included in the initial team assessment of these patients until the TM Joint is affected; however, prior to this time, the patient may have had years of poor oral hygiene which could contribute to severe decay and early tooth loss. This case report describes the oral health status of a child with polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and the specific recommendations for dental management.

  18. Early warnings of the potential for malaria transmission in Rural Africa using the Hydrology, Entomology and Malaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamana, T. K.; Eltahir, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Early warnings of malaria transmission allow health officials to better prepare for future epidemics. Monitoring rainfall is recognized as an important part of malaria early warning systems, as outlined by the Roll Back Malaria Initiative. The Hydrology, Entomology and Malaria Simulator (HYDREMATS) is a mechanistic model that relates rainfall to malaria transmission, and could be used to provide early warnings of malaria epidemics. HYDREMATS is used to make predictions of mosquito populations and vectorial capacity for 2005, 2006, and 2007 in Banizoumbou village in western Niger. HYDREMATS is forced by observed rainfall, followed by a rainfall prediction based on the seasonal mean rainfall for a period two or four weeks into the future. Predictions made using this method provided reasonable estimates of mosquito populations and vectorial capacity, two to four weeks in advance. The predictions were significantly improved compared to those made when HYDREMATS was forced with seasonal mean rainfall alone.

  19. Acute periostitis in early acquired syphilis simulating shin splints in a jogger.

    PubMed

    Meier, J L; Mollet, E

    1986-01-01

    Acute periostitis affecting the long bones is a characteristic but uncommon manifestation of syphilis in the adult with an early acquired infection. This report describes the history of a jogger who developed acute localized periostitis of the shaft of both tibiae during the early stage of acquired syphilis. Symptomatology was initially attributed to the medial tibial stress syndrome.

  20. Rheumatoid flexor tenosynovitis and rupture.

    PubMed

    Ferlic, D C

    1996-08-01

    Rheumatoid flexor tenosynovitis at the wrist can cause locking, limitation of motion, nerve compression, and rupture of tendons. To prevent and treat these conditions, a flexor tenosynovectomy, combined with nerve decompression and tendon reconstruction as indicated, is necessary. If tendons are ruptured, the flexor pollicis longus and profundus to the index finger are most commonly affected. On the fingers flexor tenosynovitis can also cause locking, decrease in range of motion and rupture tendons. Flexor tenosynovitis of the fingers should be treated with decompression of the tendons health with preservation of the pulley system.

  1. Flurbiprofen in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Pipitone, V; Numo, R; Loizzi, P

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary findings are reported from an open study of 300 mg flurbiprofen daily in 24 patients and from 6 out of 30 patients treated so far in a double-blind crossover comparison of 300 mg flurbiprofen daily and 150 mg indomethacin daily in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The results indicate that flurbiprofen is effective in relieving symptoms and is better tolerated than indomethacin. Using an experimental model in rats to assess the anti-inflammatory activity of flurbiprofen, data suggest that flurbiprofen is unable to prevent an immunological type of inflammation but is capable of modifying the type and extent of cellular infiltration.

  2. Rheumatoid pleural effusion with nodular pleuritis. A rare presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Emmungil, H; Yıldız, F; Gözükara, M Y; Açıkalın, A

    2015-02-01

    Rheumatoid pleural effusion and lung nodules are unusual complications of rheumatoid disease that typically present subsequently to other more common manifestations of rheumatoid illness. However, these complications may occasionally occur before or concurrently with the development of joint manifestations of disease. We report the case of a 41-year-old female patient with rheumatoid pleural effusion and lung nodule arising simultaneously with the onset of joint symptoms. The patient underwent thoracentesis followed by video-assisted thoracoscopic biopsy to result in a diagnosis of rheumatoid pleuritis and nodular disease. A high index of suspicion and coexistence of the cytologic and histopathologic effusion picture characteristic of rheumatoid pleuritis are of clinical importance in making a diagnosis.

  3. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS—Diagnosis in Peripheral Joint Affliction

    PubMed Central

    Mettier, Stacy R.

    1955-01-01

    The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis in a typical case depends upon a history of pain and swelling of various joints throughout the body. In the first stages the disease usually involves only the small joints of the hands and feet, but sooner or later it spreads to the larger joints. This may be accompanied by fibrosis of one or more joints, causing disability ranging from disuse of one joint up to total incapacity. Diagnosis in early or atypical cases is often impossible until the patient has been under observation a long time. It is important that diagnosis be made as early as possible, in order that appropriate therapy may be started and ankylosis and disability of the joints prevented. Since laboratory procedures and roentgen films do not show early changes, emphasis is placed on the history and physical examination for diagnosis. PMID:14351989

  4. [The goal for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis should be remission].

    PubMed

    Möttönen, Timo; Mäkinen, Heidi; Puolakka, Kari

    2010-01-01

    Early diagnosis is the cornerstone for a successful treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The Finnish way is to start early using the combination of three disease modifying drugs (methotrexate, sulphasalazine, hydroxychloroquine) and a low dose of glucocorticoid (FIN-RACo strategy) aiming at remission. A tight control of disease activity and flexible adjustment of drug therapy are needed using local joint injections, as well. In severe disease with insufficient treatment response, the new biologicals are indicated before marked joint damages occur.

  5. Modeling Temporal Processes in Early Spacecraft Design: Application of Discrete-Event Simulations for Darpa's F6 Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubos, Gregory F.; Cornford, Steven

    2012-01-01

    While the ability to model the state of a space system over time is essential during spacecraft operations, the use of time-based simulations remains rare in preliminary design. The absence of the time dimension in most traditional early design tools can however become a hurdle when designing complex systems whose development and operations can be disrupted by various events, such as delays or failures. As the value delivered by a space system is highly affected by such events, exploring the trade space for designs that yield the maximum value calls for the explicit modeling of time.This paper discusses the use of discrete-event models to simulate spacecraft development schedule as well as operational scenarios and on-orbit resources in the presence of uncertainty. It illustrates how such simulations can be utilized to support trade studies, through the example of a tool developed for DARPA's F6 program to assist the design of "fractionated spacecraft".

  6. Emerging MRI methods in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Borrero, Camilo G; Mountz, James M; Mountz, John D

    2011-02-01

    New MRI techniques have been developed to assess not only the static anatomy of synovial hyperplasia, bone changes and cartilage degradation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but also the activity of the physiological events that cause these changes. This enables an estimation of the rate of change in the synovium, bone and cartilage as a result of disease activity or in response to therapy. Typical MRI signs of RA in the pre-erosive phase include synovitis, bone marrow edema and subchondral cyst formation. Synovitis can be assessed by T2-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI or diffusion tensor imaging. Bone marrow edema can be detected on fluid-sensitive sequences such as short-tau inversion recovery or T2-weighted fast-spin echo sequences. Detection of small bone erosions in the early erosive phase using T1-weighted MRI has sensitivity comparable to CT. Numerous MRI techniques have been developed for quantitative assessment of potentially pathologic changes in cartilage composition that occur before frank morphologic changes. In this Review, we summarize the advances and new directions in the field of MRI, with an emphasis on their current state of development and application in RA.

  7. Pathogenesis of joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bresnihan, B

    1999-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by the appearance of progressive joint damage that may be identified only months after the onset of symptoms. Early cartilage and bone erosion is associated with the accumulation of several cell populations in the synovial membrane (SM) and the formation of a proliferating pannus. The synovial sublining layer contains several cell populations including macrophages, T and B lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The lining layer contains large numbers of macrophages and fibroblast-like synoviocytes. The interface between pannus and cartilage is occupied predominantly by activated macrophage populations and synoviocytes capable of secreting destructive proteases in abundance. We have observed that macrophages aggregate preferentially adjacent to the cartilage-pannus junction (CPJ) and express differentiation phenotypes that are absent from the lining layer macrophages of more remote SM. Moreover, in a prospective study, the number of SM macrophages correlated with the degree of joint damage occurring over one year. Similar results were obtained when SM biopsy samples were analyzed and correlated with clinical and radiological changes occurring over 6 years. Macrophages and synoviocytes at the CPJ express matrix metalloproteinase and cathepsin mRNA from the earliest stage of RA. The mechanisms involved in the secretion of tissue degrading enzymes by macrophages and synoviocytes are undergoing further investigation and preliminary results suggest that different regulation pathways may exist.

  8. Treatment strategy of elderly rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

      Since the general population is ageing, the number and the mean age of elderly patients of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased. Elderly RA is classified into two clinical subsets, younger onset elderly RA (YORA) and elderly-onset RA (EORA). In the past literature, onset after 60 years of age is mainly adopted as the classical definition of EORA. Elderly-YORA patients, in addition to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, sometimes need analgestics, joint surgery and rehabilitation taking into account their bone destruction and their activities of daily living. Early phase EORA patients should be treated using the treat-to-target strategy, although low disease activity is the realistic goal due to their co-morbidities, patient factors and drug-related risks. Methotrexate (MTX) is the anchor drug in the treatment of EORA. It should be started at low dose (2-4 mg/day) and if tolerated, the dosage is carefully increased. In the case of renal dysfunction or dementia, and MTX is intolerable, biologics monotherapy could be a choice of treatment. Tapering of glucocorticoid, as far as possible, is needed because it is one of the risk factors of infection. Treatment of super-aged RA patients is a future agenda.

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Crowson, Cynthia S; Liao, Katherine P; Davis, John M; Solomon, Daniel H; Matteson, Eric L; Knutson, Keith L; Hlatky, Mark A; Gabriel, Sherine E

    2014-01-01

    Background Rheumatic disease and heart disease share common underpinnings involving inflammation. The high levels of inflammation that characterize rheumatic diseases provide a “natural experiment” to help elucidate the mechanisms by which inflammation accelerates heart disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common of the rheumatic diseases and has the best studied relationships with heart disease. Methods Review of current literature on heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis Results Patients with RA have an increased risk of developing heart disease that is not fully explained by traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Therapies used to treat RA may also affect the development of heart disease; by suppressing inflammation, they may also reduce the risk of heart disease. However, their other effects, as in the case of steroids, may increase heart disease risk. Conclusions Investigations of the innate and adaptive immune responses occurring in RA may delineate novel mechanisms in the pathogenesis of heart disease, and help identify novel therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of heart disease. PMID:24093840

  10. Epigenetic modifications in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Strietholt, Simon; Maurer, Britta; Peters, Marvin A; Pap, Thomas; Gay, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decades, genetic factors for rheumatoid diseases like the HLA haplotypes have been studied extensively. However, during the past years of research, it has become more and more evident that the influence of epigenetic processes on the development of rheumatic diseases is probably as strong as the genetic background of a patient. Epigenetic processes are heritable changes in gene expression without alteration of the nucleotide sequence. Such modifications include chromatin methylation and post-translational modification of histones or other chromatin-associated proteins. The latter comprise the addition of methyl, acetyl, and phosphoryl groups or even larger moieties such as binding of ubiquitin or small ubiquitin-like modifier. The combinatory nature of these processes forms a complex network of epigenetic modifications that regulate gene expression through activation or silencing of genes. This review provides insight into the role of epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and points out how a better understanding of such mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic strategies.

  11. Cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Soubrier, Martin; Barber Chamoux, Nicolas; Tatar, Zuzana; Couderc, Marion; Dubost, Jean-Jacques; Mathieu, Sylvain

    2014-07-01

    The objectives of this review are to discuss data on the cardiovascular risk increase associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the effects of RA treatments on the cardiovascular risk level, and the management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with RA. Overall, the risk of cardiovascular disease is increased 2-fold in RA patients compared to the general population, due to the combined effects of RA and conventional risk factors. There is some evidence that the cardiovascular risk increase associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy may be smaller in RA patients than in the general population. Glucocorticoid therapy increases the cardiovascular risk in proportion to both the current dose and the cumulative dose. Methotrexate and TNFα antagonists diminish cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. The management of dyslipidemia remains suboptimal. Risk equations may perform poorly in RA patients even when corrected using the multiplication factors suggested by the EUropean League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) (multiply the score by 1.5 when two of the following three criteria are met: disease duration longer than 10 years, presence of rheumatoid factor or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, and extraarticular manifestations). Doppler ultrasonography of the carotid arteries in patients at moderate cardiovascular risk may allow a more aggressive approach to dyslipidemia management via reclassification into the high-risk category of patients with an intima-media thickness greater than 0.9 mm or atheroma plaque.

  12. Complete heart block in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Ahern, M; Lever, J V; Cosh, J

    1983-01-01

    We report 8 cases of complete heart block (CHB) occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and review 20 similar patients previously reported. Complete heart block occurs generally in patients with established erosive nodular rheumatoid disease. It usually appears to be sudden and permanent, but progression from minor conduction delays is not uncommon. The characteristic histopathological finding is a rheumatoid granuloma in or near the AV node or bundle of His. If syncope or Stokes-Adams attacks occur, the treatment of choice is the insertion of a permanent pacemaker. The prognosis is good provided no other cardiac lesions occur, whether pericardial, valvular, or myocardial. Images PMID:6882034

  13. Epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis: rheumatoid arthritis and mortality.

    PubMed

    Myasoedova, Elena; Davis, John M; Crowson, Cynthia S; Gabriel, Sherine E

    2010-10-01

    Increased mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is widely recognized but not fully explained. Despite substantial improvements in management and growing knowledge of the determinants of increased mortality, evidence for reduction in mortality in RA has lagged behind. Indeed, most studies report no apparent reduction in mortality in RA. However, emerging evidence from some recent RA inception cohorts suggests no increased mortality, including cardiovascular mortality, but this awaits further confirmation. Although it is possible that recent advances in RA treatment may manifest in improvement of survival in the near future, other factors, including undertreated or unrecognized low-grade inflammation, comorbidities, and immunogenetic factors, may contribute to the excess mortality in RA and impede its improvement. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the rates and determinants of mortality in RA, identify and discuss potential explanations for excess mortality, and outline promising research avenues for targeting mortality in RA.

  14. Reliable and cost-effective serodiagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Pieter W A; Ally, Mahmood M T M; Anderson, Ronald

    2016-06-01

    Early diagnosis of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) optimises therapeutic benefit and the probability of achieving disease remission. Notwithstanding clinical acumen, early diagnosis is dependent on access to reliable serodiagnostic procedures, as well as on the discerning application and interpretation of these. In the case of RA, however, no disease-specific serodiagnostic procedure is available due to the multi-factorial and polygenic nature of this autoimmune disorder. This has resulted in the development of an array of serodiagnostic procedures based on the detection of autoantibodies reactive with various putative autoantigens. Other procedures based on measurement of elevations in the concentrations of systemic biomarkers of inflammation, most commonly acute phase reactants and cytokines/chemokines, are used as objective indices of disease activity. Following a brief overview of RA research in African populations, the current review is focused on those autoantibodies/biomarkers, specifically rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies and C-reactive protein, which are currently recognised as being the most reliable and cost-effective with respect to disease prediction and diagnosis, as well as in monitoring activity and outcome.

  15. Psychosocial problems among newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Gåfvels, C; Hägerström, M; Nordmark, B; Wändell, P E

    2012-03-01

    We identified patients with newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the ages 18-65 years who needed psychosocial interventions. A total of 123 patients (90 women) were asked to participate, but 19 declined and 4 dropped out early in the study, leaving a total of 100 patients (75 women) in the sample. Questionnaires used were the Epidemiological Investigation on Rheumatoid Arthritis study questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Sense of Coherence (SOC) scale, and the General Coping Questionnaire. Interviews showed that 46% of the included 100 patients had psychosocial problems (PSP). One third of them had problems directly related to RA. The rest had problems with their life situation in general, without or reinforced by RA. Compared to patients without psychosocial problems, PSP patients lived in more strained social situations, especially regarding personal finances and social support. More of the PSP patients were anxious, showed lower SOC scores, and also used more emotion-based coping strategies (resignation, protest, isolation and intrusion) and less problem-oriented (minimization). They also had higher scores on depression and more frequently expected that RA would negatively affect their future. PSP patients also experienced a more negative impact of the disease, a finding not confirmed by the sickness activity score judged by the rheumatologist. Thus, early in the course of RA, screening instruments should be used to identify PSP patients. Psychosocial treatment and support by medical social workers skilled in RA care should be offered.

  16. Vocational Rehabilitation for Persons with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allaire, Saralynn H.

    1998-01-01

    Useful vocational rehabilitation strategies for persons with rheumatoid arthritis include (1) management of symptoms and reduction of energy demand; (2) reasonable job accommodations; (3) identification of suitable jobs and necessary training; and (4) enhancement of self-advocacy skills. (SK)

  17. ASTROMEDICINE IN THE TREATMENT OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Janai, Sudhakar; Biviji, A. T.; Naik, D. G.; Lakhe, R. T.; Rao, V. Bhaskar

    1991-01-01

    One patient of rheumatoid arthritis was treated according to astromedicine. Wearing of Coral beads had remarkable effect on the disease. The interesting finding are reported in this paper. PMID:22556538

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis associated pulmonary hypertension: Clinical challenges reflecting the diversity of pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Panagiotidou, Evangelia; Sourla, Evdokia; Kotoulas, Serafim Xrisovalantis; Akritidou, Sofia; Bikos, Vasileios; Bagalas, Vasileios; Stanopoulos, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia

    2017-01-01

    The present article reports three clinical cases in order to elucidate the diversity of the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie rheumatoid arthritis associated pulmonary hypertension. The condition's three major causes are: interstitial lung disease, vasculitis, and chronic thromboembolic disease, but it should be noted that the multiple pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, can all contribute to chronic lung disease or hypoxia. The first patient in this report suffered from moderate restriction due to fibrosis and was diagnosed with pulmonary hypertension during an episode of life threatening hypoxia. Early upfront combination therapy prevented intubation and reversed hypoxia to adequate levels. The second presented patient was a case of isolated pulmonary hypertension attributable to vasculopathy. The patient maintained normal lung volumes but low diffusion capacity and echocardiography dictated the need for right heart catheterization. Finally, the third patient presented severe functional limitation due to several manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, but a past episode of acute pulmonary embolism was also reported although it had never been evaluated. Chronic thromboembolic disease was eventually proved to be one major cause of the patient's pulmonary hypertension. The importance of early identification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is therefore emphasized, especially since multiple treatment options are available, symptoms can be treated, and right heart failure can be avoided.

  19. Early detection of drug use and bullying in secondary school children by using a three-dimensional simulation program.

    PubMed

    Carmona Torres, José A; Cangas, Adolfo J; García, Gustavo R; Langer, Alvaro I; Zárate, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The current study analyzes the psychometric properties of an innovative three-dimensional (3D) simulation program, entitled Mii-School (MS), designed for the early detection of drug use and bullying in Secondary School children. This computer program showed adequate reliability and construct validity. The factorial structure, as well as the explanatory weight of the different factors, is presented. In addition, the results of a parallel version in paper and pencil format are also presented and compared with those of the computerized version (i.e., MS). There was a statistically significant difference between the two formats in the total (i.e., combined) sore of risk. When drug use and bullying were separately analyzed, differences were found only with regard to drug use. The relevance of these results as well as the suitability of this type of 3D instrument for the early detection of risky behaviors in young people are discussed.

  20. [New therapies for rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Salgado, Eva; Maneiro, José Ramón

    2014-11-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial membrane and progressive destruction of the articular cartilage and bone. Advances in the knowledge of disease pathogenesis allowed the identification of novel therapeutic targets such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 or the system JAK/STAT phosphorylation. At present there are 5 TNF antagonists approved for RA. Tocilizumab blocks the pathway of IL-6 and is the only biological with proven efficacy in monotherapy. Rituximab modulates B cell response in RA. Abatacept provided new data on T cell involvement in the pathogenesis of RA. Tofacitinib is the first kinase inhibitor approved for this disease. Biologic drugs have proven efficacy, almost always in combination with methotrexate, and even halt radiographic progression. Monitoring infection is the main precaution in handling these patients.

  1. Pharmacotherapy Options in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Banik, Snehashish

    2013-01-01

    Drugs form the mainstay of therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Five main classes of drugs are currently used: analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), glucocorticoids, nonbiologic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend that clinicians start biologic agents if patients have suboptimal response or intolerant to one or two traditional disease modifying agents (DMARDs). Methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide and hydroxychloroquine are the commonly used DMARDs. Currently, anti-TNF is the commonly used first line biologic worldwide followed by abatacept and it is usually combined with MTX. There is some evidence that tocilizumab is the most effective biologic as a monotherapy agent. Rituximab is generally not used as a first line biologic therapy due to safety issues but still as effective as anti-TNF. The long term data for the newer oral small molecule biologics such as tofacitinib is not available and hence used only as a last resort. PMID:23997576

  2. Psychosocial Concepts in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    McGillivray, Donald C.

    1973-01-01

    This article reviews and tabulates some of the current concepts of the role of psychosocial factors in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concepts prevalent during the 1950's are listed followed by discussion of some of the variable factors that complicate studies in this field. Studies are then cited which lead to the following conclusions: 1. Patients with RA tend to have certain personality characteristics, such as depression, rigidity, dependency, neurotic response patterns, emotional instability, feelings of guilt and low ego strength. 2. These are not specific to RA. 3. They may well be sequelae of the disease rather than pre-morbid features. 4. There is no clear evidence as to the role of psychological stress in causing or activating RA. 5. Personality factors have an influence on the course of the disease. PMID:20468900

  3. [Imaging modalities of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Tamai, K

    1992-03-01

    Modern diagnostic techniques for rheumatoid arthritis include x-ray examination, arthro- or myelography, CT scan, scintigraphy, thermography, ultrasonography, and MRI. X-ray is the simplest and most common method for assessing the degree of joint destruction. Arthrography provides information on intra-articular pathology. CT is particularly of value in visualizing changes in the axial skeleton. Joint scintigraphy, using 99m-technetium pertechnetate, is available in evaluating the degree of synovial inflammation. Thermography has been performed for a similar purpose. Ultrasound allows a real-time, dynamic study of soft tissues in and around the joint, including tendons, synovium and articular cartilage. MRI most clearly shows various pathological conditions such as pannus, degenerated cartilage or spinal cord compression, although the examination time should be shortened.

  4. Update in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim-Howard, Xana R; Staudt, Leslie; James, Judith A

    2005-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by polyarticular symmetrical arthritis. Inflammatory mediators targeting joint structures produce joint inflammation with pain, functional loss, joint destruction and permanent deformity. Currently, no cure for RA exists but the increasing use of combination therapy and immunomodulatory agents has led to improved quality of life and long-term outlook for many of these patients. While traditionally employed therapies have provided limited disease suppression, advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of RA have resulted in new therapies targeting very specific components of the inflammatory process. These new treatments have shown very promising results with improved efficacy and an overall decreased toxicity profile. This review provides an overview for practicing clinicians of the current immunosuppressive therapies in RA with an emphasis on newer biological agents regarding their mechanisms of action, efficacy, side effects and monitoring recommendations. Developing therapeutics will be briefly discussed.

  5. The Rheumatoid Arthritic At Home

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, T. E.

    1977-01-01

    Most management of rheumatoid arthritis must take place in the patient's own home with only intermittent professional help. With good planning and instruction it is possible to create in the home a milieu appropriate not only for possible inducement of remission, but also for continuing care during even protracted disability. The mainstay of treatment in all stages of this disease is the achievement of a right balance between rest and activity. In the initial stages, proper rest and support, including splinting of the joints with other simple measures, will greatly relieve pain and help control the inflammatory process. A variety of therapeutic exercises can reduce the likelihood of secondary immobility and promote restoration of strength and function. For the patient in whom the disease has become chronic and disabling a wide variety of self-help devices can be prescribed, together with appropriate home modifications. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Figs. 4 & 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:21307997

  6. Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

  7. The Gigantic Explosions from the Early Universe: Multidimensional Simulations of the First Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Current models of the formation of the first stars in the universe suggest that these stars were very massive, having a typical mass scale of hundreds of solar masses. Some of them would die as pair instability supernovae (PSNe) which might be the biggest explosions of the universe. Most theoretical models for the PSNe are based on one-dimensional simulations; until now, multidimensional simulations have been scarce because of their complexity. However, multidimensional simulations are essential because, when the star dies in a supernova, the assumption of spherical symmetry of the star breaks down on a large scale due to fluid instabilities generated during the explosion. These instabilities are fundamentally multidimensional. We present the results from multidimensional numerical studies of PSNe with a new radiation-hydrodynamics code, CASTRO and with realistic nuclear reaction networks. We simulate the fluid instabilities that occur in multiple spatial dimensions and discuss how the resulting mixing affects the explosion, mixing, and nucleosynthesis of these supernovae. Our simulations can provide useful predictions for the observational signatures of PSNe. They might soon be examined by the forthcoming telescopes such as James Webb Space Telescope or Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  8. Simulation of the early stage of binary alloy decomposition, based on the free energy density functional method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, P. E.; Svetukhin, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    Based on the free energy density functional method, the early stage of decomposition of a onedimensional binary alloy corresponding to the approximation of regular solutions has been simulated. In the simulation, Gaussian composition fluctuations caused by the initial alloy state are taken into account. The calculation is performed using the block approach implying discretization of the extensive solution volume into independent fragments for each of which the decomposition process is calculated, and then a joint analysis of the formed second phase segregations is performed. It was possible to trace all stages of solid solution decomposition: nucleation, growth, and coalescence (initial stage). The time dependences of the main phase distribution characteristics are calculated: the average size and concentration of the second phase particles, their size distribution function, and the nucleation rate of the second phase particles (clusters). Cluster trajectories in the size-composition space are constructed for the cases of growth and dissolution.

  9. Modeling and simulation with Hybrid Functional Petri Nets of the role of interleukin-6 in human early haematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Troncale, Sylvie; Tahi, Fariza; Campard, David; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Guespin, Janine

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of human haematopoiesis is a complex biological system with numerous interdependent processes. In vivo Haematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) self-renew so as to maintain a constant pool of these cells. It would be very interesting to maintain these cells in vitro, in view of their therapeutical importance. Unfortunately, there is currently no known process to activate HSCs self-renewal in vitro. Since the difficulties related to in vitro experiments, modeling and simulating this process is indispensable. Moreover, the complexity of haematopoiesis makes it necessary to integrate various functionalities: both discrete and continuous models as well as consumption and production of resources. We thus focus on the use of Hybrid Functional Petri Nets, which offer a number of features and flexibility. We begin by modeling and simulating the role of a specific cytokine, interleukin-6, in the regulation of early haematopoiesis. Results obtained in silico lead to the disappearence of HSCs, which is in agreement with in vitro results.

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis is caused by a Proteus urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Ebringer, Alan; Rashid, Taha

    2014-05-01

    Genetic, molecular and biological studies indicate that rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a severe arthritic disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population in developed countries, is caused by an upper urinary tract infection by the microbe, Proteus mirabilis. Elevated levels of specific antibodies against Proteus bacteria have been reported from 16 different countries. The pathogenetic mechanism involves six stages triggered by cross-reactive autoantibodies evoked by Proteus infection. The causative amino acid sequences of Proteus namely, ESRRAL and IRRET, contain arginine doublets which can be acted upon by peptidyl arginine deiminase thereby explaining the early appearance of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies in patients with RA. Consequently, RA patients should be treated early with anti-Proteus antibiotics as well as biological agents to avoid irreversible joint damages.

  11. Beyond the joints: neurological involvement in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Remus, Cesar; Duran-Barragan, Sergio; Castillo-Ortiz, Jose Dionisio

    2012-01-01

    Although arthritis is the most notable component, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder where extra-articular manifestations are common; among them, central and peripheral nervous system involvement is frequent and associated with significant morbidity and, in some cases, reduced life span. It may produce a myriad of symptoms and signs ranging from subtle numbness in a hand, to quadriparesis and sudden death. Central and peripheral neurologic manifestations may arise from structural damage produced by RA in diarthroidal joints, by the systemic inflammatory process of the disease itself or by the drugs used to treat it. Neurologic syndromes may appear suddenly or developed slowly through months, and emerge early or after years of having RA. Neurologic manifestations may be easily overlooked or incorrectly assigned to peripheral arthritis unless the attending physician is aware of these complications. In this article, we review neurologic involvement in RA patients with emphasis on clinical approach for early detection.

  12. Analysis of light incident location and detector position in early diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanping; Chen, Yisha; Yan, Huangping; Wang, Xiaoling

    2017-01-01

    Early detection of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is meaningful to delay or prevent the onset of osteoarthritis. In consideration of structural complexity of knee joint, position of light incidence and detector appears to be extremely important in optical inspection. In this paper, the propagation of 780-nm near infrared photons in three-dimensional knee joint model is simulated by Monte Carlo (MC) method. Six light incident locations are chosen in total to analyze the influence of incident and detecting location on the number of detected signal photons and signal to noise ratio (SNR). Firstly, a three-dimensional photon propagation model of knee joint is reconstructed based on CT images. Then, MC simulation is performed to study the propagation of photons in three-dimensional knee joint model. Photons which finally migrate out of knee joint surface are numerically analyzed. By analyzing the number of signal photons and SNR from the six given incident locations, the optimal incident and detecting location is defined. Finally, a series of phantom experiments are conducted to verify the simulation results. According to the simulation and phantom experiments results, the best incident location is near the right side of meniscus at the rear end of left knee joint and the detector is supposed to be set near patella, correspondingly.

  13. Early diagnostic suggestions improve accuracy of GPs: a randomised controlled trial using computer-simulated patients

    PubMed Central

    Kostopoulou, Olga; Rosen, Andrea; Round, Thomas; Wright, Ellen; Douiri, Abdel; Delaney, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    Background Designers of computerised diagnostic support systems (CDSSs) expect physicians to notice when they need advice and enter into the CDSS all information that they have gathered about the patient. The poor use of CDSSs and the tendency not to follow advice once a leading diagnosis emerges would question this expectation. Aim To determine whether providing GPs with diagnoses to consider before they start testing hypotheses improves accuracy. Design and setting Mixed factorial design, where 297 GPs diagnosed nine patient cases, differing in difficulty, in one of three experimental conditions: control, early support, or late support. Method Data were collected over the internet. After reading some initial information about the patient and the reason for encounter, GPs requested further information for diagnosis and management. Those receiving early support were shown a list of possible diagnoses before gathering further information. In late support, GPs first gave a diagnosis and were then shown which other diagnoses they could still not discount. Results Early support significantly improved diagnostic accuracy over control (odds ratio [OR] 1.31; 95% confidence interval [95%CI] = 1.03 to 1.66, P = 0.027), while late support did not (OR 1.10; 95% CI = 0.88 to 1.37). An absolute improvement of 6% with early support was obtained. There was no significant interaction with case difficulty and no effect of GP experience on accuracy. No differences in information search were detected between experimental conditions. Conclusion Reminding GPs of diagnoses to consider before they start testing hypotheses can improve diagnostic accuracy irrespective of case difficulty, without lengthening information search. PMID:25548316

  14. Performance of a new digital flat-panel detector system in the detection of simulated rheumatoid erosions: a comparison with a speed-class 200 screen-film system, a mammography screen-film system, and a storage-phosphor system at different levels of exposure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Karl; Henschel, Andreas; Bernhardt, Thomas; Lenzen, Horst; Wormanns, Dag; Diederich, Stefan; Heindel, Walter

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a large-area direct read-out flat-panel detector system with a speed class 200 screen-film system, a storage-phosphor system and a mammography screen-film system with regard to the detection of simulated rheumatoid erosions and to assess its diagnostic performance with decreasing exposure dose. The performance of a flat-panel system in such small lesions was considered especially interesting, as the spatial resolution of this system, limited by its pixel size, is considerably lower than that of conventional screen-film systems. An animal model with 160 joint specimens from 20 monkey paws was used. 640 regions were defined in these 160 meta- carpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joint specimens. Simulated rheumatoid erosions were created in 320 of these 640 regions. Specimens were enclosed in containers filed with water to obtain absorption and scatter radiation conditions similar to a human hand. Imaging was performed using a flat-panel system, a sped class 200 screen-film system, a mammography screen-film system and a storage- phosphor system under exactly matched conditions. Different exposure doses equivalent to speed classes of S equals 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600 and 3200 were used. Presence or absence of a lesion was assessed by three radiologists using a five level confidence scale. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed for a total of 21,120 observations and diagnostic performance estimated by the area under the ROC curve. The significance of differences between Az values was tested with analysis of variance. ROC-analysis showed Az values of 0.809, 0.768, 0.737, 0.710 and 0.685 for the flat-panel system, 0.770 for the screen-film system, 0.781, 0.739, 0.724 and 0.680 for the storage-phosphor system, and 0.798 for the mammography screen-film system. Analysis of variance showed significant differences for certain combinations of imaging modalities and exposure doses. The diagnostic performance of

  15. Evaluation of aqua crop simulation of early season evaporation and water flux in a semiarid environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The AquaCrop model of crop growth, water use, yield and water use efficiency (WUE) is intended for use by extension personnel, farm and irrigation managers, planners and other less advanced users of simulation models in irrigation planning and scheduling. It could be useful in estimating changes in ...

  16. Obesity May Make Rheumatoid Arthritis Tough to Spot, Track

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_164558.html Obesity May Make Rheumatoid Arthritis Tough to Spot, Track Inflammation from excess weight ... HealthDay News) -- Blood tests to diagnose and monitor rheumatoid arthritis may be thrown off by obesity in women, ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet: Can Certain Foods Reduce Symptoms?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can diet affect symptoms? Can certain diets affect rheumatoid arthritis symptoms? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. ... saturated fats might help reduce symptoms associated with rheumatoid arthritis. But the research studies supporting this benefit have ...

  18. Could a Germ Link Gum Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 162571.html Could a Germ Link Gum Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis? Study may offer new insight into the cause ... the long-noticed connection between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis, a new study suggests. The discovery might also ...

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the collapsar model for early and late evolution of gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Proga, Daniel

    2007-05-15

    I present results from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of a gaseous envelope collapsing onto a black hole (BH). These results support the notion that the collapsar model is one of the most promising scenarios to explain the huge release of energy in a matter of seconds associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Additionally, the MHD simulations show that at late times, when the mass supply rate is expected to decrease, the region in the vicinity of the BH can play an important role in determining the rate of accretion, its time behaviour and ultimately the energy output. In particular, the magnetic flux accumulated around the BH can repeatedly stop and then restart the energy release. As proposed by Proga & Zhang, the episode or episodes of reoccurrence of accretion processes can correspond to X-ray flares discovered recently in a number of GRBs.

  20. 3D Simulations of the Early Mars Climate with a General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forget, F.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.; Cha, S.; Marcq, E.; Schaeffer, J.; Wanherdrick, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The environmental conditions that existed on Mars during the Noachian period are subject to debate in the community. In any case, there are compelling evidence that these conditions were different than what they became later in the amazonian and possibly the Hesperian periods. Indeed, most of the old cratered terrains are disected by valley networks (thought to have been carved by flowing liquid water), whereas younger surface are almost devoid of such valleys. In addition, there are evidence that the erosion rate was much higher during the early noachian than later. Flowing water is surprising on early Mars because the solar luminosity was significantly lower than today. Even with the thick atmosphere (up to several bars).To improve our understanding of the early Mars Climate, we have developed a 3D general circulation model similar to the one used on current Earth or Mars to study the details of the climate today. Our first objective is to answer the following questions : how is the Martian climate modified if 1) the surface pressure is increased up to several bars (our baseline: 2 bars) and 2) if the sun luminosity is decreased by 25 account the heat possibly released by impacts during short periods, although it may have played a role .For this purpose, we have coupled the Martian General Circulation model developed at LMD with a sophisticated correlated k distribution model developped at NASA Ames Research Center. It is a narrow band model which computes the radiative transfer at both solar and thermal wavelengths (from 0.3 to 250 microns).

  1. The performance of field scientists undertaking observations of early life fossils while in simulated space suit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, D.; Rask, J. C.; George, S. C.; de Leon, P.; Bonaccorsi, R.; Blank, J.; Slocombe, J.; Silburn, K.; Steele, H.; Gargarno, M.; McKay, C. P.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulated Apollo Extravehicular Activity's (EVA) at the 3.45 Ga Australian 'Pilbara Dawn of life' (Western Australia) trail with field and non-field scientists using the University of North Dakota's NDX-1 pressurizable space suit to overview the effectiveness of scientist astronauts employing their field observation skills while looking for stromatolite fossil evidence. Off-world scientist astronauts will be faced with space suit limitations in vision, human sense perception, mobility, dexterity, the space suit fit, time limitations, and the psychological fear of death from accidents, causing physical fatigue reducing field science performance. Finding evidence of visible biosignatures for past life such as stromatolite fossils, on Mars, is a very significant discovery. Our preliminary overview trials showed that when in simulated EVAs, 25% stromatolite fossil evidence is missed with more incorrect identifications compared to ground truth surveys but providing quality characterization descriptions becomes less affected by simulated EVA limitations as the science importance of the features increases. Field scientists focused more on capturing high value characterization detail from the rock features whereas non-field scientists focused more on finding many features. We identified technologies and training to improve off-world field science performance. The data collected is also useful for NASA's "EVA performance and crew health" research program requirements but further work will be required to confirm the conclusions.

  2. The co-evolution of total density profiles and central dark matter fractions in simulated early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Naab, Thorsten; Burkert, Andreas; Hirschmann, Michaela; Hoffmann, Tadziu L.; Johansson, Peter H.

    2017-01-01

    We present evidence from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations for a co-evolution of the slope of the total (dark and stellar) mass density profile, γtot, and the dark matter fraction within the half-mass radius, fDM, in early-type galaxies. The relation can be described as γtot = A fDM + B for all systems at all redshifts. The trend is set by the decreasing importance of gas dissipation towards lower redshifts and for more massive systems. Early-type galaxies are smaller, more concentrated, have lower fDM and steeper γtot at high redshifts and at lower masses for a given redshift; fDM and γtot are good indicators for growth by `dry' merging. The values for A and B change distinctively for different feedback models, and this relation can be used as a test for such models. A similar correlation exists between γtot and the stellar mass surface density Σ*. A model with weak stellar feedback and feedback from black holes is in best agreement with observations. All simulations, independent of the assumed feedback model, predict steeper γtot and lower fDM at higher redshifts. While the latter is in agreement with the observed trends, the former is in conflict with lensing observations, which indicate constant or decreasing γtot. This discrepancy is shown to be artificial: the observed trends can be reproduced from the simulations using observational methodology to calculate the total density slopes.

  3. Cosmological Simulations of Early Black Hole Formation: Halo Mergers, Tidal Disruption, and the Conditions for Direct Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Sunmyon; Hirano, Shingo; Hosokawa, Takashi; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-12-01

    Gravitational collapse of a massive primordial gas cloud is thought to be a promising path for the formation of supermassive black holes in the early universe. We study conditions for the so-called direct collapse (DC) black hole formation in a fully cosmological context. We combine a semianalytic model of early galaxy formation with halo merger trees constructed from dark matter N-body simulations. We locate a total of 68 possible DC sites in a volume of 20 {h}-1 {Mpc} on a side. We then perform hydrodynamics simulations for 42 selected halos to study in detail the evolution of the massive clouds within them. We find only two successful cases where the gas clouds rapidly collapse to form stars. In the other cases, gravitational collapse is prevented by the tidal force exerted by a nearby massive halo, which otherwise should serve as a radiation source necessary for DC. Ram pressure stripping disturbs the cloud approaching the source. In many cases, a DC halo and its nearby light source halo merge before the onset of cloud collapse. When the DC halo is assembled through major mergers, the gas density increases rapidly to trigger gravitational instability. Based on our cosmological simulations, we conclude that the event rate of DC is an order of magnitude smaller than reported in previous studies, although the absolute rate is still poorly constrained. It is necessary to follow the dynamical evolution of a DC cloud and its nearby halo(s) in order to determine the critical radiation flux for DC.

  4. Post-impact climate conditions on early Mars: preliminary results from GCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steakley, Kathryn; Murphy, Jim; Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Observations imply that liquid water was stable on Mars' surface during the late Noachian/early Hesperian era, with valley networks forming roughly 3.5-3.75 billion years ago, possibly from precipitation and runoff (Fassett & Head 2008, Icarus 195, 61; Hynek et al., 2010, JGR Planets, 115, E09008). Climate models, however, struggle to reproduce such warm conditions (Forget et al., 2013, Icarus 21, 81). Volcanism and impacts have been suggested as mechanisms of either inducing a warm and wet environment or causing local melting in a cold and wet environment. Comets and asteroids are capable of injecting into the atmosphere both kinetic energy from the impact and water from the object itself and from vaporized surface and subsurface ice. Segura et al. (2008, JGR Planets 113, E11007) find using a 1-D atmospheric model that significant rainfall and periods of above-freezing temperatures lasting months to years can follow impacts of objects between 30 and 100 km in diameter. We revisit this work utilizing a 3-D global climate model (GCM) to consider the effects of dynamics, topography, global surface ice variations, etc. We present preliminary results from the NASA ARC Mars GCM investigating global temperature and precipitation behavior in a post-impact, early Mars environment.

  5. The multifaceted aspects of interstitial lung disease in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cavagna, Lorenzo; Monti, Sara; Grosso, Vittorio; Boffini, Nicola; Scorletti, Eva; Crepaldi, Gloria; Caporali, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a relevant extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that may occur either in early stages or as a complication of long-standing disease. RA related ILD (RA-ILD) significantly influences the quoad vitam prognosis of these patients. Several histopathological patterns of RA-ILD have been described: usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) is the most frequent one, followed by nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP); other patterns are less commonly observed. Several factors have been associated with an increased risk of developing RA-ILD. The genetic background plays a fundamental but not sufficient role; smoking is an independent predictor of ILD, and a correlation with the presence of rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies has also been reported. Moreover, both exnovo occurrence and progression of ILD have been related to drug therapies that are commonly prescribed in RA, such as methotrexate, leflunomide, anti-TNF alpha agents, and rituximab. A greater understanding of the disease process is necessary in order to improve the therapeutic approach to ILD and RA itself and to reduce the burden of this severe extra-articular manifestation.

  6. Update on Therapeutic Approaches for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Gomes, Andreia; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common chronic inflammatory and destructive arthropathy that consumes considerable personal, social and economic costs. It consists of a syndrome of pain, stiffness and symmetrical inflammation of the synovial membrane (synovitis) of freely moveable joints such as the knee (diarthrodial joints). Although the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis is unclear, the disease is characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining of diarthrodial joints, high synovial proliferation and an influx of inflammatory cells, macrophages and lymphocytes through angiogenic blood vessels. Diseasemodifying antirheumatic drugs slow disease progression and can induce disease remission in some patients. Methotrexate is the first line therapy, but if patients become intolerant to this drug, biologic agents should be used. The development of biological substances for the treatment of rheumatic conditions has been accompanied by ongoing health economic discussions regarding the implementation of these highly effective, but accordingly, highly priced drugs are the standard treatment guidelines of rheumatic diseases. In this way, more efficient strategies have to be identified. Despite numerous reviews in rheumatoid arthritis in the last years, this area is in constant development and updates are an urgent need to incorporate new advances in rheumatoid arthritis research. This review highlights the immunopathogenesis rationale for the current therapeutic strategies in rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Remission-inducing drugs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Anastassiades, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    The administration of certain drugs to patients with established rheumatoid arthritis frequently results in improvement that is slow to appear but persists for long periods, even after the drug is discontinued. The three main drugs with this effect, whose efficacy and toxicity are reviewed in this paper, are gold salts, D-penicillamine and chloroquine. The cytotoxic agents used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, which likely have nonspecific anti-inflammatory actions and have serious long-term side effects, are also briefly reviewed. A new drug, levamisole, is currently being tested in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It is suggested that the time for considering the introduction of a remission-inducing drug in patients with progressive rheumatoid arthritis is after an adequate trial of therapy with salicylates or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or both, and before the oral administration of steroids. It is difficult, however, on the basis of rigorous clinical comparisons, to recommend which of the three main remission-inducing drugs should be tried first, although gold salts have been used the most. Patients who have improved with 6 months of chrysotherapy may continue treatment for at least 3 years, during which time the frequency of mucocutaneous and renal toxic effects will steadily decrease. Some aspects of the medical economics of therapy with remission-inducing drugs for rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. PMID:6768438

  8. Expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-δ), IL-10, IL-12 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) mRNA in synovial fluid cells from patients in the early and late phases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

    PubMed Central

    BUCHT, A.; LARSSON, P.; WEISBROT, L.; THORNE, C.; PISA, P.; SMEDEGÅRD, G.; KEYSTONE, E C; GRÖNBERG, A.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of immunoregulatory cytokines was investigated in freshly isolated synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with RA, using a quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. IFN-γ, TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-12 (p40) transcripts were detected in SFMC of patients with early disease (<1 year duration) as well as in patients with long standing arthritis (>1 year). The expression of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-12 mRNA was increased in SFMC compared with RA PBMC. In addition, the expression was higher in RA SFMC than in PBMC from healthy control individuals. Immunoassay analysis of the secreted IL-12 heterodimer demonstrated increased levels in RA SF compared with levels found in serum from RA patients and control individuals. High levels of TGF-β mRNA were found in SFMC, but a significantly decreased TGF-β/β2-microglobulin (β2-M) ratio was found compared with PBMC from both patients and control individuals. IL-4 mRNA could not be detected, either in SFMC or in PBMC. Cytokine expression in RA PBMC did not differ from control PBMC, with the exception of a decreased TGF-β/β2-M ratio in RA patients with early disease. Our findings of IFN-7 mRNA and IL-12, but undetectable levels of IL-4 mRNA, suggest that the synovitis is characterized by a type 1 immune response. The presence of TGF-β and IL-10 mRNA indicates that immunosuppressive cytokines may also operate in the inflamed joint, although their level of expression may not be sufficient for down-modulation of immune activation. PMID:8608632

  9. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target: physician and patient adherence issues in contemporary rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Wabe, Nasir; Wiese, Michael D

    2016-09-21

    Development of the treat-to-target (T2T) strategy, the process whereby drug therapy is adjusted until the therapeutic goal is achieved, has revolutionized how rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are treated. With the advent of T2T, the management of RA is more effective than ever, with the possibility of remission and other favorable clinical and patient-reported outcomes. Effective implementation of a T2T strategy in routine clinical practice mainly depends on the long-term commitment of physician and patient to T2T treatment recommendations. However, as T2T is a complex process involving aggressive early management with several steps of therapy modifications requiring frequent close monitoring of disease activity and drug toxicities, it may be more liable to suboptimal adherence in real-life clinical practice. The aim of the review is to present key issues related to patient medication adherence and physician adherence to the current RA treatment recommendations and their importance in optimizing the outcome of treatment in RA treated according to T2T strategy.

  10. Rheumatoid arthritis and work: The impact of rheumatoid arthritis on absenteeism and presenteeism.

    PubMed

    Verstappen, Suzanne M M

    2015-06-01

    For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), being in paid work is very important, and it increases self-esteem and financial independence. Although the management of RA has changed in the last 15 years to early aggressive treatment and the introduction of biologic treatments, many patients still have to take sick leave or even stop working because of their RA (i.e., absenteeism). For those remaining in paid work, patients may experience problems due to RA resulting in productivity loss while at work (i.e., presenteeism). The costs attributed to absenteeism and presenteeism (i.e., indirect costs) have been estimated to be very high, and they even exceed direct costs. However, there is no consensus on how to calculate these costs. This manuscript examines the relationship between the use of biologic therapy and absenteeism, with a focus on sick leave, and on presenteeism, and it provides an overview of indirect costs of absenteeism and presenteeism in those treated with biologic therapies.

  11. The impact of HLA-DRB1 genes on extra-articular disease manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Turesson, Carl; Schaid, Daniel J; Weyand, Cornelia M; Jacobsson, Lennart TH; Goronzy, Jörg J; Petersson, Ingemar F; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Nyhäll-Wåhlin, Britt-Marie; Truedsson, Lennart; Dechant, Sonja A; Matteson, Eric L

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 genotypes in patients with severe extra-articular rheumatoid arthritis (ExRA) and to compare them with the genotypes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients without extra-articular manifestations. Patients with severe ExRA were recruited from a large research database of patients with RA, from two cohorts of prevalent RA cases, and from a regional multicenter early RA cohort. Cases with ExRA manifestations (n = 159) were classified according to predefined criteria. Controls (n = 178) with RA but no ExRA were selected from the same sources. Cases and controls were matched for duration of RA and for clinical center. PCR based HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 genotyping was performed using the Biotest SSP kit, with additional sequencing in order to distinguish DRB1*04 subtypes. Associations between alleles and disease phenotypes were tested using multiple simulations of random distributions of alleles. There was no difference in global distribution of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles between patients with ExRA and controls. DRB1*0401 (P = 0.003) and 0401/0401 homozygosity (P = 0.002) were more frequent in Felty's syndrome than in controls. The presence of two HLA-DRB1*04 alleles encoding the shared epitope (SE) was associated with ExRA (overall odds ratio 1.79, 95% confidence interval 1.04–3.08) and with rheumatoid vasculitis (odds ratio 2.44, 95% confidence interval 1.22–4.89). In this large sample of patients with ExRA, Felty's syndrome was the only manifestation that was clearly associated with HLA-DRB1*0401. Other ExRA manifestations were not associated with individual alleles but with DRB1*04 SE double dose genotypes. This confirms that SE genes contribute to RA disease severity and ExRA. Other genetic and environmental factors may have a more specific impact on individual ExRA manifestations. PMID:16277691

  12. Early and transient stages of Cu oxidation: Atomistic insights from theoretical simulations and in situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qing; Zou, Lianfeng; Zhou, Guangwen; Saidi, Wissam A.; Yang, Judith C.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of metal oxidation is critical to corrosion control, catalysis synthesis, and advanced materials engineering. Although, metal oxidation process is rather complicated, different processes, many of them coupled, are involved from the onset of reaction. Since first introduced, there has been great success in applying heteroepitaxial theory to the oxide growth on a metal surface as demonstrated in the Cu oxidation experiments. In this paper, we review the recent progress in experimental findings on Cu oxidation as well as the advances in the theoretical simulations of the Cu oxidation process. We focus on the effects of defects such as step edges, present on realistic metal surfaces, on the oxide growth dynamics. We show that the surface steps can change the mass transport of both Cu and O atoms during oxide growth, and ultimately lead to the formation of different oxide morphology. We also review the oxidation of Cu alloys and explore the effect of a secondary element to the oxide growth on a Cu surface. From the review of the work on Cu oxidation, we demonstrate the correlation of theoretical simulations at multiple scales with various experimental techniques.

  13. Effects of simulated weightlessness on meiosis. Fertilization, and early development in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The initial goal was to construct a clinostat which could support mammalian cell culture. The clinostat was selected as a means by which to simulate microgravity conditions within the laboratory, by constant re-orientation of cells with respect to the gravity vector. The effects of this simulated microgravity on in-vitro meiotic maturation of oocytes, using mouse as the model system, was investigated. The effects of clinostat rotation on fertilization in-vitro was then examined. Specific endpoints included examining the timely appearance of male and female pronuclei (indicating fertilization) and the efficiency of extrusion of the second polar body. Particular attention was paid to detecting anomalies of fertilization, including parthenogenetic activation and multiple pronuclei. Finally, for the preliminary studies on mouse embryogenesis, a key feature of the clinostat was modified, that of the position of the cells during rotation. A means was found to immobilize the cells during the clinostat reotation, permitting the cells to remain at the axis of rotation yet not interfering with cellular development.

  14. Relativistic Particle-In-Cell Simulation Studies of Prompt and Early Afterglows from GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hardee, Philip; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities {e.g., the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.-/

  15. New Relativistic Particle-In-Cell Simulation Studies of Prompt and Early Afterglows from GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Zhang, B.; Medvedev, M.; Hartmann, D.; Fishman, J. F.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the collisionless relativistic shock particle acceleration is due to plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  16. Relativistic Particle-in-Cell Simulation Studies of Prompt and Early Afterglows Observed by GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizuno, Y.; Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2007-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "'jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  17. Insufficiency fractures of the distal tibia misdiagnosed as cellulitis in three patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Straaton, K.V.; Lopez-Mendez, A.; Alarcon, G.S. )

    1991-07-01

    We describe 3 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who presented with diffuse pain, swelling, and erythema of the distal aspect of the lower extremity, suggestive of either cellulitis or thrombophlebitis, but were found to have insufficiency fractures of the distal tibia. The value of technetium-99m diphosphonate bone scintigraphy in the early recognition of these fractures and a possible explanation for the associated inflammatory symptoms are discussed.

  18. Preliminary numerical simulations of the 27 February 2010 Chile tsunami: first results and hints in a tsunami early warning perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, S.; Tonini, R.; Armigliato, A.; Zaniboni, F.; Pagnoni, G.; Gallazzi, Sara; Bressan, Lidia

    2010-05-01

    The tsunamigenic earthquake (M 8.8) that occurred offshore central Chile on 27 February 2010 can be classified as a typical subduction-zone earthquake. The effects of the ensuing tsunami have been devastating along the Chile coasts, and especially between the cities of Valparaiso and Talcahuano, and in the Juan Fernandez islands. The tsunami propagated across the entire Pacific Ocean, hitting with variable intensity almost all the coasts facing the basin. While the far-field propagation was quite well tracked almost in real-time by the warning centres and reasonably well reproduced by the forecast models, the toll of lives and the severity of the damage caused by the tsunami in the near-field occurred with no local alert nor warning and sadly confirms that the protection of the communities placed close to the tsunami sources is still an unresolved problem in the tsunami early warning field. The purpose of this study is two-fold. On one side we perform numerical simulations of the tsunami starting from different earthquake models which we built on the basis of the preliminary seismic parameters (location, magnitude and focal mechanism) made available by the seismological agencies immediately after the event, or retrieved from more detailed and refined studies published online in the following days and weeks. The comparison with the available records of both offshore DART buoys and coastal tide-gauges is used to put some preliminary constraints on the best-fitting fault model. The numerical simulations are performed by means of the finite-difference code UBO-TSUFD, developed and maintained by the Tsunami Research Team of the University of Bologna, Italy, which can solve both the linear and non-linear versions of the shallow-water equations on nested grids. The second purpose of this study is to use the conclusions drawn in the previous part in a tsunami early warning perspective. In the framework of the EU-funded project DEWS (Distant Early Warning System), we will

  19. HLA-linked rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hasstedt, S.J.; Clegg, D.O.; Ingles, L.; Ward, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    Twenty-eight pedigrees were ascertained through pairs of first-degree relatives diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA was confirmed in 77 pedigree members including probands; the absence of disease was verified in an additional 261 pedigree members. Pedigree members were serologically typed for HLA. We used likelihood analysis to statistically characterize the HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus. The genetic model assumed tight linkage to HLA. The analysis supported the existence of an HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus, estimated the lifetime penetrance as 41% in male homozygotes and as 48% in female homozygotes. Inheritance was recessive in males and was nearly recessive in females. In addition, the analysis attributed 78% of the variance within genotypes to genetic or environmental effects shared by siblings. The genetic model inferred in this analysis is consistent with previous association, linkage, and familial aggregation studies of RA. The inferred HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus accounts for approximately one-fifth of the RA in the population. Although other genes may account for the remaining familial RA, a large portion of RA cases may occur sporadically. 79 refs., 9 tabs.

  20. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  1. HLA-linked rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hasstedt, S. J.; Clegg, D. O.; Ingles, L.; Ward, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-eight pedigrees were ascertained through pairs of first-degree relatives diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA was confirmed in 77 pedigree members including probands; the absence of disease was verified in an additional 261 pedigree members. Pedigree members were serologically typed for HLA. We used likelihood analysis to statistically characterize the HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus. The genetic model assumed tight linkage to HLA. The analysis supported the existence of an HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus, estimated the susceptibility allele frequency as 2.16%, and estimated the lifetime penetrance as 41% in male homozygotes and as 48% in female homozygotes. Inheritance was recessive in males and was nearly recessive in females. In addition, the analysis attributed 78% of the variance within genotypes to genetic or environmental effects shared by siblings. The genetic model inferred in this analysis is consistent with previous association, linkage, and familial aggregation studies of RA. The inferred HLA-linked RA susceptibility locus accounts for approximately one-half of familial RA, although it accounts for only approximately one-fifth of the RA in the population. Although other genes may account for the remaining familial RA, a large portion of RA cases may occur sporadically. PMID:7942852

  2. The association between rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Leech, Michelle T; Bartold, P M

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and poor oral health has been recognised for many decades. The association between periodontal infection and the risk of developing RA has been the subject of epidemiological, clinical and basic science research in recent times. Converging and reproducible evidence now makes a clear case for the role of specific periodontal infective pathogens in initiating, amplifying and perpetuating rheumatoid arthritis. The unique enzymatic properties of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and its contribution to the burden of citrullinated peptides is now well established. The impact of localized infection such as periodontitis in shaping specific anti-citrullinated peptide immune responses highlights a key area for treatment, prevention and risk assessment in rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Identifying early stage precipitation in large-scale atomistic simulations of superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Eric; Bristowe, Paul D.

    2017-04-01

    A method for identifying and classifying ordered phases in large chemically and thermally disordered atomistic models is presented. The method uses Steinhardt parameters to represent local atomic configurations and develops probability density functions to classify individual atoms using naïve Bayes. The method is applied to large molecular dynamics simulations of supersaturated Ni-20 at% Al solid solutions in order to identify the formation of embryonic γ‧-Ni3Al. The composition and temperatures are chosen to promote precipitation, which is observed in the form of ordering and is found to occur more likely in regions with above average Al concentration producing ‘clusters’ of increasing size. The results are interpreted in terms of a precipitation mechanism in which the solid solution is unstable with respect to ordering and potentially followed by either spinodal decomposition or nucleation and growth.

  4. Simulation of Prebiotic Processing by Comet and Meteoroid Impact: Implications for Life on Early Earth and Other Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dateo, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    We develop a reacting flow model to simulate the shock induced chemistry of comets and meteoroids entering planetary atmospheres. Various atmospheric compositions comprising of simpler molecules (i.e., CH4, CO2, H2O, etc.) are investigated to determine the production efficiency of more complex prebiotic molecules as a function of composition, pressure, and entry velocity. The possible role of comets and meteoroids in creating the inventory of prebiotic material necessary for life on Early Earth is considered. Comets and meteoroids can also introduce new materials from the Interstellar Medium (ISM) to planetary atmospheres. The ablation of water from comets, introducing the element oxygen into Titan's atmosphere will also be considered and its implications for the formation of organic and prebiotic material.

  5. Simulating Evoked Gamma Oscillations of Human EEG in a Network of Spiking Neurons Reveals an Early Mechanism of Memory Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fründ, Ingo; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2007-05-01

    Stimulus-locked gamma oscillations in early visual cortex have experimentally been linked to fast matching with perceptual memory. It has been argued that these oscillations could be explained by recurrent feedback between different levels of visual processing. We simulated two layers of simple spiking neurons in a minimal network. Synaptic strengths of feedforward as well as feedback connections were systematically varied. The network was stimulated with patterns that were either completely or partially represented by convergent connections between the layers, or that were not represented in the connectivity pattern of the network. Transient, stimulus-locked spike trains with a frequency of ≈40 Hz were observed for stimuli that were represented in the connectivity pattern of the network, but not for stimuli that were not represented in the connectivity pattern.

  6. Thermodynamic equilibrium solubility measurements in simulated fluids by 96-well plate method in early drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Sonali S; Vishwakarma, Ram A

    2015-04-01

    An early prediction of solubility in physiological media (PBS, SGF and SIF) is useful to predict qualitatively bioavailability and absorption of lead candidates. Despite of the availability of multiple solubility estimation methods, none of the reported method involves simplified fixed protocol for diverse set of compounds. Therefore, a simple and medium-throughput solubility estimation protocol is highly desirable during lead optimization stage. The present work introduces a rapid method for assessment of thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of compounds in aqueous media using 96-well microplate. The developed protocol is straightforward to set up and takes advantage of the sensitivity of UV spectroscopy. The compound, in stock solution in methanol, is introduced in microgram quantities into microplate wells followed by drying at an ambient temperature. Microplates were shaken upon addition of test media and the supernatant was analyzed by UV method. A plot of absorbance versus concentration of a sample provides saturation point, which is thermodynamic equilibrium solubility of a sample. The established protocol was validated using a large panel of commercially available drugs and with conventional miniaturized shake flask method (r(2)>0.84). Additionally, the statistically significant QSPR models were established using experimental solubility values of 52 compounds.

  7. Psychological effects of living with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sarah

    2014-12-02

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a long-term inflammatory condition that can affect physical, psychological and social function. The condition is not curable - although drug therapy can be used to reduce inflammation - and patients often experience daily symptoms of joint pain and stiffness, fatigue and functional limitations. Patients may also experience psychological challenges. This article focuses on the psychological implications of living with rheumatoid arthritis, including reaction to diagnosis, anxiety and depression, body image, sexuality, self-esteem and social role. It aims to explore the role of the nurse in addressing these psychological challenges to optimise the physical and psychological status of each patient.

  8. Rheumatoid Vasculitis: Vanishing Menace or Target for New Treatments?

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, C. M.; Bridges, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid vasculitis is a rare but serious complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Herein we examine the pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical diagnosis, and treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis. Seropositivity, specific HLA variations, and tobacco use are among the genetic and environmental predictors of rheumatoid vasculitis. Fortunately, recent reports have noted declines in the prevalence of rheumatoid vasculitis. Nevertheless, proper recognition of systemic manifestations may assist in pathologically confirming the diagnosis, determining the extent of disease, and guiding treatment. Contemporary treatment reports are discussed in the context of the ongoing debate regarding whether new agents may trigger, treat, or even prevent rheumatoid vasculitis. Evolving genetic, histopathologic, and immunologic studies partnered with ongoing clinical experience with biologics offer promise to inform future prevention and treatment of rheumatoid vasculitis. PMID:20842467

  9. The early stage of formation of self-organized nanocolumns in thin films: Monte Carlo simulations versus atomic-scale observations in Ge-Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Mouton, I.; Talbot, E. Pareige, C.; Lardé, R.; Blavette, D.

    2014-02-07

    Formation kinetics of self-organized nanocolumns during epitaxial growth of a thin film composed of immiscible elements (A,B) has been investigated using Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Simulated nanostructures show a good agreement with those observed in Ge-Mn using Atom Probe Tomography and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Self organisation is observed although the rigid lattice simulations used do not account for misfit elastic strain. Simulations reveal that the final nanostructure, in term of number density and diameter of nanocolumns, is controlled by the early stages of growth of the film. The influence of both growth temperature and solute concentration on the nanostructure features is discussed in details.

  10. Monsters in the dark: predictions for luminous galaxies in the early Universe from the BLUETIDES simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Dacen; Wilkins, Stephen M.; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Feng, Yu; Croft, Rupert; Nagai, Daisuke

    2016-09-01

    Using deep Hubble and Spitzer observations Oesch et al. have identified a bright (MUV ≈ -22) star-forming galaxy candidate at z ≈ 11. The presence of GN-z11 implies a number density ˜10-6 Mpc-3, roughly an order of magnitude higher than the expected value based on extrapolations from lower redshift. Using the unprecedented volume and high resolution of the BLUETIDES cosmological hydrodynamical simulation, we study the population of luminous rare objects at z > 10. The luminosity function in BLUETIDES implies an enhanced number of massive galaxies, consistent with the observation of GN-z11. We find about 30 galaxies at MUV ≈ -22 at z = 11 in the BLUETIDES volume, including a few objects about 1.5 mag brighter. The probability of observing GN-z11 in the volume probed by Oesch et al. is ˜13 per cent. The predicted properties of the rare bright galaxies at z = 11 in BLUETIDES closely match those inferred from the observations of GN-z11. BLUETIDES predicts a negligible contribution from faint AGN in the observed SED. The enormous increase in volume surveyed by WFIRST will provide observations of ˜1000 galaxies with MUV < -22 beyond z = 11 out to z = 13.5.

  11. Marine methane cycle simulations for the period of early global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.; Cameron-Smith, P.J.

    2011-01-02

    Geochemical environments, fates, and effects are modeled for methane released into seawater by the decomposition of climate-sensitive clathrates. A contemporary global background cycle is first constructed, within the framework of the Parallel Ocean Program. Input from organics in the upper thermocline is related to oxygen levels, and microbial consumption is parameterized from available rate measurements. Seepage into bottom layers is then superimposed, representing typical seabed fluid flow. The resulting CH{sub 4} distribution is validated against surface saturation ratios, vertical sections, and slope plume studies. Injections of clathrate-derived methane are explored by distributing a small number of point sources around the Arctic continental shelf, where stocks are extensive and susceptible to instability during the first few decades of global warming. Isolated bottom cells are assigned dissolved gas fluxes from porous-media simulation. Given the present bulk removal pattern, methane does not penetrate far from emission sites. Accumulated effects, however, spread to the regional scale following the modeled current system. Both hypoxification and acidification are documented. Sensitivity studies illustrate a potential for material restrictions to broaden the perturbations, since methanotrophic consumers require nutrients and trace metals. When such factors are considered, methane buildup within the Arctic basin is enhanced. However, freshened polar surface waters act as a barrier to atmospheric transfer, diverting products into the deep return flow. Uncertainties in the logic and calculations are enumerated including those inherent in high-latitude clathrate abundance, buoyant effluent rise through the column, representation of the general circulation, and bacterial growth kinetics.

  12. Color matrix display simulation based upon luminance and chromatic contrast sensitivity of early vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Russel A.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Larimer, James O.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a new simulation model for color matrix display development. It models the physical structure, the signal processing, and the visual perception of static displays, to allow optimization of display design parameters through image quality measures. The model is simple, implemented in the Mathematica computer language, and highly modular. Signal processing modules operate on the original image. The hardware modules describe backlights and filters, the pixel shape, and the tiling of the pixels over the display. Small regions of the displayed image can be visualized on a CRT. Visual perception modules assume static foveal images. The image is converted into cone catches and then into luminance, red-green, and blue-yellow images. A Haar transform pyramid separates the three images into spatial frequency and direction-specific channels. The channels are scaled by weights taken from human contrast sensitivity measurements of chromatic and luminance mechanisms at similar frequencies and orientations. Each channel provides a detectability measure. These measures allow the comparison of images displayed on prospective devices and, by that, the optimization of display designs.

  13. 21 CFR 866.5775 - Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Measurement of rheumatoid factor may aid in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. (b) Classification. Class... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. 866....5775 Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A rheumatoid...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5775 - Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Measurement of rheumatoid factor may aid in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. (b) Classification. Class... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. 866....5775 Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A rheumatoid...

  15. 21 CFR 866.5775 - Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Measurement of rheumatoid factor may aid in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. (b) Classification. Class... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. 866....5775 Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A rheumatoid...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5775 - Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Measurement of rheumatoid factor may aid in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. (b) Classification. Class... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. 866....5775 Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A rheumatoid...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5775 - Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... Measurement of rheumatoid factor may aid in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. (b) Classification. Class... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. 866....5775 Rheumatoid factor immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. A rheumatoid...

  18. Endothelial Dysfunction and Inflammation: Immunity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, XueZhi; Chang, Yan; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, as a feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), leads to the activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Activated ECs induce atherosclerosis through an increased expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is recognized as a failure of endothelial repair mechanisms. It is also an early preclinical marker of atherosclerosis and is commonly found in RA patients. RA is now established as an independent cardiovascular risk factor, while mechanistic determinants of ED in RA are still poorly understood. An expanding body of study has shown that EC at a site of RA is both active participant and regulator of inflammatory process. Over the last decade, a role for endothelial dysfunction in RA associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been hypothesized. At the same time, several maintenance drugs targeting this phenomenon have been tested, which has promising results. Assessment of endothelial function may be a useful tool to identify and monitor RA patients. PMID:27122657

  19. A rheumatoid arthritis study by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Carolina S.; Silva, Ana Carla A.; Santos, Tatiano J. P. S.; Martin, Airton A.; dos Santos Fernandes, Ana Célia; Andrade, Luís E.; Raniero, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory disease of unknown causes and a new methods to identify it in early stages are needed. The main purpose of this work is the biochemical differentiation of sera between normal and RA patients, through the establishment of a statistical method that can be appropriately used for serological analysis. The human sera from 39 healthy donors and 39 rheumatics donors were collected and analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The results show significant spectral variations with p<0.05 in regions corresponding to protein, lipids and immunoglobulins. The technique of latex particles, coated with human IgG and monoclonal anti-CRP by indirect agglutination known as FR and CRP, was performed to confirm possible false-negative results within the groups, facilitating the statistical interpretation and validation of the technique.

  20. Combination therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, A C; Boers, M; Tugwell, P

    1998-06-01

    In a second update of a systematic review, many new developments in the combined drug treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are highlighted. In early RA patients, step-down bridge therapy that includes corticosteroids leads to much enhanced efficacy at acceptable or low toxicity. The effects on joint damage may be persistent, but the symptomatic effects are probably dependent on continued corticosteroid dosing. In late patients, cyclosporin improves a suboptimal clinical response to methotrexate, and the triple combination of methotrexate, sulphasalazine and hydroxychloroquine appears to be clinically better than the components. Other combinations are either untested, tested at low sample size, or show negative interaction. In view of the low volume of evidence, most studies need confirmation by replication.

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis - an update for general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    de Souza, S; Bansal, R K; Galloway, J

    2016-11-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder which significantly impacts patients' lives and can lead to permanent disability. Inflammation in RA not only affects joints; but can affect organs including the heart and lungs. Early diagnosis, initiation of intensive drug therapy, and a multidisciplinary care approach have vastly improved the long-term prognosis for those living with the condition. However, RA patients often present with co-morbidities which add to the complexity of clinical management. Orofacial conditions associated with RA which dental professionals need to be aware of include periodontal disease, temporomandibular dysfunction and salivary gland dysfunction. In this article, we provide information on RA, oral health in RA and guidance on how best to manage patients with RA in general dental practice.

  2. Rheumatoid cachexia and other nutritional alterations in rheumatologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Torres, Gilberto Fabián; González-Baranda, Lourdes Larisa; Abud-Mendoza, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of nutritional alterations in rheumatologic diseases ranges from 4 to 95%, depending on the detection method used. Formerly described as the single term rheumatoid cachexia, nutritional alterations can currently be grouped and subdivided based on the physiopathological mechanisms involved: chronic disease-related inflammatory conditions (cachexia), malnutrition associated to acute malnutrition inflammatory conditions (protein-caloric malnutrition) and starvation-related malnutrition. Clinical manifestations of malnutrition associated to rheumatic diseases vary from the patient with low weight or overweight and obesity; with lean body mass depletion as well as functional repercussions, and impact of quality of life as a common denominator. Additionally, the associated increase in body fat mass increases the risk for cardiovascular morbidity. A multidisciplinary approach towards rheumatic diseases should include aspects oriented towards prevention, early identification, diagnosis and correction of nutritional alterations.

  3. Epidemiology, pathophysiology, and diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis: A Synopsis.

    PubMed

    Gibofsky, Allan

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the more common autoimmune disorders, affecting approximately 1% of the population worldwide. The exact cause of RA is not known; however, initiation of disease seems to result from an interaction among genetic susceptibility, environmental triggers, and chance. RA is characterized by dysregulated inflammatory processes in the synovium of the joint that eventually leads to the destruction of both cartilaginous and bony elements of the joint, with resulting pain and disability. Systemic inflammation associated with RA is associated with a variety of extra-articular comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease, resulting in increased mortality in patients with RA. RA is also associated with several psychosocial disorders. Classification criteria for RA that were promulgated jointly by the American College of Rheumatology and the European League Against Rheumatism in 2010 emphasize early detection of RA so that effective management can be initiated before pathological changes become irreversible.

  4. A 3D simulation of the early winter distribution of reactive chlorine in the north polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, A.; Rood, R.; Waters, J.; Froidevaux, L.; Read, W.; Elson, L.; Geller, M.; Chi, Y.; Cerniglia, M.; Steenrod, S.

    1993-01-01

    Early in December 1991, high values of ClO are seen by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite at latitudes south of areas of temperatures cold enough to form polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). A 3D simulation shows that the heterogeneous conversion of chlorine reservoirs to reactive chlorine on the surfaces of PSCs (processing) takes place at high latitudes. Often the processed air must be transported to lower latitudes, where the reactive chlorine is photochemically converted to ClO, to be observed by MLS. In this simulation, one incidence of cold temperatures is associated with an anticyclone, and a second with a cyclone. The transport of processed air associated with the anticyclone is marked by shearing; a decrease in the maximum of the processed air is accompanied by growth of the area influenced by the processing. In contrast, the air processed in the cyclonic event spreads more slowly. This shows that transport and shearing is a crucial element to the evolution of reactive chlorine associated with a processing event. In particular, transport and shearing, as well as photochemical processes, can cause variations in observed ClO.

  5. Real & Simulated IFU Observations of Low-Mass Early-Type Galaxies: Environmental Influence Probed for Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybilska, Agnieszka; Łokas, Ewa Luiza; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2017-03-01

    We combine high-quality IFU data with a new set of numerical simulations to study low-mass early type galaxies (dEs) in dense environments. Our earlier study of dEs in the Virgo cluster has produced the first large-scale maps of kinematic and stellar population properties of dEs in those environments (Ryś et al. 2013, 2014, 2015). A quantitative discrimination between various (trans)formation processes proposed for these objects is, however, a complex issue, requiring a priori assumptions about the progenitors of galaxies we observe and study today. To bridge this gap between observations and theoretical predictions, we use the expertise gained in the IFU data analysis to look ``through the eye of SAURON'' at our new suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of dEs in the Virgo cluster. Mimicking the observers perspective as closely as possible, we can also indicate the existing instrumental and viewer limitations regarding what we are/are not able to detect as observers.

  6. [Therapeutic update in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lequerré, T; Avenel, G; Vittecoq, O

    2013-12-01

    The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was revolutionized by the introduction of the biologics. Their power and their good safety profile have allowed to define new objectives and procedures to reach them; it is the "treat to target" concept. New recommendations were published by EULAR or ACR to obtain the remission as soon as possible. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, in particular the methotrexate (MTX), remain the cornerstone of RA treatment in association with symptomatic treatments. The use of corticosteroids can be necessary to control the disease activity in the waiting time of the DMARDs efficiency or to control a flare. The absence of remission after 3months after initiation of MTX should prompt the rheumatologist to intensify the treatment with biologics. The increasing number of biologics targeting different mechanisms (5 anti-tumor necrosis factor-α, antagonist of interleukine-1 [IL-1] receptor, antagonist of IL-6 receptor, anti-CD20, anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4) asks the question of the strategy in their prescription. Besides, all the registers or meta-analysis plead in favor of a good safety subject to a moderate prescription and to a greater vigilance. Except the opportunist infections, it is more the comorbidities or the associated treatments such as corticoids or MTX, which would favor the infections than anti-TNFα. There is no indication that biologics may increase the risk of solid cancer compared with a population of RA patients not exposed to anti-TNFα. However, biologics could increase the risk of cutaneous cancers, including melanoma.

  7. Early black holes in cosmological simulations: luminosity functions and clustering behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Khandai, Nishikanta; Croft, Rupert; Lopez, Julio; Springel, Volker

    2012-08-01

    We examine predictions for the quasar luminosity functions (QLFs) and quasar clustering at high redshift (z ≥ 4.75) using MassiveBlack, our new hydrodynamic cosmological simulation which includes a self-consistent model for black hole (BH) growth and feedback. We show that the model reproduces the Sloan QLF within observational constraints at z ≥ 5. We find that the high-z QLF is consistent with a redshift-independent occupation distribution of BHs among dark matter haloes (which we provide) such that the evolution of the QLF follows that of the halo mass function. The sole exception is the bright end at z = 6 and 7, where BHs in high-mass haloes tend to be unusually bright due to extended periods of Eddington growth caused by high-density cold flows into the halo centre. We further use these luminosity functions to make predictions for the number density of quasars in upcoming surveys, predicting that there should be ˜119 ± 28 (˜87 ± 28) quasars detectable in the F125W band of the WIDE (DEEP) fields of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) from z = 5 to 6, ˜19 ± 7 (˜18 ± 9) from z = 6 to 7 and ˜1.7 ± 1.5 (˜1.5 ± 1.5) from z = 7 to 8. We also investigate quasar clustering, finding that the correlation length is fully consistent with current constraints for Sloan quasars (r0 ˜ 17 h-1 Mpc at z = 4 for quasars above mi = 20.2) and grows slowly with redshift up to z = 6 (r0 ˜ 22 h-1 Mpc). Finally, we note that the quasar clustering strength depends weakly on luminosity for low LBH, but gets stronger at higher LBH as the BHs are found in higher mass haloes.

  8. Denatured proteins and early folding intermediates simulated in a reduced conformational space.

    PubMed

    Kmiecik, Sebastian; Kurcinski, Mateusz; Rutkowska, Aleksandra; Gront, Dominik; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Conformations of globular proteins in the denatured state were studied using a high-resolution lattice model of proteins and Monte Carlo dynamics. The model assumes a united-atom and high-coordination lattice representation of the polypeptide conformational space. The force field of the model mimics the short-range protein-like conformational stiffness, hydrophobic interactions of the side chains and the main-chain hydrogen bonds. Two types of approximations for the short-range interactions were compared: simple statistical potentials and knowledge-based protein-specific potentials derived from the sequence-structure compatibility of short fragments of protein chains. Model proteins in the denatured state are relatively compact, although the majority of the sampled conformations are globally different from the native fold. At the same time short protein fragments are mostly native-like. Thus, the denatured state of the model proteins has several features of the molten globule state observed experimentally. Statistical potentials induce native-like conformational propensities in the denatured state, especially for the fragments located in the core of folded proteins. Knowledge-based protein-specific potentials increase only slightly the level of similarity to the native conformations, in spite of their qualitatively higher specificity in the native structures. For a few cases, where fairly accurate experimental data exist, the simulation results are in semiquantitative agreement with the physical picture revealed by the experiments. This shows that the model studied in this work could be used efficiently in computational studies of protein dynamics in the denatured state, and consequently for studies of protein folding pathways, i.e. not only for the modeling of folded structures, as it was shown in previous studies. The results of the present studies also provide a new insight into the explanation of the Levinthal's paradox.

  9. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    A, Madame

    2016-01-01

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established.

  10. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    A, Madame

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established.

  11. Rheumatoid factor on a daily basis.

    PubMed

    Renaudineau, Yves; Jamin, Christophe; Saraux, Alain; Youinou, Pierre

    2005-02-01

    Rheumatoid factors (RF), which are antibodies (Ab) with specificity directed against gamma (?) globulins, are the commonest auto-Ab ever described in man. Some of them are referred to as agglutinating RF, others designated non-agglutinating RF. Not only do these characterize rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but they are also encountered in a variety of disease conditions, as well as a proportion of healthy controls. Although non-specific for RA, the measurement of agglutinating IgM-RF remains the most useful serological test for the diagnosis of this disease. Demonstration of abnormal amount of serum RF by any method for which the result has been positive in less than 5% of normal subjects has indeed become one of the seven revised criteria, listed by the American College of Rheumatology (Arnett, FC, Edworthy, SM, Bloch, DA, McShane, DJ, Fries, JF, Cooper, NS, et al. The American Rheumatism Association 1987 revised criteria for the classification of rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Rheum, 1988: 31: 315-24), for the classification of RA. Over the course of years, the relative importance of genetic (Carson, DA, Chen, PP, Kipps, TJ, Radoux, V, Jirik, FR, Goldfien, RD, et al. Idiotypic and genetic studies of human rheumatoid factors. Arthritis Rheum, 1987: 30: 1321-1325) and environmental (Nemazee, DA, Sato, VL. Enhancing antibody, a novel component of the immune response. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 1982: 79: 3828-3832) factors in the production of such intriguing auto-Ab has been delineated.

  12. Rheumatoid Meningitis: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Observations.

    PubMed

    Stretz, Christoph; Song, Xianyuan; Killory, Brendan D; Ollenschleger, Martin D; Nouh, Amre M

    2016-03-01

    A 75-year-old female with untreated rheumatoid arthritis presented with two weeks of behavioral changes and cognitive decline. A neurologic examination showed severe encephalopathy, brisk reflexes, and bilateral Babinski sign. A contrast-enhanced brain MRI demonstrated right meningeal enhancement and periventricular white matter disease. A computed tomographic angiogram (CTA) of the head and neck was negative for vasculitis. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) demonstrated lymphocytic pleocytosis. The patient's serum rheumatoid factor levels were elevated. A biopsy of the leptomeninges and cortex showed lymphocytic vasculitis of the cortical tissue and patchy lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates of dural small vessels consistent with rheumatoid meningitis. The patient received pulse-dose steroids followed by cyclophosphamide infusions. At her three month follow-up appointment, the patient's mental status had improved mildly. A follow-up brain MRI showed resolution of enhancement, but progression of subcortical bihemispheric white matter disease. Subsequently, the patient developed a respiratory infection and passed away. In rheumatoid arthritis, symptoms of encephalopathy, headaches, seizures, or focal neurologic deficits should raise suspicion for CNS involvement. This potentially treatable disease warrants prompt diagnosis.

  13. [The golden age of rheumatoid arthritis treatment].

    PubMed

    Mercado, Ulises

    2014-01-01

    Today, we enjoy the golden age of rheumatology. In the 1970s, the paradigm for treating rheumatoid arthritis consisted in a pyramid. In the decade of the 1980s, and shortly after began a revolution in the understanding and treatment of rheumatic diseases. Methotrexate and tumor necrosis factor-blockers came on the scene.

  14. Pain management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Durham, Catherine O; Fowler, Terri; Donato, AnneMarie; Smith, Whitney; Jensen, Elizabeth

    2015-05-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the most common inflammatory conditions in the United States affecting approximately 1 million adults. This article briefly reviews the evidence-based diagnosis of RA, mainstays of treatment to prevent joint destruction, and pain management.

  15. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... List of All Topics All Rheumatoid Arthritis - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Korean (한국어) Spanish (español) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Chinese - Simplified ( ...

  17. Optical monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis: Monte Carlo generated reconstruction kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minet, O.; Beuthan, J.; Hielscher, A. H.; Zabarylo, U.

    2008-06-01

    Optical imaging in biomedicine is governed by the light absorption and scattering interaction on microscopic and macroscopic constituents in the medium. Therefore, light scattering characteristics of human tissue correlate with the stage of some diseases. In the near infrared range the scattering event with the coefficient approximately two orders of magnitude greater than absorption plays a dominant role. When measuring the optical parameters variations were discovered that correlate with the rheumatoid arthritis of a small joint. The potential of an experimental setup for transillumination the finger joint with a laser diode and the pattern of the stray light detection are demonstrated. The scattering caused by skin contains no useful information and it can be removed by a deconvolution technique to enhance the diagnostic value of this non-invasive optical method. Monte Carlo simulations ensure both the construction of the corresponding point spread function and both the theoretical verification of the stray light picture in rather complex geometry.

  18. 78 FR 32667 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Rheumatoid Arthritis: Developing Drug Products for Treatment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Rheumatoid Arthritis... guidance for industry entitled ``Rheumatoid Arthritis: Developing Drug Products for Treatment.'' This... of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It also addresses additional considerations for...

  19. Early warning of freshwater salinization due to upward brine displacement by species transport simulations combined with a hydrochemical genesis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Maria; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Shallow groundwater resources could be possibly affected by intruding brines, which are displaced along hydraulically conductive faults as result of subsurface activities like CO2 injection. To avoid salinization of potable freshwater aquifers an early detection of intruding saline water is necessary, especially in regions where an initial geogenic salinization already exists. Our study is based on work of Tillner et al. [1] and Langer et al. [2] who investigated the influence of permeable fault systems on brine displacement for the prospective storage site Beeskow-Birkholz in the Northeast German Basin. With a 3D regional scale model considering the deep groundwater system, they demonstrated that the existence of hydraulically conductive faults is not necessarily an exclusion criterion for potential injection sites, because salinization of shallower aquifers strongly depends on the effective damage zone volume, the initial salinity distribution and overlying reservoirs [2], while permeability of fault zones does not influence salinization of shallower aquifers significantly [1]. Here we extracted a 2D cross section regarding the upper 220 m of the study area mainly represented by shallow freshwater aquifers, but also considering an initial geogenic salinization [3]. We took flow rates of the intruding brines from the previous studies [2] and implemented species transport simulations with the program code SHEMAT [4]. Results are investigated and interpreted with the hydrochemical genesis model GEBAH [5] which has been already applied as early warning of saltwater intrusions into freshwater aquifers and surface water [6]. GEBAH allows a categorization of groundwater by the ion ratios of the dissolved components and offers a first indicative determination for an existence and the intensity of saline water intrusion in shallow groundwater aquifer, independent of the concentration of the solution. With our model we investigated the migration of saline water through a

  20. Quality in rheumatoid arthritis care.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Sehrash; Lesuis, Nienke; van Tuyl, Lilian H D; van Riel, Piet; Landewé, Robert

    2015-01-01

    While most rheumatology practices are characterized by strong commitment to quality of care and continuous improvement to limit disability and optimize quality of life for patients and their families, the actual step toward improvement is often difficult. This is because there are still barriers to be addressed and facilitators to be captured before a satisfying and cost-effective practice management is installed. Therefore, this review aims to assist practicing rheumatologists with quality improvement of their daily practice, focusing on care for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. First we define quality of care as "the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge". Often quality is determined by the interplay between structure, processes, and outcomes of care, which is also reflected in the corresponding indicators to measure quality of care. Next, a brief overview is given of the current treatment strategies used in RA, focusing on the tight control strategy, since this strategy forms the basis of international treatment guidelines. Adherence to tight control strategies leads, also in daily practice, to better outcomes in patients with regard to disease control, functional status, and work productivity. Despite evidence in favor of tight control strategies, adherence in daily practice is often challenging. Therefore, the next part of the review focuses on possible barriers and facilitators of adherence, and potential interventions to improve quality of care. Many different barriers and facilitators are known and targeting these can be effective in changing care, but these effects are rather small to moderate. With regard to RA, few studies have tried to improve care, such as a study aiming to increase the number of disease activity measures done by a combination of education and feedback. Two out of the three studies showed markedly

  1. Vitamin D and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Athanassiou, Panagiotis; Lyraki, Aikaterini; Raftakis, Ioannis; Antoniadis, Christodoulos

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as diabetes mellitus type 1 and multiple sclerosis. Reduced vitamin D intake has been linked to increased susceptibility to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and vitamin D deficiency has been found to be associated with disease activity in patients with RA. The objective was to evaluate vitamin D status in patients with RA and to assess the relationship between vitamin D levels and disease activity. Methods: In a cohort of 44 patients with RA, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] levels, parathyroid hormone levels, C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were measured. Disease activity was evaluated by calculating the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28). A control group (n = 44), matched for age and sex, was evaluated as well. Results: In the cohort of 44 patients with RA 25(OH)D3 levels were found to be low compared with the control group, 25(OH)D3 being 15.26 ± 1.07 ng/ml [mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM)] and 25.8 ± 1.6 ng/ml in the patient and control group respectively (Student’s t test, p < 0.001). Parathyroid hormone levels were 71.08 ± 7.02 pg/ml (mean ± SEM) (normal values 10.0–65.0 pg/ml), CRP 7.6 ± 1.57 mg/litre (mean ± SEM) (normal values < 3 mg/litre) and ESR was 38.0 ± 4.6 mm/h (mean ± SEM) in the group of patients with RA. Levels of 25(OH)D3 were found to be negatively correlated to the DAS28, the correlation coefficient being −0.084. Levels of 25(OH)D3 were also found to be negatively correlated to CRP and ESR, the correlation coefficient being –0.115 and −0.18, respectively. Conclusion: It appears that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with RA, and that vitamin D deficiency may be linked to disease severity in RA. As vitamin D deficiency has been linked to diffuse musculoskeletal pain, these results have therapeutic implications. Vitamin D supplementation may be needed

  2. Spaceflight and simulated microgravity cause a significant reduction of key gene expression in early T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Emily M; Yoshida, Miya C; Candelario, Tara Lynne T; Hughes-Fulford, Millie

    2015-03-15

    Healthy immune function depends on precise regulation of lymphocyte activation. During the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Apollo and Shuttle eras, multiple spaceflight studies showed depressed lymphocyte activity under microgravity (μg) conditions. Scientists on the ground use two models of simulated μg (sμg): 1) the rotating wall vessel (RWV) and 2) the random positioning machine (RPM), to study the effects of altered gravity on cell function before advancing research to the true μg when spaceflight opportunities become available on the International Space Station (ISS). The objective of this study is to compare the effects of true μg and sμg on the expression of key early T-cell activation genes in mouse splenocytes from spaceflight and ground animals. For the first time, we compared all three conditions of microgravity spaceflight, RPM, and RWV during immune gene activation of Il2, Il2rα, Ifnγ, and Tagap; moreover, we confirm two new early T-cell activation genes, Iigp1 and Slamf1. Gene expression for all samples was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results demonstrate significantly increased gene expression in activated ground samples with suppression of mouse immune function in spaceflight, RPM, and RWV samples. These findings indicate that sμg models provide an excellent test bed for scientists to develop baseline studies and augment true μg in spaceflight experiments. Ultimately, sμg and spaceflight studies in lymphocytes may provide insight into novel regulatory pathways, benefiting both future astronauts and those here on earth suffering from immune disorders.

  3. Spaceflight and simulated microgravity cause a significant reduction of key gene expression in early T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Emily M.; Yoshida, Miya C.; Candelario, Tara Lynne T.

    2015-01-01

    Healthy immune function depends on precise regulation of lymphocyte activation. During the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Apollo and Shuttle eras, multiple spaceflight studies showed depressed lymphocyte activity under microgravity (μg) conditions. Scientists on the ground use two models of simulated μg (sμg): 1) the rotating wall vessel (RWV) and 2) the random positioning machine (RPM), to study the effects of altered gravity on cell function before advancing research to the true μg when spaceflight opportunities become available on the International Space Station (ISS). The objective of this study is to compare the effects of true μg and sμg on the expression of key early T-cell activation genes in mouse splenocytes from spaceflight and ground animals. For the first time, we compared all three conditions of microgravity spaceflight, RPM, and RWV during immune gene activation of Il2, Il2rα, Ifnγ, and Tagap; moreover, we confirm two new early T-cell activation genes, Iigp1 and Slamf1. Gene expression for all samples was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results demonstrate significantly increased gene expression in activated ground samples with suppression of mouse immune function in spaceflight, RPM, and RWV samples. These findings indicate that sμg models provide an excellent test bed for scientists to develop baseline studies and augment true μg in spaceflight experiments. Ultimately, sμg and spaceflight studies in lymphocytes may provide insight into novel regulatory pathways, benefiting both future astronauts and those here on earth suffering from immune disorders. PMID:25568077

  4. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS—An Evaluation of Long-Term Treatment with Cortisone

    PubMed Central

    Engleman, Ephraim P.; Krupp, Marcus A.; Saunders, William W.; Wilson, Lloyd E.; Fredell, Erling W.

    1954-01-01

    Fifty-six patients with rheumatoid arthritis were treated continuously with cortisone for periods ranging between 4 and 38 months, in daily doses of 15 to 100 mg. Concomitant therapy included periods of rest, physical therapy, and salicylates. The incidence of subjective improvement exceeded that of objective improvement. The incidence of objective improvement was higher in females; also, in those patients whose disease was in an early stage and of short duration at the time therapy was begun, and who required relatively smaller maintenance doses of cortisone. Therapeutic results were not affected by the age of the patient or by the presence of spondylitis. Despite precautions, the long-term administration of cortisone was, in some patients, productive of serious undesirable side-effects. Although cortisone usually suppressed the symptoms and signs of rheumatoid arthritis, progression of the disease was frequently noted during its long-term administration. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:13150213

  5. Modeling and simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Corey C.; Taylor, Paul Allen

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this modeling and simulation study was to establish the role of stress wave interactions in the genesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) from exposure to explosive blast. A high resolution (1 mm{sup 3} voxels), 5 material model of the human head was created by segmentation of color cryosections from the Visible Human Female dataset. Tissue material properties were assigned from literature values. The model was inserted into the shock physics wave code, CTH, and subjected to a simulated blast wave of 1.3 MPa (13 bars) peak pressure from anterior, posterior and lateral directions. Three dimensional plots of maximum pressure, volumetric tension, and deviatoric (shear) stress demonstrated significant differences related to the incident blast geometry. In particular, the calculations revealed focal brain regions of elevated pressure and deviatoric (shear) stress within the first 2 milliseconds of blast exposure. Calculated maximum levels of 15 KPa deviatoric, 3.3 MPa pressure, and 0.8 MPa volumetric tension were observed before the onset of significant head accelerations. Over a 2 msec time course, the head model moved only 1 mm in response to the blast loading. Doubling the blast strength changed the resulting intracranial stress magnitudes but not their distribution. We conclude that stress localization, due to early time wave interactions, may contribute to the development of multifocal axonal injury underlying TBI. We propose that a contribution to traumatic brain injury from blast exposure, and most likely blunt impact, can occur on a time scale shorter than previous model predictions and before the onset of linear or rotational accelerations traditionally associated with the development of TBI.

  6. [Reconstructing the pyramid as a therapeutic approach to rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Ferraccioli, G

    2004-01-01

    Several recent clinical studies have clearly established that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease identifiable since its early phases, a disease that can be adequately and efficaciously treated provided the therapeutic program can be started early on. To reach the aim of controlling effectively the disease and of leading the patients to live a normal life, several points must be fulfilled. The first is an early diagnosis obtained through a careful clinical examination along with an appropriate laboratory immunological work-up, followed by an adequate monotherapy within the first 4 months from symptoms onset. The second is the therapeutic re-assessment that needs to be done every three months, to start a possible combination therapy (COMBO), in order to rescue monotherapy failures. The third is the initiation of biological response modifiers (BRMs) within 6 months from monotherapy onset, within 3 months from COMBO in the most resistant cases. Having at hand several molecules with BRMs characteristics, we believe that the future appears much more favourable in most cases even in those with the severe disease.

  7. Current Concepts in the Management of the Rheumatoid Hand

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C; Pushman, Allison G

    2011-01-01

    Hand surgeons are an integral part of the management team for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. There is now a greater understanding of the national utilization of rheumatoid hand surgery, which highlights the differences between hand surgeons and rheumatologists regarding the treatment of the rheumatoid hand. Advances in medical treatments have also decreased the prevalence of hand deformities caused by this disease. Hand surgeons today have less exposure to treating rheumatoid hand, but despite more effective medical options, surgery may still offer patients hope for improvement of hand function and appearance. This article will summarize the current state of rheumatoid hand surgery and discuss the surgical treatment strategies for optimizing outcomes for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:21463736

  8. Leaders’ and followers’ individual experiences during the early phase of simulation-based team training: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Meurling, Lisbet; Hedman, Leif; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Wallin, Carl-Johan

    2013-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence shows that team training can develop essential team skills and contribute to better patient outcomes. Current simulation-based team training (SBTT) programmes most often include targets and feedback focused on the whole team and/or leader, ignoring the follower as a unique entity. By considering followers’ individual experiences, and tailoring behavioural targets for training and feedback, SBTT could be improved. Our aim was to explore the individual experiences and behaviours of leaders and followers during the early phase of SBTT, and we hypothesised that leaders and followers would show different responses. Methods Medical students (n=54) participated in half-day SBTT including three video-recorded scenarios. Self-efficacy was assessed pretraining and post-training. For each scenario (n=36), the individual teamwork behaviours, concentration, mental strain and the team's clinical performance were recorded. Data were analysed using a mixed model allowing for participants to be their own control in their roles as leader or follower. Results Self-efficacy improved. In the role of leader, participants communicated to a greater extent and experienced higher mental strain and concentration than they did in the role of follower. Discussion The increased self-efficacy enables a positive learning outcome after only three scenarios. Individual experiences and behaviours differed between the role of leader and that of follower. By shedding further light on leaders’ and followers’ individual experiences and behaviours, targets for training and feedback could be specified in order to improve SBTT. PMID:23293119

  9. [Early responses of soil fauna in three typical forests of south subtropical China to simulated N deposition addition].

    PubMed

    Xu, Guolian; Mo, Jiangming; Zhou, Guoyi

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, simulated N deposition addition (0, 50, 100 and 150 kg x hm(-2) x yr(-1)) by spreading water or NH4NO3 was conducted to study the early responses of soil fauna in three typical native forests (monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest, pine forest, and broadleaf-pine mixed forest) of subtropical China. The results showed that in monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest, N deposition addition had an obviously negative effect on the three indexes for soil fauna, but in pine forest, the positive effect was significant (P < 0. 05), and the soil fauna community could reach the level in mixed forest, even that in monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest at sometime. The responses in mixed forest were not obvious. In monsoon evergreen broadleaf forest, the negative effects were significant (P < 0.05) under medium N deposition, but not under low N deposition. In pine forest, the positive effect was significant (P < 0.05) under high N deposition, especially for the number of soil fauna groups. The results obtained might imply the N saturation-response mechanisms of forest ecosystems in subtropical China, and the conclusions from this study were also consisted with some related researches.

  10. Multidimensional Simulations for Early-Phase Spectra of Aspherical Hypernovae: SN 1998bw and Off-Axis Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaomi; Maeda, Keiichi; Mazzali, Paolo A.; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2007-10-01

    Early-phase optical spectra of aspherical jet-like supernovae (SNe) are presented. We focus on energetic core-collapse SNe, or hypernovae. Based on hydrodynamic and nucleosynthetic models, radiative transfer in the SN atmosphere is solved with a multidimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer code, SAMURAI. Since the luminosity is boosted in the jet direction, the temperature there is higher than in the equatorial plane by ~2000 K. This causes anisotropic ionization in the ejecta. Emergent spectra are different depending on viewing angle, reflecting both aspherical abundance distribution and anisotropic ionization. Spectra computed with an aspherical explosion model with kinetic energy 20×1051 ergs are compatible with those of the Type Ic SN 1998bw if ~10%-20% of the synthesized metals are mixed out to higher velocities. The simulations enable us to predict the properties of off-axis hypernovae. Even if an aspherical hypernova explosion is observed from the side, it should show hypernova-like spectra but with some differences in the line velocity, the width of the Fe absorptions, and the strength of the Na I line.

  11. The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis in radiological studies. Part I: Formation of inflammatory infiltrates within the synovial membrane.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Kontny, Ewa; Maśliński, Włodzimierz; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida; Zaniewicz-Kaniewska, Katarzyna; Warczyńska, Agnieszka

    2012-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a multifactorial etiology and varied course, which in the majority of patients leads to partial disability or to permanent handicap. Its characteristic trait is a persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane and the formation of an invasive synovial tissue, called the pannus, which in time leads to destruction of the cartilage, subchondral bone tissue, and the soft tissue of the affected joint(s). The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis is complex and involves cells of both innate and adaptive immunity, a network of various cytokines and an immunoregulatory dysfunction. An important role in the discovery of rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis was played by magnetic resonance imaging, which showed the disease process to extend beyond the synovium into the bone marrow. Many studies have shown a strict correlation between the vascularity of the synovium (assessed through the power Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations), bone marrow edema and the clinical, laboratory and histopathological parameters of rheumatoid arthritis. From the current understanding of rheumatoid arthritis, bone erosions could occur from two directions: from the joint cavity and from the bone marrow. With power Doppler ultrasound, as well as in magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to visualize the well-vascularized pannus and its destructive effects on joint structures and ligaments. In addition, the magnetic resonance study shows inflammatory and destructive changes within the bone marrow (bone marrow edema, inflammatory cysts, and erosions). Bone marrow edema occurs in 68-75% of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis and is considered to be a predictor of rapid disease progression.

  12. Respiratory failure due to a massive rheumatoid pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Pritikin, J D; Jensen, W A; Yenokida, G G; Kirsch, C M; Fainstat, M

    1990-05-01

    A patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chronic obstructive lung disease was admitted with respiratory failure due to a massive pleural effusion. An extensive evaluation proved the effusion to be of rheumatoid origin. The effusion resolved with prednisone and penicillamine therapy. Although pleural effusions associated with RA are common, massive effusions are rare and respiratory failure from a rheumatoid pleural effusion has not been reported.

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Assayag, Deborah; Lee, Joyce S; King, Talmadge E

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  14. Nanomedicine for Intra-Articular Drug Delivery in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    O'Mary, Hannah; Del Rincόn, Inmaculada; Cui, Zhengrong

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation within the joint. Recent developments in the understanding of inflammation have led to an increased interest in the use of nanomedicine in the treatment and diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The ability of nanomedicine, such as nanoparticles, to permeate into and/or retain within the inflamed joint after intravenous and/or intra-articular administration has proven to be beneficial in improving rheumatoid arthritis therapy while reducing systemic exposure of patients to potentially toxic anti-arthritic drugs. This review aims at explaining the major applications of nanomedicine in rheumatoid arthritis treatment and diagnosis.

  15. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Dura, Marta; Blumfield, Einat; Żuchowski, Paweł; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequently than in healthy persons of the same age, osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies occur, which hinder a correct assessment in the DXA test. Rheumatoid arthritis patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) examination of the abdominal cavity for other medical indications than suspected spinal injury. Then, CT examination may also serve for the assessment of bone density, especially in patients with osteoporotic fractures.

  16. Abatacept in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Maya H; Vital, Edward M; Emery, Paul

    2008-01-01

    T-cell biology has regained importance in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Despite the significant improvements associated with the introduction of tumor necrosis factor-α blockade, reasonable proportions of failures and suboptimal responses have been reported, necessitating a search for alternative targeted therapies. This has included drug therapy designed to interrupt T-cell activation via the co-stimulation pathway. Abatacept is a recombinant fusion protein that blocks the co-stimulatory signal mediated by the CD28-CD80/86 pathway, which is required for T-cell activation. Several clinical trials have confirmed the safety and efficacy of this drug in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This review summarizes the clinical data supporting this line of treatment and considers the safety and efficacy data from phase II and III trials. PMID:19007425

  17. Infectious arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo Soria, L; Miquel Nolla Solé, J; Rozadilla Sacanell, A; Valverde García, J; Roig Escofet, D

    1992-01-01

    Eleven cases of infectious arthritis occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in eight patients. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus agalactiae in one patient each, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 days in patients with pyogenic arthritis. The diagnosis of joint infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was especially delayed (57 days). Four patients died; they were found to have a longer time to diagnosis and two of them had multiple joint infection. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most often affecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis, infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis must also be considered in such patients. PMID:1575593

  18. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O’Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease. PMID:26084368

  19. [Basic research overview in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease with a prevalence of 0.5-1.0% worldwide. Although advances in understanding the pathogenesis of RA have led to new therapeutics with good outcomes, the real cause of the disease is still unknown. RA is characterized by synovial inflammation and hyperplasia, which erodes cartilage and bone, and autoantibody production (rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)). There are many critical questions on the mechanism of the disease onset and progression: How genetic and environmental factors interact with each other? Why does the inflammatory response localize in joints? What are the key players to perpetuate synovial inflammation? In this review, we summarize pathogenetic advances in these issues especially from the point of view of basic research.

  20. [Follicular bronchiolitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Morita, S; Sato, A; Hayakawa, H; Chida, K; Sato, J; Todate, A; Tsukamoto, K; Toyoshima, M; Imokawa, S; Iwata, M

    1996-08-01

    A 52-year-old man with an 8-year history of rheumatoid arthritis was admitted to the hospital because of coughing and purulent sputum. A chest X-ray film obtained on admission showed small nodular shadows without overinflation in both lower lung fields, and a high-resolution CT scan showed many micronodular shadows in the centrilobular regions. Follicular bronchiolitis was diagnosed from the results of an open-lung biopsy, and prednisolone therapy was started at a dosage of 40 mg/day. Sinusitis developed 4 years later. Five years after the start of steroid therapy, dilation of bronchi and thickening of bronchial walls appeared on a CT scan, which also showed areas of low attenuation that were presumed to be bronchiolitis obliterans. These findings suggest that the pattern of airway disease can vary during the course of rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  2. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease.

  3. Benefits of Exercise in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Jennifer K.; Law, Rebecca-Jane; Matschke, Verena; Lemmey, Andrew B.; Moore, Jonathan P.; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Jones, Jeremy G.; Maddison, Peter; Thom, Jeanette M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to highlight the importance of exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to demonstrate the multitude of beneficial effects that properly designed exercise training has in this population. RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease characterised by decrements to joint health including joint pain and inflammation, fatigue, increased incidence and progression of cardiovascular disease, and accelerated loss of muscle mass, that is, “rheumatoid cachexia”. These factors contribute to functional limitation, disability, comorbidities, and reduced quality of life. Exercise training for RA patients has been shown to be efficacious in reversing cachexia and substantially improving function without exacerbating disease activity and is likely to reduce cardiovascular risk. Thus, all RA patients should be encouraged to include aerobic and resistance exercise training as part of routine care. Understanding the perceptions of RA patients and health professionals to exercise is key to patients initiating and adhering to effective exercise training. PMID:21403833

  4. Rheumatoid factor measured by fluoroimmunoassay: a responsive measure of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity that is associated with joint damage

    PubMed Central

    Knijff-Dutmer, E; Drossaers-Bakker, W; Verhoeven, A; van der Sluijs, Ve... G; Boers, M; van der Linden, S; van de Laar, M

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether rheumatoid factors (RFs), measured as continuous variables by time resolved fluoroimmunoassay, reflect disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Further, to study the association of RFs and other disease activity parameters with radiological joint damage, especially in individual patients. Methods: In active, early RA, IgM and IgA RFs, as well as erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C reactive protein (CRP), tender joint score, and swollen joint score were assessed regularly. At the study start and at 56 and 80 weeks, radiographs of hands and feet were assessed by the Sharp score (van der Heijde modification). Associations between RFs and disease activity parameters were studied. In addition, associations between radiographic damage and disease activity parameters (baseline and time integrated) were analysed by non-parametric tests and multiple regression analysis. The relation between time integrated disease activity parameters and radiological damage in individual patients was analysed and visualised. Results: 155 patients were included. RF levels were strongly associated with the disease activity parameters (especially ESR and CRP) and with each other. All disease activity parameters, at baseline as well as time integrated parameters, were associated with (the progression of) radiographic damage. Moreover, in individual patients, a linear relationship between time integrated disease activity parameters and progression of radiological damage was seen. Conclusion: RFs, measured as continuous variables, can be considered as disease activity parameters in patients with RA. The level of RF at baseline and the exposure to RF over time is associated with radiological damage. In individual patients, there is a constant relation between disease activity and radiological damage. PMID:12079900

  5. [Genomic approach to pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ryo

    2012-11-01

    Genetic studies identified multiple genes and polymorphisms that increase risk to develop rheumatoid arthritis. Genomic approach is characterized with its integrative style using mathematical and statistical models. Its main targets include (1)combinatorial effect of multiple genetic and environmental factors, (2)heterogeneity of pathological states and its individuality, and (3)their chronological heterogeneity. Genomic approach will clarify pathophysiology of various diseases along with the progresses in molecular biology and other researches on individual molecules.

  6. Lipid abnormalities in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Erum, Uzma; Ahsan, Tasnim; Khowaja, Danish

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of dyslipidemia in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis. Methods: This is a prospective, cross-sectional, observational study, conducted at the ‘Rheumatology Clinic’ of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center (JPMC), Karachi, from November 2013 to May 2014. A total of 200 patients of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), diagnosed according to the ACR/EULAR criteria 2010, were included in the study. Laboratory investigations including creatinine, ALT, CBC, TSH and fasting lipid profile (LDL, HDL, and Total cholesterol) were done for all patients. Results: Out of 200 patients, 23 (11.5%) were male and 177 (88.5%) were female. The mean age was 36.31±10.46 years and the mean duration of disease was 3.82±3.03 years. A total of 107 (53.5%) patients had dyslipidemia, and the commonest abnormality was a low HDL, seen in 83 (41.5 %) patients. Conclusion: Dyslipidemia was frequently observed in Rheumatoid Arthritis. This may be considered as a secondary impact of chronic inflammatory state, seen in RA. Lipid abnormalities should be sought at regular intervals, and corrective actions taken to mitigate increased cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:28367205

  7. Rheumatoid Hand Deformities: Pathophysiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Apfelberg, David B.; Maser, Morton R.; Lash, Harvey; Kaye, Ronald L.; Britton, Melvin C.; Bobrove, Arthur

    1978-01-01

    Rheumatoid disease, as it affects the hand, is a disease of the synovium lining the joints and sheaths of the tendon. The proliferating synovium destroys the articular surfaces of the joint, interferes with the gliding mechanism of the tendons and weakens the supporting ligaments of the joints. The degree and variety of deformities is multifold. Treatment of the rheumatoid hand is aimed at conservation and restoration of hand function, as well as prevention of future deformities. Rheumatologists, physical therapists and hand surgeons carry out important functions in the well-planned, integrated regimen. Surgical treatment of the rheumatoid hand deformity may alleviate pain, lessen deformity and improve function in selected cases. It should be integrated in the general medical management of a patient. Treatment of tendon ruptures includes tenorrhaphy, tendon grafting and arthrodesis in the case of mallet finger deformity. The wrist joint is improved by synovectomy and carpal tunnel release is accomplished by median nerve decompression. Metacarpal phalangeal joint deformities may be treated by synovectomy or silastic joint replacement when there is destruction of the articular joint surface, severe subluxation, or persistent painful motion. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:716388

  8. Numerical shake prediction for Earthquake Early Warning: data assimilation, real-time shake-mapping, and simulation of wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshiba, M.; Aoki, S.

    2014-12-01

    In many methods of the present Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) systems, hypocenter and magnitude are determined quickly and then strengths of ground motions are predicted. The 2011 Tohoku Earthquake (MW9.0), however, revealed some technical issues with the conventional methods: under-prediction due to the large extent of the fault rupture, and over-prediction due to confusion of the system by multiple aftershocks occurred simultaneously. To address these issues, a new concept is proposed for EEW: applying data assimilation technique, present wavefield is estimated precisely in real time (real-time shake mapping) and then future wavefield is predicted time-evolutionally using physical process of seismic wave propagation. Information of hypocenter location and magnitude are not required, which is basically different from the conventional method. In the proposed method, data assimilation technique is applied to estimate the current spatial distribution of wavefield, in which not only actual observation but also anticipated wavefield predicted from one time-step before are used. Real-time application of the data assimilation technique enables us to estimate wavefield in real time, which corresponds to real-time shake mapping. Once present situation is estimated precisely, we go forward to the prediction of future situation using simulation of wave propagation. The proposed method is applied to the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake (MW9.0) and the 2004 Mid-Niigata earthquake (Mw6.7). Future wavefield is precisely predicted, and the prediction is improved with shortening the lead time: for example, the error of 10 s prediction is smaller than that of 20 s, and that of 5 s is much smaller. By introducing this method, it becomes possible to predict ground motion precisely even for cases of the large extent of fault rupture and the multiple simultaneous earthquakes. The proposed method is based on a simulation of physical process from the precisely estimated present condition. This

  9. Early identification of drug-induced impairment of gastric emptying through physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) simulation of plasma concentration-time profiles in rat.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sheila Annie; Hultin, Leif

    2008-02-01

    Inhibition of gastric emptying rate can have adverse effects on the absorption of food and nutrients. The absorption phase of the plasma concentration-time profile of a compound administered orally to pre-clinical species reflects among others, the gastric and intestinal transit kinetics, and can thus assist in the early identification of delayed gastric emptying. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the value of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modelling in the early identification of drug induced impairment of gastric emptying from pharmacokinetic profiles. To our knowledge, this is first time that the value of a generic PBPK model for hypothesis testing has been demonstrated with examples. A PBPK model built in-house using MATLAB package and incorporating absorption, metabolism, distribution, biliary and renal elimination models has been employed for the simulation of concentration-time profiles. PBPK simulations of a few compounds that are currently in drug discovery projects show that the observed initial absorption phase of their concentration-time profiles in rat were consistent with reduced gastric emptying rates. The slow uptake of these compounds into the systemic circulation is reflected in their pharmacokinetic profiles but it is not obvious until PBPK simulations are done. Delayed gastric emptying rates of these compounds in rats were also independently observed in x-ray imaging. PBPK simulations can provide early alerts to drug discovery projects, besides aiding the understanding of complex mechanisms that determine the lineshapes of pharmacokinetic profiles. The application of PBPK simulations in the early detection of gastric emptying problems with existing data and without the need to resort to additional animal studies, is appealing both from an economic and ethical standpoint.

  10. Current therapies in rheumatoid arthritis: a Latin American perspective.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Catoggio, Luis Jose; Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Ostojich, Kasmir; Cardiel, Mario H

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease affecting the synovium of joints, tendons, and some extra-articular sites. RA prevalence in Latin America ranges from 0.4 to 1.6%. Early treatment of RA translates into a substantial reduction in the cost to society. In light of this, early disease clinics are being established in some countries. Barriers to RA management, such as delay in referral to rheumatologists and limited access to therapy, have been identified. Evidence-based treatment guidelines have been adapted by countries according to their own situations. The need for keeping accurate records of biologics prescribed has been addressed by biologic registries, thereby contributing toward a better understanding of rheumatic diseases and their treatment. Current biologics include the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab), B-cell depletion agent (rituximab), interleukin-6 receptor blocker (tocilizumab), and T-cell co-stimulatory blocker (abatacept). Future therapies include kinase inhibitors (tofacitinib and fostamatinib), alternative TNF-α inhibitors (golimumab and certolizumab), and biosimilars.

  11. How does established rheumatoid arthritis develop, and are there possibilities for prevention?

    PubMed

    van Beers-Tas, Marian H; Turk, Samina A; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan

    2015-01-01

    Established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic state with more or less joint damage and inflammation, which persists after a phase of early arthritis. Autoimmunity is the main determinant of persistence. Although the autoimmune response is already fully developed in the phase of early arthritis, targeted treatment within the first months produces better results than delayed treatment. Prevention of established RA currently depends on the success of remission-targeted treatment of early disease. Early recognition is aided by the new criteria for RA. Further improvement may be possible by even earlier recognition and treatment in the at-risk phase. This requires the improvement of prediction models and strategies, and more intervention studies. Such interventions should also be directed at modifiable risk factors such as smoking and obesity. The incidence of RA has declined for decades in parallel with the decrease of smoking rates; however, a recent increase has occurred that is associated with obesity.

  12. Bone marrow edema and osteitis in rheumatoid arthritis: the imaging perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging bone marrow edema is an imaging feature that has been described in many conditions, including osteomyelitis, overuse syndromes, avascular necrosis, trauma, and inflammatory arthritides. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), bone edema has special significance as it has been shown to be a common and widespread lesion that is often apparent at the hands and wrists but has also been described elsewhere, including the feet. It may occur in early or late disease and has been shown in several large cohort studies to have major negative implications for prognosis. It is the strongest predictor of erosive progression yet to be identified and characteristically occurs in those patients with the most aggressive and potentially disabling disease. In patients with undifferentiated arthritis, bone edema also predicts progression to criteria-positive RA, both independently and to a greater extent when combined with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide status or rheumatoid factor positivity. Its histological correlate in the late stages of RA has been shown to be osteitis, in which the bone marrow beneath the joint is invaded by an inflammatory and vascular lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. This lies adjacent to trabecular bone, where increased numbers of osteoclasts have been observed within resorption lacunae, suggesting a mechanistic link between inflammation and erosive bone damage. This could lead to erosion both of the overlying cortex, leading to classic radiographic rheumatoid erosions, and of local trabecular bone, possibly contributing to periarticular osteopenia and cyst formation. In addition to synovitis, osteitis is now regarded as a major rheumatoid lesion that is responsive to therapeutic intervention. PMID:23043770

  13. Extensor-tendons reconstruction using autogenous palmaris longus tendon grafting for rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Po-Jung; Lee, Hung-Maan; Hou, Yao-Tung; Hung, Sheng-Tsai; Chen, Jung-Kuei; Shih, Jui-Tien

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study is to retrospectively review the clinical outcome of our study population of middle-aged RA patients who had suffered extensor-tendon rupture. We reported the outcome of autogenous palmaris tendon grafting of multiple extensor tendons at wrist level in 14 middle-aged rheumatoid patients. Methods Between Feb. 2000 to Feb. 2004, thirty-six ruptured wrist level extensor tendons were reconstructed in fourteen rheumatoid patients (11 women and three men) using autogenous palmaris longus tendon as a free interposition graft. In each case, the evaluation was based on both subjective and objective criteria, including the range of MCP joint flexion after surgery, the extension lag at the metacarpophalangeal joint before and after surgery, and the ability of the patient to work. Results and Discussion The average of follow-up was 54.1 months (range, 40 to 72 months). The average range of MCP joint flexion after reconstruction was 66°. The extension lag at the metacarpophalangeal joint significantly improved from a preoperative mean of 38° (range, 25°–60°) to a postoperative mean of 16° (range, 0°–30°). Subjectively all patients were satisfied with the clinical results, and achieved a return to their level of ability before tendon rupture. We found good functional results in our series of interposition grafting using palmaris longus to reconstruct extensor tendon defects in the rheumatoid patients. Conclusion Reconstruction for multiple tendon ruptures is a salvage procedure that is often associated with extensor lag and impairment of overall function. Early aggressive treatment of extensor tendon reconstruction using autogenous palmaris longus tendon as a free interposition graft in the rheumatoid wrist is another viable option to achieve good clinical functional result. PMID:18435845

  14. A Case Report Describing a Rare Presentation of Simultaneous Occurrence of MPO-ANCA-Associated Vasculitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Papireddy, Muralidhar; Gao, John

    2016-01-01

    Background. Renal-limited myeloperoxidase vasculitis with simultaneous rheumatoid arthritis is reported as a rare occurrence. Review of literature suggests that most patients had a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis for several years prior to presenting with renal failure from myeloperoxidase vasculitis. Case Presentation. A 58-year-old Caucasian male presented to the hospital experiencing malaise, fevers, decreased oral intake, nausea, and vomiting for one week duration. His past medical history consisted of newly diagnosed but untreated rheumatoid arthritis, hypertension, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. He was found to have acute renal failure, proteinuria, and hypoglycemia. Standard therapy, including intravenous fluids, did not improve his acute renal failure. A vasculitis workup resulted in a positive myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). Renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) pauci-immune type, suggestive of MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis (MPO-AAV). Treatment consisted of prednisone, cyclophosphamide, and seven cycles of plasmapheresis, in addition to hemodialysis for uremia. Upon discharge, he received hemodialysis for another week and continued treatment with cyclophosphamide and prednisone. Conclusion. Patients with longstanding rheumatoid arthritis may develop renal failure due to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication use and AA type amyloidosis; however, necrotizing glomerulonephritis with crescent formation has been rarely reported. This stresses the importance of early recognition and swift initiation of treatment. PMID:27891268

  15. Virus antibody levels and delayed hypersensitivity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, P E; Waxman, J; Hirshaut, Y; Kaplan, M H

    1976-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus antibody levels were not higher in patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared to matched controls. Delayed hypersensitivity, measured by skin test reactivity, was depressed in rheumatoid arthritis. There was no correlation between virus antibody titres and delayed hypersensitivity. PMID:182092

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis in 2014: Exciting times for RA research.

    PubMed

    Emery, Paul

    2015-02-01

    2014 saw the emergence of a novel rheumatoid arthritis therapy to rival methotrexate, as well as advances in our understanding of mouse T.cell biology and of the cross-talk between the nervous system and the immune system. How will these advances affect the future of rheumatoid arthritis research and therapy?

  17. [Erroneous prescription of rumalon to rheumatoid arthritis patients].

    PubMed

    Erov, N K

    1984-01-01

    The author describes 2 cases of erroneous prescription of rumalon to patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as a result of which in one of the patients oligoarthritis arthritis while in the other one the typical seropositive slow-progressing rheumatoid arthritis transformed to RA with systemic manifestations.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis: an immune disease in search of an etiology.

    PubMed

    Weiss, D L

    1975-01-01

    The current knowledge of the immunologic and etiologic factors which play a role in rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed and extrapolated to the systemic effects of rheumatoid disease. The disease process is viewed as the incidental result of an atypical immuno-inflammatory mechanism initiated by an unidentified antigenic stimulus.

  19. From "Below Dignity" to "Above It All": Origins and Early History of Underwater Neutral Buoyancy Simulation of Weightlessness for EVA Procedures Development and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.

    2013-01-01

    An attempt to clarify some vague memories of underwater studies of astronaut capabilities in space led Dr. John Charles to become acquainted with Sam Mattingly, one of the pioneers in the field, and to greater insights into Mattingly's work simulating Gemini EVAs in the mid-1960s. Charles recounted major accomplishments by Environmental Research Associates (ERA), Mattingly's company for contracting with NASA Langley on several early studies. ERA's work was considered within the context of contemporary efforts to simulate weightlessness and the widespread development of neutral buoyancy facilities after ERA's successful demonstration for Gemini 12.

  20. Evaluating and mitigating fracture risk in established rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Matthew B; Saag, Kenneth G

    2015-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are predisposed to systemic bone loss, and they are at an increased risk of fractures. Although there are similarities in the patient demographics between rheumatoid arthritis patients and the general population of osteoporosis patients, there are factors, particularly the use of glucocorticoids, which are specific to rheumatoid arthritis. These factors can lead to an increased risk of bone loss and fracture. Given that fractures are often very debilitating, especially in elderly patients, it is of paramount importance for the practicing rheumatologist to be aware of ways to reduce the risk of fracture in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This review discusses currently available modalities for fracture risk assessment as well as pharmacologic and lifestyle interventions available to treat and prevent bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  1. IL33 in rheumatoid arthritis: potential contribution to pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Rafaela Bicalho Viana; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Melo de Andrade, Marcus Vinicius

    A better understanding of the inflammatory mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis and the development of biological therapy revolutionized its treatment, enabling an interference in the synovitis - structural damage - functional disability cycle. Interleukin 33 was recently described as a new member of the interleukin-1 family, whose common feature is its pro-inflammatory activity. Its involvement in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, raises the interest in the possible relationship with rheumatoid arthritis. Its action has been evaluated in experimental models of arthritis as well as in serum, synovial fluid and membrane of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It has been shown that the administration of interleukin-33 exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis in experimental models, and a positive correlation between cytokine concentrations in serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and disease activity was found. This review discusses evidence for the role of interleukin-33 with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. IL33 in rheumatoid arthritis: potencial contribution to pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Rafaela Bicalho Viana; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Andrade, Marcus Vinicius Melo de

    2016-03-22

    A better understanding of the inflammatory mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis and the development of biological therapy revolutionized its treatment, enabling an interference in the synovitis-structural damage-functional disability cycle. Interleukin 33 was recently described as a new member of the interleukin-1 family, whose common feature is its pro-inflammatory activity. Its involvement in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, raises the interest in the possible relationship with rheumatoid arthritis. Its action has been evaluated in experimental models of arthritis as well as in serum, synovial fluid and membrane of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It has been shown that the administration of interleukin-33 exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis in experimental models, and a positive correlation between cytokine concentrations in serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and disease activity was found. This review discusses evidence for the role of interleukin-33 with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Quantification of joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy and tracer kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioussoufovitch, Seva; Morrison, Laura B.; Lee, Ting-Yim; St. Lawrence, Keith; Diop, Mamadou

    2015-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic synovial inflammation, which can cause progressive joint damage and disability. Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and imaging have the potential to become potent monitoring tools for RA. We devised a method that combined time-resolved DOS and tracer kinetics modeling to rapidly and reliably quantify blood flow in the joint. Preliminary results obtained from two animals show that the technique can detect joint inflammation as early as 5 days after onset.

  4. A comparative study of the modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for rheumatoid wrist with and without stabilization of the proximal ulnar stump.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, A; Egi, T; Hashimoto, H; Masada, K; Saito, S

    2010-10-01

    We compared the clinical and radiological results of the modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for 41 of 86 operated rheumatoid wrists with (n=22) and without (n=19) stabilization of the proximal ulnar stump with a slip of half the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. Gender, age, and follow-up period were similar in the two groups. We found no difference clinically or on radiographs between the two groups other than better early postoperative pain relief in those stabilized. Stabilization of the proximal ulnar stump may not be necessary in the modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for rheumatoid wrists.

  5. Early stage P22 viral capsid self-assembly mediated by scaffolding protein: atom-resolved model and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiajian; Yang, Jing; Sereda, Yuriy V; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2015-04-23

    Molecular dynamics simulation of an atom-resolved bacteriophage P22 capsid model is used to delineate the underlying mechanism of early stage P22 self-assembly. A dimer formed by the C-terminal fragment of scaffolding protein with a new conformation is demonstrated to catalyze capsomer (hexamer and pentamer) aggregation efficiently. Effects of scaffolding protein/coat protein binding patterns and scaffolding protein concentration on efficiency, fidelity, and capsid curvature of P22 self-assembly are identified.

  6. Abatacept in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vital, Edward M; Emery, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Abatacept (CTLA4-Ig) is a new agent which targets T-cell activation, an event which is thought to be critical to the onset and maintenance of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Abatacept now has substantial evidence from phase III trials for efficacy in patients with RA who have failed to respond to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and antitumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) biologic agents. Safety profile is favorable in combination with DMARDs. The mechanism of action and available evidence of its efficacy and safety are reviewed in this article. PMID:18360649

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis association at 6q23.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Wendy; Barton, Anne; Ke, Xiayi; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Donn, Rachelle; Symmons, Deborah; Hider, Samantha; Bruce, Ian N; Wilson, Anthony G; Marinou, Ioanna; Morgan, Ann; Emery, Paul; Carter, Angela; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Strachan, David; Worthington, Jane

    2007-12-01

    The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) identified nine single SNPs putatively associated with rheumatoid arthritis at P = 1 x 10(-5) - 5 x 10(-7) in a genome-wide association screen. One, rs6920220, was unequivocally replicated (trend P = 1.1 x 10(-8)) in a validation study, as described here. This SNP maps to 6q23, between the genes oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 3 (OLIG3) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3).

  8. A case study on rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tom

    2003-09-01

    At a time when many managed care organizations increasingly shift costs to patients through tiered formularies and widening copay differentials, biologic agents represent a significant clinical and financial challenge unlikely to be managed optimally with tiered formularies and greater patient cost sharing. The information discussed in this article is intended for healthcare professionals involved with rheumatoid arthritis therapy, including but not limited to physicians in both the inpatient and outpatient setting, and for other managed care professionals, including medical directors, pharmacy directors, long-term care decision makers, nurses, pharmacists, and case managers.

  9. What next for rheumatoid arthritis therapy?

    PubMed

    Blake, Simon M; Swift, Barbara A

    2004-06-01

    Introduction of biological agents for the treatment of the chronic inflammatory joint disease rheumatoid arthritis has reinvigorated research into this debilitating disease. These agents have been shown to both act on the signs and symptoms of disease, as well as retard the progression of joint destruction. However, these agents are not efficacious in all cases and their expense and route of administration can severely limit their use. Therefore the search continues not only for additional targets to help those individuals refractive to current therapy but also for more affordable orally active small molecule alternatives to biological agents.

  10. Current understanding of rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Colmegna, Inés; Ohata, Brent R; Menard, Henri A

    2012-04-01

    Progress in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), together with the availability of new therapies, has changed the way we think about RA. The paradigm shift in RA therapy has been from controlling symptoms to controlling the disease process with the abrogation of inflammation. Challenges that are still unresolved include the issues in disease prevention, treatment specificity to restore tolerance, approaches to facilitate tissue repair, and treatment optimization to fit the individual patient's disease phenotype and comorbidity context. This review summarizes the pathogenesis-related rationales for the current therapeutic strategies in RA and for emerging therapies and potential approaches to restoring immune tolerance in RA.

  11. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in pulmonary rheumatoid nodules diagnosed by video-assisted thoracic surgery lung biopsy: two case reports and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Saraya, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryota; Fujiwara, Masachika; Koji, Hitoshi; Oda, Miku; Ogawa, Yukari; Nagatomo, Tomoko; Watanabe, Masato; Yokoyama, Takuma; Ishii, Haruyuki; Takei, Hidefumi; Goya, Tomoyuki; Takizawa, Hajime; Goto, Hajime

    2013-03-01

    Two cases of rheumatoid nodules evaluated by fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) biopsy are reported. The first case was that of a 44-year-old woman who presented with a cavitated nodule with intense standardized uptake values (SUVs) both in the early (max 3.4) and delayed (max 4.4) phases, suggesting malignancy. However, after VATS biopsy, she was diagnosed as having a rheumatoid nodule with vasculitis. The second case was that of a 74-year-old woman admitted with bilateral lung nodules, two of which showed intense early (max 2.2) and delayed (max 6.0) phase SUVs, and mild early (max 0.6) and delayed (max 0.9) phase SUVs. These two nodules were finally proven to be a lung cancer and rheumatoid nodule without vasculitis, respectively. These cases show that rheumatoid nodules with an enhanced inflammatory process, such as vasculitis, can appear false-positive for malignancy on FDG-PET/CT scan images.

  12. Risk Factors for Asymptomatic Ventricular Dysfunction in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garza-García, Carlos; Rocío, Sánchez-Santillán; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Eduardo, Canseco; López-Campos, José Luis; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to describe echocardiographic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, concurrent systemic comorbidities, rheumatologic clinical activity, serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory activity. Methods. In an observational, cross-sectional study, rheumatoid arthritis outpatients were included (n = 105). Conventional transthoracic echocardiographic variables were compared between patients with arthritis and non-RA controls (n = 41). For rheumatoid arthritis patients, articular activity and rheumatologic and inflammatory markers were obtained. Results. Ventricular dysfunction was found in 54.3% of the population: systolic (18.1%), diastolic (32.4%), and/or right (24.8%), with lower ejection fraction (P < 0.0001). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 46.9%. Other echocardiographic findings included increased left atrial diameter (P = 0.01), aortic diameter (P = 0.01), ventricular septum (P = 0.01), left ventricular posterior wall (P = 0.013), and right ventricular (P = 0.01) and atrial diameters compared to control subjects. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibodies levels were significantly elevated in cases with ventricular dysfunction. Angina and myocardial infarction, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were the main risk factors for ventricular dysfunction. Conclusions. Ventricular dysfunction is common in rheumatoid arthritis and associated with longer disease duration and increased serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis. Screening for cardiac abnormalities should be considered in this kind of patients. PMID:24368945

  13. Risk factors for asymptomatic ventricular dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Garza-García, Carlos; Rocío, Sánchez-Santillán; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Eduardo, Canseco; López-Campos, José Luis; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to describe echocardiographic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, concurrent systemic comorbidities, rheumatologic clinical activity, serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory activity. Methods. In an observational, cross-sectional study, rheumatoid arthritis outpatients were included (n = 105). Conventional transthoracic echocardiographic variables were compared between patients with arthritis and non-RA controls (n = 41). For rheumatoid arthritis patients, articular activity and rheumatologic and inflammatory markers were obtained. Results. Ventricular dysfunction was found in 54.3% of the population: systolic (18.1%), diastolic (32.4%), and/or right (24.8%), with lower ejection fraction (P < 0.0001). Pulmonary hypertension was found in 46.9%. Other echocardiographic findings included increased left atrial diameter (P = 0.01), aortic diameter (P = 0.01), ventricular septum (P = 0.01), left ventricular posterior wall (P = 0.013), and right ventricular (P = 0.01) and atrial diameters compared to control subjects. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibodies levels were significantly elevated in cases with ventricular dysfunction. Angina and myocardial infarction, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were the main risk factors for ventricular dysfunction. Conclusions. Ventricular dysfunction is common in rheumatoid arthritis and associated with longer disease duration and increased serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis. Screening for cardiac abnormalities should be considered in this kind of patients.

  14. Is air pollution a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Essouma, Mickael; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory debilitating disease triggered by a complex interaction involving genetic and environmental factors. Active smoking and occupational exposures such as silica increase its risk, suggesting that initial inflammation and generation of rheumatoid arthritis-related autoantibodies in the lungs may precede the clinical disease. This hypothesis paved the way to epidemiological studies investigating air pollution as a potential determinant of rheumatoid arthritis. Studies designed for epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis found a link between traffic, a surrogate of air pollution, and this disease. Furthermore, a small case-control study recently found an association between wood smoke exposure and anticyclic citrullinated protein/peptide antibody in sera of patients presenting wood-smoke-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, reports addressing impact of specific pollutants on rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity across populations are somewhat conflicting. In addition to the link reported between other systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases and particulate matters/gaseous pollutants, experimental observation of exacerbated rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity in mice models of collagen-induced arthritis after diesel exhaust particles exposure as well as hypovitaminosis D-related autoimmunity can help understand the role of air pollution in rheumatoid arthritis. All these considerations highlight the necessity to extend high quality epidemiological researches investigating different sources of atmospheric pollution across populations and particularly in low-and-middle countries, in order to further explore the biological plausibility of air pollution's effect in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This should be attempted to better inform policies aiming to reduce the burden of rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis therapy reappraisal: strategies, opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is considered a chronic disease that cannot be cured. Biologic agents have enabled good therapeutic successes; however, the response to biologic therapy depends on treatment history and, especially, disease duration. In general, the more drug-experienced the patients, the lower the response rates, although this limitation can be overcome by promptly adjusting or switching treatment in a treat-to-target approach. Another challenge is the question of how long therapy should be continued once the treatment target, which should be remission or at least a state of low disease activity, has been reached. The data available suggest that, in most patients with established disease, cessation of biologic therapy will be followed by disease flares, whereas a reduction of dose or an increase in the interval between doses enables maintenance of treatment success. Induction therapy very early in the disease course followed by withdrawal of the biologic agent might also be a feasible approach to attain sustained good outcomes, but currently available data are not strong enough to allow for such a conclusion to be reached. Taken together, this underscores the importance of research into the cause(s) of RA so that curative therapies can be developed.

  16. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis: emerging markers, tools, and techniques.

    PubMed

    Put, Stéphanie; Westhovens, René; Lahoutte, Tony; Matthys, Patrick

    2014-04-15

    Early diagnosis and effective monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are important for a positive outcome. Instant treatment often results in faster reduction of inflammation and, as a consequence, less structural damage. Anatomical imaging techniques have been in use for a long time, facilitating diagnosis and monitoring of RA. However, mere imaging of anatomical structures provides little information on the processes preceding changes in synovial tissue, cartilage, and bone. Molecular imaging might facilitate more effective diagnosis and monitoring in addition to providing new information on the disease pathogenesis. A limiting factor in the development of new molecular imaging techniques is the availability of suitable probes. Here, we review which cells and molecules can be targeted in the RA joint and discuss the advances that have been made in imaging of arthritis with a focus on such molecular targets as folate receptor, F4/80, macrophage mannose receptor, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, phosphatidylserine, and matrix metalloproteinases. In addition, we discuss a new tool that is being introduced in the field, namely the use of nanobodies as tracers. Finally, we describe additional molecules displaying specific features in joint inflammation and propose these as potential new molecular imaging targets, more specifically receptor activator of nuclear factor κB and its ligand, chemokine receptors, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, αVβ₃ integrin, P2X7 receptor, suppression of tumorigenicity 2, dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein, and osteoclast-stimulatory transmembrane protein.

  17. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Edward C.A.; Hanson, Emma K.; Saithna, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anatomical shoulder replacement for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complicated by a high incidence of rotator cuff tears and glenoid erosion. This can lead to poor function and early failure. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) has gained popularity as an alternative. This systematic review attempts to further define the role of RSA in RA. Methods: A systematic review identified seven studies reporting outcomes of RSA in RA patients. Studies were critically appraised, and data on outcomes, complications and technical considerations were extracted and analysed. Results: One hundred and twenty one shoulders were included (mean follow up 46.9 months). Consistent improvements in the main outcome measures were noted between studies. Ninety five percent of patients described excellent to satisfactory outcomes. The minimum mean forward elevation reported in each study was 115 degrees. Symptomatic glenoid loosening (1.7%), deep infection (3.3%) and revision surgery (5%) rates were no higher than for a population of mixed aetiologies. Discussion: Previous concerns regarding high pre- and peri-operative complication and revision rates in RA patients were not shown to be valid by the results of this review. Although associated cuff tears are common and glenoid bone loss can increase the technical complexity of surgery, RSA provides consistent and predictable improvements in key outcome measures and the revision and complication rates do not appear to be higher than reported in a large population of mixed aetiologies. Conclusion: The contemporary literature shows that RSA is a safe, effective and reliable treatment option in RA patients. PMID:26448802

  18. Somatic mutations in the mitochondria of rheumatoid arthritis synoviocytes.

    PubMed

    Da Sylva, Tanya R; Connor, Alison; Mburu, Yvonne; Keystone, Edward; Wu, Gillian E

    2005-01-01

    Somatic mutations have a role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, particularly cancers. Here we present data supporting a role of mitochondrial somatic mutations in an autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA is a complex, multifactorial disease with a number of predisposition traits, including major histocompatibility complex (MHC) type and early bacterial infection in the joint. Somatic mutations in mitochondrial peptides displayed by MHCs may be recognized as non-self, furthering the destructive immune infiltration of the RA joint. Because many bacterial proteins have mitochondrial homologues, the immune system may be primed against these altered peptides if they mimic bacterial homologues. In addition, somatic mutations may be influencing cellular function, aiding in the acquirement of transformed properties of RA synoviocytes. To test the hypothesis that mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with RA, we focused on the MT-ND1 gene for mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (subunit one of complex I - NADH dehydrogenase) of synoviocyte mitochondria from RA patients, using tissue from osteoarthritis (OA) patients for controls. We identified the mutational burden and amino acid changes in potential epitope regions in the two patient groups. RA synoviocyte mtDNA had about twice the number of mutations as the OA group. Furthermore, some of these changes had resulted in potential non-self MHC peptide epitopes. These results provide evidence for a new role for somatic mutations in mtDNA in RA and predict a role in other diseases.

  19. [Occupational therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: what rheumatologists need to know?].

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Pedro Henrique Tavares Queiroz; Pontes, Tatiana Barcelos; Matheus, João Paulo Chieregato; Muniz, Luciana Feitosa; da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Interventions focusing on education and self-management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by the patient improves adherence and effectiveness of early treatment. The combination of pharmacologic and rehabilitation treatment aims to maximize the possibilities of intervention, delaying the appearance of new symptoms, reducing disability and minimizing sequelae, decreasing the impact of symptoms on patient's functionality. Occupational therapy is a health profession that aims to improve the performance of daily activities by the patient, providing means for the prevention of functional limitations, adaptation to lifestyle changes and maintenance or improvement of psychosocial health. Due to the systemic nature of RA, multidisciplinary follow-up is necessary for the proper management of the impact of the disease on various aspects of life. As a member of the health team, occupational therapists objective to improve and maintaining functional capacity of the patient, preventing the progression of deformities, assisting the process of understanding and coping with the disease and providing means for carrying out the activities required for the engagement of the individual in meaningful occupations, favoring autonomy and independence in self-care activities, employment, educational, social and leisure. The objective of this review is to familiarize the rheumatologist with the tools used for assessment and intervention in occupational therapy, focusing on the application of these principles to the treatment of patients with RA.

  20. What precedes development of rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Klareskog, L; Alfredsson, L; Rantapaa-Dahlqvis..., S; Berglin, E; Stolt, P; Padyukov, L

    2004-01-01

    Studies on aetiology of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) need to investigate the potential environmental triggers that are active before onset of disease, the genetic context in which these triggers act, and whether the presence of such triggers in an arthritis prone genetic context will give rise to the immune reactions associated with/preceding RA. Such knowledge would help not only to address much better the issue of causality of these potential triggers and the immune reactions, but also to carry out various interventions aimed at influencing the disease provoking immune events before development of clinical signs of disease. This short report summarises recent data demonstrating (a) the presence of anticitrullin antibodies or rheumatoid factors in between a third and half of patients with RA before development of clinical signs; (b) long term smoking is associated with a high risk of future development of seropositive but not seronegative RA; and (c) a strong gene–environment interaction between smoking and SE genes in the development of seropositive RA. We conclude that, in a certain genetic context, smoking is a potential trigger of RA, and a combination of the two factors is associated with the occurrence of immune reactions long before the onset of RA. PMID:15479868

  1. The onset of rheumatoid arthritis following trauma

    PubMed Central

    Brawer, Arthur E; Goel, Noopur

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is known to have many predisposing factors. Objective We studied individuals whose RA was initiated by physical injuries. Patients and methods Sixty patients (43 females), previously well, developed RA following trauma. No other known environmental or familial influences were present. Fourteen sustained a fracture; of the 46 who did not, 36 sustained multiple injuries that in part involved the axial skeleton. Subsequent unremitting daily pain, stiffness, limited motion, pain on motion, and/or swelling in the injured areas were mandatory for inclusion. Results Nine months after injuries (span: 2 weeks–36 months), more obvious signs of inflammation (IM) appeared in multiple other joints that were previously not affected by the original trauma. In those with laboratory tests done prior to the spread of IM (30/60), 22 (73%) were normal until an average 8 months after the spread of IM. Of the entire cohort of 60, only 23% had a positive rheumatoid factor, but 43% had a positive antinuclear antibody. Conclusion It seems apparent that any severe trauma to a joint may precipitate an ongoing localized chronic inflammatory disorder for an indefinite period of time, which may then lead to the spread of IM to multiple other joints. The initiation of RA following trauma warrants consideration as a legitimate entity. PMID:27843373

  2. A case of bilateral rheumatoid pleuritis successfully treated with tocilizumab.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Keiko; Takeuchi, Kimihiko; Matsushita, Masatoshi; Aramaki, Tetsuo

    2014-11-01

    The patient was a 77-year-old woman diagnosed as having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 1973. She was initiated on infliximab therapy in addition to methotrexate administration in 2009. The therapeutic response decreased after the fifth dose of infliximab, and the patient developed rheumatoid pleuritis due to increased RA disease activity. The therapy was switched from infliximab to tocilizumab, which resulted in amelioration of the arthralgias well as pleuritis. Our results suggest that tocilizumab is an effective treatment alternative for the treatment of rheumatoid pleuritis.

  3. Trace element analysis in rheumatoid arthritis under chrysotheraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, R.; Paradis, P.; Monaro, S.; Barrette, M.; Lamoureux, G.; Menard, H.-A.

    1981-03-01

    Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is used to measure trace element concentrations in blood serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Initially trace element contaminations in blood-collecting and storing devices are determined. Then mean values and nyctemeral cycles are measured both in normal subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other similar pathologies. Abnormal concentrations of Cu and Zn and anomalies in the nyctemeral cycle are found in the patients. In the second phase of the project, the special case of chrysotherapeutically treated (gold salt treatment) rheumatoid arthritis patients is studied for extended periods of time (up to 53 weeks).

  4. Pipette-based Method to Study Embryoid Body Formation Derived from Mouse and Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Partially Recapitulating Early Embryonic Development Under Simulated Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Vaibhav; Brungs, Sonja; Hescheler, Jürgen; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2016-06-01

    The in vitro differentiation of pluripotent stem cells partially recapitulates early in vivo embryonic development. More recently, embryonic development under the influence of microgravity has become a primary focus of space life sciences. In order to integrate the technique of pluripotent stem cell differentiation with simulated microgravity approaches, the 2-D clinostat compatible pipette-based method was experimentally investigated and adapted for investigating stem cell differentiation processes under simulated microgravity conditions. In order to keep residual accelerations as low as possible during clinorotation, while also guaranteeing enough material for further analysis, stem cells were exposed in 1-mL pipettes with a diameter of 3.5 mm. The differentiation of mouse and human pluripotent stem cells inside the pipettes resulted in the formation of embryoid bodies at normal gravity (1 g) after 24 h and 3 days. Differentiation of the mouse pluripotent stem cells on a 2-D pipette-clinostat for 3 days also resulted in the formation of embryoid bodies. Interestingly, the expression of myosin heavy chain was downregulated when cultivation was continued for an additional 7 days at normal gravity. This paper describes the techniques for culturing and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells and exposure to simulated microgravity during culturing or differentiation on a 2-D pipette clinostat. The implementation of these methodologies along with -omics technologies will contribute to understand the mechanisms regulating how microgravity influences early embryonic development.

  5. Production of Human Monoclonal Rheumatoid Factor Secreting Hybridomas Derived from Rheumatoid Synovial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    antisera to human [gM and human IgG heavy chains , kappa and lambda lightTable 2: Rheumatoid synowal cell tRF subelass speclicity profiles chains , and...antisera to whole mouse Ig including light chains .(ELISA)frompantie MKin Table 1& AD7 RF was a human 1gM k monoclonal antibody without Well IgGI gG2

  6. Human monoclonal rheumatoid factors derived from the polyclonal repertoire of rheumatoid synovial tissue: production and characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Randen, I; Thompson, K M; Natvig, J B; Førre, O; Waalen, K

    1989-01-01

    A panel of 20 human monoclonal antibodies was produced from cells derived from the synovial tissue of two rheumatoid arthritis patients and one polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patient. Fourteen IgM monoclonal antibodies were classical rheumatoid factors (RFs) with specificities restricted to IgG and included twelve kappa and two lambda proteins. Two of them were pan-specific for IgG and reacted with all four human subclasses. Nine showed the Ga specificity, i.e. they reacted with IgG1, IgG2 and IgG4 subclass proteins. Two showed the 'new Ga-related' specificity, i.e. they reacted with IgG1, IgG2 and IgG4 subclass proteins, and also with the Ge3m(st) allotype proteins. One RF demonstrated an anti-G3m(u) anti-allotypic specificity. Five IgM(lambda) monoclonal antibodies and one IgM(kappa) monoclonal antibody demonstrated polyreactivity against various antigens including DNA, human thyroglobulin, human serum albumin and tetanus toxoid. PMID:2805416

  7. Simulated NASA Satellite Data Products for the NOAA Integrated Coral Reef Observation Network/Coral Reef Early Warning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, Leland; Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    This RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) experiment will demonstrate the use of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) and LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission) sensor data as significant input to the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) ICON/ CREWS (Integrated Coral Reef Observation System/Coral Reef Early Warning System). The project affects the Coastal Management Program Element of the Applied Sciences Program.

  8. Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography of Preclinical Chloroquine Maculopathy in Egyptian Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Riham S. H. M.; Abd-Elmohsen, Mai N.; Khafagy, Mohamed M.; Raafat, Karim A.; Sheta, Sherif M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the role of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in early detection of Chloroquine maculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Methods. 40 left eyes of 40 female rheumatoid arthritis patients who received treatment chloroquine for more than one year were recruited in the study. All patients had no symptoms or signs of Chloroquine retinopathy. They were evaluated using SD-OCT, where the Central Foveal Thickness (CFT), parafoveal thickness and perifoveal thickness, average Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer (RNFL) thickness, and Ganglion Cell Complex (GCC) measurements were measured and compared to 40 left eyes of 40 normal females. Results. The mean CFT was found to be thinner in the Chloroquine group (238.15 µm ± 22.49) than the normal controls (248.2 µm ± 19.04), which was statistically significant (p value = 0.034). The mean parafoveal thickness was lesser in the Chloroquine group than the control group in all quadrants (p value <0.05). The perifoveal thickness in both groups showed no statistically significant difference (p value >0.05) in all quadrants. No significant difference was detected between the two groups regarding RNFL, GCC, or IS/OS junction. Conclusions. Preclinical Chloroquine toxicity can lead to early thinning in the central fovea as well as the parafoveal regions that is detected by SD-OCT. PMID:26301102

  9. Recent paradigm shifts in the diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Ok; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2012-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a progressive inflammatory disease with severe symptoms of pain and stiffness. Chronic persistent inflammation of RA often leads to joint destruction, deformity and limitation of function, which ultimately results in significant deterioration of quality of life (QoL). RA is characterized pathogenetically by immunologically driven, chronic synovitis, and production of autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies. Although the cause of RA is yet unknown, advances in the molecular biology led to in-depth understanding of its pathogenesis, and have fostered the recent development of novel treatments. The last decade has seen the dramatic change in the landscape of RA treatment with more aggressive therapy early in the disease course and with treatment guided by a structured assessment of disease activity, with the ultimate goal of reaching remission. In addition, prevention and control of joint damage and improvement in QoL are important goals. To achieve these goals, a multidisciplinary approach to reduce disease activity with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs and biological therapy is needed. We also need to find ways to identify those patients who are at risk for more rapid disease progression who would benefit from intensive therapy early in the course of disease.

  10. The Clinical Application of Anti-CCP in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Other Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chou, CT; Liao, HT; Chen, CH; Chen, WS; Wang, HP; Su, KY

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common rheumatic disease in Caucasians and in other ethnic groups. Diagnosis is mainly based on clinical features. Before 1998, the only serological laboratory test that could contribute to the diagnosis was that for rheumatoid factor (RF). The disease activity markers for the evaluation of clinical symptoms or treatment outcome were the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). As a matter of fact, the diagnosis of early RA is quite impossible, as the clinical criteria are insufficient at the beginning stage of the disease. In 1998, Schelleken reported that a high percentage of RA patients had a specific antibody that could interact with a synthetic peptide which contained the amino acid citrulline. The high specificity (98%) for RA of this new serological marker, anti-cyclic citrullinated antibody (anti-CCP antibody), can be detected early in RA, before the typical clinical features appear. The presence or absence of this antibody can easily distinguish other rheumatic diseases from RA. Additionally, the titer of anti-CCP can be used to predict the prognosis and treatment outcome after DMARDs or biological therapy. Therefore, with improvement of sensitivity, the anti-CCP antibody will be widely used as a routine laboratory test in the clinical practice for RA. PMID:19662201

  11. Serum levels of macrophage migration inhibitory factor are associated with rheumatoid arthritis course.

    PubMed

    Llamas-Covarrubias, Mara Anaís; Valle, Yeminia; Navarro-Hernández, Rosa Elena; Guzmán-Guzmán, Iris Paola; Ramírez-Dueñas, María Guadalupe; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco

    2012-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease of unknown etiology. Many cytokines have been found to be associated with RA pathogenesis and among them is macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). The aim of this study was to determine whether MIF serum levels are associated with RA course, clinical activity, and clinical biomarkers of the disease. MIF levels were determined in serum samples of 54 RA patients and 78 healthy subjects (HS) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Disease activity was evaluated using the DAS28 score. Patients were subgrouped according to disease activity and years of evolution of disease. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS 10.0 and GraphPad Prism 5 software. RA patients presented increased levels of MIF as compared to HS. MIF levels were raised on early stages of RA and tend to decrease according to years of evolution. Moreover, MIF levels positively correlated with rheumatoid factor in RA patients and with C reactive protein in all individuals studied. Our findings suggest that MIF plays a role in early stages of RA.

  12. Current status of gene therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, J; Koch, H; Meijer, H; Granrath, M; Schulitz, K P; Wehling, P

    1999-02-01

    Despite the high prevalence of the disease, at present little effective pharmacological treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is available. Novel approaches utilising biological agents have resulted in the development of new antiarthritic and antiinflammatory agents, such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha)-specific antibodies and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra). Local gene therapy not only allows the pharmaceutical use of these biologicals, but also allows for continuous drug supply, which is necessary for chronic diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. We discuss the basics of rheumatoid arthritis therapy, candidate genes and possible gene transfer methods. A current clinical gene therapy trial is focusing on the IL-1 system using IL-1ra as a transgene. The transfer system, clinical protocol and preliminary results are described. After treatment of 11 patients we feel that gene therapy will offer potential as a new avenue to treat rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. [Juvenile rheumatoid artritis (a single or various diseases?].

    PubMed

    Frati Munari, A C; Criollos Torres, O; Flores Suárez, R E

    1977-01-01

    Some characteristics of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis that appeared in recent literature have led us to think that it can be divided into the following four groups: I. Seronegative poliarthritis, with more or less systemic symptoms. With the same characteristics it may appear in adulthood. II. Seropositive poliarthritis, identical to the adult rheumatoid arthritis. III. B-27 negative oligoarthritis, complicated frequently with chronic uveitis and autolimited course. IV. B-27 positive oligoarthritis evolving to ankylosing spondylitis. These groups may represent different diseases.

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis and pulmonary nodules: An unexpected final diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zurita Prada, Pablo Antonio; Urrego Laurín, Claudia Lía; Assyaaton Bobo, Sow; Faré García, Regina; Estrada Trigueros, Graciliano; Gallardo Romero, José Manuel; Borrego Pintado, Maria Henar

    2016-05-11

    We report the case of a 50-year-old female smoker with an 11-year history of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies) receiving triple therapy. She developed pulmonary nodules diagnosed as Langerhans cell histiocytosis by lung biopsy. We found no reported cases of the coexistence of these two diseases. Smoking abstinence led to radiologic resolution without modifying the immunosuppressive therapy.

  15. Prognostic Factors in Arthroplasty in the Rheumatoid Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Nagels, Jochem; Rozing, Maarten P.

    2010-01-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty is commonly considered a good option for treatment of the rheumatoid shoulder. However, when the rotator cuff and glenoid bone stock are not preserved, the clinical outcome of arthroplasty in the rheumatoid patients remains unclear. Aim of the study is to explore the prognostic value of multiple preoperative and peroperative variables in total shoulder arthroplasty and shoulder hemiarthroplasty in rheumatoid patients. Clinical Hospital for Special Surgery Shoulder score was determined at different time points over a mean period of 6.5 years in 66 rheumatoid patients with total shoulder arthroplasty and 75 rheumatoid patients with shoulder hemiarthroplasty. Moreover, radiographic analysis was performed to assess the progression of humeral head migration and glenoid loosening. Advanced age and erosions or cysts at the AC joint at time of surgery were associated with a lower postoperative Clinical Hospital for Special Surgery Shoulder score. In total shoulder arthroplasty, status of the rotator cuff and its repair at surgery were predictive of postoperative improvement. Progression of proximal migration during the period after surgery was associated with a lower clinical score over time. However, in hemiarthroplasty, no relation was observed between the progression of proximal or medial migration during follow-up and the clinical score over time. Status of the AC joint and age at the time of surgery should be taken into account when considering shoulder arthroplasty in rheumatoid patients. Total shoulder arthroplasty in combination with good cuff repair yields comparable clinical results as total shoulder arthroplasty when the cuff is intact. PMID:21423883

  16. Whole breast irradiation vs. APBI using multicatheter brachytherapy in early breast cancer – simulation of treatment costs based on phase 3 trial data

    PubMed Central

    Harat, Maciej; Makarewicz, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A recent large phase 3 trial demonstrated that the efficacy of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI) in the treatment of early breast cancer is non-inferior to that of whole breast irradiation (WBI) commonly used in this indication. The aim of this study was to compare the costs of treatment with APBI and WBI in a population of patients after conserving surgery for early breast cancer, and to verify if the use of APBI can result in direct savings of a public payer. Material and methods The hereby presented cost analysis was based on the results of GEC-ESTRO trial. Expenditures for identified cost centers were estimated on the basis of reimbursement data for the public payer. After determining the average cost of early breast cancer treatment with APBI and WBI over a 5-year period, the variance in this parameter resulting from fluctuations in the price per single procedure was examined on univariate sensitivity analysis. Then, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated to verify the cost against clinical outcome. Finally, a simulation of public payer’s expenditures for the treatment of early breast cancer with APBI and WBI in 2013 and 2025 has been conducted. Results The average cost of treatment with APBI is lower than for WBI, even assuming a potential increase in the unit price of the former procedure. There was no additional health benefit of WBI and the calculation of cost-effectiveness was based on the absolute difference in overall local control rate. However, this difference (0.92% vs. 1.44%) was fairly minimal and was not identified as statistically significant during 5 years. Conclusions The use of APBI as an alternative to WBI in the treatment of early breast cancer would substantially reduce healthcare expenditures in both 2013 and 2025, even assuming an increase in the price per single APBI procedure. PMID:28115956

  17. Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Beuthan, J; Netz, U; Minet, O; Mueller, G; Scheel, A; Henniger, J

    2002-11-30

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient {mu}{sub s}, absorption coefficient {mu}{sub a}, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results. (laser biology and medicine)

  18. Periodontal condition in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ishi, Eduardo de Paula; Bertolo, Manoel Barros; Rossa, Carlos; Kirkwood, Keith Lough; Onofre, Mirian Aparecida

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this clinical study was to investigate if periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are associated. The study included 39 RA patients (test group) and 22 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals (control group). Questionnaires on general and oral health were applied and a complete periodontal exam, including visible plaque, marginal bleeding, attachment loss (AL) and number of teeth present, was also performed by a single calibrated examiner. Diabetes mellitus patients and smokers were excluded. RA patients had fewer teeth, higher prevalence of sites presenting dental plaque and a higher frequency of sites with advanced attachment loss. Although the prevalence of dental plaque was higher in the test group (Chi-square test, p = 0.0006), the percentage of sites showing gingival bleeding was not different (Fishers exact test, p > 0.05). Based on our results, we suggest that there is an association between periodontal disease and RA.

  19. [Plasma beta-2-microglobulin in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Fioravanti, A; Giordano, N; Loi, F; D'Amato, S; Castagna, M L; Frati, E; Marcolongo, R

    1984-09-30

    The beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2m) is a low molecular weight protein, recognized on the cellular membranes of numerous nucleated cells and strictly correlated to the antigens of Major Histocompatibility Complex. Many authors have demonstrated an increase of the plasmatic beta 2m in different inflammatory diseases and, particularly in rheumatic ones, as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Reiter's syndrome, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Systemic lupus erythematosus. We have also investigated the behaviour of the plasmatic beta 2m in 52 RA patients and in 17 healthy subjects. The beta 2m was measured in serum, by radioimmunoassay. We have demonstrated that the plasmatic beta 2m has moderately increased in the serum of RA patients, even if there is not a significant difference when compared to the normal subjects.

  20. Gene Polymorphisms and Pharmacogenetics in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rego-Pérez, Ignacio; Fernández-Moreno, Mercedes; Blanco, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, chronic and inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with genetic predisposition. The advent of new biological agents, as well as the more traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, has resulted in highly efficient therapies for reducing the symptoms and signs of RA; however, not all patients show the same level of response in disease progression to these therapies. These variations suggest that RA patients may have different genetic regulatory mechanisms. The extensive polymorphisms revealed in non-coding gene-regulatory regions in the immune system, as well as genetic variations in drug-metabolizing enzymes, suggest that this type of variation is of functional and evolutionary importance and may provide clues for developing new therapeutic strategies. Pharmacogenetics is a rapidly advancing area of research that holds the promise that therapies will soon be tailored to an individual patient’s genetic profile. PMID:19506728

  1. Rheumatoid neuropathy: a histological and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Weller, R. O.; Bruckner, F. E.; Chamberlain, M. Anne

    1970-01-01

    Peripheral nerves in five patients with rheumatoid neuropathy were examined electrophysiologically and by sural nerve biopsy. There was close correlation between the clinical severity of the disease and the degree of nerve damage found histologically and by EMG. Group 1 patients with a mild distal sensory neuropathy showed varying degrees of axonal degeneration in the large myelinated fibres and some segmental demyelination. Group 2 patients with a severe, rapidly progressive sensori-motor neuropathy had extensive loss of myelinated fibres. In one case all the large fibres had degenerated. The second case had lost both large and small myelinated fibres together with many of the non-myelinated axons. The major nerve damage in both groups appeared to be axonal degeneration but some segmental demyelination was detected. Occlusive vascular disease in the vasa nervorum was considered to be the major cause of the nerve damage. Images PMID:4320255

  2. Ibuprofen or aspirin in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Blechman, W J; Schmid, F R; April, P A; Wilson, C H; Brooks, C D

    1975-07-28

    Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal drug with analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory properties that was recently introduced for use in antiarthritis therapy in the United States. In a year-long double-blind multiclinic trial in 885 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ibuprofen was at least as satisfactory as aspirin, considering both efficacy and tolerance. In the majority of patients, daily doses ranged from 800 to 1,600 mg of ibuprofen and 3 to 6 gm of aspirin. The drugs did not differ greatly in providing relief from arthritis symptoms, but ibuprofen was definitely better tolerated, especially in regard to gastrointestinal complaints. Seven percent of the ibuprofen group dropped out of the study because of adverse reactions, as compared with 16% of the aspirin group; 17% of the ibuprofen group and 31% of the aspirin group had gastrointestinal symptoms.

  3. Hypoxia and its implications in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Quiñonez-Flores, Celia María; González-Chávez, Susana Aideé; Pacheco-Tena, César

    2016-08-22

    Alterations in tissue oxygen pressure contribute to a number of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Low partial pressure of oxygen, a condition known as hypoxia, is a relevant feature in RA since it is involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, apoptosis, cartilage degradation, energy metabolism, and oxidative damage. Therefore, alterations in hypoxia-related signaling pathways are considered potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. The objective of this review is to highlight and update our current knowledge of the role of hypoxia in the pathogenesis of RA. We describe the experimental evidence that RA synovial tissue exists in a hypoxic state, as well as the origin and involvement of synovial hypoxia in different aspects of the pathogenic process.

  4. Characteristics of resistin in rheumatoid arthritis angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen-Ming; Huang, Chun-Yin; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    Adipokines have been reported to be involved in the regulation of various physiological processes, including the immune response. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an example of a systemic immune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the synovium and bone destruction in the joint. Recent therapeutic strategies based on the understanding of the role of cytokines and cellular mechanisms in RA have improved our understanding of angiogenesis. On the other hand, endogenous endothelial progenitor cells, which are a population isolated from peripheral blood monocytes have recently been identified as a homing target for pro-angiogeneic factor and vessel formation. In this review, we summarize the effects of common adipokines, such as adiponectin, leptin and resistin in RA pathogenesis and discuss other potential mechanisms of relevance for the therapeutic treatment of RA.

  5. Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Rheumatoid Arthritis. A Systematic Review Literature

    PubMed Central

    Benucci, Maurizio; Saviola, Gianantonio; Manfredi, Mariangela; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2011-01-01

    The cost effectiveness of treatments that have changed the “natural history” of a chronic progressive disease needs to be evaluated over the long term. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are the standard treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and should be started as early as possible. A number of studies have shown that they are effective in improving disease activity and function, and in joint damage. Our review was focused on revision and critical evaluation of the studies including the literature on cost effectiveness of DMARDs (cyclosporine A, sulphasalazine, leflunomide, and methotrexate). The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations showed that traditional DMARDs are cost effective at the time of disease onset. They are less expensive than biological DMARDs and can be useful in controlling disease activity in early RA. PMID:22162693

  6. THE EVOLUTION OF DWARF GALAXY SATELLITES WITH DIFFERENT DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES IN THE ERISMOD SIMULATIONS. I. THE EARLY INFALLS

    SciTech Connect

    Tomozeiu, Mihai; Mayer, Lucio; Quinn, Thomas

    2016-02-20

    We present the first simulations of tidal stirring of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group carried out in a fully cosmological context. We use the ErisDARK cosmological simulation of a Milky Way (MW)-sized galaxy to identify some of the most massive subhalos (M{sub vir} > 10{sup 8} M{sub ⊙}) that fall into the main host before z = 2. Subhalos are replaced before infall with extremely high-resolution models of dwarf galaxies comprising a faint stellar disk embedded in a dark matter halo. The set of models contains cuspy halos as well as halos with “cored” profiles (with the cusp coefficient γ = 0.6) consistent with recent results of hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf galaxy formation. The simulations are then run to z = 0 with as many as 54 million particles and resolutions as small as ∼4 pc using the new parallel N-body code ChaNGa. The stellar components of all satellites are significantly affected by tidal stirring, losing stellar mass, and undergoing a morphological transformation toward a pressure supported spheroidal system. However, while some remnants with cuspy halos maintain significant rotational flattening and disk-like features, all the shallow halo models achieve v{sub rot}/σ{sub ⋆} < 0.5 and round shapes typical of dSph satellites of the MW and M31. Mass loss is also enhanced in the latter, and remnants can reach luminosities and velocity dispersions as low as those of ultra-faint dwarfs.

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... disease, which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... In an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system turns against parts of the body it is ... In an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system turns against parts of the body it is ...

  9. Laboratory Drop Towers for the Experimental Simulation of Dust-aggregate Collisions in the Early Solar System

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jürgen; Beitz, Eike; Bukhari, Mohtashim; Gundlach, Bastian; Hagemann, Jan-Hendrik; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Schräpler, Rainer; von Borstel, Ingo; Weidling, René

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of investigating the evolution of dust aggregates in the early Solar System, we developed two vacuum drop towers in which fragile dust aggregates with sizes up to ~10 cm and porosities up to 70% can be collided. One of the drop towers is primarily used for very low impact speeds down to below 0.01 m/sec and makes use of a double release mechanism. Collisions are recorded in stereo-view by two high-speed cameras, which fall along the glass vacuum tube in the center-of-mass frame of the two dust aggregates. The other free-fall tower makes use of an electromagnetic accelerator that is capable of gently accelerating dust aggregates to up to 5 m/sec. In combination with the release of another dust aggregate to free fall, collision speeds up to ~10 m/sec can be achieved. Here, two fixed high-speed cameras record the collision events. In both drop towers, the dust aggregates are in free fall during the collision so that they are weightless and match the conditions in the early Solar System. PMID:24962693

  10. Laboratory drop towers for the experimental simulation of dust-aggregate collisions in the early solar system.

    PubMed

    Blum, Jürgen; Beitz, Eike; Bukhari, Mohtashim; Gundlach, Bastian; Hagemann, Jan-Hendrik; Heißelmann, Daniel; Kothe, Stefan; Schräpler, Rainer; von Borstel, Ingo; Weidling, René

    2014-06-05

    For the purpose of investigating the evolution of dust aggregates in the early Solar System, we developed two vacuum drop towers in which fragile dust aggregates with sizes up to ~10 cm and porosities up to 70% can be collided. One of the drop towers is primarily used for very low impact speeds down to below 0.01 m/sec and makes use of a double release mechanism. Collisions are recorded in stereo-view by two high-speed cameras, which fall along the glass vacuum tube in the center-of-mass frame of the two dust aggregates. The other free-fall tower makes use of an electromagnetic accelerator that is capable of gently accelerating dust aggregates to up to 5 m/sec. In combination with the release of another dust aggregate to free fall, collision speeds up to ~10 m/sec can be achieved. Here, two fixed high-speed cameras record the collision events. In both drop towers, the dust aggregates are in free fall during the collision so that they are weightless and match the conditions in the early Solar System.

  11. Postoperative Surgical Infection After Spinal Surgery in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kensuke; Ohba, Tetsuro; Ebata, Shigeto; Haro, Hirotaka

    2016-05-01

    Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis are at higher risk for infection than the general population, and surgical site infection after spinal surgery in this population can result in clinically significant complications. The goal of this study was to identify risk factors for acute surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with nonbiologic (conventional) disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) alone or with biologic DMARDs. All patients treated with biologic agents were treated with nonbiologic agents as well. The authors performed a retrospective, single-center review of 47 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent spinal surgery and had follow-up of 3 months or longer. The incidence of surgical site infection was examined, and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to test the association of surgical site infection with putative risk factors, including the use of biologic agents, methotrexate, and prednisolone, as well as the duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the presence of diabetes, patient age, length of surgery, and number of operative levels. After spinal surgery, 14.89% (7 of 47) of patients had surgical site infection. Use of methotrexate and/or prednisolone, patient age, diabetes, duration of rheumatoid arthritis, length of surgery, number of operative levels, and use of biologic DMARDs did not significantly increase the risk of infection associated with spinal surgery. All patients who had surgical site infection had undergone spinal surgery with instrumentation. The findings show that greater attention to preventing surgical site infection may be needed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who undergo spinal surgery with instrumentation. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to show that the use of biologic agents did not increase the incidence of surgical site infection after spinal surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

  12. Incorporating a Generic Model of Subcutaneous Insulin Absorption into the AIDA v4 Diabetes Simulator 3. Early Plasma Insulin Determinations

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Eldon D.; Tarín, Cristina; Bondia, Jorge; Teufel, Edgar; Deutsch, Tibor

    2009-01-01

    Introduction AIDA is an interactive educational diabetes simulator that has been available without charge via the Internet for over 12 years. Recent articles have described the incorporation of a novel generic model of insulin absorption into AIDA as a way of enhancing its capabilities. The basic model components to be integrated have been overviewed, with the aim being to provide simulations of regimens utilizing insulin analogues, as well as insulin doses greater than 40 IU (the current upper limit within the latest release of AIDA [v4.3a]). Some preliminary calculated insulin absorption results have also recently been described. Methods This article presents the first simulated plasma insulin profiles from the integration of the generic subcutaneous insulin absorption model, and the currently implemented model in AIDA for insulin disposition. Insulin absorption has been described by the physiologically based model of Tarín and colleagues. A single compartment modeling approach has been used to specify how absorbed insulin is distributed in, and eliminated from, the human body. To enable a numerical solution of the absorption model, a spherical subcutaneous depot for the injected insulin dose has been assumed and spatially discretized into shell compartments with homogeneous concentrations, having as its center the injection site. The number of these compartments will depend on the dose and type of insulin. Insulin inflow arises as the sum of contributions to the different shells. For this report the first bench testing of plasma insulin determinations has been done. Results Simulated plasma insulin profiles are provided for currently available insulin preparations, including a rapidly acting insulin analogue (e.g., lispro/Humalog or aspart/Novolog), a short-acting (regular) insulin preparation (e.g., Actrapid), intermediate-acting insulins (both Semilente and neutral protamine Hagedorn types), and a very long-acting insulin analogue (e.g., glargine/Lantus), as

  13. Serum immune complexes containing IgA appear to predict erosive arthritis in a longitudinal study in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Westedt, M L; Daha, M R; Baldwin, W M; Stijnen, T; Cats, A

    1986-01-01

    Fifty seven patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were studied longitudinally, and the presence of rheumatoid factor (RF) and various types of immune complexes (IC) was correlated with joint activity and the presence of extra-articular features (EAF). In a cross sectional study it was found that the levels of circulating IC and RF correlated significantly with joint disease activity and the presence of EAF. Longitudinally, levels of IC measured by the C1q binding activity and IC containing IgG and IgM correlated significantly with fluctuations in joint disease activity, whereas IC containing IgG and IgA correlated with the occurrence of EAF. RF and IC levels, however, did not predict the clinical course of the disease. IC containing C3 and C4 were found infrequently and were only present in patients with active rheumatoid vasculitis (RV). The continuous presence of these IC appeared to be linked to the recurrence of vasculitis, irrespective of treatment. Significantly more erosions of hands and feet were found after one year follow up in those RA patients who presented early (disease duration less than one year) who initially had a raised serum IgA IC level (r = 0.72; p less than 0.005). PMID:3789816

  14. Association of susceptible genetic markers and autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Vasanth Konda; Ganesan, Nalini; Gopalakrishnan, Rajasekhar

    2014-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology resulting in inflammation of the synovium, cartilage and bone. The disease has a heterogeneous character, consisting of clinical subsets of anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive and APCA-negative disease. Although, the pathogenesis of RA is incompletely understood, genetic factors play a vital role in susceptibility to RA as the heritability of RA is between 50 and 60%, with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus accounting for at least 30% of overall genetic risk. Non-HLA genes, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) within the MHC (major histocompatibility complex) have also been investigated for association with RA. Although, some contradictory results have originated from several studies on TNF-α gene, the data published so far indicate the possible existence of TNF-α gene promoter variants that act as markers for disease severity and response to treatment in RA. The correlation of HLA and non-HLA genes within MHC region is apparently interpreted. A considerable number of confirmed associations with RA and other autoimmune disease susceptibility loci including peptidylarginine deiminase type 4 (PADI4), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT4), cluster of differentiation 244 (CD244) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4), located outside the MHC have been reported recently. In this review, we aim to give an update on recent progress in RA genetics, the importance of the combination of HLA-DRB1 alleles, non-HLA gene polymorphism, its detection and autoantibodies as susceptibility markers for early RA disease.

  15. Current concepts in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and joint destruction that causes significant morbidity and mortality. However, the combined use of methotrexate, a synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), and biologic DMARD has revolutionized treatment of RA. Clinical remission is now realistic targets, achieved by a large proportion of RA patients, and rapid and appropriate induction of remission by intensive treatment with biological DMARD and methotrexate is prerequisite to halt joint damage and functional disabilities. However, biological DMARD is limited to intravenous or subcutaneous uses and orally available small but strong molecules have been developed. Oral administration of tofacitinib targeting the Janus kinase (JAK) is significantly effective than placebo in active patients with methotrexatenaïve, inadequately responsive to methotrexate or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitors. The efficacy was rapid and as strong as adalimumab, a TNF-inhibitor. Meanwhile, association of tofacitinib on carcinogenicity and malignancy is under debate and further investigation on post-marketing survey would be warranted. On the other hand, discontinuation of a biological DMARD without disease flare is our next goal and desirable from the standpoint of risk reduction and cost effectiveness, especially for patients with clinical remission. Recent reports indicate that more than half of early RA patients could discontinue TNF-targeted biological DMARD without clinical flare and functional impairment after obtaining clinical remission. Contrarily, for established RA, fewer patients sustained remission after the discontinuation of biological DMARD and "deep remission" at the discontinuation was a key factor to keep the treatment holiday of biological DMARD.

  16. Citrullinated peptides in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gómara, María J; Haro, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies directed against citrullinated proteins and peptides (ACPAs) are the most specific serological markers available for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ACPAs may be detected several years before symptoms of RA appear, and their presence at disease onset is a good predictor of the development of erosive joint lesions. RA patients can be classified into two major groups: those who have ACPAs and those who do not. The presence of ACPAs at early stages of RA predicts the development of earlier and more widespread joint erosions, and low remission rates.Synthetic peptides can replace cognate proteins in solid-phase assays for specific autoantibody recognition in RA patients. The use of synthetic peptides instead of proteins represents an advantage in terms of the reproducibility of such immunoassays. Proteins also contain non-citrullinated epitopes that are recognized by non-RA sera and this could reduce the specificity of the test. The use of synthetic citrullinated peptides gives absolute control over the exact epitopes presented. Furthermore, it is difficult to prepare sufficient amounts of high-quality antigenic proteins with a well-defined degree of citrullination. Synthetic citrullinated peptides, in contrast, are easily obtained in a pure form with a well-defined chemical structure and the epitopes can be precisely oriented in the plate by covalent binding of the peptides.Chimeric peptides bearing different citrullinated protein domains have recently been used in the design of RA diagnosis systems. The results of the application of those systems indicate that more than one serological test is required to classify RA patients based on the presence or absence of ACPAs. Each of the target molecules reported (fibrin, vimentin and filaggrin) helps to identify a particular subset of RA patients.

  17. Help-seeking trajectory in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Ingris; Infante, Claudia; Quintana, Rosana

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) depends on the degree of fit between the characteristics of the patients and those of the health services. Ensuring timely assessment and treatment is the ideal medical care of RA. The reasons that underlay delays and the help-seeking trajectories are contextually determined. This study aims to identify the empirical evidence related to the help-seeking process and delay in RA in Latin America and to create a comprehensive model integrating the RA medical care processes of help-seeking and delay in a mixed health care system with variable accessibility. Non-systematic literature review of studies with both quantitative and qualitative methodology was conducted. Most of the research about delay and its associated variables have been undertaken in European countries and with White population and cannot be translated to the Latin America context where this research is almost inexistent. These countries have a completely different social context, and for most of the population, the health services are insufficient, inaccessible, fragmented, limited, and inequitable. Our results also show that in RA medical care utilization research, the theories and measurements of the constructs of illness trajectories, help-seeking, and accessibility are not integrated. We offer a conceptual framework that integrates help-seeking trajectories, delay, and accessibility of RA medical health services. If research on RA service utilization is to be undertaken in these countries, there is a need for a comprehensive framework than can enable researchers to integrate and contextualize the study of the problems within broad theoretical and methodological perspectives.

  18. Database of tsunami scenario simulations for Western Iberia: a tool for the TRIDEC Project Decision Support System for tsunami early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armigliato, Alberto; Pagnoni, Gianluca; Zaniboni, Filippo; Tinti, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    TRIDEC is a EU-FP7 Project whose main goal is, in general terms, to develop suitable strategies for the management of crises possibly arising in the Earth management field. The general paradigms adopted by TRIDEC to develop those strategies include intelligent information management, the capability of managing dynamically increasing volumes and dimensionality of information in complex events, and collaborative decision making in systems that are typically very loosely coupled. The two areas where TRIDEC applies and tests its strategies are tsunami early warning and industrial subsurface development. In the field of tsunami early warning, TRIDEC aims at developing a Decision Support System (DSS) that integrates 1) a set of seismic, geodetic and marine sensors devoted to the detection and characterisation of possible tsunamigenic sources and to monitoring the time and space evolution of the generated tsunami, 2) large-volume databases of pre-computed numerical tsunami scenarios, 3) a proper overall system architecture. Two test areas are dealt with in TRIDEC: the western Iberian margin and the eastern Mediterranean. In this study, we focus on the western Iberian margin with special emphasis on the Portuguese coasts. The strategy adopted in TRIDEC plans to populate two different databases, called "Virtual Scenario Database" (VSDB) and "Matching Scenario Database" (MSDB), both of which deal only with earthquake-generated tsunamis. In the VSDB we simulate numerically few large-magnitude events generated by the major known tectonic structures in the study area. Heterogeneous slip distributions on the earthquake faults are introduced to simulate events as "realistically" as possible. The members of the VSDB represent the unknowns that the TRIDEC platform must be able to recognise and match during the early crisis management phase. On the other hand, the MSDB contains a very large number (order of thousands) of tsunami simulations performed starting from many different

  19. The role and modulation of CCR6+ Th17 cell populations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Paulissen, Sandra M J; van Hamburg, Jan Piet; Dankers, Wendy; Lubberts, Erik

    2015-07-01

    The IL-17A producing T-helper-17 (Th17) cell population plays a major role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and has gained wide interest as treatment target. IL-17A expressing Th cells are characterized by the expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6 and the transcription factor RORC. In RA, CCR6+ Th cells were identified in peripheral blood, synovial fluid and inflamed synovial tissue. CCR6+ Th cells might drive the progression of an early inflammation towards a persistent arthritis. The CCR6+ Th cell population is heterogeneous and several subpopulations can be distinguished, including Th17, Th22, Th17.1 (also called non-classic Th1 cells), and unclassified or intermediate populations. Interestingly, some of these populations produce low levels of IL-17A but are still very pathogenic. Furthermore, the CCR6+ Th cells phenotype is unstable and plasticity exists between CCR6+ Th cells and T-regulatory (Treg) cells and within the CCR6+ Th cell subpopulations. In this review, characteristics of the different CCR6+ Th cell populations, their plasticity, and their potential impact on rheumatoid arthritis are discussed. Moreover, current approaches to target CCR6+ Th cells and future directions of research to find specific CCR6+ Th cell targets in the treatment of patients with RA and other CCR6+ Th cell mediated autoimmune diseases are highlighted.

  20. Evaluation of human serum of severe rheumatoid arthritis by confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, C. S.; Raniero, L.; Santo, A. M. E.; Pinheiro, M. M.; Andrade, L. E. C.; Cardoso, M. A. G.; Junior, J. S.; Martin, A. A.

    2010-02-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease, recurrent and systemic, initiated by autoantibodies and maintained by inflammatory mechanisms cellular applicants. The evaluation of this disease to promote early diagnosis, need an associations of many tools, such as clinical, physical examination and thorough medical history. However, there is no satisfactory consensus due to its complexity. In the present work, confocal Raman spectroscopy was used to evaluate the biochemical composition of human serum of 40 volunteers, 24 patients with rheumatoid arthritis presenting clinical signs and symptoms, and 16 healthy donors. The technique of latex agglutination for the polystyrene covered with human immunoglobulin G and PCR (protein c-reactive) was performed for confirmation of possible false-negative results within the groups, facilitating the statistical interpretation and validation of the technique. This study aimed to verify the changes for the characteristics Raman peaks of biomolecules such as immunoglobulins amides and protein. The results were highly significant with a good separation between groups mentioned. The discriminant analysis was performed through the principal components and correctly identified 92% of the donors. Based on these results, we observed the behavior of arthritis autoimmune, evident in certain spectral regions that characterize the serological differences between the groups.

  1. Detection of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chong-Jun; Lv, Jin-Han; Niu, Dong-Sheng; Ma, Tao; Sun, Shou-Xuan; Li, Li-Xin; Zhao, Xin; Wu, Long; Jin, Qun-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic inflammatory joint disorder and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP Ab) is regarded as a serological marker for diagnosing early and late RA. In the present study, we aimed to determine the levels of anti-CCP Ab in serum, synovial tissue (ST) and synovial fluid (SF) in RA patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA). 23 patients were included. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-CCP Ab in serum were detected prior to surgery and then at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after TKA. Synovial samples were obtained by knee arthroscopy and used for anti-CCP detection. One month after TKA, anti-CCP levels were significantly reduced (P < 0.01) in RA patients. However, their levels were not significantly different between pre-surgery and 1 year post-surgery (P > 0.05). Furthermore, anti-CCP levels in ST were much higher than in serum. These findings suggest that RA patients should continue antirheumatic therapy after TKA. ST is the preferred place for the synthesis of anti-CCP Ab.

  2. Ultrasound versus conventional radiography in the assessment of bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salaffi, Fausto; Gutierrez, Marwin; Carotti, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Bone erosions are the hallmark of joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis and both their detection and increase in number and/or in size are indicative of a poor outcome. To date, conventional radiography is still the most common imaging tool adopted for detecting and scoring joint damage in daily clinical practice, in spite of its low sensitivity with respect computerised tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound. Ultrasound is a rapidly evolving technique that is gaining an increasing success in the assessment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It permits an early detection and careful characterisation of bone erosions playing a key role in both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Ultrasound presents several advantages over other imaging techniques: it is patient-friendly, safe and non-invasive, free of ionising radiation, less expensive, and permit multiple target assessment in real time without the need for external referral. The aim of this review is to compare conventional radiography and ultrasound in the assessment of bone erosions in RA in daily rheumatology practice and to provide insights into which modality can provide the optimal information for a desired outcome in a given clinical trial or practice situation.

  3. A Case of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Unilateral Knee Synovial Hypertrophy in Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan Woo; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Si Bog

    2012-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman suffering right hemiplegia came in with pain and swelling on her left knee, general weakness and poor oral intake for 2 months. On physical examination we were able to palpate a mass with irregular margin around the left suprapatellar area. From the results of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), synovial proliferative disease, infectious arthritis, or gouty arthritis was suspected. We performed a blood laboratory test to detect rheumatologic diseases, knee joint aspiration, and bone scan for differential diagnosis, and were able to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from the results of blood laboratory, physical examination, and bone scan. Consequently, we started medications for controlling RA. Herein, we report a case of rheumatoid arthritis with unilateral knee synovial hypertrophy in hemiplegia. If a right hemiplegic patient has recurrent pain on the left knee and synovial hypertrophy, and fails to respond to treatment for osteoarthritis, early detection by evaluation for rheumatic disease is crucial to prevent severe sequelae influencing rehabilitation of hemiplegia. PMID:22506248

  4. Frequency of occurrence, mode of development, and significance or rice bodies in rheumatoid joints.

    PubMed Central

    Popert, A J; Scott, D L; Wainwright, A C; Walton, K W; Williamson, N; Chapman, J H

    1982-01-01

    The incidence of rice bodies (RB) in synovial effusions has been studied in 36 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in 12 patients with seronegative inflammatory arthritis (7 cases of Still's disease, 3 of psoriatic arthritis, and 2 of ankylosing spondylitis). In the RA group 50 joints were aspirated before and after saline lavage with a specially designed wide-bore needle. RB were found in 72% overall of the joints studied in this group, 14% on initial simple aspiration and an additional 58% after lavage. In contrast no rice bodies were found in 31 aspirations with lavage by an identical technique in the 12 patients with seronegative synovitis. The RB in RA synovitis occurred both early and late in the course of the disease and were not related to the severity of clinical or radiological changes. However, removal of rice bodies was accompanied by clinical improvement and reduction of synovitis. Macroscopically RB varied in shape and size, some being so large as to preclude effective removal by needles of the gauge customarily employed for joint aspirations. Microscopically the majority of RB were composed of coarsely reticular material reacting immunologically with antifibrinogen and antifibronectin and containing mononuclear cells. Some showed vacuolation suggestive of fibrinolysis, but many showed organisation like that seen in established connective tissues, with the formation of mature collagen, reticulin, and elastin. These findings are discussed in relation to the origin, development, and significance of rice bodies in rheumatoid synovitis. Images PMID:6176192

  5. Is rheumatoid arthritis a disease that starts in the intestine? A pilot study comparing an elemental diet with oral prednisolone

    PubMed Central

    Podas, Thrasyvoulos; Nightingale, Jeremy M D; Oldham, Roger; Roy, S; Sheehan, Nicholas J; Mayberry, John F

    2007-01-01

    Objectives This pilot study aimed to determine if an elemental diet could be used to treat patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and to compare its effect to that of oral prednisolone. Methods Thirty patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were randomly allocated to 2 weeks of treatment with an elemental diet (n = 21) or oral prednisolone 15 mg/day (n = 9). Assessments of duration of early morning stiffness (EMS), pain on a 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS), the Ritchie articular index (RAI), swollen joint score, the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire, global patient and physician assessment, body weight, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C‐reactive protein (CRP) and haemoglobin, were made at 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks. Results All clinical parameters improved in both groups (p<0.05) except the swollen joint score in the elemental diet group. An improvement of greater than 20% in EMS, VAS and RAI occurred in 72% of the elemental diet group and 78% of the prednisolone group. ESR, CRP and haemoglobin improved in the steroid group only (p<0.05). Conclusions An elemental diet for 2 weeks resulted in a clinical improvement in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis, and was as effective as a course of oral prednisolone 15 mg daily in improving subjective clinical parameters. This study supports the concept that rheumatoid arthritis may be a reaction to a food antigen(s) and that the disease process starts within the intestine. PMID:17308218

  6. Sleep Loss Exacerbates Fatigue, Depression, and Pain in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Olmstead, Richard; Carrillo, Carmen; Sadeghi, Nina; FitzGerald, John D.; Ranganath, Veena K.; Nicassio, Perry M.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Disturbances of sleep are hypothesized to contribute to pain. However, experimental data are limited to healthy pain-free individuals. This study evaluated the effect of sleep loss during part of the night on daytime mood symptoms and pain perceptions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in comparison with control subjects. Design: A between-groups laboratory study with assessment of mood symptoms and pain perception before and after partial night sleep deprivation (PSD; awake 23:00 hr to 03:00 hr). Setting: General clinical research center. Participants: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 27) and volunteer comparison control subjects (n = 27). Measurements: Subjective reports of sleep, mood symptoms and pain, polysomnographic assessment of sleep continuity, and subjective and objective assessment of rheumatoid arthritis-specific joint pain. Results: PSD induced differential increases in self-reported fatigue (P < 0.09), depression (P < 0.04), anxiety (P < 0.04), and pain (P < 0.01) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with responses in control subjects, in whom differential increases of self-reported pain were independent of changes in mood symptoms, subjective sleep quality, and objective measures of sleep fragmentation. In the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, PSD also induced increases in disease-specific activity as indexed by self-reported pain severity (P < 0.01) and number of painful joints (P < 0.02) as well as clinician-rated joint counts (P < 0.03). Conclusion: This study provides the first evidence of an exaggerated increase in symptoms of mood and pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis after sleep loss, along with an activation of rheumatoid arthritis-related joint pain. Given the reciprocal relationship between sleep disturbances and pain, clinical management of pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis should include an increased focus on the prevention and treatment of sleep disturbance in this clinical

  7. A molecular dynamics simulation study decodes the early stage of the disassembly process abolishing the human SAMHD1 function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardamone, Francesca; Iacovelli, Federico; Chillemi, Giovanni; Falconi, Mattia; Desideri, Alessandro

    2017-03-01

    The human sterile alpha motif SAM and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) restricts in non-cycling cells type the infection of a large range of retroviruses including HIV-1, reducing the intracellular pool concentration of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) required for the reverse transcription of the viral genome. The enzyme is in equilibrium between different forms depending on bound cofactors and substrate. In this work, two SAMHD1 three-dimensional models have been investigated through classical molecular dynamics simulation, to define the role of cofactors and metal ions in the association of the tetrameric active form. A detailed analysis of the inter-subunit interactions, taking place at the level of helix 13, indicates that removal of metal ions and cofactors induces an asymmetric loosening of the monomer-monomer interface leading to the formation of a loose tetramer where the two dimeric interfaces are weakened in different way.

  8. A molecular dynamics simulation study decodes the early stage of the disassembly process abolishing the human SAMHD1 function.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Francesca; Iacovelli, Federico; Chillemi, Giovanni; Falconi, Mattia; Desideri, Alessandro

    2017-03-01

    The human sterile alpha motif SAM and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) restricts in non-cycling cells type the infection of a large range of retroviruses including HIV-1, reducing the intracellular pool concentration of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) required for the reverse transcription of the viral genome. The enzyme is in equilibrium between different forms depending on bound cofactors and substrate. In this work, two SAMHD1 three-dimensional models have been investigated through classical molecular dynamics simulation, to define the role of cofactors and metal ions in the association of the tetrameric active form. A detailed analysis of the inter-subunit interactions, taking place at the level of helix 13, indicates that removal of metal ions and cofactors induces an asymmetric loosening of the monomer-monomer interface leading to the formation of a loose tetramer where the two dimeric interfaces are weakened in different way.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of GPs when using an early-intervention decision support system: a high-fidelity simulation

    PubMed Central

    Kostopoulou, Olga; Porat, Talya; Corrigan, Derek; Mahmoud, Samhar; Delaney, Brendan C

    2017-01-01

    Background Observational and experimental studies of the diagnostic task have demonstrated the importance of the first hypotheses that come to mind for accurate diagnosis. A prototype decision support system (DSS) designed to support GPs’ first impressions has been integrated with a commercial electronic health record (EHR) system. Aim To evaluate the prototype DSS in a high-fidelity simulation. Design and setting Within-participant design: 34 GPs consulted with six standardised patients (actors) using their usual EHR. On a different day, GPs used the EHR with the integrated DSS to consult with six other patients, matched for difficulty and counterbalanced. Method Entering the reason for encounter triggered the DSS, which provided a patient-specific list of potential diagnoses, and supported coding of symptoms during the consultation. At each consultation, GPs recorded their diagnosis and management. At the end, they completed a usability questionnaire. The actors completed a satisfaction questionnaire after each consultation. Results There was an 8–9% absolute improvement in diagnostic accuracy when the DSS was used. This improvement was significant (odds ratio [OR] 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.13 to 1.77, P<0.01). There was no associated increase of investigations ordered or consultation length. GPs coded significantly more data when using the DSS (mean 12.35 with the DSS versus 1.64 without), and were generally satisfied with its usability. Patient satisfaction ratings were the same for consultations with and without the DSS. Conclusion The DSS prototype was successfully employed in simulated consultations of high fidelity, with no measurable influences on patient satisfaction. The substantially increased data coding can operate as motivation for future DSS adoption. PMID:28137782

  10. Circulating CD4+CD161+ T Lymphocytes Are Increased in Seropositive Arthralgia Patients but Decreased in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chalan, Paulina; Huitema, Minke G.; Abdulahad, Wayel H.; Bijzet, Johan; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Improved understanding of the immune events discriminating between seropositive arthralgia and clinical synovitis is of key importance in rheumatology research. Ample evidence suggests a role for Th17 cells in rheumatoid arthritis. We hypothesized that CD4+CD161+ cells representing Th17 lineage cells may be modulated prior to or after development of clinical synovitis. Therefore, in a cross-sectional study, we investigated the occurrence of CD4+CD161+ T-cells in seropositive arthralgia patients who are at risk for developing rheumatoid arthritis and in newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis patients. In a prospective study, we evaluated the effect of methotrexate treatment on circulating CD4+CD161+ T-cells. Next, we assessed if these cells can be detected at the level of the RA joints. Precursor Th17 lineage cells bearing CD161 were found to be increased in seropositive arthralgia patients. In contrast, circulating CD4+CD161+T-cells were decreased in newly diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis patients. The decrease in CD4+CD161+ T-cells correlated inversely with C-reactive protein and with the 66 swollen joint count. Methotrexate treatment led to normalization of CD4+CD161+ T-cells and reduced disease activity. CD4+CD161+ T cells were readily detected in synovial tissues from both early and late-stage rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, synovial fluid from late-stage disease was found to be enriched for CD4+CD161+ T-cells. Notably, synovial fluid accumulated CD4+CD161+T-cells showed skewing towards the Th1 phenotype as evidenced by increased interferon-γ expression. The changes in peripheral numbers of CD4+CD161+ T-cells in seropositive arthralgia and early rheumatoid arthritis and the enrichment of these cells at the level of the joint predict a role for CD4+CD161+ T-cells in the early immune events leading to clinical synovitis. Our findings may add to the development of RA prediction models and provide opportunities for early intervention. PMID:24223933

  11. Spectroscopic investigations of high-energy-density plasma transformations in a simulated early reducing atmosphere containing methane, nitrogen and water.

    PubMed

    Civiš, Martin; Ferus, Martin; Knížek, Antonín; Kubelík, Petr; Kamas, Michal; Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Ksenia; Shestivska, Violetta; Juha, Libor; Skřehot, Petr; Laitl, Vojtěch; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2016-10-05

    Large-scale plasma was created in gas mixtures containing methane using high-power laser-induced dielectric breakdown (LIDB). The composition of the mixtures corresponded to a cometary and/or meteoritic impact into the early atmosphere of either Titan or Earth. A multiple-centimeter-sized fireball was created by focusing a single 100 J, 450 ps near-infrared laser pulse into the center of a 15 L gas cell. The excited reaction intermediates formed during the various stages of the LIDB plasma chemical evolution were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) with temporal resolution. The chemical consequences of laser-produced plasma generation in a CH4-N2-H2O mixture were investigated using high resolution Fourier-transform infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas selected ion flow tube spectrometry (SIFT). Several simple inorganic and organic compounds were identified in the reaction mixture exposed to ten laser sparks. Deuterated water (D2O) in a gas mixture was used to separate several of the produced isotopomers of acetylene, which were then quantified using the FTIR technique.

  12. [IgG rheumatoid factor in rheumatoid arthritis with interstitial lung disease].

    PubMed

    Sakaida, H

    1995-08-01

    Case of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with interstitial lung disease (ILD) have been reported to show increased titers of rheumatoid factor (RF) in serum; however the pathogenic role of this substance in the lung is still obscure. The aims of this study were to estimate IgGRF in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in RA and to investigate its possible roles in the ILD of RA. Two step bronchoalveolar lavage in 20 RA patients (9 males, 11 females) was performed in conjunction with high resolution chest CT. IgGRF was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and its molecular size in BALF was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography. IgGRF bound to BALF cells was eluted by sonication of the cells. RA patients with ILD had significantly elevated levels of IgGRF in serum as well as in BALF. The IgGRF in BALF was monomeric in 2 of 3 RA patients with ILD. The activity of IgGRF bound to BALF cells was significantly higher in RA with ILD than in control patients. These findings suggest that monomeric IgGRF in the lungs of RA patients could bind to the cells with Fc receptors.

  13. Lymphoid irradiation in intractable rheumatoid arthritis: effects on the production of immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors.

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, J G; Hassan, J; Moriarty, M; Whelan, A; Feighery, C; Bresnihan, B

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the production of immunoglobulins and rheumatoid factors (RF's) were studied in 20 patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis (RA) following total doses of 750 rad or 2,000 rad lymphoid irradiation. Over a 12 month follow up period there was no consistent change in absolute serum or synovial fluid levels, or in synovial membrane production of either total IgG, IgA or IgM, or the corresponding RF fractions. The invitro production of immunoglobulins and IgM RF by peripheral blood mononuclear cells was also unaltered, except for one patient who had a dramatic rise in IgM RF production. Over the same period there was a significant overall reduction in disease activity following both doses of radiotherapy. It is concluded that the clinical response which occurs following lymphoid irradiation is not due to a reduction in RF production. Furthermore, the production of RF's appears to be unaffected by the changes in T cell immunity which occur following lymphoid irradiation. PMID:4085151

  14. Historical observations contributing insights on etiopathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and role of rheumatoid factor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    When studies on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that were made many decades ago and could be considered “historical” in nature are analyzed in the context of recent observations, important insights on RA and on the function of rheumatoid factor (RF) become apparent. RF in the role of antibody to immune complexes (ICs) appears to be involved in activation of the complement system and in the production of chemotactic and inflammatory mediators, creating a condition that can be sustained and reinitiated. In the synovial cavity, a state of nonresolving inflammation is produced with the formation of citrullinated protein antigen–antibody complexes or other forms of ICs. This is followed by a second wave of IC production in the form of RF acting as antibody reactive with the initial ICs. Both of these processes are associated with complement consumption and production of inflammatory mediators. We present a model of an initiation phase of RA that might represent an example of repetitive formation of ICs and complement-mediated inflammation. Targeting therapy at this phase of RA to break the cycles of recurrent inflammation might be a novel approach to aid in further control of the disease. PMID:27621417

  15. Correlation of Demographic and Clinical Characteristics with Rheumatoid Factor Seropositivity in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Maizatul Akmal; Ghazali, Wan Syamimee Wan; Yahya, Nurul Khaiza; Wong, Kah Keng

    2016-01-01

    Background The rheumatoid factor (RF) blood test is the most commonly adopted test for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). RA patients who are seropositive for RF might face a greater likelihood of developing more aggressive symptoms. Methods Our goal was to study the demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as their correlation with RF seropositivity, among a series of 80 RA patients aged ≥ 18 years who attend Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM). Results Of the 80 RA patients included in this study, 66 (82.5%) were female and 14 (17.5%) were male. No significant associations between RF seropositivity and demographic and/or clinical characteristics or other laboratory investigations were observed, including gender, morning stiffness, individual joint involvement (from multiple sites of the body), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) measurement. However, a significant association between RF seropositivity and patients aged ≥ 50 was found (P = 0.032). Conclusion RF seropositivity was found to be more common in much older RA patients. PMID:28090179

  16. Genetics and epigenetics of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Viatte, Sebastien; Plant, Darren; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2013-03-01

    Investigators have made key advances in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) genetics in the past 10 years. Although genetic studies have had limited influence on clinical practice and drug discovery, they are currently generating testable hypotheses to explain disease pathogenesis. Firstly, we review here the major advances in identifying RA genetic susceptibility markers both within and outside of the MHC. Understanding how genetic variants translate into pathogenic mechanisms and ultimately into phenotypes remains a mystery for most of the polymorphisms that confer susceptibility to RA, but functional data are emerging. Interplay between environmental and genetic factors is poorly understood and in need of further investigation. Secondly, we review current knowledge of the role of epigenetics in RA susceptibility. Differences in the epigenome could represent one of the ways in which environmental exposures translate into phenotypic outcomes. The best understood epigenetic phenomena include post-translational histone modifications and DNA methylation events, both of which have critical roles in gene regulation. Epigenetic studies in RA represent a new area of research with the potential to answer unsolved questions.

  17. TNF inhibitor therapy for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    MA, XIXI; XU, SHENGQIAN

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy has markedly improved treatment outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonists, such as infliximab (IFX), etanercept (ETN), adalimumab (ADA), golimumab (GOLI) and certolizumab pegol (CZP) have been widely used for the treatment of RA. IFX provides significant, clinically relevant improvement in physical function and the quality of life, inhibits progressive joint damage and sustains improvement in the signs and symptoms of patients with RA. ETN is effective and safe for patients with RA. Combination therapy with ETN plus methotrexate (MTX) reduces disease activity, decreases total joint score progression, slows the pace of joint destruction and improves function more effectively compared to any of the monotherapies. ADA with or without MTX also relieves the signs and symptoms of RA. CZP and GOLI expand the therapeutic schedule for patients with RA. The TNF-α inhibitors have similar efficacy, but distinct clinical pharmacokinetic and -dynamic properties. The common adverse events of these TNF-α antagonists include adverse reactions, infections and injection-site reaction. Additionally, these adverse events are mostly mild or moderate and their incidence is low. Certain patients exhibit a lack of response to anti-TNF-α therapies. Some patients may discontinue the initial drug and switch to a second anti-TNF-α agent. The shortage of clinical response to one agent may not predict deficiency of response to another. This review mainly addresses the latest developments of these biological agents in the treatment of RA. PMID:24648915

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontal Disease. An Update.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Archana; Almas, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    A review of the epidemiological, pathological and immunological relationships between two chronic inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD). RA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, characterized by loss of connective tissue and mineralized structures, the so-called "synovial membrane." Periodontitis is the inflammatory destruction of the periodontal attachment and alveolar bone. While the etiology of these two diseases may differ, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are similar. And it is possible that individuals manifesting both PD and RA may suffer from a unifying underlying systemic deregulation of the inflammatory response. There is an overproduction of a variety of cytokines and MMPs that appears to be common in both diseases. Oral health parameters should be more closely monitored in patients with RA, an autoimmune disease. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Interventions to prevent, minimize or treat periodontitis in arthritis patients will definitely promise a better quality of life for these patients.

  19. Clinically relevant advances in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Neumann, Elena; Tarner, Ingo H

    2009-09-14

    Owing to the success of biologics in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), several novel drugs have been introduced in the therapeutic armamentarium, although not all of them have been approved in all countries worldwide. Among the drugs are tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors such as certolizumab pegol and golimumab (the latter of which was the first TNF blocker shown to be effective in patients who had been unsuccessfully treated with other TNF blockers and which can be applied only once a month), and the interleukin-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab, which not only opens up a completely new field of anti-inflammatory modulation of RA pathophysiology, but also highlights the challenge of novel potential side effects. Moreover, aside from clinical studies showing efficacy in the inhibition of osteoclast activation by the anti-RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand) antibody denosumab, an improved form of steroid application known as slow-release 'tempus tablet' for treatment of RA and several developments in the small-molecule area have been addressed by clinical trials.

  20. Tofacitinib prevents radiographic progression in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Wan; Choi, In Ah; Lee, Eun Young; Song, Yeong Wook; Lee, Eun Bong

    2013-08-01

    Tofacitinib, a novel Janus kinase inhibitor, may prevent structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this cohort study, we compared radiographic progression of hand joints between 21 RA patients who took tofacitinb for 18 months in a phase IIb and its extension study and 42 patients who took conventional disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), using simple erosion narrowing score. For tofacitinib group, changes before and after the treatment were also compared. The changes of erosion and sum scores were significantly less in tofacitinib than DMARDs group (for erosion, -0.60 ± 1.83 vs 0.51 ± 1.77, P = 0.038; for sum, -0.50 ± 1.72 vs 1.57 ± 4.13, P = 0.012). Joint space narrowing score (JSN) was also less in tofacitinib group (0.095 ± 0.58 vs 1.06 ± 2.60, P = 0.055). In tofacitinib group, yearly rates of both erosion and JSN were significantly decreased after administration of tofacitinib (For erosion, 0.62 ± 0.93 to -0.14 ± 0.48, P = 0.009; for JSN, 0.47 ± 0.64 to 0.03 ± 0.40, P = 0.032), as was change of sum score (1.09 ± 1.27 to -0.10 ± 0.63, P < 0.001). In conclusion, tofacitinib may prevent structural damage caused by RA.

  1. Giant Baker's Cyst Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bılgın, Emre; Ketencı, İsmail Emre; Ugurlar, Meriç

    2017-01-01

    We report a rare case of a “giant Baker's cyst-related rheumatoid arthritis (RA)” with 95 × 26 mm dimensions originating from the semimembranosus tendon. The patient presented with chronic pain and a palpable mass behind his left calf located between the posteriosuperior aspect of the popliteal fossa and the distal third of the calf. In MRI cystic lesion which was located in soft tissue at the posterior of gastrocnemius, extensive synovial pannus inside and degeneration of medial meniscus posterior horn were observed. Arthroscopic joint debridement and partial excision of the cyst via biomechanical valve excision were performed. The patient continued his follow-up visits at Rheumatology Department and there was no recurrence of cyst-related symptoms in 1-year follow-up. Similar cases were reported in the literature previously. However, as far as we know, a giant Baker's cyst-related RA, which was treated as described, has not yet been presented. PMID:28116197

  2. Genetics and epigenetics of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Viatte, Sebastien; Plant, Darren; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Investigators have made key advances in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) genetics in the past 10 years. Although genetic studies have had limited influence on clinical practice and drug discovery, they are currently generating testable hypotheses to explain disease pathogenesis. Firstly, we review here the major advances in identifying RA genetic susceptibility markers both within and outside of the MHC. Understanding how genetic variants translate into pathogenic mechanisms and ultimately into phenotypes remains a mystery for most of the polymorphisms that confer susceptibility to RA, but functional data are emerging. Interplay between environmental and genetic factors is poorly understood and in need of further investigation. Secondly, we review current knowledge of the role of epigenetics in RA susceptibility. Differences in the epigenome could represent one of the ways in which environmental exposures translate into phenotypic outcomes. The best understood epigenetic phenomena include post-translational histone modifications and DNA methylation events, both of which have critical roles in gene regulation. Epigenetic studies in RA represent a new area of research with the potential to answer unsolved questions. PMID:23381558

  3. [Anemia in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Wahle, M

    2012-12-01

    One of the most frequent extra-articular organ manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is anemia. As anemia in RA patients may result in severe symptoms and aggravation of other disease manifestations (e.g. arteriosclerosis), the influence on the course of RA is profound. However, the importance of anemia in RA patients is frequently underestimated. The etiology of anemia in RA is complex. Anemia of inflammation (AI) and iron deficiency anemia, alone or in combination are the most frequent forms of anemia in RA. Changes in iron metabolism are the leading causes of anemia in RA patients and mainly induced by the altered synthesis and function of hepcidin and ferroportin. Hepcidin, a peptide produced in the liver and immunocompetent cells, impairs the expression of ferroportin on iron-secreting cells, thus reducing iron bioavailability. The typical changes of iron metabolism and hepcidin synthesis in RA are induced by proinflammatory cytokines, primarily interleukin-6. Hence, the treatment of RA with cytokine antagonists has significant therapeutic implications on anemia in the context of inflammation and impaired iron metabolism.

  4. Proteome Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Gut Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Ellingsen, Torkell; Glerup, Henning; Bonderup, Ole Kristian; Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Meyer, Michael Kruse; Bøgsted, Martin; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend; Andersen, Vibeke; Stensballe, Allan

    2017-01-06

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory joint disease leading to cartilage damage and ultimately impaired joint function. To gain new insight into the systemic immune manifestations of RA, we characterized the colon mucosa proteome from 11 RA-patients and 10 healthy controls. The biopsies were extracted by colonoscopy and analyzed by label-free quantitative proteomics, enabling the quantitation of 5366 proteins. The abundance of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) was statistically significantly increased in RA-patient biopsies compared with controls and correlated with the administered dosage of methotrexate (MTX), the most frequently prescribed immunosuppressive drug for RA. Additionally, our data suggest that treatment with Leflunomide, a common alternative to MTX, increases DHFR. The findings were supported by immunohistochemistry with confocal microscopy, which furthermore demonstrated that DHFR was located in the cytosol of the intestinal epithelial and interstitial cells. Finally, we identified 223 citrullinated peptides from 121 proteins. Three of the peptides were unique to RA. The list of citrullinated proteins was enriched in extracellular and membrane proteins and included known targets of anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs). Our findings support that the colon mucosa could trigger the production of ACPAs, which could contribute to the onset of RA. The MS data have been deposited to ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001608 and PXD003082.

  5. Sarilumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Simon Cooper has >18 years of global experience in the pharmaceutical industry. He joined Sanofi in July 2014 as the Vice President, Global Project Head. In his current position at Sanofi, Dr Cooper is responsible for the clinical development of sarilumab and the worldwide submission in rheumatoid arthritis. He joined Sanofi after serving as the Global Program Medical Director at Novartis since 2012. In this role, Dr Cooper acted as the clinical lead for secukinumab psoriasis submission. Prior to Novartis, Dr Cooper held various posts at Human Genome Sciences, USA, including Executive Director of Clinical Research, Senior Director of Clinical Research and Director of Clinical Research. During his tenure at Human Genome Sciences, USA, Dr Cooper was involved in the submission of belimumab leading to its approval for SLE, and was responsible for its subsequent clinical development program. Dr Cooper has also previously held positions at MedImmune Ltd, UK, Roche, Napp Pharmaceutical Research Ltd, Wyeth Research and Medeval Ltd. In these roles, his responsibilities ranged from medical oversight of clinical trials to medical support for commercial, medical affairs and business development. He received a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery from University of Newcastle upon Tyne Medical School.

  6. The pill, parity, and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Spector, T D; Roman, E; Silman, A J

    1990-06-01

    We report on a case-control study investigating the relationship of oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use and parity to the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Women with RA were compared with 2 separate control groups, women with osteoarthritis (OA) and women randomly selected from a population-based electoral register. Nulliparity was found to be a risk factor for the development of RA, with age-adjusted odds ratios of 1.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-3.03) versus the OA control group and 1.83 (95% CI 1.03-3.06) versus the population control group. Use of OCPs before the age of 35 was negatively associated with RA (odds ratio 0.56, 95% CI 0.29-1.12 versus the OA control group; odds ratio 0.6, 95% CI 0.30-1.17 versus the population control group). Some evidence of a duration-response effect was seen, although the numbers were small. The 2 variables were also multiplicative, with nulliparous non-OCP users having a 4-fold risk of RA compared with parous OCP users. These findings suggest that pregnancy and OCP use have a "protective effect" on the development of RA, although the mechanism remains unclear.

  7. Our experiences in treatment of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mekić, Mevludin; Ristić, Miomir

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systematic inflammation illness characterized by progressive damage of joints. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is individual, programmed and complex and consists of general measures, application of adequate medication, physical procedures, balneotherapy and various surgical techniques as necessary. The objective of research is to show success of therapy in use of medication and other types of treatment for patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. The following were applied: non-steroid anti-inflammatory medications (NAIL), metotrexate, gold salts, corticosteroids, sulphasalzine, Chlorochin, cyclophosphamide and others. Metotrexate was often applied in our research and good results were achieved with it, but very good results were also achieved by combination of 2 or more immunodatulatory medications, including interarticular application of medication, physical, balneo and orthopedic therapy, as well as other alternative therapy. Success of therapy based on Richie index shows statistically significant improvement, meaning that there was movement from grade 3 and 4 into grades 1 and 2.

  8. Plantar pressures in rheumatoid arthritis using prefabricated metatarsal padding.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Lorraine; Binning, Jodi; Potter, Julia

    2004-01-01

    We sought to determine whether one of two prefabricated insole designs could better manage high forefoot plantar pressures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Ten subjects with rheumatoid arthritis who experienced pain with shod weightbearing were studied by using a plantar pressure measurement system. Two insole designs and a shoe-only control condition were randomly tested in repeated trials. Dome- and bar-shaped metatarsal pads made of latex foam were incorporated into full-length insoles made of urethane. Significant reductions in mean peak plantar pressures over the central metatarsals were noted when using the insole and dome pad design (12% [33 kPa]) and the insole and bar pad design (21% [58 kPa]) compared with the shoe-only condition. A prefabricated insole design incorporating a bar metatarsal pad is recommended to manage high forefoot plantar pressures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Methotrexate-induced panniculitis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Al Maashari, Raghda; Hamodat, Mowafak M

    2016-12-01

    Methotrexate-induced accelerated nodulosis (MIAN) is not an uncommon adverse effect associated with the use of the methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis. Limited case reports describe panniculitis as a pathological finding in this setting. A 31-year-old female with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis on methotrexate therapy presented with a 2-week history of sudden onset of painful infiltrated subcutaneous nodules on both forearms. Based on clinical and histological findings, a diagnosis of methotrexate-induced panniculitis was made. The majority of MIAN case reports that we reviewed showed characteristic pathological findings of classic rheumatoid nodules; few reported panniculitis as a finding. This case illustrates the importance of recognizing this phenomenon as methotrexate-induced panniculitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient receiving methotrexate presenting with a recent history of accelerated nodulosis. Discontinuation of methotrexate remains controversial.

  10. The effects of simulated solar UVB radiation on early developmental stages of the Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile) from three lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, Robin D.; Little, Edward E.; Pearl, Christopher A.; Hoffman, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) has received much attention as a factor that could play a role in amphibian population declines. UV can be hazardous to some amphibians, but the resultant effects depend on a variety of environmental and behavioral factors. In this study, the potential effects of UV on the Northwestern Salamander, Ambystoma gracile, from three lakes were assessed in the laboratory using a solar simulator. We measured the survival of embryos and the survival and growth of larvae exposed to four UV treatments in controlled laboratory studies, the UV absorbance of egg jelly, oviposition depths in the lakes, and UV absorbance in water samples from the three lakes. Hatching success of embryos decreased in the higher UV treatments as compared to the control treatments, and growth of surviving larvae was significantly reduced in the higher UVB irradiance treatments. The egg jelly exhibited a small peak of absorbance within the UVB range (290–320 nm). The magnitude of UV absorbance differed among egg jellies from the three lakes. Oviposition depths at the three sites averaged 1.10 m below the water surface. Approximately 66% of surface UVB radiation was attenuated at 10-cm depth in all three lakes. Results of this study indicate that larvae may be sensitive to UVB exposure under laboratory conditions; however, in field conditions the depths of egg deposition in the lakes, absorbance of UV radiation by the water column, and the potential for behavioral adjustments may mitigate severe effects of UV radiation.

  11. Production of nitrogen oxides by lightning and coronae discharges in simulated early Earth, Venus and Mars environments.

    PubMed

    Nna Mvondo, D; Navarro-Gonzalez, R; McKay, C P; Coll, P; Raulin, F

    2001-01-01

    We present measurements for the production of nitrogen oxides (NO and N2O) in CO2-N2 mixtures that simulate different stages of the evolution of the atmospheres of the Earth, Venus and Mars. The nitrogen fixation rates by two different types of electrical discharges, namely lightning and coronae, were studied over a wide range in CO2 and N2 mixing ratios. Nitric oxide (NO) is formed with a maximum energy yield estimated to be ~1.3 x 10(16) molecule J-1 at 80% CO2 and ~1.3 x 10(14) molecule J-1 at 50% CO2 for lightning and coronae discharges, respectively. Nitrous oxide (N2O) is only formed by coronae discharge with a maximum energy yield estimated to be ~1.2 x 10(13) molecule J-1 at 50% CO2. The pronounced difference in NO production in lightning and coronae discharges and the lack of formation of N2O in lightning indicate that the physics and chemistry involved in nitrogen fixation differs substantially in these two forms of electric energy.

  12. Effects of simulated solar UVB radiation on early developmental stages of the northwestern salamander (Ambystoma gracile) from three lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calfee, R.D.; Little, E.E.; Pearl, C.A.; Hoffman, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV) has received much attention as a factor that could play a role in amphibian population declines. UV can be hazardous to some amphibians, but the resultant effects depend on a variety of environmental and behavioral factors. In this study, the potential effects of UV on the Northwestern Salamander, Ambystoma gracile, from three lakes were assessed in the laboratory using a solar simulator. We measured the survival of embryos and the survival and growth of larvae exposed to four UV treatments in controlled laboratory studies, the UV absorbance of egg jelly, oviposition depths in the lakes, and UV absorbance in water samples from the three lakes. Hatching success of embryos decreased in the higher UV treatments as compared to the control treatments, and growth of surviving larvae was significantly reduced in the higher UVB irradiance treatments. The egg jelly exhibited a small peak of absorbance within the UVB range (290-320 nm). The magnitude of UV absorbance differed among egg jellies from the three lakes. Oviposition depths at the three sites averaged 1.10 m below the water surface. Approximately 66 of surface UVB radiation was attenuated at 10-cm depth in all three lakes. Results of this study indicate that larvae may be sensitive to UVB exposure under laboratory conditions; however, in field conditions the depths of egg deposition in the lakes, absorbance of UV radiation by the water column, and the potential for behavioral adjustments may mitigate severe effects of UV radiation. Copyright 2010 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  13. Adiponectin stimulates IL-8 production by rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, Kanako; Kusunoki, Natsuko; Kakiuchi, Terutaka; Suguro, Toru; Kawai, Shinichi

    2009-01-09

    The adipokines are linked not only to metabolic regulation, but also to immune responses. Adiponectin, but not leptin or resistin induced interleukin-8 production from rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts (RSF). The culture supernatant of RSF treated with adiponectin induced chemotaxis, although adiponectin itself had no such effect. Addition of antibody against adiponectin, and inhibition of adiponectin receptor gene decreased adiponectin-induced IL-8 production. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B was increased by adiponectin. The induction of interleukin-8 was inhibited by mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. These findings suggest that adiponectin contributes to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and the immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinberg, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    The interrelationship among lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils appears to be an important aspect of the synovial inflammation that is characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis. In a study comparing gold sodium aurothiomalate (GST) with auranofin (Au), an orally absorbed compound, both appeared to inhibit the disease process and no difference between parenteral and oral administration was observed. Another study involved two groups of nine patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis. One group underwent plasmapheresis. The second group underwent total lymphoid irradiation. Both agents appeared to inhibit the disease process. Plasmapheresis was better tolerated that irradiation.

  15. [Methotrexate - anchor drug in the treament of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Fiehn, Christoph

    2016-02-01

    Methotrexate is in the centre of the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. There are new insights in the understanding of its mechanism: intracellular polyglutamation activates the methotrexate molecule. The magnitude of this step is associated with response to the treatment. Further on, it was found that even low doses of methotrexate are sufficient to guarantee its effect as comedication of TNF-inhibitors. Finally, from the follow-up of long term cohorts it seems that methotrexate reduces mortality in rheumatoid arthritis independently from its effect on disease activity.

  16. Telomere Length of Individual Chromosomes in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Blinova, E A; Zinnatova, E V; Barkovskaya, M Sh; Borisov, V I; Sizikov, A E; Kozhevnikov, V S; Rubtsov, N B; Kozlov, V A

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed telomere length of individual chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Quantitative fluorescent in situ hybridization and subsequent computer analysis of metaphase chromosomes showed that distribution of telomere length on individual chromosomes is different under normal and pathological conditions. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis had significantly shorter chromosome 4p telomeres, which can be essential for pathogenesis of this multifactorial disease. Additionally, disease activity inversely correlated with telomere length on chromosome 10p carrying genes involved in T cell differentiation and proliferation.

  17. Cell-cell Interactions in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovium

    PubMed Central

    Gizinski, Alison; Morgan, Rachel; Lundy, Steven K

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Understanding the pathogenesis of joint inflammation and destruction in rheumatoid arthritis involves dissection of the cellular and molecular interactions that occur in synovial tissue. Development of effective targeted therapies has been based on progress in achieving such insights. Safer and more specific approaches to treatment could flow from discovery of cell-cell interaction pathways that are relatively specific for inflammation of the joint, and less important in defense against systemic infection. This chapter highlights selected cell-cell interactions in rheumatoid arthritis synovium that may be worthy of evaluation as future therapeutic targets. PMID:20510236

  18. Spleen and liver enlargement in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, María Eugenia; Ceccato, Federico; Paira, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 51-year-old woman with a seropositive, erosive, and non-nodular rheumatoid arthritis of 15 year of evolution. The patient had poor compliance with medical visits and treatment. She came to the clinic with persistent pancytopenia and spleen and liver enlargement. Liver and bone marrow biopsies were carried out and amyloidosis, neoplasias and infections were ruled out. We discuss the differential diagnosis of pancytopenia and spleen and liver enlargement in a long-standing rheumatoid arthritis patient.

  19. Spontaneous bilateral olecranon fractures in a rheumatoid patient.

    PubMed

    Kirmani, Sayyied; Draviaraj, Kingsley; Madegowda, Babu; Shahane, Shantanu

    2008-04-01

    A case is described of a patient sustaining bilateral spontaneous olecranon fractures while undergoing rehabilitation following surgery for a hip fracture. The patient's underlying rheumatoid arthritis disease process most likely caused erosions and subchondral cysts formation in the mid-trochlear notch region. This area, in turn, acts as a pivot point in elbow extension/flexion movements. During rehabilitation, the patient became dependent on her upper limbs for mobilisation. This led to significant forces being put through this already weakened region, causing spontaneous bilateral olecranon fractures. Rheumatoid patients after lower limb surgery should be careful during rehabilitation, and avoid undue strains through their upper limbs.

  20. The role of exercise in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Metsios, George S; Stavropoulos-Kalinoglou, Antonis; Kitas, George D

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with significant functional impairment and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Along with pharmacological therapy, exercise seems to be a very promising intervention to improve disease-related outcomes, including functional ability and systemic manifestations, such as the increased cardiovascular risk. In this review, we discuss the physiological mechanisms by which exercise improves inflammation, cardiovascular risk and psychological health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and describe in detail how exercise can be incorporated in the management of this disease using real examples from our clinical practice.